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Sample records for cardiac output determined

  1. Cardiac output determinations with ear piece densitometry.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, G; Schildt, B

    1975-01-01

    The results of cardiac output determinations by a dye dilution technique were compared using (a) a dichromatic earpiece which was calibrated as a flow-through cuvette, but also permitted automatic computing by virtue of a pressure capsule, and (b) an ordinary flow-through densitometer. Eleven subjects, some with cardio-pulmonary disease, were investigated. Cardiac outputs were systematically overestimated when automatically computed. The results obtained by manual calculation with the ear-piece corresponded more nearly with those derived from the flow-through cuvette, but still with a deviation from the identity line and with a residual standard deviation of 0.8 l/min. Double determinations had a residual standard deviation of 0.7 l/min. Despite its ease of handling, an earpiece densitometer seems to be too unreliable to be suitable for routine use.

  2. Methods and apparatus for determining cardiac output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Mukkamala, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for determining a dynamical property of the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree using long time scale information, i.e., information obtained from measurements over time scales greater than a single cardiac cycle. In one aspect, the invention provides a method and apparatus for monitoring cardiac output (CO) from a single blood pressure signal measurement obtained at any site in the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree or from any related measurement including, for example, fingertip photoplethysmography.According to the method the time constant of the arterial tree, defined to be the product of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) and the nearly constant arterial compliance, is determined by analyzing the long time scale variations (greater than a single cardiac cycle) in any of these blood pressure signals. Then, according to Ohm's law, a value proportional to CO may be determined from the ratio of the blood pressure signal to the estimated time constant. The proportional CO values derived from this method may be calibrated to absolute CO, if desired, with a single, absolute measure of CO (e.g., thermodilution). The present invention may be applied to invasive radial arterial blood pressure or pulmonary arterial blood pressure signals which are routinely measured in intensive care units and surgical suites or to noninvasively measured peripheral arterial blood pressure signals or related noninvasively measured signals in order to facilitate the clinical monitoring of CO as well as TPR.

  3. Comparison of three methods for cardiac output determination in cats.

    PubMed

    Dyson, D H; Allen, D G; McDonell, W N

    1985-12-01

    Cardiac output (CO) was measured in sodium pentobarbital-anesthetized cats over a wide range of blood flow rates. In 10 cats, CO was measured simultaneously, using Fick determination and thermodilution techniques. Echocardiography was used to estimate contractility of the heart by measuring percentage change in minor diameter and velocity of circumferential fiber shortening. These indices were compared with CO by the other techniques. Echocardiographic equations used for CO determination in man were evaluated for reliability in the cat. Thermodilution and Fick determination correlated best with low CO (r = 0.89) and less with intermediate (r = 0.69) and high (r = 0.75) CO. Percentage change in minor diameter and velocity of circumferential fiber shortening correlated with thermodilution measurements of the cardiac index (r = 0.71 and r = 0.84, respectively). The value of echocardiography for CO estimation was questionable, using existing equations. Fick determination of CO was more inconsistent and was more prone to technical error than was thermodilution.

  4. Comparison of cardiac output determined by bioimpedance and bioreactance methods at rest and during exercise.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Moore, Sarah; Hallsworth, Kate; Fattakhova, Gulnar; Thoma, Christian; Trenell, Michael I

    2012-04-01

    Bioreactance is a novel non-invasive method for cardiac output measurement that involves the analysis of blood flow-dependent changes in the phase shifts of electrical currents applied across the chest. The present study (1) compared resting and exercise cardiac outputs determined by bioreactance and bioimpedance methods and those estimated from measured oxygen consumption, (2) determined the relationship between cardiac output and oxygen consumption, and (3) assessed the agreement between the bioreactance and bioimpedance methods. Twelve healthy subjects (aged 30 ± 4 years) performed graded cardiopulmonary exercise test on a recumbent cycle ergometer on two occasions, 1 week apart. Cardiac output was monitored at rest, at 30, 50, 70, 90, 150 W and at peak exercise intensity by bioreactance and bioimpedance and expired gases collected. Resting cardiac output was not significantly different between the bioreactance and bioimpedance methods (6.2 ± 1.4 vs. 6.5 ± 1.4 l min(-1), P = 0.42). During exercise cardiac outputs were correlated with oxygen uptake for both bioreactance (r = 0.84, P < 0.01) and bioimpedance techniques (r = 0.82, P < 0.01). At peak exercise bioimpedance estimated significantly lower cardiac outputs than both bioreactance and theoretically calculated cardiac output (14.3 ± 2.6 vs. 17.5 ± 5.2 vs. 16.9 ± 4.9 l min(-1), P < 0.05). Bland-Altman analyses including data from rest and exercise demonstrated that the bioimpedance method reported ~1.5 l min(-1) lower cardiac output than bioreactance with lower and upper limits of agreement of -2.98 to 5.98 l min(-1). Bioimpedance and bioreactance methods provide different cardiac output estimates, particularly at high exercise intensity, and therefore the two methods cannot be used interchangeably. In contrast with bioimpedance, bioreactance cardiac outputs are similar to those estimated from measured oxygen consumption.

