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  1. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  2. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Watkin, Levi B.; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S.; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y.; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S.; Coe, Bradley P.; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A.; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Yang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3–9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3–9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4–6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3–9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations. PMID:26805781

  3. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Seema R; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Watkin, Levi B; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S; Coe, Bradley P; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H B; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M; Hanchard, Neil A; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Yang, Yaping

    2016-02-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3-9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3-9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4-6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3-9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations.

  4. Slow Conduction in Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Melvyn; Kootsey, J. Mailen; Johnson, Edward A.; Sawanobori, Tohru

    1973-01-01

    Mechanisms of slow conduction in cardiac muscle are categorized and the most likely identified. Propagating action potentials were obtained experimentally from a synthetically grown strand of cardiac muscle (around 50 μm by 30 mm) and theoretically from a one-dimensional cable model that incorporated varying axial resistance and membrane properties along its length. Action potentials propagated at about 0.3 m/s, but in some synthetic strands there were regions (approximately 100 μm in length) where the velocity decreased to 0.002 m/s. The electrophysiological behavior associated with this slow conduction was similar to that associated with slow conduction in naturally occurring cardiac muscle (notches, Wenckebach phenomena, and block). Theoretically, reasonable changes in specific membrane capacitance, membrane activity, and various changes in geometry were insufficient to account for the observed slow conduction velocities. Conduction velocities as low as 0.009 m/s, however, could be obtained by increasing the resistance (ri) of connections between the cells in the cable; velocities as low as 0.0005 m/s could be obtained by a further increase in ri made possible by a reduction in membrane activity by one-fourth, which in itself decreased conduction velocity by only a factor of 1/1.4. As a result of these findings, several of the mechanisms that have been postulated, previously, are shown to be incapable of accounting for delays such as those which occur in the synthetic strand as well as in the atrioventricular (VA) node. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 2FIGURE 3FIGURE 4 PMID:4709519

  5. Neonatal multiorgan failure due to ACAD9 mutation and complex I deficiency with mitochondrial hyperplasia in liver, cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle, and renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Nancy; Wang, Xinjian; Peng, Yanyan; Valencia, C Alexander; Khuchua, Zaza; Hata, Jessica; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Bove, Kevin E

    2016-03-01

    Complex I deficiency causes Leigh syndrome, fatal infant lactic acidosis, and neonatal cardiomyopathy. Mutations in more than 100 nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA genes miscode for complex I subunits or assembly factors. ACAD9 is an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase with a novel function in assembly of complex I; biallelic mutations cause progressive encephalomyopathy, recurrent Reye syndrome, and fatal cardiomyopathy. We describe the first autopsy in fatal neonatal lethal lactic acidosis due to mutations in ACAD9 that reduced complex I activity. We identified mitochondrial hyperplasia in cardiac myocytes, diaphragm muscle, and liver and renal tubules in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using immunohistochemistry for mitochondrial antigens. Whole-exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in the ACAD9 gene: c.187G>T (p.E63*) and c.941T>C (p.L314P). The nonsense mutation causes late infantile lethality; the missense variant is novel. Autopsy-derived fibroblasts had reduced complex I activity (53% of control) with normal activity in complexes II to IV, similar to reported cases of ACAD9 deficiency.

  6. Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4) due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.

    PubMed

    Rajab, Anna; Straub, Volker; McCann, Liza J; Seelow, Dominik; Varon, Raymonda; Barresi, Rita; Schulze, Anne; Lucke, Barbara; Lützkendorf, Susanne; Karbasiyan, Mohsen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Spuler, Simone; Schuelke, Markus

    2010-03-01

    We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4) of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin) as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT). PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.

  7. Cardiac assistance from skeletal muscle: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Salmons, Stanley

    2009-02-01

    Cardiac assistance from skeletal muscle offers an attractive surgical solution to the problem of end-stage heart failure, yet it is widely regarded as a failed approach. I argue here that this is an outdated assessment. Systematic progress has been made over the last 25 years in understanding the relevant basic science. In the light of these advances we should be reconsidering the place of skeletal muscle assist in the surgical armamentarium. PMID:18954996

  8. Cardiac Muscle Studies with Rat Ventricular Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, Bert K.; Faleschini, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    Details undergraduate physiology laboratory experiments that demonstrate mechanical properties of cardiac muscle, using strips from the ventricle of a rat heart. Includes procedures for obtaining length-tension curves, demonstrating the role of calcium in excitation-contraction coupling, and showing effects of several cardiovascular drugs…

  9. Microwave radiation effects on cardiac muscle cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, M.J.; Hall, C.A.; McRee, D.I.

    1981-05-01

    Isolated cardiac muscle cells were exposed to microwave radiation in a temperature-controlled waveguide apparatus. Microwave radiation for 90 min at specific absorption rates (SAR) as low as 10 mW/g increases the permeability of cardiac cells to trypan blue. At 100 mW/g the inability of the cells to exclude trypan blue is concurrent with the release of lactic dehydrogenase into the suspending medium. However, when the SAR is decreased to 50 mW/g, trypan blue uptake is still elevated without the concomitant release of lactic dehydrogenase. Transmission electron micrographs of the exposed cells showed cellular damage only at the 100 mW/g exposure level. The microwave-reduced change in membrane permeability was unrelated to a macroscopic heating effect of microwave radiation on the cells, but appeared to be due to some other specific action of microwave radiation on isolated cardiac cells.

  10. Carbon nanotube biocompatibility with cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibaldi, Silvano; Brunelli, Claudio; Bavastrello, Valter; Ghigliotti, Giorgio; Nicolini, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Purified carbon nanotubes are new carbon allotropes, sharing similarities with graphite, that have recently been proposed for their potential use with biological systems as probes for in vitro research and for diagnostic and clinical purposes. However the biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes with cells represents an important problem that, so far, remains largely uninvestigated. The objective of this in vitro study is to explore the cytocompatibility properties of purified carbon nanofibres with cardiomyocytes. Cardiac muscle cells from a rat heart cell line H9c2 (2-1) have been used. Highly purified single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) were suspended at the concentration of 0.2 mg ml-1 by ultrasound in complete Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, and administered to cells to evaluate cell proliferation and shape changes by light microscopy, cell viability by trypan blue exclusion, and apoptosis, determined flow cytometrically by annexin/PI staining. Microscopic observation evidenced that carbon nanotubes bind to the cell membrane, causing a slight modification in cell shape and in cell count only after three days of treatment. Cell viability was not affected by carbon nanotubes in the first three days of culture, while after this time, cell death was slightly higher in nanotube-treated cells (p = ns). Accordingly, nanotube treatment induced little and non-significant change in the apoptotic cell number at day 1 and 3. The effect of nanotubes bound to cells was tested by reseeding treated cardiomyocytes. Cells from a trypsinized nanotube-treated sample showed a limited ability to proliferate, and a definite difference in shape, with a high degree of cell death: compared to reseeded untreated ones, in SWNT-treated samples the annexin-positive/PI-negative cells increased from 2.9% to 9.3% in SWNT (p<0.05, where p<0.05 defines a statistically significant difference with a probability above 95%), and the annexin-positive/PI-positive cells increased from 5.2% to 18.7% (p<0

  11. NUCLEOSIDE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITIES IN RAT CARDIAC MUSCLE.

    PubMed

    ESSNER, E; NOVIKOFF, A B; QUINTANA, N

    1965-05-01

    Localizations of aldehyde-resistant nucleoside phosphatase activities in frozen sections of rat cardiac muscle have been studied by electron microscopy. Activities are higher after fixation with formaldehyde than with glutaraldehyde. After incubation with adenosine triphosphate or inosine diphosphate at pH 7.2, reaction product is found in the "terminal cisternae" or "transverse sacs" of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which, together with the "intermediary vesicles" (T system), constitute the "dyads" or "triads". Reaction product is also present at the membranes of micropinocytotic vacuoles which apparently form from the plasma membrane of capillary endothelial cells and from the sarcolemma. In certain regions of the intercalated discs, reaction product is found within the narrow spaces between sarcolemmas of adjacent cells and within micropinocytotic vacuoles that seem to form from the sarcolemma. With inosine diphosphate, reaction product is also found in other parts of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. After incubation with cytidine monophosphate at pH 5, reaction product is present in the transverse sacs of sarcoplasmic reticulum, in micropinocytotic vacuoles in capillary endothelium, and in lysosomes of muscle fibers and capillaries. The possible significance of the sarcoplasmic reticulum phosphatases is discussed in relation to the role the reticulum probably plays in moving calcium ions and thereby controlling contraction and relaxation of the muscle fiber.

  12. [Muscle problems due to statins: underestimated].

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stan P; Smulders, Yvo M; Gerdes, Victor E; Visseren, Frank L J

    2010-01-01

    Statin-associated muscle problems are more common than the 1-5% prevalence reported in large clinical trials. Observational studies show a prevalence of about 10%. Muscle problems can occur anytime during statin treatment, but usually occur in the first 6 months. The occurrence of rhabdomyolysis is rare. Depletion of isoprenoids due to HMG-CoA reductase inhibition is probably the main cause of the myopathy. Statin-associated myopathy is treated by prevention and treatment of risk factors. The main risk factors are multiple drug treatment, alcohol abuse, hypothyroidism and a family history of muscle problems due to statin therapy. The first step in the treatment of muscle problems or of elevated creatine kinase levels is lowering or stopping the statin. The chance of another type of statin not having the same muscular effects is about 40%.The benefit of Q10 or other supplements is unproven thus far. In the presence of recurrent creatine kinase elevation or muscle problems, other cholesterol-lowering agents can be considered.

  13. Identification and localization of caldesmon in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Woo, G C; Walsh, M P; Ikebe, M; Kargacin, G J

    1998-01-01

    Caldesmon has been detected in smooth muscle and in a number of non-muscle cells. It binds both actin and myosin and may act as a regulator of contraction or a structural element in smooth muscle. The presence of caldesmon in striated muscle has not been well established. To address this issue, polyclonal antibodies and a panel of monoclonal antibodies were raised against chicken gizzard smooth muscle caldesmon and used to demonstrate that caldesmon is present in adult cardiac muscle of a variety of mammalian species. Western-blot analysis revealed the presence of caldesmon in ventricular myocytes isolated from rat heart. The epitopes for the individual monoclonal antibodies were mapped to the caldesmon primary structure using chymotryptic and 2-nitro-5-thiocyanatobenzoic acid fragments. Bovine and rat cardiac caldesmons were recognized only by a subset of these monoclonal antibodies, indicating primary sequence differences from the chicken smooth muscle protein. Immunofluorescence labelling of isolated myocytes from rat, rabbit and guinea pig cardiac muscle revealed a striated pattern of fluorescence labelling. Dual labelling of caldesmon and myosin or caldesmon and alpha-actinin demonstrated that caldesmon was present at the centre of the I-band rather than in the A-band, as might have been expected from the myosin binding properties of the smooth muscle protein. These results suggest a structural role for caldesmon in cardiac muscle cells. PMID:9693116

  14. A viscoplastic model for the active component in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Rubin, M B

    2016-08-01

    The HMK model (Hunter et al. in Prog Biophys Mol Biol 69:289-331, 1998) proposes mechanobiological equations for the influence of intracellular calcium concentration [Formula: see text] on the evolution of bound calcium concentration [Formula: see text] and the tropomyosin kinetics parameter z, which model processes in the active component of the tension in cardiac muscle. The inelastic response due to actin-myosin crossbridge kinetics is modeled in the HMK model with a function Q that depends on the history of the rate of total stretch of the muscle fiber. Here, an alternative model is proposed which models the active component of the muscle fiber as a viscoplastic material. In particular, an evolution equation is proposed for the elastic stretch [Formula: see text] in the active component. Specific forms of the constitutive equations are proposed and used to match experimental data. The proposed viscoplastic formulation allows for separate modeling of three processes: the high rate deactivation of crossbridges causing rapid reduction in active tension; the high but lower rate reactivation of crossbridges causing recovery of active tension; and the low rate relaxation effects characterizing the Hill model of muscles.

  15. Heterokaryons of cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts reveal the lack of dominance of the cardiac muscle phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S M; Tai, L J; Tan, V P; Newton, C B; Chien, K R

    1994-01-01

    The molecular characterization of a cardiac determination gene has been an elusive goal for the past several years. Prior to cloning of the skeletal muscle determination factor MyoD, the presence of a dominantly acting skeletal muscle determination factor had been inferred from the observation that the skeletal muscle phenotype was dominant in skeletal muscle-fibroblast heterokaryons (H. M. Blau, G. K. Pavlath, E. C. Hardeman, C.-P. Chiu, L. Siberstein, S. G. Webster, S. C. Miller, and D. Webster, Science 230:758-766, 1985). In these experiments, we have examined cardiac-fibroblast heterokaryons to investigate the existence of a dominantly acting cardiac determination factor. We have employed a novel experimental approach using primary embryonic fibroblasts from transgenic mice as a means of assaying for the activation of a cardiac promoter-luciferase reporter transgene within fibroblast nuclei. This approach provides a potential means of genetic selection for a dominantly acting positive factor and can be generalized to other systems. We have examined the expression of three markers of the cardiac lineage: a myofibrillar protein promoter (MLC2), a secreted protein (ANF), and a transcription factor (MEF2). MEF2 is specific to both cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. Our results indicate that in a majority of heterokaryons with an equal ratio of cardiac to fibroblast nuclei, none of these cardiac markers are expressed, indicating that the cardiac phenotype is not dominant over the embryonic fibroblast phenotype. The distinction from previous results with skeletal muscle is emphasized by our results with MEF2, which is dominantly expressed in skeletal muscle-fibroblast but not cardiac-fibroblast heterokaryons, supporting its divergent regulation in the two cell types. Images PMID:8196663

  16. Endothelial, cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle exhibit different viscous and elastic properties as determined by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, A. B.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Reichert, W. M.; Kraus, W. E.; Truskey, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the hypothesis that, due to functional and structural differences, the apparent elastic modulus and viscous behavior of cardiac and skeletal muscle and vascular endothelium would differ. To accurately determine the elastic modulus, the contribution of probe velocity, indentation depth, and the assumed shape of the probe were examined. Hysteresis was observed at high indentation velocities arising from viscous effects. Irreversible deformation was not observed for endothelial cells and hysteresis was negligible below 1 microm/s. For skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle cells, hysteresis was negligible below 0.25 microm/s. Viscous dissipation for endothelial and cardiac muscle cells was higher than for skeletal muscle cells. The calculated elastic modulus was most sensitive to the assumed probe geometry for the first 60 nm of indentation for the three cell types. Modeling the probe as a blunt cone-spherical cap resulted in variation in elastic modulus with indentation depth that was less than that calculated by treating the probe as a conical tip. Substrate contributions were negligible since the elastic modulus reached a steady value for indentations above 60 nm and the probe never indented more than 10% of the cell thickness. Cardiac cells were the stiffest (100.3+/-10.7 kPa), the skeletal muscle cells were intermediate (24.7+/-3.5 kPa), and the endothelial cells were the softest with a range of elastic moduli (1.4+/-0.1 to 6.8+/-0.4 kPa) depending on the location of the cell surface tested. Cardiac and skeletal muscle exhibited nonlinear elastic behavior. These passive mechanical properties are generally consistent with the function of these different cell types.

  17. Effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, A.C.; Chen, K.C.; Cheng, Mei General Motors Research Laboratories, Warren, MI )

    1988-09-01

    Embryonic rat cardiac muscle cells grown in the presence of various tensions of CO (5-95%) without the presence of O{sub 2} survived and exhibited reduced cell growth, which was concentration dependent. When cardiac muscle cells were grown in the presence of a mixture of CO (10-20%) and O{sub 2} (10-20%), the growth rate of these cells was comparable to that of the control cells. Cardiac myocytes continued to beat when exposed to varying tensions of CO, except in the case of 95% CO. The cells exposed to different concentrations of CO contained fewer myofibrils of different stages of differentiation compared with the control and the culture exposed to a mixture of 20% O{sub 2} and 20% CO, with cells that contained abundant, highly differentiated myofibrils. There was no significant difference in the structural organization of mitochondria between the control and the surviving experimental cells. It is evident from the present studies that O{sub 2} is required for the optimum in vitro cellular growth of cardiac muscle. Furthermore, CO in combination with O{sub 2} at a concentration of 10 or 20% can produce optimal growth of cardiac muscle cells in culture. To determine maximum labeling index during the labeling period, cells were continuously labeled with ({sup 3}H)thymidine for 24 h before the termination of cultures.

  18. Cardiac arrest due to baclofen withdrawal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Ana Luísa; Quintaneiro, Claudio; Seabra, Helena; Teixeira, Carla

    2014-01-01

    A 41-year-old man presented with postcervical traumatic complete quadriparesis under intrathecal baclofen therapy (ITB) for refractory spasticity. Less than 24 h after having his baclofen pump substituted, he develops hyperthermia, seizures, cognitive depression, acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure and cardiovascular instability leading to mechanical ventilation and vasopressor support. He was transferred to an intensive care unit with diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia leading to septic shock. He evolved with progressive clinical worsening and multisystem organ failure and cardiac arrest in non-shockable rhythm (pulseless electrical activity)—4 min resuscitation with return of spontaneous circulation. Considering the possible diagnosis of baclofen withdrawal syndrome and, in suspicion of ITB delivery disruption, the catheter system was surgically explored and a leaking tubule attachment was found. Despite aggressive cardiovascular, respiratory and renal support therapy, clinical improvement occurred only after restoration of intrathecal drug delivery. He was discharged from the hospital after 56 days, having returned to baseline status. PMID:24827663

  19. Unpinning and Removal of a Rotating Wave in Cardiac Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, S.; Pumir, A.; Pazó, D.; Efimov, I.; Nikolski, V.; Krinsky, V.

    2004-07-01

    Rotating waves in cardiac muscle may be pinned to a heterogeneity, as it happens in superconductors or in superfluids. We show that the physics of electric field distribution between cardiac cells permits one to deliver an electric pulse exactly to the core of a pinned wave, without knowing its position, and even to locations where a direct access is not possible. Thus, unpinning or removal of rotating waves can be achieved. The energy needed is 2 orders of magnitude less than defibrillation energy. This opens a way to new manipulations with pinned vortices both in experiments and in cardiac clinics.

  20. Cardiac muscle regeneration: lessons from development

    PubMed Central

    Mercola, Mark; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Schneider, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The adult human heart is an ideal target for regenerative intervention since it does not functionally restore itself after injury yet has a modest regenerative capacity that could be enhanced by innovative therapies. Adult cardiac cells with regenerative potential share gene expression signatures with early fetal progenitors that give rise to multiple cardiac cell types, suggesting that the evolutionarily conserved regulatory networks that drive embryonic heart development might also control aspects of regeneration. Here we discuss commonalities of development and regeneration, and the application of the rich developmental biology heritage to achieve therapeutic regeneration of the human heart. PMID:21325131

  1. Strategies to Study Desmin in Cardiac Muscle and Culture Systems.

    PubMed

    Diokmetzidou, Antigoni; Tsikitis, Mary; Nikouli, Sofia; Kloukina, Ismini; Tsoupri, Elsa; Papathanasiou, Stamatis; Psarras, Stelios; Mavroidis, Manolis; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) cytoskeleton comprises the fine-tuning cellular machinery regulating critical homeostatic mechanisms. In skeletal and cardiac muscle, deficiency or disturbance of the IF network leads to severe pathology, particularly in the latter. The three-dimensional scaffold of the muscle-specific IF protein desmin interconnects key features of the cardiac muscle cells, including the Z-disks, intercalated disks, plasma membrane, nucleus, mitochondria, lysosomes, and potentially sarcoplasmic reticulum. This is crucial for the highly organized striated muscle, in which effective energy production and transmission as well as mechanochemical signaling are tightly coordinated among the organelles and the contractile apparatus. The role of desmin and desmin-associated proteins in the biogenesis, trafficking, and organelle function, as well as the development, differentiation, and survival of the cardiac muscle begins to be enlightened, but the precise mechanisms remain elusive. We propose a set of experimental tools that can be used, in vivo and in vitro, to unravel crucial new pathways by which the IF cytoskeleton facilitates proper organelle function, homeostasis, and cytoprotection and further understand how its disturbance and deficiency lead to disease.

  2. Strategies to Study Desmin in Cardiac Muscle and Culture Systems.

    PubMed

    Diokmetzidou, Antigoni; Tsikitis, Mary; Nikouli, Sofia; Kloukina, Ismini; Tsoupri, Elsa; Papathanasiou, Stamatis; Psarras, Stelios; Mavroidis, Manolis; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) cytoskeleton comprises the fine-tuning cellular machinery regulating critical homeostatic mechanisms. In skeletal and cardiac muscle, deficiency or disturbance of the IF network leads to severe pathology, particularly in the latter. The three-dimensional scaffold of the muscle-specific IF protein desmin interconnects key features of the cardiac muscle cells, including the Z-disks, intercalated disks, plasma membrane, nucleus, mitochondria, lysosomes, and potentially sarcoplasmic reticulum. This is crucial for the highly organized striated muscle, in which effective energy production and transmission as well as mechanochemical signaling are tightly coordinated among the organelles and the contractile apparatus. The role of desmin and desmin-associated proteins in the biogenesis, trafficking, and organelle function, as well as the development, differentiation, and survival of the cardiac muscle begins to be enlightened, but the precise mechanisms remain elusive. We propose a set of experimental tools that can be used, in vivo and in vitro, to unravel crucial new pathways by which the IF cytoskeleton facilitates proper organelle function, homeostasis, and cytoprotection and further understand how its disturbance and deficiency lead to disease. PMID:26795479

  3. Cardiac autoimmunity in HIV related heart muscle disease

    PubMed Central

    Currie, P; Goldman, J; Caforio, A; Jacob, A; Baig, M; Brettle, R; Haven, A; Boon, N; McKenna, W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the frequency of circulating cardiac specific autoantibodies in HIV positive patients with and without echocardiographic evidence of left ventricular dysfunction.
Subjects—74 HIV positive patients including 28 with echocardiographic evidence of heart muscle disease, 52 HIV negative people at low risk of HIV infection, and 14 HIV negative drug users who had all undergone non-invasive cardiac assessment were studied along with a group of 200 healthy blood donors.
Results—Cardiac autoantibodies detected by indirect immunofluorescence (serum dilution 1/10) were more common in the HIV positive patients (15%), particularly the HIV heart muscle disease group (21%), than in HIV negative controls (3.5%) (both p < 0.001). By ELISA (dilution 1/320), abnormal anti-α myosin autoantibody concentrations were found more often in HIV patients with heart muscle disease (43%) than in HIV positive patients with normal hearts (19%) or in HIV negative controls (3%) (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). Anti-α myosin autoantibody concentrations were greater in HIV positive patients than in HIV negative controls, regardless of cardiac status ((mean SD) 0.253 (0.155) v 0.170 (0.076); p = 0.003). In particular the mean antibody concentration was higher in the HIV heart muscle disease patients (0.291 (0.160) v 0.170 (0.076); p = 0.001) than in HIV negative controls. On follow up, six subjects with normal echocardiograms but raised autoantibody concentrations had died after a median of 298 days, three with left ventricular abnormalities at necropsy. This compared with a median survival of 536 days for 21 HIV positive patients with normal cardiological and immunological results.
Conclusions—There is an increased frequency of circulating cardiac specific autoantibodies in HIV positive individuals, particularly those with heart muscle disease. The data support a role for cardiac autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of HIV related heart

  4. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser(319) and Thr(24), as well as p-Foxo3a Thr(32) decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was

  5. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser319 and Thr24, as well as p-Foxo3a Thr32 decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was upregulated only

  6. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser319 and Thr24, as well as p-Foxo3a Thr32 decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was upregulated only

  7. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser(319) and Thr(24), as well as p-Foxo3a Thr(32) decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was

  8. Oxidants, antioxidants and alcohol: implications for skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Preedy, V R; Patel, V B; Reilly, M E; Richardson, P J; Falkous, G; Mantle, D

    1999-08-01

    setting. In the rat, circulating troponin-T release increases in the presence of ethanol, a mechanism ascribed to free radical mediated damage, as it is prevented with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor and beta-blocker, propranolol. However, whilst propranolol prevents the release of troponin-T, it does not prevent the fall in whole cardiac protein synthesis, suggestive of localized ischemic damage due to ethanol.

  9. Oxidants, antioxidants and alcohol: implications for skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Preedy, V R; Patel, V B; Reilly, M E; Richardson, P J; Falkous, G; Mantle, D

    1999-08-01

    setting. In the rat, circulating troponin-T release increases in the presence of ethanol, a mechanism ascribed to free radical mediated damage, as it is prevented with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor and beta-blocker, propranolol. However, whilst propranolol prevents the release of troponin-T, it does not prevent the fall in whole cardiac protein synthesis, suggestive of localized ischemic damage due to ethanol. PMID:10430553

  10. Localisation of AMPK γ subunits in cardiac and skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Katalin; Grignani, Robert T; Watkins, Hugh; Redwood, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The trimeric protein AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important sensor of energetic status and cellular stress, and mutations in genes encoding two of the regulatory γ subunits cause inherited disorders of either cardiac or skeletal muscle. AMPKγ2 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with glycogen deposition and conduction abnormalities; mutations in AMPKγ3 result in increased skeletal muscle glycogen. In order to gain further insight into the roles of the different γ subunits in muscle and into possible disease mechanisms, we localised the γ2 and γ3 subunits, along with the more abundant γ1 subunit, by immunofluorescence in cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres. The predominant cardiac γ2 variant, γ2-3B, gave a striated pattern in cardiomyocytes, aligning with the Z-disk but with punctate staining similar to T-tubule (L-type Ca(2+) channel) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2) markers. In skeletal muscle fibres AMPKγ3 localises to the I band, presenting a uniform staining that flanks the Z-disk, also coinciding with the position of Ca(2+) influx in these muscles. The localisation of γ2-3B- and γ3-containing AMPK suggests that these trimers may have similar functions in the different muscles. AMPK containing γ2-3B was detected in oxidative skeletal muscles which had low expression of γ3, confirming that these two regulatory subunits may be co-ordinately regulated in response to metabolic requirements. Compartmentalisation of AMPK complexes is most likely dependent on the regulatory γ subunit and this differential localisation may direct substrate selection and specify particular functional roles.

  11. Differential contribution of clinical amounts of acetaldehyde to skeletal and cardiac muscle dysfunction in alcoholic myopathy.

    PubMed

    Oba, Toshiharu; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Ishida, Kazuto

    2005-01-01

    Acute intoxication due to alcohol consumption has been known to elicit reversible skeletal and cardiac muscle dysfunction, or "alcoholic myopathy and cardiomyopathy". Sometimes, irreversible muscle damage can be induced after heavy alcohol drinking. Many researchers have proposed that acetaldehyde, the major oxidised product of alcohol, may be a primary factor underlying alcohol-induced muscle dysfunction. Because acetaldehyde is rapidly metabolised to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) mainly in the liver, blood concentration of acetaldehyde is maintained at a low level even after heavy alcohol intoxication. In alcoholics, blood acetaldehyde level is relatively high, probably due to hepatic inhibition of ALDH activity. Several mM of acetaldehyde have been used for studies of cardiac muscle contraction, the intracellular calcium transient, and the L-type calcium channel. In skeletal muscle, the calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor activity has been reported to be inhibited by exposure to 1 mM acetaldehyde. However, these observations were made using potentially lethal concentrations of acetaldehyde, so the hypothesis that acetaldehyde plays a crucial role on alcoholic myopathy is questionable. In this review, we will summarise the effect of alcohol and its major oxidised product, acetaldehyde, on skeletal and heart muscles and propose a toxic contribution of clinical concentrations of acetaldehyde to alcoholic myopathy. In addition, this review will include briefly the effect of acetaldehyde on diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  12. Calsequestrins in skeletal and cardiac muscle from adult Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sandra; Mosole, Simone; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Argenton, Francesco; Volpe, Pompeo; Nori, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Calsequestrin (Casq) is a high capacity, low affinity Ca(2+)-binding protein, critical for Ca(2+)-buffering in cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. All vertebrates have multiple genes encoding for different Casq isoforms. Increasing interest has been focused on mammalian and human Casq genes since mutations of both cardiac (Casq2) and skeletal muscle (Casq1) isoforms cause different, and sometime severe, human pathologies. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is a powerful model for studying function and mutations of human proteins. In this work, expression, biochemical properties cellular and sub-cellular localization of D. rerio native Casq isoforms are investigated. By quantitative PCR, three mRNAs were detected in skeletal muscle and heart with different abundances. Three zebrafish Casqs: Casq1a, Casq1b and Casq2 were identified by mass spectrometry (Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002455). Skeletal and cardiac zebrafish calsequestrins share properties with mammalian Casq1 and Casq2. Skeletal Casqs were found primarily, but not exclusively, at the sarcomere Z-line level where terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum are located. PMID:26585961

  13. Endothermic force generation in skinned cardiac muscle from rat.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W

    1999-08-01

    Isometric tension responses to rapid temperature jumps (T-jumps) of 2-6 degrees C were examined in skinned muscle fibre bundles isolated from papillary muscles of the rat heart. T-jumps were induced by an infra-red laser pulse (wave length 1.32 microm, pulse duration 0.2 ms) obtained from a Nd-YAG laser, which heated the fibres and bathing buffer solution in a 50 microl trough; the increased temperature by laser pulse was clamped at the high temperature by a Peltier system (see Ranatunga, 1996). In maximally Ca2+ -activated (pCa ca. 4.5) fibres, the relationship between tension and temperature was non-linear, the increase of active tension with temperature being more pronounced at lower temperatures (below ca. 20 degrees C). A T-jump at any temperature (range 3-35 degrees C) induced an initial step decrease of tension of variable amplitude (Phase 1), probably due to thermal expansion, and it was followed by a tension transient which resulted in a net rise of tension above the pre-T-jump level. The rate of net rise of tension (Phase 2b or endothermic force generation) was 7-10/s at ca. 12 degrees C and its Q10 was 6.3 (below 25 degrees C). In cases where the step decrease of tension in Phase 1 was prominent, an initial quick tension recovery phase (Phase 2a, 70-100/s at 12 degrees C) that did not contribute to a rise of tension above the pre-T-jump level, was also seen. This phase (Phase 2a) appeared to be similar to the quick tension recovery induced by a small length release and its rate increased with temperature with a Q10 of 1.8. In some cases where Phase 2a was present, a slower tension rise (Phase 3) was seen; its rate (ca. 5/s) was temperature-insensitive. The results show that the rate of endothermic force generation in cardiac fibres is clearly different from that of either fast-twitch or slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle fibres; implication of such fibre type-specific differences is discussed in relation to the difficulty in identifying the

  14. Effect of inotropic stimulation on mitochondrial calcium in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Moravec, C S; Bond, M

    1992-03-15

    Ca(2+)-dependent activation of citric acid cycle enzymes has been demonstrated in isolated cardiac mitochondria. These observations led to the hypothesis that Ca2+ is the signal coupling myofibrillar energy use to mitochondrial energy production in vivo. To test this hypothesis we have measured mitochondrial Ca2+ content during increased energy demand, using electron probe microanalysis. Mitochondrial Ca2+ was measured in hamster papillary muscles rapidly frozen at the peak rate of tension rise under control conditions and after stimulation with the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (10(-6) M). A third group of muscles was frozen after incubation in low (46.5 mM) Na+ solution to Ca2+ load the cells. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was measured in each of the muscles. Isoproterenol caused a 39% increase in force and a 43% increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase activity but no change in mitochondrial Ca2+ (0.46 +/- 0.19 (S.E.) mmol of Ca2+/kg, dry weight) compared with control (0.54 +/- 0.12). In contrast, low Na+ increased pyruvate dehydrogenase activity by 56% and also elevated mitochondrial Ca2+ to 1.28 +/- 0.31 (p less than 0.02). These results demonstrate that mitochondrial Ca2+ is not elevated after inotropic stimulation of cardiac muscle by beta-adrenergic agonists although pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is increased. We conclude that Ca2+ uptake by mitochondria is not a requirement for activation of mitochondrial respiration after increased energy demand. PMID:1544913

  15. In utero Undernutrition Programs Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2016-01-01

    In utero undernutrition is associated with increased risk for insulin resistance, obesity, and cardiovascular disease during adult life. A common phenotype associated with low birth weight is reduced skeletal muscle mass. Given the central role of skeletal muscle in whole body metabolism, alterations in its mass as well as its metabolic characteristics may contribute to disease risk. This review highlights the metabolic alterations in cardiac and skeletal muscle associated with in utero undernutrition and low birth weight. These tissues have high metabolic demands and are known to be sites of major metabolic dysfunction in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research demonstrates that mitochondrial energetics are decreased in skeletal and cardiac muscles of adult offspring from undernourished mothers. These effects apparently lead to the development of a thrifty phenotype, which may represent overall a compensatory mechanism programmed in utero to handle times of limited nutrient availability. However, in an environment characterized by food abundance, the effects are maladaptive and increase adulthood risks of metabolic disease. PMID:26779032

  16. Ultrastructural features of degenerated cardiac muscle cells in patients with cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Maron, B. J.; Ferrans, V. J.; Roberts, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Degenerated cardiac muscle cells were present in hypertrophied ventricular muscle obtained at operation from 12 (38%) of 32 patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) or aortic valvular disease. Degenerated cells demonstrated a wide variety of ultrastructural alterations. Mildly altered cells were normal-sized or hypertrophied and showed focal changes, including preferential loss of thick (myosin) filaments, streaming and clumping of Z band material, and proliferation of the tubules of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moderately and severely degenerated cells were normal-sized or atrophic and showed additional changes, including extensive myofibrillar lysis and loss of T tubules. The appearance of the most severely degenerated cells usually reflected the cytoplasmic organelle (sarcoplasmic reticulum, glycogen, or mitochondria) which underwent proliferation and filled the myofibril-free areas of these cells. Moderately and severely degenerated cells were present in areas of fibrosis, had thickened basement membranes, and had lost their intercellular connections. These observations suggest that degenerated cardiac muscle cells have poor contractile function and may be responsible for impaired cardiac performance in some patients with chronic ventricular hypertrophy. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Figs 4-6 Figs 7-8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 11 Figs 12-15 Fig 16 Fig 17 Figs 18-21 Figs 22-23 Fig 24 Fig 25 Fig 26 Fig 27 Figs 28-29 Fig 30 Figs 31-32 Fig 33 PMID:124533

  17. [Tolerance of +Gz accelerations in chronic compensated cardiac muscle disease].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, P M; Bykova, Iu I

    1975-01-01

    The functional potentialities of the cardiovascular system were investigated during an exposure of people with compensated chronic diseases of the cardiac muscle to acceleration (+Gz). The test subjects were exposed to acceleration of 3 and 5 g for 30 sec with an interval of 5 min. The parameters of hemodynamics, ECG and visual perception were recorded. The systolic blood volume, cardiac output and specific peripheral resistance were derived from the Bremser-Ranke formula. Seventy one subjects with heart diseases and 23 healthy subjects were examined. The subjects with myocardiodystrophy and myocarditic cardiosclerosis (12+/-16) showed a reduced tolerance to accelerations. During an exposure the subjects with atherosclerotic cardiosclerosis showed a higher pressure in vessels of ear conch than the healthy subjects. The myocardiodystrophic subjects frequently (20%) exhibited an inversion of electrocardiographic T2. The subjects with heart diseases (27-33%) showed extrasystolic disturbances. The results may be used in medical expertise of pilots.

  18. [Tolerance of +Gz accelerations in chronic compensated cardiac muscle disease].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, P M; Bykova, Iu I

    1975-01-01

    The functional potentialities of the cardiovascular system were investigated during an exposure of people with compensated chronic diseases of the cardiac muscle to acceleration (+Gz). The test subjects were exposed to acceleration of 3 and 5 g for 30 sec with an interval of 5 min. The parameters of hemodynamics, ECG and visual perception were recorded. The systolic blood volume, cardiac output and specific peripheral resistance were derived from the Bremser-Ranke formula. Seventy one subjects with heart diseases and 23 healthy subjects were examined. The subjects with myocardiodystrophy and myocarditic cardiosclerosis (12+/-16) showed a reduced tolerance to accelerations. During an exposure the subjects with atherosclerotic cardiosclerosis showed a higher pressure in vessels of ear conch than the healthy subjects. The myocardiodystrophic subjects frequently (20%) exhibited an inversion of electrocardiographic T2. The subjects with heart diseases (27-33%) showed extrasystolic disturbances. The results may be used in medical expertise of pilots. PMID:1214489

  19. Characterization of Post-Translational Modifications to Calsequestrins of Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kevin M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Byrd, Samuel S.; Kang, Jeehoon; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Ríos, Eduardo; Kang, ChulHee

    2016-01-01

    Calsequestrin is glycosylated and phosphorylated during its transit to its final destination in the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum. To determine the significance and universal profile of these post-translational modifications to mammalian calsequestrin, we characterized, via mass spectrometry, the glycosylation and phosphorylation of skeletal muscle calsequestrin from cattle (B. taurus), lab mice (M. musculus) and lab rats (R. norvegicus) and cardiac muscle calsequestrin from cattle, lab rats and humans. On average, glycosylation of skeletal calsequestrin consisted of two N-acetylglucosamines and one mannose (GlcNAc2Man1), while cardiac calsequestrin had five additional mannoses (GlcNAc2Man6). Skeletal calsequestrin was not phosphorylated, while the C-terminal tails of cardiac calsequestrin contained between zero to two phosphoryls, indicating that phosphorylation of cardiac calsequestrin may be heterogeneous in vivo. Static light scattering experiments showed that the Ca2+-dependent polymerization capabilities of native bovine skeletal calsequestrin are enhanced, relative to the non-glycosylated, recombinant isoform, which our crystallographic studies suggest may be due to glycosylation providing a dynamic “guiderail”-like scaffold for calsequestrin polymerization. Glycosylation likely increases a polymerization/depolymerization response to changing Ca2+ concentrations, and proper glycosylation, in turn, guarantees both effective Ca2+ storage/buffering of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and localization of calsequestrin (Casq) at its target site. PMID:27649144

  20. Characterization of Post-Translational Modifications to Calsequestrins of Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kevin M; Munske, Gerhard R; Byrd, Samuel S; Kang, Jeehoon; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Ríos, Eduardo; Kang, ChulHee

    2016-01-01

    Calsequestrin is glycosylated and phosphorylated during its transit to its final destination in the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum. To determine the significance and universal profile of these post-translational modifications to mammalian calsequestrin, we characterized, via mass spectrometry, the glycosylation and phosphorylation of skeletal muscle calsequestrin from cattle (B. taurus), lab mice (M. musculus) and lab rats (R. norvegicus) and cardiac muscle calsequestrin from cattle, lab rats and humans. On average, glycosylation of skeletal calsequestrin consisted of two N-acetylglucosamines and one mannose (GlcNAc₂Man₁), while cardiac calsequestrin had five additional mannoses (GlcNAc₂Man₆). Skeletal calsequestrin was not phosphorylated, while the C-terminal tails of cardiac calsequestrin contained between zero to two phosphoryls, indicating that phosphorylation of cardiac calsequestrin may be heterogeneous in vivo. Static light scattering experiments showed that the Ca(2+)-dependent polymerization capabilities of native bovine skeletal calsequestrin are enhanced, relative to the non-glycosylated, recombinant isoform, which our crystallographic studies suggest may be due to glycosylation providing a dynamic "guiderail"-like scaffold for calsequestrin polymerization. Glycosylation likely increases a polymerization/depolymerization response to changing Ca(2+) concentrations, and proper glycosylation, in turn, guarantees both effective Ca(2+) storage/buffering of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and localization of calsequestrin (Casq) at its target site. PMID:27649144

  1. Interaction between titin and thin filaments in intact cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Trombitás, K; Greaser, M L; Pollack, G H

    1997-06-01

    A 'freeze break' technique and immunoelectron microscopy were used to study the elastic properties of cardiac titin filaments. Small bundles consisting of a few fibres from freshly prepared dog papillary muscle were quickly frozen and broken under liquid nitrogen to fracture sarcomeres in planes perpendicular to the filament axes. Breaks occurred at each of several regions along the sarcomeres. The still-frozen specimens were thawed during fixation to allow elastic filaments to retract. The broken muscle segments were then treated with monoclonal titin antibody 9D10 which labelled a unique epitope in the I-band. In sarcomeres broken at the A-I junction, the titin filaments reacted toward the Z-line, independently of the thin filaments. The retracted epitopes did not reach the Z-line; retraction stopped at the N1-line level. In sarcomeres broken near the Z-line, the titin filaments retracted in the opposite direction, to the tip of the thick filaments. When the break occurred in the A-band, by contrast, the titin-epitope position was unaffected. On the basis of these results, and despite the reported interaction of titin and actin in vitro, it appears that cardiac titin molecules form elastic filaments that are functionally independent of the thin filaments. Near the Z-line, however, the titin filaments seem to associate firmly with the thin filaments. PMID:9172076

  2. How does an electric field defibrillate cardiac muscle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Krinsky, Valentin I.

    Cardiac fibrillation is caused by an irregular wave propagation. Fibrillation can be eliminated by a strong electric field (5 kV, 20 A, 2 msec). The mechanism of this phenomenon (defibrillation) is not known. The principal difficulty, as shown in experiments and confirmed by classical cable theory, is that the changes in transmembrane potential, e, induced by electric field, decay exponentially with distance from the electrodes. We study wave suppression by an electric field in generic excitable media. In excitable media consisting of separate cells (similar to biological tissues), we have found a suppression of rotating waves and defibrillation induced by strong electric field, contrary to what happens in continuous media. We show that the spatially periodic component of e which arises in cellular media is responsible for defibrillation. We have found that (i) it does not decay with distance; (ii) it can excite quiescent cells and terminate excitation in excited cells; (iii) the coupling between cardiac cells is a crucial parameter affecting the amplitude of the spatially periodic component of e, and the efficiency of defibrillation. New experiments on cardiac muscle are proposed.

  3. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Trinity, Joel D; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-08-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Citrate synthase (CS) activity, an index of mitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (222 ± 13, 115 ± 2, and 48 ± 2 μmol·g(-1)·min(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, when respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, although oxidative phosphorylation capacity per mitochondrial content in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting respiratory control ratio and nonphosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production.

  4. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives.

  5. Cardiac troponin testing in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis-spectrum disorders: biomarkers to distinguish between primary cardiac involvement and low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael; Lilleker, James B; Herrick, Ariane L; Chinoy, Hector

    2015-05-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, an under-recognised manifestation of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc)-spectrum disorders, is associated with significant mortality. Within these two conditions, traditional skeletal muscle enzyme testing may not effectively distinguish between skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement, especially in patients with subclinical cardiac disease. Accurate biomarkers are thus required to screen for cardiac disease, to better inform both therapeutic decision-making and treatment response. The widespread uptake of cardiac troponin testing has revolutionised the management of acute coronary syndromes. While cardiac troponin I (cTnI) appears specific to the myocardium, cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is also expressed by skeletal muscle, including regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There is increasing interest about the role of cardiac troponins as a putative biomarker of primary cardiac involvement in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders. Herewith we discuss subclinical cardiac disease in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders, the respective roles of cTnI and cTnT testing, and the re-expression of cTnT within regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There remains wide variation in access to cardiac troponin testing nationally and internationally. We propose two pragmatic clinical pathways using cardiac troponins, preferably measuring concomitant cTnT followed by confirmatory (cardiac) cTnI to screen patients for subclinical cardiac disease and/or low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity, and also an agenda for future research.

  6. Cardiac Troponin Testing in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies and Systemic Sclerosis-Spectrum Disorders: Biomarkers to Distinguish between Primary Cardiac Involvement and Low Grade Skeletal Muscle Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael; Lilleker, James B; Herrick, Ariane L; Chinoy, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, an under-recognised manifestation of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc)-spectrum disorders, is associated with significant mortality. Within these two conditions, traditional skeletal muscle enzyme testing may not effectively distinguish between skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement, especially in patients with subclinical cardiac disease. Accurate biomarkers are thus required to screen for cardiac disease, to better inform both therapeutic decision-making and treatment response. The widespread uptake of cardiac troponin testing has revolutionised the management of acute coronary syndromes. Whereas cardiac troponin I (cTnI) appears specific to the myocardium, cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is also expressed by skeletal muscle, including regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There is increasing interest about the role of cardiac troponins as a putative biomarker of primary cardiac involvement in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders. Herewith we discuss subclinical cardiac disease in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders, the respective roles of cTnI and cTnT testing, and the re-expression of cTnT within regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There remains wide variation in access to cardiac troponin testing nationally and internationally. We propose two pragmatic clinical pathways using cardiac troponins, preferably measuring concomitant cTnT followed by confirmatory (cardiac) cTnI to screen patients for subclinical cardiac disease and/or low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity, and also an agenda for future research, and also an agenda for future research. PMID:25732174

  7. Bilateral muscular tinnitus due to myoclonus of extrinsic auricular muscles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kijeong; Chang, Jiwon; Park, Sangheon; Im, Gi Jung; Choi, Hyung Joon; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Hyung-Jong

    2015-04-01

    The muscular tinnitus due to an extrinsic auricular myoclonus is an extremely rare disorder which demonstrates a semirhythmic involuntary movement of the ear. We report a 33-year-old man with clicking tinnitus caused by focal myoclonic jerks of bilateral posterior auricularis muscle and bilateral temporalis muscle. This muscular tinnitus persisted except for when he was sleeping or breath holding. His symptom responded poorly to medical therapy but was controlled by botulinum toxin type A injection under electromyography monitoring with favorable outcome. Previous reports of this condition and possible therapeutic approaches are discussed.

  8. Functions of Myosin Light Chain-2 (MYL2) In Cardiac Muscle and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Farah; Lyon, Robert C.; Chen, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Myosin light chain-2 (MYL2, also called MLC-2) is an ∼19 kDa sarcomeric protein that belongs to the EF-hand calcium binding protein superfamily and exists as three major isoforms encoded by three distinct genes in mammalian striated muscle. Each of the three different MLC-2 genes (MLC-2f; fast twitch skeletal isoform, MLC-2v; cardiac ventricular and slow twitch skeletal isoform, MLC-2a; cardiac atrial isoform) has a distinct developmental expression pattern in mammals. Genetic loss-of-function studies in mice demonstrated an essential role for cardiac isoforms of MLC-2, MLC-2v and MLC-2a, in cardiac contractile function during early embryogenesis. In the adult heart, MLC-2v function is regulated by phosphorylation, which displays a specific expression pattern (high in epicardium and low in endocardium) across the heart. These data along with new data from computational models, genetic mouse models, and human studies have revealed a direct role for MLC-2v phosphorylation in cross-bridge cycling kinetics, calcium-dependent cardiac muscle contraction, cardiac torsion, cardiac function and various cardiac diseases. This review focuses on the regulatory functions of MLC-2 in the embryonic and adult heart, with an emphasis on phosphorylation-driven actions of MLC-2v in adult cardiac muscle, which provide new insights into mechanisms regulating myosin cycling kinetics and human cardiac diseases. PMID:26074085

  9. Getting the skinny on thick filament regulation in cardiac muscle biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Farah; Lyon, Robert C; Chen, Ju

    2014-05-01

    Thin (actin) filament accessory proteins are thought to be the regulatory force for muscle contraction in cardiac muscle; however, compelling new evidence suggests that thick (myosin) filament regulatory proteins are emerging as having independent and important roles in regulating cardiac muscle contraction. Key to these new findings is a growing body of evidence that point to an influential and, more recently, direct role for ventricular myosin light chain-2 (MLC2v) phosphorylation in regulating cardiac muscle contraction, function, and disease. This includes the discovery and characterization of a cardiac-specific myosin light chain kinase capable of phosphorylating MLC2v as well as a myosin phosphatase that dephosphorylates MLC2v in the heart, which provides added mechanistic insights on MLC2v regulation within cardiac muscle. Here, we review evidence for an emerging and critical role for MLC2v phosphorylation in regulating cardiac myosin cycling kinetics, function, and disease, based on recent studies performed in genetic mouse models and humans. We further provide new perspectives on future avenues for targeting these pathways as therapies in alleviating cardiac disease.

  10. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal {beta} III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  11. Force velocity relations of single cardiac muscle cells: calcium dependency

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Cellular cardiac preparations in which spontaneous activity was suppressed by EGTA buffering were isolated by microdissection. Uniform and reproducible contractions were induced by iontophoretically released calcium ions. No effects of a diffusional barrier to calcium ions between the micropipette and the contractile system were detected since the sensitivity of the mechanical performance for calcium was the same regardless of whether a constant amount of calcium ions was released from a single micropipette or from two micropipettes positioned at different sites along the longitudinal axis of the preparation. Force development, muscle length, and shortening velocity of eitherisometric or isotopic contractions were measured simultaneously. Initial length, and hence preload of the preparation were established by means of an electronic stop and any additional load was sensed as afterload. Mechanical performance was derived from force velocity relations and from the interrelationship between simultaneously measured force, length, and shortening velocity. From phase plane analysis of shortening velocity vs, instantaneous length during shortening and from load clamp experiments, the interrelationship between force, shortening, and velocity was shown to be independent of time during the major portion of shortening. Moreover, peak force, shortening, and velocity of shortening depended on the amount of calcium ions in the medium at low and high ionic strength. PMID:839198

  12. [Study of Magnolia grandiflora extracts in guinea pigs cardiac muscle].

    PubMed

    del Valle Mondragón, Leonardo; Tenorio López, Fermín Alejandro; Torres Narváez, Juan Carlos; Zarco Olvera, Gabriela; Pastelín Hernández, Gustavo

    2004-01-01

    Several extracts from diverse Magnolia grandiflora varieties were pharmacological evaluated in the cardiac muscle. From March to July, flowers and leaves from Magnolia grandiflora, native from the National Institute of Cardiology "Ignacio Chávez", from north, west, and orient zones from Mexico City, and from Puebla, Colima and Chiapas states were collected. They were separately processed and the extracts were obtained by maceration with ethanol-water (1:3 v/v) at 4 degrees C during two weeks. Qualitative analysis was accomplished with thin-layer, column and high-performance liquid chromatographies (HPLC). Functional and molecular analysis was made by specific chemical reactivity and by protonic magnetic resonance (RMN 1H). Pharmacological evaluation was completed in isolated and perfused male guinea pigs hearts. Extracts, fractions, and compounds were administrated by serial bolus in a gradual dose-response curves study in which left intraventricular pressure and coronary perfusion pressure were recorded, evaluating by such the positive inotropic and vasodilator effects of Magnolia grandiflora extracts. Vulgarenol and 2-p-hydroxyphenyl-2-hydroxy-ethylamine were isolated and identified, and the obtained results suggest that its positive inotropic and vasodilator effects are owed to these substances, being complemented by magnograndiolide and tyramine.

  13. Mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitor cells functionally regenerate cardiac and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Swinnen, Melissa; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Camps, Jordi; Barthélemy, Ines; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Caluwé, Ellen; Grosemans, Hanne; Thorrez, Lieven; Pelizzo, Gloria; Muijtjens, Manja; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Blot, Stephane; Janssens, Stefan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as muscular dystrophies (MDs) that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles would benefit from therapeutic strategies that enable regeneration of both of these striated muscle types. Protocols have been developed to promote induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate toward cardiac or skeletal muscle; however, there are currently no strategies to simultaneously target both muscle types. Tissues exhibit specific epigenetic alterations; therefore, source-related lineage biases have the potential to improve iPSC-driven multilineage differentiation. Here, we determined that differential myogenic propensity influences the commitment of isogenic iPSCs and a specifically isolated pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs) toward the striated muscle lineages. Differential myogenic propensity did not influence pluripotency, but did selectively enhance chimerism of MiP-derived tissue in both fetal and adult skeletal muscle. When injected into dystrophic mice, MiPs engrafted and repaired both skeletal and cardiac muscle, reducing functional defects. Similarly, engraftment into dystrophic mice of canine MiPs from dystrophic dogs that had undergone TALEN-mediated correction of the MD-associated mutation also resulted in functional striatal muscle regeneration. Moreover, human MiPs exhibited the same capacity for the dual differentiation observed in murine and canine MiPs. The findings of this study suggest that MiPs should be further explored for combined therapy of cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26571398

  14. Developmental changes in the protein profiles of human cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tipler, T D; Edwards, Y H; Hopkinson, D A

    1978-05-01

    1. The use of SDS electrophoresis as a tool for the analysis of development processes in man has been evaluated. 2. The protein profiles of cardiac and skeletal muscle from foetal (10--24 weeks gestation) infant and adult specimens have been analysed and striking developmental changes were found which involved all the major proteins. 3. Before 20 weeks gestation the soluble protein profile of skeletal muscle appears to consist largely of extracellular proteins. 4. Myoglobin was found in foetal cardiac muscle from 20 weeks gestation but was not demonstrable in foetal (greater than 24 weeks) skeletal muscle. Foetal and adult myoglobin were indistinguishable. 5. A limited survey of the protein patterns of brain, liver and kidney was carried out. In general these tissues show less developmental change than skeletal or cardiac muscle.

  15. Cardiac and skeletal muscles show molecularly distinct responses to cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Shum, Angie M Y; Fung, David C Y; Corley, Susan M; McGill, Max C; Bentley, Nicholas L; Tan, Timothy C; Wilkins, Marc R; Polly, Patsie

    2015-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is a systemic, paraneoplastic syndrome seen in patients with advanced cancer. There is growing interest in the altered muscle pathophysiology experienced by cachectic patients. This study reports the microarray analysis of gene expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle in the colon 26 (C26) carcinoma mouse model of cancer cachexia. A total of 268 genes were found to be differentially expressed in cardiac muscle tissue, compared with nontumor-bearing controls. This was fewer than the 1,533 genes that changed in cachectic skeletal muscle. In addition to different numbers of genes changing, different cellular functions were seen to change in each tissue. The cachectic heart showed signs of inflammation, similar to cachectic skeletal muscle, but did not show the upregulation of ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic processes or downregulation of genes involved in cellular energetics and muscle regeneration that characterizes skeletal muscle cachexia. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate a subset of inflammatory genes in the cardiac and skeletal muscle of independent cachectic samples; this revealed that B4galt1, C1s, Serpina3n, and Vsig4 were significantly upregulated in cardiac tissue, whereas C1s and Serpina3n were significantly upregulated in skeletal tissue. Our skeletal muscle microarray results were also compared with those from three published microarray studies and found to be consistent in terms of the genes differentially expressed and the functional processes affected. Our study highlights that skeletal and cardiac muscles are affected differently in the C26 mouse model of cachexia and that therapeutic strategies cannot assume that both muscle types will show a similar response.

  16. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André Luiz Lisboa; de Melo, Thiago Araújo; Neves, Daniela; Luna, Julianne; Esquivel, Mateus Souza; Guimarães, André Raimundo França; Borges, Daniel Lago; Petto, Jefferson

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. Objective To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods This is a clinical randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Instituto Nobre de Cardiologia. Patients were divided into two groups: control group and training. Preoperatively, were assessed the maximum inspiratory pressure and the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test. From the third postoperative day, the control group was managed according to the routine of the unit while the training group underwent daily protocol of respiratory muscle training until the day of discharge. Results 50 patients, 27 (54%) males were included, with a mean age of 56.7±13.9 years. After the analysis, the training group had significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure (69.5±14.9 vs. 83.1±19.1 cmH2O, P=0.0073) and 6-minute walk test (422.4±102.8 vs. 502.4±112.8 m, P=0.0031). Conclusion We conclude that inspiratory muscle training was effective in improving functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in this sample of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27556313

  17. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  18. Effect of muscle length on cross-bridge kinetics in intact cardiac trabeculae at body temperature.

    PubMed

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Xu, Ying; Davis, Jonathan P; Campbell, Kenneth S; Janssen, Paul M L

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic force generation in cardiac muscle, which determines cardiac pumping activity, depends on both the number of sarcomeric cross-bridges and on their cycling kinetics. The Frank-Starling mechanism dictates that cardiac force development increases with increasing cardiac muscle length (corresponding to increased ventricular volume). It is, however, unclear to what extent this increase in cardiac muscle length affects the rate of cross-bridge cycling. Previous studies using permeabilized cardiac preparations, sub-physiological temperatures, or both have obtained conflicting results. Here, we developed a protocol that allowed us to reliably and reproducibly measure the rate of tension redevelopment (k(tr); which depends on the rate of cross-bridge cycling) in intact trabeculae at body temperature. Using K(+) contractures to induce a tonic level of force, we showed the k(tr) was slower in rabbit muscle (which contains predominantly β myosin) than in rat muscle (which contains predominantly α myosin). Analyses of k(tr) in rat muscle at optimal length (L(opt)) and 90% of optimal length (L(90)) revealed that k(tr) was significantly slower at L(opt) (27.7 ± 3.3 and 27.8 ± 3.0 s(-1) in duplicate analyses) than at L(90) (45.1 ± 7.6 and 47.5 ± 9.2 s(-1)). We therefore show that k(tr) can be measured in intact rat and rabbit cardiac trabeculae, and that the k(tr) decreases when muscles are stretched to their optimal length under near-physiological conditions, indicating that the Frank-Starling mechanism not only increases force but also affects cross-bridge cycling kinetics.

  19. Sudden cardiac death due to coronary artery dissection as a complication of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kanaroglou, Savas; Nair, Vidhya; Fernandes, John R

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), cardiac tamponade and sudden cardiac death that typically affects young women in the postpartum period. Rarely, it can be caused by systemic inflammatory conditions such as sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease most often affecting the lung and lymph nodes that can sometimes affect the heart. The authors report a case of sudden cardiac death caused by SCAD in the context of undiagnosed and subclinical cardiac sarcoidosis. The decedent was a 47-year-old male with a relatively innocuous past medical history. He was found dead in bed. At autopsy, there was a lethal hemopericardium resulting in cardiac tamponade. Gross examination of the heart revealed dissection of the posterior descending coronary branch of the right coronary artery. Histologically, the coronary artery showed acute and organizing dissection with evidence of vasculitis. A chronic inflammatory infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, histiocytes, eosinophils and giant cells was seen. Sections of the myocardium showed myocarditis with a nonnecrotizing granuloma. The death was attributed to cardiac tamponade secondary to SCAD in the context of systemic sarcoidosis. The presented case demonstrates two concurrent rare pathologies and highlights the importance of considering SCAD in cases of sudden cardiac death at autopsy.

  20. From Syncitium to Regulated Pump: A Cardiac Muscle Cellular Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korzick, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information…

  1. Proto-oncogene expression during terminal differentiation of cardiac and skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, W.C.; Lanson, N.A. Jr.; Springhorn, J.P.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the expression of 17 different protooncogenes in proliferating and terminally differentiating cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. Cardiac muscle cells at various periods during differentiation were obtained from the rat. The L6 skeletal muscle cell line and a primary culture of human skeletal muscle satellite cells were the source of skeletal muscle cells. Total cellular RNA was isolated by the quanidinium procedure and purified by CsCl. RNA was separated on 1.2% agarose-formaldehyde gels and blotted onto Zeta-Probe nylon membranes. DNA probes, labeled with /sup 32/P, were generated by nick translation of purified DNA fragments or recombinant plasmid DNA. Northern blots were hybridized with /sup 32/P-DNA in 50% formamide, 1 mM EDTA, 7% SDS, 0.5 M NaHPO/sub 4/, 0.5 mg/ml denatured herring testes DNA and washed in 1 mM EDTA, 40 mM NaHPO/sub 4/ and 5% SDS. As positive controls, to assess DNA synthesis and cell proliferation, human histone H/sub 4/ and thymidine kinase were used as probes; rat cardiac muscle myosin heavy chain and M creatine kinase served to assess muscle cell differentiation. Results of these studies indicate that several of these oncogenes may be involved with the regulation of cell proliferation and terminal cell differentiation in striated muscle.

  2. Taurine transporter knockout depletes muscle taurine levels and results in severe skeletal muscle impairment but leaves cardiac function uncompromised.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Ulrich; Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Hartwig, Hans-Georg; Thewissen, Michael; Merx, Marc W; Molojavyi, Andrej; Heller-Stilb, Birgit; Schrader, Jürgen; Häussinger, Dieter

    2004-03-01

    Taurine is the most abundant free amino acid in heart and skeletal muscle. In the present study, the effects of hereditary taurine deficiency on muscle function were examined in taurine transporter knockout (taut-/-) mice. These mice show an almost complete depletion of heart and skeletal muscle taurine levels. Treadmill experiments demonstrated that total exercise capacity of taut-/- mice was reduced by >80% compared with wild-type controls. The decreased performance of taut-/- mice correlated with increased lactate levels in serum during exercise. Surprisingly, cardiac function of taut-/- mice as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and isolated heart studies showed a largely normal phenotype under both control and stimulated conditions. However, analysis of taut-/- skeletal muscle revealed electromyographic abnormalities. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of tissue extracts showed that in the heart of taut-/- mice the lack of taurine was compensated by the up-regulation of various organic solutes. In contrast, a deficit of >10 mM in total organic osmolyte concentration was found in skeletal muscle. The present study identifies taurine transport as a crucial factor for the maintenance of skeletal muscle function and total exercise capacity, while cardiac muscle apparently can compensate for the loss of taurine. PMID:14734644

  3. Taurine transporter knockout depletes muscle taurine levels and results in severe skeletal muscle impairment but leaves cardiac function uncompromised.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Ulrich; Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Hartwig, Hans-Georg; Thewissen, Michael; Merx, Marc W; Molojavyi, Andrej; Heller-Stilb, Birgit; Schrader, Jürgen; Häussinger, Dieter

    2004-03-01

    Taurine is the most abundant free amino acid in heart and skeletal muscle. In the present study, the effects of hereditary taurine deficiency on muscle function were examined in taurine transporter knockout (taut-/-) mice. These mice show an almost complete depletion of heart and skeletal muscle taurine levels. Treadmill experiments demonstrated that total exercise capacity of taut-/- mice was reduced by >80% compared with wild-type controls. The decreased performance of taut-/- mice correlated with increased lactate levels in serum during exercise. Surprisingly, cardiac function of taut-/- mice as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and isolated heart studies showed a largely normal phenotype under both control and stimulated conditions. However, analysis of taut-/- skeletal muscle revealed electromyographic abnormalities. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of tissue extracts showed that in the heart of taut-/- mice the lack of taurine was compensated by the up-regulation of various organic solutes. In contrast, a deficit of >10 mM in total organic osmolyte concentration was found in skeletal muscle. The present study identifies taurine transport as a crucial factor for the maintenance of skeletal muscle function and total exercise capacity, while cardiac muscle apparently can compensate for the loss of taurine.

  4. A synthetic strand of cardiac muscle: its passive electrical properties

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, M; Sawanobori, T; Kootsey, JM; Johnson, EA

    1975-01-01

    The passive electrical properties of synthetic strands of cardiac muscle, grown in tissue culture, were studied using two intracellular microelectrodes: one to inject a rectangular pulse of current and the other to record the resultant displacement of membrane potential at various distances from the current source. In all preparations, the potential displacement, instead of approaching a steady value as would be expected for a cell with constant electrical properties, increased slowly with time throughout the current step. In such circumstances, the specific electrical constants for the membrane and cytoplasm must not be obtained by applying the usual methods, which are based on the analytical solution of the partial differential equation describing a one-dimensional cell with constant electrical properties. A satisfactory fit of the potential waveforms was, however, obtained with numerical solutions of a modified form of this equation in which the membrane resistance increased linearly with time. Best fits of the waveforms from 12 preparations gave the following values for the membrane resistance times unit length, membrane capacitance per unit length, and for the myoplasmic resistance: 1.22 plus or minus 0.13 x 10-5 omegacm, 0.224 plus or minus 0.023 uF with cm-minus 1, and 1.37 plus or minus 0.13 x 10-7 omegacm-minus 1, respectively. The value of membrane capacitance per unit length was close to that obtained from the time constant of the foot of the action potential and was in keeping with the generally satisfactory fit of the recorded waveforms with solutions of the cable equation in which the membrane impedance is that of a single capacitor and resistor in parallel. The area of membrane per unit length and the cross-sectional area of myoplasm at any given length of the preparation were determined from light and composite electron micrographs, and these were used to calculate the following values for the specific electrical membrane resistance, membrane

  5. Sudden death due to an unrecognized cardiac hydatid cyst: three medicolegal autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Pakis, Isil; Akyildiz, Elif Ulker; Karayel, Ferah; Turan, Arzu Akcay; Senel, Berna; Ozbay, Mehmet; Cetin, Gursel

    2006-03-01

    Echinococcosis is a human infection caused by the larval stage of Echinococcocus granulosus. The most common sites of infection are the liver and the lungs. Cardiac hydatid cysts are very rare, even in regions where hydatic cysts are endemic (the Mediterranean, South America, Africa, and Australia). It has been reported that cardiac involvement is seen in about 0.5-3% of human echinococcosis cases. Three cases of cardiac hydatid disease that caused sudden death and which were histopathologically diagnosed are reported. Cardiac echinococcosis is rare, but due to its insidious presentation and affinity to cause sudden death, it is important that it be identified in the histopathological examination.

  6. GLP-1 at physiological concentrations recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    SUBARAN, Sharmila C.; SAUDER, Matthew A.; CHAI, Weidong; JAHN, Linda A.; FOWLER, Dale E.; AYLOR, Kevin W.; BASU, Ananda; LIU, Zhenqi

    2015-01-01

    Muscle microvascular surface area determines substrate and hormonal exchanges between plasma and muscle interstitium. GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) regulates glucose-dependent insulin secretion and has numerous extrapancreatic effects, including a salutary vascular action. To examine whether GLP-1 recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in healthy humans, 26 overnight-fasted healthy adults received a systemic infusion of GLP-1 (1.2 pmol/kg of body mass per min) for 150 min. Skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV (microvascular blood volume), MFV (microvascular flow velocity) and MBF (microvascular blood flow) were determined at baseline and after 30 and 150 min. Brachial artery diameter and mean flow velocity were measured and total blood flow was calculated before and at the end of the GLP-1 infusion. GLP-1 infusion raised plasma GLP-1 concentrations to the postprandial levels and suppressed plasma glucagon concentrations with a transient increase in plasma insulin concentrations. Skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV and MBF increased significantly at both 30 and 150 min (P < 0.05). MFV did not change in skeletal muscle, but decreased slightly in cardiac muscle. GLP-1 infusion significantly increased brachial artery diameter (P < 0.005) and flow velocity (P = 0.05) at 150 min, resulting in a significant increase in total brachial artery blood flow (P < 0.005). We conclude that acute GLP-1 infusion significantly recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in addition to relaxing the conduit artery in healthy humans. This could contribute to increased tissue oxygen, nutrient and insulin delivery and exchange and therefore better prandial glycaemic control and tissue function in humans. PMID:24552454

  7. GLP-1 at physiological concentrations recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Subaran, Sharmila C; Sauder, Matthew A; Chai, Weidong; Jahn, Linda A; Fowler, Dale E; Aylor, Kevin W; Basu, Ananda; Liu, Zhenqi

    2014-08-01

    Muscle microvascular surface area determines substrate and hormonal exchanges between plasma and muscle interstitium. GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) regulates glucose-dependent insulin secretion and has numerous extrapancreatic effects, including a salutary vascular action. To examine whether GLP-1 recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in healthy humans, 26 overnight-fasted healthy adults received a systemic infusion of GLP-1 (1.2 pmol/kg of body mass per min) for 150 min. Skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV (microvascular blood volume), MFV (microvascular flow velocity) and MBF (microvascular blood flow) were determined at baseline and after 30 and 150 min. Brachial artery diameter and mean flow velocity were measured and total blood flow was calculated before and at the end of the GLP-1 infusion. GLP-1 infusion raised plasma GLP-1 concentrations to the postprandial levels and suppressed plasma glucagon concentrations with a transient increase in plasma insulin concentrations. Skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV and MBF increased significantly at both 30 and 150 min (P<0.05). MFV did not change in skeletal muscle, but decreased slightly in cardiac muscle. GLP-1 infusion significantly increased brachial artery diameter (P<0.005) and flow velocity (P=0.05) at 150 min, resulting in a significant increase in total brachial artery blood flow (P<0.005). We conclude that acute GLP-1 infusion significantly recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in addition to relaxing the conduit artery in healthy humans. This could contribute to increased tissue oxygen, nutrient and insulin delivery and exchange and therefore better prandial glycaemic control and tissue function in humans.

  8. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Plays No Regulatory Role in Skeletal Muscle Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Brian; Govindan, Suresh; Lee, Kyounghwan; Zhao, Piming; Han, Renzhi; Runte, K. Elisabeth; Craig, Roger; Palmer, Bradley M.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2013-01-01

    Myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) exists in three major isoforms: slow skeletal, fast skeletal, and cardiac. While cardiac MyBP-C (cMyBP-C) expression is restricted to the heart in the adult, it is transiently expressed in neonatal stages of some skeletal muscles. However, it is unclear whether this expression is necessary for the proper development and function of skeletal muscle. Our aim was to determine whether the absence of cMyBP-C alters the structure, function, or MyBP-C isoform expression in adult skeletal muscle using a cMyBP-C null mouse model (cMyBP-C(t/t)). Slow MyBP-C was expressed in both slow and fast skeletal muscles, whereas fast MyBP-C was mostly restricted to fast skeletal muscles. Expression of these isoforms was unaffected in skeletal muscle from cMyBP-C(t/t) mice. Slow and fast skeletal muscles in cMyBP-C(t/t) mice showed no histological or ultrastructural changes in comparison to the wild-type control. In addition, slow muscle twitch, tetanus tension, and susceptibility to injury were all similar to the wild-type controls. Interestingly, fMyBP-C expression was significantly increased in the cMyBP-C(t/t) hearts undergoing severe dilated cardiomyopathy, though this does not seem to prevent dysfunction. Additionally, expression of both slow and fast isoforms was increased in myopathic skeletal muscles. Our data demonstrate that i) MyBP-C isoforms are differentially regulated in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, ii) cMyBP-C is dispensable for the development of skeletal muscle with no functional or structural consequences in the adult myocyte, and iii) skeletal isoforms can transcomplement in the heart in the absence of cMyBP-C. PMID:23936073

  9. Attenuated muscle metaboreflex-induced increases in cardiac function in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Spranger, Marty D; Abu-Hamdah, Rania; Kaur, Jasdeep; Coutsos, Matthew; Stayer, Douglas; Augustyniak, Robert A; O'Leary, Donal S

    2013-11-15

    Sympathoactivation may be excessive during exercise in subjects with hypertension, leading to increased susceptibility to adverse cardiovascular events, including arrhythmias, infarction, stroke, and sudden cardiac death. The muscle metaboreflex is a powerful cardiovascular reflex capable of eliciting marked increases in sympathetic activity during exercise. We used conscious, chronically instrumented dogs trained to run on a motor-driven treadmill to investigate the effects of hypertension on the mechanisms of the muscle metaboreflex. Experiments were performed before and 30.9 ± 4.2 days after induction of hypertension, which was induced via partial, unilateral renal artery occlusion. After induction of hypertension, resting mean arterial pressure was significantly elevated from 98.2 ± 2.6 to 141.9 ± 7.4 mmHg. The hypertension was caused by elevated total peripheral resistance. Although cardiac output was not significantly different at rest or during exercise after induction of hypertension, the rise in cardiac output with muscle metaboreflex activation was significantly reduced in hypertension. Metaboreflex-induced increases in left ventricular function were also depressed. These attenuated cardiac responses caused a smaller metaboreflex-induced rise in mean arterial pressure. We conclude that the ability of the muscle metaboreflex to elicit increases in cardiac function is impaired in hypertension, which may contribute to exercise intolerance.

  10. Decreased hydrogen peroxide production and mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle but not cardiac muscle of the green-striped burrowing frog, a natural model of muscle disuse.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Beau D; Hickey, Anthony J R; Cramp, Rebecca L; Franklin, Craig E

    2014-04-01

    Suppression of disuse-induced muscle atrophy has been associated with altered mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mammals. However, despite extended hindlimb immobility, aestivating animals exhibit little skeletal muscle atrophy compared with artificially immobilised mammalian models. Therefore, we studied mitochondrial respiration and ROS (H2O2) production in permeabilised muscle fibres of the green-striped burrowing frog, Cyclorana alboguttata. Mitochondrial respiration within saponin-permeabilised skeletal and cardiac muscle fibres was measured concurrently with ROS production using high-resolution respirometry coupled to custom-made fluorometers. After 4 months of aestivation, C. alboguttata had significantly depressed whole-body metabolism by ~70% relative to control (active) frogs, and mitochondrial respiration in saponin-permeabilised skeletal muscle fibres decreased by almost 50% both in the absence of ADP and during oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial ROS production showed up to an 88% depression in aestivating skeletal muscle when malate, succinate and pyruvate were present at concentrations likely to reflect those in vivo. The percentage ROS released per O2 molecule consumed was also ~94% less at these concentrations, indicating an intrinsic difference in ROS production capacities during aestivation. We also examined mitochondrial respiration and ROS production in permeabilised cardiac muscle fibres and found that aestivating frogs maintained respiratory flux and ROS production at control levels. These results show that aestivating C. alboguttata has the capacity to independently regulate mitochondrial function in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Furthermore, this work indicates that ROS production can be suppressed in the disused skeletal muscle of aestivating frogs, which may in turn protect against potential oxidative damage and preserve skeletal muscle structure during aestivation and following arousal. PMID:24311816

  11. Evidence of a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement due to ACAD9 mutations: Report on nine patients.

    PubMed

    Dewulf, Joseph P; Barrea, Catherine; Vincent, Marie-Françoise; De Laet, Corinne; Van Coster, Rudy; Seneca, Sara; Marie, Sandrine; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD9) is a mitochondrial protein involved in oxidative phosphorylation complex I biogenesis. This protein also exhibits acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity. ACAD9-mutated patients have been reported to suffer from primarily heart, muscle, liver, and nervous system disorders. ACAD9 mutation is suspected in cases of elevated lactic acid levels combined with complex I deficiency, and confirmed by ACAD9 gene analysis. At least 18 ACAD9-mutated patients have previously been reported, usually displaying severe cardiac involvement. We retrospectively studied nine additional patients from three unrelated families with a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement between the families as well as the patients from the same families. All patients exhibited elevated lactate levels. Deleterious ACAD9 mutations were identified in all patients except one for whom it was not possible to recover DNA. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports on isolated mild ventricular hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutation in a family with moderate symptoms during adolescence. This report also confirms that dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in conjunction with ACAD9 mutation and that some patients may respond clinically to riboflavin treatment. Of note, several patients suffered from patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), with one exhibiting a complex congenital heart defect. It is yet unknown whether these cardiac manifestations were related to ACAD9 mutation. In conclusion, this disorder should be suspected in the presence of lactic acidosis, complex I deficiency, and any cardiac involvement, even mild. PMID:27233227

  12. Evidence of a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement due to ACAD9 mutations: Report on nine patients.

    PubMed

    Dewulf, Joseph P; Barrea, Catherine; Vincent, Marie-Françoise; De Laet, Corinne; Van Coster, Rudy; Seneca, Sara; Marie, Sandrine; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD9) is a mitochondrial protein involved in oxidative phosphorylation complex I biogenesis. This protein also exhibits acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity. ACAD9-mutated patients have been reported to suffer from primarily heart, muscle, liver, and nervous system disorders. ACAD9 mutation is suspected in cases of elevated lactic acid levels combined with complex I deficiency, and confirmed by ACAD9 gene analysis. At least 18 ACAD9-mutated patients have previously been reported, usually displaying severe cardiac involvement. We retrospectively studied nine additional patients from three unrelated families with a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement between the families as well as the patients from the same families. All patients exhibited elevated lactate levels. Deleterious ACAD9 mutations were identified in all patients except one for whom it was not possible to recover DNA. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports on isolated mild ventricular hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutation in a family with moderate symptoms during adolescence. This report also confirms that dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in conjunction with ACAD9 mutation and that some patients may respond clinically to riboflavin treatment. Of note, several patients suffered from patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), with one exhibiting a complex congenital heart defect. It is yet unknown whether these cardiac manifestations were related to ACAD9 mutation. In conclusion, this disorder should be suspected in the presence of lactic acidosis, complex I deficiency, and any cardiac involvement, even mild.

  13. Changes in the cardiac muscle electric activity as a result of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajek, Magdalena; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Kalawski, Ryszard; Kulczak, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Many bioelectric signals have a complex internal structure that can be a rich source of information on the tissue or cell processes. The structure of such signals can be analysed in detail by applying digital methods of signal processing. Therefore, of substantial use in diagnosis of the coronary arterial disease is the method of digital enhancement of increasing signal resolution ECG (NURSE-ECG), permitting detection of temporary changes in the electric potentials in the cardiac muscle in the process of depolarisation. Thanks to the application of NURSE-ECG it has become possible to detect relatively small changes in the electric activity of particular fragments of the cardiac muscle undetectable by the standard ECG method, caused by ischemia, the effect of a drug or infarct. The aim of this study was to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) operation. In this study the method of NURSE-ECG has been applied in order to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the CABG operation. In the study performed in cooperation of the Institute of Physics Adam Mickiewicz University and the Strus Hospital, Cardiac Surgery Ward, 37 patients with advanced coronary arterial disease were asked to participate. The patients were examined prior to the operation, on the day after the operation and two months after the operation and a year after the operation. The ECG recordings were subjected to a numerical procedure of resolution enhancement by a NURSE-ECG program to reveal the tentative changes in the electric potential of the cardiac muscle on its depolarisation. Results of the study have shown that the NURSE ECG method can be applied to monitor changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle occurring as a result of CABG operation. One the second day after the operation in the majority of patients (70%) a rapid decrease of the total

  14. Passive tension in cardiac muscle: contribution of collagen, titin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Granzier, H L; Irving, T C

    1995-01-01

    The passive tension-sarcomere length relation of rat cardiac muscle was investigated by studying passive (or not activated) single myocytes and trabeculae. The contribution of collagen, titin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments to tension and stiffness was investigated by measuring (1) the effects of KCl/KI extraction on both trabeculae and single myocytes, (2) the effect of trypsin digestion on single myocytes, and (3) the effect of colchicine on single myocytes. It was found that over the working range of sarcomeres in the heart (lengths approximately 1.9-2.2 microns), collagen and titin are the most important contributors to passive tension with titin dominating at the shorter end of the working range and collagen at longer lengths. Microtubules made a modest contribution to passive tension in some cells, but on average their contribution was not significant. Finally, intermediate filaments contributed about 10% to passive tension of trabeculae at sarcomere lengths from approximately 1.9 to 2.1 microns, and their contribution dropped to only a few percent at longer lengths. At physiological sarcomere lengths of the heart, cardiac titin developed much higher tensions (> 20-fold) than did skeletal muscle titin at comparable lengths. This might be related to the finding that cardiac titin has a molecular mass of 2.5 MDa, 0.3-0.5 MDa smaller than titin of mammalian skeletal muscle, which is predicted to result in a much shorter extensible titin segment in the I-band of cardiac muscle. Passive stress plotted versus the strain of the extensible titin segment showed that the stress-strain relationships are similar in cardiac and skeletal muscle. The difference in passive stress between cardiac and skeletal muscle at the sarcomere level predominantly resulted from much higher strains of the I-segment of cardiac titin at a given sarcomere length. By expressing a smaller titin isoform, without changing the properties of the molecule itself, cardiac muscle is able to

  15. Translating golden retriever muscular dystrophy microarray findings to novel biomarkers for cardiac/skeletal muscle function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Cristi L.; Soslow, Jonathan H.; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Gupte, Manisha; Smith, Holly M.; Sengsayadeth, Seng; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kornegay, Joe N.; Markham, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), abnormal cardiac function is typically preceded by a decade of skeletal muscle disease. Molecular reasons for differences in onset and progression of these muscle groups are unknown. Human biomarkers are lacking. Methods We analyzed cardiac and skeletal muscle microarrays from normal and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs (ages 6, 12, or 47+ months) to gain insight into muscle dysfunction and to identify putative DMD biomarkers. These biomarkers were then measured using human DMD blood samples. Results We identified GRMD candidate genes that might contribute to the disparity between cardiac and skeletal muscle disease, focusing on brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and osteopontin (OPN/SPP1). BDNF was elevated in cardiac muscle of younger GRMD but was unaltered in skeletal muscle, while SPP1 was increased only in GRMD skeletal muscle. In human DMD, circulating levels of BDNF were inversely correlated with ventricular function and fibrosis, while SPP1 levels correlated with skeletal muscle function. Conclusion These results highlight gene expression patterns that could account for differences in cardiac and skeletal disease in GRMD. Most notably, animal model-derived data were translated to DMD and support use of BDNF and SPP1 as biomarkers for cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement, respectively. PMID:26672735

  16. Acute Cardiac Failure in a Pregnant Woman due to Thyrotoxic Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Nao; Onodera, Mutsuo; Tsunano, Yumiko; Nakataki, Emiko; Oto, Jun; Imanaka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Masaji

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cardiac failure during pregnancy is usually related to preeclampsia/eclampsia, rarely to hyperthyroidism. While hyperthyroidism can easily lead to hypertensive cardiac failure and may harm the fetus, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish hyperthyroidism from normal pregnancy. Case Presentation. We encountered a case of 41-year-old pregnant woman with hypertensive cardiac failure. Because we initially diagnosed as pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, Caesarian section was performed. However, her symptoms still persisted after delivery. After thyroid function test results taken on the day of admission were obtained on the fourth day, we could diagnose that her cardiac failure was caused by thyrotoxic crisis. Conclusions. Hypertensive cardiac failure due to hyperthyroidism during pregnancy is rare and difficult to diagnose because of similar presentation of normal pregnancy. However, physicians should be aware of the risks posed by hyperthyroidism during pregnancy. PMID:24804110

  17. Management of cocaine-induced cardiac arrhythmias due to cardiac ion channel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I; Hoffman, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine use is common in many areas of the world, particularly the United States and Western Europe. Toxicity following the use of cocaine is associated with a wide range of clinical features. In this review, we will focus on the cocaine-associated cardiac arrhythmias and, in particular, some of the controversies in their etiology and management. Cocaine can produce arrhythmias either through the production of myocardial ischemia or as a direct result of ion channel alterations. Excessive catecholamines, combined with sodium and potassium channel blockades, give rise to a wide variety of supra-ventricular and ventricular rhythms. The animal and human evidence for ion channel dysfunction is reviewed, and the effects of catecholamines are followed from the cardiac action potential to the development of arrhythmias. Finally, theoretical constructs are combined with existing evidence to develop a rational treatment strategy for patients with cocaine-induced cardiac arrhythmias. In particular, we review the evidence concerning the controversies relating to the use of lidocaine in comparison with sodium bicarbonate, in terms of QRS prolongation secondary to sodium channel blockade.

  18. Production of arrays of cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers by micropatterning techniques on a soft substrate.

    PubMed

    Cimetta, Elisa; Pizzato, Sara; Bollini, Sveva; Serena, Elena; De Coppi, Paolo; Elvassore, Nicola

    2009-04-01

    Micropatterning and microfabrication techniques have been widely used to pattern cells on surfaces and to have a deeper insight into many processes in cell biology such as cell adhesion and interactions with the surrounding environment. The aim of this study was the development of an easy and versatile technique for the in vitro production of arrays of functional cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers using micropatterning techniques on soft substrates. Cardiomyocytes were used for the production of oriented cardiac myofibers whereas mouse muscle satellite cells for that of differentiated parallel myotubes. We performed micro-contact printing of extracellular matrix proteins on soft polyacrylamide-based hydrogels photopolymerized onto functionalized glass slides. Our methods proved to be simple, repeatable and effective in obtaining an extremely selective adhesion of both cardiomyocytes and satellite cells onto patterned soft hydrogel surfaces. Cardiomyocytes resulted in aligned cardiac myofibers able to exhibit a synchronous contractile activity after 2 days of culture. We demonstrated for the first time that murine satellite cells, cultured on a soft hydrogel substrate, fuse and form aligned myotubes after 7 days of culture. Immunofluorescence analyses confirmed correct expression of cell phenotype, differentiation markers and sarcomeric organization. These results were obtained in myotubes derived from satellite cells from both wild type and MDX mice which are research models for the study of muscle dystrophy. These arrays of both cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers could be used as in vitro models for pharmacological screening tests or biological studies at the single fiber level.

  19. Production of arrays of cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers by micropatterning techniques on a soft substrate.

    PubMed

    Cimetta, Elisa; Pizzato, Sara; Bollini, Sveva; Serena, Elena; De Coppi, Paolo; Elvassore, Nicola

    2009-04-01

    Micropatterning and microfabrication techniques have been widely used to pattern cells on surfaces and to have a deeper insight into many processes in cell biology such as cell adhesion and interactions with the surrounding environment. The aim of this study was the development of an easy and versatile technique for the in vitro production of arrays of functional cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers using micropatterning techniques on soft substrates. Cardiomyocytes were used for the production of oriented cardiac myofibers whereas mouse muscle satellite cells for that of differentiated parallel myotubes. We performed micro-contact printing of extracellular matrix proteins on soft polyacrylamide-based hydrogels photopolymerized onto functionalized glass slides. Our methods proved to be simple, repeatable and effective in obtaining an extremely selective adhesion of both cardiomyocytes and satellite cells onto patterned soft hydrogel surfaces. Cardiomyocytes resulted in aligned cardiac myofibers able to exhibit a synchronous contractile activity after 2 days of culture. We demonstrated for the first time that murine satellite cells, cultured on a soft hydrogel substrate, fuse and form aligned myotubes after 7 days of culture. Immunofluorescence analyses confirmed correct expression of cell phenotype, differentiation markers and sarcomeric organization. These results were obtained in myotubes derived from satellite cells from both wild type and MDX mice which are research models for the study of muscle dystrophy. These arrays of both cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibers could be used as in vitro models for pharmacological screening tests or biological studies at the single fiber level. PMID:18987976

  20. Chromosome mapping of five human cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Otsu, K.; Fujii, J.; MacLennan, D.H. ); Periasamy, M. ); Difilippantonio, M.; Uppender, M.; Ward, D.C. )

    1993-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments were performed using genomic and complementary DNA probes in order to determine the location on human chromosomes for five genes expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. The chromosome location of each gene was determined in terms of both cytogenetic bands and fractional chromosome length. The ATP2A2 gene, expressing the SERCA2 isoform of the Ca[sup 2+] pump, maps to bands 12q23-q24.1, the phospholamban gene (PLN) to 6q22.1, the human skeletal muscle calsequestrin gene (CASQ1) to band 1q21, the cardiac calsequestrin gene (CASQ2) to bands 1p11-p13.3, and the cardiac calcium release channel gene (RYR2) to the interval between band 1q42.1 (distal) and band 1q43 (proximal). 13 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Undernutrition during pregnancy in mice leads to dysfunctional cardiac muscle respiration in adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Thrush, A. Brianne; Quizi, Jessica; Antoun, Ghadi; McIntosh, Nathan; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y.; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with an increased risk of developing obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. However, its effect on energetics in heart remains unknown. In the present study, we examined respiration in cardiac muscle and liver from adult mice that were undernourished in utero. We report that in utero undernutrition is associated with impaired cardiac muscle energetics, including decreased fatty acid oxidative capacity, decreased maximum oxidative phosphorylation rate and decreased proton leak respiration. No differences in oxidative characteristics were detected in liver. We also measured plasma acylcarnitine levels and found that short-chain acylcarnitines are increased with in utero undernutrition. Results reveal the negative impact of suboptimal maternal nutrition on adult offspring cardiac energy metabolism, which may have life-long implications for cardiovascular function and disease risk. PMID:26182362

  2. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A.; Penheiter, Alan R.; Burghardt, Thomas P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  3. Cardiac supporting device using artificial rubber muscle: preliminary study to active dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Goto, Takeshi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic cardiomyoplasty is a surgical treatment that utilizes the patient's skeletal muscle to support circulation. To overcome the limitations of autologous skeletal muscles in dynamic cardiomyoplasty, we studied the use of a wrapped-type cardiac supporting device using pneumatic muscles. Four straight rubber muscles (Fluidic Muscle, FESTO, Esslingen, Germany) were used and connected to pressure sensors, solenoid valves, a controller and an air compressor. The driving force was compressed air. A proportional-integral-derivative system was employed to control the device movement. An overflow-type mock circulation system was used to analyze the power and the controllability of this new device. The device worked powerfully with pumped flow against afterload of 88 mmHg, and the beating rate and contraction/dilatation time were properly controlled using simple software. Maximum pressure inside the ventricle and maximum output were 187 mmHg and 546.5 ml/min, respectively, in the setting of 50 beats per minute, a contraction/dilatation ratio of 1:2, a preload of 18 mmHg, and an afterload of 88 mmHg. By changing proportional gain, contraction speed could be modulated. This study showed the efficacy and feasibility of a pneumatic muscle for use in a cardiac supporting device.

  4. Allosteric interactions of three muscarine antagonists at bovine tracheal smooth muscle and cardiac M2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    1989-03-01

    The kinetics of [3H]dexetimide dissociation from muscarine receptors in bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes were studied in the absence and presence of three muscarine antagonists. It was found that [3H]dexetimide dissociation from cardiac muscarine receptors was monophasic and very fast (half life less than 1 min) and was slowed by the cardioselective muscarine antagonists, gallamine, methoctramine and AF-DX 116, concentration dependently. [3H]Dexetimide dissociation from tracheal muscarine receptors was biphasic, with a fast phase (half-life less than 1 min) followed after 4-5 min by a slow phase (half-life = 38.5 min). The fast component, but not the slow component, was slowed by the muscarine antagonists with concentration dependencies very similar to those found in the heart. We conclude from these data that the major population of tracheal smooth muscle muscarine receptors resembles the cardiac M2 type not only with respect to equilibrium binding affinities but also with respect to the secondary, allosteric binding site on the muscarine receptor. The results also imply that the cardiac receptor subtype is much more sensitive to allosteric modulation than the glandular/smooth muscle receptor subtype. PMID:2714370

  5. Sudden unexpected death due to severe pulmonary and cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ginelliová, Alžbeta; Farkaš, Daniel; Farkašová Iannaccone, Silvia; Vyhnálková, Vlasta

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the autopsy findings of a 57 year old woman who died unexpectedly at home. She had been complaining of shortness of breath, episodes of dry coughing, and nausea. Her past medical and social history was unremarkable. She had no previous history of any viral or bacterial disease and no history of oncological disorders. Autopsy revealed multiple grayish-white nodular lesions in the pleura and epicardial fat and areas resembling fibrosis on the cut surface of the anterior and posterior wall of the left ventricle and interventricular septum. Histological examination of the lungs and heart revealed multiple well-formed noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas with multinucleated giant cells. Death was attributed to myocardial ischemia due to vasculitis of intramural coronary artery branches associated with sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by the formation of noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas in the affected organs and tissues. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis in this case was established when other causes of granulomatous disease such as tuberculosis, berylliosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and giant cell myocarditis had been reasonably excluded. PMID:27379608

  6. Novel muscle-specific enhancer sequences upstream of the cardiac actin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Biben, C; Kirschbaum, B J; Garner, I; Buckingham, M

    1994-01-01

    A DNase I-hypersensitive site analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse alpha-cardiac actin gene with muscle cell lines derived from C3H mice shows the presence of two such sites, at about -5 and -7 kb. When tested for activity in cultured cells with homologous and heterologous promoters, both sequences act as muscle-specific enhancers. Transcription from the proximal promoter of the alpha-cardiac actin gene is increased 100-fold with either enhancer. The activity of the distal enhancer in C2/7 myotubes is confined to an 800-bp fragment, which contains multiple E boxes. In transfection assays, this sequence does not give detectable transactivation by any of the myogenic factors even though one of the E boxes is functionally important. Bandshift assays showed that MyoD and myogenin can bind to this E box. However, additional sequences are also required for activity. We conclude that in the case of this muscle enhancer, myogenic factors alone are not sufficient to activate transcription either directly via an E box or indirectly through activation of genes encoding other muscle factors. In BALB/c mice, in which cardiac actin mRNA levels are 8- to 10-fold lower, the alpha-cardiac actin locus is perturbed by a 9.5-kb insertion (I. Garner, A. J. Minty, S. Alonso, P. J. Barton, and M. E. Buckingham, EMBO J. 5:2559-2567, 1986). This is located at -6.5 kb, between the two enhancers. The insertion therefore distances the distal enhancer from the promoter and from the proximal enhancer of the bona fide cardiac actin gene, probably thus perturbing transcriptional activity. Images PMID:8164695

  7. Different regulatory sequences control creatine kinase-M gene expression in directly injected skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, C K; Gualberto, A; Patel, C V; Walsh, K

    1993-01-01

    Regulatory sequences of the M isozyme of the creatine kinase (MCK) gene have been extensively mapped in skeletal muscle, but little is known about the sequences that control cardiac-specific expression. The promoter and enhancer sequences required for MCK gene expression were assayed by the direct injection of plasmid DNA constructs into adult rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. A 700-nucleotide fragment containing the enhancer and promoter of the rabbit MCK gene activated the expression of a downstream reporter gene in both muscle tissues. Deletion of the enhancer significantly decreased expression in skeletal muscle but had no detectable effect on expression in cardiac muscle. Further deletions revealed a CArG sequence motif at position -179 within the promoter that was essential for cardiac-specific expression. The CArG element of the MCK promoter bound to the recombinant serum response factor and YY1, transcription factors which control expression from structurally similar elements in the skeletal actin and c-fos promoters. MCK-CArG-binding activities that were similar or identical to serum response factor and YY1 were also detected in extracts from adult cardiac muscle. These data suggest that the MCK gene is controlled by different regulatory programs in adult cardiac and skeletal muscle. Images PMID:8423791

  8. [ATRIAL AND BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES OF CARDIAC MUSCLE CELLS IN POSTREPERFUSION PERIOD IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Bugrova, M L

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation and release of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in right atrial cardiac muscle cells has been investigated in rats after 60 minutes and 60 days after the reperfusion start. The total ischemia was simulated by the method of V. G. Korpachev. Immunocytochemical localization of peptides in cardiomyocytes was performed in ultrathin sections using polyclonal antibodies. The intensity of accumulation/excretion of ANP and BNP were analyzed by the method of counting the number of granules (A- and B-types) with immunoreactive labels in 38 x 38 mkm2 visual fields in transmission electron microscope Morgagni 268D (FEI). The results were assessed using Mann-Whitney U-test (p < 0.05). After 60 minutes and 60 days post-reperfusion period, we detected an increase in the synthesis and release of ANP and BNP. The reaction of BNP was more pronounced than ANP. This is due to the fact that ANP is the main hormone of the natriuretic peptide system involved in the regulation of blood pressure in normal conditions, while BNP is the principal regulator of pressure in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:27228659

  9. Global deletion of thrombospondin-1 increases cardiac and skeletal muscle capillarity and exercise capacity in mice.

    PubMed

    Malek, Moh H; Olfert, I Mark

    2009-06-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is a known inhibitor of angiogenesis; however, a skeletal muscle phenotype of TSP-1 null mice has not been investigated. The purposes of this study were to compare and contrast TSP-1 null and wild-type mice by examining the following: (1) capillarity in the skeletal and cardiac muscles; (2) fibre type composition and oxidative enzyme activity in the hindlimb; and (3) the consequences of TSP-1 gene deletion for exercise capacity. In TSP-1 null mice, maximal running speed was 11% greater and time to exhaustion during submaximal endurance running was 67% greater compared with wild-type mice. Morphometric analyses revealed that TSP-1 null mice had higher (P < 0.05) capillarity in the heart and skeletal muscle than wild-type mice, whereas no differences for fibre type composition or oxidative enzyme activity were present between the two groups. Cardiac function, as measured by transthoracic echocardiography, revealed no difference in myocardial contractility but greater left ventricular end-diastolic and systolic dimensions, corresponding to an elevated heart mass in the TSP-1 null mice. The results of this study indicate that TSP-1 is an important endogenous negative regulator of angiogenesis that prevents excessive capillarization in the heart and skeletal muscles. The increased capillarity alone was sufficient to increase (P < 0.05) exercise capacity. These data demonstrate that the capillary-to-muscle interface is a critical factor that limits oxygen transport during exercise. PMID:19297388

  10. Tragedy in a heartbeat: malfunctioning desmin causes skeletal and cardiac muscle disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Lev G.; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2009-01-01

    Muscle fiber deterioration resulting in progressive skeletal muscle weakness, heart failure, and respiratory distress occurs in more than 20 inherited myopathies. As discussed in this Review, one of the newly identified myopathies is desminopathy, a disease caused by dysfunctional mutations in desmin, a type III intermediate filament protein, or αB-crystallin, a chaperone for desmin. The range of clinical manifestations in patients with desminopathy is wide and may overlap with those observed in individuals with other myopathies. Awareness of this disease needs to be heightened, diagnostic criteria reliably outlined, and molecular testing readily available; this would ensure prevention of sudden death from cardiac arrhythmias and other complications. PMID:19587455

  11. Tragedy in a heartbeat: malfunctioning desmin causes skeletal and cardiac muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Lev G; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2009-07-01

    Muscle fiber deterioration resulting in progressive skeletal muscle weakness, heart failure, and respiratory distress occurs in more than 20 inherited myopathies. As discussed in this Review, one of the newly identified myopathies is desminopathy, a disease caused by dysfunctional mutations in desmin, a type III intermediate filament protein, or alphaB-crystallin, a chaperone for desmin. The range of clinical manifestations in patients with desminopathy is wide and may overlap with those observed in individuals with other myopathies. Awareness of this disease needs to be heightened, diagnostic criteria reliably outlined, and molecular testing readily available; this would ensure prevention of sudden death from cardiac arrhythmias and other complications.

  12. cap alpha. -skeletal and. cap alpha. -cardiac actin genes are coexpressed in adult human skeletal muscle and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, P.; Ponte, P.; Blau, H.; Kedes, L.

    1983-11-01

    The authors determined the actin isotypes encoded by 30 actin cDNA clones previously isolated from an adult human muscle cDNA library. Using 3' untranslated region probes, derived from ..cap alpha.. skeletal, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin cDNAs and from an ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genomic clone, they showed that 28 of the cDNAs correspond to ..cap alpha..-skeletal actin transcripts. Unexpectedly, however, the remaining two cDNA clones proved to derive from ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin mRNA. Sequence analysis confirmed that the two skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin cDNAs are derived from transcripts of the cloned ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin gene. Comparison of total actin mRNA levels in adult skeletal muscle and adult heart revealed that the steady-state levels in skeletal muscle are about twofold greater, per microgram of total cellular RNA, than those in heart. Thus, in skeletal muscle and in heart, both of the sarcomeric actin mRNA isotypes are quite abundant transcripts. They conclude that ..cap alpha..-skeletal and ..cap alpha..-cardiac actin genes are coexpressed as an actin pair in human adult striated muscles. Since the smooth-muscle actins (aortic and stomach) and the cytoplasmic actins (..beta.. and ..gamma..) are known to be coexpressed in smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells, respectively, they postulate that coexpression of actin pairs may be a common feature of mammalian actin gene expression in all tissues.

  13. Effects of short-term endurance exercise training on acute doxorubicin-induced FoxO transcription in cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kavazis, Andreas N; Smuder, Ashley J; Powers, Scott K

    2014-08-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent antitumor agent used in cancer treatment. Unfortunately, DOX can induce myopathy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle, which limits its clinical use. Importantly, exercise training has been shown to protect against DOX-mediated cardiac and skeletal muscle myopathy. However, the mechanisms responsible for this exercise-induced muscle protection remain elusive. These experiments tested the hypothesis that short-term exercise training protects against acute DOX-induced muscle toxicity, in part, due to decreased forkhead-box O (FoxO) transcription of atrophy genes. Rats (n = 6 per group) were assigned to sedentary or endurance exercise-trained groups and paired with either placebo or DOX treatment. Gene expression and protein abundance were measured in both cardiac and skeletal muscles to determine the impact of DOX and exercise on FoxO gene targets. Our data demonstrate that DOX administration amplified FoxO1 and FoxO3 mRNA expression and increased transcription of FoxO target genes [i.e., atrogin-1/muscle atrophy F-box (MaFbx), muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF-1), and BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3)] in heart and soleus muscles. Importantly, exercise training protected against DOX-induced increases of FoxO1 and MuRF-1 in cardiac muscle and also prevented the rise of FoxO3, MuRF-1, and BNIP3 in soleus muscle. Furthermore, our results indicate that exercise increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) in both the heart and soleus muscles. This is important because increased PGC-1α expression is known to suppress FoxO activity resulting in reduced expression of FoxO target genes. Together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that exercise training protects against DOX-induced myopathy in both heart (FoxO1 and MuRF-1) and skeletal muscles (FoxO3, MuRF-1, and BNIP3).

  14. Digital Imaging Fluorescence Microscopy Reveals Intracellular Calcium Ions In Living Cardiac And Smooth Muscle Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil Wier, W.; Goldman, William F.

    1988-06-01

    We have used digital video microscopy to study the relationship of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) to the function of living cardiac and vascular smooth muscle cells. The technical goal of our work is to obtain, with high spatial and temporal resolution, "maps" of [Ca2+]i inside single living cells. To relate [Ca2+]i to cell function, such "maps" can be used in conjunction with measurements of cell electrical activity, contractile activity or biochemical assays.

  15. Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Defects in a Mouse Model of Human Barth Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Acehan, Devrim; Vaz, Frederic; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; James, Jeanne; Moore, Vicky; Tokunaga, Chonan; Kulik, Willem; Wansapura, Janaka; Toth, Matthew J.; Strauss, Arnold; Khuchua, Zaza

    2011-01-01

    Barth syndrome is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by mutations in the tafazzin (taz) gene and characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy, exercise intolerance, chronic fatigue, delayed growth, and neutropenia. Tafazzin is a mitochondrial transacylase required for cardiolipin remodeling. Although tafazzin function has been studied in non-mammalian model organisms, mammalian genetic loss of function approaches have not been used. We examined the consequences of tafazzin knockdown on sarcomeric mitochondria and cardiac function in mice. Tafazzin knockdown resulted in a dramatic decrease of tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin in cardiac and skeletal muscles and accumulation of monolysocardiolipins and cardiolipin molecular species with aberrant acyl groups. Electron microscopy revealed pathological changes in mitochondria, myofibrils, and mitochondrion-associated membranes in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe cardiac abnormalities, including left ventricular dilation, left ventricular mass reduction, and depression of fractional shortening and ejection fraction in tafazzin-deficient mice. Tafazzin knockdown mice provide the first mammalian model system for Barth syndrome in which the pathophysiological relationships between altered content of mitochondrial phospholipids, ultrastructural abnormalities, myocardial and mitochondrial dysfunction, and clinical outcome can be completely investigated. PMID:21068380

  16. Control of rotating waves in cardiac muscle: analysis of the effect of an electric field.

    PubMed

    Pumir, A; Plaza, F; Krinsky, V I

    1994-08-22

    The effect of an electric field on rotating waves in cardiac muscle is considered from a theoretical point of view. A model of excitation propagation taking into account the cellular structure of the heart is presented and studied. The application of a direct current electric field along the cardiac tissue is known to induce changes in membrane potential which decay exponentially with distance. Investigation of the model shows that the electric field induces a gradient of potential inside a cell which does not decay with distance, and results in modification of excitation propagation which extends a considerable distance from the electrodes. In two dimensions, it induces a drift of rotating waves. The effect of the electric field on propagation velocity and on rotating waves cannot be obtained in any arbitrary models of cardiac muscle. For an electric field of about 1 V cm-1 and junctional resistances of about 20 M omega, the change in velocity of propagation can be up to several percent, resulting in a drift velocity of rotating waves of the order of 1 cm s-1. To test these predictions, experiments with cardiac preparations are proposed.

  17. Effect of an externally applied electric field on excitation propagation in the cardiac muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Plaza, Frédéric; Krinsky, Valentin I.

    1994-09-01

    Classical theory of potential distribution in cardiac muscle (cable theory) postulates that all effects of electric field (internally or externally applied) should decay exponentially with a space constant of the order of the tissue space constant (˜1 mm). Classical theory does not take into account the cellular structure of the heart. Here, we formulate a mathematical model of excitation propagation taking into account cellular gap junctions. Investigation of the model has shown that the classical description is correct on the macroscopic scale only. At microscopic scale, electric field is modulated with a spatial period equal to the cell size (Plonsey and Barr), with the zero average. A very important new feature found here is that this effect of electric field does not decay at arbitrary big distances from the electrode. It opens the new way to control the excitation propagation in the cardiac muscle. In particular, we show that electric field can modify the velocity of propagation of an impulse in cardiac tissue at arbitrary big distances from electrode. In 2-dimensions, it can make rotating waves drift. To test these predictions, experiments with cardiac preparations are proposed.

  18. Effect of hypokinesia on contractile function of cardiac muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerson, F. Z.; Kapelko, V. I.; Trikhpoyeva, A. M.; Gorina, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were subjected to hypokinesia for two months and the contractile function of isolated papillary muscle was studied. Hypokinesia reduced significantly the isotonic contraction rate which depended on the ATPase activity of the myofibrils; it also reduced the rate and index of relaxation which depended on the functional capacity of the Ca(++) pump of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The maximum force of isometric contraction determined by the quantity of actomyosin bridges in the myofibrils did not change after hypokinesia. This complex of changes is contrary to that observed in adaptation to exercise when the rate of isotonic contraction and relaxation increases while the force of isometric contraction does not change. The possible mechanism of this stability of the contractile force during adaptation and readaptation of the heart is discussed.

  19. A quasi-one-dimensional theory for anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Johnson, E A; Kootsey, J M

    1996-01-01

    It has been shown that propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle is anisotropic. Compared to propagation at right angles to the long axes of the fibers, propagation along the long axis is faster, the extracellular action potential (AP) is larger in amplitude, and the intracellular AP has a lower maximum rate of depolarization, a larger time constant of the foot, and a lower peak amplitude. These observations are contrary to the predictions of classical one-dimensional (1-D) cable theory and, thus far, no satisfactory theory for them has been reported. As an alternative description of propagation in cardiac muscle, this study provides a quasi-1-D theory that includes a simplified description of the effects of action currents in extracellular space as well as resistive coupling between surface and deeper fibers in cardiac muscle. In terms of classical 1-D theory, this quasi-1-D theory reveals that the anisotropies in the wave form of the AP arise from modifications in the effective membrane ionic current and capacitance. The theory also shows that it is propagation in the longitudinal, not in the transverse direction that deviates from classical 1-D cable theory. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8913583

  20. Cardiac Meets Skeletal: What's New in Microfluidic Models for Muscle Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Visone, Roberta; Gilardi, Mara; Marsano, Anna; Rasponi, Marco; Bersini, Simone; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years microfluidics and microfabrication technique principles have been extensively exploited for biomedical applications. In this framework, organs-on-a-chip represent promising tools to reproduce key features of functional tissue units within microscale culture chambers. These systems offer the possibility to investigate the effects of biochemical, mechanical, and electrical stimulations, which are usually applied to enhance the functionality of the engineered tissues. Since the functionality of muscle tissues relies on the 3D organization and on the perfect coupling between electrochemical stimulation and mechanical contraction, great efforts have been devoted to generate biomimetic skeletal and cardiac systems to allow high-throughput pathophysiological studies and drug screening. This review critically analyzes microfluidic platforms that were designed for skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue engineering. Our aim is to highlight which specific features of the engineered systems promoted a typical reorganization of the engineered construct and to discuss how promising design solutions exploited for skeletal muscle models could be applied to improve cardiac tissue models and vice versa. PMID:27571058

  1. Controlling the contractile strength of engineered cardiac muscle by hierarchal tissue architecture

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Adam W.; Alford, Patrick W.; Jin, Hongwei; Ripplinger, Crystal M.; Werdich, Andreas A.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Grosberg, Anna; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a muscular organ with a wrapping, laminar structure embedded with neural and vascular networks, collagen fibrils, fibroblasts, and cardiac myocytes that facilitate contraction. We hypothesized that these non-muscle components may have functional benefit, serving as important structural alignment cues in inter- and intra-cellular organization of cardiac myocytes. Previous studies have demonstrated that alignment of engineered myocardium enhances calcium handling, but how this impacts actual force generation remains unclear. Quantitative assays are needed to determine the effect of alignment on contractile function and muscle physiology. To test this, micropatterned surfaces were used to build 2-dimensional myocardium from neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with distinct architectures: confluent isotropic (serving as the unaligned control), confluent anisotropic, and 20 μm spaced, parallel arrays of multicellular myocardial fibers. We combined image analysis of sarcomere orientation with muscular thin film contractile force assays in order to calculate the peak sarcomere-generated stress as a function of tissue architecture. Here we report that increasing peak systolic stress in engineered cardiac tissues corresponds with increasing sarcomere alignment. This change is larger than would be anticipated from enhanced calcium handling and increased uniaxial alignment alone. These results suggest that boundary conditions (heterogeneities) encoded in the extracellular space can regulate muscle tissue function, and that structural organization and cytoskeletal alignment are critically important for maximizing peak force generation. PMID:22594976

  2. Controlling the contractile strength of engineered cardiac muscle by hierarchal tissue architecture.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Adam W; Alford, Patrick W; Jin, Hongwei; Ripplinger, Crystal M; Werdich, Andreas A; Sheehy, Sean P; Grosberg, Anna; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2012-08-01

    The heart is a muscular organ with a wrapping, laminar structure embedded with neural and vascular networks, collagen fibrils, fibroblasts, and cardiac myocytes that facilitate contraction. We hypothesized that these non-muscle components may have functional benefit, serving as important structural alignment cues in inter- and intra-cellular organization of cardiac myocytes. Previous studies have demonstrated that alignment of engineered myocardium enhances calcium handling, but how this impacts actual force generation remains unclear. Quantitative assays are needed to determine the effect of alignment on contractile function and muscle physiology. To test this, micropatterned surfaces were used to build 2-dimensional myocardium from neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with distinct architectures: confluent isotropic (serving as the unaligned control), confluent anisotropic, and 20 μm spaced, parallel arrays of multicellular myocardial fibers. We combined image analysis of sarcomere orientation with muscular thin film contractile force assays in order to calculate the peak sarcomere-generated stress as a function of tissue architecture. Here we report that increasing peak systolic stress in engineered cardiac tissues corresponds with increasing sarcomere alignment. This change is larger than would be anticipated from enhanced calcium handling and increased uniaxial alignment alone. These results suggest that boundary conditions (heterogeneities) encoded in the extracellular space can regulate muscle tissue function, and that structural organization and cytoskeletal alignment are critically important for maximizing peak force generation.

  3. A Cycling Movement Based System for Real-Time Muscle Fatigue and Cardiac Stress Monitoring and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chang, Ya-Ju; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Chiu, Li-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we defined a new parameter, referred to as the cardiac stress index (CSI), using a nonlinear detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of heart rate (HR). Our study aimed to incorporate the CSI into a cycling based fatigue monitoring system developed in our previous work so the muscle fatigue and cardiac stress can be both continuously and quantitatively assessed for subjects undergoing the cycling exercise. By collecting electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, the DFA scaling exponent α was evaluated on the RR time series extracted from a windowed ECG segment. We then obtained the running estimate of α by shifting a one-minute window by a step of 20 seconds so the CSI, defined as the percentage of all the less-than-one α values, can be synchronously updated every 20 seconds. Since the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale is considered as a convenient index which is commonly used to monitor subjective perceived exercise intensity, we then related the Borg RPE scale value to the CSI in order to investigate and quantitatively characterize the relationship between exercise-induced fatigue and cardiac stress. Twenty-two young healthy participants were recruited in our study. Each participant was asked to maintain a fixed pedaling speed at a constant load during the cycling exercise. Experimental results showed that a decrease in DFA scaling exponent α or an increase in CSI was observed during the exercise. In addition, the Borg RPE scale and CSI were positively correlated, suggesting that the factors due to cardiac stress might also contribute to fatigue state during physical exercise. Since the CSI can effectively quantify the cardiac stress status during physical exercise, our system may be used in sports medicine, or used by cardiologists who carried out stress tests for monitoring heart condition in patients with heart diseases. PMID:26115515

  4. Morphometric study of cardiac muscle: the problem of tissue shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, A.M.; Kriseman, J.; Bishop, S.P.

    1982-03-01

    Comparison of data from morphometric studies dealing with the heart is complicated by the fact that little information dealing with cell size changes during tissue processing is available. To investigate these changes, isolated cardiac myocytes were adhered to glass cover slips of Sykes Moore chambers and photographed after each step of processing for transmission electron microscopy. Six different experiments with a minimum of 10 cells each were followed through the entire procedure after fixation with isoosmolar glutaraldehyde. Cellular dimension changes were determined by tracing individual isolated myocytes after each step of the procedure with a sonic digitizer. Significant cell volume changes occurred after osmium (16 per cent swelling), postosmium wash (10 per cent swelling), and uranyl acetate (25 per cent shrinkage). Hypertonic aldehyde solutions resulted in cellular shrinkage during fixation not found with isotonic solutions. Changes in cell cross-sectional area rather than length were largely responsible for altered cell volumes during any given phase of processing. The results indicate that, although cell volume changes occur during processing, final cell dimensions of embedded cells were not different from unfixed cells. In whole tissue blocks, inclusion of propylene oxide in the procedure resulted in tissue shrinkage which was not observed in isolated myocytes, suggesting that different tissue components react in a variable manner to propylene oxide. After each of the other steps in processing, tissue blocks reacted in a similar manner to the isolated myocytes.

  5. Morphometric study of cardiac muscle: the problem of tissue shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, A M; Kriseman, J; Bishop, S P

    1982-03-01

    Comparison of data from morphometric studies dealing with the heart is complicated by the fact that little information dealing with cell size changes during tissue processing is available. To investigate these changes, isolated cardiac myocytes were adhered to glass cover slips of Sykes Moore chambers and photographed after each step of processing for transmission electron microscopy. Six different experiments with a minimum of 10 cells each were followed through the entire procedure after fixation with isoosmolar glutaraldehyde. Cellular dimension changes were determined by tracing individual isolated myocytes after each step of the procedure with a sonic digitizer. Significant cell volume changes occurred after osmium (16 per cent swelling), postosmium wash (10 per cent swelling), and uranyl acetate (25 per cent shrinkage). Hypertonic aldehyde solutions resulted in cellular shrinkage during fixation not found with isotonic solutions. Changes in cell cross-sectional area rather than length were largely responsible for altered cell volumes during any given phase of processing. The results indicate that, although cell volume changes occur during processing, final cell dimensions of embedded cells were not different from unfixed cells. In whole tissue blocks, inclusion of propylene oxide in the procedure resulted in tissue shrinkage which was not observed in isolated myocytes, suggesting that different tissue components react in a variable manner to propylene oxide. After each of the other steps in processing, tissue blocks reacted in a similar manner to the isolated myocytes.

  6. Changes in isoform composition, structure, and functional properties of titin from Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) cardiac muscle after space flight.

    PubMed

    Vikhlyantsev, I M; Okuneva, A D; Shpagina, M D; Shumilina, Yu V; Molochkov, N V; Salmov, N N; Podlubnaya, Z A

    2011-12-01

    Changes in isoform composition, secondary structure, and titin phosphorylation in Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) cardiac muscle were studied after 12-day-long space flight onboard the Russian spacecraft Foton-M3. The effect of titin on the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity at pCa 7.5 and 4.6 was also studied. Almost twofold increase in titin long N2BA isoform content relative to that of short N2B isoform was found on electrophoregrams of cardiac muscle left ventricle of the flight group gerbils. Differences in secondary structure of titin isolated from cardiac muscle of control and flight groups of gerbils were found. An increase in phosphorylation (1.30-1.35-fold) of titin of cardiac muscle of the flight group gerbils was found. A decrease in activating effect of titin of cardiac muscle of the flight group gerbils on actomyosin ATPase activity in vitro was also found. The observed changes are discussed in the context of M. unguiculatus cardiac muscle adaptation to conditions of weightlessness.

  7. Myofibril ATPase activity of cardiac and skeletal muscle of exhaustively exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, A N; Turcotte, R; Rossiter, M; Secord, D; Maybank, P E

    1984-01-01

    The activation characteristics of Mg-ATP and Ca2+ on cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibril ATPase activity were studied in rats following a run to exhaustion. In addition, the effect of varying ionic strength was determined on skeletal muscle from exhausted animals. The exhausted group (E) ran at a speed of 25 m min-1 with an 8% incline. Myofibril ATPase activities for control (C) and E were determined with 1, 3 and 5 mM Mg-ATP and 1 and 10 microM Ca2+ at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. For control skeletal muscle, at 1 and 10 microM Ca2+, there was an increase in ATPase activity from 1 to 5 mM Mg-ATP (P less than 0.05). For E animals the myofibril ATPase activities at 10 microM Ca2+ and all Mg-ATP concentrations were similar to C (P greater than 0.05). At 1.0 microM Ca2+ and all Mg-ATP concentrations were similar to C (P greater than 0.05). At 1.0 microM Ca2+ the activities at 3 and 5 mM Mg-ATP were greater for the E animals (P less than 0.05). Increasing KCl concentrations resulted in greater inhibition for E animals. With cardiac muscle, the myofibril ATPase activities at 1.0 microM free Ca2+ were lower for E at all Mg-ATP levels (P less than 0.05). In contrast, at 10 microM Ca2+, the E group exhibited an elevated myofibril ATPase activity. The results indicate that Mg-ATP and Ca2+ activation of cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibril ATPase is altered with exhaustive exercise. PMID:6230276

  8. Successful extracorporeal life support in sudden cardiac arrest due to coronary anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wan; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ki-Sik; Bang, Duk Won; Hyon, Min-Su; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Byoung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has recently been reported to have a survival benefit in patients with cardiac arrest. It is now used widely as a lifesaving modality. Here, we describe a case of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in a young athlete with an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left coronary sinus. Resuscitation was successful using ECLS before curative bypass surgery. We highlight the efficacy of ECLS for a patient with SCA caused by a rare, unexpected aetiology. In conclusion, ECLS was a lifesaving modality for SCA due to an anomalous coronary artery in this young patient. PMID:27354896

  9. Skeletal muscle damage and impaired regeneration due to LPL-mediated lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tamilarasan, K P; Temmel, H; Das, S K; Al Zoughbi, W; Schauer, S; Vesely, P W; Hoefler, G

    2012-01-01

    According to the concept of lipotoxicity, ectopic accumulation of lipids in non-adipose tissue induces pathological changes. The most prominent effects are seen in fatty liver disease, lipid cardiomyopathy, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance and skeletal muscle myopathy. We used the MCK(m)-hLPL mouse distinguished by skeletal and cardiac muscle-specific human lipoprotein lipase (hLPL) overexpression to investigate effects of lipid overload in skeletal muscle. We were intrigued to find that ectopic lipid accumulation induced proteasomal activity, apoptosis and skeletal muscle damage. In line with these findings we observed reduced Musculus gastrocnemius and Musculus quadriceps mass in transgenic animals, accompanied by severely impaired physical endurance. We suggest that muscle loss was aggravated by impaired muscle regeneration as evidenced by reduced cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers after cardiotoxin-induced injury in MCK(m)-hLPL mice. Similarly, an almost complete loss of myogenic potential was observed in C2C12 murine myoblasts upon overexpression of LPL. Our findings directly link lipid overload to muscle damage, impaired regeneration and loss of performance. These findings support the concept of lipotoxicity and are a further step to explain pathological effects seen in muscle of obese patients, patients with the metabolic syndrome and patients with cancer-associated cachexia. PMID:22825472

  10. Zebrafish cardiac muscle thick filaments: isolation technique and three-dimensional structure.

    PubMed

    González-Solá, Maryví; Al-Khayat, Hind A; Behra, Martine; Kensler, Robert W

    2014-04-15

    To understand how mutations in thick filament proteins such as cardiac myosin binding protein-C or titin, cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, it is important to determine the structure of the cardiac thick filament. Techniques for the genetic manipulation of the zebrafish are well established and it has become a major model for the study of the cardiovascular system. Our goal is to develop zebrafish as an alternative system to the mammalian heart model for the study of the structure of the cardiac thick filaments and the proteins that form it. We have successfully isolated thick filaments from zebrafish cardiac muscle, using a procedure similar to those for mammalian heart, and analyzed their structure by negative-staining and electron microscopy. The isolated filaments appear well ordered with the characteristic 42.9 nm quasi-helical repeat of the myosin heads expected from x-ray diffraction. We have performed single particle image analysis on the collected electron microscopy images for the C-zone region of these filaments and obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction at 3.5 nm resolution. This reconstruction reveals structure similar to the mammalian thick filament, and demonstrates that zebrafish may provide a useful model for the study of the changes in the cardiac thick filament associated with disease processes.

  11. Zebrafish Cardiac Muscle Thick Filaments: Isolation Technique and Three-Dimensional Structure

    PubMed Central

    González-Solá, Maryví; AL-Khayat, Hind A.; Behra, Martine; Kensler, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how mutations in thick filament proteins such as cardiac myosin binding protein-C or titin, cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, it is important to determine the structure of the cardiac thick filament. Techniques for the genetic manipulation of the zebrafish are well established and it has become a major model for the study of the cardiovascular system. Our goal is to develop zebrafish as an alternative system to the mammalian heart model for the study of the structure of the cardiac thick filaments and the proteins that form it. We have successfully isolated thick filaments from zebrafish cardiac muscle, using a procedure similar to those for mammalian heart, and analyzed their structure by negative-staining and electron microscopy. The isolated filaments appear well ordered with the characteristic 42.9 nm quasi-helical repeat of the myosin heads expected from x-ray diffraction. We have performed single particle image analysis on the collected electron microscopy images for the C-zone region of these filaments and obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction at 3.5 nm resolution. This reconstruction reveals structure similar to the mammalian thick filament, and demonstrates that zebrafish may provide a useful model for the study of the changes in the cardiac thick filament associated with disease processes. PMID:24739166

  12. Use of ion-sensitive microelectrodes to study intracellular free magnesium concentration and its regulation in mammalian cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Hall, S K; Fry, C H; Buri, A; McGuigan, J A

    Ion-sensitive microelectrodes (ISEs) have been used to measure intracellular [Mg2+] ([Mg2+]i) in cardiac muscle, although most measurements have tended to overestimate the value due to the poor selectivity of the Mg2+ ionophore in the sarcoplasm and to inaccurate collation of individual ISE measurements. This paper highlights the correct method for analysis of data from multiple ISE experiments. Since [Mg2+]i is constrained at a lower concentration than would be expected by passive distribution of the ion, some of the possible mechanisms underlying Mg2+ extrusion from ferret ventricular myocardium were investigated. During elevation of the extracellular [Mg], mean [Mg2+]i rose from 1.61 to 1.91 mM. The same intervention had no significant effect on membrane potential, intracellular [Na+] or pH measured with ISEs, and there was no change in resting [Ca2+], as assessed from fura-2 fluorescence. The data are not consistent with a simple mechanism for Na(+)-Mg2+ exchange as the primary mode of Mg2+ regulation in cardiac muscle or with an Mg2+ extrusion mechanism involving steady-state ion exchange.

  13. Effect of muscle metaboreflex activation on spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartwich, Doreen; Dear, William E; Waterfall, Jessica L; Fisher, James P

    2011-12-15

    We sought to determine whether the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) is a potential mechanism for the decrease in spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS) during exercise in humans. In protocol 1, 15 male subjects (22 ± 1 years) performed steady-state leg cycling at low (26 ± 4 W) and moderate workloads (105 ± 7 W), under free-flow conditions and with partial flow restriction (bilateral thigh cuff inflation at 100 mmHg) to evoke muscle metaboreflex activation during exercise. In protocol 2, rhythmic handgrip exercise at 35% maximum voluntary contraction was performed with progressive upper arm cuff inflation (0, 80, 100 and 120 mmHg) to elicit graded metaboreflex activation. Both protocols were followed by post-exercise ischaemia (PEI) to isolate the muscle metaboreflex. Leg cycling-induced increases in HR and mean BP were augmented by partial flow restriction (P < 0.05 vs. free flow), while HR and mean BP both remained elevated during PEI (P < 0.05 vs. rest). Leg cycling evoked an intensity-dependent decrease in cBRS (16 ± 2, 7 ± 1 and 2 ± 0.2 ms mmHg(-1) at rest, low and moderate workloads, respectively; P < 0.05), which was further reduced with partial flow restriction (by -2.6 ± 0.8 and -0.4 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1) at low and moderate workloads). cBRS remained suppressed during PEI following leg cycling with partial flow restriction (4 ± 1 ms mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 vs. rest). cBRS was unchanged during handgrip under free-flow conditions, handgrip with partial flow restriction and PEI following handgrip (P > 0.05 vs. rest). These data indicate that the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) decreases cardiac baroreflex responsiveness during leg cycling exercise in humans.