  5. The precision of a special purpose analog computer in clinical cardiac output determination.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, F J; Mroz, E A; Miller, R E

    1975-01-01

    Three hundred dye-dilution curves taken during our first year of clinical experience with the Waters CO-4 cardiac output computer were analyzed to estimate the errors involved in its use. Provided that calibration is accurate and 5.0 mg of dye are injected for each curve, then the percentage standard deviation of measurement using this computer is about 8.7%. Included in this are the errors inherent in the computer, errors due to baseline drift, errors in the injection of dye and acutal variation of cardiac output over a series of successive determinations. The size of this error is comparable to that involved in manual calculation. The mean value of five successive curves will be within 10% of the real value in 99 cases out of 100. Advances in methodology and equipment are discussed which make calibration simpler and more accurate, and which should also improve the quality of computer determination. A list of suggestions is given to minimize the errors involved in the clinical use of this equipment. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1089394

  6. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans: insight from atrial pacing.

    PubMed

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H; Saltin, B; Mortensen, S P

    2012-04-15

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral vasodilatation in the regulation of cardiac output during steady-state exercise, we measured central and peripheral haemodynamics in 10 healthy male subjects, with and without atrial pacing (100–150 beats min(−1)) during: (i) resting conditions, (ii) one-legged knee extensor exercise (24 W) and (iii) femoral arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P < 0.05), whereas cerebral perfusion remained unchanged. During atrial pacing increasing heart rate by up to 54 beats min(−1), cardiac output did not change in any of the three conditions, because of a parallel decrease in stroke volume (P < 0.01). Atrial pacing increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) at rest and during ATP infusion (P < 0.05), whereas MAP remained unchanged during exercise. Atrial pacing lowered central venous pressure (P < 0.05) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (P < 0.05) in all conditions, whereas it did not affect pulmonary mean arterial pressure. Atrial pacing lowered the left ventricular contractility index (dP/dt) (P < 0.05) in all conditions and plasma noradrenaline levels at rest (P < 0.05), but not during exercise and ATP infusion. These results demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output.

  7. Noninvasive cardiac output determination for children by the inert gas-rebreathing method.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Gesa; Kerst, Gunter; Baden, Winfried; Hofbeck, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Standard methods for determination of cardiac output (CO) are either invasive or technically demanding. Measurement of CO by the inert gas-rebreathing (IGR) method, applied successfully in adults, uses a low-concentration mixture of an inert and a blood-soluble gas, respectively. This study tested the feasibility of this method for determining CO during exercise for pediatric patients with complete congenital atrioventricular block (CCAVB) stimulated with a VVI pacemaker. In this study, 5 CCAVB patients (age 9.2-17.4 years) were compared with 10 healthy age-matched boys and girls. Testing was performed with the Innocor system. The patients were instructed to breathe the test gas from a closed system. Pulmonary blood flow was calculated according to the washout of the soluble gas component. During standardized treadmill testing, CO was determined at three defined levels. The CO measurements were successful for all the study participants. The patients reached a lower peak CO than the control subjects (5.9 l/min/m(2) vs 7.3 [boys] and 7.2 [girls]). The stroke volume increase under exercise also was reduced in the patients compared with the control subjects. The feasibility of the IGR method for exercise CO testing in children was documented. Application of the IGR method for children requires careful instruction of the patients and appears restricted to subjects older than 8 years. The method offers new insights into mechanisms of cardiovascular adaptation in children with congenital heart disease.

  8. Validation and application of single breath cardiac output determinations in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Fletcher, E. R.; Myhre, L. G.; Luft, U. C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a procedure for estimating cardiac output by a single-breath technique (Qsb), obtained in healthy males during supine rest and during exercise on a bicycle ergometer, were compared with the results on cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick method (QF). The single breath maneuver consisted of a slow exhalation to near residual volume following an inspiration somewhat deeper than normal. The Qsb calculations incorporated an equation of the CO2 dissociation curve and a 'moving spline' sequential curve-fitting technique to calculate the instantaneous R from points on the original expirogram. The resulting linear regression equation indicated a 24-percent underestimation of QF by the Qsb technique. After applying a correction, the Qsb-QF relationship was improved. A subsequent study during upright rest and exercise to 80 percent of VO2(max) in 6 subjects indicated a close linear relationship between Qsb and VO2 for all 95 values obtained, with slope and intercept close to those in published studies in which invasive cardiac output measurements were used.