  14. The couplonopathies: A comparative approach to a class of diseases of skeletal and cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Lourdes; Manno, Carlo; Kraeva, Natalia; Riazi, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    A novel category of diseases of striated muscle is proposed, the couplonopathies, as those that affect components of the couplon and thereby alter its operation. Couplons are the functional units of intracellular calcium release in excitation–contraction coupling. They comprise dihydropyridine receptors, ryanodine receptors (Ca2+ release channels), and a growing list of ancillary proteins whose alteration may lead to disease. Within a generally similar plan, the couplons of skeletal and cardiac muscle show, in a few places, marked structural divergence associated with critical differences in the mechanisms whereby they fulfill their signaling role. Most important among these are the presence of a mechanical or allosteric communication between voltage sensors and Ca2+ release channels, exclusive to the skeletal couplon, and the smaller capacity of the Ca stores in cardiac muscle, which results in greater swings of store concentration during physiological function. Consideration of these structural and functional differences affords insights into the pathogenesis of several couplonopathies. The exclusive mechanical connection of the skeletal couplon explains differences in pathogenesis between malignant hyperthermia (MH) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), conditions most commonly caused by mutations in homologous regions of the skeletal and cardiac Ca2+ release channels. Based on mechanistic considerations applicable to both couplons, we identify the plasmalemma as a site of secondary modifications, typically an increase in store-operated calcium entry, that are relevant in MH pathogenesis. Similar considerations help explain the different consequences that mutations in triadin and calsequestrin have in these two tissues. As more information is gathered on the composition of cardiac and skeletal couplons, this comparative and mechanistic approach to couplonopathies should be useful to understand pathogenesis, clarify diagnosis, and

  15. Acute regulation of glucose uptake in cardiac muscle of the American eel Anguilla rostrata.

    PubMed

    Rodnick; Bailey; West; Driedzic

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effects of anoxia and contractile activity on glucose uptake and the intracellular location of hexokinase in cardiac muscle of the American eel Anguilla rostrata. Uptake of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) by ventricle strips at 15 °C was increased by 45 % by anoxia and by 85 % by contractile activity over basal conditions. The anoxia- and contraction-induced increase in basal 2-DG uptake was inhibited completely by 25 µmol l-1 cytochalasin B, suggesting that facilitated glucose transporters are involved. Maximal activity of hexokinase in whole homogenates (approximately 10 µmol min-1 g-1 tissue) was 200 times higher than the maximal rate of 2-DG uptake measured in vitro (46 nmol min-1 g-1 tissue). Only 20­25 % of hexokinase activity was localized to the mitochondrial fraction, and this was not altered by perfusion of the hearts with anoxic media. It is therefore unlikely that anoxia-induced stimulation of 2-DG uptake is mediated by intracellular translocation of hexokinase. As in the case of mammalian muscle, glucose 6-phosphate is a potent inhibitor of hexokinase in eel cardiac muscle (IC50=0.44 mmol l-1). In summary, anoxia and contractile activity significantly increase 2-DG uptake in cardiac muscle of American eels, and glucose transport may be rate-limiting for glucose utilization. Increased utilization of glucose during anoxia or contractile activity may involve the recruitment of facilitative glucose transport proteins to the cell surface of myocytes or an increase in the intrinsic activity of glucose transporters already residing at the cell surface.

  16. A novel steroid-like compound F90927 exerting positive-inotropic effects in cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pignier, Christophe; Keller, Markus; Vié, Bruno; Vacher, Bernard; Santelli, Maurice; Niggli, Ernst; Egger, Marcel; Le Grand, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    Here we report a novel steroid-like compound F90363, exhibiting positive inotropy in vivo and in vitro in various cardiac muscle preparations. F90363 is a racemic mixture composed of the stereoisomers (−)-F90926 and (+)-F90927. Only F90927 exerted positive inotropy, while F90926 induced a weak negative inotropy, but only at concentrations 103 times higher than F90927 and most likely resulting from an unspecific interaction. The rapid time course of the action of F90927 suggested a direct interaction with a cellular target rather than a genomic alteration. We could identify the L-type Ca2+ current ICa(L) as a main target of F90927, while excluding other components of cardiac Ca2+ signalling as potential contributors. In addition, several other signaling pathways known to lead to positive inotropy (e.g. α- and β-adrenergic stimulation, cAMP pathways) could be excluded as targets of F90927. However, vessel contraction and stiffening of the cardiac muscle at high doses (>30 μM, 0.36 mg kg−1, respectively) prevent the use of F90927 as a candidate for drug development. Since the compound may still find valuable applications in research, the aim of the present study was to identify the cellular target and the mechanism of inotropy of F90927. PMID:16474419

  17. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  18. Normalisation of plasma growth hormone levels improved cardiac dysfunction due to acromegalic cardiomyopathy with severe fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Fumiko; Arima, Hiroshi; Hirano, Miho; Uchikawa, Tomohiro; Inden, Yasuya; Nagatani, Tetsuya; Oiso, Yutaka

    2010-09-19

    A 51-year-old man was referred to the Department of Cardiology in our hospital due to severe congestive heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias in March 2008. He had repeated ventricular tachycardia for years and the left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) was 11% on admission. A myocardial biopsy revealed that over 50% cardiomyocytes were replaced by fibrosis. Due to the typical acromegalic features, he was referred to the endocrinology department and diagnosed as acromegaly. He was treated with octreotide for 8 months followed by trans-sphenoidal surgery. The plasma levels of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) decreased by octreotide and normalised by surgery after which the cardiac function improved drastically. The current case demonstrates that cardiac dysfunction in acromegaly could be recovered by normalisation of GH and IGF-1 even in the presence of severe fibrosis in the myocardium.

  19. Application of MicroRNA in Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Disease Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhan-Peng; Neppl, Ronald L.; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small ~22 nt noncoding RNAs. miRNAs regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional levels by destabilization and degradation of the target mRNA or by translational repression. Numerous studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are essential for normal mammalian development and organ function. Deleterious changes in miRNA expression play an important role in human diseases. We and others have previously reported several muscle-specific miRNAs, including miR-1/206, miR-133, and miR-208. These muscle-specific miRNAs are essential for normal myoblast differentiation and proliferation, and they have also been implicated in various cardiac and skeletal muscular diseases. miRNA-based gene therapies hold great potential for the treatment of cardiac and skeletal muscle disease(s). Herein, we introduce the methods commonly applied to study the biological role of miRNAs, as well as the techniques utilized to manipulate miRNA expression. PMID:21194029

  20. Tri-modal regulation of cardiac muscle relaxation; intracellular calcium decline, thin filament deactivation, and cross-bridge cycling kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Ziolo, Mark T.; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac muscle relaxation is an essential step in the cardiac cycle. Even when the contraction of the heart is normal and forceful, a relaxation phase that is too slow will limit proper filling of the ventricles. Relaxation is too often thought of as a mere passive process that follows contraction. However, many decades of advancements in our understanding of cardiac muscle relaxation have shown it is a highly complex and well-regulated process. In this review, we will discuss three distinct events that can limit the rate of cardiac muscle relaxation: the rate of intracellular calcium decline, the rate of thin-filament de-activation, and the rate of cross-bridge cycling. Each of these processes are directly impacted by a plethora of molecular events. In addition, these three processes interact with each other, further complicating our understanding of relaxation. Each of these processes is continuously modulated by the need to couple bodily oxygen demand to cardiac output by the major cardiac physiological regulators. Length-dependent activation, frequency-dependent activation, and β-adrenergic regulation all directly and indirectly modulate calcium decline, thin-filament deactivation, and cross-bridge kinetics. We hope to convey our conclusion that cardiac muscle relaxation is a process of intricate checks and balances, and should not be thought of as a single rate-limiting step that is regulated at a single protein level. Cardiac muscle relaxation is a system level property that requires fundamental integration of three governing systems: intracellular calcium decline, thin filament deactivation, and cross-bridge cycling kinetics. PMID:25484996

  1. Changes of contractile responses due to simulated weightlessness in rat soleus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhammari, A.; Noireaud, J.; Léoty, C.

    1994-08-01

    Some contractile and electrophysiological properties of muscle fibers isolated from the slow-twitch soleus (SOL) and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of rats were compared with those measured in SOL muscles from suspended rats. In suspendede SOL (21 days of tail-suspension) membrane potential (Em), intracellular sodium activity (aiNa) and the slope of the relationship between Em and log [K]o were typical of fast-twitch muscles. The relation between the maximal amplitude of K-contractures vs Em was steeper for control SOL than for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. After suspension, in SOL muscles the contractile threshold and the inactivation curves for K-contractures were shifted to more positive Em. Repriming of K-contractures was unaffected by suspencion. The exposure of isolated fibers to perchlorate (ClO4-)-containing (6-40 mM) solutions resulted ina similar concentration-dependent shift to more negative Em of activation curves for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. On exposure to a Na-free TEA solution, SOL from control and suspended rats, in contrast to EDL muscles, generated slow contractile responses. Suspended SOL showed a reduced sensitivity to the contracture-producing effect of caffeine compared to control muscles. These results suggested that the modification observed due to suspension could be encounted by changes in the characteristics of muscle fibers from slow to fast-twitch type.

  2. Measurement of calcium release due to inositol trisphosphate receptors in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Casas, Mariana; Altamirano, Francisco; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calcium transients elicited by IP(3) receptors upon electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells (slow calcium signals) are often hard to visualize due to their relatively small amplitude compared to the large transient originated from ryanodine receptors associated to excitation-contraction coupling. The study of slow calcium transients, however, is relevant due to their function in regulation of muscle gene expression and in the process of excitation-transcription coupling. Discussed here are the procedures used to record slow calcium signals from both cultured mouse myotubes and from cultured adult skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:22130849

  3. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction in acromegaly: evidence for a specific disease of heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, E A; Caruana, M P; Lahiri, A; Nabarro, J D; Jacobs, H S; Raftery, E B

    1989-09-01

    Acromegaly is associated with an increased cardiac morbidity and mortality, but it is not clear whether this is the result of increased incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease or of a specific disease of heart muscle. Thirty four acromegalic patients were studied by non-invasive techniques. Seven of these patients had raised plasma concentrations of growth hormone at the time of study; three were newly diagnosed and had not received any treatment. Hypertension was present in nine (26%) but only three (9%) had electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy. Echocardiography showed ventricular hypertrophy in 12 (48%) and increased left ventricular mass in 17 (68%) patients. Holter monitoring detected important ventricular arrhythmias in 14 patients. Thallium-201 scanning showed evidence for coronary heart disease in eight patients. Systolic time intervals were normal except when there was coexistent ischaemic heart disease. A comparison between 19 acromegalic patients with no other detectable cause of heart disease and 22 age matched controls showed appreciably abnormal left ventricular diastolic function in the group with acromegaly. The abnormalities shown did not correlate with left ventricular mass or wall thickness. There was no difference in diastolic function between patients with active acromegaly and those with treated acromegaly. Hypertensive acromegalic patients had worse diastolic function than hypertensive controls, suggesting that hypertension may further impair the left ventricular diastolic abnormality in acromegaly. This is the first study to find evidence of subclinical cardiac diastolic dysfunction in acromegaly and it supports the suggestion that there is a specific disease of heart muscle in acromegaly.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase-dependent "on/off" switch and apoptosis in freshwater and aestivating lungfish, Protopterus annectens: skeletal muscle versus cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Amelio, D; Garofalo, F; Wong, W P; Chew, S F; Ip, Y K; Cerra, M C; Tota, B

    2013-08-01

    African lungfishes (Protopterus spp.) are obligate air breathers which enter in a prolonged torpor (aestivation) in association with metabolic depression, and biochemical and morpho-functional readjustments during the dry season. During aestivation, the lungfish heart continues to pump, while the skeletal muscle stops to function but can immediately contract during arousal. Currently, nothing is known regarding the orchestration of the multilevel rearrangements occurring in myotomal and myocardial muscles during aestivation and arousal. Because of its universal role in cardio-circulatory and muscle homeostasis, nitric oxide (NO) could be involved in coordinating these stress-induced adaptations. Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy on cardiac and skeletal muscles of Protopterus annectens (freshwater, 6months of aestivation and 6days after arousal) showed that expression, localization and activity of the endothelial-like nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) isoform and its partners Akt and Hsp-90 are tissue-specifically modulated. During aestivation, phospho-eNOS/eNOS and phospho-Akt/Akt ratios increased in the heart but decreased in the skeletal muscle. By contrast, Hsp-90 increased in both muscle types during aestivation. TUNEL assay revealed that increased apoptosis occurred in the skeletal muscle of aestivating lungfish, but the myocardial apoptotic rate of the aestivating lungfish remained unchanged as compared with the freshwater control. Consistent with the preserved cardiac activity during aestivation, the expression of apoptosis repressor (ARC) also remained unchanged in the heart of aestivating and aroused fish as compared with the freshwater control. Contrarily, ARC expression was strongly reduced in the skeletal muscle of aestivating lungfish. On the whole, our data indicate that changes in the eNOS/NO system and cell turnover are implicated in the morpho-functional readjustments occurring in lungfish cardiac and skeletal muscle during the switch

  5. Regulation of troponin C synthesis in primary culture of chicken cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, S B; Bag, J

    1987-01-01

    Cardiac myocyte cell culture from fourteen day old embryonic chicken heart was prepared. This cultured cell system was used to examine the regulation of troponin C (TnC) synthesis in cardiac muscle. To examine the regulation of TnC polypeptide synthesis, cardiac myocyte cells were pulse labelled with 35S-methionine at different days after plating. The synthesis of TnC was measured by determining the amount of radioactivity incorporated into the TnC polypeptide following separation by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. These measurements showed that TnC synthesis was maximum in 36 to 48 h old cultures and reached its lowest level in 4 day old cultures. This was in contrast to the synthesis of actin and tropomyosin. Synthesis of these polypeptides were lowest in 36 to 48 h old cultures and was maximum in 7 day old cultures. To examine whether the synthesis of TnC polypeptide paralleled the levels of TnC mRNA the sequences homologous to quail slow TnC cDNA clone were measured by hybridisation. The results showed that the decrease in the synthesis of troponin C polypeptide cannot be fully explained by the decrease in the steady state level of troponin C mRNA. The possibility of a role of translational control of troponin C mRNA in this process is discussed. PMID:2890096

  6. Cardiac arrest during radical nephrectomy due to a mass in the right ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Yoon, Ji Uk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Byeon, Gyeong-Jo; Ahn, Ji Hye

    2016-09-01

    We report cardiac arrest due to obstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) caused by an RVOT mass that was not identified preoperatively. A 62-year-old woman with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) experienced deteriorating hypotension and bradycardia during radical nephrectomy. Hemodynamic stability was maintained on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and after surgery, she was transferred to the intensive care unit. On postoperative day 3, transthoracic echocardiography showed an intracardiac mass obstructing the RVOT, which caused severe functional pulmonary stenosis and moderate resting pulmonary hypertension. Despite maintaining extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient died of cardiac arrest. Our findings suggest that it may be necessary to perform additional tests if RCC has invaded the renal vein and inferior vena cava or if a patient with RCC has abnormal cardiovascular symptoms without definite etiology for exclusion of cardiac metastasis or tumor thrombus. In addition, intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography might be the procedure of choice for the evaluation of these conditions because other diagnostic tests are difficult to perform during surgery. In conclusion, for patients with acute hemodynamic instability for whom other possible causes have been excluded, we recommend that anesthesiologists use transesophageal echocardiography to detect outflow tract obstruction or pulmonary thromboembolism and perform anesthetic management. PMID:27555152

  7. Exposure to a Low Lead Concentration Impairs Contractile Machinery in Rat Cardiac Muscle.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marito A S C; de Oliveira, Thiago F; Almenara, Camila C P; Broseghini-Filho, Gilson B; Vassallo, Dalton V; Padilha, Alessandra S; Silveira, Edna A

    2015-10-01

    Lead exposure has been considered to be a risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of low plasma lead concentration on cardiac contractility in isolated papillary muscles. Wistar rats were divided in control group or group treated with 100 ppm of lead acetate in the drinking water for 15 days. Blood pressure (BP) was measured weekly. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were anesthetized and euthanized, and parameters related to isolated papillary muscle contractility were recorded. The lead concentrations in the blood reached 12.3 ± 2 μg/dL. The BP was increased in the group treated with 100 ppm of lead acetate. Lead treatment did not alter force and time derivatives of the force of left ventricular papillary muscles. In addition, the inotropic response induced by an increase in the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration was reduced in the Pb(2+) group. However, the uptake of Ca(2+) by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the protein expression of SERCA and phospholamban remained unchanged. Postrest contraction was similar in the both groups, and tetanic peak and plateau tension were reduced in lead group. These results demonstrated that the reduction in the inotropic response to calcium does not appear to be caused by changes in the trans-sarcolemmal calcium flux but suggest that an impairment of the contractile machinery might be taking place. Our results demonstrate that even at a concentration below the limit considered to be safe, lead exerts deleterious effects on the cardiac contractile machinery. PMID:25795172

  8. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  9. Three-dimensional organization of troponin on cardiac muscle thin filaments in the relaxed state.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shixin; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Orzechowski, Marek; Craig, Roger; Trinick, John; White, Howard; Lehman, William

    2014-02-18

    Muscle contraction is regulated by troponin-tropomyosin, which blocks and unblocks myosin binding sites on actin. To elucidate this regulatory mechanism, the three-dimensional organization of troponin and tropomyosin on the thin filament must be determined. Although tropomyosin is well defined in electron microscopy helical reconstructions of thin filaments, troponin density is mostly lost. Here, we determined troponin organization on native relaxed cardiac muscle thin filaments by applying single particle reconstruction procedures to negatively stained specimens. Multiple reference models led to the same final structure, indicating absence of model bias in the procedure. The new reconstructions clearly showed F-actin, tropomyosin, and troponin densities. At the 25 Å resolution achieved, troponin was considerably better defined than in previous reconstructions. The troponin density closely resembled the shape of troponin crystallographic structures, facilitating detailed interpretation of the electron microscopy density map. The orientation of troponin-T and the troponin core domain established troponin polarity. Density attributable to the troponin-I mobile regulatory domain was positioned where it could hold tropomyosin in its blocking position on actin, thus suggesting the underlying structural basis of thin filament regulation. Our previous understanding of thin filament regulation had been limited to known movements of tropomyosin that sterically block and unblock myosin binding sites on actin. We now show how troponin, the Ca(2+) sensor, may control these movements, ultimately determining whether muscle contracts or relaxes. PMID:24559988

  10. Diazepam as an adjuvant analgesic to morphine for pain due to skeletal muscle spasm.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Manish; Walsh, Declan

    2003-01-01

    Side effects of morphine are common when it is given in titrated doses to control severe pain in advanced cancer. We describe a case of severe back pain resistant to parenteral morphine accompanied by muscle spasm, in which the addition of diazepam both had an opioid-sparing effect and provided superior symptomatic relief. Diazepam appears to have a specific role as an adjuvant analgesic for pain due to skeletal muscle spasm associated with painful vertebral metastases.

  11. Measuring the mechanical efficiency of a working cardiac muscle sample at body temperature using a flow-through calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Taberner, Andrew J; Johnston, Callum M; Pham, Toan; June-Chiew Han; Ruddy, Bryan P; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a new `work-loop calorimeter' that is capable of measuring, simultaneously, the work-done and heat production of isolated cardiac muscle samples at body temperature. Through the innovative use of thermoelectric modules as temperature sensors, the development of a low-noise fluid-flow system, and implementation of precise temperature control, the heat resolution of this device is 10 nW, an improvement by a factor of ten over previous designs. These advances have allowed us to conduct the first flow-through measurements of work output and heat dissipation from cardiac tissue at body temperature. The mechanical efficiency is found to vary with peak stress, and reaches a peak value of approximately 15 %, a figure similar to that observed in cardiac muscle at lower temperatures.

  12. Measuring the mechanical efficiency of a working cardiac muscle sample at body temperature using a flow-through calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Taberner, Andrew J; Johnston, Callum M; Pham, Toan; June-Chiew Han; Ruddy, Bryan P; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a new `work-loop calorimeter' that is capable of measuring, simultaneously, the work-done and heat production of isolated cardiac muscle samples at body temperature. Through the innovative use of thermoelectric modules as temperature sensors, the development of a low-noise fluid-flow system, and implementation of precise temperature control, the heat resolution of this device is 10 nW, an improvement by a factor of ten over previous designs. These advances have allowed us to conduct the first flow-through measurements of work output and heat dissipation from cardiac tissue at body temperature. The mechanical efficiency is found to vary with peak stress, and reaches a peak value of approximately 15 %, a figure similar to that observed in cardiac muscle at lower temperatures. PMID:26738140

  13. Functional coupling with cardiac muscle promotes maturation of hPSC-derived sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yohan; Cho, Gun-Sik; Li, Zhe; Hong, Ingie; Zhu, Renjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yong Jun; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Tung, Leslie; Huganir, Richard; Dong, Xinzhong; Kwon, Chulan; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are powerful tools for studying human neural development and diseases. Robust functional coupling of hPSC-derived neurons with target tissues in vitro is essential for modeling intercellular physiology in a dish and to further translational studies, but has proven difficult to achieve. Here, we derive sympathetic neurons from hPSCs and show they can form physical and functional connections with cardiac muscle cells. Using multiple hPSC reporter lines, we recapitulated human autonomic neuron development in vitro and successfully isolated PHOX2B:eGFP+ neurons that exhibit sympathetic marker expression and electrophysiological properties, and norepinephrine secretion. Upon pharmacologic and optogenetic manipulation, PHOX:eGFP+ neurons controlled beating rates of cardiomyocytes, and the physical interactions between these cells increased neuronal maturation. This study provides a foundation for human sympathetic neuron specification and for hPSC-based neuronal control of organs in a dish. PMID:27320040

  14. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Mishra, Bud; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing.

  15. Myofilament flexibility: a possible role in Hill's model for cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Streeter, D D; Kirkendall, G W

    1975-01-01

    The sarcomeric unit ("sark") is an elastic structure (cf. hard rubber). The sark stretch under load is the sum of the deflections of: (a) the naked thick filament, (b) the joined thick-thin filaments, (c) the naked thin filaments, (d) the parallel array of S1 moieties (bending deflection), (e) the parallel array of S2 rods, and (f) the Z-filaments. Hill's model can be revalidated at the molecular level, if the contractile element is identified as the instantaneous array of contract points between each S1 moiety and the thin filament, such that sark stretch accounts for series elasticity. A matrix array of variously activated and test-rig-damaged sarks can account for large quick-release compliances in cardiac muscles. PMID:766130

  16. Early Treatment with Lisinopril and Spironolactone Preserves Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rafael-Fortney, Jill A.; Chimanji, Neeraj S.; Schill, Kevin E.; Martin, Christopher D.; Murray, Jason D.; Ganguly, Ranjit; Stangland, Jenna E.; Tran, Tam; Xu, Ying; Canan, Benjamin D.; Mays, Tessily A.; Delfín, Dawn A.; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Raman, Subha V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nearly-universal cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) contributes to heart failure and death. As DMD patients show myocardial fibrosis well before functional impairment, we postulated that earlier treatment using drugs with anti-fibrotic effect may be beneficial. Methods and Results Three groups of 10 utrn+/−;mdx or “het” mice with skeletal myopathy and cardiomyopathy that closely mimics clinical DMD were studied. One het group received spironolactone and lisinopril starting at 8 weeks-of-life (het-treated-8), a second received the same starting at 4 weeks-of-life (het-treated-4), and the third het group was untreated. At 20 weeks, all mice had normal EFs though circumferential strain rate was abnormal (−0.21±0.08) in untreated hets. This improved to −0.40±0.07 in het-treated-8 mice (p=0.003), and further improved to −0.56±0.10 in het-treated-4 mice (p=0.014 for het-treated-4 vs. het-treated-8). Treated mice showed less cardiomyocyte damage, with a 44% reduction in intra-cardiomyocyte serum IgG localization in het-treated-8 mice (p<0.0001), and further 53% reduction in het-treated-4 mice (p=0.0003 vs. het-treated-8); matrix metalloproteinases were similarly reduced. Cardiac, limb and diaphragm function by ex vivo muscle testing remained at 80% of normal with early treatment compared to a decline to 40% of normal skeletal muscle function without treatment. Conclusions These findings offer clinically-available medications with proven anti-fibrotic effect as a new therapeutic strategy in DMD. Early initiation greatly attenuated myocardial disease and, for the first time with these drugs, improved skeletal myopathy. Thus, early initiation of such agents warrants further clinical evaluation to maintain ambulatory, respiratory and cardiac function for DMD and related myopathies. PMID:21768542

  17. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2012-04-02

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-{Delta}43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing ({approx} 1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-{Delta}43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-{Delta}43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.

  18. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy for the study of cardiac muscle ultrastructure at nanoscale resolutions.

    PubMed

    Pinali, Christian; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2014-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques have made a significant contribution towards understanding muscle physiology since the 1950s. Subsequent advances in hardware and software have led to major breakthroughs in terms of image resolution as well as the ability to generate three-dimensional (3D) data essential for linking structure to function and dysfunction. In this methodological review we consider the application of a relatively new technique, serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM), for the study of cardiac muscle morphology. Employing SBF-SEM we have generated 3D data for cardiac myocytes within the myocardium with a voxel size of ~15 nm in the X-Y plane and 50 nm in the Z-direction. We describe how SBF-SEM can be used in conjunction with selective staining techniques to reveal the 3D cellular organisation and the relationship between the t-tubule (t-t) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) networks. These methods describe how SBF-SEM can be used to provide qualitative data to investigate the organisation of the dyad, a specialised calcium microdomain formed between the t-ts and the junctional portion of the SR (jSR). We further describe how image analysis methods may be applied to interrogate the 3D volumes to provide quantitative data such as the volume of the cell occupied by the t-t and SR membranes and the volumes and surface area of jSR patches. We consider the strengths and weaknesses of the SBF-SEM technique, pitfalls in sample preparation together with tips and methods for image analysis. By providing a 'big picture' view at high resolutions, in comparison to conventional confocal microscopy, SBF-SEM represents a paradigm shift for imaging cellular networks in their native environment.

  19. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy for the study of cardiac muscle ultrastructure at nanoscale resolutions.

    PubMed

    Pinali, Christian; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2014-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques have made a significant contribution towards understanding muscle physiology since the 1950s. Subsequent advances in hardware and software have led to major breakthroughs in terms of image resolution as well as the ability to generate three-dimensional (3D) data essential for linking structure to function and dysfunction. In this methodological review we consider the application of a relatively new technique, serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM), for the study of cardiac muscle morphology. Employing SBF-SEM we have generated 3D data for cardiac myocytes within the myocardium with a voxel size of ~15 nm in the X-Y plane and 50 nm in the Z-direction. We describe how SBF-SEM can be used in conjunction with selective staining techniques to reveal the 3D cellular organisation and the relationship between the t-tubule (t-t) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) networks. These methods describe how SBF-SEM can be used to provide qualitative data to investigate the organisation of the dyad, a specialised calcium microdomain formed between the t-ts and the junctional portion of the SR (jSR). We further describe how image analysis methods may be applied to interrogate the 3D volumes to provide quantitative data such as the volume of the cell occupied by the t-t and SR membranes and the volumes and surface area of jSR patches. We consider the strengths and weaknesses of the SBF-SEM technique, pitfalls in sample preparation together with tips and methods for image analysis. By providing a 'big picture' view at high resolutions, in comparison to conventional confocal microscopy, SBF-SEM represents a paradigm shift for imaging cellular networks in their native environment. PMID:25149127

  20. The role of the N-terminus of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jones, Michelle; Guzman, Georgianna; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kerrick, W. Glenn L.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Summary To study the regulation of cardiac muscle contraction by the myosin essential light chain (ELC) and the physiological significance of its N-terminal extension, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice partially replacing the endogenous mouse ventricular ELC with either the human ventricular ELC wild type (Tg-WT) or its 43 amino acid N-terminal truncation mutant (Tg-Δ43) in the murine hearts. The mutant protein is similar in sequence to the short ELC variant present in skeletal muscle and the ELC protein distribution in Tg-Δ43 ventricles resembles that of fast skeletal muscle. Cardiac muscle preparations from Tg-Δ43 mice demonstrate reduced force per cross-sectional area of muscle, which is likely caused by a reduced number of force generating myosin cross-bridges and/or by decreased force per cross-bridge. As the mice grow older, the contractile force per cross-sectional area further decreases in Tg-Δ43 mice and the mutant hearts develop a phenotype of non-pathologic hypertrophy while still maintaining normal cardiac performance. The myocardium of older Tg-Δ43 mice also exhibits reduced myosin content. Our results suggest that the role of the N-terminal ELC extension is to maintain the integrity of myosin and to modulate force generation by decreasing myosin neck region compliance and promoting strong cross-bridge formation and/or by enhancing myosin attachment to actin. PMID:19361417

  1. Pluripotent stem cell derivation and differentiation toward cardiac muscle: novel techniques and advances in patent literature.

    PubMed

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Thorrez, Lieven; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2013-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold unprecedented potential for regenerative medicine, disease modeling and drug screening. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), standard model for pluripotency studies, have been recently flanked by induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs are obtained from somatic cells via epigenetic and transcriptional reprogramming, overcoming ESC-related ethical issues and enabling the possibility of donor-matching pluripotent cell lines. Since the European Court of Justice banned patents involving embryo disaggregation to generate human ESCs, iPSCs can now fuel the willingness of European companies to invest in treatments based on stem cells. Moreover, iPSCs share many unique features of ESCs, such as unlimited self-renewal potential and broad differentiation capability, even though iPSCs seem more susceptible to genomic instability and display epigenetic biases as compared to ESCs. Both ESCs and iPSCs have been intensely investigated for cardiomyocyte production and cardiac muscle regeneration, both in human and animal models. In vitro and in vivo studies are continuously expanding and refining this field via genetic manipulation and cell conditioning, trying to achieve standard and reproducible products, eligible for clinical and biopharmaceutical scopes. This review focuses on the recently growing body of patents, concerning technical advances in production, expansion and cardiac differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs.

  2. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus – different methods of cardiac surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. Case study 1 The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs’ surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. Case study 2 The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored

  3. A conserved CATTCCT motif is required for skeletal muscle-specific activity of the cardiac troponin T gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Mar, J H; Ordahl, C P

    1988-01-01

    Transcription of the cardiac troponin T (cTNT) gene is restricted to cardiac and embryonic skeletal muscle tissue. A DNA segment containing 129 nucleotides upstream from the cTNT transcription initiation site (cTNT-129) directs expression of a heterologous marker gene in transfected embryonic skeletal muscle cells but is inactive in embryonic cardiac or fibroblast cells. By using chimeric promoter constructions, in which distal and proximal segments of cTNT-129 are fused to reciprocal segments of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV tk) gene promoter, the DNA segment responsible for this cell specificity can be localized to the cTNT distal promoter region, located between 50 and 129 nucleotides upstream of the transcription initiation site. The ability of the cTNT distal promoter region to confer skeletal muscle-specific activity upon a heterologous promoter is abolished when it is displaced 60 nucleotides upstream, indicating that its ability to direct skeletal muscle-specific transcription probably requires proximity to other components of the transcription initiation region. Two copies of the heptamer, CATTCCT ("muscle-CAT" or "M-CAT" motif), reside within the 80-nucleotide cTNT distal promoter region. A 3-nucleotide mutation in one of these copies inactivates the cTNT promoter in skeletal muscle cells. Therefore, the M-CAT motif is a distal promoter element required for expression of the cTNT promoter in embryonic skeletal muscle cells. Since the M-CAT motif is found in other contractile protein gene promoters, it may represent one example of a muscle-specific promoter element. Images PMID:3413104

  4. Metabolism of brain cortex and cardiac muscle mitochondria in hibernating 13-lined ground squirrels Ictidomys tridecemlineatus.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kirsten; Staples, James F

    2013-01-01

    During bouts of torpor, mitochondrial metabolism is known to be suppressed in the liver and skeletal muscle of hibernating mammals. This suppression is rapidly reversed during interbout euthermic (IBE) phases, when whole-animal metabolic rate and body temperature (T(b)) return spontaneously to euthermic levels. Such mitochondrial suppression may contribute significantly to energy savings, but the capacity of other tissues to suppress mitochondrial metabolism remains unclear. In this study we compared the metabolism of mitochondria from brain cortex and left ventricular cardiac muscle between animals sampled while torpid (stable T(b) near 5°C) and in IBE (stable T(b) near 37°C). Instead of isolating mitochondria using the traditional methods of homogenization and centrifugation, we permeabilized tissue slices with saponin, allowing energetic substrates and inhibitors to access mitochondria. No significant differences in state 3 or state 4 respiration were observed between torpor and IBE in either tissue. In general, succinate produced the highest oxidation rates followed by pyruvate and then glutamate, palmitoyl carnitine, and β-hydroxybutyrate. These findings suggest that there is no suppression of mitochondrial metabolism or change in substrate preference in these two tissues despite the large changes in whole-animal metabolism seen between torpor and IBE. PMID:23303316

  5. Cardiac tamponade complicating purulent pericarditis due to community acquired methicilin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Bagavathy, Kavitha; Raju, Shine K; Joseph, Ranjit; Kumar, Anupam

    2014-03-01

    Community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) is a global pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections with increasing prevalence since the 1990s. Purulentpericarditis, characterized by accumulation of purulent fluid in the pericardial space was historically a disease of the pediatric and early adult population, but through the years the median age of diagnosis has increased from 21 to 49. Mortality rates are as high as 40% even in the treated population. We report a case of purulent pericarditis due to CA-MRSA that was complicated by cardiac tamponade. Early diagnosis and intervention proved to be life-saving. A brief review of the literature and current management options are discussed.

  6. Impact of transglutaminase on the textural, physicochemical, and structural properties of chicken skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscles.

    PubMed

    Ahhmed, Abdulatef M; Nasu, Tetsuo; Muguruma, Michio

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effects of microbial transglutaminase (MTG; 3.1mg/ml) on chicken skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscles; the meat containing the different muscle types was shaped into sausages and treated at 40°C and/or 78°C for 30min. Although the three muscle types were obtained from the same bird, the effects of MTG addition were not uniform. All the muscle types showed a significant increase in the breaking strength (P<0.01), but skeletal muscle exhibited the maximum increase. All samples showed a decrease in the fluorescence intensity and a significant reduction in the concentration of proteins that were extracted in a high ionic strength solution (P<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy images and histological studies revealed that different muscle types had different physical structures and frameworks after MTG treatment, which is a reflection of the differences in the reaction specificity of MTG with different muscle proteins. Histological studies revealed that the reactions of MTG with meat proteins are both exogenous and endogenous. Cooking loss data suggested that MTG did not have any negative effect on water retention during cooking. MTG appears to be a functional and contributive substance since the results suggest that MTG can function on all muscle types that are mechanically processed for different industrial applications. MTG aggregates muscle proteins in different ways that improve their organoleptic properties such as texture, appearance, and water retention.

  7. Rat muscle opacity decrease due to the osmosis of a simple mixture.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, M; Tuchin, Valery V

    2010-01-01

    It is known that the fibrous structure of muscle causes light scattering. This phenomenon occurs due to the refractive index discontinuities located between muscle fibers and interstitial fluid. To study the possibility of reducing light scattering inside muscle, we consider its spectral transmittance evolution during an immersion treatment with an optical clearing solution containing ethanol, glycerol, and distilled water. Our methodology consists of registering spectral transmittance of muscle samples while immersed in that solution. With the spectral data collected, we represent the transmittance evolution for some wavelengths during the treatment applied. Additionally, we study the variations that the treatment has caused on the samples regarding tissue refractive index and mass. By analyzing microscopic photographs of tissue cross section, we can also verify changes in the internal arrangement of muscle fibers caused by the immersion treatment. Due to a mathematical model that we develop, we can explain the variations observed in the studied parameters and estimate the amount of optical clearing agent that has diffused into the tissue samples during the immersion treatment. At the end of the study, we observe and explain the improvement in tissue spectral transmittance, which is approximately 65% after 20 min.

  8. Rat muscle opacity decrease due to the osmosis of a simple mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, M.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2010-09-01

    It is known that the fibrous structure of muscle causes light scattering. This phenomenon occurs due to the refractive index discontinuities located between muscle fibers and interstitial fluid. To study the possibility of reducing light scattering inside muscle, we consider its spectral transmittance evolution during an immersion treatment with an optical clearing solution containing ethanol, glycerol, and distilled water. Our methodology consists of registering spectral transmittance of muscle samples while immersed in that solution. With the spectral data collected, we represent the transmittance evolution for some wavelengths during the treatment applied. Additionally, we study the variations that the treatment has caused on the samples regarding tissue refractive index and mass. By analyzing microscopic photographs of tissue cross section, we can also verify changes in the internal arrangement of muscle fibers caused by the immersion treatment. Due to a mathematical model that we develop, we can explain the variations observed in the studied parameters and estimate the amount of optical clearing agent that has diffused into the tissue samples during the immersion treatment. At the end of the study, we observe and explain the improvement in tissue spectral transmittance, which is approximately 65% after 20 min.

  9. Fulminant mediastinitis due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: atypical presentation and spreading following cardiac surgery†

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Horacio; Carrascal, Yolanda; Maroto, Laura; Arce, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    Mediastinitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, related to thoracic wall contamination after cardiac surgery, has rarely been described. We aim to report a case of fulminant mediastinitis due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae, secondary to a disseminated concomitant pulmonary infection. The patient remained pauci-symptomatic until clinical manifestations of sepsis acutely appeared. PMID:23416348

  10. Effects of sildenafil on the gastrocnemius and cardiac muscles of rats in a model of prolonged moderate exercise training.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Barbara; Donniacuo, Maria; Sodano, Loredana; Gritti, Giulia; Signoriello, Simona; Parretta, Elisabetta; Berrino, Liberato; Urbanek, Konrad; Capuano, Annalisa; Rossi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Moderate exercise training improves energetic metabolism, tissue perfusion and induces cardiac and skeletal muscle remodeling. Sildenafil, a potent phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor used to treat erectile dysfunction, reduces infarct size and increases tissue oxygenation in experimental models of cardiovascular disease. We have evaluated the effects of prolonged moderate exercise training and a repeat administration of sildenafil on the rat gastrocnemius and cardiac muscles. Animals were divided into two groups: sedentary and trained. Each group was subdivided into animals treated with vehicle or with two doses of sildenafil (10 or 15 mg/kg/day) during the last week of training. Physical exercise did not induce cardiac hypertrophy, whereas it increased mRNA levels of the PGC-1α, HIF-1α and VEGF genes, which are involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis, and reduced mRNA levels of FoxO3a, MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1. Sildenafil dose-dependently promoted both angiogenesis, as shown by increased capillary density, and muscle atrophy, as shown by muscle fibre size. These effects were more pronounced in trained animals. Our data confirm the beneficial effects of a moderate and prolonged training on cardiovascular and skeletal systems and document the positive and negative effects of sildenafil on these tissues at doses higher than those used in clinical practice. This report may impact on the use of sildenafil as a substance able to influence sports performance.

  11. Muscle-specific vascular endothelial growth factor deletion induces muscle capillary rarefaction creating muscle insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Jeffrey S; Lantier, Louise; Hasenour, Clinton M; James, Freyja D; Bracy, Deanna P; Wasserman, David H

    2013-02-01

    Muscle insulin resistance is associated with a reduction in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) action and muscle capillary density. We tested the hypothesis that muscle capillary rarefaction critically contributes to the etiology of muscle insulin resistance in chow-fed mice with skeletal and cardiac muscle VEGF deletion (mVEGF(-/-)) and wild-type littermates (mVEGF(+/+)) on a C57BL/6 background. The mVEGF(-/-) mice had an ~60% and ~50% decrease in capillaries in skeletal and cardiac muscle, respectively. The mVEGF(-/-) mice had augmented fasting glucose turnover. Insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose disappearance was blunted in mVEGF(-/-) mice. The reduced peripheral glucose utilization during insulin stimulation was due to diminished in vivo cardiac and skeletal muscle insulin action and signaling. The decreased insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake was independent of defects in insulin action at the myocyte, suggesting that the impairment in insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake was due to poor muscle perfusion. The deletion of VEGF in cardiac muscle did not affect cardiac output. These studies emphasize the importance for novel therapeutic approaches that target the vasculature in the treatment of insulin-resistant muscle. PMID:23002035

  12. Three-Dimensional Structure of Vertebrate Muscle Z-Band: The Small-Square Lattice Z-Band in Rat Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Morris, Edward P.; Luther, Pradeep K.

    2015-01-01

    The Z-band in vertebrate striated muscle crosslinks actin filaments of opposite polarity from adjoining sarcomeres and transmits tension along myofibrils during muscular contraction. It is also the location of a number of proteins involved in signalling and myofibrillogenesis; mutations in these proteins lead to myopathies. Understanding the high-resolution structure of the Z-band will help us understand its role in muscle contraction and the role of these proteins in the function of muscle. The appearance of the Z-band in transverse-section electron micrographs typically resembles a small-square lattice or a basketweave appearance. In longitudinal sections, the Z-band width varies more with muscle type than species: slow skeletal and cardiac muscles have wider Z-bands than fast skeletal muscles. As the Z-band is periodic, Fourier methods have previously been used for three-dimensional structural analysis. To cope with variations in the periodic structure of the Z-band, we have used subtomogram averaging of tomograms of rat cardiac muscle in which subtomograms are extracted and compared and similar ones are averaged. We show that the Z-band comprises four to six layers of links, presumably α-actinin, linking antiparallel overlapping ends of the actin filaments from the adjoining sarcomeres. The reconstruction shows that the terminal 5–7 nm of the actin filaments within the Z-band is devoid of any α-actinin links and is likely to be the location of capping protein CapZ. PMID:26362007

  13. Dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in cardiac and skeletal muscle membranes: studies with antibodies against the. cap alpha. subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, M.; Catterall, W.A.

    1987-08-25

    Polyclonal antibodies (PAC-2) against the purified skeletal muscle calcium channel were prepared and shown to be directed against ..cap alpha.. subunits of this protein by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. These polypeptides have an apparent molecular weight of 162,000 without reduction of disulfide bonds. Under conditions where the functional properties of the purified skeletal muscle calcium channel are retained, ..beta.. subunits (M/sub r/ 50,000) and lambda subunits (M/sub r/ 33,000) are coprecipitated, demonstrating specific noncovalent association of these three polypeptides in the purified skeletal muscle channel. PAC-2 immunoprecipitated cardiac calcium channels labeled with (/sup 3/H)isopropyl 4-(2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-(methoxycarbonyl)pyridine-3-carboxylate ((/sup 3/H)PN200-110) at a 3-fold higher concentration than skeletal muscle channels. Preincubation with cardiac calcium channels blocked only 49% of the immunoreactivity of PAC-2 toward skeletal muscle channels, indicating that these two proteins have both homologous and distinct epitopes. The immunoreactive component of the cardiac calcium channel was identified by immunoprecipitation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 170,000 before reduction of disulfide bonds and 141,000 after reduction, in close analogy with the properties of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ subunits of the skeletal muscle channel. The calcium channels were radiolabeled with /sup 32/P and /sup 125/I. It is concluded that these two calcium channels have a homologous, but distinct, ..cap alpha.. subunit as a major polypeptide component.

  14. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1b (CPT1b) Deficiency Aggravates Pressure-Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy due to Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Kim, Teayoun; Long, Qinqiang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Peiyong; Zhou, Yiqun; Ding, Yishu; Prasain, Jeevan; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2012-01-01

    Background Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1(CPT1) is a rate-limiting step of mitochondrial β-oxidation by controlling the mitochondrial uptake of long-chain acyl-CoAs. The muscle isoform, CPT1b, is the predominant isoform expressed in the heart. It has been suggested that inhibiting CPT-1 activity by specific CPT-1 inhibitors exerts protective effects against cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, clinical and animal studies have shown mixed results, thereby posting concerns on the safety of this class of drugs. Preclinical studies using genetically modified animal models should provide a better understanding of targeting CPT1 in order to evaluate it as a safe and effective therapeutic approach. Methods and Results Heterozygous CPT1b knockout mice (CPT1b+/−) were subjected to transverse aorta constriction (TAC)-induced pressure-overload. These mice showed overtly normal cardiac structure/function under the basal condition. Under a severe pressure-overload condition induced by two weeks of transverse aorta constriction (TAC), CPT1b+/− mice were susceptible to premature death with congestive heart failure. Under a milder pressure-overload condition, CPT1b+/− mice exhibited exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling compared with that in wild-type littermates. There were more pronounced impairments of cardiac contraction with greater eccentric cardiac hypertrophy in CPT1b+/− than in controlled mice. Moreover, the CPT1b+/− heart exhibited exacerbated mitochondrial abnormalities and myocardial lipid accumulation with elevated triglycerides and ceramide content, leading to greater cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Conclusions We conclude that CPT1b deficiency can cause lipotoxicity in the heart under pathological stress, leading to exacerbation of cardiac pathology. Therefore, caution should be applied in the clinical use of CPT-1 inhibitors. PMID:22932257

  15. Characterization of the zebrafish cx36.7 gene promoter: Its regulation of cardiac-specific expression and skeletal muscle-specific repression.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Hisako; Nag, Kakon; Sultana, Naznin; Munakata, Keijiro; Hirose, Shigehisa; Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2016-02-15

    Zebrafish connexin 36.7 (cx36.7/ecx) has been identified as a key molecule in the early stages of heart development in this species. A defect in cx36.7 causes severe heart malformation due to the downregulation of nkx2.5 expression, a result which resembles congenital heart disease in humans. It has been shown that cx36.7 is expressed specifically in early developing heart cardiomyocytes. However, the regulatory mechanism for the cardiac-restricted expression of cx36.7 remains to be elucidated. In this study we isolated the 5'-flanking promoter region of the cx36.7 gene and characterized its promoter activity in zebrafish embryos. Deletion analysis showed that a 316-bp upstream region is essential for cardiac-restricted expression. This region contains four GATA elements, the proximal two of which are responsible for promoter activation in the embryonic heart and serve as binding sites for gata4. When gata4, gata5 and gata6 were simultaneously knocked down, the promoter activity was significantly decreased. Moreover, the deletion of the region between -316 and -133bp led to EGFP expression in the embryonic trunk muscle. The distal two GATA and A/T-rich elements in this region act as repressors of promoter activity in skeletal muscle. These results suggest that cx36.7 expression is directed by cardiac promoter activation via the two proximal GATA elements as well as by skeletal muscle-specific promoter repression via the two distal GATA elements.

  16. Simulation of surface EMG signals generated by muscle tissues with inhomogeneity due to fiber pinnation.

    PubMed

    Mesin, Luca; Farina, Dario

    2004-09-01

    Surface electromyographic (EMG) signal modeling has important applications in the interpretation of experimental EMG data. Most models of surface EMG generation considered volume conductors homogeneous in the direction of propagation of the action potentials. However, this may not be the case in practice due to local tissue inhomogeneities or to the fact that there may be groups of muscle fibers with different orientations. This study addresses the issue of analytically describing surface EMG signals generated by bi-pinnate muscles, i.e., muscles which have two groups of fibers with two orientations. The approach will also be adapted to the case of a muscle with fibers inclined in the depth direction. Such muscle anatomies are inhomogeneous in the direction of propagation of the action potentials with the consequence that the system can not be described as space invariant in the direction of source propagation. In these conditions, the potentials detected at the skin surface do not travel without shape changes. This determines numerical issues in the implementation of the model which are addressed in this work. The study provides the solution of the nonhomogenous, anisotropic problem, proposes an implementation of the results in complete surface EMG generation models (including finite-length fibers), and shows representative results of the application of the models proposed.

  17. Phosphorylation of tropomodulin1 contributes to the regulation of actin filament architecture in cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Katherine T.; Tsukada, Takehiro; Novak, Stefanie Mares; Dorovkov, Maxim V.; Shah, Samar P.; Nworu, Chinedu; Kostyukova, Alla S.; Gregorio, Carol C.

    2014-01-01

    Tropomodulin1 (Tmod1) is an actin-capping protein that plays an important role in actin filament pointed-end dynamics and length in striated muscle. No mechanisms have been identified to explain how Tmod1's functional properties are regulated. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the functional significance of the phosphorylation of Tmod1 at previously identified Thr54. Rat cardiomyocytes were assessed for phosphorylation of Tmod1 using Pro-Q Diamond staining and 32P labeling. Green fluorescent protein-tagged phosphorylation-mimic (T54E) and phosphorylation-deficient (T54A) versions of Tmod1 were expressed in cultured cardiomyocytes, and the ability of these mutants to assemble and restrict actin lengths was observed. We report for the first time that Tmod1 is phosphorylated endogenously in cardiomyocytes, and phosphorylation at Thr54 causes a significant reduction in the ability of Tmod1 to assemble to the pointed end compared with that of the wild type (WT; 48 vs. 78%, respectively). In addition, overexpression of Tmod1-T54E restricts actin filament lengths by only ∼3%, whereas Tmod1-WT restricts the lengths significantly by ∼8%. Finally, Tmod1-T54E altered the actin filament-capping activity in polymerization assays. Taken together, our data suggest that pointed-end assembly and Tmod1's thin filament length regulatory function are regulated by its phosphorylation state.—Bliss, K. T., Tsukada, T., Novak, S. M., Dorovkov, M. V., Shah, S. P., Nworu, C., Kostyukova, A. S., Gregorio, C. C. Phosphorylation of tropomodulin1 contributes to the regulation of actin filament architecture in cardiac muscle. PMID:24891520

  18. Negative inotropic actions of nitric oxide require high doses in rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Wyeth, R P; Temma, K; Seifen, E; Kennedy, R H

    1996-08-01

    Initial experiments were designed to determine if vasoactive concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) alter contractility in rat heart. Contractile function was monitored in left atrial and papillary muscles (30 degrees C; paced at 0.5 Hz) during cumulative addition of 3-morpholino-sydnonimine-HCl(SIN-1), an agent that releases NO. At concentrations between 10(-7) and 10(-4) M (NO concentrations of approximately 10(-8)- 3 x 10(-7) M), SIN-1 did not affect contractility in either tissue. Similarly, 10(-4) M SIN-1 did not alter the positive inotropic responses to isoproterenol or increasing extracellular [Ca+2] ([Ca+2]o). To obtain higher concentrations of NO, additional studies were conducted using authentic NO. NO-saturated stock solutions and a corresponding control solvent were adjusted to pH 1.6 with HCl. Dose-dependent effects of NO were examined by adding aliquots of the stock solutions (or control solvent) to the bathing solution. At final concentrations of 1 x 10(-5)- 5 x 10(-4) M, NO produced transient, concentration-dependent decreases in contractility that were paralleled by reductions in buffer pH. Control solvent elicited similar reductions in pHo and transient decreases in contractility; however, the negative inotropic action elicited by the NO-containing solution was approximately 20% greater than that observed in control conditions. These data demonstrate that only high concentrations of NO depress contractility in isolated rat cardiac muscle, and suggest that this effect is mediated by both acidosis and a pHo-independent mechanism.

  19. A case of rotational restriction of the forearm due to abnormal configuration of pronator quadratus muscle.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yusuke; Sawaizumi, Takuya; Tsunoda, Ryu; Horiguchi, Gen; Matsui, Syuhei; Takai, Shinro

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of rotational restriction of the forearm due to abnormal configuration of the pronator quadratus muscle. A 20-year-old man developed right wrist joint pain on pitching of a baseball game and thereafter displayed rotational disorder of the forearm. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a space-occupying lesion from the volar side of the radius to the dorsal side of the ulna. The lesion was iso-hyperintense on T1-weighted (T1W) images and showed a mixed pattern of high intensities on T2-weighted (T2W) images. His symptoms were immediately reduced after removal of the mass. Histological examination showed that the mass contained much skeletal muscle and revealed myxoid degeneration of striated muscles. We assumed that his pronator quadratus muscle had been a divided form of deep layer and superficial layer tissue, possibly congenitally. We supposed that the deep layer had degenerated due to chronic stimulation and had extended around to the dorsal side of the ulna, which caused rotational restriction from the resulting impaired distal radioulnar joint. To our knowledge, there has been no similar case reported in the literature.

  20. Chronic hindlimb suspension unloading markedly decreases turnover rates of skeletal and cardiac muscle proteins and adipose tissue triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Bederman, Ilya R; Lai, Nicola; Shuster, Jeffrey; Henderson, Leigh; Ewart, Steven; Cabrera, Marco E

    2015-07-01

    We previously showed that a single bolus of "doubly-labeled" water ((2)H2 (18)O) can be used to simultaneously determine energy expenditure and turnover rates (synthesis and degradation) of tissue-specific lipids and proteins by modeling labeling patterns of protein-bound alanine and triglyceride-bound glycerol (Bederman IR, Dufner DA, Alexander JC, Previs SF. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 290: E1048-E1056, 2006). Using this novel method, we quantified changes in the whole body and tissue-specific energy balance in a rat model of simulated "microgravity" induced by hindlimb suspension unloading (HSU). After chronic HSU (3 wk), rats exhibited marked atrophy of skeletal and cardiac muscles and significant decrease in adipose tissue mass. For example, soleus muscle mass progressively decreased 11, 43, and 52%. We found similar energy expenditure between control (90 ± 3 kcal · kg(-1)· day(-1)) and hindlimb suspended (81 ± 6 kcal/kg day) animals. By comparing food intake (∼ 112 kcal · kg(-1) · day(-1)) and expenditure, we found that animals maintained positive calorie balance proportional to their body weight. From multicompartmental fitting of (2)H-labeling patterns, we found significantly (P < 0.005) decreased rates of synthesis (percent decrease from control: cardiac, 25.5%; soleus, 70.3%; extensor digitorum longus, 44.9%; gastrocnemius, 52.5%; and adipose tissue, 39.5%) and rates of degradation (muscles: cardiac, 9.7%; soleus, 52.0%; extensor digitorum longus, 27.8%; gastrocnemius, 37.4%; and adipose tissue, 50.2%). Overall, HSU affected growth of young rats by decreasing the turnover rates of proteins in skeletal and cardiac muscles and adipose tissue triglycerides. Specifically, we found that synthesis rates of skeletal and cardiac muscle proteins were affected to a much greater degree compared with the decrease in degradation rates, resulting in large negative balance and significant tissue loss. In contrast, we found a small decrease in adipose tissue

  1. Resveratrol protects ROS-induced cell death by activating AMPK in H9c2 cardiac muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin-Taek; Kwon, Dae Young; Park, Ock Jin

    2007-01-01

    Resveratrol, one of polyphenols derived from red wine, has been shown to protect against cell death, possibly through the association with several signaling pathways. Currently numerous studies indicate that cardiovascular diseases are linked to the release of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) often generated in states such as ischemia/reperfusion injury. In the present study, we investigated whether resveratrol has the capability to control intracellular survival signaling cascades involving AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in the inhibitory process of cardiac injury. We hypothesized that resveratrol may exert a protective effect on damage to heart muscle through modulating of the AMPK signaling pathway. We mimicked ischemic conditions by inducing cell death with H2O2 in H9c2 muscle cells. In this experiment, resveratrol induced strong activation of AMPK and inhibited the occurrence of cell death caused by treatment with H2O2. Under the same conditions, inhibition of AMPK using dominant negative AMPK constructs dramatically abolished the effect of resveratrol on cell survival in H2O2-treated cardiac muscle cells. These results indicate that resveratrol-induced cell survival is mediated by AMPK in H9c2 cells and may exert a novel therapeutic effect on oxidative stress induced in cardiac disorders. PMID:18850225

  2. High resolution measurement of striation patterns and sarcomere motions in cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, J W; Denton, A

    1992-01-01

    We describe an extension of the method of Myers et al. (1982) to measure with high precision the uniformity of contractile motions that occur between sarcomeres in the isolated cardiac muscle cell (guinea pig and rat). The image of the striations, observed with modulation contrast microscopy, was detected by a linear array of photodiodes. Sarcomere length was measured greater than 500/s from the frequency of the array's video signal at two selectable regions of the cell. A precision test grating demonstrated that method resolves known differences in the spacing between two contiguous striations to +/- 0.01 micron and that the effects of image translation and microscopic resolution are minor. The distribution of striation spacing appears to be discrete in isolated segments of the cell, and patches of fairly uniform length can be identified that are laterally contiguous. When electrically triggered, contraction is synchronous and the sarcomeres shorten and relengthen smoothly. The contrast between the striations is transiently enhanced during relengthening, an indication that the contracting cell can not be treated as a simple grating. Pauses that occur during late in relengthening (and transient contractile alternans) are characterized by very synchronized activity. These forms of irregular contractile behavior are not explained by desynchronization of a mechanism of release of intracellular calcium. A companion article describes application of the technique to study the nonuniform motions that occur between sarcomeres. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1540686

  3. Functional Coupling with Cardiac Muscle Promotes Maturation of hPSC-Derived Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yohan; Cho, Gun-Sik; Li, Zhe; Hong, Ingie; Zhu, Renjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yong Jun; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Tung, Leslie; Huganir, Richard; Dong, Xinzhong; Kwon, Chulan; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-07-01

    Neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are powerful tools for studying human neural development and diseases. Robust functional coupling of hPSC-derived neurons with target tissues in vitro is essential for modeling intercellular physiology in a dish and to further translational studies, but it has proven difficult to achieve. Here, we derive sympathetic neurons from hPSCs and show that they can form physical and functional connections with cardiac muscle cells. Using multiple hPSC reporter lines, we recapitulated human autonomic neuron development in vitro and successfully isolated PHOX2B::eGFP+ neurons that exhibit sympathetic marker expression and electrophysiological properties and norepinephrine secretion. Upon pharmacologic and optogenetic manipulation, PHOX2B::eGFP+ neurons controlled beating rates of cardiomyocytes, and the physical interactions between these cells increased neuronal maturation. This study provides a foundation for human sympathetic neuron specification and for hPSC-based neuronal control of organs in a dish. PMID:27320040

  4. Microscopic feature extraction from optical sections of contracting cardiac muscle cells recorded at high speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Kenneth P.; Lake, David S.; Lubell, Bradford A.

    1991-05-01

    The rapid motion of microscopic features such as the cross-striations of contracting cardiac muscle cells are difficult to capture with conventional RS-170 video systems and image processing approaches. In this report, efforts to extract, enhance and analyze striation data from widefield optical sections of single contracting cells recorded with a charge-coupled device (CCD) video camera modified for high-speed RS-170 compatible operation are described. Each video field from the camera provides four 1/4 height images separated by 4 ms in time for a 240 Hz image acquisition rate. Data are continuously recorded on S-VHS video tape during each experiment. Selected image sequences are digitized field by field and stored in a computer system under automated software control. The four individual images in each video field are separated, geometrically corrected for time base error, and reassembled as a single sequence of images for interpretable visualization. The images are then processed with digital filters and gray scale expansion to preferentially enhance the cross-striations and minimize out of focus features. Regions within each image containing striations are identified and their positions determined and followed during the contraction cycle to obtain individual, regional and cellular sarcomere dynamics. This approach permits the critical evaluation of the magnitude, time course and uniformity of contractile function throughout the volume of a single cell with higher temporal and spatial resolutions than previously possible.

  5. Ultrastructure of the cysts of Sarcocystis grueneri from cardiac muscle of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus).

    PubMed

    Gjerde, B

    1985-01-01

    Cysts of Sarcocystis grueneri from cardiac muscle of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) in Norway were examined by transmission electron microscopy. The limiting unit membrane of the cyst proper formed regularly spaced invaginations into the cyst at numerous sites coinciding with interruptions in the underlying osmiophilic layer. The primary cyst wall formed numerous strip-like, sinuous protrusions, which were 30-40 nm thick, 150-300 nm wide and up to 4.5 microns long, and were running in parallel with the surface of the cyst. Generally the protrusions were arranged in several closely spaced layers compressed against the cyst. The nature and arrangement of the protrusions render them undetectable by light microscopy. Cyst ground substance divided the interior of the cyst into compartments containing typical sarcosporidian metrocytes and cystozoites. The cysts of S. grueneri from reindeer were ultrastructurally similar to cysts reported from red deer, roe deer and moose by other workers. The possibility that these cervids are hosts for a common Sarcocystis species is discussed. PMID:3922150

  6. Regulation of the murine alpha B-crystallin/small heat shock protein gene in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gopal-Srivastava, R; Haynes, J I; Piatigorsky, J

    1995-01-01

    The murine alpha B-crystallin/small heat shock protein gene is expressed at high levels in the lens and at lower levels in the heart, skeletal muscle, and numerous other tissues. Previously we have found a skeletal-muscle-preferred enhancer at positions -427 to -259 of the alpha B-crystallin gene containing at least four cis-acting regulatory elements (alpha BE-1, alpha BE-2, alpha BE-3, and MRF, which has an E box). Here we show that in transgenic mice, the alpha B-crystallin enhancer directs the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene driven by the alpha B-crystallin promoter specifically to myocardiocytes of the heart. The alpha B-crystallin enhancer was active in conjugation with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter/human growth hormone reporter gene in transfected rat myocardiocytes. DNase I footprinting and site-specific mutagenesis experiments showed that alpha BE-1, alpha BE-2, alpha BE-3, MRF, and a novel, heart-specific element called alpha BE-4 are required for alpha B-crystallin enhancer activity in transfected myocardiocytes. By contrast, alpha BE-4 is not utilized for enhancer activity in transfected lens or skeletal muscle cell lines. Alpha BE-4 contains an overlapping heat shock sequence and a reverse CArG box [5'-GG(A/T)6CC-3']. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with an antibody to serum response factor and a CArG-box-competing sequence from the c-fos promoter indicated that a cardiac-specific protein with DNA-binding and antigenic similarities to serum response factor binds to alpha BE-4 via the reverse CArG box; electrophoretic mobility shift assays and antibody experiments with anti-USF antiserum and heart nuclear extract also raised the possibility that the MRF E box utilizes USF or an antigenically related protein. We conclude that the activity of the alpha B-crystallin enhancer in the heart utilizes a reverse CArG box and an E-box-dependent pathway. PMID:8524275

  7. Effects of muscle potential depression and muscle stimulation caused by different insulation coating configurations on cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Toshimi; Yamada, Kenichi; Okubo, Naoko; Nitta, Takashi; Ochi, Masami; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    Insulation coating was added to the external pacemaker surface to prevent unnecessary electric current leakage to the periphery because the pulse generator body is used as an anode in unipolar pacing. However, a model without insulation coating has recently been used, so we studied the effects on muscle potential inhibition and muscle stimulation of pacemakers in unipolar pacing with different parts of the pacemaker body coated with insulation. Case comparisons were made for the following models: insulated except for the center of one side (33, group C), insulated except for the peripheral zone (10, group E), and noncoated models (11, group N). The muscle detection threshold voltage, muscle detection threshold pulse duration, muscle potential sensing threshold (MP), and lead resistance were measured. A comparison was made of the amount of energy (En) needed to reach the muscle stimulation threshold. For MP values, there was no significant statistical difference between group C and E, whereas a significant difference was present between group C and N and between group E and N. For En values, there was a significant difference between group C and E and between group C and N, but there was no significant difference between group E and N. The muscle potential sensing threshold dose not have a change in group E and much muscle stimulation energy is needed. The muscle potential sensing threshold was low in group N, requiring much muscle stimulation energy. Based on these results, it is usually not necessary to coat the pacemaker with insulation for unipolar pacing.

  8. Outcomes in Cardiac Arrest Patients due to Toxic Exposure Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Modisett, Katharine L; Walsh, Steven J; Heffner, Alan C; Pearson, David A; Kerns, William

    2016-09-01

    The incidence and outcome of patients who undergo therapeutic hypothermia (TH) after toxin-induced cardiac arrest (TICA) is not previously described. Our study aimed to describe the incidence, epidemiologic characteristics, and outcomes of patients who experience TICA in a dedicated clinical pathway for post-cardiac arrest care between November 2007 and February 2013. All patients were treated in an evidence-based clinical pathway that included TH. Database and medical records were independently reviewed by investigators to ascertain TICA. TICA was defined as cardiac arrest (CA) directly and immediately caused by a xenobiotic exposure. All patients were enrolled at Carolinas Medical Center, an urban 874-bed teaching hospital that serves as a regional cardiac resuscitation center. All patients were adult victims of cardiac arrest who had obtained return of spontaneous circulation and were enrolled in a clinical pathway for post-cardiac arrest care that included TH. Three hundred eighty-nine patients underwent treatment following CA during the study period and 48 (12 %) were deemed TICA. Patients who suffered TICA were slightly younger, less likely to have an initial shockable rhythm, and less likely to receive bystander CPR as compared to non-toxic cases. TICA accounted for a significant proportion of patients in this study. Additional, larger studies are needed to fully elucidate the optimal role for TH in TICA.

  9. [A case of cerebral embolism due to cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebral microaneurysms detected on first MRI scans].

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Saji, Naoki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man developed right arm weakness and dysarthria, and was admitted to our hospital. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a high intensity area in the frontal lobe. T2*-weighted images showed multiple spotty low intensity lesions in bilateral cerebral hemispheres, mimicking cerebral microbleeds. Cerebral angiography showed multiple aneurysms in the anterior, middle, posterior cerebral arteries and cerebellar arteries. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a floating structure in the left atrial chamber, indicating cardiac myxoma. We diagnosed cardioembolic ischemic stroke due to left atrial myxoma. Cardiac surgery for excision of a left atrial myxoma was performed on the 3rd hospital day. Multiple aneurysms should be taken into account for differential diagnosis in patients with cardiac myxoma and with atypical spotty low intensity on T2*-weighted images. PMID:26797485

  10. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, S.G.; Inui, Makoto; Chadwick, C.C.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Jung, C.Y.; Fleischer, S. )

    1989-02-07

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar.

  11. REGULATION OF CARDIAC AND SKELETAL MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS BY INDIVIDUAL BRANCHED-CHAIN AMINO ACIDS IN NEONATAL PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle grows at a very rapid rate in the neonatal pig, due in part to an enhanced sensitivity of protein synthesis to the postprandial rise in amino acids. An increase in leucine alone stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of the neonatal pig; however, the effect of isoleucine and...

  12. Diastolic scattered light fluctuation, resting force and twitch force in mammalian cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lakatta, E. G.; Lappé, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    1. When coherent light was passed through isolated isometric cardiac muscles during the diastolic or resting period, intensity fluctuations were observed in the scattered field. The frequency of these intensity fluctuations (f½) varied with many experimental interventions known to enhance Ca2+ flux into the cell. 2. In rat muscles stimulated at low frequencies (0.1 ± 2.0 min-1) stepwise increases (0.4-10 mm) of [Ca2+] in the bathing fluid ([Ca2+]e), or addition of ouabain (10-6-6 × 10-4 m) to the perfusate caused stepwise increases in f½. These were paralleled by increments in resting force (RF) such that the changes in f½ and RF were highly correlated. Substitution of K+ for Na+ in the perfusate resulted in parallel transients in RF and f½. 3. In contrast to the rat, most cat muscles stimulated at low frequencies in the steady state exhibited neither diastolic intensity fluctuations nor Ca2+-dependent changes in RF in [Ca2+]e of 10 mm or less; when [Ca2+]e was increased to 12-32 mm, however, steady-state Ca2+-dependent f½ and RF were observed. In a given [Ca2+]e reduction of [Na+]e increased f½. In the transient state following cessation of regular stimulation at more rapid rates (12-96 min-1) intensity fluctuations were present in all [Ca2+]e and decayed with time (seconds to minutes); the f½ and time course of the decay of the fluctuations were determined by the rate of prior stimulation and [Ca2+]e. 4. Maximum potentiation of twitch force in response to the above inotropic interventions was associated with an optimal level of f½ which was similar in both species; when higher levels of f½ were produced by more intense inotropic intervention, twitch force declined. Over the range of inotropic intervention up to and including that at which maximum twitch potentiation occurred, the increase in diastolic f½ predicted the extent of twitch potentiation with a high degree of accuracy (r > 0.97) both in the transient and steady states. 5. In contrast to the

  13. Organ failures due to low cardiac output syndrome following open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Kumon, K; Tanaka, K; Hirata, T; Naito, Y; Fujita, T

    1986-04-01

    During the period from August, 1977 to December, 1984, a total of 3003 patients who received open heart surgery were treated postoperatively at the ICU of National Cardiovascular Center. Low cardiac output syndrome (LOS) developed in 669 (22.3%) patients. Organ failures due to LOS were studied in these patients. Although the overall mortality of postoperative patients was 5.6% and improved to around 4% in the later years, death rate of patients with LOS was persistently high (22.8%) and showed no tendency to improve even in the latest years. Moreover, the clinical results of those LOS patients who developed organ failure were extremely poor; the mortality of patients with respiratory failure (RF) accounted for 36.8% and that of patients with other organ failure exceeded 50%. The incidence of impaired organs in LOS patients was 49.9% in RF, 29.9% in acute renal failure (ARF), 18.4% in hepatic failure (HF), 16.4% in disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), 15.5% in central nervous system failure (CNSF), and 11.1% in gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Pathophysiological mechanisms as well as the management of these major complications caused by LOS are also discussed. Some patients developed multiple organ failure (MOF). Plasma exchange (PE) was performed on 16 patients who developed MOF. Improvement of various organ functions was obtained and consequently three patients were successfully treated by means of PE. Removal of various substances toxic to organs, supplement of deficient substances and cessation of the vicious cycle produced by the interaction of impaired organs in patients with MOF are major roles of PE in the treatment of MOF.

  14. Calsequestrin and the calcium release channel of skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Beard, N A; Laver, D R; Dulhunty, A F

    2004-05-01

    Calsequestrin is by far the most abundant Ca(2+)-binding protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal and cardiac muscle. It allows the Ca2+ required for contraction to be stored at total concentrations of up to 20mM, while the free Ca2+ concentration remains at approximately 1mM. This storage capacity confers upon muscle the ability to contract frequently with minimal run-down in tension. Calsequestrin is highly acidic, containing up to 50 Ca(2+)-binding sites, which are formed simply by clustering of two or more acidic residues. The Kd for Ca2+ binding is between 1 and 100 microM, depending on the isoform, species and the presence of other cations. Calsequestrin monomers have a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa and contain approximately 400 residues. The monomer contains three domains each with a compact alpha-helical/beta-sheet thioredoxin fold which is stable in the presence of Ca2+. The protein polymerises when Ca2+ concentrations approach 1mM. The polymer is anchored at one end to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels either via the intrinsic membrane proteins triadin and junctin or by binding directly to the RyR. It is becoming clear that calsequestrin has several functions in the lumen of the SR in addition to its well-recognised role as a Ca2+ buffer. Firstly, it is a luminal regulator of RyR activity. When triadin and junctin are present, calsequestrin maximally inhibits the Ca2+ release channel when the free Ca2+ concentration in the SR lumen is 1mM. The inhibition is relieved when the Ca2+ concentration alters, either because of small changes in the conformation of calsequestrin or its dissociation from the junctional face membrane. These changes in calsequestrin's association with the RyR amplify the direct effects of luminal Ca2+ concentration on RyR activity. In addition, calsequestrin activates purified RyRs lacking triadin and junctin. Further roles for calsequestrin are indicated by the kinase activity of the protein, its

  15. Increased mitochondrial emission of reactive oxygen species and calpain activation are required for doxorubicin-induced cardiac and skeletal muscle myopathy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kisuk; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Sollanek, Kurt J; Christou, Demetra D; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Szeto, Hazel H; Kavazis, Andreas N; Powers, Scott K

    2015-04-15

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-tumour agent used to treat a variety of cancers, DOX administration is associated with significant side effects, including myopathy of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. The mechanisms responsible for DOX-mediated myopathy remain a topic of debate. We tested the hypothesis that both increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission and activation of the cysteine protease calpain are required for DOX-induced myopathy in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cause and effect was determined by administering a novel mitochondrial-targeted anti-oxidant to prevent DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission, whereas a highly-selective pharmacological inhibitor was exploited to inhibit calpain activity. Our findings reveal that mitochondria are a major site of DOX-mediated ROS production in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres and the prevention of DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission protects against fibre atrophy and contractile dysfunction in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. Furthermore, our results indicate that DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission are required to activate calpain in heart and skeletal muscles and, importantly, calpain activation is a major contributor to DOX-induced myopathy. Taken together, these findings show that increased mitochondrial ROS production and calpain activation are significant contributors to the development of DOX-induced myopathy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres.

  16. Effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiac muscle cell length, diameter, area, and sarcomere length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, R.; Barnes, M. A.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of anisosmotic stress on adult mammalian cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte) size. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length were measured in cardiocytes isolated from 10 normal rats and 10 normal cats. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 300 +/- 6 to 130 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 630 +/- 8 mosM. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length increased progressively when osmolarity was decreased, and there were no significant differences between cat and rat cardiocytes with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area or diameter; however, there were significant differences in cardiocyte length (2.8 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05) and sarcomere length (3.3 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05). To determine whether these species-dependent differences in length were related to diastolic interaction of the contractile elements or differences in relative passive stiffness, cardiocytes were subjected to the osmolarity gradient 1) during treatment with 7 mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), which inhibits cross-bridge interaction, or 2) after pretreatment with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), a bivalent Ca2+ chelator. Treatment with EGTA or BDM abolished the differences between cat and rat cardiocytes. Species-dependent differences therefore appeared to be related to the degree of diastolic cross-bridge association and not differences in relative passive stiffness. In conclusion, the osmolarity vs. cell size relation is useful in assessing the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress and may in future studies be useful in assessing changes in relative passive cardiocyte stiffness produced by pathological processes.

  17. Ryanodine Receptor Current Amplitude Controls Ca2+ Sparks in Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tao; Gillespie, Dirk; Fill, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Rationale In cardiac muscle, Ca2+ induced Ca2+ release (CICR) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels. The inherent positive feedback of CICR is normally well controlled. Understanding this control mechanism is a priority because its malfunction has life-threatening consequences. Objective Show that CICR local control is governed by SR Ca2+ load largely because load determines the single RyR current amplitude that drives inter-RyR CICR. Methods and Results We differentially manipulated single RyR Ca2+ flux amplitude and SR Ca2+ load in permeabilized ventricular myocytes as an endogenous cell biology model of the heart. Large RyR-permeable organic cations were used to interfere with Ca2+ conductance through the open RyR pore. Single-channel studies show this attenuates current amplitude without altering other aspects of RyR function. In cells, the same experimental maneuver increased resting SR Ca2+ load. Despite the increased load, Ca2+ spark (inter-RyR CICR events) frequency decreased and sparks terminated earlier. Conclusion Spark local control follows single RyR current amplitude, not SR Ca2+ load per se. Spark frequency increases with load because spontaneous RyR openings at high loads produce larger currents (i.e. a larger CICR trigger signal). Sparks terminate when load falls to the point where single RyR current amplitude is no longer sufficient to sustain inter-RyR CICR. Thus, RyRs that spontaneously close no longer re-open and local Ca2+ release ends. PMID:22628577

  18. Ca(2+) induces an extended conformation of the inhibitory region of troponin I in cardiac muscle troponin.

    PubMed

    Dong, W J; Xing, J; Robinson, J M; Cheung, H C

    2001-11-16

    The inhibitory region of troponin I (TnI) plays a central regulatory role in the contraction and relaxation cycle of skeletal and cardiac muscle through its Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with actin. Detailed structural information on the interface between TnC and this region of TnI has been long in dispute. We have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to investigate the global conformation of the inhibitory region of a full-length TnI mutant from cardiac muscle (cTnI) in the unbound state and in reconstituted complexes with the other cardiac troponin subunits. The mutant contained a single tryptophan residue at the position 129 which was used as an energy transfer donor, and a single cysteine residue at the position 152 labeled with IAEDANS as energy acceptor. The sequence between Trp129 and Cys152 in cTnI brackets the inhibitory region (residues 130-149), and the distance between the two sites was found to be 19.4 A in free cTnI. This distance was insensitive to reconstitution of cTnI with cardiac troponin T (cTnT), cTnC, or cTnC and cTnT in the absence of bound regulatory Ca(2+) in cTnC. An increase of 9 A in the Trp129-Cys152 separation was observed upon saturation of the Ca(2+) regulatory site of cTnC in the complexes. This large increase suggests an extended conformation of the inhibitory region in the interface between cTnC and cTnI in holo cardiac troponin. This extended conformation is different from a recent model of the Ca(2+)-saturated skeletal TnI-TnC complex in which the inhibitory region is modeled as a beta-turn. The observed Ca(2+)-induced conformational change may be a switch mechanism by which movement of the regulatory region of cTnI to the exposed hydrophobic patch of the open regulatory N-domain of cTnC pulls the inhibitory region away from actin upon Ca(2+) activation in cardiac muscle.

  19. Impaired exercise capacity, but unaltered mitochondrial respiration in skeletal or cardiac muscle of mice lacking cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Nico, Patrícia Barreto Costa; Lobão-Soares, Bruno; Landemberger, Michele Christine; Marques, Wilson; Tasca, Carla I; de Mello, Carlos Fernando; Walz, Roger; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Brentani, Ricardo R; Sakamoto, Américo C; Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt

    2005-11-01

    The studies of physiological roles for cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) have focused on possible functions of this protein in the CNS, where it is largely expressed. However, the observation that PrP(c) is expressed also in muscle tissue suggests that the physiological role of PrP(c) might not be limited to the central nervous system. In the present study, we investigated possible functions of PrP(c) in muscle using PrP(c) gene (Prnp) null mice (Prnp(0/0)). For this purpose, we submitted Prnp(0/0) animals to different protocols of exercise, and compared their performance to that of their respective wild-type controls. Prnp(0/0) mice showed an exercise-dependent impairment of locomotor activity. In searching for possible mechanisms associated with the impairment observed, we evaluated mitochondrial respiration (MR) in skeletal or cardiac muscle from these mice during resting or after different intensities of exercise. Baseline MR (states 3 and 4), respiratory control ratio (RCR) and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi) were evaluated and were not different in skeletal or cardiac muscle tissue of Prnp(0/0) mice when compared with wild-type animals. We concluded that Prnp(0/0) mice show impairment of swimming capacity, perhaps reflecting impairment of muscular activity under more extreme exercise conditions. In spite of the mitochondrial abnormalities reported in Prnp(0/0) mice, our observation seems not to be related to MR. Our results indicate that further investigations should be conducted in order to improve our knowledge about the function of PrP(c) in muscle physiology and its possible role in several different neuromuscular pathologies.

  20. Desmoplakin and talin2 are novel mRNA targets of Fragile X Related Protein-1 in cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, Samantha A.; Cover, Cathleen; Yu, Lily; Nelson, David L.; Zarnescu, Daniela C.; Gregorio, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The proper function of cardiac muscle requires the precise assembly and interactions of numerous cytoskeletal and regulatory proteins into specialized structures that orchestrate contraction and force transmission. Evidence suggests that post-transcriptional regulation is critical for muscle function, but the mechanisms involved remain understudied. Objective To investigate the molecular mechanisms and targets of the muscle-specific Fragile X mental retardation, autosomal homolog 1 (FXR1), an RNA binding protein whose loss leads to perinatal lethality in mice and cardiomyopathy in zebrafish. Methods and Results Using RNA immunoprecipitation approaches we found that desmoplakin and talin2 mRNAs associate with FXR1 in a complex. In vitro assays indicate that FXR1 binds these mRNA targets directly and represses their translation. Fxr1 KO hearts exhibit an upregulation of desmoplakin and talin2 proteins, which is accompanied by severe disruption of desmosome as well as costamere architecture and composition in the heart, as determined by electron microscopy and deconvolution immunofluorescence analysis. Conclusions Our findings reveal the first direct mRNA targets of FXR1 in striated muscle and support translational repression as a novel mechanism for regulating heart muscle development and function, in particular the assembly of specialized cytoskeletal structures. PMID:21659647

  1. Dysautonomia due to reduced cholinergic neurotransmission causes cardiac remodeling and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lara, Aline; Damasceno, Denis D; Pires, Rita; Gros, Robert; Gomes, Enéas R; Gavioli, Mariana; Lima, Ricardo F; Guimarães, Diogo; Lima, Patricia; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Vasconcelos, Anilton; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Menezes, Cristiane A S; Sirvente, Raquel A; Salemi, Vera M; Mady, Charles; Caron, Marc G; Ferreira, Anderson J; Brum, Patricia C; Resende, Rodrigo R; Cruz, Jader S; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius; Prado, Vania F; de Almeida, Alvair P; Prado, Marco A M; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2010-04-01

    Overwhelming evidence supports the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. In contrast, much less is known about the role of failing cholinergic neurotransmission in cardiac disease. By using a unique genetically modified mouse line with reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and consequently decreased release of acetylcholine, we investigated the consequences of altered cholinergic tone for cardiac function. M-mode echocardiography, hemodynamic experiments, analysis of isolated perfused hearts, and measurements of cardiomyocyte contraction indicated that VAChT mutant mice have decreased left ventricle function associated with altered calcium handling. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blotting, and the results indicated that VAChT mutant mice have profound cardiac remodeling and reactivation of the fetal gene program. This phenotype was attributable to reduced cholinergic tone, since administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine for 2 weeks reversed the cardiac phenotype in mutant mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that decreased cholinergic neurotransmission and underlying autonomic imbalance cause plastic alterations that contribute to heart dysfunction.

  2. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  3. The Ca2+-release channel/ryanodine receptor is localized in junctional and corbular sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of the Ca(2+)-release channel/ryanodine receptor in adult rat papillary myofibers has been determined by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopical studies using affinity purified antibodies against the ryanodine receptor. The receptor is confined to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) where it is localized to interior and peripheral junctional SR and the corbular SR, but it is absent from the network SR where the SR-Ca(2+)-ATPase and phospholamban are densely distributed. Immunofluorescence labeling of sheep Purkinje fibers show that the ryanodine receptor is confined to discrete foci while the SR-Ca(2+)-ATPase is distributed in a continuous network-like structure present at the periphery as well as throughout interior regions of these myofibers. Because Purkinje fibers lack T- tubules, these results indicate that the ryanodine receptor is localized not only to the peripheral junctional SR but also to corbular SR densely distributed in interfibrillar spaces of the I-band regions. We have previously identified both corbular SR and junctional SR in cardiac muscle as potential Ca(2+)-storage/Ca(2+)-release sites by demonstrating that the Ca2+ binding protein calsequestrin and calcium are very densely distributed in these two specialized domains of cardiac SR in situ. The results presented here provide strong evidence in support of the hypothesis that corbular SR is indeed a site of Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release via the ryanodine receptor during excitation contraction coupling in cardiac muscle. Furthermore, these results indicate that the function of the cardiac Ca(2+)-release channel/ryanodine receptor is not confined to junctional complexes between SR and the sarcolemma. PMID:8381786

  4. Recurrent proptotic diplopia due to congestive expansion of cavernous haemangioma with relapsing right-sided cardiac failure

    PubMed Central

    O'Mahony, D.; O'Neill, E.

    1999-01-01

    A 75-year-old man with a recent history of pulmonary embolism, presented with collapse followed by a gran mal seizure and right-sided non-pulsatile proptosis. On recovery, he had diplopia on lateral and upward gaze and signs of congestive cardiac failure. Further pulmonary embolism was proven by lung scintigraphy. Computed tomography of his orbits confirmed a contrast-enhancing space-occupying lesion of the medial wall of the right orbit, with no intracranial abnormality. The patient was investigated for metastatic tumour as a possible cause of the space-occupying lesion and the unprovoked thromboembolic event, but no evidence of malignancy was found. The orbital lesion was not biopsied because of the risk of bleeding from anticoagulation. Three weeks later, the patient re-presented with recurrent cardiac failure, proptosis, and diplopia. A transorbital ultrasound confirmed an encapsulated, well-defined vascular lesion, with typical appearances and Doppler flow characteristics of a cavernous haemangioma. Diuretic therapy abolished the proptosis and diplopia in tandem with relief of the cardiac failure. This is the first description of recurrent proptosis with diplopia due to recurrent congestive expansion of an orbital cavernous haemangioma.


Keywords: haemangioma; proptosis; diplopia; cardiac failure PMID:10621902

  5. Gel stretch method: a new method to measure constitutive properties of cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, B. A.; Baicu, C. F.; Cooper G, I. V.; Gharpuray, V.

    1998-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is an important cause of congestive heart failure; however, the basic mechanisms causing diastolic congestive heart failure are not fully understood, especially the role of the cardiac muscle cell, or cardiocyte, in this process. Before the role of the cardiocyte in this pathophysiology can be defined, methods for measuring cardiocyte constitutive properties must be developed and validated. Thus this study was designed to evaluate a new method to characterize cardiocyte constitutive properties, the gel stretch method. Cardiocytes were isolated enzymatically from normal feline hearts and embedded in a 2% agarose gel containing HEPES-Krebs buffer and laminin. This gel was cast in a shape that allowed it to be placed in a stretching device. The ends of the gel were held between a movable roller and fixed plates that acted as mandibles. Distance between the right and left mandibles was increased using a stepper motor system. The force applied to the gel was measured by a force transducer. The resultant cardiocyte strain was determined by imaging the cells with a microscope, capturing the images with a CCD camera, and measuring cardiocyte and sarcomere length changes. Cardiocyte stress was characterized with a finite-element method. These measurements of cardiocyte stress and strain were used to determine cardiocyte stiffness. Two variables affecting cardiocyte stiffness were measured, the passive elastic spring and viscous damping. The passive spring was assessed by increasing the force on the gel at 1 g/min, modeling the resultant stress vs. strain relationship as an exponential [sigma = A/k(ekepsilon - 1)]. In normal cardiocytes, A = 23.0 kN/m2 and k = 16. Viscous damping was assessed by examining the loop area between the stress vs. strain relationship during 1 g/min increases and decreases in force. Normal cardiocytes had a finite loop area = 1.39 kN/m2, indicating the presence of viscous damping. Thus the gel stretch method provided accurate

  6. From hair to heart: nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells differentiate to beating cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the neural stem-cell marker nestin is expressed in hair follicle stem cells located in the bulge area which are termed hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. HAP stem cells from mouse and human could form spheres in culture, termed hair spheres, which are keratin 15-negative and CD34-positive and could differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we demonstrated that nestin-expressing stem cells could effect nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. In the present study, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. We separated the mouse vibrissa hair follicle into 3 parts (upper, middle, and lower), and suspended each part separately in DMEM containing 10% FBS. All three parts of hair follicle differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells as well as neurons, glial cells, keratinocytes and smooth muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle is greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol and inhibited by propanolol. HAP stem cells have potential for regenerative medicine for heart disease as well as nerve and spinal cord repair.

  7. Sudden Cardiac Death Due to Deficiency of the Mitochondrial Inorganic Pyrophosphatase PPA2.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Hannah; Haack, Tobias B; Hartill, Verity; Mataković, Lavinija; Baumgartner, E Regula; Potter, Howard; Mackay, Richard; Alston, Charlotte L; O'Sullivan, Siobhan; McFarland, Robert; Connolly, Grainne; Gannon, Caroline; King, Richard; Mead, Scott; Crozier, Ian; Chan, Wandy; Florkowski, Chris M; Sage, Martin; Höfken, Thomas; Alhaddad, Bader; Kremer, Laura S; Kopajtich, Robert; Feichtinger, René G; Sperl, Wolfgang; Rodenburg, Richard J; Minet, Jean Claude; Dobbie, Angus; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; George, Peter M; Johnson, Colin A; Taylor, Robert W; Prokisch, Holger; Doudney, Kit; Mayr, Johannes A

    2016-09-01

    We have used whole-exome sequencing in ten individuals from four unrelated pedigrees to identify biallelic missense mutations in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPA2) that are associated with mitochondrial disease. These individuals show a range of severity, indicating that PPA2 mutations may cause a spectrum of mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Severe symptoms include seizures, lactic acidosis, cardiac arrhythmia, and death within days of birth. In the index family, presentation was milder and manifested as cardiac fibrosis and an exquisite sensitivity to alcohol, leading to sudden arrhythmic cardiac death in the second decade of life. Comparison of normal and mutant PPA2-containing mitochondria from fibroblasts showed that the activity of inorganic pyrophosphatase was significantly reduced in affected individuals. Recombinant PPA2 enzymes modeling hypomorphic missense mutations had decreased activity that correlated with disease severity. These findings confirm the pathogenicity of PPA2 mutations and suggest that PPA2 is a cardiomyopathy-associated protein, which has a greater physiological importance in mitochondrial function than previously recognized. PMID:27523597

  8. Internal jugular vein cannulation complications and elimination of the muscular triangle of the neck due to aberrant infrahyoid muscles.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Athanasios; Agnihotri, Ashwin; Yousif, Saif; Kordali, Panagiota; Saberi, Minu; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2014-01-01

    We report on a rare case of anatomical variations of the infrahyoid muscles with prominent clinical significance. The aberrant anatomy was on the right side of the neck and involved the omohyoid and sternohyoid muscles. The superior belly of the omohyoid was duplicated in width due to an aberrant belly anteriorly and merged with fibers of the inferior belly inferiorly and the sternohyoid muscle medially. An additional aberrant muscle slip extended between the inferior third of the sternohyoid muscle and united with the inferior belly of the omohyoid. The intermediate tendon between the two bellies of the omohyoid was absent, whereas the so-called muscular triangle of the neck was diminished. Due to the arrangement and fusion of myofibers the muscle could be termed as omo-sternohyoid muscle. A profound hematoma was noted in the aberrant muscle at the area overlying the internal jugular vein indicating difficulty in obtaining jugular venous access for catheter placement. Clinicians and surgeons should be aware of muscular anatomic variations when intervening in the lateral neck area as the classical anatomical landmarks might be misinterpreted and confuse.

  9. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  10. Combined analyses of creatine kinase MB, cardiac troponin I and myoglobin in pericardial and cerebrospinal fluids to investigate myocardial and skeletal muscle injury in medicolegal autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Zhu, Bao-Li; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-09-01

    Creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and myoglobin (Mb) are biochemical markers of myocardial injury; however, Mb is more abundant in skeletal muscles. The present study involved analysis of these markers in pericardial and cerebrospinal fluids (PCF and CSF) from serial medicolegal autopsy cases (n=295, within 48h) to examine their efficacy in determining the cause of death. Although these markers showed a slight postmortem time-dependent elevation, except for CK-MB in CSF, the distribution depended on the cause of death. Mb levels in PCF and CSF were higher in fatal hyperthermia (heat stroke) and methamphetamine abuse, and CK-MB in both fluids was also higher in the latter. In psychotropic drug intoxication, CK-MB, cTnI and Mb were higher in PCF, but only cTnI was elevated in CSF. In electrocution and cerebrovascular disease, each marker was higher in PCF and also relatively high in CSF. PCF cTnI level was higher in acute pulmonary embolism without significant elevation of any other markers, whereas CSF CK-MB was higher in acute blunt brain injury death and methamphetamine abuse. In most cases of delayed brain injury death, hypothermia (cold exposure) and pneumonia, these markers were low or intermediate in both PCF and CSF; however, sudden cardiac death, asphyxiation and fire fatality cases showed few characteristic findings. These observations suggest that combined analyses of these markers in postmortem PCF and CSF, in addition to blood samples, are helpful for evaluating the severity of myocardial and/or skeletal muscle damage in death processes, in particular for investigating deaths due to hyperthermia, hypothermia, electrocution and intoxication.

  11. Acquisition of multiple nuclei and the activity of DNA polymerase alpha and reinitiation of DNA replication in terminally differentiated adult cardiac muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, W.C.; Bradshaw, H.D. Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Terminally differentiated ventricular cardiac muscle cells isolated from the adult rat and maintained in cell culture have been observed to acquire multiple nuclei. In one cultured myocyte as many as 10 nuclei have been counted. Apparently, these multiple nuclei are formed by DNA replication followed by karyokinesis; the cells must then fail to complete mitosis and divide. To investigate whether DNA synthesis was occurring, the cells were cultured in the presence of (3H)thymidine and then processed for autoradiography. Mononucleated, binucleated, and multinucleated cells incorporate (3H)thymidine into DNA as evidenced by the high concentration of silver grains over their nuclei. Peak periods of incorporation were observed to occur at 10- to 12-day intervals; at 11, 23, and 33 days after initially placing the cells in culture. When the cells were maintained in the presence of (3H)thymidine continuously from Day 7 to Day 17 of culture, 23% of the cells became labeled. If the cells were cultured continuously for 30 days in the presence of (3H)thymidine, from Day 10 to Day 40, 56% of the cells were labeled. Isopycnic gradient analysis indicates that this thymidine incorporation was into DNA that was being replicated semiconservatively; these experiments did not eliminate the possibility, however, that this incorporation was due to amplification of specific genes, such as those coding for the contractile proteins. The activity of DNA polymerase alpha also returns to these cells. These studies demonstrate that the terminally differentiated mammalian ventricular cardiac muscle cell, previously thought to have permanently lost the capacity to replicate DNA during early development, is able to reinitiate semiconservative DNA replication when grown in culture.

  12. [The expression of the sperm-specific lactate dehydrogenase gene Ldh-c in plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) cardiac muscle and its effect on the anaerobic glycolysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Wei, Lian; Wang, Yang; Xu, Li-Na; Wei, Lin-Na; Wei, Deng-Bang

    2015-06-25

    The plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) has a strong adaptability to hypoxic plateau environment. We found that the sperm-specific lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-C4) gene Ldh-c expressed in plateau pika cardiac muscle. In order to shed light on the effect of LDH-C4 on the anaerobic glycolysis in plateau pika cardiac muscle, 20 pikas were randomly divided into the inhibitor group and the control group, and the sample size of each group was 10. The pikas of inhibitor group were injected with 1 mL 1 mol/L N-isopropyl oxamate, a specific LDH-C4 inhibitor, in biceps femoris muscle of hind legs, each leg with 500 μL. The pikas of control group were injected with the same volume of normal saline (0.9% NaCl). The mRNA and protein expression levels of Ldh-c gene in plateau pika cardiac muscle were determined by real-time PCR and Western blot. The activities of LDH, and the contents of lactate (LD) and ATP in cardiac muscle were compared between the inhibitor group and the control group. The results showed that 1) the expression levels of Ldh-c mRNA and protein were 0.47 ± 0.06 and 0.68 ± 0.08, respectively; 2) 30 min after injection of 1 mL 1 mol/L N-isopropyl oxamate in biceps femoris muscle, the concentration of N-isopropyl oxamate in blood was 0.08 mmol/L; 3) in cardiac muscle of the inhibitor group and the control group, the LDH activities were (6.18 ± 0.48) U/mg and (9.08 ± 0.58) U/mg, the contents of LD were (0.21 ± 0.03) mmol/g and (0.26 ± 0.04) mmol/g, and the contents of ATP were (4.40 ± 0.69) nmol/mg and (6.18 ± 0.73) nmol/mg (P < 0.01); 5) the inhibition rates of N-isopropyl oxamate to LDH, LD and ATP were 31.98%, 20.90% and 28.70%, respectively. The results suggest that Ldh-c expresses in cardiac muscle of plateau pika, and the pika cardiac muscle may get at least 28% ATP for its activities by LDH-C4 catalyzed anaerobic glycolysis, which reduces the dependence on oxygen and enhances the adaptation to the hypoxic environments.

  13. Fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force of mouse fast skeletal muscle and ameliorates weakness due to nebulin-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; De Winter, Josine M; Buck, Danielle; Jasper, Jeffrey R; Malik, Fady I; Labeit, Siegfried; Ottenheijm, Coen A; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the fast skeletal muscle troponin activator, CK-2066260, on calcium-induced force development was studied in skinned fast skeletal muscle fibers from wildtype (WT) and nebulin deficient (NEB KO) mice. Nebulin is a sarcomeric protein that when absent (NEB KO mouse) or present at low levels (nemaline myopathy (NM) patients with NEB mutations) causes muscle weakness. We studied the effect of fast skeletal troponin activation on WT muscle and tested whether it might be a therapeutic mechanism to increase muscle strength in nebulin deficient muscle. We measured tension-pCa relations with and without added CK-2066260. Maximal active tension in NEB KO tibialis cranialis fibers in the absence of CK-2066260 was ∼60% less than in WT fibers, consistent with earlier work. CK-2066260 shifted the tension-calcium relationship leftwards, with the largest relative increase (up to 8-fold) at low to intermediate calcium levels. This was a general effect that was present in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. At pCa levels above ∼6.0 (i.e., calcium concentrations <1 µM), CK-2066260 increased tension of NEB KO fibers to beyond that of WT fibers. Crossbridge cycling kinetics were studied by measuring k(tr) (rate constant of force redevelopment following a rapid shortening/restretch). CK-2066260 greatly increased k(tr) at submaximal activation levels in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. We also studied the sarcomere length (SL) dependence of the CK-2066260 effect (SL 2.1 µm and 2.6 µm) and found that in the NEB KO fibers, CK-2066260 had a larger effect on calcium sensitivity at the long SL. We conclude that fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force at submaximal activation in both wildtype and NEB KO fiber bundles and, importantly, that this troponin activation is a potential therapeutic mechanism for increasing force in NM and other skeletal muscle diseases with loss of muscle strength. PMID:23437068

  14. Evaluation and management of heart rhythm disturbances due to cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Selan, Jeffrey C; Michaelson, Melody; Fanburg, Barry L; Estes, N A Mark

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) affects less than 5% of patients with pulmonary or systemic sarcoidosis, but when present is often associated with a spectrum of clinically significant conduction abnormalities and arrhythmias. The cardinal manifestations of CS include conduction disturbances, arrhythmias, or congestive heart failure. Less commonly, there is concealed subclinical disease. The electrophysiologic evaluation for CS includes a history and physical exam, ECG, and echocardiogram for all sarcoidosis patients, along with MRI, PET/nuclear scans, and EPS for certain subsets of patients. Despite variable data to support their efficacy, glucocorticoids should still be considered in the treatment plan of CS. Antiarrhythmics in isolation are often ineffective in controlling ventricular arrhythmias. Cardiac pacemakers have provided important therapy for patients with conduction defects and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy provides the strongest insurance to prevent fatal arrhythmias from CS. A recent consensus statement provides guidance for clinicians on the diagnosis and management of arrhythmias associated with CS including indications for ICDs. The use of pacemakers, ICD implantation and early implementation of corticosteroid therapy have led to an improvement in the overall prognosis and clinical outcomes of CS.

  15. N-Glycolylneuraminic acid deficiency worsens cardiac and skeletal muscle pathophysiology in α-sarcoglycan-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul T; Camboni, Marybeth; Xu, Rui; Golden, Bethannie; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Wang, Chiou-Miin; Varki, Ajit; Janssen, Paul M L

    2013-01-01

    Roughly 3 million years ago, an inactivating deletion occurred in CMAH, the human gene encoding CMP-Neu5Ac (cytidine-5′-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid) hydroxylase (Chou HH, Takematsu H, Diaz S, Iber J, Nickerson E, Wright KL, Muchmore EA, Nelson DL, Warren ST, Varki A. 1998. A mutation in human CMP-sialic acid hydroxylase occurred after the Homo-Pan divergence. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 95:11751–11756). This inactivating deletion is now homozygous in all humans, causing the loss of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) biosynthesis in all human cells and tissues. The CMAH enzyme is active in other mammals, including mice, where Neu5Gc is an abundant form of sialic acid on cellular membranes, including those in cardiac and skeletal muscle. We recently demonstrated that the deletion of mouse Cmah worsened the severity of pathophysiology measures related to muscular dystrophy in mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Chandrasekharan K, Yoon JH, Xu Y, deVries S, Camboni M, Janssen PM, Varki A, Martin PT. 2010. A human-specific deletion in mouse Cmah increases disease severity in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Sci Transl Med. 2:42–54). Here, we demonstrate similar changes in cardiac and skeletal muscle pathology and physiology resulting from Cmah deletion in α-sarcoglycan-deficient (Sgca−/−) mice, a model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D. These experiments demonstrate that loss of mouse Cmah can worsen disease severity in more than one form of muscular dystrophy and suggest that Cmah may be a general genetic modifier of muscle disease. PMID:23514716

  16. The decreased oxygen uptake during progressive exercise in ischemia-induced heart failure is due to reduced cardiac output rate.

    PubMed

    Rolim, N P L; Mattos, K C; Brum, P C; Baldo, M V C; Middlekauff, H R; Negrão, C E

    2006-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the inability to increase cardiac output during exercise would explain the decreased rate of oxygen uptake (VO2) in recent onset, ischemia-induced heart failure rats. Nine normal control rats and 6 rats with ischemic heart failure were studied. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary ligation. VO2 was measured during a ramp protocol test on a treadmill using a metabolic mask. Cardiac output was measured with a flow probe placed around the ascending aorta. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was higher in ischemic heart failure rats compared with normal control rats (17 +/- 0.4 vs 8 +/- 0.8 mmHg, P = 0.0001). Resting cardiac index (CI) tended to be lower in ischemic heart failure rats (P = 0.07). Resting heart rate (HR) and stroke volume index (SVI) did not differ significantly between ischemic heart failure rats and normal control rats. Peak VO2 was lower in ischemic heart failure rats (73.72 +/- 7.37 vs 109.02 +/- 27.87 mL min(-1) kg(-1), P = 0.005). The VO2 and CI responses during exercise were significantly lower in ischemic heart failure rats than in normal control rats. The temporal response of SVI, but not of HR, was significantly lower in ischemic heart failure rats than in normal control rats. Peak CI, HR, and SVI were lower in ischemic heart failure rats. The reduction in VO2 response during incremental exercise in an ischemic model of heart failure is due to the decreased cardiac output response, largely caused by depressed stroke volume kinetics.

  17. Calcium Alternans is Due to an Order-Disorder Phase Transition in Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Echebarria, Blas; Spalding, Jon; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2015-03-01

    Electromechanical alternans is a beat-to-beat alternation in the strength of contraction of a cardiac cell, which can be caused by an instability of calcium cycling. Using a distributed model of subcellular calcium we show that alternans occurs via an order-disorder phase transition which exhibits critical slowing down and a diverging correlation length. We apply finite size scaling along with a mapping to a stochastic coupled map model, to show that this transition in two dimensions is characterized by critical exponents consistent with the Ising universality class. These findings highlight the important role of cooperativity in biological cells, and suggest novel approaches to investigate the onset of the alternans instability in the heart.

  18. [Cardiac Angiosarcoma with Acute Myocardial Infarction due to Tumor Embolism;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Date, Yusuke; Miyazu, Katsuyuki; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old man with a rare angiosarcoma complicated by acute myocardial infarction secondary to tumor embolism. He was transported to our emergency unit because of sudden onset of chest pain. The echocardiography showed a 42×60 mm mass in the left ventricle, and the coronary angiography showed embolic occlusion of the proximal left anterior descending and circumflex arteries. Emergent surgical removal of the mass was attempted under cardiopulmonary bypass, concomitant with double coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. However, complete tumor excision was impossible. The postoperative pathological examination revealed undifferentiated angiosarcoma. Twenty days after the operation, the patient suffered acute cerebral hemorrhage from a metastatic tumor in the brain. He died at 37 days after the initial cardiac surgery. PMID:27586319

  19. Distal myosin heavy chain-7 myopathy due to the novel transition c.5566G>A (p.E1856K) with high interfamilial cardiac variability and putative anticipation.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Brandau, Oliver; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wallefeld, William; Laing, Nigel G; Laccone, Franco

    2014-08-01

    Myosin-heavy-chain 7 (MYH7)-myopathy manifests clinically with a distal, scapuloperoneal, limb-girdle (proximal), or axial distribution and may involve the respiratory muscles. Cardiac involvement is frequent, ranging from relaxation impairment to severe dilative cardiomyopathy. Progression and earlier onset of cardiac disease in successive generations with MYH7-myopathy is unreported. In a five-generation family MYH7-myopathy due to the novel c.5566G > A (p.E1856K) mutation manifested with late-onset, distal > proximal myopathy and variable degree of cardiac involvement. The index patient developed distal myopathy since age 49 y and anginal chest pain. Her mother had distal myopathy and impaired myocardial relaxation. The daughter of the index patient had discrete myopathy but left ventricular hypertrabeculation/noncompaction and ventricular arrhythmias requiring an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The granddaughter of the index patient had infantile dilated cardiomyopathy without overt myopathy. Cardiac involvement may be present in MYH7-myopathy and may be progressive between the generations, ranging from relaxation abnormality to noncompaction, ventricular arrhythmias, and dilated cardiomyopathy.

  20. Energetics of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange in resting cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Ponce-Hornos, J E; Philipson, K D; Bonazzola, P; Langer, G A

    1999-01-01

    The energetic effect of extracellular Na(+) removal and readmission (in a nominally Ca(2+)-free perfusate) in Langendorff-perfused ventricles of transgenic mice (TM), which overexpress the sarcolemmal Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger; normal mice (NM); young (7-12 days old) rats (YR); and older (13-20 days old) rats (OR) was studied. In all heart muscles, extracellular Na(+) removal induced an increase in heat production (H(1)). Na(+) readmission further increased heat production to a peak value (H(2)) followed by a decrease toward initial values. These effects were more marked in the YR and TM as compared with the OR and NM groups, respectively. Caffeine (1 mM), ryanodine (0.2 microM), and verapamil (1 microM) decreased H(1) and H(2) in both rat groups. EGTA (1 mM) decreased H(1) and H(2) in the YR but not in the OR group. Thapsigargin (1 microM) decreased H(1) and H(2) in all four hearts preparations. A possible interpretation is that Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange acts as an energy-saving mechanism to prevent Ca(2+) accumulation at the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum zone (JSR) and thus prevents further release of Ca(2+). Extracellular Na(+) removal lead to Ca(2+) accumulation in the JSR inducing further SR-Ca(2+) release and increased energy release. Na(+) readmission removes the accumulated Ca(2+) at the JSR (cleft) zone by exchanging Ca(2+) with Na(+) producing a transitory increase in energy release due to Na(+)-K pump activation. PMID:10585954

  1. Electrical recordings from rat cardiac muscle cells using field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprössler, Christoph; Denyer, Morgan; Britland, Steve; Knoll, Wolfgang; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    1999-08-01

    Extracellular electrophysiological recordings were made from cardiac cells cultured for up to seven days over microfabricated arrays of field-effect transistors. The recorded signals can be separated mainly into two types of cell transistor couplings: one that can be explained entirely by purely passive circuitry elements, and a second where voltage-gated ion channels contribute greatly to the measured extracellular signal.

  2. Healthy older humans exhibit augmented carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity with aspirin during muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Drew, Rachel C; Blaha, Cheryl A; Herr, Michael D; Stocker, Sean D; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-10-01

    Low-dose aspirin inhibits thromboxane production and augments the sensitivity of carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of heart rate (HR) during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in healthy young humans. However, it is unknown how aging affects this response. Therefore, the effect of low-dose aspirin on carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during muscle mechanoreflex with and without metaboreflex activation in healthy older humans was examined. Twelve older subjects (6 men and 6 women, mean age: 62 ± 1 yr) performed two trials during two visits preceded by 7 days of low-dose aspirin (81 mg) or placebo. One trial involved 3 min of passive calf stretch (mechanoreflex) during 7.5 min of limb circulatory occlusion (CO). In another trial, CO was preceded by 1.5 min of 70% maximal voluntary contraction isometric calf exercise (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex). HR (ECG) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; Finometer) were recorded. CBR function was assessed using rapid neck pressure application (+40 to -80 mmHg). Aspirin significantly decreased baseline thromboxane B2 production by 83 ± 4% (P < 0.05) but did not affect 6-keto-PGF1α. After aspirin, CBR-HR maximal gain and operating point gain were significantly higher during stretch with metabolite accumulation compared with placebo (maximal gain: -0.23 ± 0.03 vs. -0.14 ± 0.02 and operating point gain: -0.11 ± 0.03 vs. -0.04 ± 0.01 beats·min(-1)·mmHg(-1) for aspirin and placebo, respectively, P < 0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that low-dose aspirin augments CBR-HR sensitivity during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in healthy older humans. This increased sensitivity appears linked to reduced thromboxane sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors, which consequently improves CBR-HR control. PMID:26371168

  3. Healthy older humans exhibit augmented carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity with aspirin during muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Drew, Rachel C; Blaha, Cheryl A; Herr, Michael D; Stocker, Sean D; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-10-01

    Low-dose aspirin inhibits thromboxane production and augments the sensitivity of carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of heart rate (HR) during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in healthy young humans. However, it is unknown how aging affects this response. Therefore, the effect of low-dose aspirin on carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during muscle mechanoreflex with and without metaboreflex activation in healthy older humans was examined. Twelve older subjects (6 men and 6 women, mean age: 62 ± 1 yr) performed two trials during two visits preceded by 7 days of low-dose aspirin (81 mg) or placebo. One trial involved 3 min of passive calf stretch (mechanoreflex) during 7.5 min of limb circulatory occlusion (CO). In another trial, CO was preceded by 1.5 min of 70% maximal voluntary contraction isometric calf exercise (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex). HR (ECG) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; Finometer) were recorded. CBR function was assessed using rapid neck pressure application (+40 to -80 mmHg). Aspirin significantly decreased baseline thromboxane B2 production by 83 ± 4% (P < 0.05) but did not affect 6-keto-PGF1α. After aspirin, CBR-HR maximal gain and operating point gain were significantly higher during stretch with metabolite accumulation compared with placebo (maximal gain: -0.23 ± 0.03 vs. -0.14 ± 0.02 and operating point gain: -0.11 ± 0.03 vs. -0.04 ± 0.01 beats·min(-1)·mmHg(-1) for aspirin and placebo, respectively, P < 0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that low-dose aspirin augments CBR-HR sensitivity during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in healthy older humans. This increased sensitivity appears linked to reduced thromboxane sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors, which consequently improves CBR-HR control.

  4. An investigation of fatigue phenomenon in the upper limb muscle due to short duration pulses in an FES system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Jannatul; Wong Azman, Amelia; Khan, Sheroz; Mohd Mustafah, Yasir

    2013-12-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is a method of artificially stimulating muscles or nerves in order to result in contraction or relaxation of muscles. Many studies have shown that FES system has helped patients to live a better lives especially those who are suffering from physical mobility. Unfortunately, one of the main limitations of an FES system besides of its high cost is largely due to muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue will affect the training duration which could delay patients' recovery rate. In this paper, we analyzed the occurrence of this fatigue phenomenon in terms of stimulator parameters such as amplitude, frequency, pulse width and pulse shape. The objective of this investigation is to identify other key features of the FES system parameters in order to prolong the training duration among patients. The experiment has been done on a healthy person for the duration of one minute and later the muscles response will be observed. Resultant muscle response is recorded as force using force resistive sensor. The experimental results show muscles will get fatigue at a different rate as the frequency increases. The experiment also shows that the duty cycle is reciprocal to the resultant force.

  5. Recurrent aborted sudden cardiac death with seizures and rhabdomyolysis due to bulimia-induced hypokalemia: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Recurrent vomiting due to bulimia associated with abuse of furosemide and laxatives causing severe hypokalemia may result in recurrent aborted sudden cardiac death (SCD) and seizures. We report a 25-year-old female with a history of bulimia associated with abuse of furosemide and laxatives since the age of 15 years, migraine since puberty, renal abscesses at age 20 y, and rhabdomyolysis of unknown cause at age 24 y. She experienced aborted SCD due to severe hypokalemia with symptomatic seizures at 21 and 25 years of age. Bulimia patients additionally taking laxatives or furosemide are at particular risk of SCD and rhabdomyolysis and require periodic determination of electrolytes, potassium substitution, and adequate psychiatric therapy and surveillance.

  6. Lanthanum Probe Studies of Cellular Pathophysiology Induced by Hypoxia in Isolated Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Karen P.; Hagler, Herbert K.; Templeton, Gordon H.; Willerson, James T.; Buja, L. Maximilian

    1977-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate directly the relationship between evolution of irreversible myocardial injury induced by hypoxia in an isolated papillary muscle preparation and the development of pathophysiological alterations related to severely impaired membrane function. An ionic lanthanum probe technique was employed as a cytochemical marker to monitor the progression of cellular injury, and data from this cytologic technique were correlated with ultrastructure and measurements of contractile parameters in a total of 67 muscles subjected to control conditions or to graded intervals of hypoxia with or without reoxygenation. Marked depression of developed tension and rate of tension development occurred after 30 min of hypoxia. Contractile function showed significant recovery with reoxygenation after 1 h and 15 min of hypoxia but remained depressed when reoxygenation was provided after 2 or 3 h of hypoxia. Examination by transmission and analytical electron microscopy (energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis) revealed lanthanum deposition only in extracellular regions of control muscles and muscles subjected to 30 min of hypoxia. After hypoxic intervals of over 1 h, abnormal intracytoplasmic and intramitochondrial localization of lanthanum were detected. After 1 h and 15 min of hypoxia, abnormal intracellular lanthanum accumulation was associated with only minimal ultrastructural evidence of injury; muscle provided reoxygenation after 1 h and 15 min of hypoxia showed improved ultrastructure and did not exhibit intracellular lanthanum deposits upon exposure to lanthanum during the reoxygenation period. After 2 to 3 h of hypoxia, abnormal intracellular lanthanum accumulation was associated with ultrastructural evidence of severe muscle injury which persisted after reoxygenation. Thus, the data support the conclusion that cellular and membrane alterations responsible for abnormal intracellular lanthanum deposition precede the development of irreversible injury

  7. Chiral recognition of pinacidil and its 3-pyridyl isomer by canine cardiac and smooth muscle: Antagonism by sulfonylureas

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.I.; Wiest, S.A.; Zimmerman, K.M.; Ertel, P.J.; Bemis, K.G.; Robertson, D.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Pinacidil, a potassium channel opener (PCO), relaxes vascular smooth muscle by increasing potassium ion membrane conductance, thereby causing membrane hyperpolarization. PCOs also act on cardiac muscle to decrease action potential duration (APD) selectively. To examine the enantiomeric selectivity of pinacidil, the stereoisomers of pinacidil (a 4-pyridylcyanoguanidine) and its 3-pyridyl isomer (LY222675) were synthesized and studied in canine Purkinje fibers and cephalic veins. The (-)-enantiomers of both pinacidil and LY222675 were more potent in relaxing phenylephrine-contracted cephalic veins and decreasing APD than were their corresponding (+)-enantiomers. The EC50 values for (-)-pinacidil and (-)-LY222675 in relaxing cephalic veins were 0.44 and 0.09 microM, respectively. In decreasing APD, the EC50 values were 3.2 microM for (-)-pinacidil and 0.43 microM for (-)-LY222675. The eudismic ratio was greater for the 3-pyridyl isomer than for pinacidil in both cardiac (71 vs. 22) and vascular (53 vs. 17) tissues. (-)-LY222675 and (-)-pinacidil (0.1-30 microM) also increased 86Rb efflux from cephalic veins to a greater extent than did their respective optical antipodes. The antidiabetic sulfonylurea, glyburide (1-30 microM), shifted the vascular concentration-response curve of (-)-pinacidil to the right by a similar extent at each inhibitor concentration. Glipizide also antagonized the response to (-)-pinacidil, but was about 1/10 as potent with a maximal shift occurring at 10 and 30 microM. Glyburide antagonized the vascular relaxant effects of 0.3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 2.3 microM) and reversed the decrease in APD caused by 3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 1.9 microM). Nitroprusside did not alter 86Rb efflux, and vascular relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by sulfonylureas.

  8. Simulation of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum with three-dimensional sarcomere model in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Tameyasu, Tsukasa

    2002-08-01

    A simulation of some basic features of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in cardiac muscle was made with a model based on the mechanism of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release. The half-sarcomere modeled as a circular cylinder was divided into 20 annular elements in the radial, 50 slices in the axial, and 125 slices in the azimuthal direction. The cylindrical surface of the sarcomere was covered by a layer of the SR. The rate of Ca(2+) release from the terminal sac (TS) is proportional to the product of the open probability of the Ca(2+) release channel and the difference of [Ca(2+)] between the TS and an element facing the TS. Ca(2+) moves from element to element by simple diffusion and is taken up by the tubular SR via Ca(2+)-ATPase. Ca(2+) influx (I(ca)) to trigger the TS Ca(2+) release was introduced to either a single element facing the TS (local I(ca)) or to 20 elements aligned at the level of the Z-line (uniform I(ca)). The simulation showed that with both types of I(ca), TS Ca(2+) release is smoothly graded over a wide range of I(ca) with the TS moderately loaded with Ca(2+). The gain determined by dividing the total amount of TS Ca(2+) release by I(ca) was greater with local than with uniform I(ca). Mechanical alternans was simulated with both the local and uniform I(ca) with an appropriate rate of Ca(2+) replenishment to the TS. A Ca(2+) wave was simulated with a model consisting of 8 longitudinally consecutive sarcomeres with TS heavily loaded with Ca(2+). Thus the present model accounted for graded TS Ca(2+) release, mechanical alternans, and Ca(2+) wave in cardiac muscle at the same time. PMID:12519471

  9. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.

  10. Image Reconstruction in Higher Dimensions: Myocardial Perfusion Imaging of Tracer Dynamics with Cardiac Motion Due to Deformation and Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. However, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images. PMID:26450115

  11. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    DOE PAGES

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variationmore » of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.« less

  12. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.

  13. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Uttam M; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images. PMID:26450115

  14. Stretch of Contracting Cardiac Muscle Abruptly Decreases the Rate of Phosphate Release at High and Low Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Catherine; West, Tim G.; Curtin, Nancy A.; Ferenczi, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The contractile performance of the heart is linked to the energy that is available to it. Yet, the heart needs to respond quickly to changing demands. During diastole, the heart fills with blood and the heart chambers expand. Upon activation, contraction of cardiac muscle expels blood into the circulation. Early in systole, parts of the left ventricle are being stretched by incoming blood, before contraction causes shrinking of the ventricle. We explore here the effect of stretch of contracting permeabilized cardiac trabeculae of the rat on the rate of inorganic phosphate (Pi) release resulting from ATP hydrolysis, using a fluorescent sensor for Pi with millisecond time resolution. Stretch immediately reduces the rate of Pi release, an effect observed both at full calcium activation (32 μmol/liter of Ca2+), and at a physiological activation level of 1 μmol/liter of Ca2+. The results suggest that stretch redistributes the actomyosin cross-bridges toward their Pi-containing state. The redistribution means that a greater fraction of cross-bridges will be poised to rapidly produce a force-generating transition and movement, compared with cross-bridges that have not been subjected to stretch. At the same time stretch modifies the Pi balance in the cytoplasm, which may act as a cytoplasmic signal for energy turnover. PMID:22692210

  15. Host-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells Accumulate in Cardiac Allografts: Role of Inflammation and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Bojakowski, Krzysztof; Soin, Joanna; Nozynski, Jerzy; Zakliczynski, Michal; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is characterized by inflammation and intimal thickening caused by accumulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) both from donor and recipient. We assessed the relationship between clinical factors and the presence of host-derived SMCs in 124 myocardial biopsies from 26 consecutive patients who received hearts from opposite-sex donors. Clinical and demographic information was obtained from the patients' medical records. Host-derived SMCs accounted for 3.35±2.3% of cells in arterioles (range, 0.08–12.51%). As shown by linear regression analysis, an increased number of SMCs was associated with rejection grade (mean, 1.41±1.03, p = 0.034) and the number of leukocytes (19.1±12.7 per 20 high-power fields, p = 0.01). The accumulation of host-derived SMCs was associated with an increased number of leukocytes in the allografts. In vitro, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) released from leukocytes was crucial for SMC migration. After heart allotransplantion, mice treated with MCP-1-specific antibodies had significantly fewer host-derived SMCs in the grafts than mice treated with isotypic antibody controls. We conclude that the number of host-derived SMCs in human cardiac allografts is associated with the rejection grade and that MCP-1 may play pivotal role in recruiting host-derived SMCs into cardiac allografts. PMID:19142231

  16. Stretch of contracting cardiac muscle abruptly decreases the rate of phosphate release at high and low calcium.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Catherine; West, Tim G; Curtin, Nancy A; Ferenczi, Michael A

    2012-07-27

    The contractile performance of the heart is linked to the energy that is available to it. Yet, the heart needs to respond quickly to changing demands. During diastole, the heart fills with blood and the heart chambers expand. Upon activation, contraction of cardiac muscle expels blood into the circulation. Early in systole, parts of the left ventricle are being stretched by incoming blood, before contraction causes shrinking of the ventricle. We explore here the effect of stretch of contracting permeabilized cardiac trabeculae of the rat on the rate of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) release resulting from ATP hydrolysis, using a fluorescent sensor for P(i) with millisecond time resolution. Stretch immediately reduces the rate of P(i) release, an effect observed both at full calcium activation (32 μmol/liter of Ca(2+)), and at a physiological activation level of 1 μmol/liter of Ca(2+). The results suggest that stretch redistributes the actomyosin cross-bridges toward their P(i)-containing state. The redistribution means that a greater fraction of cross-bridges will be poised to rapidly produce a force-generating transition and movement, compared with cross-bridges that have not been subjected to stretch. At the same time stretch modifies the P(i) balance in the cytoplasm, which may act as a cytoplasmic signal for energy turnover.

  17. Sudden cardiac death due to physical exercise in male competitive athletes. A report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Durakovic, Z; Misigoj-Durakovic, M; Vuori, I; Skavic, J; Belicza, M

    2005-12-01

    In the period of 30 years, i.e. from 1973 to 2002, we noticed in Croatia 6 sudden and unexpected cardiac deaths in male athletes during or after training. Two were soccer players, 2 athletic runners, one was a rugby player and one was a basketball player. All of them were without cardiovascular symptoms. At the forensic autopsy, the first athlete, aged 29, had chronic myocarditis and thickened left ventricular wall of 15 mm. The second, aged 21, had an acute myocardial infarction of the posterior wall with normal coronaries and thickened left ventricular wall of 15 mm. The third aged 17, had hypoplastic right coronary artery and narrowed ascending aorta, suppurant tonsillitis and subacute myocarditis. Two athletes, aged 29 and 15, had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and normal coronaries, and one dilated aorta. The sixth, aged 24, had arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy of the right ventricle. All the 6 athletes died suddenly, obviously because of malignant ventricular arrhythmias. In Croatia the death rate among athletes reached 0.15/100 000, in others who practice exercise reached 0.74/100,000 and the difference is highly significant (c2=14.487, Poisson rates=3.81, P=0.00014) and in physicians-specialists reached 33.6/100,000. Preventive medical examinations are essential, especially in athletes before physical exercise, as are other investigations in every case suspicious of heart disease, including electrocardiogram (ECG), stress ECG, echocardiography and stress-echocardiography and other findings if indicated. Physical exercise is contraindicated in acute respiratory infection: in 2 of those cases had been a cause of death as a trigger.

  18. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and sudden cardiac death due to physical exercise in Croatia in a 27-year period.

    PubMed

    Duraković, Zijad; Duraković, Marjeta Misigoj; Skavić, Josip

    2011-12-01

    The paper deals with the sudden cardiac death during physical exercise in males in Croatia. The data are a part of a retrospective study dealing with 69 sudden death due to physical activity in men in Croatia during 27 years: from January 1, 1984 to December 31, 2010. Three of them suddenly died during training and two of them died during recreational physical exercise, probably because of malignant ventricular arrhythmia due to hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy. One had an obstructive form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with i.v. septum of 40 mm and four had a non-obstructive forms of hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular wall of 18-20-22-25 mm. First athlete was a short trails runner, aged 24, with no any previous physical discomforts, who suddenly collapsed and died during training. The second athlete was a soccer player aged 18, with no any previous physical discomfort, who suddenly collapsed and died during training. The third aged 15, was a school boy, basketball player, with no any previous physical discomfort, who collapsed and died during training. Two aged 25 and 34, were with no physical discomfort during exercise and died suddenly during recreational soccer games. A sudden cardiac death due to physical exercise in young athletes in Croatia suffered of hyperthropic cardiomyopathy reached 0.06/100 000 yearly (p = 0.00000) in 27 years, in teenagers 0.26/100 000 (p = 0.00226), in teenagers suffered of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy reached 0.10/100 000 (p = 0.00000), in all young athletes suffered of other heart diseases reached 0.19/100 000 (p = 0.00005), and in the total male population aged 15 or more, engaged in sports and recreational physical exercise: 0.71/100.0000 (p = 0.00001).

  19. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The 3 types of muscle tissue are cardiac, smooth, and skeletal. Cardiac muscle cells are located in ... heart, appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow ...

  20. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  1. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks.

    PubMed

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  2. Miniaturized iPS-Cell-Derived Cardiac Muscles for Physiologically Relevant Drug Response Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Huebsch, Nathaniel; Loskill, Peter; Deveshwar, Nikhil; Spencer, C. Ian; Judge, Luke M.; Mandegar, Mohammad A.; B. Fox, Cade; Mohamed, Tamer M.A.; Ma, Zhen; Mathur, Anurag; Sheehan, Alice M.; Truong, Annie; Saxton, Mike; Yoo, Jennie; Srivastava, Deepak; Desai, Tejal A.; So, Po-Lin; Healy, Kevin E.; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering approaches have the potential to increase the physiologic relevance of human iPS-derived cells, such as cardiomyocytes (iPS-CM). However, forming Engineered Heart Muscle (EHM) typically requires >1 million cells per tissue. Existing miniaturization strategies involve complex approaches not amenable to mass production, limiting the ability to use EHM for iPS-based disease modeling and drug screening. Micro-scale cardiospheres are easily produced, but do not facilitate assembly of elongated muscle or direct force measurements. Here we describe an approach that combines features of EHM and cardiospheres: Micro-Heart Muscle (μHM) arrays, in which elongated muscle fibers are formed in an easily fabricated template, with as few as 2,000 iPS-CM per individual tissue. Within μHM, iPS-CM exhibit uniaxial contractility and alignment, robust sarcomere assembly, and reduced variability and hypersensitivity in drug responsiveness, compared to monolayers with the same cellular composition. μHM mounted onto standard force measurement apparatus exhibited a robust Frank-Starling response to external stretch, and a dose-dependent inotropic response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Based on the ease of fabrication, the potential for mass production and the small number of cells required to form μHM, this system provides a potentially powerful tool to study cardiomyocyte maturation, disease and cardiotoxicology in vitro. PMID:27095412

  3. Influence of menstrual cycle phase on muscle metaboreflex control of cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate and blood pressure in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartwich, Doreen; Aldred, Sarah; Fisher, James P

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine whether menstrual cycle phase influences muscle metaboreflex control of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS), blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Twenty-three young women not taking oral contraceptives were studied during the early (EF; low oestrogen, low progesterone) and late follicular menstrual phases (LF; high oestrogen, low progesterone). Protocol 1 consisted of leg cycling at low (21 ± 2 W) and moderate workloads (71 ± 3 W) in free-flow conditions and with partial flow restriction (bilateral thigh-cuff inflation at 100 mmHg) to activate the muscle metaboreflex. Protocol 2 consisted of rhythmic hand-grip exercise with incremental upper arm-cuff inflation (0, 80, 100 and 120 mmHg) to elicit graded metaboreflex activation. Both protocols were followed by post-exercise ischaemia. Leg cycling decreased cBRS (EF, 20 ± 5, 6 ± 1 and 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 19 ± 3, 6 ± 0.4, 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1) during rest, low- and moderate-intensity leg cycling, respectively) and increased HR in an intensity-dependent manner, while BP remained unchanged. Partial flow restriction during leg cycling decreased cBRS, and increased HR and BP. During post-exercise ischaemia, HR and BP remained elevated, while cBRS remained suppressed (EF, 4.2 ± 0.6 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 4.7 ± 0.5 ms mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 versus rest). Cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was unchanged during hand-grip with and without partial flow restriction and post-exercise ischaemia. No differences in cBRS, HR or BP responses were observed between EF and LF at any time during either protocol. These data indicate that endogenous fluctuations in oestrogen between the EF and LF phases of the menstrual cycle do not influence muscle metaboreflex control of cBRS, BP or HR in young women.