  9. Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement is preserved with lifelong endurance training and is the main determinant of maximal cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Boushel, Robert C; Calbet, José A; Åkeson, Per; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2015-12-01

    Age-related decline in cardiac function can be prevented or postponed by lifelong endurance training. However, effects of normal ageing as well as of lifelong endurance exercise on longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine resting longitudinal and radial pumping in elderly athletes, sedentary elderly and young sedentary subjects. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate determinants of maximal cardiac output in elderly. Eight elderly athletes (63 ± 4 years), seven elderly sedentary (66 ± 4 years) and ten young sedentary subjects (29 ± 4 years) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. All subjects underwent maximal exercise testing and for elderly subjects maximal cardiac output during cycling was determined using a dye dilution technique. Longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume did not differ between groups (longitudinal left ventricle (LV) 52-65%, P = 0.12, right ventricle (RV) 77-87%, P = 0.16, radial 7.9-8.6%, P = 1.0). Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement (LVAVPD) was higher in elderly athletes and young sedentary compared with elderly sedentary subjects (14 ± 3, 15 ± 2 and 11 ± 1 mm, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no difference between groups for RVAVPD (P = 0.2). LVAVPD was an independent predictor of maximal cardiac output (R(2) = 0.61, P < 0.01, β = 0.78). Longitudinal and radial contributions to stroke volume did not differ between groups. However, how longitudinal pumping was achieved differed; elderly athletes and young sedentary subjects showed similar AVPD whereas this was significantly lower in elderly sedentary subjects. Elderly sedentary subjects achieved longitudinal pumping through increased short-axis area of the ventricle. Large AVPD was a determinant of maximal cardiac output and exercise capacity.

  10. Cardiac output after burn injury.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.; Shakespeare, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output after burn injury has been measured by the non-invasive method of impedance plethysmography. An initial study of 143 normal subjects was undertaken in order to investigate variations in cardiac output with age. Fifteen patients were monitored during resuscitation after extensive burns. Fourteen patients showed a depression of stroke volume below the lower limits of the normal range, derived from the initial study on normal people. PMID:6691694

  11. Mathematics and the Heart: Understanding Cardiac Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champanerkar, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    This paper illustrates a biological application of the concepts of relative change and area under a curve, from mathematics. We study two biological measures "relative change in cardiac output" and "cardiac output", which are predictors of heart blockages and other related ailments. Cardiac output refers to the quantity of…

  12. Assessment of cardiac output from noninvasive determination of arterial pressure profile in subjects at rest.

    PubMed

    Antonutto, G; Girardis, M; Tuniz, D; Petri, E; Capelli, C

    1994-01-01

    The stroke volume of the left ventricle (SV) was calculated from noninvasive recordings of the arterial pressure using a finger photoplethysmograph and compared to the values obtained by pulsed Doppler echocardiography (PDE). A group of 19 healthy men and 12 women [mean ages: 20.8 (SD 1.6) and 22.2 (SD 1.6) years respectively] were studied at rest in the supine position. The ratio of the area below the ejection phase of the arterial pressure wave (A(s)) to SV, as obtained by PDE, yielded a "calibration factor" dimensionally equal to the hydraulic impedance of the system (Zao = A(s).SV-1). The Zao amounted on average to 0.062 (SD 0.018) mmHg.s.cm-3 for the men and to 0.104 (SD 0.024) mmHg.s.cm-3 for the women. The Zao was also estimated from the equation: Zao = a.(d + b.HR + c.PP + e.MAP)-1, where HR was the heart rate, PP the pulse pressure, MAP the mean arterial pressure and the coefficients of the equation were obtained by an iterating statistical package. The value of Zao thus obtained allowed the calculation of SV from measurements derived from the photoplethysmograph only. The mean percentage error between the SV thus obtained and those experimentally determined by PDE amounted to 14.8 and 15.6 for the men and the women, respectively. The error of the estimate was reduced to 12.3 and to 11.1, respectively, if the factor Zao, experimentally obtained from a given heart beat, was subsequently applied to other beats to obtain SV from the A(s) measurement in the same subject.

  13. Seasonal variations of cardiac output in rats.

    PubMed

    Back, G; Strubelt, O

    1975-11-15

    Cardiac output of rats shows seasonal variations with low values in spring and summer and high ones in autumn and winter. The stroke volume was much more implicated in these changes than the heart rate. The seasonal changes of cardiac output are probably due to changes of thyroid function.

  14. Cardiac output measurement in pediatric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Skowno, Justin J; Broadhead, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Maintenance of cardiovascular stability is crucial to safe anesthetic practice, but measurement of cardiac output has been technically challenging, particularly in pediatric patients. Cardiovascular monitoring has therefore generally relied upon pressure-based measurements, as opposed to flow-based measurements. The measurement of cardiac output under anesthesia and in critical care has recently become easier as a result of new techniques of measurement. This article reviews the basic concepts of and rationale for cardiac output monitoring, and then describes the techniques available for monitoring in clinical practice.

  15. Methods in pharmacology: measurement of cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Geerts, Bart F; Aarts, Leon P; Jansen, Jos R

    2011-01-01

    Many methods of cardiac output measurement have been developed, but the number of methods useful for human pharmacological studies is limited. The ‘holy grail’ for the measurement of cardiac output would be a method that is accurate, precise, operator independent, fast responding, non-invasive, continuous, easy to use, cheap and safe. This method does not exist today. In this review on cardiac output methods used in pharmacology, the Fick principle, indicator dilution techniques, arterial pulse contour analysis, ultrasound and bio-impedance are reviewed. PMID:21284692

  16. The 24 h pattern of arterial pressure in mice is determined mainly by heart rate‐driven variation in cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Theodore W.; Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have systematically investigated whether daily patterns of arterial blood pressure over 24 h are mediated by changes in cardiac output, peripheral resistance, or both. Understanding the hemodynamic mechanisms that determine the 24 h patterns of blood pressure may lead to a better understanding of how such patterns become disturbed in hypertension and influence risk for cardiovascular events. In conscious, unrestrained C57BL/6J mice, we investigated whether the 24 h pattern of arterial blood pressure is determined by variation in cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, or both and also whether variations in cardiac output are mediated by variations in heart rate and or stroke volume. As expected, arterial pressure and locomotor activity were significantly (P < 0.05) higher during the nighttime period compared with the daytime period when mice are typically sleeping (+12.5 ± 1.0 mmHg, [13%] and +7.7 ± 1.3 activity counts, [254%], respectively). The higher arterial pressure during the nighttime period was mediated by higher cardiac output (+2.6 ± 0.3 mL/min, [26%], P < 0.05) in association with lower peripheral resistance (−1.5 ± 0.3 mmHg/mL/min, [−13%] P < 0.05). The increased cardiac output during the nighttime was mainly mediated by increased heart rate (+80.0 ± 16.5 beats/min, [18%] P < 0.05), as stroke volume increased minimally at night (+1.6 ± 0.5 μL per beat, [6%] P < 0.05). These results indicate that in C57BL/6J mice, the 24 h pattern of blood pressure is hemodynamically mediated primarily by the 24 h pattern of cardiac output which is almost entirely determined by the 24 h pattern of heart rate. These findings suggest that the differences in blood pressure between nighttime and daytime are mainly driven by differences in heart rate which are strongly correlated with differences in locomotor activity. PMID:25428952

  17. Can stroke volume and cardiac output be determined reliably in a tilt-table test using the pulse contour method?

    PubMed

    Nieminen, T; Kööbi, T; Turjanmaa, V

    2000-11-01

    The applicability of the finger pressure-derived pulse contour (PC) technique was evaluated in the measurement of stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and their changes in different phases of the tilt-table test. The reference method was whole-body impedance cardiography (ICG). A total number of 40 physically active patients, aged 41 +/- 19 years, were randomly chosen from a pool of 230. Specifically speaking, 20 of the patients experienced (pre)syncope (tilt+ patients) during the head-up tilt (HUT), and 20 did not (tilt-). A total number of three measurement periods, 30-60 s each, were analysed: supine position, 5 min after the commencement of HUT, and 1 min before set down. SV and CO values measured by PC underestimated significantly those measured by ICG (biases +/- SD 19 +/- 14 ml and 1.55 +/- 1.14 l min-1, respectively) in agreement with earlier reports. The bias between the methods was almost the same in the different phases of the test. However, the SD of the bias was bigger for tilt+ (P < 0.05). When the bias between the methods was eliminated by scaling the first measurement to 100%, the agreement between the methods in the second and third measurements was clearly better than without scaling. Both methods showed a physiological drop in SV after the commencement of HUT. These results indicate that PC suffices in tracking the changes in CO and SV, but for absolute values it is not reliable.

  18. A computerised dichromatic earpiece densitometer for the measurement of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P S; Crowther, A; Jenkins, B S; Webb-Peploe, M M; Coltart, D J

    1979-07-01

    This study assesses a precalibrated dichromatic earpiece densitometer and microprocessor for the measurement of cardiac output by indocyanine green dye dilution. The measured cardiac output is compared with values of cardiac output simultaneously determined using a cuvette densitometer. The microprocessor computation of cardiac output agreed very closely with the cardiac output determined by manual calculation from the same dye dilution curves (standard deviation +/- 1.47%). The reproducibility of the earpiece densitometer (standard deviation +/- 5.2%) was virtually identical to that of the cuvette densitometer (+/- 5.3%). In a comparison of earpiece and cuvette densitometers for 60 measurements of cardiac output following pulmonary arterial injection of dye and for 50 measurements following femoral venous injection of dye, correlation coefficients were 0.83 and 0.78 and the standard deviations of the differences of simultaneous measurements were 7.2% and 8.3% respectively. The instrument offers an accurate reproducible and relatively noninvasive technique for measuring cardiac output.

  19. Pathophysiology of Post-Operative Low Cardiac Output Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Epting, Conrad L; McBride, Mary E; Wald, Eric L; Costello, John M

    2016-01-01

    Low cardiac output syndrome frequently complicates the post-operative care of infants and children following cardiac surgery. The onset of low cardiac output follows a predictable course in the hours following cardiopulmonary bypass, as myocardial performance declines in the face of an elevated demand for cardiac output. When demand outstrips supply, shock ensues, and early recognition and intervention can decrease mortality. Multifactorial in etiology, this article will discuss the pathophysiology of low cardiac output syndrome, including myocardial depression following bypass, altered cardiac loading conditions, and inflammation driving a hypermetabolic state. Contributions from altered neurohormonal, thyroid, and adrenal axes will also be discussed. Sources included the clinical experiences of four cardiac intensivists, supported throughout by primary sources and relevant reviews obtained through PubMed searches and from seminal textbooks in the field. This article addresses the second of eight topics comprising the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery".