  4. Sustained skeletal muscle power for cardiac assist devices: implications of metabolic constraints.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, S H; Egrie, G D; Marinache, S M; Gustafson, K J; Farrar, D J; Hill, J D

    2001-01-01

    A device to harness power from skeletal muscle contracting in a linear configuration is under development. This application requires a sustained level of power that is dependent upon muscle mechanics and metabolic properties. A biomechanical muscle model and a metabolic model constructed from experimental data were used to predict maximum power available in a sustainable region of loading and stimulation conditions. Latissimus dorsi (LD) of four goats were evaluated in vivo after a 10 week in situ conditioning protocol with an implanted Telectronics myostimulator. The LD insertion was reconnected to a hydraulic loading system, allowing isometric and isotonic contractions for biomechanical characterization. Metabolic utilization was measured by a thermister based myothermic technique. Brief fatigue tests of working isotonic contractions revealed stimulation conditions associated with sustained power. The results show metabolic utilization was dependent on contraction duration, rate, force, and stroke. The region of sustainable contractions was found for a range of durations of 0.1 to 0.6 sec and rates of 10 to 120 bpm. The boundary for the sustainable power region was well approximated by a constant value of metabolic utilization. A constant duty cycle (contraction to cycle duration ratio) also approximated the sustained power but differed by as much as 30% during the shorter contraction durations. The results demonstrate that a mechanical muscle model can predict maximum sustained power when the operating conditions are constrained to a sustainable range determined by a metabolic model. Furthermore, metabolic constraints influence the optimum conditions for sustained power needed in the design of skeletal muscle powered assist devices.

  5. Relationship between adductor pollicis muscle thickness and subjective global assessment in a cardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Karst, Fernanda Pickrodt; Vieira, Renata Monteiro; Barbiero, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify the relationship between the adductor pollicis muscle thickness test and the subjective global assessment and to correlate it with other anthropometric methods. Methods This observational cross-sectional study was conducted in the intensive care unit of a cardiology hospital in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The hospitalized patients underwent subjective global assessment and adductor pollicis muscle thickness tests on both hands, along with measurement of the right calf circumference. Laboratory parameters, length of stay, vital signs and electronic medical record data and tests were all collected. Results The study population included 83 patients, of whom 62% were men. The average age was 68.6 ± 12.5 years. The most common reason for hospitalization was acute myocardial infarction (34.9%), and the most common pathology was systolic blood pressure (63.9%), followed by diabetes mellitus (28.9%). According to subjective global assessment classifications, 62.7% of patients presented no nutritional risk, 20.5% were moderately malnourished and 16.9% were severely malnourished. Women had a higher nutritional risk, according to both the subjective global assessment and the adductor pollicis muscle thickness test, the cutoff for which was < 6.5mm (54.8%; p = 0.001). The pathology presenting the greatest nutritional risk was congestive heart failure (p = 0.001). Evaluation of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve between adductor pollicis muscle thickness and subjective global assessment showed the accuracy of the former, with an area of 0.822. Conclusion Adductor pollicis muscle thickness proved to be a good method for evaluating nutritional risk. PMID:26761475

  6. Upstream regions of the human cardiac actin gene that modulate its transcription in muscle cells: presence of an evolutionarily conserved repeated motif.

    PubMed Central

    Minty, A; Kedes, L

    1986-01-01

    Transfection into cultured cell lines was used to investigate the transcriptional regulation of the human cardiac actin gene. We first demonstrated that in both human heart and human skeletal muscle, cardiac actin mRNAs initiate at the identical site and contain the same first exon, which is separated from the first coding exon by an intron of 700 base pairs. A region of 485 base pairs upstream from the transcription initiation site of the human cardiac actin gene directs high-level transient expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in differentiated myotubes of the mouse C2C12 muscle cell line, but not in mouse L fibroblast or rat PC-G2 pheochromocytoma cells. Deletion analysis of this region showed that at least two physically separated sequence elements are involved, a distal one starting between -443 and -395 and a proximal one starting between -177 and -118, and suggested that these sequences interact with positively acting transcriptional factors in muscle cells. When these two sequence elements are inserted separately upstream of a heterologous (simian virus 40) promoter, they do not affect transcription but do give a small (four- to fivefold) stimulation when tested together. Overall, these regulatory regions upstream of the cap site of the human cardiac actin gene show remarkably high sequence conservation with the equivalent regions of the mouse and chick genes. Furthermore, there is an evolutionarily conserved repeated motif that may be important in the transcriptional regulation of actin and other contractile protein genes. Images PMID:3785189

  7. Length-dependent changes in contractile dynamics are blunted due to cardiac myosin binding protein-C ablation

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gresham, Kenneth S.; Stelzer, Julian E.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced cardiac contractile function with increased sarcomere length (SL) is, in part, mediated by a decrease in the radial distance between myosin heads and actin. The radial disposition of myosin heads relative to actin is modulated by cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C), suggesting that cMyBP-C contributes to the length-dependent activation (LDA) in the myocardium. However, the precise roles of cMyBP-C in modulating cardiac LDA are unclear. To determine the impact of cMyBP-C on LDA, we measured isometric force, myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity (pCa50) and length-dependent changes in kinetic parameters of cross-bridge (XB) relaxation (krel), and recruitment (kdf) due to rapid stretch, as well as the rate of force redevelopment (ktr) in response to a large slack-restretch maneuver in skinned ventricular multicellular preparations isolated from the hearts of wild-type (WT) and cMyBP-C knockout (KO) mice, at SL's 1.9 μm or 2.1 μm. Our results show that maximal force was not significantly different between KO and WT preparations but length-dependent increase in pCa50 was attenuated in the KO preparations. pCa50 was not significantly different between WT and KO preparations at long SL (5.82 ± 0.02 in WT vs. 5.87 ± 0.02 in KO), whereas pCa50 was significantly different between WT and KO preparations at short SL (5.71 ± 0.02 in WT vs. 5.80 ± 0.01 in KO; p < 0.05). The ktr, measured at half-maximal Ca2+-activation, was significantly accelerated at short SL in WT preparations (8.74 ± 0.56 s−1 at 1.9 μm vs. 5.71 ± 0.40 s−1 at 2.1 μm, p < 0.05). Furthermore, krel and kdf were accelerated by 32% and 50%, respectively at short SL in WT preparations. In contrast, ktr was not altered by changes in SL in KO preparations (8.03 ± 0.54 s−1 at 1.9 μm vs. 8.90 ± 0.37 s−1 at 2.1 μm). Similarly, KO preparations did not exhibit length-dependent changes in krel and kdf. Collectively, our data implicate cMyBP-C as an important regulator of LDA via its impact on

  8. Effects of nutritional supplementation with l-arginine on repair of injuries due to muscle strain: experimental study on rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Lauren Izabel Medeiros; Wuicik, William Luiz; Kuhn, Ivan; Capriotti, Juan Rodolfo Vilela; Repka, João Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of oral supplementation with arginine on regeneration of injuries due to straining of the anterior tibial muscle of rats. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats of weight 492.5 ± 50.45 g were used. Injuries were induced through straining the anterior tibial muscles. The rats were separated into three groups of eight rats each. In the untreated group (UTG), after induction of injuries, the rats were observed for 24 h. In the simulation group (SG) and the arginine group (AG) respectively, the rats received isotonic saline solution and arginine solution via direct gavage, over a seven-day period. At the end of the period, blood samples were collected for serum evaluations of creatine kinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The right and left anterior tibial muscles were resected for histopathological evaluations on the muscle injuries, investigating edema, hemorrhage and disorganization or morphometric alteration of the muscle fibers. The tissue repair was investigated in terms of proliferation of adipose tissue, angiogenesis and collagen fibers. The ANOVA and Student's t methods were used and p ≤ 0.05 was taken to be statistically significant. Results In the serum evaluations, the AG showed lower CK assay values and higher AST values. In the histopathological evaluation, the UTG presented edema and hemorrhage compatible with injuries due to strain; the SG presented edema and hemorrhage with proliferation of adipose tissue and collagen fibers; and the AG presented not only the findings of the SG but also, especially, intense angiogenesis. Conclusion Oral supplementation with arginine did not cause any significant metabolic alterations that would contraindicate its use and it induced angiogenesis during the repair of muscles injured due to strain. PMID:26401505

  9. Giant Purulent Pericarditis with Cardiac Tamponade Due to Streptococcus intermedius Rapidly Progressing to Constriction.

    PubMed

    Tigen, Elif T; Sari, Ibrahim; Ak, Koray; Sert, Sena; Tigen, Kursat; Korten, Volkan

    2015-08-01

    Purulent pericardial effusion, although rare, is a life-threatening condition usually produced by the extension of a nearby bacterial infection locus or by blood dissemination in the immune-suppressed subjects or in the course of cardiothoracic surgery. Because clinical features of purulent pericardial effusion are often nonspecific, it can cause delay in diagnosis. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is required for timely diagnosis and management. Herein, we describe a case of giant purulent pericardial effusion due to Streptococcus intermedius with the history of bronchiectasis and pneumonia, which was successfully treated with pericardiocentesis via parasternal approach, appropriate antibiotics, and pericardiectomy.

  10. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  11. Aspirin augments carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Drew, Rachel C; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl A; Mast, Jessica L; Herr, Michael D; Stocker, Sean D; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2013-10-15

    Muscle mechanoreflex activation decreases the sensitivity of carotid baroreflex (CBR)-heart rate (HR) control during local metabolite accumulation in humans. However, the contribution of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) toward this response is unknown. Therefore, the effect of inhibiting TXA2 production via low-dose aspirin on CBR-HR sensitivity during muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in humans was examined. Twelve young subjects performed two trials during two visits, preceded by 7 days' low-dose aspirin (81 mg) or placebo. One trial involved 3-min passive calf stretch (mechanoreflex) during 7.5-min limb circulatory occlusion (CO). In another trial, CO was preceded by 1.5 min of 70% maximal voluntary contraction isometric calf exercise to accumulate metabolites during CO and stretch (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex). HR (ECG) and mean arterial pressure (Finometer) were recorded. CBR function was assessed using rapid neck pressures ranging from +40 to -80 mmHg. Aspirin significantly decreased baseline thromboxane B2 production by 84 ± 4% (P < 0.05) but did not affect 6-keto prostaglandin F1α. Following aspirin, stretch with metabolite accumulation significantly augmented maximal gain (GMAX) and operating point gain (GOP) of CBR-HR (GMAX; -0.71 ± 0.14 vs. -0.37 ± 0.08 and GOP; -0.69 ± 0.13 vs. -0.35 ± 0.12 beats·min(-1)·mmHg(-1) for aspirin and placebo, respectively; P < 0.05). CBR-HR function curves were reset similarly with aspirin and placebo during stretch with metabolite accumulation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that low-dose aspirin augments CBR-HR sensitivity during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in humans. This increased sensitivity appears linked to reduced TXA2 production, which likely plays a role in metabolite sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors. PMID:23970529

  12. The cardiac muscle duplex as a method to study myocardial heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Solovyova, O.; Katsnelson, L.B.; Konovalov, P.V.; Kursanov, A.G.; Vikulova, N.A.; Kohl, P.; Markhasin, V.S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development and application of paired muscle preparations, called duplex, for the investigation of mechanisms and consequences of intra-myocardial electro-mechanical heterogeneity. We illustrate the utility of the underlying combined experimental and computational approach for conceptual development and integration of basic science insight with clinically relevant settings, using previously published and new data. Directions for further study are identified. PMID:25106702

  13. Real-time Ca ion wave imaging in living rat cardiac muscle cells by a confocal multiphoton microscope with a microlens-pinhole array scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Katsumasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Osamu; Oyamada, Masahito; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Kawata, Satoshi

    2000-04-01

    A real-time confocal multiphoton fluorescence microscope was developed to observe Ca2+ dynamics in living rat- cardiac muscle cells. The real-time imaging was achieved by multifocus excitation of a specimen with a rotating microlens-array disk. A pinhole-array disk for confocal detection was introduced in the microscope to improve the spatial resolution and the contrast of fluorescence images. Ca2+ wave and Ca2+ transient in cultured rat- cardiac cells were successfully observed with the developed microscope.

  14. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies. PMID:27317993

  15. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies.

  16. Acute decrease in the stiffness of resting muscle belly due to static stretching.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, K; Shinohara, M; Nozaki, S; Katayose, M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the acute effect of static stretching exercise on the resting stiffness of gastrocnemius muscle belly. Ten healthy young adults performed standing wall stretching in dorsiflexion for 1 min at a time and repeated five times. Before and after stretching, the shear modulus was measured in medial and lateral heads of the resting gastrocnemius muscle with ultrasound shear-wave elastography. After the stretching, dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint increased (P < 0.01) by 3.9° and returned in 20 min. Immediately after stretching, shear modulus decreased (P < 0.01) by 14%, compared with before stretching across muscle heads. The decrease in shear modulus returned in 20 min after stretching. In the comparison group of 10 additional subjects, the standing intervention without stretching had no influence on these measures. There was a negative correlation between dorsiflexion ROM and shear modulus in either head before and after stretching. The results demonstrate the transient decreases in the stiffness of the resting gastrocnemius muscle belly and indicate that joint flexibility is greater in individuals with lower resting stiffness of the muscle belly.

  17. Irreversible muscle damage in bodybuilding due to long-term intramuscular oil injection.

    PubMed

    Banke, I J; Prodinger, P M; Waldt, S; Weirich, G; Holzapfel, B M; Gradinger, R; Rechl, H

    2012-10-01

    Intramuscular oil injections generating slowly degrading oil-based depots represent a controversial subject in bodybuilding and fitness. However they seem to be commonly reported in a large number of non-medical reports, movies and application protocols for 'site-injections'. Surprisingly the impact of long-term (ab)use on the musculature as well as potential side-effects compromising health and sports ability are lacking in the medical literature. We present the case of a 40 year old male semi-professional bodybuilder with systemic infection and painful reddened swellings of the right upper arm forcing him to discontinue weightlifting. Over the last 8 years he daily self-injected sterilized sesame seed oil at numerous intramuscular locations for the purpose of massive muscle building. Whole body MRI showed more than 100 intramuscular rather than subcutaneous oil cysts and loss of normal muscle anatomy. 2-step septic surgery of the right upper arm revealed pus-filled cystic scar tissue with the near-complete absence of normal muscle. MRI 1 year later revealed the absence of relevant muscle regeneration. Persistent pain and inability to perform normal weight training were evident for at least 3 years post-surgery. This alarming finding indicating irreversible muscle mutilation may hopefully discourage people interested in bodybuilding and fitness from oil-injections. The impact of such chronic tissue stress on other diseases like malignancy remains to be determined.

  18. Acute Muscle Trauma due to Overexercise in an Otherwise Healthy Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Henning; Wirth, Clemens; Ruf, Katharina; Hebestreit, Helge; Beer, Meinrad

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common inherited diseases and is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene. Although the pulmonary and gastrointestinal manifestations of the disease remain in the focus of treatment, recent studies have shown expression of the CFTR gene product in skeletal muscle cells and observed altered intramuscular Ca2+ release dynamics in CFTR-deficient animal models. Physical exercise is beneficial for maintaining fitness and well-being in CF patients and constitutes one aspect of modern multimodal treatment, which has considerably increased life span and reduced morbidity. We report on a case of acute muscle trauma resulting from excessive dumbbell exercise in a young adult with cystic fibrosis and describe clinical, laboratory and imaging characteristics of acute exercise-induced muscle injury. PMID:22606534

  19. Disseminated Skeletal Muscle and Cardiac Metastasis from Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Detected with FDG and FLT PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Rayamajhi, Sampanna Jung; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Dheeraj; Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading cancers all over the world. Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (18F FDG) is useful for staging of the disease and decide the appropriate management. 3’-deoxy-3’-18 F-fluorothymidine (18F FLT) is a tracer being extensively evaluated currently and is said to represent tumor proliferation. Common sites of metastases from lung cancer include adrenal glands, bone, and brain. Muscle metastasis and cardiac metastasis are uncommon findings. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung with metastases to multiple skeletal muscles and myocardium detected with both FDG and FLT PET/computed tomography (CT).

  20. Disseminated Skeletal Muscle and Cardiac Metastasis from Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Detected with FDG and FLT PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Rayamajhi, Sampanna Jung; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Dheeraj; Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading cancers all over the world. Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (18F FDG) is useful for staging of the disease and decide the appropriate management. 3'-deoxy-3'-18 F-fluorothymidine (18F FLT) is a tracer being extensively evaluated currently and is said to represent tumor proliferation. Common sites of metastases from lung cancer include adrenal glands, bone, and brain. Muscle metastasis and cardiac metastasis are uncommon findings. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung with metastases to multiple skeletal muscles and myocardium detected with both FDG and FLT PET/computed tomography (CT). PMID:27651747

  1. Double muscling in cattle due to mutations in the myostatin gene

    PubMed Central

    McPherron, Alexandra C.; Lee, Se-Jin

    1997-01-01

    Myostatin (GDF-8) is a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily of secreted growth and differentiation factors that is essential for proper regulation of skeletal muscle mass in mice. Here we report the myostatin sequences of nine other vertebrate species and the identification of mutations in the coding sequence of bovine myostatin in two breeds of double-muscled cattle, Belgian Blue and Piedmontese, which are known to have an increase in muscle mass relative to conventional cattle. The Belgian Blue myostatin sequence contains an 11-nucleotide deletion in the third exon which causes a frameshift that eliminates virtually all of the mature, active region of the molecule. The Piedmontese myostatin sequence contains a missense mutation in exon 3, resulting in a substitution of tyrosine for an invariant cysteine in the mature region of the protein. The similarity in phenotypes of double-muscled cattle and myostatin null mice suggests that myostatin performs the same biological function in these two species and is a potentially useful target for genetic manipulation in other farm animals. PMID:9356471

  2. Task Failure during Exercise to Exhaustion in Normoxia and Hypoxia Is Due to Reduced Muscle Activation Caused by Central Mechanisms While Muscle Metaboreflex Does Not Limit Performance.

    PubMed

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Morales-Alamo, David; González-Izal, Miriam; Losa-Reyna, José; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A L

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether task failure during incremental exercise to exhaustion (IE) is principally due to reduced neural drive and increased metaboreflex activation eleven men (22 ± 2 years) performed a 10 s control isokinetic sprint (IS; 80 rpm) after a short warm-up. This was immediately followed by an IE in normoxia (Nx, PIO2:143 mmHg) and hypoxia (Hyp, PIO2:73 mmHg) in random order, separated by a 120 min resting period. At exhaustion, the circulation of both legs was occluded instantaneously (300 mmHg) during 10 or 60 s to impede recovery and increase metaboreflex activation. This was immediately followed by an IS with open circulation. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis. Muscle biopsies and blood gases were obtained in separate experiments. During the last 10 s of the IE, pulmonary ventilation, VO2, power output and muscle activation were lower in hypoxia than in normoxia, while pedaling rate was similar. Compared to the control sprint, performance (IS-Wpeak) was reduced to a greater extent after the IE-Nx (11% lower P < 0.05) than IE-Hyp. The root mean square (EMGRMS) was reduced by 38 and 27% during IS performed after IE-Nx and IE-Hyp, respectively (Nx vs. Hyp: P < 0.05). Post-ischemia IS-EMGRMS values were higher than during the last 10 s of IE. Sprint exercise mean (IS-MPF) and median (IS-MdPF) power frequencies, and burst duration, were more reduced after IE-Nx than IE-Hyp (P < 0.05). Despite increased muscle lactate accumulation, acidification, and metaboreflex activation from 10 to 60 s of ischemia, IS-Wmean (+23%) and burst duration (+10%) increased, while IS-EMGRMS decreased (-24%, P < 0.05), with IS-MPF and IS-MdPF remaining unchanged. In conclusion, close to task failure, muscle activation is lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. Task failure is predominantly caused by central mechanisms, which recover to great extent within 1 min even when the legs remain ischemic. There is dissociation between the

  3. Task Failure during Exercise to Exhaustion in Normoxia and Hypoxia Is Due to Reduced Muscle Activation Caused by Central Mechanisms While Muscle Metaboreflex Does Not Limit Performance

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Morales-Alamo, David; González-Izal, Miriam; Losa-Reyna, José; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A. L.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether task failure during incremental exercise to exhaustion (IE) is principally due to reduced neural drive and increased metaboreflex activation eleven men (22 ± 2 years) performed a 10 s control isokinetic sprint (IS; 80 rpm) after a short warm-up. This was immediately followed by an IE in normoxia (Nx, PIO2:143 mmHg) and hypoxia (Hyp, PIO2:73 mmHg) in random order, separated by a 120 min resting period. At exhaustion, the circulation of both legs was occluded instantaneously (300 mmHg) during 10 or 60 s to impede recovery and increase metaboreflex activation. This was immediately followed by an IS with open circulation. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis. Muscle biopsies and blood gases were obtained in separate experiments. During the last 10 s of the IE, pulmonary ventilation, VO2, power output and muscle activation were lower in hypoxia than in normoxia, while pedaling rate was similar. Compared to the control sprint, performance (IS-Wpeak) was reduced to a greater extent after the IE-Nx (11% lower P < 0.05) than IE-Hyp. The root mean square (EMGRMS) was reduced by 38 and 27% during IS performed after IE-Nx and IE-Hyp, respectively (Nx vs. Hyp: P < 0.05). Post-ischemia IS-EMGRMS values were higher than during the last 10 s of IE. Sprint exercise mean (IS-MPF) and median (IS-MdPF) power frequencies, and burst duration, were more reduced after IE-Nx than IE-Hyp (P < 0.05). Despite increased muscle lactate accumulation, acidification, and metaboreflex activation from 10 to 60 s of ischemia, IS-Wmean (+23%) and burst duration (+10%) increased, while IS-EMGRMS decreased (−24%, P < 0.05), with IS-MPF and IS-MdPF remaining unchanged. In conclusion, close to task failure, muscle activation is lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. Task failure is predominantly caused by central mechanisms, which recover to great extent within 1 min even when the legs remain ischemic. There is dissociation between the

  4. Differential translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB in a cardiac muscle cell line under gravitational changes.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ohwon; Tranter, Michael; Jones, W Keith; Sankovic, John M; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2009-06-01

    Microgravity (micro-g) environments have been shown to elicit dysregulation of specific genes in a wide assay of cell types. It is known that the activation of transcription factors and molecular signaling pathways influence various physiological outcomes associated with stress and adaptive responses. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is one of the most prevailing oxidation-sensitive transcription factors. It is hypothesized that simulated microgravity would activate NF-kappaB and its downstream transcriptional networks, thus suggesting a role for NF-kappaB in microgravity induced muscle atrophy. To investigate the activation of NF-kappaB in a rat cardiac cell line (H9c2) under micro-g, rotating wall vessel bioreactors were used to simulate micro-g conditions. Western blotting revealed that mean nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p65 subunit was 69% for micro-g and 46% for unit-g dynamic control as compared with a 30 min TNF-alpha positive control (p<0.05, n=3). The results from western blots were confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, which showed 66% for micro-g and 45% for dynamic control as compared with positive control (p<0.05, n=3). These results show significant differential translocation of NF-kappaB p65 under simulated micro-g. These results may be expanded upon to explain physiological changes such as muscle atrophy and further identify the regulatory pathways and effector molecules activated under exposure to micro-g.

  5. Changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) eigenvalues of skeletal muscle due to hybrid exercise training.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshikazu; Kemp, Graham J; Isobe, Tomonori; Sato, Eisuke; Hirano, Yuji; Shoda, Junichi; Minami, Manabu

    2014-12-01

    Several studies have proposed the cell membrane as the main water diffusion restricting factor in the skeletal muscle cell. We sought to establish whether a particular form of exercise training (which is likely to affect only intracellular components) could affect water diffusion. The purpose of this study is to characterise prospectively the changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) eigenvalues of thigh muscle resulting from hybrid training (HYBT) in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Twenty-one NAFLD patients underwent HYBT for 30 minutes per day, twice a week for 6 months. Patients were scanned using DTI of the thigh pre- and post-HYBT. Fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), the three eigenvalues lambda 1 (λ1), λ2, λ3, and the maximal cross sectional area (CSA) were measured in bilateral thigh muscles: knee flexors (biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), semimembranous (SM)) and knee extensors (medial vastus (MV), intermediate vastus (IV), lateral vastus (LV), and rectus femoris (RF)), and compared pre- and post-HYBT by paired t-test. Muscle strength of extensors (P<0.01), but not flexors, increased significantly post-HYBT. For FA, ADC and eigenvalues, the overall picture was of increase. Some (P<0.05 in λ2 and P<0.01 in λ1) eigenvalues of flexors and all (λ1-λ3) eigenvalues of extensors increased significantly (P<0.01) post-HYBT. HYBT increased all 3 eigenvalues. We suggest this might be caused by enlargement of muscle intracellular space.

  6. A novel cardiac muscle-derived biomaterial reduces dyskinesia and postinfarct left ventricular remodeling in a mouse model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Daniel M; Naresh, Nivedita K; Piras, Bryan A; Xu, Yaqin; Smith, Robert S; Epstein, Frederick H; Hossack, John A; Ogle, Roy C; French, Brent A

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation after myocardial infarction (MI) leaves the myocardium structurally weakened and, as a result, susceptible to early infarct zone dyskinesia and left ventricular (LV) remodeling. While various cellular and biomaterial preparations have been transplanted into the infarct zone in hopes of improving post-MI LV remodeling, an allogeneic cardiac muscle-derived ECM extract has yet to be developed and tested in the setting of reperfused MI. We sought to determine the effects of injecting a novel cardiac muscle-derived ECM into the infarct zone on early dyskinesia and LV remodeling in a mouse model of MI. Cardiac muscle ECM was extracted from frozen mouse heart tissue by a protocol that enriches for basement membrane constituents. The extract was injected into the infarct zone immediately after ischemia/reperfusion injury (n = 6). Echocardiography was performed at baseline and at days 2, 7, 14, and 28 post-MI to assess 3D LV volumes and cardiac function, as compared to infarcted controls (n = 9). Early infarct zone dyskinesia was measured on day 2 post-MI using a novel metric, the dyskinesia index. End-systolic volume was significantly reduced in the ECM-treated group compared to controls by day 14. Ejection fraction and stroke volume were also significantly improved in the ECM-treated group. ECM-treated hearts showed a significant (P < 0.005) reduction in dyskinetic motion on day 2. Thus, using high-frequency ultrasound, it was shown that treatment with a cardiac-derived ECM preparation reduced early infarct zone dyskinesia and post-MI LV remodeling in a mouse model of reperfused MI. PMID:25825543

  7. Suppression of skeletal muscle signal using a crusher coil: A human cardiac 31p‐MR spectroscopy study at 7 tesla

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, William T.; Neubauer, Stefan; Robson, Matthew D.; Rodgers, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The translation of sophisticated phosphorus MR spectroscopy (31P‐MRS) protocols to 7 Tesla (T) is particularly challenged by the issue of radiofrequency (RF) heating. Legal limits on RF heating make it hard to reliably suppress signals from skeletal muscle that can contaminate human cardiac 31P spectra at 7T. We introduce the first surface‐spoiling crusher coil for human cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7T. Methods A planar crusher coil design was optimized with simulations and its performance was validated in phantoms. Crusher gradient pulses (100 μs) were then applied during human cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7T. Results In a phantom, residual signals were 50 ± 10% with BISTRO (B1‐insensitive train to obliterate signal), and 34 ± 8% with the crusher coil. In vivo, residual signals in skeletal muscle were 49 ± 4% using BISTRO, and 24 ± 5% using the crusher coil. Meanwhile, in the interventricular septum, spectral quality and metabolite quantification did not differ significantly between BISTRO (phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate [PCr/ATP] = 2.1 ± 0.4) and the crusher coil (PCr/ATP = 1.8 ± 0.4). However, the specific absorption rate (SAR) decreased from 96 ± 1% of the limit (BISTRO) to 16 ± 1% (crusher coil). Conclusion A crusher coil is an SAR‐efficient alternative for selectively suppressing skeletal muscle during cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7T. A crusher coil allows the use of sequence modules that would have been SAR‐prohibitive, without compromising skeletal muscle suppression. Magn Reson Med 75:962–972, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:25924813

  8. Potentiating paired stimulation of cardiac muscle in vitro as positive inotropic reference standard.

    PubMed

    Scholtysik, G

    1986-07-01

    In rabbit papillary muscles, potentiating paired stimulation was used as a standard positive inotropic intervention. Pairs of depolarizing electrical stimuli were applied, equal in strength and with a coupling interval of the functional refractory period plus 10 msec. After five successive pairs at a basic driving rate of 0.5 Hz, maximum potentiation amounting to a two- to threefold increase in the contraction amplitude was reached. The potentiating paired stimulation was rapid in both onset and reversibility and was reproducible. Potentiating paired stimulation is sparing since internal Ca2+ pools are utilized to increase force. Using potentiating paired stimulation-induced increase in force of contraction as a new reference, the following order of potency of positive inotropic agents was obtained: ouabain greater than DPI 201-106 greater than IBMX greater than APP 201-533. Effects of these drugs on rested-state contractions and frequency-force relationship were also investigated.

  9. Bispyridinium non-oximes: An evaluation of cardiac effects in isolated hearts and smooth muscle relaxing effects in jejunum.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, Katharina; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2016-09-01

    Bispyridinium non-oximes seem to be promising candidates for the generic treatment of nerve agent poisoning as they interact with nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The lead compound MB327 showed therapeutic effectiveness in vitro and in vivo but was toxic at higher doses. In the present study, the effect of various bispyridinium non-oximes on isolated heart and small intestine function was investigated. Bispyridinium non-oximes and oximes were tested in at least seven different concentrations in rat jejunum preparations pre-treated with carbachol. All bispyridinium non-oximes showed classical dose response curves with MB327 being the most effective (EC50=6.6μM) and MB782 being slightly less effective (EC50=10.4μM). Neither the bispyridinium non-oximes nor the oximes showed cardiotoxic effects in the isolated Langendorff heart. The tested bispyridinum compounds showed no direct cardiac effect but had variable smooth muscle relaxing effects. Further in vivo studies are required to get more insight into potential toxic mechanisms of these promising nerve agent antidotes. PMID:27184650

  10. Isolation and characterization of a Streptococcus pyogenes protein that binds to basal laminae of human cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Winters, B D; Ramasubbu, N; Stinson, M W

    1993-01-01

    A 9-kDa glycosaminoglycan-binding protein (GAG-BP) was isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on heparin-agarose. The protein selectively bound to the basal laminae of human cardiac muscle and had an apparent dissociation constant of 2.5 x 10(-7) M. Chemical analyses indicated that the GAG-BP was rich in alanine, lysine, and arginine (pI 9.5) and devoid of tyrosine, methionine, histidine, and half-cystine. There were no detectable carbohydrate or phosphate substituents. The amino acid sequence of the N terminus of GAG-BP showed homology with those of histone-like DNA-binding proteins of several other bacteria. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the protein was made up of 50% beta-sheet and 50% beta-turn and random coil in aqueous solution; however, when the protein complexed with heparin, it adopted a more ordered structure containing 25% alpha-helix, 50% beta-sheet, and 25% beta-turn and random coil. The GAG-BP cross-reacted serologically with a component of similar size in extracts of other group A streptococci and was present in the culture medium during late logarithmic growth. Images PMID:8335359

  11. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP) displacement in a reaction time task condition. Methods Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift) before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated. Results Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05). Tibialis anterior and vastus medialis muscle pain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (P<0.05). Conclusions The central nervous system in healthy individuals was sufficiently robust in maintaining the APA characteristics during pain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered. PMID:26680777

  12. Selectivity and permeation in calcium release channel of cardiac muscle: alkali metal ions.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D P; Xu, L; Tripathy, A; Meissner, G; Eisenberg, B

    1999-01-01

    Current was measured from single open channels of the calcium release channel (CRC) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (over the range +/-180 mV) in pure and mixed solutions (e.g., biionic conditions) of the alkali metal ions Li+, K+, Na+, Rb+, Cs+, ranging in concentration from 25 mM to 2 M. The current-voltage (I-V) relations were analyzed by an extension of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) formulation of electrodiffusion, which includes local chemical interaction described by an offset in chemical potential, which likely reflects the difference in dehydration/solvation/rehydration energies in the entry/exit steps of permeation. The theory fits all of the data with few adjustable parameters: the diffusion coefficient of each ion species, the average effective charge distribution on the wall of the pore, and an offset in chemical potential for lithium and sodium ions. In particular, the theory explains the discrepancy between "selectivities" defined by conductance sequence and "selectivities" determined by the permeability ratios (i.e., reversal potentials) in biionic conditions. The extended PNP formulation seems to offer a successful combined treatment of selectivity and permeation. Conductance selectivity in this channel arises mostly from friction: different species of ions have different diffusion coefficients in the channel. Permeability selectivity of an ion is determined by its electrochemical potential gradient and local chemical interaction with the channel. Neither selectivity (in CRC) seems to involve different electrostatic interaction of different ions with the channel protein, even though the ions have widely varying diameters. PMID:10049318

  13. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Results Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Conclusions Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational

  14. Selective control of fibroblast proliferation and its effect on cardiac muscle differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Clark, W A

    1976-09-01

    The stability of the differentiated state of cardiac myocytes in vitro was examined under culture conditions which selectively stimulated or inhibited proliferation of fibroblasts. Regulation of fibroblast proliferation in cultures of myocardial cells from 8-day embryonic chicks was achieved by adjustment of the glutamine (Gln) concentration in the culture medium (Ham's F-12 medium containing 2 x amino acids and 5% fetal calf serum). Myocardial cells, when plated at 80 cells/mm2 in Gln- medium, maintained a stable density of approximately 40% of the plating density for more than 30 days. When Gln was added to the medium (292 micrograms/ml) fibroblast proliferation was stimulated, and by 5-6 days after this addition cell densities had increased to confluency. The selective action of glutamine on fibroblast proliferation was determined by labeling cultures with tritiated thymidine ([3H]TdR) and scoring its incorporation into myocytes and fibroblasts by radioautography. After 2 weeks in Gln- medium, the mitotic index was 0.3% and the [3H]TdR-labeling index (1.5-hr pulse) was 6.4%. In addition, the proportion of myocytes in the population was constant at 64.2% for at least 30 days in vitro, and contractile activity was observed for up to 6 months. After 5 days of Gln replacement, the cells exhibited a labeling index of 25%, the proportion of myocytes decreased to less than 10% and contractile activity was rarely observed. Although the [3H]TdR-labeling index of fibroblasts and myocytes was nearly identical in Gln- medium, the addition of Gln produced a fivefold stimulation in the fibroblast labeling index, but did not affect myocyte proliferation or DNA synthesis. A unique phenomenon of myocyte congregation was observed only in Gln- medium which resulted in the formation of myocyte colonies from which fibroblasts were largely absent. It is suggested that this process with the resultant establishment of a functional electrical syncytium plays a significant role in the

  15. [Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in the eye, cardiac and skeletal muscles of several decapods].

    PubMed

    Chernyĭ, V G; Chizhevich, E P; Shukoliukov, S A

    1976-01-01

    Properties of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the eye, heart and muscles of Hemigrapsus sanguineus, Paralithodes camtschatica, Erimacrus isenbeckii, Pandalus latirastrus, Pagurus brachiomastus have been studied with acrylamide gel electrophoresis and kinetics analysis. LDH in all the tissues of all the representatives studied was found to be specific for L-pyruvate and lactate; it migrated in electrophoresis as a single band revealing low mobility towards anode. The isoenzyme from P. camtschatica and P. latirastrus differed from the isoenzymes of other animals studied by higher mobility towards anode that reflected higher negative value of its total charge. The LDH isoenzymes in all the animals studied resembled the A4 (LDH5) of the vertebrates being unstable to the denaturing action of high temperature and being unaffected by high concentrations of pyruvate up to 1.0.10-3M. On the other hand, in conrast to the A4 of mammals, the LDH in question displayed enhancement of the reaction rate and decrease of the Km values upon increase in the NAD+ and NAD.H concentrations both in the presence of high or low lactate and pyruvate concentrations. The isoenzymes displayed catalytic activity also in the presence of NADP, the Km values for pyruvate in the presence of equimolar (2.25 mM) concentrations of NAD.H or NADP.H were practically identical and were found to be within the limits of 14-26.10-5 M. Molecular weight of the LDH studied assessed by the gel filtration method was found to be 130-140,000. It is suggested that the LDH isoenzyme from the representatives of the decapod crayfish studied is homologous in its certain properties to the homotetrameric A4 form of the vertebrates.

  16. Acquired torticollis due to primary pyomyositis of the paraspinal muscles in an 11-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Iyer, A; Avula, S; Kneen, R

    2016-03-18

    Torticollis is characterised by tilting and rotation of the cervical spine in opposite directions. Causes can be congenital or acquired. Primary pyomyositis is a rare subacute deep bacterial infection of skeletal muscles that typically affects individuals under 20 years of age from tropical countries. Infrequently, pyomyositis occurs in individuals from temperate regions, usually in immunocompromised adults, and this is defined as secondary pyomyositis. We report a case of acquired torticollis due to primary pyomyositis of the paraspinal muscles in a previously healthy boy from the UK. A prolonged course of antibiotics and physiotherapy led to a complete resolution of his illness. We review how to differentiate pyomyositis from focal myositis, a more common inflammatory muscular cause of acquired torticollis.

  17. Sudden cardiac arrest due to a single sodium channel mutation producing a mixed phenotype of Brugada and Long QT3 syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanadoss, U; Mertens, A; Gallagher, M; Kutinsky, I; Williamson, B

    2016-01-01

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes are a known, albeit rare, cause of sudden cardiac arrest which may present with characteristic electrocardiogram changes in patients with structurally normal heart. There are a variety of distinct arrhythmogenic syndromes that arise from mutations in voltage gated sodium channels, resulting in either gain or loss of function. We describe a patient with a primary inherited arrhythmia syndrome which presented as sudden cardiac arrest. Further workup revealed that her arrest was due to a combination of Brugada syndrome and Long QT3 syndrome secondary to a deleterious mutation of voltage-gated, sodium channel, type V alpha subunit (SCN5A Thr1709Met). PMID:27676163

  18. Reorganised motor control strategies of trunk muscles due to acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hirata, R P; Salomoni, S E; Christensen, S W; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed how the low back motor control strategies were affected by experimental pain. In twelve volunteers the right m. longissimus was injected by hypertonic and isotonic (control) saline. The pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects were seated on a custom-designed chair including a 3-dimensional force sensor adjusted to the segmental height of T1. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from longissimus, multifidus, rectus abdominis, and external oblique muscles. Isometric trunk extensions were performed before, during, and after the saline injections at 5%, 10%, and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction force. Visual feedback of the extension force was provided whereas the tangential force components were recorded. Compared with isotonic saline, VAS scores were higher following hypertonic saline injections (P<.01). Experimental low back pain reduced the EMG activity bilaterally of the rectus abdominis muscles during contractions at 10% and 20% MVC (P<.01) although force accuracy and tangential force variability was not affected. Increased variability in the tangential force composition was found during pain compared with the non-painful condition (P<.05). The immediate adaptation to pain was sufficient to maintain the quality of the task performance; however the long-term consequence of such adaptation is unknown and may overload other structures.

  19. Reorganised motor control strategies of trunk muscles due to acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hirata, R P; Salomoni, S E; Christensen, S W; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed how the low back motor control strategies were affected by experimental pain. In twelve volunteers the right m. longissimus was injected by hypertonic and isotonic (control) saline. The pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects were seated on a custom-designed chair including a 3-dimensional force sensor adjusted to the segmental height of T1. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from longissimus, multifidus, rectus abdominis, and external oblique muscles. Isometric trunk extensions were performed before, during, and after the saline injections at 5%, 10%, and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction force. Visual feedback of the extension force was provided whereas the tangential force components were recorded. Compared with isotonic saline, VAS scores were higher following hypertonic saline injections (P<.01). Experimental low back pain reduced the EMG activity bilaterally of the rectus abdominis muscles during contractions at 10% and 20% MVC (P<.01) although force accuracy and tangential force variability was not affected. Increased variability in the tangential force composition was found during pain compared with the non-painful condition (P<.05). The immediate adaptation to pain was sufficient to maintain the quality of the task performance; however the long-term consequence of such adaptation is unknown and may overload other structures. PMID:25879794

  20. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  1. Increase in ( sup 3 H)PN 200-110 binding to cardiac muscle membrane in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Y.; Kashiwagi, A.; Ogawa, T.; Asahina, T.; Ikebuchi, M.; Kodama, M.; Shigeta, Y. )

    1990-09-01

    Voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in cardiac left ventricular muscle membranes isolated from nondiabetic control and diabetic rats were measured with (3H)PN 200-110, a dihydropyridine derivative, as a ligand. The binding site (Bmax) of (3H)PN 200-110 in cardiac membranes isolated from streptozocin-induced diabetic (STZ-D) rats (128 +/- 10 fmol/mg protein) significantly (P less than 0.01) increased by 64% compared with that of control rats (78 +/- 4 fmol/mg protein) 10 wk after STZ administration without a significant change in Kd. However, the significant increase in Bmax of (3H)PN 200-110 binding in diabetic rats depended on the duration of diabetes such that the increase was not found until 6 wk after STZ injection. An 8-wk intensive insulin treatment, which was initiated 2 wk after STZ injection, normalized the increase in (3H)PN 200-110 binding in STZ-D rats to control levels (85 +/- 4 fmol/mg protein). Furthermore, (3H)PN 200-110 binding to control cardiac membranes was dose-dependently inhibited in the presence of verapamil, a phenylalkylamine Ca2+ antagonist, but that was not the case in cardiac membranes isolated from STZ-D rats. These results indicate that voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in cardiac muscle isolated from STZ-D rats are quantitatively and qualitatively altered, because the course of diabetes and the increase in the channels can be prevented by treatment with insulin.

  2. The role of tropomyosin isoforms and phosphorylation in force generation in thin-filament reconstituted bovine cardiac muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoying; Heeley, David H.; Smillie, Lawrence B.

    2011-01-01

    The thin filament extraction and reconstitution protocol was used to investigate the functional roles of tropomyosin (Tm) isoforms and phosphorylation in bovine myocardium. The thin filament was extracted by gelsolin, reconstituted with G-actin, and further reconstituted with cardiac troponin together with one of three Tm varieties: phosphorylated αTm (αTm.P), dephosphorylated αTm (αTm.deP), and dephosphorylated βTm (βTm.deP). The effects of Ca, phosphate, MgATP and MgADP concentrations were examined in the reconstituted fibres at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Our data show that Ca2+ sensitivity (pCa50: half saturation point) was increased by 0.19 ± 0.07 units when βTm.deP was used instead of αTm.deP (P < 0.05), and by 0.27 ± 0.06 units when phosphorylated αTm was used (P < 0.005). The cooperativity (Hill factor) decreased (but insignificantly) from 3.2 ± 0.3 (5) to 2.8 ± 0.2 (7) with phosphorylation. The cooperativity decreased significantly from 3.2 ± 0.3 (5) to 2.1 ± 0.2 (9) with isoform change from αTm.deP to βTm.deP. There was no significant difference in isometric tension or stiffness between αTm.P, αTm.deP, and βTm.deP muscle fibres at saturating [Ca2+] or after rigor induction. Based on the six-state cross-bridge model, sinusoidal analysis indicated that the equilibrium constants of elementary steps differed up to 1.7x between αTm.deP and βTm.deP, and up to 2.0x between αTm.deP and αTm.P. The rate constants differed up to 1.5x between αTm.deP and βTm.deP, and up to 2.4x between αTm.deP and αTm.P. We conclude that tension and stiffness per cross-bridge are not significantly different among the three muscle models. PMID:20559861

  3. Calcium structural transition of human cardiac troponin C in reconstituted muscle fibres as studied by site-directed spin labelling.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Motoyoshi; Ueki, Shoji; Hara, Hideyuki; Arata, Toshiaki

    2005-04-22

    The in situ structure of human cardiac troponin C (hcTnC) has been studied with site-directed, spin labelling, electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR). Analysis of the in situ structures of hcTnC is essential for elucidating the molecular mechanism behind its Ca(2+)-sensitive regulation. We prepared two hcTnC mutants (C35S and C84S) containing one native cysteine residue (84 and 35, respectively) for spin labelling. The mutants were labelled with a methane thiosulfonate spin label (MTSSL) and the TnC was reconstituted into permeabilized muscle fibres. The mobility of Cys84-MTSSL changed markedly after addition of Ca2+, while that of the Cys35 residue did not change in the monomer state or in fibres. The rotational correlation time of Cys84-MTSSL decreased from 32ns to 13ns upon Ca(2+)-binding in the monomer state, whereas in fibres the spectrum of Cys84-MTSSL was resolved into mobile (16ns) and immobile (35ns) components and the addition of Ca2+ increased the immobile component. Moreover, the accessibility of Cys84-MTSSL to molecular oxygen increased slightly in the presence of Ca2+. These data suggest that Cys35 remains in the same location regardless of the addition of Ca2+, whereas Cys84 is located at the position that interacts with B and C helices of hcTnC and interacts with troponin I (TnI) at high concentrations of Ca2+. We determined the distances between Cys35 and Cys84 by measuring pulsed electron-electron double resonance spectra. The distances were 26.0 angstroms and 27.2 angstroms in the monomer state and in fibres, respectively, and the addition of Ca2+ decreased the distance to 23.2 angstroms in fibres but only slightly in the monomer state, showing that Ca2+ binding to the N-domain of hcTnC induced a larger structural change in muscle fibres than in the monomer state.

  4. Effects of pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy on passive stiffness in isolated adult cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Koide, M.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the changes in myocardial stiffness induced by chronic hemodynamic overloading are dependent on changes in the passive stiffness of the cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte). However, no previous studies have examined the passive constitutive properties of cardiocytes isolated from animals with myocardial hypertrophy. Accordingly, changes in relative passive stiffness of cardiocytes isolated from animals with chronic pressure- or volume-overload hypertrophy were determined by examining the effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiocyte size. Anisosmotic stress was produced by altering superfusate osmolarity. Hypertrophied cardiocytes were enzymatically isolated from 16 adult cats with right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) and from 6 adult cats with RV volume-overload hypertrophy induced by creating an atrial septal defect (ASD). Left ventricular (LV) cardiocytes from each cat served as nonhypertrophied, normally loaded, same-animal controls. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 305 +/- 3 to 135 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 645 +/- 4 mosM. During anisosmotic stress, there were no significant differences between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes in pressure overload PAB cats with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area (47 +/- 2% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), diameter (46 +/- 3% in RV vs. 48 +/- 2% in LV), or length (2.4 +/- 0.2% in RV vs. 2.0 +/- 0.3% in LV), or sarcomere length (1.5 +/- 0.1% in RV vs. 1.3 +/- 0.3% in LV). Likewise, there were no significant differences in cardiocyte strain between hypertrophied RV and normal LV cardiocytes from ASD cats. In conclusion, chronic pressure-overload hypertrophy and chronic volume-overload hypertrophy did not alter the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress. Thus chronic overload hypertrophy did not alter relative passive cardiocyte stiffness.

  5. Topographic mapping and compression elasticity analysis of skinned cardiac muscle fibers in vitro with atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Sabharwal, Tanya; Kalyanasundaram, Aruna; Guo, Lianhong; Wang, Guodong

    2009-09-18

    Surface topography and compression elasticity of bovine cardiac muscle fibers in rigor and relaxing state have been studied with atomic force microscopy. Characteristic sarcomere patterns running along the longitudinal axis of the fibers were clearly observed, and Z-lines, M-lines, I-bands, and A-bands can be distinguished through comparing with TEM images and force curves. AFM height images of fibers had shown a sarcomere length of 1.22+/-0.02 microm (n=5) in rigor with a significant 9% increase in sarcomere length in relaxing state (1.33+/-0.03 microm, n=5), indicating that overlap moves with the changing physiological conditions. Compression elasticity curves along with sarcomere locations have been taken by AFM compression processing. Coefficient of Z-line, I-band, Overlap, and M-line are 25+/-2, 8+/-1, 10+/-1, and 17+/-1.5 pN/nm respectively in rigor state, and 18+/-2.5, 4+/-0.5, 6+/-1, and 11+/-0.5 pN/nm respectively in relaxing state. Young's Modulus in Z-line, I-band, Overlap, and M-line are 115+/-12, 48+/-9, 52+/-8, and 90+/-12 kPa respectively in rigor, and 98+/-10, 23+/-4, 42+/-4, and 65+/-7 kPa respectively in relaxing state. The elasticity curves have shown a similar appearance to the section analysis profile of AFM height images of sarcomere and the distance between adjacent largest coefficient and Young's Modulus is equal to the sarcomere length measured from the AFM height images using section analysis, indicating that mechanic properties of fibers have a similar periodicity to the topography of fibers.

  6. Autophagy plays an important role in Sunitinib-mediated cell death in H9c2 cardiac muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yuqin; Xue Tao; Yang Xiaochun; Zhu Hong; Ding Xiaofei; Lou Liming; Lu Wei; Yang Bo; He Qiaojun

    2010-10-01

    Sunitinib, which is a multitargeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, exhibits antiangiogenic and antitumor activity, and extends survival of patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). This molecule has also been reported to be associated with cardiotoxicity at a high frequency, but the mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we observed that Sunitinib showed high anti-proliferative effect on H9c2 cardiac muscle cells measured by PI staining and the MTT assay. But apoptotic markers (PARP cleavage, caspase 3 cleavage and chromatin condensation) were uniformly negative in H9c2 cells after Sunitinib treatment for 48 h, indicating that another cell death pathway may be involved in Sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity. Here we found Sunitinib dramatically increased autophagic flux in H9c2 cells. Acidic vesicle fluorescence and high expression of LC3-II in H9c2 cells identified autophagy as a Sunitinib-induced process that might be associated with cytotoxicity. Furthermore, knocking down Beclin 1 by RNA-interference to block autophagy in H9c2 cells revealed that the death rate was decreased when treated with Sunitinib in comparison to control cells. These results confirmed that autophagy plays an important role in Sunitinib-mediated H9c2 cells cytotoxicity. Taken together, the data presented here strongly suggest that autophagy is associated with Sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity, and that inhibition of autophagy constitutes a viable strategy for reducing Sunitinib-induced cardiomyocyte death thereby alleviating Sunitinib cardiotoxicity.

  7. Muscle endothelial-dependent microvascular dysfunction in adulthood due to early postnatal overnutrition.

    PubMed

    Leite, Richard Diego; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz Guilherme; Boa, Beatriz Costa da Silva; Cyrino, Fatima Z G A; Nivoit, Pierre; Bouskela, Eliete

    2012-07-01

    The aims of our study were to investigate effects of postnatal overnutrition, obtained by restricting the number of pups per litter, on microcirculatory reactivity, fat depots, its total percentage and lipid profile. Microvascular reactivity was evaluated in the cremaster muscle of 24 hamsters divided into four groups, with 6 animals in each one: normal (NL) and restricted (RL) litter groups, both at 6th and 21st weeks of age. The NL group had 8-9 pups and the RL 3 pups per litter and to avoid the litter effect, only one animal was used per litter. The results have shown that the RL group had higher velocity of weight, body mass and fat gain compared to the NL one at weeks 6 and 21. Significant differences were also observed on urogenital fat depot, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein between groups. At the lowest concentration of Ach, the RL group showed smaller arteriolar dilatation at the 21st than at the 6th week [5(3-13) vs 19(8-40)%, p<0.01] while the NL one did not show any difference within the group. The highest concentration of Ach at the 21th week pointed to endothelial-dependent microvascular dysfunction in RL compared to NL [3(8-26) vs. 13(8-26)%, p<0.05]. Endothelial-independent microvascular reactivity was similar between groups. Our data suggest that postnatal overnutrition is associated to muscle endothelial-dependent microvascular dysfunction, greater body mass and total percentage of fat and impaired the lipid profile. In conclusion, the imprinting promoted by this experimental model of obesity was able to influence microvascular reactivity later in life.

  8. The relationship between the hypokalaemic response to adrenaline, beta-adrenoceptors, and Na(+)-K+ pumps in skeletal and cardiac muscle membranes in the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Elfellah, M.S.; Reid, J.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The hypokalaemic response to adrenaline and the involvement of beta-adrenoceptors and Na(+)-K+ pumps were investigated in control rabbits and animals chronically pretreated with adrenaline. The hypokalaemic response to acute intravenous infusion of adrenaline was significantly reduced when rabbits were chronically pretreated with adrenaline for 10 days. Chronic pretreatment of rabbits with adrenaline significantly reduced the densities for (125I)cyanopindolol and (3H)ouabain binding sites in skeletal muscle and heart. Furthermore, there was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.97, p less than 0.001) between the Bmax for ICYP and (3H)ouabain, in the rabbit heart. Ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake and the activity of 3-O-methylfluorescein phosphate phosphatase were used to assess the function of the Na(+)-K+ pump in skeletal and cardiac muscle. There was no significant difference in these functional indices of the Na(+)-K+ pump between the control and adrenaline-pretreated animals, in skeletal or cardiac muscle. Thus, downregulation of the (3H)ouabain binding sites did not appear to be accompanied by reduced function of the Na(+)-K+ pump. Additional investigations are required to confirm further the dissociation between the function of the pump and the ouabain binding sites.

  9. The relation between cardiac output kinetics and skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate exercise in moderately impaired patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ruud F; Niemeijer, Victor M; Schoots, Thijs; Wijn, Pieter F; Doevendans, Pieter A; Kemps, Hareld M

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics are prolonged in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This may be caused by impaired oxygen delivery or skeletal muscle derangements. We investigated whether impaired cardiac output (Q̇) kinetics limit skeletal muscle oxygen delivery relative to the metabolic demands at submaximal exercise in CHF patients by evaluating the relation between Q̇ kinetics and skeletal muscle deoxygenation. Forty-three CHF patients, NYHA II-III, performed a constant-load exercise test at 80% of the ventilatory aerobic threshold (VAT) to assess V̇o2 kinetics (τV̇o2). Q̇ kinetics (τQ̇) were assessed by a radial artery pulse contour analysis method. Skeletal muscle deoxygenation was assessed by near infrared spectroscopy at the m. vastus lateralis, using the minimal value of the tissue saturation index during onset of exercise (TSImin). Patients were categorized in slow and normal Q̇ responders relative to metabolic demands (τQ̇/V̇o2 ≥1 and τQ̇/V̇o2 <1, respectively), τQ̇ (62 ± 29 s), and τV̇o2 (60 ± 21 s) were significantly related (r = 0.66, P = 0.001). There was a significant correlation between τQ̇ and TSImin in the slow Q̇ responders [rs= -0.57, P = 0.005, n = 22 (51%)]. In conclusion, in moderately impaired CHF patients with relatively slow Q̇ kinetics, central hemodynamics may limit skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate-intensity exercise. PMID:27283909

  10. Segmenting the papillary muscles and the trabeculae from high resolution cardiac CT through restoration of topological handles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingchen; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Shaoting; Qian, Zhen; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for segmenting the high resolution CT images of the left ventricle (LV), particularly the papillary muscles and the trabeculae. High quality segmentations of these structures are necessary in order to better understand the anatomical function and geometrical properties of LV. These fine structures, however, are extremely challenging to capture due to their delicate and complex nature in both geometry and topology. Our algorithm computes the potential missing topological structures of a given initial segmentation. Using techniques from computational topology, e.g. persistent homology, our algorithm find topological handles which are likely to be the true signal. To further increase accuracy, these proposals are measured by the saliency and confidence from a trained classifier. Handles with high scores are restored in the final segmentation, leading to high quality segmentation results of the complex structures. PMID:24683968

  11. Disseminated Skeletal Muscle and Cardiac Metastasis from Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Detected with FDG and FLT PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Rayamajhi, Sampanna Jung; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Dheeraj; Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading cancers all over the world. Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (18F FDG) is useful for staging of the disease and decide the appropriate management. 3’-deoxy-3’-18 F-fluorothymidine (18F FLT) is a tracer being extensively evaluated currently and is said to represent tumor proliferation. Common sites of metastases from lung cancer include adrenal glands, bone, and brain. Muscle metastasis and cardiac metastasis are uncommon findings. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung with metastases to multiple skeletal muscles and myocardium detected with both FDG and FLT PET/computed tomography (CT). PMID:27651747

  12. The Scaffold Protein Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein β Orchestrates Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophic Signaling Required for the Development of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kritzer, Michael D.; Li, Jinliang; Passariello, Catherine L.; Gayanilo, Marjorie; Thakur, Hrishikesh; Dayan, Joseph; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac myocyte hypertrophy is regulated by an extensive intracellular signal transduction network. In vitro evidence suggests that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein β (mAKAPβ) serves as a nodal organizer of hypertrophic signaling. However, the relevance of mAKAPβ signalosomes to pathological remodeling and heart failure in vivo remains unknown. Methods and Results Using conditional, cardiac myocyte–specific gene deletion, we now demonstrate that mAKAPβ expression in mice is important for the cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload and catecholamine toxicity. mAKAPβ targeting prevented the development of heart failure associated with long-term transverse aortic constriction, conferring a survival benefit. In contrast to 29% of control mice (n=24), only 6% of mAKAPβ knockout mice (n=31) died in the 16 weeks of pressure overload (P=0.02). Accordingly, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited myocardial apoptosis and the development of interstitial fibrosis, left atrial hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. This improvement in cardiac status correlated with the attenuated activation of signaling pathways coordinated by the mAKAPβ scaffold, including the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase D1 and histone deacetylase 4 that we reveal to participate in a new mAKAP signaling module. Furthermore, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited pathological gene expression directed by myocyte-enhancer factor-2 and nuclear factor of activated T-cell transcription factors that associate with the scaffold. Conclusions mAKAPβ orchestrates signaling that regulates pathological cardiac remodeling in mice. Targeting of the underlying physical architecture of signaling networks, including mAKAPβ signalosome formation, may constitute an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of pathological remodeling and heart failure. PMID:24812305

  13. Chemosensitivity of cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Williams, E. M. Vaughan; Whyte, J. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. Measurements of contractions, conduction velocity and intracellular potential were made on isolated rabbit atria under four sets of conditions: high bicarbonate/high CO2 (HH), low bicarbonate/low CO2 (LL), high bicarbonate/low CO2 (HL) and low bicarbonate/high CO2 (LH). The ratio high/low was the same for the bicarbonate and CO2 concentrations, so that HH had the same pH as LL. 2. Acid solutions caused a fall of a few mV in the resting potential, but not in the overshoot. They reduced conduction velocity and rate of rise of the action potential. They depressed contractions, but prolonged the tail of the action potential. 3. Alkaline solutions caused the converse changes, but, with the exception of the effect on the duration of the action potential, the relation with pH was markedly alinear, in that a rise in pH had much less effect than an equivalent fall. 4. Statistical tests were devised to decide whether the observed changes were associated primarily with pH, PCO2 or bicarbonate. By far the strongest association was with external pH. Changes in PCO2, per se, had no significant effect. PMID:16992240

  14. Evidence towards Improved Estimation of Respiratory Muscle Effort from Diaphragm Mechanomyographic Signals with Cardiac Vibration Interference Using Sample Entropy with Fixed Tolerance Values

    PubMed Central

    Sarlabous, Leonardo; Torres, Abel; Fiz, José A.; Jané, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of amplitude parameters of the diaphragm mechanomyographic (MMGdi) signal is a non-invasive technique to assess respiratory muscle effort and to detect and quantify the severity of respiratory muscle weakness. The amplitude of the MMGdi signal is usually evaluated using the average rectified value or the root mean square of the signal. However, these estimations are greatly affected by the presence of cardiac vibration or mechanocardiographic (MCG) noise. In this study, we present a method for improving the estimation of the respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals that is robust to the presence of MCG. This method is based on the calculation of the sample entropy using fixed tolerance values (fSampEn), that is, with tolerance values that are not normalized by the local standard deviation of the window analyzed. The behavior of the fSampEn parameter was tested in synthesized mechanomyographic signals, with different ratios between the amplitude of the MCG and clean mechanomyographic components. As an example of application of this technique, the use of fSampEn was explored also in recorded MMGdi signals, with different inspiratory loads. The results with both synthetic and recorded signals indicate that the entropy parameter is less affected by the MCG noise, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, we believe that the proposed fSampEn parameter could improve estimates of respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals with the presence of MCG interference. PMID:24586436

  15. Evidence towards improved estimation of respiratory muscle effort from diaphragm mechanomyographic signals with cardiac vibration interference using sample entropy with fixed tolerance values.

    PubMed

    Sarlabous, Leonardo; Torres, Abel; Fiz, José A; Jané, Raimon

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of amplitude parameters of the diaphragm mechanomyographic (MMGdi) signal is a non-invasive technique to assess respiratory muscle effort and to detect and quantify the severity of respiratory muscle weakness. The amplitude of the MMGdi signal is usually evaluated using the average rectified value or the root mean square of the signal. However, these estimations are greatly affected by the presence of cardiac vibration or mechanocardiographic (MCG) noise. In this study, we present a method for improving the estimation of the respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals that is robust to the presence of MCG. This method is based on the calculation of the sample entropy using fixed tolerance values (fSampEn), that is, with tolerance values that are not normalized by the local standard deviation of the window analyzed. The behavior of the fSampEn parameter was tested in synthesized mechanomyographic signals, with different ratios between the amplitude of the MCG and clean mechanomyographic components. As an example of application of this technique, the use of fSampEn was explored also in recorded MMGdi signals, with different inspiratory loads. The results with both synthetic and recorded signals indicate that the entropy parameter is less affected by the MCG noise, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, we believe that the proposed fSampEn parameter could improve estimates of respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals with the presence of MCG interference.