  20. Evaluation of noninvasive exercise cardiac output determination in chronic heart failure patients: a proposal of a new diagnostic and prognostic method.

    PubMed

    Cattadori, Gaia; Salvioni, Elisabetta; Gondoni, Erica; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (VO2) and various parameters of cardiopulmonary response to exercise are of important prognostic value in chronic heart failure patients. However, all the available parameters only indirectly reflect left-ventricular dysfunction and hemodynamic adaptation to an increased demand. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac output, especially during an incremental exercise test, would allow the direct measurement of cardiac reserve and may become the gold standard for prognostic evaluation of chronic heart failure patients.

  1. The Impact of Direct Cardiac Output Determination On Using A Widely Available Direct Continuous Oxygen Consumption Measuring Device On The Hemodynamic Assessment of Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Fanari, Zaher; Grove, Matthew; Rajamanickam, Anitha; Hammami, Sumaya; Walls, Cassie; Kolm, Paul; Saltzberg, Mitchell; Weintraub, William S.; Doorey, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate assessment of cardiac output (CO) is essential for the hemodynamic assessment of aortic valve area (AVA). Estimation of oxygen consumption (VO2) and Thermodilution (TD) is employed in many cardiac catheterization laboratories (CCL) given the historically cumbersome nature of direct continuous VO2 measurement, the “gold standard” for this technique. A portable facemask device simplifies the direct continuous measurement of VO2, allowing for relatively rapid and continuous assessment of CO and AVA. Methods and Materials Seventeen consecutive patients undergoing right heart catheterization had simultaneous determination of CO by both direct continuous and assumed VO2 and TD. Assessments were only made when a plateau of VO2 had occurred. All measurements of direct continuous and assumed VO2, as well as, TD CO were obtained in triplicate. Results Direct continuous VO2 CO and assumed VO2 CO correlated poorly (R= 0.57; ICC =0.59). Direct continuous VO2 CO and TD CO also correlated poorly (R= 0.51; ICC=0.60). Similarly AVA derived from direct continuous VO2 correlated poorly with those of assumed VO2 (R= 0.68; ICC=0.55) and TD (R=0.66, ICC=0.60). Repeated direct continuous VO2 CO and AVA measurements were extremely correlated and reproducible [(R=0.93; ICC=0.96) and (R=0.99; ICC>0.99) respectively], suggesting that this was the most reliable measurement of CO. Conclusions CO calculated from direct continuous VO2 measurement varies substantially from both assumed VO2 and TD based CO, which are widely used in most CCL. These differences may significantly impact the CO and AVA measurements. Furthermore, continuous, rather than average, measurement of VO2 appears to give highly reproducible results. PMID:27904163

  2. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  3. Non-invasive assessment of cardiac output in children.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, J R; Ferguson, J; Hiscox, J; Rawles, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke distance, the systolic velocity integral of aortic blood flow, is a linear analogue of stroke volume; its product with heart rate is minute distance, analogous to cardiac output. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of assessing cardiac output in children with a simple non-invasive Doppler ultrasound technique, and to determine the normal range of values. METHODS: Peak aortic blood velocity, stroke distance, and minute distance were measured through the suprasternal window in 166 children (mean age 9.6 years, range 2-14) using a portable non-imaging Doppler ultrasound instrument. RESULTS: The technique was well tolerated by all the children participating. Mean peak aortic blood velocity was 138 cm/s and was independent of age. Mean stroke distance was 31.8 cm and showed a small but significant increase with age; mean minute distance was 2490 cm and fell with age, as did heart rate. CONCLUSIONS: Suprasternal Doppler ultrasound measurement of stroke distance is a convenient, well tolerated, non-invasive technique for the assessment of cardiac output in children. The normal range of values during childhood has been established. The technique has great potential for assessing hypovolaemia in children. Images p307-a PMID:9785155

  4. Fetal cardiac ventricular volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction determined with four-dimensional ultrasound using Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™)

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Neil; Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia S.; Myers, Stephen A.; Mittal, Pooja; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Vaisbuch, Edi; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Goncalves, Luis F.; Lee, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify fetal cardiovascular parameters with Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™) utilizing the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”. Study Design A cross-sectional study was designed consisting of patients with normal pregnancies between 19 and 40 weeks of gestation. After STIC datasets were acquired, analysis was performed offline (4DView) and the following cardiovascular parameters were evaluated: ventricular volume in end systole and end diastole, stroke volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction. To account for fetal size, cardiac output was also expressed as a function of head circumference, abdominal circumference, or femoral diaphysis length. Regression models were fitted for each cardiovascular parameter to assess the effect of gestational age and paired comparisons were made between the left and right ventricles. Results 1) Two hundred and seventeen patients were retrospectively identified, of whom 184 had adequate STIC datasets (85% acceptance); 2) ventricular volume, stroke volume, cardiac output, and adjusted cardiac output increased with gestational age; whereas, the ejection fraction decreased as gestation advanced; 3) the right ventricle was larger than the left in both systole (Right: 0.50 ml, IQR: 0.2 – 0.9; vs. Left: 0.27 ml, IQR: 0.1 – 0.5; p<0.001) and diastole (Right: 1.20 ml, IQR: 0.7 – 2.2; vs. Left: 1.03 ml, IQR: 0.5 – 1.7; p<0.001); 4) there were no differences between the left and right ventricle with respect to stroke volume, cardiac output, or adjusted cardiac output; and 5) the left ventricular ejection fraction was greater than the right (Left: 72.2%, IQR: 64 – 78; vs. Right: 62.4%, IQR: 56 – 69; p<0.001). Conclusion Fetal echocardiography, utilizing STIC and VOCAL™ with the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”, allows assessment of fetal cardiovascular parameters. Normal fetal cardiovascular physiology is characterized by ventricular

  5. Cardiac output response to exercise in chronic cardiac failure patients.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Taira; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Kurano, Miwa; Takano, Haruhito; Iida, Haruko; Morita, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Hirata, Yasunobu; Nagai, Ryozo; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the precise pattern of stroke volume (SV) response during exercise in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) compared with age-matched controls. Fourteen patients with CHF and 7 controls performed symptom-limited bicycle exercise testing with respiratory gas exchange measurement. Patients were classified into group A (n = 7) with peak VO2 ≥ 18.0 mL/kg/minute and group B (n = 7) with peak VO2 < 18.0 mL/kg/ minute. SV and cardiac output (CO) were continuously measured during exercise using a novel thoracic impedance method (Physioflow). CO and SV were lower in the group B patients than those in controls at peak exercise [CO: 11.3 ± 1.0 (SE) versus 15.6 ± 0.9 L/minute, P < 0.05, SV: 89 ± 6 versus 110 ± 6 mL, P < 0.05]. SV reached its peak levels during submaximal exercise and remained close to the peak value until peak exercise in 6 of 7 group B patients (86%). On the other hand, it progressively increased until peak exercise in 6 of 7 controls (86%) and 5 of 7 group A patients (71%). In all subjects, CO at peak exercise was more closely correlated with SV at peak exercise (r = 0.86, P < 0.001) than with peak heart rate (r = 0.69, P < 0.001). CHF patients with impaired exercise capacity had attenuated increment of CO during exercise, and SV reached its peak levels during submaximal exercise.

  6. Ease of noninvasive measurement of cardiac output coupled with peak VO2 determination at rest and during exercise in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lang, Chim C; Karlin, Paula; Haythe, Jennifer; Tsao, Lana; Mancini, Donna M

    2007-02-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (VO2) is a powerful prognostic predictor of survival in patients with heart failure (HF) because it provides an indirect assessment of a patient's ability to increase cardiac output (CO). However, many peripheral factors affect VO2. Inert gas rebreathing using low-concentration soluble and insoluble inert gases can derive CO by the Fick principle. The Innocor rebreathing system uses an oxygen-enriched mixture of an inert soluble gas (0.5% nitrous oxide) and an inert insoluble gas (0.1% sulfur hexafluoride) measured by photoacoustic analyzers over a 5-breath interval. The practicality of this device in measuring CO and VO2 during exercise was assessed in patients with HF. Ninety-two consecutive exercise tests were prospectively performed in 88 patients with HF using the Innocor system. Incremental bicycle exercise was performed with CO measurements at rest, at 50 W, and at peak exercise. The mean age of the 68 men and 20 women was 54 +/- 13 years; 33% had coronary artery disease, and 67% had dilated cardiomyopathy. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 24 +/- 9%. Patients were able to rapidly learn the rebreathing technique and easily integrate it into the exercise protocol. Eighty-six percent of the tests had successful measurement of metabolic and cardiac output data. Mean CO at rest was 3.5 +/- 1.1 L/min and increased to 7.2 +/- 2.7 L/min. Mean peak VO2 was 12.6 +/- 4.7 ml/kg/min. A significant linear correlation was observed between peak VO2 and peak CO (r = 0.64, p <0.0001). In conclusion, combined metabolic stress testing with inert gas rebreathing can be easily performed in patients with HF.

  7. Measurement of cardiac output in adult and newborn animals by ascorbic acid dilution.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, J K; Haselby, K A; Paradise, R R

    1984-05-01

    We have developed an ascorbic acid-dilution method for measuring cardiac output which requires minimal blood withdrawal. Ascorbate is injected into a central venous catheter. The indicator-dilution curve is obtained by drawing blood from an arterial catheter through an amperometric cell at 0.96 ml/min for 35 s. The current is measured by a picoammeter . A calibration curve is obtained in 15 s prior to each indicator-dilution curve. An on-line digital computer measures the curve areas and calculates the cardiac output. Cardiac outputs of heparinized dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital and halothane measured by this method (AA) compared closely to cardiac outputs measured by the dye-dilution method (CG) (AA = 0.96 CG + 20 ml/min, r = 0.98). Both the cardiac output and the arterial blood pressure remained stable during replicate measurements of the cardiac output of 1-day-old piglets. This system allows cardiac output determinations of neonatal subjects without excessive blood removal and, with further development, should be practical in human neonates.