  16. Complete cardiac rupture associated with closed chest cardiac massage: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Lucia; Maselli, Eloisa; Romanelli, Maria Carolina; Di Vella, Giancarlo; Solarino, Biagio

    2014-03-01

    Chest skeletal injuries are the most frequent complications of external chest massage (ECM) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but heart and great vessels lacerations that are indeed very rare. We report the case of a 35-year-old workman who collapsed and underwent ECM by his co-workers for almost 30 min. At autopsy, no external injuries, fractures or bruises of the ribs or sternum, were observed. A hemopericardium with a rupture of the heart was found, with no signs of pre-existent cardiac disease. Bruises of thoracic aortic wall, lung petechiae, a contusion of the liver, and bruises of lumbar muscles were found. The cause of death was due to sudden cardiac death with an extensive cardiac rupture. This is an unusual report of massive heart damage without any skeletal or muscle chest injuries, secondary to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This kind of cardiac lesions may be considered when thoracic–abdominal trauma, or medical history, is unclear. PMID:24749147

  17. Single adult rabbit and rat cardiac myocytes retain the Ca2+- and species-dependent systolic and diastolic contractile properties of intact muscle

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    conclude that the widely divergent, Ca2+-dependent systolic and diastolic properties of intact rat and rabbit cardiac muscle are retained with a high degree of fidelity in the majority of viable single myocytes isolated from the myocardium of these species, and that these myocytes are thus a valid model for studies of Ca2+-dependent excitation- contraction mechanisms in the heart. PMID:3783125

  18. Study of the function of sarcoplasmic reticulum of vascular smooth muscle during activation due to depolarization-induced calcium influx

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.S.

    1987-01-01

    The role of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in vascular smooth muscle was evaluated with respect to regulation of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} during the Ca{sup 2+} entry induced by depolarization. Calcium agonist, Bay K8644, stimulated Ca{sup 2+} influx as well as tension in physiological salt solution, (PSS) in contrast to the priming effects due to the depolarization originally reported. Disparity, however, was found between the Ca{sup 2+} entered and tension developed. Correlation between the tension and {sup 45}Ca influx showed a typical threshold phenomenon; the basal Ca{sup 2+} influx can be raised to a certain level (25%) without tension induction, after which a minor increase in Ca{sup 2+} influx produced significant tension. This subthreshold Ca{sup 2+} influx was found accumulated in the caffeine-sensitive Ca stores, the SR. This confirmed the dependency of tension on the rate of Ca{sup 2+} entry demonstrated by a previous report.

  19. Improvements in skeletal muscle strength and cardiac function induced by resveratrol during exercise training contribute to enhanced exercise performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Dolinsky, Vernon W; Jones, Kelvin E; Sidhu, Robinder S; Haykowsky, Mark; Czubryt, Michael P; Gordon, Tessa; Dyck, Jason R B

    2012-06-01

    Exercise training (ET) improves endurance capacity by increasing both skeletal muscle mitochondrial number and function, as well as contributing to favourable cardiac remodelling.Interestingly, some of the benefits of regular exercise can also be mimicked by the naturally occurring polyphenol, resveratrol (RESV). However, it is not known whether RESV enhances physiological adaptations to ET. To investigate this, male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to a control chow diet or a chow diet that contained RESV (4 g kg⁻¹ of diet) and subsequently subjected to a programme of progressive treadmill running for 12 weeks. ET-induced improvements in exercise performance were enhanced by 21% (P <0.001) by the addition of RESV to the diet. In soleus muscle, ET+RESV increased both the twitch (1.8-fold; P <0.05) and tetanic(1.2-fold; P <0.05) forces generated during isometric contraction, compared to ET alone. In vivo echocardiography demonstrated that ET+RESV also increased the resting left ventricular ejection fraction by 10% (P <0.05), and reduced left ventricular wall stress compared to ET alone.These functional changes were accompanied by increased cardiac fatty acid oxidation (1.2-fold;P <0.05) and favourable changes in cardiac gene expression and signal transduction pathways that optimized the utilization of fatty acids in ET+RESV compared to ET alone. Overall, our findings provide evidence that the capacity for fatty acid oxidation is augmented by the addition of RESV to the diet during ET, and that this may contribute to the improved physical performance of rats following ET.

  20. Changes in cardiac function after pedicle subtraction osteotomy in patients with a kyphosis due to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Fu, J; Song, K; Zhang, Y G; Zheng, G Q; Zhang, G Y; Liu, C; Wang, Y

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac disease in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has previously been studied but not in patients with a kyphosis or in those who have undergone an operation to correct it. The aim of this study was to measure the post-operative changes in cardiac function of patients with an AS kyphosis after pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO). The original cohort consisted of 39 patients (33 men, six women). Of these, four patients (two men, two women) were lost to follow-up leaving 35 patients (31 men, four women) to study. The mean age of the remaining patients was 37.4 years (22.3 to 47.8) and their mean duration of AS was 17.0 years (4.6 to 26.4). Echocardiographic measurements, resting heart rate (RHR), physical function score (PFS), and full-length standing spinal radiographs were obtained before surgery and at the two-year follow-up. The mean pre-operative RHR was 80.2 bpm (60.6 to 112.3) which dropped to a mean of 73.7 bpm (60.7 to 90.6) at the two-year follow-up (p = 0.0000). Of 15 patients with normal ventricular function pre-operatively, two developed mild left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) at the two-year follow-up. Of 20 patients with mild LVDD pre-operatively only five had this post-operatively. Overall, 15 patients had normal LV diastolic function before their operation and 28 patients had normal LV function at the two-year follow-up. The clinical improvement was 15 out of 20 (75.0%): cardiac function in patients with AS whose kyphosis was treated by PSO was significantly improved.

  1. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heartbeats ( arrhythmias ) ... due to medicine) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  2. Development of endothermy and concomitant increases in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration in the precocial Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica).

    PubMed

    Sirsat, Sarah K G; Sirsat, Tushar S; Faber, Alan; Duquaine, Allison; Winnick, Sarah; Sotherland, Paul R; Dzialowski, Edward M

    2016-04-15

    Attaining endothermic homeothermy occurs at different times post-hatching in birds and is associated with maturation of metabolic and aerobic capacity. Simultaneous measurements at the organism, organ and cellular levels during the transition to endothermy reveal means by which this change in phenotype occurs. We examined development of endothermy in precocial Pekin ducks ( ITALIC! Anas platyrhynchos domestica) by measuring whole-animal O2consumption ( ITALIC! V̇O2 ) as animals cooled from 35 to 15°C. We measured heart ventricle mass, an indicator of O2delivery capacity, and mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized skeletal and cardiac muscle to elucidate associated changes in mitochondrial capacities at the cellular level. We examined animals on day 24 of incubation through 7 days post-hatching. ITALIC! V̇O2  of embryos decreased when cooling from 35 to 15°C; ITALIC! V̇O2  of hatchlings, beginning on day 0 post-hatching, increased during cooling with a lower critical temperature of 32°C. Yolk-free body mass did not change between internal pipping and hatching, but the heart and thigh skeletal muscle grew at faster rates than the rest of the body as the animals transitioned from an externally pipped paranate to a hatchling. Large changes in oxidative phosphorylation capacity occurred during ontogeny in both thigh muscles, the primary site of shivering, and cardiac ventricles. Thus, increased metabolic capacity necessary to attain endothermy was associated with augmented metabolic capacity of the tissue and augmented increasing O2delivery capacity, both of which were attained rapidly at hatching. PMID:26896549

  3. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  4. [Case of Wernicke's encephalopathy and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord due to vitamin deficiency showing changes in the bilateral corpus striatum and cardiac arrest due to beriberi heart disease].

    PubMed

    Ishiko, Tomoko; Taguchi, Takeshi; Takeguchi, Masafumi; Saito, Hirohiko; Nanri, Kazunori

    2009-09-01

    A 52-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital because of appetite loss, unsteadiness, psychogenic symptoms, ataxia, and consciousness disturbance as a result of the ingestion of a diet restricted to only carbohydrates for a long term. Laboratory examination indicated the presence of pancytopenia with macrocytic anemia; further, decreased vitamin B1 and B12 levels were detected in her serum. Magnetic resonance imaging fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), revealed high-signal intensity in the bilateral corpus striatum, third ventricle circumference, and cerebellar cortex. Thereafter, she received drip infusion that did not include vitamin B1 or B12 and subsequently suffered a cardiac arrest due to the aggravation of cardiac insufficiency; consequently, she was transferred to our hospital. Upon admission the patient was diagnosed to have obvious cardiomegaly with pleural effusion; further, a negative T-wave was obtained on the electrocardiogram. A diagnosis of beriberi heart disease was made because of thiamine deficiency. She was treated by thiamine administration, following which the cardiac symptoms improved immediately. Various neurological symptoms caused by encephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy and subacute combined spinal cord degeneration improved by treatment with thiamine and cyanocobalamine administration; however, some of these symptoms still remained. General awareness of the fact that neurological symptoms can be caused by vitamin deficiency is essential.

  5. Mechanical Chest Compressions in Prolonged Cardiac Arrest due to ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Can Cause Myocardial Contusion.

    PubMed

    Stechovsky, Cyril; Hajek, Petr; Cipro, Simon; Veselka, Josef

    2016-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is a common cause of sudden cardiac death. We present a case report of a 60-year-old man without a history of coronary artery disease who presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. During transportation to the hospital, he developed ventricular fibrillation (VF) and later pulseless electrical activity. Chest compressions with LUCAS 2 (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) automated mechanical compression-decompression device were initiated. Coronary angiography showed total occlusion of the left main coronary artery and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed. After the PCI, his heart started to generate effective contractions and LUCAS could be discontinued. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved after 90 minutes of cardiac arrest. The patient died of cardiogenic shock 11 hours later. An autopsy revealed a transmural anterolateral myocardial infarction but also massive subepicardial hemorrhage and interstitial edema and hemorrhages on histologic samples from regions of the myocardium outside the infarction itself and also from the right ventricle. These lesions were concluded to be a myocardial contusion. The true incidence of myocardial contusion as a consequence of mechanical chest compressions is not known. We speculate that severe myocardial contusion might have influenced outcome of our patient. PMID:27574387

  6. Effective ADAPT Thrombectomy in a Patient with Acute Stroke due to Cardiac Papillary Elastofibroma: Histological Thrombus Confirmation.

    PubMed

    Biraschi, Francesco; Diana, Francesco; Alesini, Francesco; Guidetti, Giulio; Peschillo, Simone

    2016-10-01

    A 75-year-old man with hypertension and atrial fibrillation was admitted to our emergency room with right-sided hemiplegia and complete aphasia (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score = 18). A noncontrast computed tomography scan showed a slight hypodensity in the left insular region and a bright hyperdense sign in the M1 tract of the left middle cerebral artery (MCA). Angio-CT confirmed an occlusion of the M1 tract of the MCA. Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging/perfusion-weighted imaging was obtained and revealed a mismatch in the left parietal cortical region. Complete revascularization was achieved by thromboaspiration with the A Direct ASPIRATION first PASS TECHNIQUE (ADAPT) technique. Histological examination of the embolic material revealed its nonthrombotic nature: cardiac embolic papillary elastofibroma (PEF). At discharge, good recovery of right-side hemiplegia was observed. This case report is the second in literature in which a histological confirmed cardiac embolic PEF is reported as a cause of embolic stroke. PEF is a rare but potentially treatable cause of embolic stroke. Understanding the nature of the embolic material would help in choosing the best revascularization approach. PMID:27539711

  7. Cardiac matrix: a clue for future therapy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Paras Kumar; Givvimani, Srikanth; Chavali, Vishalakshi; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac muscle is unique because it contracts ceaselessly throughout the life and is highly resistant to fatigue. The marvelous nature of the cardiac muscle is attributed to its matrix that maintains structural and functional integrity and provides ambient micro-environment required for mechanical, cellular and molecular activities in the heart. Cardiac matrix dictates the endothelium myocyte (EM) coupling and contractility of cardiomyocytes. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) regulate matrix degradation that determines cardiac fibrosis and myocardial performance. We have shown that MMP-9 regulates differential expression of micro RNAs (miRNAs), calcium cycling and contractility of cardiomyocytes. The differential expression of miRNAs is associated with angiogenesis, hypertrophy and fibrosis in the heart. MMP-9, which is involved in the degradation of cardiac matrix and induction of fibrosis, is also implicated in inhibition of survival and differentiation of cardiac stem cells (CSC). Cardiac matrix is distinct because it renders mechanical properties and provides a framework essential for differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPC) into specific lineage. Cardiac matrix regulates myocyte contractility by EM coupling and calcium transients and also directs miRNAs required for precise regulation of continuous and synchronized beating of cardiomyocytes that is indispensible for survival. Alteration in the matrix homeostasis due to induction of MMPs, altered expression of specific miRNAs or impaired signaling for contractility of cardiomyocytes leads to catastrophic effects. This review describes the mechanisms by which cardiac matrix regulates myocardial performance and suggests future directions for the development of treatment strategies in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24055000

  8. Interactions between sarco-endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in cardiac and skeletal muscle - pivotal roles in Ca²⁺ and reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Verónica; Csordás, György; Hajnóczky, György

    2013-07-15

    Mitochondria are strategically and dynamically positioned in the cell to spatially coordinate ATP production with energy needs and to allow the local exchange of material with other organelles. Interactions of mitochondria with the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) have been receiving much attention owing to emerging evidence on the role these sites have in cell signaling, dynamics and biosynthetic pathways. One of the most important physiological and pathophysiological paradigms for SR/ER-mitochondria interactions is in cardiac and skeletal muscle. The contractile activity of these tissues has to be matched by mitochondrial ATP generation that is achieved, at least in part, by propagation of Ca(2+) signals from SR to mitochondria. However, the muscle has a highly ordered structure, providing only limited opportunity for mitochondrial dynamics and interorganellar interactions. This Commentary focuses on the latest advances in the structure, function and disease relevance of the communication between SR/ER and mitochondria in muscle. In particular, we discuss the recent demonstration of SR/ER-mitochondria tethers that are formed by multiple proteins, and local Ca(2+) transfer between SR/ER and mitochondria.

  9. Point-of-care pleural and lung ultrasound in a newborn suffering from cardiac arrest due to tension pneumothorax after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Polito, Angelo; Biasucci, Daniele G; Cogo, Paola

    2016-02-01

    We report the case of a 12-day-old newborn affected by coarctation of the aorta and intraventricular defect who underwent coarctectomy and pulmonary artery banding. On post-operative day 7, the patient suffered from pulseless electric activity due to tension pneumothorax. Point-of-care ultrasound was performed during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an attempt to diagnose pneumothorax. The diagnosis was made without delaying or interrupting chest compressions, and the pneumothorax was promptly treated.

  10. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting for a left main lesion due to cardiac allograft vasculopathy in Japan: first report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Hata, Hiroki; Murata, Yoshihiro; Seguchi, Osamu; Yanase, Masanobu; Shimahara, Yusuke; Sato, Shunsuke; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major cause of mortality after transplantation. We treated a 44-year-old female with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) 4 years after heart transplantation. Annual examinations, including coronary angiography and intravenous ultrasound (IVUS), revealed a severe lesion in the left main trunk. The left internal mammary artery was successfully anastomosed to the left anterior descending artery in an off-pump manner. To ensure that patients have a good long-term outcome after heart transplantation, routine examinations, including IVUS, are crucial, because of the nature of CAV. OPCAB is a good option for a left main trunk lesion due to CAV.

  11. Muscle-specific AMPK β1β2-null mice display a myopathy due to loss of capillary density in nonpostural muscles.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa M; Wang, David C; D'Souza, Donna M; Krause, Matthew P; Layne, Andrew S; Criswell, David S; O'Neill, Hayley M; Connor, Michael K; Anderson, Judy E; Kemp, Bruce E; Steinberg, Gregory R; Hawke, Thomas J

    2014-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of metabolism. While muscle-specific AMPK β1β2 double-knockout (β1β2M-KO) mice display alterations in metabolic and mitochondrial capacity, their severe exercise intolerance suggested a secondary contributor to the observed phenotype. We find that tibialis anterior (TA), but not soleus, muscles of sedentary β1β2M-KO mice display a significant myopathy (decreased myofiber areas, increased split and necrotic myofibers, and increased centrally nucleated myofibers. A mitochondrial- and fiber-type-specific etiology to the myopathy was ruled out. However, β1β2M-KO TA muscles displayed significant (P<0.05) increases in platelet aggregation and apoptosis within myofibers and surrounding interstitium (P<0.05). These changes correlated with a 45% decrease in capillary density (P<0.05). We hypothesized that the β1β2M-KO myopathy in resting muscle resulted from impaired AMPK-nNOSμ signaling, causing increased platelet aggregation, impaired vasodilation, and, ultimately, ischemic injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, AMPK-specific phosphorylation (Ser1446) of nNOSμ was decreased in β1β2M-KO compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The AMPK-nNOSμ relationship was further demonstrated by administration of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) to β1β2-MKO muscles and C2C12 myotubes. AICAR significantly increased nNOSμ phosphorylation and nitric oxide production (P<0.05) within minutes of administration in WT muscles and C2C12 myotubes but not in β1β2M-KO muscles. These findings highlight the importance of the AMPK-nNOSμ pathway in resting skeletal muscle.

  12. Single myosin cross-bridge orientation in cardiac papillary muscle detects lever-arm shear strain in transduction.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Thomas P; Josephson, Matthew P; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-09-13

    Myosin motors transduce ATP free energy into mechanical work. Transduction models allocate specific functions to motor structural domains beginning with ATP hydrolysis in the active site and ending in a lever-arm rotating power-stroke. Myosin light chains, regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC), bind IQ-domains on the lever-arm and track its movement. Strong evidence exists that light chains stabilize the lever-arm and that light chain mutation undermines stability. Human ventricular RLC tagged with photoactivatable GFP (HCRLC-PAGFP) replaces native RLC in porcine papillary muscle fibers, restores native contractility, and situates PAGFP for single molecule orientation tracking within the crowded fiber lattice. The spatial emission pattern from single photoactivated PAGFP tagged myosins was observed in z-stacks fitted simultaneously to maximize accuracy in estimated dipole orientation. Emitter dipole polar and azimuthal angle pair scatter plots identified an area where steric and molecular crowding constraints depopulated orientations unfavorable for actin interaction. Transitions between pre- and post-power-stroke states represent the lever-arm trajectory sampled by the data and quantify lever-arm shear strain in transduction at three tension levels. These data identify forces acting on myosin in the in situ fiber system due to crowding, steric hindrance, and actomyosin interaction. They induce lever-arm shear strain observed with single molecule orientation detection. A single myosin work histogram reveals discretized power-stroke substates reminiscent of the Huxley-Simmons model for myosin based contraction [Huxley and Simmons ( 1971 ) Nature 233 , 533]. RLC or ELC mutation, should it impact lever-arm shear strain, will be detected as changes in single myosin shear strain or power-stroke substate distribution.

  13. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Julia Meireles; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Sharpe, Colin; Noble, Anna; Wood, William M.; Jorge, Erika C.; Goldhamer, David J.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route toward the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies. It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells. To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm. PMID:26042028

  14. Temperature-Dependence of Isometric Tension and Cross-Bridge Kinetics of Cardiac Muscle Fibers Reconstituted with a Tropomyosin Internal Deletion Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoying; Tobacman, Larry S.; Kawai, Masataka

    2006-01-01

    The effect of temperature on isometric tension and cross-bridge kinetics was studied with a tropomyosin (Tm) internal deletion mutant AS-Δ23Tm (Ala-Ser-Tm Δ(47–123)) in bovine cardiac muscle fibers by using the thin filament extraction and reconstitution technique. The results are compared with those from actin reconstituted alone, cardiac muscle-derived control acetyl-Tm, and recombinant control AS-Tm. In all four reconstituted muscle groups, isometric tension and stiffness increased linearly with temperature in the range 5–40°C for fibers activated in the presence of saturating ATP and Ca2+. The slopes of the temperature-tension plots of the two controls were very similar, whereas the slope derived from fibers with actin alone had ∼40% the control value, and the slope from mutant Tm had ∼36% the control value. Sinusoidal analysis was performed to study the temperature dependence of cross-bridge kinetics. All three exponential processes A, B, and C were identified in the high temperature range (30–40°C); only processes B and C were identified in the mid-temperature range (15–25°C), and only process C was identified in the low temperature range (5–10°C). At a given temperature, similar apparent rate constants (2πa, 2πb, 2πc) were observed in all four muscle groups, whereas their magnitudes were markedly less in the order of AS-Δ23Tm < Actin < AS-Tm ≈ Acetyl-Tm groups. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that Tm enhances hydrophobic and stereospecific interactions (positive allosteric effect) between actin and myosin, but Δ23Tm decreases these interactions (negative allosteric effect). Our observations further indicate that tension/cross-bridge is increased by Tm, but is diminished by Δ23Tm. We conclude that Tm affects the conformation of actin so as to increase the area of hydrophobic interaction between actin and myosin molecules. PMID:16980359

  15. The protective effects of Chinese herb-Taikong Yangxin Prescription on the atrophic remodeling of cardiac muscle in rats induced by hindlimb unloading through activating Akt/GSK-3beta signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Yuan; Min, Yuan; Jianfeng, Zhang; Zhili, Li; Huijuan, Wang; Desheng, Wang; Yinghui, Li; Yongzhi, Li; Shizhong, Jiang

    Objective To test the hypothesis that traditional Chinese herb-TaiKong Yangxin Prescrip-tion can activate the Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway and alleviate the atrophic remodeling of cardiac muscle in rats induced by hindlimb unloading. Methods The physiological effects of simulated microgravity was induced by 7d hindlimb unloading in rats. TaiKong Yangxin Pre-scription was given daily by gastric irrigation as countermeasure against effects of simulated microgravity. The frozen sections of left ventricular cardiac muscles were stained by FITC la-beled lectin and visualized by laser scanning confocal microscopy, the cross section areas(CSA) of cardiomyocytes were calculated by IPP6.0 Image software. The protein expression of TnI, phosphorylation level of Akt and GSK-3β were measured by Western blot. Results Simulated microgravity decreased the CSA of cardiomyocytes and protein expression of TnI in left ven-tricular cardiac muscles, inhibited the phosphorylation level of Akt at serine 473 and GSK-3β at serine 9. The traditional Chinese herb-TaiKong Yangxin Prescription alleviated the atrophic remodeling of cardiac muscles, reversed the declined protein expression of TnI and phosphoryla-tion levels of Akt at serine 473 and GSK-3β at serine 9 in hindlimb-unloading rats. Conclusion The traditional Chinese herb-TaiKong Yangxin Prescription has significant countermeasure effects on the atrophic remodeling of cardiac muscle induced by hindlimb unloading in rats, in which activating Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway plays an important role.(Funded by Advanced space medico-engineering research project of China, grant NO. 2005SY5206005 and SJ200801)

  16. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roccio, M; Goumans, M J; Sluijter, J P G; Doevendans, P A

    2008-03-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyocytes to ameliorate the injured myocardium, compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility and eventually restore cardiac function. An array of cell types has been explored in this respect, including skeletal muscle, bone marrow derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and more recently cardiac progenitor cells. The best-studied cell types are mouse and human ESC cells, which have undisputedly been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and vascular lineages and have been of great help to understand the differentiation process of pluripotent cells. However, due to their immunogenicity, risk of tumor development and the ethical challenge arising from their embryonic origin, they do not provide a suitable cell source for a regenerative therapy approach. A better option, overcoming ethical and allogenicity problems, seems to be provided by bone marrow derived cells and by the recently identified cardiac precursors. This report will overview current knowledge on these different cell types and their application in cardiac regeneration and address issues like implementation of delivery methods, including tissue engineering approaches that need to be developed alongside.

  17. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  18. Cerebral infarction due to cardiac myxoma developed with the loss of consciousness immediately after defecation-a case report.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Toshimasa; Oomura, Masahiro; Sato, Chikako; Anan, Chise; Yamada, Kentaro; Kamimoto, Kaoru

    2016-05-31

    A 74-year-old man lost consciousness immediately after defecation. The loss of consciousness lasted for several minutes, and he experienced difficulty in walking when he regained consciousness. He was transferred to our hospital via an ambulance. Upon neurological examination, nystagmus and ataxia in the left arm and leg were noted. An MRI of the brain revealed multiple acute infarcts mainly in the bilateral cerebellum. Intravenous thrombolytic therapy with alteplase was initiated 3 h and 20 min after the onset of symptoms, and an improvement in neurological symptoms was observed. Echocardiography displayed a mobile mass in the left atrium, suggesting myxoma. After 14 days from the onset of symptoms, the tumor was surgically resected, and a pathological diagnosis of myxoma was established. Because of the unique event surrounding the onset in this case, we considered that there was a potential detachment of myxoma and/or thrombi fragments triggered by an increase in intrathoracic pressure induced by the action of defecation. This present case suggests that clinicians should consider cardiac myxoma in patients with cerebral infarction if the stroke is preceded by a Valsalva maneuver-like action and accompanied by the loss of consciousness. PMID:27151226

  19. Molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of angiotensin II-induced muscle wasting: potential therapeutic targets for cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Tabony, A Michael; Galvez, Sarah; Mitch, William E; Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2013-10-01

    Cachexia is a serious complication of many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many factors are involved in the development of cachexia, and there is increasing evidence that angiotensin II (Ang II), the main effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), plays an important role in this process. Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. In rodent models, an increase in systemic Ang II leads to weight loss through increased protein breakdown, reduced protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and decreased appetite. Ang II activates the ubiquitin-proteasome system via generation of reactive oxygen species and via inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and disrupts normal energy balance. Ang II also increases cytokines and circulating hormones such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A, glucocorticoids and myostatin, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II acts on hypothalamic neurons to regulate orexigenic/anorexigenic neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide-Y, orexin and corticotropin-releasing hormone, leading to reduced appetite. Also, Ang II may regulate skeletal muscle regenerative processes. Several clinical studies have indicated that blockade of Ang II signaling via ACE inhibitors or Ang II type 1 receptor blockers prevents weight loss and improves muscle strength. Thus the RAS is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with CHF and CKD. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  20. High-Dose Polymerized Hemoglobin Fails to Alleviate Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury due to Induction of Oxidative Damage in Coronary Artery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Chan; Zhou, Ronghua; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Shen; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Wentao; Liu, Jiaxin; Yang, Chengmin; Liu, Jin; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an unavoidable event for patients in cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This study was designed to investigate whether glutaraldehyde-polymerized human placenta hemoglobin (PolyPHb), a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC), can protect heart against CPB-induced I/R injury or not and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Methods and Results. A standard dog CPB model with 2-hour cardiac arrest and 2-hour reperfusion was established. The results demonstrated that a low-dose PolyPHb (0.1%, w/v) provided a significant protection on the I/R heart, whereas the high-dose PolyPHb (3%, w/v) did not exhibit cardioprotective effect, as evidenced by the impaired cardiac function, decreased myocardial oxygen utilization, and elevated enzymes release and pathological changes. Further study indicated that exposure of isolated coronary arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to a high-dose PolyPHb caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was companied with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and elevated malonaldehyde (MDA) formation. Consistent with the increased oxidative stress, the NAD(P)H oxidase activity and subunits expression, including gp91(phox), p47(phox), p67(phox), and Nox1, were greatly upregulated. Conclusion. The high-dose PolyPHb fails to protect heart from CPB-induced I/R injury, which was due to overproduction of NAD(P)H oxidase-induced ROS and resultant endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26161234

  1. Posttranslational modifications of cardiac and skeletal muscle proteins by reactive oxygen species after burn injury in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, J M; Ganguly, M; Stockman, H; Ferland, L H; Toner, M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the involvement of oxidative damage in muscle wasting after burn injury. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Burn injury damages tissue at the site of the burn and also affects peripheral tissue. There is evidence to suggest that reactive oxygen species may be generated in increased amounts after burn, and these may contribute to wound healing and to posttranslational modifications of tissue constituents distant from the wound site. METHODS: The oxidation of muscle proteins was assessed, using the dinitrophenylhydrazine assay for carbonyl content, in muscles of rats after a full-thickness skin scald burn covering 20% of the total body surface area, over a 6-week period. In this model, rats failed to incur normal body weight or muscle weight gain. RESULTS: Soleus, extensor digitorum longus, diaphragm, and heart ventricle proteins were oxidatively damaged after injury. The extent of tissue protein oxidation, however, differed depending on the time points studied. In general, higher levels of protein carbonyl group formation, an indicator of oxidative damage, were found to occur within 1 to 5 days after injury, and the oxidized protein content of the various tissues decreased during the later stages. Both sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar carbonyl-containing proteins accumulated in diaphragm 3 days after burn injury and were rapidly removed from the tissue during a 2-hour in vitro incubation. This coincided with increased proteolytic activity in diaphragm. CONCLUSIONS: These observations suggest that the loss of proteins modified by reactive oxygen species may contribute to the burn-induced protein wasting in respiratory and other muscles by a proteolytically driven mechanism. PMID:9923807

  2. A conserved MADS-box phosphorylation motif regulates differentiation and mitochondrial function in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Mughal, W; Nguyen, L; Pustylnik, S; da Silva Rosa, S C; Piotrowski, S; Chapman, D; Du, M; Alli, N S; Grigull, J; Halayko, A J; Aliani, M; Topham, M K; Epand, R M; Hatch, G M; Pereira, T J; Kereliuk, S; McDermott, J C; Rampitsch, C; Dolinsky, V W; Gordon, J W

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to metabolic disease during fetal development alters cellular differentiation and perturbs metabolic homeostasis, but the underlying molecular regulators of this phenomenon in muscle cells are not completely understood. To address this, we undertook a computational approach to identify cooperating partners of the myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors, known regulators of muscle differentiation and metabolic function. We demonstrate that MEF2 and the serum response factor (SRF) collaboratively regulate the expression of numerous muscle-specific genes, including microRNA-133a (miR-133a). Using tandem mass spectrometry techniques, we identify a conserved phosphorylation motif within the MEF2 and SRF Mcm1 Agamous Deficiens SRF (MADS)-box that regulates miR-133a expression and mitochondrial function in response to a lipotoxic signal. Furthermore, reconstitution of MEF2 function by expression of a neutralizing mutation in this identified phosphorylation motif restores miR-133a expression and mitochondrial membrane potential during lipotoxicity. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that miR-133a regulates mitochondrial function through translational inhibition of a mitophagy and cell death modulating protein, called Nix. Finally, we show that rodents exposed to gestational diabetes during fetal development display muscle diacylglycerol accumulation, concurrent with insulin resistance, reduced miR-133a, and elevated Nix expression, as young adult rats. Given the diverse roles of miR-133a and Nix in regulating mitochondrial function, and proliferation in certain cancers, dysregulation of this genetic pathway may have broad implications involving insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and cancer biology. PMID:26512955

  3. [Dynamics of cardiac and skeletal muscle lactate dehydrogenase activity following a single exposure to an alternating magnetic field].

    PubMed

    Udintsev, N A; Kanskaia, N V; Shchepetil'nikova, A I; Ordina, O M; Pichurina, R A

    1976-06-01

    A rise in LDH activity and a change of the enzyme distribution in the cytostructures of the heart and skeletal muscles of albino rats was revealed during the first 48 hours after a single twenty-four-hour action of an A. C. magnetic field (200 e, 50 cps). A displacement of the enzyma ratio in the direction of M-type was noted. Complete normalization occurred in the 3rd or 4th week only.

  4. Novel X-linked syndrome of cardiac valvulopathy, keloid scarring, and reduced joint mobility due to filamin A substitution G1576R.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep Singh; Blease, Sophie; Braxton, Alicia; Graves, Julia; He, Weimin; Person, Richard; Slattery, Leah; Bernstein, Jonathan Adam; Hudgins, Louanne

    2016-04-01

    Filamin A (FLNA) is known to be involved in intracellular actin binding, cell migration, scaffolding, and signaling. We report a novel X-linked syndrome characterized by cardiac valvular disease, keloid scarring and reduced joint mobility in male second cousins due to a previously unreported mutation in FLNA. Whole exome sequencing was performed using standard methods and segregation analysis was performed in affected and non-affected family members. A novel hemizygous c.4726G>A (p.G1576R) mutation in FLNA was detected. Segregation analysis performed on multiple maternal family members showed c.4726G>A (p.G1576R) segregated with disease in an X-linked inheritance pattern. The findings in these cases are distinct from previously described FLNA related disorders by virtue of decreased joint mobility and spontaneous keloid scarring. They occur in association with a novel mutation and represent a novel genetic syndrome.

  5. Finite element modelling predicts changes in joint shape and cell behaviour due to loss of muscle strain in jaw development.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Lucy H; Norton, Joanna L; Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J; Hammond, Chrissy L

    2015-09-18

    Abnormal joint morphogenesis is linked to clinical conditions such as Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) and to osteoarthritis (OA). Muscle activity is known to be important during the developmental process of joint morphogenesis. However, less is known about how this mechanical stimulus affects the behaviour of joint cells to generate altered morphology. Using zebrafish, in which we can image all joint musculoskeletal tissues at high resolution, we show that removal of muscle activity through anaesthetisation or genetic manipulation causes a change to the shape of the joint between the Meckel's cartilage and Palatoquadrate (the jaw joint), such that the joint develops asymmetrically leading to an overlap of the cartilage elements on the medial side which inhibits normal joint function. We identify the time during which muscle activity is critical to produce a normal joint. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), to model the strains exerted by muscle on the skeletal elements, we identify that minimum principal strains are located at the medial region of the joint and interzone during mouth opening. Then, by studying the cells immediately proximal to the joint, we demonstrate that biomechanical strain regulates cell orientation within the developing joint, such that when muscle-induced strain is removed, cells on the medial side of the joint notably change their orientation. Together, these data show that biomechanical forces are required to establish symmetry in the joint during development. PMID:26253758

  6. Finite element modelling predicts changes in joint shape and cell behaviour due to loss of muscle strain in jaw development

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Lucy H.; Norton, Joanna L.; Bright, Jen A.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Hammond, Chrissy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal joint morphogenesis is linked to clinical conditions such as Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) and to osteoarthritis (OA). Muscle activity is known to be important during the developmental process of joint morphogenesis. However, less is known about how this mechanical stimulus affects the behaviour of joint cells to generate altered morphology. Using zebrafish, in which we can image all joint musculoskeletal tissues at high resolution, we show that removal of muscle activity through anaesthetisation or genetic manipulation causes a change to the shape of the joint between the Meckel's cartilage and Palatoquadrate (the jaw joint), such that the joint develops asymmetrically leading to an overlap of the cartilage elements on the medial side which inhibits normal joint function. We identify the time during which muscle activity is critical to produce a normal joint. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), to model the strains exerted by muscle on the skeletal elements, we identify that minimum principal strains are located at the medial region of the joint and interzone during mouth opening. Then, by studying the cells immediately proximal to the joint, we demonstrate that biomechanical strain regulates cell orientation within the developing joint, such that when muscle-induced strain is removed, cells on the medial side of the joint notably change their orientation. Together, these data show that biomechanical forces are required to establish symmetry in the joint during development. PMID:26253758

  7. Determination of cardiac size following space missions of different durations - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Gowen, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A simple method to estimate cardiac size from single frontal plane chest roentgenograms has been described. Pre- and postflight chest X-rays from Apollo 17, and Skylab 2 and 3 have been analyzed for changes in the cardiac silhouette size. The data obtained from the computed cardiothoracic areal ratios compared well with the clinical cardiothoracic diametral ratios (r = .86). Though an overall postflight decrease in cardiac size is evident, the mean difference was not statistically significant (n = 8). The individual decreases in the cardiac silhouette size postflight are thought to be due to decrements in intracardiac chamber volumes rather than in myocardial muscle mass.

  8. Determination of cardiac size following space missions of different durations: the second manned Skylab mission.

    PubMed

    Nicogossian, A; Hoffler, G W; Johnson, R L; Gowen, R J

    1976-04-01

    A simple method to estimate cardiac size from single frontal plane chest roentgenograms has been described. Pre- and postflight chest X-rays from Apollo 17, and Skylab 2 and 3 have been analyzed for changes in the cardiac silhouette size. The data obtained from the computed cardiothoracic areal ratios compared well with the clinical cardiothoracic diametral ratios (r = .86). Though an overall postflight decrease in cardiac size is evident, the mean difference was not statistically significant (n = 8). The individual decreases in the cardiac silhouette size postflight are thought to be due to decrements in intracardiac chamber volumes rather than in myocardial muscle mass.

  9. Skeletal muscle involvement in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Limongelli, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Raffaella; Maddaloni, Valeria; Rea, Alessandra; Sarkozy, Anna; McKenna, William J

    2013-12-01

    The link between heart and skeletal muscle disorders is based on similar molecular, anatomical and clinical features, which are shared by the 'primary' cardiomyopathies and 'primary' neuromuscular disorders. There are, however, some peculiarities that are typical of cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders. Skeletal muscle weakness presenting at any age may indicate a primary neuromuscular disorder (associated with creatine kinase elevation as in dystrophinopathies), a mitochondrial disease (particularly if encephalopathy, ocular myopathy, retinitis, neurosensorineural deafness, lactic acidosis are present), a storage disorder (progressive exercise intolerance, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa, as in Danon disease), or metabolic disorders (hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperammonaemia or other specific biochemical abnormalities). In such patients, skeletal muscle weakness usually precedes the cardiomyopathy and dominates the clinical picture. Nevertheless, skeletal involvement may be subtle, and the first clinical manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder may be the occurrence of heart failure, conduction disorders or ventricular arrhythmias due to cardiomyopathy. ECG and echocardiogram, and eventually, a more detailed cardiovascular evaluation may be required to identify early cardiac involvement. Paediatric and adult cardiologists should be proactive in screening for neuromuscular and related disorders to enable diagnosis in probands and evaluation of families with a focus on the identification of those at risk of cardiac arrhythmia and emboli who may require specific prophylactic treatments, for example, pacemaker, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and anticoagulation. PMID:24149064

  10. TRPA1 is functionally co-expressed with TRPV1 in cardiac muscle: Co-localization at z-discs, costameres and intercalated discs

    PubMed Central

    Andrei, Spencer R.; Sinharoy, Pritam; Bratz, Ian N.; Damron, Derek S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transient receptor potential channels of the ankyrin subtype-1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid subtype-1 (TRPV1) are structurally related, non-selective cation channels that show a high permeability to calcium. Previous studies indicate that TRP channels play a prominent role in the regulation of cardiovascular dynamics and homeostasis, but also contribute to the pathophysiology of many diseases and disorders within the cardiovascular system. However, no studies to date have identified the functional expression and/or intracellular localization of TRPA1 in primary adult mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes (CMs). Although TRPV1 has been implicated in the regulation of cardiac function, there is a paucity of information regarding functional expression and localization of TRPV1 in adult CMs. Our current studies demonstrate that TRPA1 and TRPV1 ion channels are co-expressed at the protein level in CMs and both channels are expressed throughout the endocardium, myocardium and epicardium. Moreover, immunocytochemical localization demonstrates that both channels predominantly colocalize at the Z-discs, costameres and intercalated discs. Furthermore, specific TRPA1 and TRPV1 agonists elicit dose-dependent, transient rises in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) that are abolished in CMs obtained from TRPA1−/− and TRPV1−/− mice. Similarly, we observed a dose-dependent attenuation of the TRPA1 and TRPV1 agonist-induced increase in [Ca2+]i when WT CMs were pretreated with increasing concentrations of selective TRPA1 or TRPV1 channel antagonists. In summary, these findings demonstrate functional expression and the precise ultrastructural localization of TRPA1 and TRPV1 ion channels in freshly isolated mouse CMs. Crosstalk between TRPA1 and TRPV1 may be important in mediating cellular signaling events in cardiac muscle. PMID:27144598

  11. Effect of tissue fat and water content on nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Scholz, T D; Fleagle, S R; Parrish, F C; Breon, T; Skorton, D J

    1990-01-01

    Understanding tissue determinants that affect the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of myocardium would improve noninvasive characterization of myocardial tissue. To determine if NMR relaxation times would reflect changes in tissue fat content, two experimental models were investigated. First, an idealized model using mixtures of beef skeletal muscle and beef fat was studied to investigate the effects of a wide range of tissue fat content. Second, myocardium with varying fat content from hogs raised to have varying degrees of ponderosity was analyzed. Tissue fat and water contents and spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times at 20 MHz were measured. The skeletal muscle/fat mixtures ranged in fat content from 35% to 95% with water content variations from 50% to 75%. Water content decreased as fat content increased. A significant inverse linear relationship was found between T1 and sample fat content (r = -0.997). Spin-spin relaxation times showed a significant positive curvilinear relationship with fat content (r2 = 0.96). In the animal experiments, 18 hogs were studied with samples obtained from both right and left ventricular (LV) free walls, with care taken to avoid epicardial fat. Myocardial fat content ranged from 3% to 25%. A significant correlation was found between LV fat content and corrected LV mass (r = 0.62), which suggested that the increase in LV mass could be explained, at least in part, by changes in myocardial fat content. Similar to the muscle/fat mixture model, a significant positive curvilinear relationship was found between myocardial T2 and tissue fat content (r2 = 0.67) for all the myocardial samples.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The essential light chain N-terminal extension alters force and fiber kinetics in mouse cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark S; Palmer, Bradley M; Ruch, Stuart; Martin, Lisa A; Farman, Gerrie P; Wang, Yuan; Robbins, Jeffrey; Irving, Thomas C; Maughan, David W

    2005-10-14

    The functional significance of the actin-binding region at the N terminus of the cardiac myosin essential light chain (ELC) remains elusive. In a previous experiment, the endogenous ventricular ELC was replaced with a protein containing a 10-amino acid deletion at positions 5-14 (ELC1vDelta5-14, referred to as 1vDelta5-14), a region that interacts with actin. 1vDelta5-14 mice showed no discernable mutant phenotype in skinned ventricular strips. However, because the myofilament lattice swells upon skinning, the mutant phenotype may have been concealed by the inability of the ELC to reach the actin-binding site. Using the same mouse model, we repeated earlier measurements and performed additional experiments on skinned strips osmotically compressed to the intact lattice spacing as determined by x-ray diffraction. 1vDelta5-14 mice exhibited decreased maximum isometric tension without a change in calcium sensitivity. The decreased force was most evident in 5-6-month-old mice compared with 13-15-month-old mice and may account for the greater ventricular wall thickness in young 1vDelta5-14 mice compared with age-matched controls. No differences were observed in unloaded shortening velocity at maximum calcium activation. However, 1vDelta5-14 mice exhibited a significant difference in the frequency at which minimum complex modulus amplitude occurred, indicating a change in cross-bridge kinetics. We hypothesize that the ELC N-terminal extension interaction with actin inhibits the reversal of the power stroke, thereby increasing isometric force. Our results strongly suggest that an interaction between residues 5-14 of the ELC N terminus and the C-terminal residues of actin enhances cardiac performance.

  13. Noninvasive, near infrared spectroscopic-measured muscle pH and PO2 indicate tissue perfusion for cardiac surgical patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R.; Idwasi, Patrick O.; Balaguer, Jorge; Levin, Steven; Simsir, Sinan A.; Vander Salm, Thomas J.; Collette, Helen; Heard, Stephen O.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether near infrared spectroscopic measurement of tissue pH and Po2 has sufficient accuracy to assess variation in tissue perfusion resulting from changes in blood pressure and metabolic demand during cardiopulmonary bypass. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: Eighteen elective cardiac surgical patients. INTERVENTION: Cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A near infrared spectroscopic fiber optic probe was placed over the hypothenar eminence. Reference Po2 and pH sensors were inserted in the abductor digiti minimi (V). Data were collected every 30 secs during surgery and for 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass. Calibration equations developed from one third of the data were used with the remaining data to investigate sensitivity of the near infrared spectroscopic measurement to physiologic changes resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass. Near infrared spectroscopic and reference pH and Po2 measurements were compared for each subject using standard error of prediction. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 at baseline were compared with values during cardiopulmonary bypass just before rewarming commenced (hypotensive, hypothermic), after rewarming (hypotensive, normothermic) just before discontinuation of cardiopulmonary bypass, and at 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass (normotensive, normothermic) using mixed-model analysis of variance. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 were well correlated with the invasive measurement of pH (R2 =.84) and Po2 (R 2 =.66) with an average standard error of prediction of 0.022 +/- 0.008 pH units and 6 +/- 3 mm Hg, respectively. The average difference between the invasive and near infrared spectroscopic measurement was near zero for both the pH and Po2 measurements. Near infrared spectroscopic Po2 significantly decreased 50% on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass and remained depressed throughout the bypass and

  14. Dosimetric perturbations due to an implanted cardiac pacemaker in MammoSite{sup Registered-Sign} treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Wonmo; Kim, Siyong; Kim, Jung-in; Lee, Jae-gi; Shin, Young-Joo; Jung, Jae-Yong; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate dose perturbations for pacemaker-implanted patients in partial breast irradiation using high dose rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to calculate dose distributions involving a pacemaker in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy. Dose perturbations by varying balloon-to-pacemaker distances (BPD = 50 or 100 mm) and concentrations of iodine contrast medium (2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, and 10.0% by volume) in the balloon were investigated for separate parts of the pacemaker (i.e., battery and substrate). Relative measurements using an ion-chamber were also performed to confirm MC results. Results: The MC and measured results in homogeneous media without a pacemaker agreed with published data within 2% from the balloon surface to 100 mm BPD. Further their dose distributions with a pacemaker were in a comparable agreement. The MC results showed that doses over the battery were increased by a factor of 3, compared to doses without a pacemaker. However, there was no significant dose perturbation in the middle of substrate but up to 70% dose increase in the substrate interface with the titanium capsule. The attenuation by iodine contrast medium lessened doses delivered to the pacemaker by up to 9%. Conclusions: Due to inhomogeneity of pacemaker and contrast medium as well as low-energy photons in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy, the actual dose received in a pacemaker is different from the homogeneous medium-based dose and the external beam-based dose. Therefore, the dose perturbations should be considered for pacemaker-implanted patients when evaluating a safe clinical distance between the balloon and pacemaker.

  15. Excitation of skeletal muscle is a self-limiting process, due to run-down of Na+, K+ gradients, recoverable by stimulation of the Na+, K+ pumps

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    The general working hypothesis of this study was that muscle fatigue and force recovery depend on passive and active fluxes of Na+ and K+. This is tested by examining the time-course of excitation-induced fluxes of Na+ and K+ during 5–300 sec of 10–60 Hz continuous electrical stimulation in rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles in vitro and in vivo using 22Na and flame photometric determination of Na+ and K+. 60 sec of 60 Hz stimulation rapidly increases 22Na influx, during the initial phase (0–15 sec) by 0.53 μmol(sec)−1(g wet wt.)−1, sixfold faster than in the later phase (15–60 sec). These values agree with flame photometric measurements of Na+ content. The progressive reduction in the rate of excitation-induced Na+ uptake is likely to reflect gradual loss of excitability due to accumulation of K+ in the extracellular space and t-tubules leading to depolarization. This is in keeping with the concomitant progressive loss of contractile force previously demonstrated. During electrical stimulation rat muscles rapidly reach high rates of active Na+, K+-transport (in EDL muscles a sevenfold increase and in soleus muscles a 22-fold increase), allowing efficient and selective compensation for the large excitation-induced passive Na+, K+-fluxes demonstrated over the latest decades. The excitation-induced changes in passive fluxes of Na+ and K+ are both clearly larger than previously observed. The excitation-induced reduction in [Na+]o contributes considerably to the inhibitory effect of elevated [K+]o. In conclusion, excitation-induced passive and active Na+ and K+ fluxes are important causes of muscle fatigue and force recovery, respectively. PMID:25862098

  16. Muscle weakness in TPM3-myopathy is due to reduced Ca2+-sensitivity and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling in slow fibres.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Michaela; Cooper, Sandra T; Marston, Steve B; Nowak, Kristen J; McNamara, Elyshia; Mokbel, Nancy; Ilkovski, Biljana; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Rendu, John; de Winter, Josine M; Klinge, Lars; Beggs, Alan H; North, Kathryn N; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Clarke, Nigel F

    2015-11-15

    Dominant mutations in TPM3, encoding α-tropomyosinslow, cause a congenital myopathy characterized by generalized muscle weakness. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the mechanism of muscle dysfunction in 12 TPM3-myopathy patients. We confirm that slow myofibre hypotrophy is a diagnostic hallmark of TPM3-myopathy, and is commonly accompanied by skewing of fibre-type ratios (either slow or fast fibre predominance). Patient muscle contained normal ratios of the three tropomyosin isoforms and normal fibre-type expression of myosins and troponins. Using 2D-PAGE, we demonstrate that mutant α-tropomyosinslow was expressed, suggesting muscle dysfunction is due to a dominant-negative effect of mutant protein on muscle contraction. Molecular modelling suggested mutant α-tropomyosinslow likely impacts actin-tropomyosin interactions and, indeed, co-sedimentation assays showed reduced binding of mutant α-tropomyosinslow (R168C) to filamentous actin. Single fibre contractility studies of patient myofibres revealed marked slow myofibre specific abnormalities. At saturating [Ca(2+)] (pCa 4.5), patient slow fibres produced only 63% of the contractile force produced in control slow fibres and had reduced acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Importantly, due to reduced Ca(2+)-sensitivity, at sub-saturating [Ca(2+)] (pCa 6, levels typically released during in vivo contraction) patient slow fibres produced only 26% of the force generated by control slow fibres. Thus, weakness in TPM3-myopathy patients can be directly attributed to reduced slow fibre force at physiological [Ca(2+)], and impaired acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling kinetics. Fast myofibres are spared; however, they appear to be unable to compensate for slow fibre dysfunction. Abnormal Ca(2+)-sensitivity in TPM3-myopathy patients suggests Ca(2+)-sensitizing drugs may represent a useful treatment for this condition.

  17. Cardiac arrest due to left circumflex coronary artery embolism as a complication of subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation in a patient with mitral and aortic mechanical valve prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Protasiewicz, Marcin; Gajek, Jacek; Mysiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old female patient after replacement of aortic and mitral valve with mechanical prostheses and implantation of a pacemaker hospitalized in our clinic due to acute coronary syndrome complicated with cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation. The electrocardiogram performed on admission showed signs of myocardial infarction with concomitant ventricular pacing. After successful resuscitation the coronary angiography was performed, which showed occlusion of the left circumflex artery (LCx) by thrombus. On the basis of intravascular ultrasound imaging the presence of vulnerable plaque, parietal thrombus and dissection of LCx were excluded. It suggested that occlusion of the LCx resulted from its embolism by left-sided heart thrombus due to subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation. In this case suboptimal anticoagulation was partially iatrogenic. Two weeks before the patient had been given vitamin K intravenously due to indeterminable international normalized ratio (INR) level, which caused transient resistance to oral anticoagulants. This case report illustrates tragic difficulties in the treatment with vitamin K antagonists, which concern as many as 2/3 of anticoagulated patients. These troubles contributed to the search for new, more efficient and safer anticoagulants. There are two classes of new oral anticoagulant drugs, which do not require monitoring of coagulation: direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban). In spite of their proven efficacy in the prevention of ischaemic stroke related to atrial fibrillation and prevention or treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, the use of new oral anticoagulants for the treatment of patients with mechanical valve prostheses needs further research. PMID:24570697

  18. Cardiac arrest due to left circumflex coronary artery embolism as a complication of subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation in a patient with mitral and aortic mechanical valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Protasiewicz, Marcin; Rojek, Aleksandra; Gajek, Jacek; Mysiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old female patient after replacement of aortic and mitral valve with mechanical prostheses and implantation of a pacemaker hospitalized in our clinic due to acute coronary syndrome complicated with cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation. The electrocardiogram performed on admission showed signs of myocardial infarction with concomitant ventricular pacing. After successful resuscitation the coronary angiography was performed, which showed occlusion of the left circumflex artery (LCx) by thrombus. On the basis of intravascular ultrasound imaging the presence of vulnerable plaque, parietal thrombus and dissection of LCx were excluded. It suggested that occlusion of the LCx resulted from its embolism by left-sided heart thrombus due to subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation. In this case suboptimal anticoagulation was partially iatrogenic. Two weeks before the patient had been given vitamin K intravenously due to indeterminable international normalized ratio (INR) level, which caused transient resistance to oral anticoagulants. This case report illustrates tragic difficulties in the treatment with vitamin K antagonists, which concern as many as 2/3 of anticoagulated patients. These troubles contributed to the search for new, more efficient and safer anticoagulants. There are two classes of new oral anticoagulant drugs, which do not require monitoring of coagulation: direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban). In spite of their proven efficacy in the prevention of ischaemic stroke related to atrial fibrillation and prevention or treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, the use of new oral anticoagulants for the treatment of patients with mechanical valve prostheses needs further research.

  19. Rapid purification of calsequestrin from cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles by Ca2+-dependent elution from phenyl-sepharose.

    PubMed

    Cala, S E; Jones, L R

    1983-10-10

    Treatment of cardiac or skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles with 0.1 M sodium carbonate selectively extracts both the Ca2+-binding protein calsequestrin and the two "intrinsic glycoproteins," while leaving the Ca2+-dependent ATPase membrane bound. Phenyl-Sepharose chromatography in the presence of ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and high salt (0.5 M NaCl) readily fractionates these solubilized proteins into a Ca2+-elutable fraction, which contains purified calsequestrin, and a low ionic strength elutable fraction, which contains one of the two intrinsic glycoproteins. Elution of calsequestrin from phenyl-Sepharose occurs near 1 mM Ca2+. Copurifying with calsequestrin are an homologous set of high molecular weight proteins, which like calsequestrin stain blue with Stains-All. These proteins are present in trace amounts and do not correspond to any sarcoplasmic reticulum proteins previously identified. Elution of calsequestrin from phenyl-Sepharose is consistent with the Ca2+-binding protein losing its hydrophobic character in the presence of millimolar Ca2+. This behavior is converse to that observed for several calmodulin-like proteins, which are eluted from hydrophobic gels in the presence of EGTA. The high yield and purity of calsequestrin prepared by this method makes possible a unique system for studying what may be a distinct class of Ca2+-binding proteins.

  20. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Caroline; Angermann, Christiane E; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of multisystem disorders, which are characterized by an extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Typically affected are the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. More than half of the patients die due to cardiac involvement. Clinical signs of cardiac amyloidosis are edema of the lower limbs, hepatomegaly, ascites and elevated jugular vein pressure, frequently in combination with dyspnea. There can also be chest pain, probably due to microvessel disease. Dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system or arrhythmias may cause low blood pressure, dizziness, or recurrent syncope. The AL amyloidosis caused by the deposition of immunoglobulin light chains is the most common form. It can be performed by monoclonal gammopathy. The desirable treatment therapy consists of high-dose melphalan therapy twice followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Due to the high peritransplantation mortality, selection of appropriate patients is mandatory. The ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the amyloidogenic form of transthyretin, a plasmaprotein that is synthesized in the liver. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative therapy. The symptomatic treatment of cardiac amyloidosis is based on the current guidelines for chronic heart failure according to the patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) state. Further types of amyloidosis with possible cardiac involvement comprise the senile systemic amyloidosis caused by the wild-type transthyretin, secondary amyloidosis after chronic systemic inflammation, and the beta(2)-microglobulin amyloidosis after long-term dialysis treatment. PMID:18344065

  1. Muscle-specific deletion of comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) causes muscle steatosis but improves insulin sensitivity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping; Kadegowda, Anil K G; Ma, Yinyan; Guo, Feng; Han, Xianlin; Wang, Miao; Groban, Leanne; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Li, Huihua; Yu, Liqing

    2015-05-01

    Intramyocellular accumulation of lipids is often associated with insulin resistance. Deficiency of comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) causes cytosolic deposition of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipid droplets in most cell types, including muscle due to defective TG hydrolysis. It was unclear, however, whether CGI-58 deficiency-induced lipid accumulation in muscle influences insulin sensitivity. Here we show that muscle-specific CGI-58 knockout mice relative to their controls have increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity on a Western-type high-fat diet, despite TG accumulation in both heart and oxidative skeletal muscle and cholesterol deposition in heart. Although the intracardiomyocellular lipid deposition results in cardiac ventricular fibrosis and systolic dysfunction, muscle-specific CGI-58 knockout mice show increased glucose uptake in heart and soleus muscle, improved insulin signaling in insulin-sensitive tissues, and reduced plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, and cholesterol. Hepatic contents of TG and cholesterol are also decreased in these animals. Cardiac steatosis is attributable, at least in part, to decreases in cardiac TG hydrolase activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1-dependent mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. In conclusion, muscle CGI-58 deficiency causes cardiac dysfunction and fat deposition in oxidative muscles but induces a series of favorable metabolic changes in mice fed a high-fat diet. PMID:25751639

  2. Calcium modulatory properties of 2,6-dibutylbenzylamine (B25) in rat isolated vas deferens, cardiac and smooth muscle preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Pirisino, R.; Banchelli, G.; Ignesti, G.; Mantelli, L.; Matucci, R.; Raimondi, L.; Buffoni, F.

    1993-01-01

    1. In rat isolated vas deferens the new compound 2,6-dibutylbenzylamine (B25) evoked a series of repeating rhythmic contractions. Concentration-response curves constructed for this effect were bell-shaped, indicating a biphasic effect for this compound. By contrast, B25 depressed heart contractility without any visible positive inotropic or chronotropic activity. 2. Experiments with tetrodotoxin, reserpine, capsaicin, alpha-adrenoceptor blocking compounds and other agents permit us to exclude a release of neuromediators or a direct stimulation of post-synaptic receptors to account for the rhythmic effect of B25 in the rat vas deferens. 3. In the same tissue, the increase in 45Ca2+ uptake, the voltage-dependency as well as the dependence of the B25-induced rhythmic activity upon the external calcium concentration indicate a direct activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC). 4. Verapamil paradoxically stimulated the rhythmic effect of B25 in the rat vas deferens. La3+ was inactive while nifedipine was a weak inhibitor. By contrast Ni2+ and Mn2+ ions were good inhibitors (IC50 < 10(-4) M), suggesting that a possible opening of T-type VSCC underlies rhythmic effect of B25. 5. In radioligand binding studies competition experiments with [3H]-nitrendipine indicated that only at high concentrations was B25 able to interact with dihydropyridine-sensitive binding sites of heart and vas deferens smooth muscle. 6. B25 (3-30 microM) counteracted the inhibitory effects of omega-conotoxin GVIA in field-stimulated rat vas deferens. PMID:8401916

  3. Cardiac Expression of Skeletal Muscle Sodium Channels Increases Longitudinal Conduction Velocity in the Canine One Week Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, Ruben; Lau, David H; Sosunov, Eugene A; Janse, Michiel J; Danilo, Peter; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P; Wilms-Schopman, Francien JG; Opthof, Tobias; Shlapakova, Iryna N; Ozgen, Nazira; Prestia, Kevin; Kryukova, Yelena; Cohen, Ira S.; Robinson, Richard B; Rosen, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle sodium channel (Nav1.4) expression in border zone myocardium increases action potential upstroke velocity in depolarized isolated tissue. Because resting membrane potential in the 1 week canine infarct is reduced, we hypothesized that conduction velocity (CV) is greater in Nav1.4 dogs compared to control dogs. Objective To measure CV in the infarct border zone border in dogs with and without Nav1.4 expression. Methods Adenovirus was injected in the infarct border zone in 34 dogs. The adenovirus incorporated the Nav1.4- and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene (Nav1.4 group, n=16) or only GFP (n=18). After 1 week, upstroke velocity and CV were measured by sequential microelectrode recordings at 4 and 7 mM [K+] in superfused epicardial slabs. High density in vivo epicardial activation mapping was performed in a subgroup (8 Nav1.4, 6 GFP) at 3–4 locations in the border zone. Microscopy and antibody staining confirmed GFP or Nav1.4 expression. Results Infarct sizes were similar between groups (30.6+/−3 % of LV mass, mean+/−SEM). Longitudinal CV was greater in Nav1.4- than in GFP- sites (58.5+/−1.8 vs 53.3+/−1.2 cm/s, 20 and 15 sites, respectively, p<0.05). Transverse CV was not different between the groups. In tissue slabs dV/dtmax was higher and CV was greater in Nav1.4 than in control at 7 mM [K+] (P<0.05). Immunohistochemical Nav1.4 staining was seen at the longitudinal ends of the myocytes. Conclusion Nav1.4 channels in myocardium surviving 1 week infarction increases longitudinal but not transverse CV, consistent with the increased dV/dtmax and with the cellular localization of Nav1.4. PMID:20385252

  4. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  5. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of actin-myosin interactions: a comparative study of cardiac α myosin, β myosin, and fast skeletal muscle myosin.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Zheng, Wenjun

    2013-11-26

    Myosins are a superfamily of actin-binding motor proteins with significant variations in kinetic properties (such as actin binding affinity) between different isoforms. It remains unknown how such kinetic variations arise from the structural and dynamic tuning of the actin-myosin interface at the amino acid residue level. To address this key issue, we have employed molecular modeling and simulations to investigate, with atomistic details, the isoform dependence of actin-myosin interactions in the rigor state. By combining electron microscopy-based docking with homology modeling, we have constructed three all-atom models for human cardiac α and β and rabbit fast skeletal muscle myosin in complex with three actin subunits in the rigor state. Starting from these models, we have performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (total of 100 ns per system) and then used the MD trajectories to calculate actin-myosin binding free energies with contributions from both electrostatic and nonpolar forces. Our binding calculations are in good agreement with the experimental finding of isoform-dependent differences in actin binding affinity between these myosin isoforms. Such differences are traced to changes in actin-myosin electrostatic interactions (i.e., hydrogen bonds and salt bridges) that are highly dynamic and involve several flexible actin-binding loops. By partitioning the actin-myosin binding free energy to individual myosin residues, we have also identified key myosin residues involved in the actin-myosin interactions, some of which were previously validated experimentally or implicated in cardiomyopathy mutations, and the rest make promising targets for future mutational experiments. PMID:24224850

  6. Ultrastructure of cardiac muscle in reptiles and birds: optimizing and/or reducing the probability of transmission between calcium release units.