  8. Fiberoptic ear densitometer for measurement of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Sekelj, P; Retfalvi, S; Lavoie, A

    1978-02-01

    This study presents theory, operation, and evaluation of a new earpiece method for measurement of cardiac output using the multichannel fiberoptic system recently described. The system includes an earpiece of simple design and small size suitable for applications in all subjects regardless of their age or size. The method requires no withdrawal and analysis of blood samples for calibration. Compared with earlier techniques the present method, based on measurements in three distinct absorption bands in the infrared, provides an increase in accuracy of the estimations. This accuracy was tested in children undergoing routine cardiac catheterization. Comparisons were made in 39 instances (25 subjects) between simultaneously carried out determinations by the earpiece and cuvette densitometer methods. The agreement was good (r = 0.97, p less than 0.001), with a standard deviation of the differences of 0.479 litre/min, or 10.2% of the mean values derived from the cuvette curves. The regression equation describing the values derived from ear curves in terms of values from the cuvette curves differed only slightly from unity (Y = 0.167 + 0.985X). The usefulness of the fiberoptic earpiece technique both in clinical investigations and cardiovascular diagnosis was demonstrated.

  9. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness. This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model. The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management. PMID:21108836

  10. Evaluation of noninvasive cardiac output methods during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alan D.; Barrows, Linda H.; Rashid, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (Qc) will be used during future space flight. This retrospective literature survey compared the Qc techniques of carbon dioxide rebreathing (CO2-R), CO2 single breath (CO2-S), Doppler (DOP), impedance (IM), and inert gas (IG: acetylene or nitrous oxide) to direct (DIR) assessments measured at rest and during exercise.

  11. Cardiac output during high afterload artificial lung attachment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongho; Sato, Hitoshi; Griffith, Grant W; Cook, Keith E

    2009-01-01

    Attachment of thoracic artificial lungs (TALs) can increase right ventricular (RV) afterload and decrease cardiac output (CO) under certain conditions. However, there is no established means of predicting the extent of RV dysfunction. The zeroth harmonic impedance modulus, Z0, was thus examined to determine its effectiveness at predicting CO during high afterload TAL attachment. The MC3 Biolung was attached in four adult sheep groups based on baseline (BL) pulmonary vascular resistance and TAL attachment mode: normal, parallel (n=7); normal, series (n=7); chronic pulmonary hypertension, parallel (n=5), and chronic pulmonary hypertension, series (n=5). The resistance of each attachment mode was increased incrementally and instantaneous pulmonary system hemodynamic data were acquired at each increment. The change in Z0 from BL, DeltaZ0, and percent change in CO (DeltaCO%) were then calculated to determine their relationship. The DeltaCO% varied significantly with DeltaZ0 (p<10(-40)) and DeltaZ02 (p<10(-4)) but not with the attachment and pulmonary hemodynamics group. The relationship between the variables for all sheep groups was DeltaCO%=0.215DeltaZ0(2)-7.14DeltaZ0+2.94 (R2=0.82) for DeltaZ0 in mm Hg/(L/min). Therefore, Z0 is an effective index for determining the CO during TAL attachment in both attachment modes with and without elevated pulmonary vascular resistance.

  12. Evaluation of transpulmonary thermodilution as a method to measure cardiac output in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Kim E; Kerr, Carolyn L; McDonell, Wayne N

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of a transpulmonary thermodilution (Trans) technique for the measurement of cardiac output, and to determine the agreement between Trans and conventional thermodilution (TD) in anesthetized cats. Using each technique, cardiac output was measured in 5 mature cats (weights 2.4 to 5.6 kg) anesthetized with isoflurane. To induce different levels of cardiac output in each cat, anesthesia was maintained at > 1.5x end-tidal minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane, and at 1.3x end-tidal isoflurane MAC with and without administration of dobutamine. At least 2 comparisons between TD and Trans values were made at each cardiac output rate. Thirty-two of the 42 recorded comparisons were analyzed. Linear regression analysis (TD vs Trans) yielded an r(2) value of 0.83. The mean bias (TD-Trans) was -3.7 mL/kg/min with limits of agreement of -35.9 to 28.5 mL/kg/min. The concordance coefficient was 0.91. The Trans method showed good relationship and good agreement with TD in anesthetized cats. The Trans method is a relatively noninvasive, practical, and safe method to measure cardiac output in anesthetized cats.

  13. Less-invasive cardiac output monitoring by earpiece densitometry.

    PubMed

    Grasberger, R C; Yeston, N S

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac output was measured by thermodilution and ear densitometry in surgical ICU patients who had pulmonary arterial catheters. Overall comparison based on 56 sets of triplicate measurements revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.76 between the two techniques. Although ear densitometry was more accurate with injection via the antecubital vein (r = 0.88) vs. more distal injection (r = 0.67), these data suggest that this technique lacks the accuracy for clinical application.