    PubMed

    Perni, Stefano; Iyer, V Ramesh; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2012-06-01

    It is known that cardiac myocytes contain three categories of calcium release units (CRUs) all bearing arrays of RyR2: peripheral couplings, constituted of an association of the junctional SR (jSR) with the plasmalemma; dyads, associations between jSR and T tubules; internal extended junctional jSR (EjSR)/corbular jSR that is not associated with plasmalemma/T tubules. The bird hearts, even if fast beating (e.g., in finch and hummingbird) have no T tubules, despite fiber sizes comparable to those of mammalian ventricle, but are rich in EjSR/corbular SR. The heart of small lizard also lacks T tubule, but it has only peripheral couplings and compensates for lack of internal CRUs by the small diameter of its cells. We have extended previous information on chicken heart to finch and lizard by establishing a spatial relationship between RyR2 clusters in jSR of peripheral couplings and clusters of intra-membrane particles identifiable as voltage sensitive calcium channels (CaV1.2) in the adjacent plasmalemma. This provides the structural basis for initiation of the heart beat in all three species. Further we evaluated the distances separating peripheral couplings from each other and between EjSR/corbular SR sites within the bird muscles in all three hearts. The distances suggest that peripheral coupling sites are most likely to act independently of each other and that a calcium wave-front propagation from one internal CRU site to the other across the level of the Z line, may be marginally successful in the chicken, but certainly very effective in the finch.

  7. Endomyocardial fibrosis and mural thrombus in a 4-year-old girl due to idiopathic hypereosinophilia syndrome described with serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tai, Christiana P; Chung, Taylor; Avasarala, Kishor

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 4-year-old girl with idiopathic hypereosinophilia syndrome, endomyocardial fibrosis, and mural thrombus. This condition is rarely seen in children outside the tropics. Myocardial biopsy is historically the standard for diagnosis. Reports in adult literature, however, have shown the utility of cardiac MRI as a non-invasive tool for diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case with serial cardiac MRI in a child.

  8. A false positive case due to matrix interference in the analysis of ronidazole residues in muscle tissue using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Rúbies, Antoni; Centrich, Francesc; Companyó, Ramon

    2014-06-01

    In contrast with the information of the inspection body concerning the use of ronidazole, several non compliant muscle samples were detected using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method in accordance with confirmation criteria of Decision 2002/657/EC. This led to the suspicion that non compliance could be due to false positive results. In this context, a liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) method was developed and sample extracts were re-analyzed, resolving the co eluting isobaric interfering peak, which also has an interfering product ion with the transition product (m/z 201>140).

  9. A false positive case due to matrix interference in the analysis of ronidazole residues in muscle tissue using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Rúbies, Antoni; Centrich, Francesc; Companyó, Ramon

    2014-06-01

    In contrast with the information of the inspection body concerning the use of ronidazole, several non compliant muscle samples were detected using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method in accordance with confirmation criteria of Decision 2002/657/EC. This led to the suspicion that non compliance could be due to false positive results. In this context, a liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) method was developed and sample extracts were re-analyzed, resolving the co eluting isobaric interfering peak, which also has an interfering product ion with the transition product (m/z 201>140). PMID:24583330

  10. Measurement of cardiac troponins.

    PubMed

    Collinson, P O; Boa, F G; Gaze, D C

    2001-09-01

    The cardiac troponins form part of the regulatory mechanism for muscle contraction. Specific cardiac isoforms of cardiac troponin T and cardiac troponin I exist and commercially available immunoassay systems have been developed for their measurement. A large number of clinical and analytical studies have been performed and the measurement of cardiac troponins is now considered the 'gold standard' biochemical test for diagnosis of myocardial damage. There have been advances in understanding the development and structure of troponins and their degradation following myocardial cell necrosis. This has contributed to the understanding of the problems with current assays. Greater clinical use has also highlighted areas of analytical and clinical confusion. The assays are reviewed based on manufacturers' information, current published material as well as the authors' in-house experience.

  11. [Effect of gravitation loading and retabolil on development of atrophy in muscles and bones of rats due to suspension].

    PubMed

    KaplanskiI, A S; Il'ina-Kakueva, E I; Durnova, G N; Alekseev, E A; Loginov, V I

    1999-01-01

    In a 3-wk experiment with tail-suspended rats histological and histomorphometric methods were used to determine the effects of graded gravitational loading (GGL) and anabolic steroid retabolil (nortestosterone decanoate) on the course of atrophy in soleus m. (SM), gastrocnemius m. (GM), tibia and humerus, and functioning of somatotrophic hormones (STH) of the pituitary and thyrocytes of the thyroid. Suspension was found to produce atrophy in SM and, to a less degree, in GM, partial transformation of SM slow fibers into the fast ones, suppression of the tibial longitudinal growth, demineralization of the tibial and humeral spongious metaphyses; besides, functional activities of STH-cells and thyrocytes were inhibited. Graded gravitational loading of rats by intermittence of suspension for 2 hrs slowed down atrophy in both muscles and osteopenia in tibia, stimulated the synthetic and secretory functions of STH-cells without any marked effect on thyrocytes or humeral osteopenia. GGL failed to influence the slow-to-fast transformation of SM fibers. Two injections of retabolil at the total dose of 3 mg/kg of the body mass somewhat interfered with the SM atrophy and humoral osteopenia, and were favorable to the synthetic but not secretory activity of STH-cells. Neither SM and tibial atrophies nor thyroid activity of the gland were improved. The prophylactic action of GGL upon the SM and humeral atrophies was significantly higher when combined with retabolil, whereas GM and tibia were not noticeably cured by retabolil. Inhibition of the SM atrophy and humeral osteopenia in rats treated with GGL and retabolil concurred with elevated activities of STH-cells and thyrocytes indirectly suggesting their more intensive production of the growth hormone and thyroid hormones, respectively.

  12. Role of reactive oxygen species and Ca(2+) dissociation from the myofilaments in determination of Ca(2+) wave propagation in rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Miura, Masahito; Murai, Naomi; Hattori, Taiki; Nagano, Tsuyoshi; Stuyvers, Bruno D; Shindoh, Chiyohiko

    2013-03-01

    Ca(2+) waves are initiated not only by Ca(2+) leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), but also by Ca(2+) dissociation from the myofilaments in the myocardium with nonuniform contraction. We investigated whether contractile properties and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) affect Ca(2+) wave propagation. Trabeculae were obtained from 76 rat hearts. Force was measured with a strain gauge, sarcomere length with a laser diffraction technique, and [Ca(2+)](i) with fura-2 and a CCD camera (24°C, 2.0mmol/L [Ca(2+)](o)). ROS production was estimated from 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence. Trabeculae were regionally exposed to a jet of solution containing 1) 10mmol/L Ca(2+) to initiate Ca(2+) waves by SR Ca(2+) leak due to Ca(2+) overload within the jet-exposed region, and 2) 0.2mmol/L Ca(2+) or 5mmol/L caffeine to initiate such waves by Ca(2+) dissociation from the myofilaments due to nonuniform contraction. Ca(2+) waves were induced by stimulus trains for 7.5s. Ten-percent muscle stretch increased DCF fluorescence and accelerated Ca(2+) waves initiated due to both Ca(2+) overload and nonuniform contraction. Preincubation with 3μmol/L diphenyleneiodonium or 10μmol/L colchicine suppressed the increase in DCF fluorescence but suppressed acceleration of Ca(2+) waves initiated only due to Ca(2+) overload. Irrespective of preincubation with colchicine, reduction of force after the addition of 10μmol/L blebbistatin did not decelerate Ca(2+) waves initiated due to Ca(2+) overload, while it did decelerate waves initiated due to nonuniform contraction. These results suggest that Ca(2+) wave propagation is modulated by ROS production through an intact microtubule network only during stretch and may be additionally modulated by Ca(2+) dissociated from the myofilaments in the case of nonuniform contraction. PMID:23266595

  13. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Pooja; Luk, Adriana; Rao, Vivek; Butany, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and of these, primary cardiac tumors are even rarer. Metastatic cardiac tumors are about 100 times more common than the primary tumors. About 90% of primary cardiac tumors are benign, and of these the most common are cardiac myxomas. Approximately 12% of primary cardiac tumors are completely asymptomatic while others present with one or more signs and symptoms of the classical triad of hemodynamic changes due to intracardiac obstruction, embolism and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. Echocardiography is highly sensitive and specific in detecting cardiac tumors. Other helpful investigations are chest X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary cardiac tumors and is usually associated with a good prognosis. This review article will focus on the general features of benign cardiac tumors with an emphasis on cardiac myxomas and their molecular basis. PMID:24447924

  14. Variation in bull beef quality due to ultimate muscle pH is correlated to endopeptidase and small heat shock protein levels.

    PubMed

    Pulford, D J; Dobbie, P; Fraga Vazquez, S; Fraser-Smith, E; Frost, D A; Morris, C A

    2009-09-01

    This study set out to determine if ultimate pH (pH(u)) affected the performance of intracellular small heat shock protein and endopeptidase dynamics in muscle during beef ageing. Longissimus dorsi muscles from 39 Angus or Limousin×Angus bulls were examined to see if pH(u) achieved at 22h post mortem (rigor) affected tenderness and water holding capacity of beef. Samples were segregated into three pH(u) groups termed high (pH>6.3), intermediate (5.7due to meat pH were observed until after 22h post mortem, but low pH(u) beef had elevated caspase 3/7 activity soon after slaughter. At 22h post mortem, greater levels of μ-calpain enzyme were found in the high and intermediate pH(u) beef and cathepsin B levels were superior in the low pH(u) beef after 2 days post mortem. Different rates of desmin and troponin T protein degradation were also observed in aged bull beef. Both proteins were degraded within 6h post mortem for high pH(u) beef, but took >3 days post mortem for intermediate pH(u) beef. High levels of alpha β-crystallin (aβC) at 22h post mortem coincided with delayed muscle protein degradation for low pH(u) beef. Our results support the hypothesis that aβC shields myofibrils and buffers against endopeptidase degradation of beef structure during ageing. PMID:20416615

  15. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function.

  16. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  17. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  18. Rhynchophylline-induced vasodilation in human mesenteric artery is mainly due to blockage of L-type calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Yun; Zeng, Xiao-Rong; Cheng, Jun; Wen, Jing; Inoue, Isao; Yang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Rhynchophylline (Rhy) is a pharmacologically active substance isolated from Uncaria rhynchophylla which has been used to treat cardiovascular diseases and has drawn considerable attention in recent years for its antihypertensive activities. We investigated the actions of Rhy on endothelium-denuded human mesenteric artery by tension measurement and its actions on high conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BKCa) currents and calcium currents (ICa) in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells using perforated patch clamp technique. Intracellular Ca(2+) level was measured in Fura-2-loaded cells. Rhy inhibited both the KCl and BayK-evoked mesenteric artery constrictions in a dose-dependent manner. K(+) channel blockers (TEA, glibenclamide, IbTX, and 4-AP) did not affect the vasorelaxing effect of Rhy. Rhy inhibited L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) current (ICa,L) but had no significant effect on macroscopic BKCa current. Rhy preincubation markedly reduced the elevation of [Ca(2+)]i level induced by KCl depolarization. Caffeine-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i elevation was also decreased to some extent by pretreatment with Rhy for 20 min. Our results show that Rhy relaxes smooth muscles of human mesenteric resistance arteries, mainly due to inhibition of Ca(2+) influx by blockage of L-type Ca(2+) channels and thereby the decrease in [Ca(2+)]i. PMID:23812676

  19. Secretion of monocyte chemotactic activity by cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells in response to PDGF is due predominantly to the induction of JE/MCP-1.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, M.; Hsu, W. C.; Bogdanov, V. Y.; Taubman, M. B.

    1996-01-01

    Inflammation is a critical feature of atherosclerosis and is characterized in part by the migration of circulating monocytes to the atherosclerotic plaque. These monocytes, together with macrophages, are a source of cytokines, growth factors, proteases, and procoagulants, which contribute to the progression of the atherosclerosis lesion. This study employed a modified Boyden chamber to examine the secretion of monocyte chemotactic activity by cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells in response to growth factors and cytokines. The induction of monocyte chemotactic activity showed a surprising specificity for platelet-derived growth factor-BB. This activity was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide and thus required de novo transcription and protein synthesis. The ability to stimulate monocyte migration appeared to be solely due to the secretion of the monocyte chemoattractant protein JE/MCP-1 and was completely blocked by antisense oligonucleotides and antibodies to JE/MCP-1. The induction of chemotactic activity was also blocked by dexamethasone, an inhibitor of JE mRNA accumulation. This study suggests that the secretion of monocyte chemotactic activity by vascular smooth muscle cells is a highly regulatable and specific event and underscores the importance of JE/MCP-1 in the inflammatory response of the vessel wall. Images Figure 5 PMID:8686755

  20. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  1. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coronary artery disease - cardiac rehab; Angina - cardiac rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab ... have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery ...

  2. The effect of moderate-intensity exercise on the expression of HO-1 mRNA and activity of HO in cardiac and vascular smooth muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cailing; Qi, Jie; Li, Wanwei; Zhang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the effects of moderate-intensity training on the activity of heme oxygenase (HO) and expression of HO-1 mRNA in the aorta and the cardiac muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). After 9 weeks of swimming exercise, the activity of HO and expression of HO-1 mRNA in the SHRs were measured. The resting blood pressure in the exercise group was increased by 1.7% (P > 0.05), whereas it was significantly elevated by 10.3% (P < 0.01) in the SHR rats. Compared with animals in the control and sedentary groups, the expression level of HO-1 mRNA of aorta and cardiac muscle in the exercise group was significantly enhanced (P < 0.01). The HO activity and the content of plasma carbon monoxide (CO) in the sedentary group were dramatically decreased (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) compared with the control group. HO activity and content of plasma CO in the exercise group were significantly higher compared with those in the sedentary group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). The HO/CO metabolic pathway might be involved in the regulation of blood pressure of the SHR models. PMID:26928589

  3. Early cardiac failure in a child with Becker muscular dystrophy is due to an abnormally low amount of dystrophin transcript lacking exon 13.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, C; Patria, S Y; Nishio, H; Yoshioka, A; Matsuo, M

    1997-12-01

    Two Japanese brothers with Becker muscular dystrophy were shown by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cDNA sequence analysis to produce a dystrophin gene transcript lacking a single exon: that is, number 13. Despite having the same deletion mutation, the brothers showed clearly different clinical phenotypes: the younger brother developed cardiac failure at the age of nine, while the elder brother was asymptomatic. As alternative splicing was not responsible for this clinical difference, the amount of dystrophin transcript was examined by using reverse transcription semi-nested and parallel PCR. The results showed that the amount of the dystrophin transcript in the younger brother was 20% of that of the elder brother. This finding suggested that lesser amount of dystrophin transcript in the younger brother was responsible for the early onset of cardiac failure. This would represent a novel molecular mechanism for dystrophinopathy.

  4. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Soo Kyung; Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-06-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  5. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-01-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  6. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to coronary heart disease: a comparison of survival before and after the introduction of defribrillators in ambulances.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, W. S.; Fitzpatrick, B.; Morrison, C. E.; Watt, G. C.; Tunstall-Pedoe, H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the actual impact on coronary mortality of equipping ambulances with defibrillators. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of routine medical and legal records of all those who had a cardiac arrest attributed to coronary heart disease occurring outside hospital in a defined population before and after the introduction of Heartstart. SETTING: City of Glasgow, North of the River Clyde, 1984 and 1990. PATIENTS: 296 and 267 men and women aged 25-64 inclusive in 1984 and 1990 respectively who had a cardiac arrest outside hospital which was attributed to coronary heart disease (International Classification of Diseases codes 410-414, ninth revision). RESULTS: The impact on coronary mortality in 1990 of equipping ambulances with defibrillators concurred with the earlier prediction of less than 1% of all coronary deaths. The circumstances of cardiac arrest were largely unchanged; most occurred outside hospital in the victim's home and the principal witnesses were members of the victim's family. A call for help before cardiac arrest was made in very few cases and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted by laypersons in less than a third of the deaths they witnessed. There was a significant increase in the number of cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts made by ambulance crews (16% v 32%, P < 0.01). Ambulance crews, however, still attended less than half of all cases (44% and 47%). CONCLUSION: The impact of equipping ambulances with defibrillators will remain small unless strategies are introduced that focus on improving the public's response to coronary emergencies by calling for help promptly and initiating cardiopulmonary resuscitation before the arrival of the emergency services. PMID:8673761

  7. Calmodulin 2 Mutation N98S Is Associated with Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Infants Due to Low Clinical Penetrance Electrical Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Palomino Doza, Julián; Ortega, Ángeles; Macías-Ruiz, Rosa; Perin, Francesca; Rodríguez-Vázquez del Rey, M. Mar; Ortiz-Genga, Martín; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; Blanca, Enrique; Álvarez, Miguel; Tercedor, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Calmodulin 1, 2 and 3 (CALM) mutations have been found to cause cardiac arrest in children at a very early age. The underlying aetiology described is long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF). Little phenotypical data about CALM2 mutations is available. Objectives The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical manifestations of the Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 in two unrelated children in southern Spain with apparently unexplained cardiac arrest/death. Methods Two unrelated children aged 4 and 7, who were born to healthy parents, were studied. Both presented with sudden cardiac arrest. The first was resuscitated after a VF episode, and the second died suddenly. In both cases the baseline QTc interval was within normal limits. Peripheral blood DNA was available to perform targeted gene sequencing. Results The surviving 4-year-old girl had a positive epinephrine test for LQTS, and polymorphic ventricular ectopic beats were seen on a previous 24-hour Holter recording from the deceased 7-year-old boy, suggestive of a possible underlying CPVT phenotype. A p.Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 was detected in both cases. This affected a highly conserved across species residue, and the location in the protein was adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain, predicting a high pathogenic effect. Conclusions Human calmodulin 2 mutation p.Asn98Ser is associated with sudden cardiac death in childhood with a variable clinical penetrance. Our results provide new phenotypical information about clinical behaviour of this mutation. PMID:27100291

  8. Penetrating Cardiac Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lateef Wani, Mohd; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Irshad, Ifat; Ul-Hassan, Nayeem

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent death. Sometimes serious cardiac injury may manifest only subtle or occult symptoms or signs. As there is an epidemic of cardiac injuries in Kashmir valley due to problems of law and order, we herein present a review on management of such injuries. PMID:24829887

  9. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies.

  10. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  11. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies.

  12. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  13. Cardiac mechanics: Physiological, clinical, and mathematical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirsky, I. (Editor); Ghista, D. N.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Recent studies concerning the basic physiological and biochemical principles underlying cardiac muscle contraction, methods for the assessment of cardiac function in the clinical situation, and mathematical approaches to cardiac mechanics are presented. Some of the topics covered include: cardiac ultrastructure and function in the normal and failing heart, myocardial energetics, clinical applications of angiocardiography, use of echocardiography for evaluating cardiac performance, systolic time intervals in the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular performance in man, evaluation of passive elastic stiffness for the left ventricle and isolated heart muscle, a conceptual model of myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock, application of Huxley's sliding-filament theory to the mechanics of normal and hypertrophied cardiac muscle, and a rheological modeling of the intact left ventricle. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  14. Coupling of cardiac and locomotor rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kirby, R L; Nugent, S T; Marlow, R W; MacLeod, D A; Marble, A E

    1989-01-01

    The pressure within exercising skeletal muscle rises and falls rhythmically during normal human locomotion, the peak pressure reaching levels that intermittently impede blood flow to the exercising muscle. Speculating that a reciprocal relationship between the timing of peak intramuscular and pulsatile arterial pressures should optimize blood flow through muscle and minimize cardiac load, we tested the hypothesis that heart rate becomes entrained with walking and running cadence at some locomotion speeds, by means of electrocardiography and an accelerometer to provide signals reflecting heart rate and cadence, respectively. In 18 of 25 subjects, 1:1 coupling of heart and step rates was present at one or more speeds on a motorized treadmill, generally at moderate to high exercise intensities. To determine how exercise specific this phenomenon is, and to refute the competing hypothesis that coupling is due to vertical accelerations of the heart during locomotion, we had 12 other subjects cycle on an electronically braked bicycle ergometer. Coupling was found between heart rate and pedaling frequency in 10 of them. Cardiac-locomotor coupling appears to be a normal physiological phenomenon, and its identification provides a fresh perspective from which to study endurance.

  15. Cardiac cell therapy: boosting mesenchymal stem cells effects.

    PubMed

    Samper, E; Diez-Juan, A; Montero, J A; Sepúlveda, P

    2013-06-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a major problem of world public health and available treatments have limited efficacy. Cardiac cell therapy is a new therapeutic strategy focused on regeneration and repair of the injured cardiac muscle. Among different cell types used, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been widely tested in preclinical studies and several clinical trials have evaluated their clinical efficacy in myocardial infarction. However, the beneficial effects of MSC in humans are limited due to poor engraftment and survival of these cells, therefore ways to overcome these obstacles should improve efficacy. Different strategies have been used, such as genetically modifying MSC, or preconditioning the cells with factors that potentiate their survival and therapeutic mechanisms. In this review we compile the most relevant approaches used to improve MSC therapeutic capacity and to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in MSC mediated cardiac repair.

  16. Green tea polyphenols improve cardiac muscle mRNA, and protein levels of signal pathways related to insulin and lipid metabolism and inflammation in insulin-resistant rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that the consumption of green tea polyphenols (GTP) may reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. To explore the underlying mechanisms of action at the molecular level, we examined the effects of GTP on cardiac mRNA and protein levels of genes involved in insulin an...

  17. Fibulin-4 deficiency increases TGF-β signalling in aortic smooth muscle cells due to elevated TGF-β2 levels.

    PubMed

    Ramnath, N W M; Hawinkels, L J A C; van Heijningen, P M; te Riet, L; Paauwe, M; Vermeij, M; Danser, A H J; Kanaar, R; ten Dijke, P; Essers, J

    2015-11-26

    Fibulins are extracellular matrix proteins associated with elastic fibres. Homozygous Fibulin-4 mutations lead to life-threatening abnormalities such as aortic aneurysms. Aortic aneurysms in Fibulin-4 mutant mice were associated with upregulation of TGF-β signalling. How Fibulin-4 deficiency leads to deregulation of the TGF-β pathway is largely unknown. Isolated aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from Fibulin-4 deficient mice showed reduced growth, which could be reversed by treatment with TGF-β neutralizing antibodies. In Fibulin-4 deficient SMCs increased TGF-β signalling was detected using a transcriptional reporter assay and by increased SMAD2 phosphorylation. Next, we investigated if the increased activity was due to increased levels of the three TGF-β isoforms. These data revealed slightly increased TGF-β1 and markedly increased TGF-β2 levels. Significantly increased TGF-β2 levels were also detectable in plasma from homozygous Fibulin-4(R/R) mice, not in wild type mice. TGF-β2 levels were reduced after losartan treatment, an angiotensin-II type-1 receptor blocker, known to prevent aortic aneurysm formation. In conclusion, we have shown increased TGF-β signalling in isolated SMCs from Fibulin-4 deficient mouse aortas, not only caused by increased levels of TGF-β1, but especially TGF-β2. These data provide new insights in the molecular interaction between Fibulin-4 and TGF-β pathway regulation in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms.

  18. Fibulin-4 deficiency increases TGF-β signalling in aortic smooth muscle cells due to elevated TGF-β2 levels

    PubMed Central

    Ramnath, N. W. M.; Hawinkels, L. J. A. C.; van Heijningen, P. M.; Riet, L. te; Paauwe, M.; Vermeij, M.; Danser, A. H. J.; Kanaar, R.; ten Dijke, P.; Essers, J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibulins are extracellular matrix proteins associated with elastic fibres. Homozygous Fibulin-4 mutations lead to life-threatening abnormalities such as aortic aneurysms. Aortic aneurysms in Fibulin-4 mutant mice were associated with upregulation of TGF-β signalling. How Fibulin-4 deficiency leads to deregulation of the TGF-β pathway is largely unknown. Isolated aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from Fibulin-4 deficient mice showed reduced growth, which could be reversed by treatment with TGF-β neutralizing antibodies. In Fibulin-4 deficient SMCs increased TGF-β signalling was detected using a transcriptional reporter assay and by increased SMAD2 phosphorylation. Next, we investigated if the increased activity was due to increased levels of the three TGF-β isoforms. These data revealed slightly increased TGF-β1 and markedly increased TGF-β2 levels. Significantly increased TGF-β2 levels were also detectable in plasma from homozygous Fibulin-4R/R mice, not in wild type mice. TGF-β2 levels were reduced after losartan treatment, an angiotensin-II type-1 receptor blocker, known to prevent aortic aneurysm formation. In conclusion, we have shown increased TGF-β signalling in isolated SMCs from Fibulin-4 deficient mouse aortas, not only caused by increased levels of TGF-β1, but especially TGF-β2. These data provide new insights in the molecular interaction between Fibulin-4 and TGF-β pathway regulation in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms. PMID:26607280

  19. Pulmonary hypoplasia-diaphragmatic hernia-anophthalmia-cardiac defect (PDAC) syndrome due to STRA6 mutations--what are the minimal criteria?

    PubMed

    Segel, Reeval; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Pasutto, Francesca; Picard, Elie; Rauch, Anita; Alterescu, Gheona; Schimmel, Michael S

    2009-11-01

    Microphthalmic syndrome 9 (OMIM601186) is a genetically and phenotypically variable condition, comprising anophthalmia, pulmonary hypoplasia, diaphragmatic hernia, and cardiac malformations (PDAC syndrome). Reported cases have all been associated with fetal/neonatal death or developmental delay. Recessive stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 homolog (STRA6) mutations have recently been identified as the cause of cases of PDAC in which distinct, "bushy" eyebrows have been observed. We describe a patient with clinical anophthalmia, bushy eyebrows, patent ductus arteriosus, and normal development at age 30 months, who is a compound heterozygote for two novel STRA6 missense mutations. This patient's phenotype is consistent with the multisystemic malformations of PDAC syndrome, but is somewhat milder. This is the first living patient with compound heterozygous STRA6 mutations, which may explain her milder phenotype. We conclude that STRA6 analysis should be considered in all patients with clinical anophthalmia. Genetic counseling should be cautious with respect to long-term developmental outcomes.

  20. Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung Won; Son, Sung Min; Lee, Na Kyung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated upper-extremity muscle activities in natural, ideal, and corrected head positions. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulder were recruited and randomly assigned to the natural head position group (n = 13), ideal head position group (n = 14), or corrected head position group (n = 13). Muscle activities were measured using a four-channel surface electromyography system at the sternocleidomastoideus, upper and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles on the right side during an overhead reaching task. [Results] The muscle activities of the upper trapezius and serratus anterior differed significantly among head positions. Post hoc tests revealed significant differences between natural and ideal head positions, and natural and ideal head positions for both the upper trapezius and serratus anterior. [Conclusion] Recovery of normal upper trapezius and serratus anterior muscle functions plays an important role in correcting forward head posture and rounded shoulders. PMID:26180310

  1. Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung Won; Son, Sung Min; Lee, Na Kyung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated upper-extremity muscle activities in natural, ideal, and corrected head positions. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulder were recruited and randomly assigned to the natural head position group (n = 13), ideal head position group (n = 14), or corrected head position group (n = 13). Muscle activities were measured using a four-channel surface electromyography system at the sternocleidomastoideus, upper and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles on the right side during an overhead reaching task. [Results] The muscle activities of the upper trapezius and serratus anterior differed significantly among head positions. Post hoc tests revealed significant differences between natural and ideal head positions, and natural and ideal head positions for both the upper trapezius and serratus anterior. [Conclusion] Recovery of normal upper trapezius and serratus anterior muscle functions plays an important role in correcting forward head posture and rounded shoulders.

  2. Ca2+ sensitization due to myosin light chain phosphatase inhibition and cytoskeletal reorganization in the myogenic response of skeletal muscle resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Domínguez, Alejandro; Colinas, Olaia; El-Yazbi, Ahmed; Walsh, Emma J; Hill, Michael A; Walsh, Michael P; Cole, William C

    2013-01-01

    The myogenic response of resistance arteries to intravascular pressure elevation is a fundamental physiological mechanism of crucial importance for blood pressure regulation and organ-specific control of blood flow. The importance of Ca2+ entry via voltage-gated Ca2+ channels leading to phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin regulatory light chains (LC20) in the myogenic response is well established. Recent studies, however, have suggested a role for Ca2+ sensitization via activation of the RhoA/Rho-associated kinase (ROK) pathway in the myogenic response. The possibility that enhanced actin polymerization is also involved in myogenic vasoconstriction has been suggested. Here, we have used pressurized resistance arteries from rat gracilis and cremaster skeletal muscles to assess the contribution to myogenic constriction of Ca2+ sensitization due to: (1) phosphorylation of the myosin targeting subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase (MYPT1) by ROK; (2) phosphorylation of the 17 kDa protein kinase C (PKC)-potentiated protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor protein (CPI-17) by PKC; and (3) dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton evoked by ROK and PKC. Arterial diameter, MYPT1, CPI-17 and LC20 phosphorylation, and G-actin content were determined at varied intraluminal pressures ± H1152, GF109203X or latrunculin B to suppress ROK, PKC and actin polymerization, respectively. The myogenic response was associated with an increase in MYPT1 and LC20 phosphorylation that was blocked by H1152. No change in phospho-CPI-17 content was detected although the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, suppressed myogenic constriction. Basal LC20 phosphorylation at 10 mmHg was high at ∼40%, increased to a maximal level of ∼55% at 80 mmHg, and exhibited no additional change on further pressurization to 120 and 140 mmHg. Myogenic constriction at 80 mmHg was associated with a decline in G-actin content by ∼65% that was blocked by inhibition of ROK or PKC. Taken together, our findings indicate

  3. Ca2+ sensitization due to myosin light chain phosphatase inhibition and cytoskeletal reorganization in the myogenic response of skeletal muscle resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Domínguez, Alejandro; Colinas, Olaia; El-Yazbi, Ahmed; Walsh, Emma J; Hill, Michael A; Walsh, Michael P; Cole, William C

    2013-03-01

    Abstract  The myogenic response of resistance arteries to intravascular pressure elevation is a fundamental physiological mechanism of crucial importance for blood pressure regulation and organ-specific control of blood flow. The importance of Ca(2+) entry via voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels leading to phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin regulatory light chains (LC20) in the myogenic response is well established. Recent studies, however, have suggested a role for Ca(2+) sensitization via activation of the RhoA/Rho-associated kinase (ROK) pathway in the myogenic response. The possibility that enhanced actin polymerization is also involved in myogenic vasoconstriction has been suggested. Here, we have used pressurized resistance arteries from rat gracilis and cremaster skeletal muscles to assess the contribution to myogenic constriction of Ca(2+) sensitization due to: (1) phosphorylation of the myosin targeting subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase (MYPT1) by ROK; (2) phosphorylation of the 17 kDa protein kinase C (PKC)-potentiated protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor protein (CPI-17) by PKC; and (3) dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton evoked by ROK and PKC. Arterial diameter, MYPT1, CPI-17 and LC20 phosphorylation, and G-actin content were determined at varied intraluminal pressures ± H1152, GF109203X or latrunculin B to suppress ROK, PKC and actin polymerization, respectively. The myogenic response was associated with an increase in MYPT1 and LC20 phosphorylation that was blocked by H1152. No change in phospho-CPI-17 content was detected although the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, suppressed myogenic constriction. Basal LC20 phosphorylation at 10 mmHg was high at ∼40%, increased to a maximal level of ∼55% at 80 mmHg, and exhibited no additional change on further pressurization to 120 and 140 mmHg. Myogenic constriction at 80 mmHg was associated with a decline in G-actin content by ∼65% that was blocked by inhibition of ROK or PKC. Taken together, our

  4. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  5. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  6. Cardiac involvement in hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Hannah E.; Harris, Elizabeth; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Beattie, Anna; Bourke, John P.; Straub, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (HMERF) due to the c.951434T>C; (p.Cys31712Arg) TTN missense mutation also includes a cardiac phenotype. Method: Clinical cohort study of our HMERF cohort using ECG, 2D echocardiogram, and cross-sectional cardiac imaging with MRI or CT. Results: We studied 22 participants with the c.951434T>C; (p.Cys31712Arg) TTN missense mutation. Three were deceased. Cardiac conduction abnormalities were identified in 7/22 (32%): sustained atrioventricular tachycardia (n = 2), atrial fibrillation (n = 2), nonsustained atrial tachycardia (n = 1), premature supraventricular complexes (n = 1), and unexplained sinus bradycardia (n = 1). In addition, 4/22 (18%) had imaging evidence of otherwise unexplained cardiomyopathy. These findings are supported by histopathologic correlation suggestive of myocardial cytoskeletal remodeling. Conclusions: Coexisting cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement is not uncommon in patients with HMERF arising due to the c.951434T>C; (p.Cys31712Arg) TTN mutation. All patients with pathogenic or putative pathogenic TTN mutations should be offered periodic cardiac surveillance. PMID:27511179

  7. Cardiac Imaging In Athletes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asaad A; Safi, Lucy; Wood, Malissa

    2016-01-01

    Athletic heart syndrome refers to the physiological and morphological changes that occur in a human heart after repetitive strenuous physical exercise. Examples of exercise-induced changes in the heart include increases in heart cavity dimensions, augmentation of cardiac output, and increases in heart muscle mass. These cardiac adaptations vary based on the type of exercise performed and are often referred to as sport-specific cardiac remodeling. The hemodynamic effects of endurance and strength training exercise lead to these adaptations. Any abnormalities in chamber dilatation and left ventricular function usually normalize with cessation of exercise. Athletic heart syndrome is rare and should be differentiated from pathologic conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia when assessing a patient for athletic heart syndrome. This paper describes specific adaptations that occur in athletic heart syndrome and tools to distinguish between healthy alterations versus underlying pathology. PMID:27486490

  8. Cardiac Imaging In Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asaad A.; Safi, Lucy; Wood, Malissa

    2016-01-01

    Athletic heart syndrome refers to the physiological and morphological changes that occur in a human heart after repetitive strenuous physical exercise. Examples of exercise-induced changes in the heart include increases in heart cavity dimensions, augmentation of cardiac output, and increases in heart muscle mass. These cardiac adaptations vary based on the type of exercise performed and are often referred to as sport-specific cardiac remodeling. The hemodynamic effects of endurance and strength training exercise lead to these adaptations. Any abnormalities in chamber dilatation and left ventricular function usually normalize with cessation of exercise. Athletic heart syndrome is rare and should be differentiated from pathologic conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia when assessing a patient for athletic heart syndrome. This paper describes specific adaptations that occur in athletic heart syndrome and tools to distinguish between healthy alterations versus underlying pathology. PMID:27486490

  9. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  10. Bioactive scaffolds for engineering vascularized cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Loraine; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Functional vascularization is a key requirement for the development and function of most tissues, and most critically cardiac muscle. Rapid and irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes during cardiac infarction directly results from the lack of blood supply. Contractile cardiac grafts, engineered using cardiovascular cells in conjunction with biomaterial scaffolds, are an actively studied method for cardiac repair. In this article, we focus on biomaterial scaffolds designed to mediate the development and maturation of vascular networks, by immobilized growth factors. The interactive effects of multiple vasculogenic factors are discussed in the context of cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:20857391

  11. An Effective Technique for Salvage of Cardiac-Related Devices

    PubMed Central

    Knepp, Erin K.; Chopra, Karan; Zahiri, Hamid R.; Holton III, Luther H.; Singh, Devinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Millions of patients require implantable cardiac devices for management of cardiac dysrhythmias. These devices are susceptible to erosion, exposure, or infection and plastic surgeons are consulted when salvage is required. As of yet, an anterior muscle-splitting approach to effectively and safely relocate the device into the subpectoral position has not been described in the plastic surgery literature. The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts of 7 patients who required repositioning of cardiac devices. Indications for repositioning included exposure, erosion, infection, hematoma at the time of primary placement (3), and one cosmetic revision. All patients were treated with subpectoral repositioning of the device into the subpectoral space via an anterior muscle-splitting approach. Six of 7 patients (86%) achieved successful long-term repositioning in the subpectoral position without recurrent exposure or hematoma and with good cosmetic results. One patient who had a prior history of multiple failed device placements required reoperation due to recurrent infection. The anterior muscle-splitting technique proposed by the authors for defibrillator or pacemaker salvage is a feasible technique with promising results. Plastic surgeons should be aware of this simple and effective approach. PMID:22292104

  12. Albumin fiber scaffolds for engineering functional cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shapira, Assaf; Regev, Omri; Nseir, Nora; Zussman, Eyal; Dvir, Tal

    2014-06-01

    In recent years attempts to engineer contracting cardiac patches were focused on recapitulation of the myocardium extracellular microenvironment. We report here on our work, where for the first time, a three-dimensional cardiac patch was fabricated from albumin fibers. We hypothesized that since albumin fibers' mechanical properties resemble those of cardiac tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) and their biochemical character enables their use as protein carriers, they can support the assembly of cardiac tissues capable of generating strong contraction forces. Here, we have fabricated aligned and randomly oriented electrospun albumin fibers and investigated their structure, mechanical properties, and chemical nature. Our measurements showed that the scaffolds have improved elasticity as compared to synthetic electrospun PCL fibers, and that they are capable of adsorbing serum proteins, such as laminin leading to strong cell-matrix interactions. Moreover, due to the functional groups on their backbone, the fibers can be chemically modified with essential biomolecules. When seeded with rat neonatal cardiac cells the engineered scaffolds induced the assembly of aligned cardiac tissues with high aspect ratio cardiomyocytes and massive actinin striation. Compared to synthetic fibrous scaffolds, cardiac cells cultured within aligned or randomly oriented scaffolds formed functional tissues, exhibiting significantly improved function already on Day 3, including higher beating rate (P = 0.0002 and P < 0.0001, respectively), and higher contraction amplitude (P = 0.009 and P = 0.003, respectively). Collectively, our results suggest that albumin electrospun scaffolds can play a key role in contributing to the ex vivo formation of a contracting cardiac muscle tissue.

  13. Electrical heart disease: Genetic and molecular basis of cardiac arrhythmias in normal structural hearts.

    PubMed

    Farwell, David; Gollob, Michael H

    2007-08-01

    Purely electrical heart diseases, defined by the absence of any structural cardiac defects, are responsible for a large number of sudden, unexpected deaths in otherwise healthy, young individuals. These conditions include the long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and the short QT syndrome. Collectively, these conditions have been referred to as channelopathies. Ion channels provide the molecular basis for cardiac electrical activity. These channels have specific ion selectivity and are responsible for the precise and timely regulation of the passage of charged ions across the cell membrane in myocytes, and the summation of their activity in cardiac muscle defines the surface electrocardiogram. Impairment in the flow of these ions in heart cells may mean the difference between a normal, prosperous life and the tragedy of a sudden, unexpected death due to ventricular arrhythmia. The present paper reviews the current clinical and molecular understanding of the electrical diseases of the heart associated with sudden cardiac death.

  14. Enteral leucine supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscles and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs through mTORC1-dependent pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine activates mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to upregulate protein synthesis (PS). To examine enteral Leu effects on PS and signaling activation, 5-d-old piglets were fed for 24 h diets containing: (i) LP, (ii) LP+L, or (iii) HP. PS in skeletal muscles, heart, liver, pancreas, and jejunum...

  15. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  16. Query cardiac pain.

    PubMed

    Todd, J W

    1983-08-01

    Query cardiac pain is a common problem, and immense efforts are made to solve it. No test can prove that a patient has not had a cardiac infarct, though in the recent past eminent authorities wrongly stated that a normal ECG supplied this proof. This history is by far the most important means of interpreting recurrent pain. Coronary arteriography is only useful in diagnosis when the pain is certainly due to myocardial ischaemia but it is uncertain whether this is caused by coronary artery disease or some other cardiac lesion. In practice, much pain is not diagnosed. This need be no cause for concern, and patients who in fact have had a small cardiac infarct gain rather than lose if wrongly reassured of its non-existence. The history of cardiology is a depressing catalogue of error. Bogus cardiac diseases have been diagnosed on an enormous scale, mainly because attention has been concentrated on the cardiac manifestations, while the patient was ignored. Much "excluding" is fatuous. Because treatment was derived from theory, treatment for patients who had had cardiac infarcts was disastrous. The great error at present is to overvalue technology.

  17. Botulinum neurotoxin type A injection of the pelvic floor muscle in pain due to spasticity: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Alka A; Puccini, Federica; Khullar, Vik; Elneil, Suzy; Digesu, G Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    The role of muscle spasm is not a new concept in the genesis of pain. Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) has been successfully employed in a variety of muscular and inflammatory conditions. The aim of our study was to review the published literature on the role of BoNTA injection of the pelvic floor muscle in the management of women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP). A systematic search of the literature published up to June 2012 on the use of BoNTA in the treatment of female pelvic floor muscle spasm was carried out using relevant search terms in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The results were limited to full-text English language articles. Relevant trials as well as relevant reviews were selected and analyzed by two independent reviewers. Five studies (2 case reports, 1 prospective pilot study, 1 retrospective study and 1 randomised double-blind placebo controlled study) were included in this systematic review. Overall, BoNTA has shown to be beneficial in relieving CPP related to pelvic floor spasm. The role of BoNTA as a treatment of CPP has been recognized for more than 10 years. Although data are still scarce preliminary results are encouraging. BoNTA is an attractive option for refractory CPP related to pelvic floor muscle spasm, but further studies using validated and reproducible outcome measures are needed, to establish its effectiveness, safeness, technique, optimal dosage, and duration of symptom relief.

  18. Role of magnesium in etiology of hypertension and atherosclerosis: is Mg/sup 2+/ a second messenger in cardiac and vascular muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Altura, B.M.; Altura, B.T.

    1988-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed which implicates a modulatory role for magnesium (Mg) in the control of arterial blood pressure, vascular tone and lipid metabolism. The evidence is beginning to become persuasive in implicating lower than normal dietary intake of Mg in the etiology of some forms of hypertension, ischemic heart disease (IHD) and atherosclerosis. Hypomagnesemic states in hospitalized patients, particularly those subjects with cardiovascular disease, is becoming more frequent and a serious risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias and stroke. Experimental evidence is presented which demonstrates that Mg deficiency can lead to hypertension, atheromas and coronary vasospasm. Therapy with Mg in several forms of experimental hypertension and atherosclerosis is efficacious. Evidence is also presented to indicate that the (Mg/sup 2+/)/degree/ controls myocardial cellular bioenergetics at the cytosolic and mitochondrial levels. Lastly, the data implicates Mg/sup 2+/ as a true intracellular regulatory cation and most likely as a second messenger.

  19. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  20. Protective effects of Labisia pumila var. alata on biochemical and histopathological alterations of cardiac muscle cells in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction rats.

    PubMed

    Dianita, Roza; Jantan, Ibrahim; Amran, Athirah Z; Jalil, Juriyati

    2015-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of the standardized aqueous and 80% ethanol extracts of Labisia pumila var. alata (LPva) in isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. The extracts were administered to Wistar rats orally for 28 days with three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of body weight) prior to ISO (85 mg/kg)-induced MI in two doses on day 29 and 30. The sera and hearts were collected for biochemical and histopathological analysis after the rats were sacrificed 48 h after the first induction. The main components of the extracts, gallic acid, alkylresorcinols and flavonoids were identified and quantitatively analyzed in the extracts by using a validated reversed phase HPLC method. The extracts showed significant protective effects as pretreated rats showed a significant dose-dependent decrease (p < 0.05) in cardiac enzyme activities, i.e., cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST), when compared with ISO-control rats. There were significant rises (p < 0.05) in the activity of oxidase enzymes, i.e., glutathione peroxide (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) of the pretreated rats, when compared with ISO-control group. Histopathological examination showed an improvement in membrane cell integrity in pre-treated rats compared to untreated rats. The major components of LPva extracts can be used as their biomarkers and contributed to the cardioprotective effects against ISO-induced MI rats. PMID:25786162

  1. Cardiac Regenerative Capacity and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    The heart holds the monumental yet monotonous task of maintaining circulation. Although cardiac function is critical to other organs and to life itself, mammals are not equipped with significant natural capacity to replace heart muscle that has been lost by injury. This deficiency plays a role in leaving millions worldwide each year vulnerable to heart failure. By contrast, certain other vertebrate species like zebrafish are strikingly good at heart regeneration. A cellular and molecular understanding of endogenous regenerative mechanisms, combined with advances in methodology to transplant cells, together project a future in which cardiac muscle regeneration can be therapeutically stimulated in injured human hearts. This review will focus on what has been discovered recently about cardiac regenerative capacity and how natural mechanisms of heart regeneration in model systems are stimulated and maintained. PMID:23057748

  2. Effect of tighter glycemic control on cardiac function, exercise capacity, and muscle strength in heart failure patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Roni; Wiggers, Henrik; Thomsen, Henrik Holm; Bovin, Ann; Refsgaard, Jens; Abrahamsen, Jan; Møller, Niels; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Nørrelund, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and heart failure (HF), the optimal glycemic target is uncertain, and evidence-based data are lacking. Therefore, we performed a randomized study on the effect of optimized glycemic control on left ventricular function, exercise capacity, muscle strength, and body composition. Design and methods 40 patients with T2D and HF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 35±12% and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 8.4±0.7% (68±0.8 mmol/mol)) were randomized to either 4-month optimization (OPT group) or non-optimization (non-OPT group) of glycemic control. Patients underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiopulmonary exercise test, 6 min hall-walk test (6-MWT), muscle strength examination, and dual X-ray absorptiometry scanning at baseline and at follow-up. Results 39 patients completed the study. HbA1c decreased in the OPT versus the non-OPT group (8.4±0.8% (68±9 mmol/mol) to 7.6±0.7% (60±7 mmol/mol) vs 8.3±0.7% (67±10 mmol/mol) to 8.4±1.0% (68±11 mmol/mol); p<0.001). There was no difference between the groups with respect to changes in myocardial contractile reserve (LVEF (p=0.18)), oxygen consumption (p=0.55), exercise capacity (p=0.12), and 6-MWT (p=0.84). Muscle strength decreased in the non-OPT compared with the OPT group (37.2±8.1 to 34.8±8.3 kg vs 34.9±10.2 to 35.4±10.7 kg; p=0.01), in line with a non-significant decrease in lean (p=0.07) and fat (p=0.07) tissue mass in the non-OPT group. Hypoglycemia and fluid retention did not differ between groups. Conclusions 4 months of optimization of glycemic control was associated with preserved muscle strength and lean body mass in patients with T2D and HF compared with lenient control, and had no deleterious effect on left ventricular contractile function and seemed to be safe. Trial registration number NCT01213784; pre-results. PMID:27158520

  3. Increased prenatal IGF2 expression due to the porcine intron3-G3072A mutation may be responsible for increased muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Clark, D L; Clark, D I; Beever, J E; Dilger, A C

    2015-05-01

    A SNP (IGF2 G3072A) within intron 3 of disrupts a binding site for the repressor zinc finger BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6), leading to increased carcass lean yields in pigs. However, the relative contributions of prenatal as opposed to postnatal increased IGF2 expression are unclear. As muscle fiber number is set at birth, prenatal and neonate skeletal muscle development is critical in determining mature growth potential. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the contributions of hyperplasia and hypertrophy to increased muscle mass and to delineate the effect of the mutation on the expression of myogenic genes during prenatal and postnatal growth. Sows (IGF2 A/A) were bred to a single heterozygous (IGF2 A/G) boar. For fetal samples, sows were euthanized at 60 and 90 d of gestation (d60 and d90) to obtain fetuses. Male and female offspring were also euthanized at birth (0d), weaning (21d), and market weight of approximately 130 kg (176d). At each sampling time, the LM, psoas major (PM), and semitendinosus (ST) muscles were weighed. Samples of the LM were used to quantify the expression of IGF family members, myogenic regulatory factors (MRF), myosin heavy chain isoforms, and growth factors, myostatin, and . Liver samples were used to quantify and expression. At 176d, weights of LM, PM, and ST muscles were all increased approximately 8% to 14% (P < 0.01) in pigs with paternal A (A(Pat)) alleles compared with those with paternal G (G(Pat)) alleles. Additionally, total muscle fiber number in the ST at 176d tended to be greater (P = 0.10), whereas muscle fiber cross-sectional area tended to be reduced ( P= 0.08) in A(Pat) pigs compared with G(Pat) pigs. In addition to the expected 2.7- to 4.5-fold increase (P ≤ 0.02) in expression in the LM in A(Pat) compared with G(Pat) pigs at postnatal sampling times (21d and 176d), IGF2 expression was also increased (P ≤ 0.06) 1.4- to 1.5-fold at d90 of gestation and at birth. At d90, expression of myogenic

  4. Microcalorimetric determination of energy expenditure due to active sodium-potassium transport in the soleus muscle and brown adipose tissue of the rat.

    PubMed

    Chinet, A; Clausen, T; Girardier, L

    1977-02-01

    1. The resting heat production rate (E) of soleus muscles from young rats and brown adipose tissue from adult rats was measured by means of a perfusable heat flux microcalorimeter in the absence and presence of ouabain. In the soleus muscle, the acute response of E to ouabain was compared with the ouabain-suppressible components of 22Na-efflux and 42K-influx. 2. In standard Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer, ouabain (10(-3)M) induced an immediate but transient decrease in E of around 5%. Both in muscle and adipose tissue this was followed by a progressive rise in heat production rate. 3. When the medium was enriched with Mg (10 mM), ouabain produced a sustained decrease in E of the same magnitude as in the standard medium and the secondary rise was less marked or abolished. Under these conditions, in the soleus muscle, ouabain inhibited E by 5% (i.e. by 1-76 +/- 0-22 mcal.g wet wt.-1.min-1), 22Na-efflux by 58% (0-187 +/- 0-013 micronmole. g wet wt.-1.min-1) and 42K-influx by 34% (0-132 +/- 0-028 micronmole. g wet wt.-1.min-1). 4. When the muscles were loaded with Na by pre-incubation in K-free Mg-enriched medium, the addition of K (3mM) induced an immediate ouabain-suppressible increase in E of 2-98 +/- 0-33 mcal. g wet wt.-1.min-1 and a concomitant stimulation of 22Na-efflux of 0-388 +/- 0-136 micronmole. g wet wt.-1.min-1. 5. Maximum Na/ATP ratios for the active Na-K transport process were computed, with no assumption as to the in vivo free energy of ATP hydrolysis. These were 2-1, 1-9 and 2-3 under the conditions described in paragraphs (2), (3) and (4) respectively. 6. The calculated reversible thermodynamic work associated with active Na-K transport corresponded to 34% of the measured ouabain-induced decrease in E. On the premise that the maximum efficiency of the cellular energy conservation processes is 65%, this estimate indicates that the minimum energetic efficiency of ATP utilization by the active Na-K transport process in mammalian muscle is 52%.

  5. Cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shanewise, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a proven, accepted mode of therapy for selected patients with end-stage heart failure, but the inadequate number of suitable donor hearts available ultimately limits its application. This chapter reviews adult cardiac transplantation, with an emphasis on the anesthetic considerations of the heart transplant operation itself.

  6. Unchain my heart: the scientific foundations of cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Dimmeler, Stefanie; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Schneider, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    In humans, the biological limitations to cardiac regenerative growth create both a clinical imperative — to offset cell death in acute ischemic injury and chronic heart failure — and a clinical opportunity; that is, for using cells, genes, and proteins to rescue cardiac muscle cell number or in other ways promote more efficacious cardiac repair. Recent experimental studies and early-phase clinical trials lend credence to the visionary goal of enhancing cardiac repair as an achievable therapeutic target. PMID:15765139

  7. The Effects of Force Inhibition by Sodium Vanadate on Cross-Bridge Binding, Force Redevelopment, and Ca2+ Activation in Cardiac Muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Martyn,D.; Smith, L.; Kreutziger, K.; Xu, S.; Yu, L.; Regnie, M.

    2007-01-01

    Strongly bound, force generating myosin crossbridges play an important role as allosteric activators of cardiac thin filaments. Sodium vanadate (Vi) is a phosphate analog that inhibits force by preventing crossbridge transition into force producing states. This study characterizes the mechanical state of crossbridges with bound Vi as a tool to examine the contribution of crossbridges to cardiac contractile activation. The K{sub i} of force inhibition by Vi was {approx} 40 {mu}M. Sinusoidal stiffness was inhibited with Vi, although to a lesser extent than force. We used chord stiffness measurements to monitor Vi induced changes in crossbridge attachment/detachment kinetics at saturating [Ca{sup 2+}]. Vi decreased chord stiffness at the fastest rates of stretch, while at slow rates chord stiffness actually increased. This suggests a shift in crossbridge population towards low force states with very slow attachment/detachment kinetics. Low angle X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that with Vi crossbridge mass shifted away from thin filaments, implying decreased crossbridge-thin filament interaction. The combined X-ray and mechanical data suggest at least two crossbridge populations with Vi; one characteristic of normal cycling crossbridges, and a population of weak-binding crossbridges with bound Vi and slow attachment/detachment kinetics. The Ca{sup 2+}-sensitivity of force (pCa{sub 50}) and force redevelopment kinetics (k{sub TR}) were measured to study the effects of Vi on contractile activation. When maximal force was inhibited by 40% with Vi pCa{sub 50} decreased, but greater force inhibition at higher [Vi] did not further alter pCa{sub 50}. In contrast, the Ca{sup 2+}-sensitivity of k{sub TR} was unaffected by Vi. Interestingly, when force was inhibited by Vi k{sub TR} increased at sub-maximal levels of CaS{sup 2+}-activated force. Additionally, kTR is faster at saturating Ca{sup 2+} at [Vi] that inhibit force by more than {approx}70%. The effects of Vi on

  8. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  9. Use of flow, electrical, and mechanical stimulation to promote engineering of striated muscles.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Swathi; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-07-01

    The field of tissue engineering involves design of high-fidelity tissue substitutes for predictive experimental assays in vitro and cell-based regenerative therapies in vivo. Design of striated muscle tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, has been particularly challenging due to a high metabolic demand and complex cellular organization and electromechanical function of the native tissues. Successful engineering of highly functional striated muscles may thus require creation of biomimetic culture conditions involving medium perfusion, electrical and mechanical stimulation. When optimized, these external cues are expected to synergistically and dynamically activate important intracellular signaling pathways leading to accelerated muscle growth and development. This review will discuss the use of different types of tissue culture bioreactors aimed at providing conditions for enhanced structural and functional maturation of engineered striated muscles.

  10. Use of flow, electrical, and mechanical stimulation to promote engineering of striated muscles

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Swathi; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering involves design of high-fidelity tissue substitutes for predictive experimental assays in vitro and cell-based regenerative therapies in vivo. Design of striated muscle tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, has been particularly challenging due to a high metabolic demand and complex cellular organization and electromechanical function of the native tissues. Successful engineering of highly functional striated muscles may thus require creation of biomimetic culture conditions involving medium perfusion, electrical and mechanical stimulation. When optimized, these external cues are expected to synergistically and dynamically activate important intracellular signaling pathways leading to accelerated muscle growth and development. This review will discuss the use of different types of tissue culture bioreactors aimed at providing conditions for enhanced structural and functional maturation of engineered striated muscles. PMID:24366526

  11. Soothing the sleeping giant: improving skeletal muscle oxygen kinetics and exercise intolerance in HFpEF.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Satyam; Levine, Benjamin D

    2015-09-15

    Patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) have similar degrees of exercise intolerance and dyspnea as patients with heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF). The underlying pathophysiology leading to impaired exertional ability in the HFpEF syndrome is not completely understood, and a growing body of evidence suggests "peripheral," i.e., noncardiac, factors may play an important role. Changes in skeletal muscle function (decreased muscle mass, capillary density, mitochondrial volume, and phosphorylative capacity) are common findings in HFrEF. While cardiac failure and decreased cardiac reserve account for a large proportion of the decline in oxygen consumption in HFrEF, impaired oxygen diffusion and decreased skeletal muscle oxidative capacity can also hinder aerobic performance, functional capacity and oxygen consumption (V̇o2) kinetics. The impact of skeletal muscle dysfunction and abnormal oxidative capacity may be even more pronounced in HFpEF, a disease predominantly affecting the elderly and women, two demographic groups with a high prevalence of sarcopenia. In this review, we 1) describe the basic concepts of skeletal muscle oxygen kinetics and 2) evaluate evidence suggesting limitations in aerobic performance and functional capacity in HFpEF subjects may, in part, be due to alterations in skeletal muscle oxygen delivery and utilization. Improving oxygen kinetics with specific training regimens may improve exercise efficiency and reduce the tremendous burden imposed by skeletal muscle upon the cardiovascular system.

  12. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  13. Ichthyophonus-induced cardiac damage: a mechanism for reduced swimming stamina in salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.; LaPatra, S.; Gregg, J.; Winton, J.; Hershberger, P.

    2006-01-01

    Swimming stamina, measured as time-to-fatigue, was reduced by approximately two-thirds in rainbow trout experimentally infected with Ichthyophonus. Intensity of Ichthyophonus infection was most severe in cardiac muscle but multiple organs were infected to a lesser extent. The mean heart weight of infected fish was 40% greater than that of uninfected fish, the result of parasite biomass, infiltration of immune cells and fibrotic (granuloma) tissue surrounding the parasite. Diminished swimming stamina is hypothesized to be due to cardiac failure resulting from the combination of parasite-damaged heart muscle and low myocardial oxygen supply during sustained aerobic exercise. Loss of stamina in Ichthyophonus-infected salmonids could explain the poor performance previously reported for wild Chinook and sockeye salmon stocks during their spawning migration. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Muscle diseases: the muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Pytel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic muscle disease can occur at any age. Early- or childhood-onset muscular dystrophies may be associated with profound loss of muscle function, affecting ambulation, posture, and cardiac and respiratory function. Late-onset muscular dystrophies or myopathies may be mild and associated with slight weakness and an inability to increase muscle mass. The phenotype of muscular dystrophy is an endpoint that arises from a diverse set of genetic pathways. Genes associated with muscular dystrophies encode proteins of the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix, and the sarcomere and Z band, as well as nuclear membrane components. Because muscle has such distinctive structural and regenerative properties, many of the genes implicated in these disorders target pathways unique to muscle or more highly expressed in muscle. This chapter reviews the basic structural properties of muscle and genetic mechanisms that lead to myopathy and muscular dystrophies that affect all age groups.

  15. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  16. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  17. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  18. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the removal of a small piece of muscle tissue for examination. ... dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis Additional conditions ...

  19. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: From Developmental Biology to Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Heart disease affects millions worldwide and is a progressive condition involving loss of cardiomyocytes. The human heart has limited endogenous regenerative capacity and is thus an important target for novel regenerative medicine approaches. While cell-based regenerative therapies hold promise, cellular reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which represent more than half of the cells in the mammalian heart, may be an attractive alternative strategy for regenerating cardiac muscle. Recent advances leveraging years of developmental biology point to the feasibility of generating de novo cardiomyocyte-like cells from terminally differentiated non-myocytes in the heart in situ after ischemic damage. Here, we review the progress in cardiac reprogramming methods and consider the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in refining this technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:24030021

  20. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  1. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac

  2. Multifunctional protein: cardiac ankyrin repeat protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xie, Xiao-jie; Wang, Jian-an

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) not only serves as an important component of muscle sarcomere in the cytoplasm, but also acts as a transcription co-factor in the nucleus. Previous studies have demonstrated that CARP is up-regulated in some cardiovascular disorders and muscle diseases; however, its role in these diseases remains controversial now. In this review, we will discuss the continued progress in the research related to CARP, including its discovery, structure, and the role it plays in cardiac development and heart diseases. PMID:27143260

  3. Effectiveness of intermittent -Gx gravitation in preventing deconditioning due to simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Fan; Sun, Biao; Cao, Xin-Sheng; Liu, Chun; Yu, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Le-Ning; Cheng, Jiu-Hua; Wu, Yan-Hong; Wu, Xing-Yu

    2003-07-01

    This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of daily short-duration -Gx gravity exposure in preventing adverse changes in skeletal and cardiac muscles and bone due to simulated microgravity. Tail suspension for 28 days was used to simulate microgravity-induced deconditioning effects. Daily standing (STD) at 1 G for 1, 2, or 4 h/day or centrifugation (CEN) at 1.5 or 2.6 G for 1 h/day was used to provide -Gx gravitation as a countermeasure. The results indicate that the minimum gravity exposure requirements vary greatly in different systems. Cardiac muscle is most responsive to such treatment: 1 h/day of -Gx gravitation by STD was sufficient to prevent adverse changes in myocardial contractility; bone is most resistant: 4 h/day of -Gx gravitation only partially alleviated the adverse changes in physical and mechanical properties of the femur. The responsiveness of skeletal muscle is moderate: 4 h/day of -Gx gravitation prevented mass reduction and histomorphometric changes in the soleus muscle during a 28-day simulation period. Increasing gravitational intensity to 2.6 G showed less benefit or no additional benefit in preventing adverse changes in muscle and bone. The present work suggests that system specificity in responsiveness to intermittent gravity exposure should be considered one of the prerequisites in proposing intermittent artificial gravity as a potential countermeasure.

  4. Bound potassium in muscle II.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Z

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to decide between the alternatives a) the ionized K+ is in a dissolved state in the muscle water, or b) a part of the muscle potassium is in a "bound' state. Sartorius muscles of Rana esculenta were put into glicerol for about one hour at 0-2 degrees C. Most of muscle water came out, but most of muscle potassium remained in the muscles. In contrast to this: from muscle in heat rigor more potassium was released due to glicerol treating than from the intact ones. 1. Supposition a) is experimentally refuted. 2. Supposition b) corresponds to the experimental results. PMID:6969511

  5. Artificial muscle: the human chimera is the future.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, P

    2011-12-14

    Severe heart failure and cerebral stroke are broadly associated with the impairment of muscular function that conventional treatments struggle to restore. New technologies enable the construction of "smart" materials that could be of great help in treating diseases where the main problem is muscle weakness. These materials "behave" similarly to biological systems, because the material directly converts energy, for example electrical energy into movement. The extension and contraction occur silently like in natural muscles. The real challenge is to transfer this amazing technology into devices that restore or replace the mechanical function of failing muscle. Cardiac assist devices based on artificial muscle technology could envelope a weak heart and temporarily improve its systolic function, or, if placed on top of the atrium, restore the atrial kick in chronic atrial fibrillation. Artificial sphincters could be used to treat urinary incontinence after prostatectomy or faecal incontinence associated with stomas. Artificial muscles can restore the ability of patients with facial paralysis due to stroke or nerve injury to blink. Smart materials could be used to construct an artificial oesophagus including peristaltic movement and lower oesophageal sphincter function to replace the diseased oesophagus thereby avoiding the need for laparotomy to mobilise stomach or intestine. In conclusion, in the near future, smart devices will integrate with the human body to fill functional gaps due to organ failure, and so create a human chimera.

  6. Dual gated nuclear cardiac images

    SciTech Connect

    Zubal, I.G.; Bennett, G.W.; Bizais, Y.; Brill, A.B.

    1984-02-01

    A data acquisition system has been developed to collect camera events simultaneously with continually digitized electrocardiograph signals and respiratory flow measurements. Software processing of the list mode data creates more precisely gated cardiac frames. Additionally, motion blur due to heart movement during breathing is reduced by selecting events within a specific respiratory phase. Thallium myocardium images of a healthy volunteer show increased definition. This technique of combined cardiac and respiratory gating has the potential of improving the detectability of small lesions, and the characterization of cardiac wall motion.

  7. Gender differences in cardiac hypertrophic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Patrizio, Mario; Marano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is a complex process that occurs in response to different types of cardiac injury such as ischemia and hypertension, and that involves cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle cells, vascular endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells. The end result is cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, inflammation, vascular, and electrophysiological remodeling. This paper reviews a large number of studies on the influence of gender on pathological cardiac remodeling and shows how sex differences result in different clinical outcomes and therapeutic responses, with males which generally develop greater cardiac remodeling responses than females. Although estrogens appear to have an important role in attenuating adverse cardiac remodeling, the mechanisms through which gender modulates myocardial remodeling remain to be identified. PMID:27364397

  8. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  9. The Physics of Cardiac Fibrillation: Strings that kill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2009-03-01

    Fibrillation is a state of spatio-temporal chaos in a 3d-biological excitable medium, namely the heart muscle. The building blocks are wave-emitting three-dimensional topological singularities in the electric excitation field of the tissue. These string like singularities send out a rotating wave fields with very fast frequencies (up to 10 times normal heart rate) and thus dominate over the pacemaker. The incoherent electrical excitation of the spatio-temporal chaotic dynamics leads to an unsynchronized contraction of the cardiac muscle and to the loss of the pumping action, and if untreated to death. Due to the topological nature of the spatio-temporal chaotic state it is very difficult to control. Current defibrillation technologies use strong electric field pulses (1 kV, 30 A, 12 ms) to reset the whole muscle. Here we report that natural muscle heterogeneities act as wave emitting sites when a weak electric field pulse is applied across the tissue. We report theoretical predictions on the physics and support the findings by results from experiment. This work was conducted in collaboration with Stefan Luther (MPIDS), Falvio Fenton ( Cornell), Amgad Squires (Cornell), Robert Gilmour (Cornell), Valentin Krinsky (MPIDS), Alain Pumir (NIce).

  10. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sandroni, Claudio; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction of neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest remains difficult. Previous guidelines recommended ocular reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and serum biomarkers for predicting poor outcome within 72h from cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines were based on patients not treated with targeted temperature management and did not appropriately address important biases in literature. Recent findings Recent evidence reviews detected important limitations in prognostication studies, such as low precision and, most importantly, lack of blinding, which may have caused a self-fulfilling prophecy and overestimated the specificity of index tests. Maintenance of targeted temperature using sedatives and muscle relaxants may interfere with clinical examination, making assessment of neurological status before 72 h or more after cardiac arrest unreliable. Summary No index predicts poor neurological outcome after cardiac arrest with absolute certainty. Prognostic evaluation should start not earlier than 72 h after ROSC and only after major confounders have been excluded so that reliable clinical examination can be made. Multimodality appears to be the most reasonable approach for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:25922894

  11. Signaling in muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ivana Y; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2015-02-02

    Signaling pathways regulate contraction of striated (skeletal and cardiac) and smooth muscle. Although these are similar, there are striking differences in the pathways that can be attributed to the distinct functional roles of the different muscle types. Muscles contract in response to depolarization, activation of G-protein-coupled receptors and other stimuli. The actomyosin fibers responsible for contraction require an increase in the cytosolic levels of calcium, which signaling pathways induce by promoting influx from extracellular sources or release from intracellular stores. Rises in cytosolic calcium stimulate numerous downstream calcium-dependent signaling pathways, which can also regulate contraction. Alterations to the signaling pathways that initiate and sustain contraction and relaxation occur as a consequence of exercise and pathophysiological conditions.

  12. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  13. Head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Tzahor, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    The developmental paths that lead to the formation of skeletal muscles in the head are distinct from those operating in the trunk. Craniofacial muscles are associated with head and neck structures. In the embryo, these structures derive from distinct mesoderm populations. Distinct genetic programs regulate different groups of muscles within the head to generate diverse muscle specifications. Developmental and lineage studies in vertebrates and invertebrates demonstrated an overlap in progenitor populations derived from the pharyngeal mesoderm that contribute to certain head muscles and the heart. These studies reveal that the genetic program controlling pharyngeal muscles overlaps with that of the heart. Indeed cardiac and craniofacial birth defects are often linked. Recent studies suggest that early chordates, the last common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates, had an ancestral pharyngeal mesoderm lineage that later during evolution gave rise to both heart and craniofacial structures. This chapter summarizes studies related to the origins, signaling, genetics, and evolution of the head musculature, highlighting its heterogeneous characteristics in all these aspects.

  14. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  15. Does Resistance Training Stimulate Cardiac Muscle Hypertrophy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomer, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the left ventricular structural adaptations induced by resistance/strength exercise, focusing on human work, particularly well-trained strength athletes engaged in regular, moderate- to high-intensity resistance training (RT). The article discusses both genders and examines the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in…

  16. The Role of Levosimendan in Patients with Decreased Left Ventricular Function Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bozhinovska, Marija; Taleska, Gordana; Fabian, Andrej; Šoštarič, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The postoperative low cardiac output is one of the most important complications following cardiac surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The condition requires inotropic support to achieve adequate hemodynamic status and tissue perfusion. While catecholamines are utilised as a standard therapy in cardiac surgery, their use is limited due to increased oxygen consumption. Levosimendan is calcium sensitising inodilatator expressing positive inotropic effect by binding with cardiac troponin C without increasing oxygen demand. Furthermore, the drug opens potassium ATP (KATP) channels in cardiac mitochondria and in the vascular muscle cells, showing cardioprotective and vasodilator properties, respectively. In the past decade, levosimendan demonstrated promising results in treating patients with reduced left ventricular function when administered in peri- or post- operative settings. In addition, pre-operative use of levosimendan in patients with severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction may reduce the requirements for postoperative inotropic support, mechanical support, duration of intensive care unit stay as well as hospital stay and a decrease in post-operative mortality. However, larger studies are needed to clarify clinical advantages of levosimendan versus conventional inotropes. PMID:27703584

  17. Calcium versus strontium handling by the heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Hendrych, Michal; Olejnickova, Veronika; Novakova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in numerous processes in living systems, from both intracellular and intercellular signalling to blood clotting. Calcium can be replaced by strontium in various intracellular processes due to high level of their similarity and strontium thus may serve as a valuable tool for different experimental studies. On the other hand, strontium is also used in clinical medicine and is commonly taken to the human body with food and water. The negative cardiac side effects of strontium therapy of osteoporosis and bone metastases are well known, but still not fully explained. This fact explains enhanced interest in this element and its impact on human body. This article reviews effects of calcium and strontium on several biochemical and physiological processes, with special emphasis on cardiac muscle.

  18. Calcium versus strontium handling by the heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Hendrych, Michal; Olejnickova, Veronika; Novakova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in numerous processes in living systems, from both intracellular and intercellular signalling to blood clotting. Calcium can be replaced by strontium in various intracellular processes due to high level of their similarity and strontium thus may serve as a valuable tool for different experimental studies. On the other hand, strontium is also used in clinical medicine and is commonly taken to the human body with food and water. The negative cardiac side effects of strontium therapy of osteoporosis and bone metastases are well known, but still not fully explained. This fact explains enhanced interest in this element and its impact on human body. This article reviews effects of calcium and strontium on several biochemical and physiological processes, with special emphasis on cardiac muscle. PMID:26612918

  19. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  20. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2015-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best “treatment”. PMID:27027021

  1. Skeletal and cardiac α-actin isoforms differently modulate myosin cross-bridge formation and myofibre force production.

    PubMed

    Ochala, Julien; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J

    2013-11-01

    Multiple congenital myopathies, including nemaline myopathy, can arise due to mutations in the ACTA1 gene encoding skeletal muscle α-actin. The main characteristics of ACTA1 null mutations (absence of skeletal muscle α-actin) are generalized skeletal muscle weakness and premature death. A mouse model (ACTC(Co)/KO) mimicking these conditions has successfully been rescued by transgenic over-expression of cardiac α-actin in skeletal muscles using the ACTC gene. Nevertheless, myofibres from ACTC(Co)/KO animals generate less force than normal myofibres (-20 to 25%). To understand the underlying mechanisms, here we have undertaken a detailed functional study of myofibres from ACTC(Co)/KO rodents. Mechanical and X-ray diffraction pattern analyses of single membrane-permeabilized myofibres showed, upon maximal Ca(2+) activation and under rigor conditions, lower stiffness and disrupted actin-layer line reflections in ACTC(Co)/KO when compared with age-matched wild-types. These results demonstrate that in ACTC(Co)/KO myofibres, the presence of cardiac α-actin instead of skeletal muscle α-actin alters actin conformational changes upon activation. This later finely modulates the strain of individual actomyosin interactions and overall lowers myofibre force production. Taken together, the present findings provide novel primordial information about actin isoforms, their functional differences and have to be considered when designing gene therapies for ACTA1-based congenital myopathies. PMID:23784376

  2. Numerical Investigation of Macroscopic Cardiac Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Gavin; Balazs, Anna

    2003-03-01

    In order to gain insight into the complex interactions between electrical excitation of the myocardial tissue, the mechanical contraction of the heart muscles and cardiac fluid dynamics, three computational techniques are successfully coupled. A Gerhardt-Schuster-Tyson Cellular Automata algorithm enables the excitation kinetics of myocardial tissue to be simulated in a computationally efficient manner. The cardiac excitation spreading is then coupled with a dynamic Born Lattice Spring Model which enables the contraction of the heart muscles and their subsequent relaxation to be modelled. The velocities at the inner surfaces of the heart can then be transferred to a Lattice Boltzmann simulation of blood flow within the cardiac chambers. The interactions (and complex feedback mechanisms) between electrical excitation, mechanical deformation, and fluid flow in the heart are explored through these three-dimensional models and the regular functionality of the whole heart is visualised.

  3. The interplay of protein kinase A and perilipin 5 regulates cardiac lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Nina M; Jaeger, Doris; Kolleritsch, Stephanie; Zimmermann, Robert; Zechner, Rudolf; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2015-01-16

    Defective lipolysis in mice lacking adipose triglyceride lipase provokes severe cardiac steatosis and heart dysfunction, markedly shortening life span. Similarly, cardiac muscle (CM)-specific Plin5 overexpression (CM-Plin5) leads to severe triglyceride (TG) accumulation in cardiomyocytes via impairing TG breakdown. Interestingly, cardiac steatosis due to overexpression of Plin5 is compatible with normal heart function and life span indicating a more moderate impact of Plin5 overexpression on cardiac lipolysis and energy metabolism. We hypothesized that cardiac Plin5 overexpression does not constantly impair cardiac lipolysis. In line with this assumption, TG levels decreased in CM of fasted compared with nonfasted CM-Plin5 mice indicating that fasting may lead to a diminished barrier function of Plin5. Recent studies demonstrated that Plin5 is phosphorylated, and activation of adenylyl cyclase leads to phosphorylation of Plin5, suggesting that Plin5 is a substrate for PKA. Furthermore, any significance of Plin5 phosphorylation by PKA in the regulation of TG mobilization from lipid droplets (LDs) is unknown. Here, we show that the lipolytic barrier of Plin5-enriched LDs, either prepared from cardiac tissue of CM-Plin5 mice or Plin5-transfected cells, is abrogated by incubation with PKA. Notably, PKA-induced lipolysis of LDs enriched with Plin5 carrying a single mutation at serine 155 (PlinS155A) of the putative PKA phosphorylation site was substantially impaired revealing a critical role for PKA in Plin5-regulated lipolysis. The strong increase in protein levels of phosphorylated PKA in CM of Plin5 transgenic mice may partially restore fatty acid release from Plin5-enriched LDs, rendering these hearts compatible with normal heart function despite massive steatosis. PMID:25418045

  4. [Pharmaca Induced Cardiac Injury].

    PubMed

    Haen, Ekkehard

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs influence vital functions via the sympathetic and the parasympathetic system. Besides that hypersensitivity reactions and reactions by chemical radicals that arise in drug metabolism may directly harm the heart muscle cell. Cardiac adverse drug reactions (ADR) result in disturbances of the heart rhythm, negative inotropic effects, direct damage to the heart muscle cell, and reduced perfusion of heart tissue. Their importance is often neglected because pharmacologically similar drugs are licensed for completely different indications. This is of particular interest if more drugs are prescribed in combination. Now these effects may add up to pharmacodynamic drug-drug-interactions. Data banks like PSIAConline (www.psiac.de), individualization of drug prescription by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) combined with a clinical pharmacological report (www.konbest.de), as well as drug information systems such as AGATE (www.amuep-agate.de) are today of help not just to recognize such drug risks, but also to find professional and evidence based solutions for it. PMID:26800070

  5. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  6. Genetic dissection of cardiac growth control pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLellan, W. R.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells exhibit two related but distinct modes of growth that are highly regulated during development and disease. Cardiac myocytes rapidly proliferate during fetal life but exit the cell cycle irreversibly soon after birth, following which the predominant form of growth shifts from hyperplastic to hypertrophic. Much research has focused on identifying the candidate mitogens, hypertrophic agonists, and signaling pathways that mediate these processes in isolated cells. What drives the proliferative growth of embryonic myocardium in vivo and the mechanisms by which adult cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo are less clear. Efforts to answer these questions have benefited from rapid progress made in techniques to manipulate the murine genome. Complementary technologies for gain- and loss-of-function now permit a mutational analysis of these growth control pathways in vivo in the intact heart. These studies have confirmed the importance of suspected pathways, have implicated unexpected pathways as well, and have led to new paradigms for the control of cardiac growth.

  7. Sudden cardiac death – Historical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, S.P.; Namboodiri, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unexpected death due to cardiac causes that occurs in a short time period (generally within 1 h of symptom onset) in a person with known or unknown cardiac disease. It is believed to be involved in nearly a quarter of human deaths, with ventricular fibrillation being the most common mechanism. It is estimated that more than 7 million lives per year are lost to SCD worldwide. Historical perspectives of SCD are analyzed with a brief description on how the developments in the management of sudden cardiac arrest evolved over time. PMID:24568828

  8. Development and application of image processing, data processing, database, and data query tools to study post-infarction cardiac remodeling in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumberger, John A.; Reed, Judd E.; Behrenbeck, Thomas; Davitt, Patrick J.; Sheedy, Patrick F., II

    1994-05-01

    In the latter 1970s, largely due to the development of echocardiography and the ready availability of invasive contrast ventriculography, clinicians noted that distinct and serial changes occurred in the heart after infarction where cardiac enlargement could progress long after completion of scarring in the infarct region. Similar changes have also been observed in the non-infarcted or non-ischemic myocardial regions commencing within days of infarction. This process, which involves both viable and infarcted heart muscle, has been termed `post- infarction cardiac remodeling.' A major obstacle to further comprehension of post-infarction cardiac remodeling in man has been related to limitations in applications of conventional cardiac imaging methods and conventional cardiac image processing. Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) has emerged recently as an alternative means to image the heart and has been extensively validated for studies of ventricular volumes, function, muscle mass, shape, characterization of regional mechanics, and affords 3-D image registration. A research investigation was designed which involved a total of 55 patients entered prospectively following an index myocardial infarction. Each was imaged using EBCT at hospital discharge, six-weeks, six-months and one-year after the event.

  9. Cardiac regeneration: epicardial mediated repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hearts of lower vertebrates such as fish and salamanders display scarless regeneration following injury, although this feature is lost in adult mammals. The remarkable capacity of the neonatal mammalian heart to regenerate suggests that the underlying machinery required for the regenerative process is evolutionarily retained. Recent studies highlight the epicardial covering of the heart as an important source of the signalling factors required for the repair process. The developing epicardium is also a major source of cardiac fibroblasts, smooth muscle, endothelial cells and stem cells. Here, we examine animal models that are capable of scarless regeneration, the role of the epicardium as a source of cells, signalling mechanisms implicated in the regenerative process and how these mechanisms influence cardiomyocyte proliferation. We also discuss recent advances in cardiac stem cell research and potential therapeutic targets arising from these studies. PMID:26702046

  10. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  11. Murine Muscle Engineered from Dermal Precursors: An In Vitro Model for Skeletal Muscle Generation, Degeneration, and Fatty Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    García-Parra, Patricia; Naldaiz-Gastesi, Neia; Maroto, Marcos; Padín, Juan Fernando; Goicoechea, María; Aiastui, Ana; Fernández-Morales, José Carlos; García-Belda, Paula; Lacalle, Jaione; Álava, Jose Iñaki; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; García, Antonio G.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can be engineered by converting dermal precursors into muscle progenitors and differentiated myocytes. However, the efficiency of muscle development remains relatively low and it is currently unclear if this is due to poor characterization of the myogenic precursors, the protocols used for cell differentiation, or a combination of both. In this study, we characterized myogenic precursors present in murine dermospheres, and evaluated mature myotubes grown in a novel three-dimensional culture system. After 5–7 days of differentiation, we observed isolated, twitching myotubes followed by spontaneous contractions of the entire tissue-engineered muscle construct on an extracellular matrix (ECM). In vitro engineered myofibers expressed canonical muscle markers and exhibited a skeletal (not cardiac) muscle ultrastructure, with numerous striations and the presence of aligned, enlarged mitochondria, intertwined with sarcoplasmic reticula (SR). Engineered myofibers exhibited Na+- and Ca2+-dependent inward currents upon acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation and tetrodotoxin-sensitive spontaneous action potentials. Moreover, ACh, nicotine, and caffeine elicited cytosolic Ca2+ transients; fiber contractions coupled to these Ca2+ transients suggest that Ca2+ entry is activating calcium-induced calcium release from the SR. Blockade by d-tubocurarine of ACh-elicited inward currents and Ca2+ transients suggests nicotinic receptor involvement. Interestingly, after 1 month, engineered muscle constructs showed progressive degradation of the myofibers concomitant with fatty infiltration, paralleling the natural course of muscular degeneration. We conclude that mature myofibers may be differentiated on the ECM from myogenic precursor cells present in murine dermospheres, in an in vitro system that mimics some characteristics found in aging and muscular degeneration. PMID:23631552

  12. Influence of cirrhosis in cardiac surgery outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Esteve, Francisco; Javierre, Casimiro; Ventura, Josep L; Mañez, Rafael; Farrero, Elisabet; Torrado, Herminia; Rodríguez-Castro, David; Carrio, Maria L

    2015-04-18

    Liver cirrhosis has evolved an important risk factor for cardiac surgery due to the higher morbidity and mortality that these patients may suffer compared with general cardiac surgery population. The presence of contributing factors for a poor outcome, such as coagulopathy, a poor nutritional status, an adaptive immune dysfunction, a degree of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and a degree of renal and pulmonary dysfunction, have to be taken into account for surgical evaluation when cardiac surgery is needed, together with the degree of liver disease and its primary complications. The associated pathophysiological characteristics that liver cirrhosis represents have a great influence in the development of complications during cardiac surgery and the postoperative course. Despite the population of cirrhotic patients who are referred for cardiac surgery is small and recommendations come from small series, since liver cirrhotic patients have increased their chance of survival in the last 20 years due to the advances in their medical care, which includes liver transplantation, they have been increasingly considered for cardiac surgery. Indeed, there is an expected rise of cirrhotic patients within the cardiac surgical population due to the increasing rates of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, especially in western countries. In consequence, a more specific approach is needed in the assessment of care of these patients if we want to improve their management. In this article, we review the pathophysiology and outcome prediction of cirrhotic patients who underwent cardiac surgery.

  13. Circulating Extracellular Vesicles Contain miRNAs and are Released as Early Biomarkers for Cardiac Injury.

    PubMed

    Deddens, Janine C; Vrijsen, Krijn R; Colijn, Johanna M; Oerlemans, Martinus I; Metz, Corina H G; van der Vlist, Els J; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; den Ouden, Krista; Jansen Of Lorkeers, Sanne J; van der Spoel, Tycho I G; Koudstaal, Stefan; Arkesteijn, Ger J; Wauben, Marca H M; van Laake, Linda W; Doevendans, Pieter A; Chamuleau, Steven A J; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2016-08-01

    Plasma-circulating microRNAs have been implicated as novel early biomarkers for myocardial infarction (MI) due to their high specificity for cardiac injury. For swift clinical translation of this potential biomarker, it is important to understand their temporal and spatial characteristics upon MI. Therefore, we studied the temporal release, potential source, and transportation of circulating miRNAs in different models of ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. We demonstrated that extracellular vesicles are released from the ischemic myocardium upon I/R injury. Moreover, we provided evidence that cardiac and muscle-specific miRNAs are transported by extracellular vesicles and are rapidly detectable in plasma. Since these vesicles are enriched for the released miRNAs and their detection precedes traditional damage markers, they hold great potential as specific early biomarkers for MI. PMID:27383837

  14. Long-Term Overexpression of Hsp70 Does Not Protect against Cardiac Dysfunction and Adverse Remodeling in a MURC Transgenic Mouse Model with Chronic Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Bianca C; Sapra, Geeta; Patterson, Natalie L; Cemerlang, Nelly; Kiriazis, Helen; Ueyama, Tomomi; Febbraio, Mark A; McMullen, Julie R

    2015-01-01

    Previous animal studies had shown that increasing heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) using a transgenic, gene therapy or pharmacological approach provided cardiac protection in models of acute cardiac stress. Furthermore, clinical studies had reported associations between Hsp70 levels and protection against atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia presenting in cardiology clinics and is associated with increased rates of heart failure and stroke. Improved therapies for AF and heart failure are urgently required. Despite promising observations in animal studies which targeted Hsp70, we recently reported that increasing Hsp70 was unable to attenuate cardiac dysfunction and pathology in a mouse model which develops heart failure and intermittent AF. Given our somewhat unexpected finding and the extensive literature suggesting Hsp70 provides cardiac protection, it was considered important to assess whether Hsp70 could provide protection in another mouse model of heart failure and AF. The aim of the current study was to determine whether increasing Hsp70 could attenuate adverse cardiac remodeling, cardiac dysfunction and episodes of arrhythmia in a mouse model of heart failure and AF due to overexpression of Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil (MURC). Cardiac function and pathology were assessed in mice at approximately 12 months of age. We report here, that chronic overexpression of Hsp70 was unable to provide protection against cardiac dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, fibrosis or characteristic molecular markers of the failing heart. In summary, elevated Hsp70 may provide protection in acute cardiac stress settings, but appears insufficient to protect the heart under chronic cardiac disease conditions. PMID:26660322

  15. Long-Term Overexpression of Hsp70 Does Not Protect against Cardiac Dysfunction and Adverse Remodeling in a MURC Transgenic Mouse Model with Chronic Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Bianca C.; Sapra, Geeta; Patterson, Natalie L.; Cemerlang, Nelly; Kiriazis, Helen; Ueyama, Tomomi; Febbraio, Mark A.; McMullen, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous animal studies had shown that increasing heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) using a transgenic, gene therapy or pharmacological approach provided cardiac protection in models of acute cardiac stress. Furthermore, clinical studies had reported associations between Hsp70 levels and protection against atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia presenting in cardiology clinics and is associated with increased rates of heart failure and stroke. Improved therapies for AF and heart failure are urgently required. Despite promising observations in animal studies which targeted Hsp70, we recently reported that increasing Hsp70 was unable to attenuate cardiac dysfunction and pathology in a mouse model which develops heart failure and intermittent AF. Given our somewhat unexpected finding and the extensive literature suggesting Hsp70 provides cardiac protection, it was considered important to assess whether Hsp70 could provide protection in another mouse model of heart failure and AF. The aim of the current study was to determine whether increasing Hsp70 could attenuate adverse cardiac remodeling, cardiac dysfunction and episodes of arrhythmia in a mouse model of heart failure and AF due to overexpression of Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil (MURC). Cardiac function and pathology were assessed in mice at approximately 12 months of age. We report here, that chronic overexpression of Hsp70 was unable to provide protection against cardiac dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, fibrosis or characteristic molecular markers of the failing heart. In summary, elevated Hsp70 may provide protection in acute cardiac stress settings, but appears insufficient to protect the heart under chronic cardiac disease conditions. PMID:26660322

  16. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  17. Factors controlling cardiac neural crest cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Mary R

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac neural crest cells originate as part of the postotic caudal rhombencephalic neural crest stream. Ectomesenchymal cells in this stream migrate to the circumpharyngeal ridge and then into the caudal pharyngeal arches where they condense to form first a sheath and then the smooth muscle tunics of the persisting pharyngeal arch arteries. A subset of the cells continues migrating into the cardiac outflow tract where they will condense to form the aorticopulmonary septum. Cell signaling, extracellular matrix and cell-cell contacts are all critical for the initial migration, pauses, continued migration and condensation of these cells. This Review elucidates what is currently known about these factors. PMID:20890117

  18. A cardiac hemangioma treated by a right minithoracotomy approach with thoracoscopic assistance.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Katsuaki; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Odate, Tomohiro; Miura, Takashi; Tsuneto, Akira; Abe, Kuniko; Hashizume, Koji; Eishi, Kiyoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hemangiomas are extremely rare tumors, accounting for only 2.5% of all cardiac tumors. Most of these develop in the ventricles, and obtaining a good field of view is, therefore, the key to successful operation. A 40-year-old female visited a local hospital due to palpitation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a spherical high-echo mass (13.5 × 10.7 mm in diameter) between the papillary muscles. She was referred to our hospital to undergo close examination. Cardiac contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was performed to differentiate between malignant and benign lesions. However, this did not provide any findings leading to a definite diagnosis. To make a diagnosis and prevent embolism, the mass was excised using a right minithoracotomy approach with thoracoscopic assistance. The post-operative pathological diagnosis was a cardiac capillary-cavernous hemangioma. A right minithoracotomy approach combined with thoracoscopy allowed accurate evaluation of the mass in the left ventricle beyond the mitral valve and its accurate excision.

  19. Molecular and Functional Effects of a Splice Site Mutation in the MYL2 Gene Associated with Cardioskeletal Myopathy and Early Cardiac Death in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiqun; Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous appearance of the intronic mutation (IVS6-1) in the MYL2 gene encoding for myosin ventricular/slow-twitch skeletal regulatory light chain (RLC) was recently linked to the development of slow skeletal muscle fiber type I hypotrophy and early cardiac death. The IVS6-1 (c403-1G>C) mutation resulted from a cryptic splice site in MYL2 causing a frameshift and replacement of the last 32 codons by 19 different amino acids in the RLC mutant protein. Infants who were IVS6-1+∕+-positive died between 4 and 6 months of age due to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In this report we have investigated the molecular mechanism and functional consequences associated with the IVS6-1 mutation using recombinant human cardiac IVS6-1 and wild-type (WT) RLC proteins. Recombinant proteins were reconstituted into RLC-depleted porcine cardiac muscle preparations and subjected to enzymatic and functional assays. IVS6-1-RLC showed decreased binding to the myosin heavy chain (MHC) compared with WT, and IVS6-1-reconstituted myosin displayed reduced binding to actin in rigor. The IVS6-1 myosin demonstrated a significantly lower Vmax of the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity compared with WT. In stopped-flow experiments, IVS6-1 myosin showed slower kinetics of the ATP induced dissociation of the acto-myosin complex and a significantly reduced slope of the kobs-[MgATP] relationship compared to WT. In skinned porcine cardiac muscles, RLC-depleted and IVS6-1 reconstituted muscle strips displayed a significant decrease in maximal contractile force and a significantly increased Ca2+ sensitivity, both hallmarks of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated mutations in MYL2. Our results showed that the amino-acid changes in IVS6-1 were sufficient to impose significant conformational alterations in the RLC protein and trigger a series of abnormal protein-protein interactions in the cardiac muscle sarcomere. Notably, the mutation disrupted the RLC-MHC interaction and the steady-state and

  20. Molecular and Functional Effects of a Splice Site Mutation in the MYL2 Gene Associated with Cardioskeletal Myopathy and Early Cardiac Death in Infants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiqun; Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous appearance of the intronic mutation (IVS6-1) in the MYL2 gene encoding for myosin ventricular/slow-twitch skeletal regulatory light chain (RLC) was recently linked to the development of slow skeletal muscle fiber type I hypotrophy and early cardiac death. The IVS6-1 (c403-1G>C) mutation resulted from a cryptic splice site in MYL2 causing a frameshift and replacement of the last 32 codons by 19 different amino acids in the RLC mutant protein. Infants who were IVS6-1(+∕+)-positive died between 4 and 6 months of age due to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In this report we have investigated the molecular mechanism and functional consequences associated with the IVS6-1 mutation using recombinant human cardiac IVS6-1 and wild-type (WT) RLC proteins. Recombinant proteins were reconstituted into RLC-depleted porcine cardiac muscle preparations and subjected to enzymatic and functional assays. IVS6-1-RLC showed decreased binding to the myosin heavy chain (MHC) compared with WT, and IVS6-1-reconstituted myosin displayed reduced binding to actin in rigor. The IVS6-1 myosin demonstrated a significantly lower Vmax of the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity compared with WT. In stopped-flow experiments, IVS6-1 myosin showed slower kinetics of the ATP induced dissociation of the acto-myosin complex and a significantly reduced slope of the kobs-[MgATP] relationship compared to WT. In skinned porcine cardiac muscles, RLC-depleted and IVS6-1 reconstituted muscle strips displayed a significant decrease in maximal contractile force and a significantly increased Ca(2+) sensitivity, both hallmarks of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated mutations in MYL2. Our results showed that the amino-acid changes in IVS6-1 were sufficient to impose significant conformational alterations in the RLC protein and trigger a series of abnormal protein-protein interactions in the cardiac muscle sarcomere. Notably, the mutation disrupted the RLC-MHC interaction and the steady

  1. Intracellular energetic units in red muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Saks, V A; Kaambre, T; Sikk, P; Eimre, M; Orlova, E; Paju, K; Piirsoo, A; Appaix, F; Kay, L; Regitz-Zagrosek, V; Fleck, E; Seppet, E

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of regulation of mitochondrial respiration by endogenous and exogenous ADP in muscle cells in situ was studied in skinned cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres. Endogenous ADP production was initiated by addition of MgATP; under these conditions the respiration rate and ADP concentration in the medium were dependent on the calcium concentration, and 70-80% of maximal rate of respiration was achieved at ADP concentration below 20 microM in the medium. In contrast, when exogenous ADP was added, maximal respiration rate was observed only at millimolar concentrations. An exogenous ADP-consuming system consisting of pyruvate kinase (PK; 20-40 units/ml) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP; 5 mM), totally suppressed respiration activated by exogenous ADP, but the respiration maintained by endogenous ADP was not suppressed by more than 20-40%. Creatine (20 mM) further activated respiration in the presence of ATP and PK+PEP. Short treatment with trypsin (50-500 nM for 5 min) decreased the apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP from 300-350 microM to 50-60 microM, increased inhibition of respiration by PK+PEP system up to 70-80%, with no changes in MgATPase activity and maximal respiration rates. Electron-microscopic observations showed detachment of mitochondria and disordering of the regular structure of the sarcomere after trypsin treatment. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed a group of at least seven low-molecular-mass proteins in cardiac skinned fibres which were very sensitive to trypsin and not present in glycolytic fibres, which have low apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP. It is concluded that, in oxidative muscle cells, mitochondria are incorporated into functional complexes ('intracellular energetic units') with adjacent ADP-producing systems in myofibrils and in sarcoplasmic reticulum, probably due to specific interaction with cytoskeletal elements responsible for mitochondrial distribution in the cell. It is suggested that these complexes represent the basic

  2. Cardiac expression of ms1/STARS, a novel gene involved in cardiac development and disease, is regulated by GATA4.

    PubMed

    Ounzain, Samir; Kobayashi, Satoru; Peterson, Richard E; He, Aibin; Motterle, Anna; Samani, Nilesh J; Menick, Donald R; Pu, William T; Liang, Qiangrong; Chong, Nelson W

    2012-05-01

    Ms1/STARS is a novel muscle-specific actin-binding protein that specifically modulates the myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-serum response factor (SRF) regulatory axis within striated muscle. This ms1/STARS-dependent regulatory axis is of central importance within the cardiac gene regulatory network and has been implicated in cardiac development and postnatal cardiac function/homeostasis. The dysregulation of ms1/STARS is associated with and causative of pathological cardiac phenotypes, including cardiac hypertrophy and cardiomyopathy. In order to gain an understanding of the mechanisms governing ms1/STARS expression in the heart, we have coupled a comparative genomic in silico analysis with reporter, gain-of-function, and loss-of-function approaches. Through this integrated analysis, we have identified three evolutionarily conserved regions (ECRs), α, SINA, and DINA, that act as cis-regulatory modules and confer differential cardiac cell-specific activity. Two of these ECRs, α and DINA, displayed distinct regulatory sensitivity to the core cardiac transcription factor GATA4. Overall, our results demonstrate that within embryonic, neonatal, and adult hearts, GATA4 represses ms1/STARS expression with the pathologically associated depletion of GATA4 (type 1/type 2 diabetic models), resulting in ms1/STARS upregulation. This GATA4-dependent repression of ms1/STARS expression has major implications for MRTF-SRF signaling in the context of cardiac development and disease.

  3. Cardiac torsion and electromagnetic fields: the cardiac bioinformation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Burleson, Katharine O; Schwartz, Gary E

    2005-01-01

    Although in physiology the heart is often referred to as a simple piston pump, there are in fact two additional features that are integral to cardiac physiology and function. First, the heart as it contracts in systole, also rotates and produces torsion due to the structure of the myocardium. Second, the heart produces a significant electromagnetic field with each contraction due to the coordinated depolarization of myocytes producing a current flow. Unlike the electrocardiogram, the magnetic field is not limited to volume conduction and extends outside the body. The therapeutic potential for interaction of this cardioelectromagnetic field both within and outside the body is largely unexplored. It is our hypothesis that the heart functions as a generator of bioinformation that is central to normative functioning of body. The source of this bioinformation is based on: (1) vortex blood flow in the left ventricle; (2) a cardiac electromagnetic field and both; (3) heart sounds; and (4) pulse pressure which produce frequency and amplitude information. Thus, there is a multidimensional role for the heart in physiology and biopsychosocial dynamics. Recognition of these cardiac properties may result in significant implications for new therapies for cardiovascular disease based on increasing cardiac energy efficiency (coherence) and bioinformation from the cardioelectromagnetic field. Research studies to test this hypothesis are suggested.

  4. Erbb2 Is Required for Cardiac Atrial Electrical Activity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Tenin, Gennadiy; Clowes, Christopher; Wolton, Kathryn; Krejci, Eliska; Wright, Jayne A.; Lovell, Simon C.; Sedmera, David; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    The heart is the first organ required to function during embryonic development and is absolutely necessary for embryo survival. Cardiac activity is dependent on both the sinoatrial node (SAN), which is the pacemaker of heart's electrical activity, and the cardiac conduction system which transduces the electrical signal though the heart tissue, leading to heart muscle contractions. Defects in the development of cardiac electrical function may lead to severe heart disorders. The Erbb2 (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2) gene encodes a member of the EGF receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The Erbb2 receptor lacks ligand-binding activity but forms heterodimers with other EGF receptors, stabilising their ligand binding and enhancing kinase-mediated activation of downstream signalling pathways. Erbb2 is absolutely necessary in normal embryonic development and homozygous mouse knock-out Erbb2 embryos die at embryonic day (E)10.5 due to severe cardiac defects. We have isolated a mouse line, l11Jus8, from a random chemical mutagenesis screen, which carries a hypomorphic missense mutation in the Erbb2 gene. Homozygous mutant embryos exhibit embryonic lethality by E12.5-13. The l11Jus8 mutants display cardiac haemorrhage and a failure of atrial function due to defects in atrial electrical signal propagation, leading to an atrial-specific conduction block, which does not affect ventricular conduction. The l11Jus8 mutant phenotype is distinct from those reported for Erbb2 knockout mouse mutants. Thus, the l11Jus8 mouse reveals a novel function of Erbb2 during atrial conduction system development, which when disrupted causes death at mid-gestation. PMID:25269082

  5. Exploring cardiac biophysical properties

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Younss Ait; Bollensdorff, Christian; Cazorla, Olivier; Magdi, Yacoub; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2015-01-01

    The heart is subject to multiple sources of stress. To maintain its normal function, and successfully overcome these stresses, heart muscle is equipped with fine-tuned regulatory mechanisms. Some of these mechanisms are inherent within the myocardium itself and are known as intrinsic mechanisms. Over a century ago, Otto Frank and Ernest Starling described an intrinsic mechanism by which the heart, even ex vivo, regulates its function on a beat-to-beat basis. According to this phenomenon, the higher the ventricular filling is, the bigger the stroke volume. Thus, the Frank-Starling law establishes a direct relationship between the diastolic and systolic function of the heart. To observe this biophysical phenomenon and to investigate it, technologic development has been a pre-requisite to scientific knowledge. It allowed for example to observe, at the cellular level, a Frank-Starling like mechanism and has been termed: Length Dependent Activation (LDA). In this review, we summarize some experimental systems that have been developed and are currently still in use to investigate cardiac biophysical properties from the whole heart down to the single myofibril. As a scientific support, investigation of the Frank-Starling mechanism will be used as a case study. PMID:26779498

  6. Evidence for increased peroxidative activity in muscles from streptozotocin-diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lammi-Keefe, C.J.; Swan, P.B.; Hegarty, P.V.J.

    1984-05-01

    The ability of cardiac and skeletal muscles from diabetic rats to metabolize superoxide and hydrogen peroxide was determined by the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, respectively. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, 43 days old, were made diabetic with a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (70 mg/kg body weight). On the 80th day after injection the blood glucose concentration of these rats was increased fourfold, and the plasma insulin concentration was decreased four- to fivefold compared to controls. Body weights of male diabetic rats were 61% and those of female diabetic rats were 66% of their ad libitum-fed controls. The seven different skeletal muscles examined weighed less in the diabetic rats than in controls of the same age and body weight. Comparison to the body weight controls allowed the distinction of specific effects due to lack of insulin from effects due to retardation in muscle growth. Increased catalase activity in all muscles examined from diabetic rats (plantaris, gastrocnemius, and heart) suggested a response in catalase activity similar to that of starved rats. SOD activity was not altered in the diabetic rat skeletal muscles and erythrocytes, but was somewhat decreased in the heart.

  7. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Brenda M; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles E; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-06-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of a healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or "big questions" were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state of the art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repair. PMID:27280684

  8. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  9. Usefulness of cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices and implantable cardioverter defibrillators in the treatment of heart failure due to severe systolic dysfunction: systematic review of clinical trials and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    García García, M A; Rosero Arenas, M A; Ruiz Granell, R; Chorro Gascó, F J; Martínez Cornejo, A

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the effectiveness of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT), implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, and the combination of these devices (CRT+ICD) in adult patients with left ventricular dysfunction and symptomatic heart failure. Methods A comprehensive systematic review of randomised clinical trials was conducted. Several electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Ovid, Cochrane, ClinicalTrials.gov) were reviewed. The mortality rates between treatments were compared. A network was established comparing the various options, and direct, indirect and mixed comparisons were made using multivariate meta-regression. The degree of clinical and statistical homogeneity was assessed. Results 43 trials involving 13 017 patients were reviewed. Resynchronisation therapy, defibrillators, and combined devices (CRT+ICD) are clearly beneficial compared to optimal medical treatment, showing clear benefit in all of these cases. In a theoretical order of efficiency, the first option is combined therapy (CRT+ICD), the second is CRT, and the third is defibrillator implantation (ICD). Given the observational nature of these comparisons, and the importance of the overlapping CIs, we cannot state that the combined option (CRT+ICD) offers superior survival benefit compared to the other two options. Conclusions The combined option of CRT+ICD seems to be better than the option of CRT alone, although no clear improvement in survival was found for the combined option. It would be advisable to perform a direct comparative study of these two options. PMID:27326223

  10. Myosin filament 3D structure in mammalian cardiac muscle☆

    PubMed Central

    AL-Khayat, Hind A.; Morris, Edward P.; Kensler, Robert W.; Squire, John M.

    2008-01-01

    A number of cardiac myopathies (e.g. familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy) are linked to mutations in cardiac muscle myosin filament proteins, including myosin and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C). To understand the myopathies it is necessary to know the normal 3D structure of these filaments. We have carried out 3D single particle analysis of electron micrograph images of negatively stained isolated myosin filaments from rabbit cardiac muscle. Single filament images were aligned and divided into segments about 2 × 430 Å long, each of which was treated as an independent ‘particle’. The resulting 40 Å resolution 3D reconstruction showed both axial and azimuthal (no radial) myosin head perturbations within the 430 Å repeat, with successive crown rotations of approximately 60°, 60° and 0°, rather than the regular 40° for an unperturbed helix. However, it is shown that the projecting density peaks appear to start at low radius from origins closer to those expected for an unperturbed helical filament, and that the azimuthal perturbation especially increases with radius. The head arrangements in rabbit cardiac myosin filaments are very similar to those in fish skeletal muscle myosin filaments, suggesting a possible general structural theme for myosin filaments in all vertebrate striated muscles (skeletal and cardiac). PMID:18472277

  11. Expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and downstream muscle-specific proteins in ground squirrel skeletal and heart muscle during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    The thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) undergoes remarkable adaptive changes during hibernation. Interestingly, skeletal muscle remodelling occurs during the torpor-arousal cycle of hibernation to prevent net muscle loss despite inactivity. Reversible cardiomyocyte hypertrophy occurs in cardiac muscle, allowing the heart to preserve cardiac output during hibernation, while avoiding chronic maladaptive hypertrophy post-hibernation. We propose that calcium signalling proteins [calcineurin (Cn), calmodulin (CaM), and calpain], the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) family of transcription factors, and the NFAT targets myoferlin and myomaker contribute significantly to adaptations taking place in skeletal and cardiac muscle during hibernation. Protein-level analyses were performed over several conditions: euthermic room temperature (ER), euthermic cold room (EC), entrance into (EN), early (ET), and late torpor (LT) time points, in addition to early (EA), interbout (IA), and late arousal (LA) time points using immunoblotting and DNA-protein interaction (DPI) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAs). In skeletal and cardiac muscle, NFATc2 protein levels were elevated during torpor. NFATc4 increased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle in both tissues, and NFATc1 showed this trend in cardiac muscle only. NFATc3 showed an elevation in DNA-binding activity but not expression during torpor. Myoferlin protein levels dramatically increased during torpor in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Myomaker levels also increased significantly in cardiac muscle during torpor. Cardiac Cn levels remained stable, whereas CaM and calpain decreased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle. Activation and/or upregulation of NFATc2, c3, myoferlin, and myomaker at torpor could be part of a stress-response mechanism to preserve skeletal muscle mass, whereas CaM and calpain appear to initiate the rapid reversal of cardiac hypertrophy during arousal through

  12. Development of Bipotent Cardiac/Skeletal Myogenic Progenitors from MESP1+ Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sunny Sun-Kin; Hagen, Hannah R.; Swanson, Scott A.; Stewart, Ron; Boll, Karly A.; Aho, Joy; Thomson, James A.; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary The branchiomeric skeletal muscles co-evolved with new chambers of the heart to enable predatory feeding in chordates. These co-evolved tissues develop from a common population in anterior splanchnic mesoderm, referred to as cardiopharyngeal mesoderm (CPM). The regulation and development of CPM are poorly understood. We describe an embryonic stem cell-based system in which MESP1 drives a PDGFRA+ population with dual cardiac and skeletal muscle differentiation potential, and gene expression resembling CPM. Using this system, we investigate the regulation of these bipotent progenitors, and find that cardiac specification is governed by an antagonistic TGFβ-BMP axis, while skeletal muscle specification is enhanced by Rho kinase inhibition. We define transcriptional signatures of the first committed CPM-derived cardiac and skeletal myogenic progenitors, and discover surface markers to distinguish cardiac (PODXL+) from the skeletal muscle (CDH4+) CPM derivatives. These tools open an accessible window on this developmentally and evolutionarily important population. PMID:26771351

  13. The Effects That Cardiac Motion has on Coronary Hemodynamics and Catheter Trackability Forces for the Treatment of Coronary Artery Disease: An In Vitro Assessment.

    PubMed

    Morris, Liam; Fahy, Paul; Stefanov, Florian; Finn, Ronan

    2015-12-01

    The coronary arterial tree experiences large displacements due to the contraction and expansion of the cardiac muscle and may influence coronary haemodynamics and stent placement. The accurate measurement of catheter trackability forces within physiological relevant test systems is required for optimum catheter design. The effects of cardiac motion on coronary flowrates, pressure drops, and stent delivery has not been previously experimentally assessed. A cardiac simulator was designed and manufactured which replicates physiological coronary flowrates and cardiac motion within a patient-specific geometry. A motorized delivery system delivered a commercially available coronary stent system and monitored the trackability forces along three phantom patient-specific thin walled compliant coronary vessels supported by a dynamic cardiac phantom model. Pressure drop variation is more sensitive to cardiac motion than outlet flowrates. Maximum pressure drops varied from 7 to 49 mmHg for a stenosis % area reduction of 56 to 90%. There was a strong positive linear correlation of cumulative trackability force with the cumulative curvature. The maximum trackability forces and curvature ranged from 0.24 to 0.87 N and 0.06 to 0.22 mm(-1) respectively for all three vessels. There were maximum and average percentage differences in trackability forces of (23-49%) and (1.9-5.2%) respectively when comparing a static pressure case with the inclusion of pulsatile flow and cardiac motion. Cardiac motion with pulsatile flow significantly altered (p value <0.001) the trackability forces along the delivery pathways with high local percentage variations and pressure drop measurements.

  14. Group I fibers: pressor reflex and cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Decandia, G F; Decandia, M; Orani, G P

    1991-09-01

    Experiments were performed on cats to see whether stimulation of group I afferent fibers from gastrocnemius-soleus muscles induced changes in cardiac activity, in addition to the increase in systemic arterial pressure already established. The results show that the increase in arterial pressure is accompanied by an increase in systolic left ventricular pressure, without any significant changes in cardiac inotropism and chronotropism. It is concluded that the cardiac innervation is not an important efferent pathway of the pressor reflex evoked by stimulating group I afferent fibers, and that the reflex increase in arterial pressure depends mainly on an increase in peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:1742468

  15. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  16. Cardiac Extracellular Vesicles in Normal and Infarcted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    Heart is a complex assembly of many cell types constituting myocardium, endocardium and epicardium that intensively communicate to each other in order to maintain the proper cardiac function. There are many types of intercellular intracardiac signals, with a prominent role of extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, for long-distant delivering of complex messages. Cardiomyocytes release EVs, whose content could significantly vary depending on the stimulus. In stress, such as hypoxia, inflammation or injury, cardiomyocytes increase secretion of EVs. In hypoxic conditions, cardiac EVs are enriched with angiogenic and prosurvival factors. In acute myocardial infarction (AMI), damaged cardiac muscle cells produce EVs with increased content of angiogenic, anti-apoptotic, mitogenic and growth factors in order to induce repair and healing of the infarcted myocardium. Exosomal microRNAs play a central role in cardiac regeneration. In AMI, circulating cardiac EVs abundantly contain cardiac-specific miRNAs that serve as indicators of cardiac damage and have a big diagnostic potential as AMI biomarkers. Cardioprotective and regenerative properties of exosomes derived from cardiac and non-cardiac stem/progenitor cells are very helpful to be used in cell-free cardiotherapy and regeneration of post-infarct myocardium. PMID:26742038

  17. Micromachined muscle cell analysis chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijie; Li, Paul C. H.; Parameswaran, M.

    2000-10-01

    We report the fabrication of a microfluidic biochip integrated with an acoustic wave sensor that can be used to characterize the contraction of single cardiac (heart) muscle cells. The work will lead to rapid analysis of single muscle cells in response to various drugs by determining changes in mass and viscoelastic properties during cell contraction and relaxation. The microfabricated device is a combination of a top cover plate which is a glass substrate containing etched channels and a bottom plate which is an AT-cut quartz crystal with excitation electrodes. The glass plate is micromachined with a network of channels and chambers, which is intended for delivery of fluids, selection and retention of single muscle cells. The bottom plate (quartz crystal) comprises all the patterned electrodes for acoustic wave launching and detection. The quartz plate is operated in the thickness-shear acoustic wave mode.

  18. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle growth, protein metabolism, and amino acid metabolism were studied in various groups of rats. Certain groups were adrenaliectomized; some rats were suspended while others (the controls) were weight bearing. Results show that: (1) metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating glucocorticoids; (2) metabolic changes in the soleus muscle due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of steroid receptors; and (3) not all metabolic responses of the soleus muscle to unloading are due to the elevated levels of glucocorticoids or the increased sensitivity of this muscle to these hormones.

  19. Computational approaches to understand cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Byron N.; Yang, Pei-Chi; Behrens, Steven B.; Moreno, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. These impulses spread throughout the cardiac muscle to manifest as electrical waves in the whole heart. Regularity of electrical waves is critically important since they signal the heart muscle to contract, driving the primary function of the heart to act as a pump and deliver blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. For more than 50 years, mathematically based models of cardiac electrical activity have been used to improve understanding of basic mechanisms of normal and abnormal cardiac electrical function. Computer-based modeling approaches to understand cardiac activity are uniquely helpful because they allow for distillation of complex emergent behaviors into the key contributing components underlying them. Here we review the latest advances and novel concepts in the field as they relate to understanding the complex interplay between electrical, mechanical, structural, and genetic mechanisms during arrhythmia development at the level of ion channels, cells, and tissues. We also discuss the latest computational approaches to guiding arrhythmia therapy. PMID:22886409

  20. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient's cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  1. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  2. Cardiac changes due to electronic control devices? A computer-based analysis of electrical effects at the human heart caused by an ECD pulse applied to the body's exterior.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Sebastian N; Aronshtam, Julia; Tränkler, Hans-Rolf; Kraus, Sybille; Graw, Matthias; Peschel, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    Electronic control devices (ECDs) deliver high-voltage, low-current energy pulses temporarily paralyzing a person. For the ECD-human interaction, we have developed a computer model using the SEMCAD program within which to simulate the electrical effects throughout the body resulting from the imposition of an ECD pulse at a particular point on the body surface. Our human body models were based on cross-sectional MRIs and CT scans, with the dielectric properties of the various tissues assigned based on previously published values. We simulated the application of a single ECD pulse and calculated the resulting electric field strength and current and charge densities at different body locations. The results were compared with corresponding values obtained by other researchers in similar simulations. Furthermore, we simulated an application of a pulse of 20-millisecond duration equal to the European household current of 50 Hz and to the ventricular fibrillation threshold. The resulting current level indicated at the heart muscle was 1/5 the level considered the threshold for triggering ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24712742

  3. Non-coding RNAs in cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanli; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Developing new therapeutic strategies which could enhance cardiomyocyte regenerative capacity is of significant clinical importance. Though promising, methods to promote cardiac regeneration have had limited success due to the weak regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian heart. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), are functional RNA molecules without a protein coding function that have been reported to engage in cardiac regeneration and repair. In light of current regenerative strategies, the regulatory effects of ncRNAs can be categorized as follows: cardiac proliferation, cardiac differentiation, cardiac survival and cardiac reprogramming. miR-590, miR-199a, miR-17-92 cluster, miR302-367 cluster and miR-222 have been reported to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation while miR-1 and miR-133 suppress that. miR-499 and miR-1 promote the differentiation of cardiac progenitors into cardiomyocyte while miR-133 and H19 inhibit that. miR-21, miR-24, miR-221, miR-199a and miR-155 improve cardiac survival while miR-34a, miR-1 and miR-320 exhibit opposite effects. miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499 are capable of reprogramming fibroblasts to cardiomyocyte-like cells and miR-284, miR-302, miR-93, miR-106b and lncRNA-ST8SIA3 are able to enhace cardiac reprogramming. Exploring non-coding RNA-based methods to enhance cardiac regeneration would be instrumental for devising new effective therapies against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26462179

  4. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  5. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  6. Cardiac deformation recovery via incompressible transformation decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrinjar, Oskar; Bistoque, Arnaud

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a method for automated deformation recovery of the left and right ventricular wall from a time sequence of anatomical images of the heart. The deformation is recovered within the heart wall, i.e. it is not limited only to the epicardium and endocardium. Most of the suggested methods either ignore or approximately model incompressibility of the heart wall. This physical property of the cardiac muscle is mathematically guaranteed to be satisfied by the proposed method. A scheme for decomposition of a complex incompressible geometric transformation into simpler components and its application to cardiac deformation recovery is presented. A general case as well as an application specific solution is discussed. Furthermore, the manipulation of the constructed incompressible transformations, including the computation of the inverse transformation, is computationally inexpensive. The presented method is mathematically guaranteed to generate incompressible transformations which are experimentally shown to be a very good approximation of actual cardiac deformations. The transformation representation has a relatively small number of parameters which leads to a fast deformation recovery. The approach was tested on six sequences of two-dimensional short-axis cardiac MR images. The cardiac deformation was recovered with an average error of 1.1 pixel. The method is directly extendable to three dimensions and to the entire heart.

  7. Biomarkers for cardiac cachexia: reality or utopia.

    PubMed

    Martins, Telma; Vitorino, Rui; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-09-25

    Cardiac cachexia is a serious complication of chronic heart failure, characterized by significant weight loss and body wasting. Chronic heart failure-related muscle wasting results from a chronic imbalance in the activation of anabolic or catabolic pathways, caused by a series of immunological, metabolic, and neurohormonal processes. In spite of the high morbidity and mortality associated to this condition, there is no universally accepted definition or specific biomarkers for cardiac cachexia, which makes its diagnosis and treatment difficult. Several hormonal, inflammatory and oxidative stress molecules have been proposed as serological markers of prognosis in cardiac cachexia but with doubtful success. As individual biomarkers may have limited sensitivity and specificity, multimarker strategies involving mediators of the biological processes modulated by cardiac cachexia will strongly contribute for the diagnosis and management of the disease, as well as for the establishment of new therapeutic targets. An integrated analysis of the biomarkers proposed so far for cardiac cachexia is made in the present review, highlighting the biological processes to which they are related.

  8. Biomarkers for cardiac cachexia: reality or utopia.

    PubMed

    Martins, Telma; Vitorino, Rui; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-09-25

    Cardiac cachexia is a serious complication of chronic heart failure, characterized by significant weight loss and body wasting. Chronic heart failure-related muscle wasting results from a chronic imbalance in the activation of anabolic or catabolic pathways, caused by a series of immunological, metabolic, and neurohormonal processes. In spite of the high morbidity and mortality associated to this condition, there is no universally accepted definition or specific biomarkers for cardiac cachexia, which makes its diagnosis and treatment difficult. Several hormonal, inflammatory and oxidative stress molecules have been proposed as serological markers of prognosis in cardiac cachexia but with doubtful success. As individual biomarkers may have limited sensitivity and specificity, multimarker strategies involving mediators of the biological processes modulated by cardiac cachexia will strongly contribute for the diagnosis and management of the disease, as well as for the establishment of new therapeutic targets. An integrated analysis of the biomarkers proposed so far for cardiac cachexia is made in the present review, highlighting the biological processes to which they are related. PMID:24978823

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Kahlfuß, Sascha; Flieger, Robert Rainer; Roepke, Torsten Kai; Yilmaz, Kadir

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac echinococcosis is a rare manifestation of cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus Among all patients suffering from CE, only 0.5%-2% exhibit a cardiac involvement. In addition, during the past years the number of CE cases reported in Western Europe remained roughly unchanged. However, we postulate that cases of CE in Western Europe will increase due to a growing number of refugees coming from endemic areas such as Southern Europe, Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Importantly, although cardiac echinococcosis is rare the disease can lead to many clinical complications, for instance acute heart failure and life-threatening arrhythmias. With respect to the increasing relevance of cardiac echinococcosis in Western Europe and the danger of fulminant disease courses, here we review diagnosis strategies and treatment options of the disease. Diagnosis of cardiac echinococcosis requires a detailed evaluation of the patients' case history, specific laboratory analyses and radiological imaging methods. Ultrasound, MRI and CT are key imaging tools for diagnosis, therapy control, prognosis estimation and disease course control. For the therapy of cardiac echinococcosis, a combination of surgical removal and drug treatment should be applied to symptomatic as well as asymptomatic patients. The complete surgical removal of the cyst(s) is the major prognosis factor of the cardiac manifestation of CE. PMID:27199228

  10. Interplay between the effects of a Protein Kinase C phosphomimic (T204E) and a dilated cardiomyopathy mutation (K211Δ or R206W) in rat cardiac troponin T blunts the magnitude of muscle length-mediated crossbridge recruitment against the β-myosin heavy chain background.

    PubMed

    Michael, John Jeshurun; Gollapudi, Sampath K; Chandra, Murali

    2016-06-01

    Failing hearts of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)-patients reveal systolic dysfunction and upregulation of several Protein Kinase C (PKC) isoforms. Recently, we demonstrated that the functional effects of T204E, a PKC phosphomimic of cardiac troponin T (TnT), were differently modulated by α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. Therefore, we hypothesized that the interplay between the effects of T204E and a DCM-linked mutation (K211Δ or R206W) in TnT would modulate contractile parameters linked-to systolic function in an MHC-dependent manner. To test our hypothesis, five TnT variants (wildtype, K211Δ, K211Δ + T204E, R206W, and R206W + T204E) were generated and individually reconstituted into demembranated cardiac muscle fibers from normal (α-MHC) and propylthiouracil-treated (β-MHC) rats. Steady-state and mechano-dynamic measurements were performed on reconstituted fibers. Myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity (pCa50) was decreased by both K211Δ and R206W to a greater extent in α-MHC fibers (~0.15 pCa units) than in β-MHC fibers (~0.06 pCa units). However, T204E exacerbated the attenuating influence of both mutants on pCa50 only in β-MHC fibers. Moreover, the magnitude of muscle length (ML)-mediated crossbridge (XB) recruitment was decreased by K211Δ + T204E (~47 %), R206W (~34 %), and R206W + T204E (~36 %) only in β-MHC fibers. In relevance to human hearts, which predominantly express β-MHC, our data suggest that the interplay between the effects of DCM mutations, PKC phosphomimic in TnT, and β-MHC lead to systolic dysfunction by attenuating pCa50 and the magnitude of ML-mediated XB recruitment. PMID:27411801

  11. Assessment of cardiac function using myocardial perfusion imaging technique on SPECT with 99mTc sestamibi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, M. R. A.; Nazir, F.; Pawiro, S. A.; Soejoko, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Suspicion on coronary heart disease can be confirmed by observing the function of left ventricle cardiac muscle with Myocardial Perfusion Imaging techniques. The function perfusion itself is indicated by the uptake of radiopharmaceutical tracer. The 31 patients were studied undergoing the MPI examination on Gatot Soebroto Hospital using 99mTc-sestamibi radiopharmaceutical with stress and rest conditions. Stress was stimulated by physical exercise or pharmacological agent. After two hours, the patient did rest condition on the same day. The difference of uptake percentage between stress and rest conditions will be used to determine the malfunction of perfusion due to ischemic or infarct. Degradation of cardiac function was determined based on the image-based assessment of five segments of left ventricle cardiac. As a result, 8 (25.8%) patients had normal myocardial perfusion and 11 (35.5%) patients suspected for having partial ischemia. Total ischemia occurred to 8 (25.8%) patients with reversible and irreversible ischemia and the remaining 4 (12.9%) patients for partial infarct with characteristic the percentage of perfusion ≤50%. It is concluded that MPI technique of image-based assessment on uptake percentage difference between stress and rest conditions can be employed to predict abnormal perfusion as complementary information to diagnose the cardiac function.

  12. Impact of an environmental relevant concentration of 17α-ethinylestradiol on the cardiac function of bullfrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Salla, Raquel F; Gamero, Fernando U; Rissoli, Rafael Z; Dal-Medico, Samuel E; Castanho, Luciano Mendes; Carvalho, Cleoni dos Santos; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine C M; Kalinin, Ana L; Abdalla, Fabio C; Costa, Monica J

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated if a concentration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2 - 10 ng L(-1) for 96 h) normally found in Brazilian surface waters exerts any impact on cardiac function of bullfrog tadpoles (25 Gosner stage), Lithobates catesbeianus. During exposure, the animals' activity level (AL -% of active individuals) was monitored twice a day. Then, the in loco heart rate (f(H) - bpm) was determined, as well as the relative ventricular mass (RVM - % of body mass). Afterwards, cardiac ventricles were mounted for isometric force recordings (CS - mN mm(-2)), and determination of the cardiac pumping capacity (CPC - mN mm(-2) min(-1)). EE2 did not affect tadpoles' AL, although it resulted in a tachycardia in animals exposed to EE2 (f(H) = 66 bpm) when compared to controls (f(H) = 52 bpm), suggesting that EE2 acts directly on the cardiac muscle of tadpoles, rather than being a result of an increased cardiac demand due to a higher activity level (i.e., avoidance response). Additionally, EE2 exerted a positive inotropic response, which resulted in a higher CPC, which occurred independently of an increase in the number of myofibrils of EE2-exposed animals, since RVM remained similar between experimental groups. Thus, the increase on cardiac demand induced by the exposure to EE2 elevates considerably the animal energy expenditure, diverting a large amount of energy that tadpoles could use for their growth and development. These alterations can make amphibians more susceptible to predators and reduce the likelihood to reach reproductive stage. PMID:26539711

  13. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  14. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  15. Cardiac cachexia: hic et nunc.

    PubMed

    Loncar, Goran; Springer, Jochen; Anker, Markus; Doehner, Wolfram; Lainscak, Mitja

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac cachexia (CC) is the clinical entity at the end of the chronic natural course of heart failure (HF). Despite the efforts, even the most recent definition of cardiac cachexia has been challenged, more precisely, the addition of new criteria on top of obligatory weight loss. The pathophysiology of CC is complex and multifactorial. A better understanding of pathophysiological pathways in body wasting will contribute to establish potentially novel treatment strategies. The complex biochemical network related with CC and HF pathophysiology underlines that a single biomarker cannot reflect all of the features of the disease. Biomarkers that could pick up the changes in body composition before they convey into clinical manifestations of CC would be of great importance. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against cachexia, sarcopenia, and wasting disorders is perceived as an urgent need by healthcare professionals. The treatment of body wasting remains an unresolved challenge to this day. As CC is a multifactorial disorder, it is unlikely that any single agent will be completely effective in treating this condition. Among all investigated therapeutic strategies, aerobic exercise training in HF patients is the most proved to counteract skeletal muscle wasting and is recommended by treatment guidelines for HF. PMID:27386168

  16. Cardiac cachexia: hic et nunc.

    PubMed

    Loncar, Goran; Springer, Jochen; Anker, Markus; Doehner, Wolfram; Lainscak, Mitja

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac cachexia (CC) is the clinical entity at the end of the chronic natural course of heart failure (HF). Despite the efforts, even the most recent definition of cardiac cachexia has been challenged, more precisely, the addition of new criteria on top of obligatory weight loss. The pathophysiology of CC is complex and multifactorial. A bette