  14. Validation of a new spectrometer for noninvasive measurement of cardiac output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Marc M.; Kumar, Sasi; Moss, John A.; Wagner, Peter D.

    2004-07-01

    Acetylene is a blood-soluble gas and for many years its uptake rate during rebreathing tests has been used to calculate the flow rate of blood through the lungs (normally equal to cardiac output) as well as the volume of lung tissue. A new, portable, noninvasive instrument for cardiac output determination using the acetylene uptake method is described. The analyzer relies on nondispersive IR absorption spectroscopy as its principle of operation and is configured for extractive (side-stream) sampling. The instrument affords exceptionally fast (30 ms, 10%-90%, 90%-10%, at 500 mL min-1 flow rates), interference-free, simultaneous measurement of acetylene, sulfur hexafluoride (an insoluble reference gas used in the cardiac output calculation), and carbon dioxide (to determine alveolar ventilation), with good (typically ±2% full-scale) signal-to-noise ratios. Comparison tests with a mass spectrometer using serially diluted calibration gas samples gave excellent (R2>0.99) correlation for all three gases, validating the IR system's linearity and accuracy. A similar level of agreement between the devices also was observed during human subject C2H2 uptake tests (at rest and under incremental levels of exercise), with the instruments sampling a common extracted gas stream. Cardiac output measurements by both instruments were statistically equivalent from rest to 90% of maximal oxygen consumption; the physiological validity of the measurements was confirmed by the expected linear relationship between cardiac output and oxygen consumption, with both the slope and intercept in the published range. These results indicate that the portable, low-cost, rugged prototype analyzer discussed here is suitable for measuring cardiac output noninvasively in a point-of-care setting.

  15. Is pulmonary gas exchange during exercise in hypoxia impaired with the increase of cardiac output?

    PubMed

    Calbet, José A L; Robach, Paul; Lundby, Carsten; Boushel, Robert

    2008-06-01

    During exercise in humans, the alveolar-arterial O(2) tension difference ((A-a)DO(2)) increases with exercise intensity and is an important factor determining the absolute level of oxygen binding to hemoglobin and therefore the level of systemic oxygen transport. During exercise in hypoxia, the (A-a)DO(2) is accentuated. Using the multiple inert gas elimination technique it has been shown that during exercise in acute hypoxia the contribution of ventilation-perfusion inequality to (A-a)DO(2) is rather small and in the absence of pulmonary edema intrapulmonary shunts can be ruled out. This implies that the main mechanism limiting pulmonary gas exchange is diffusion limitation. It is presumed that an elevation of cardiac output during exercise in acute hypoxia should increase the (A-a)DO(2). However, no studies have examined how variations in cardiac output independently affect pulmonary diffusion with increases in exercise intensity. We have consistently observed that during steady-state, submaximal (100-120 W) exercise on the cycle ergometer in hypoxia the lung can accommodate an increase in cardiac output of approximately 2 L x min(-1) without any significant effect on pulmonary gas exchange. This result contrasts with the predicted effect of cardiac output on (A-a)DO(2) using the model of Piiper and Scheid, and thus indicates that an elevation of cardiac output is not necessarily accompanied by a reduction of mean transit time and (or) diffusion limitation during submaximal exercise in acute hypoxia. It remains to be determined what is the influence of changes in cardiac output per se on pulmonary gas exchange during high-intensity exercise.

  16. Cardiac power output and its response to exercise in athletes and non-athletes.

    PubMed

    Klasnja, Aleksandar V; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Barak, Otto F; Popadic Gacesa, Jelena Z; Lukac, Damir D; Grujic, Nikola G

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac power output (CPO) is an integrative measure of overall cardiac function as it accounts for both, flow- and pressure-generating capacities of the heart. The purpose of the present study was twofold: (i) to assess cardiac power output and its response to exercise in athletes and non-athletes and (ii) to determine the relationship between cardiac power output and reserve and selected measures of cardiac function and structure. Twenty male athletes and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy sedentary controls participated in this study. CPO was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial pressure, expressed in watts. Measures of hemodynamic status, cardiac structure and pumping capability were assessed by echocardiography. CPO was assessed at rest and after peak bicycle exercise. At rest, the two groups had similar values of cardiac power output (1·08 ± 0·2 W versus 1·1 ± 0·24 W, P>0·05), but the athletes demonstrated lower systolic blood pressure (109·5 ± 6·2 mmHg versus 117·2 ± 8·2 mmHg, P<0·05) and thicker posterior wall of the left ventricle (9·8 ± 1 mm versus 9 ± 1·1 mm, P<0·05). Peak CPO was higher in athletes (5·87 ± 0·75 W versus 5·4 ± 0·69 W, P<0·05) as was cardiac reserve (4·92 ± 0·66 W versus 4·26 ± 0·61 W, P<0·05), respectively. Peak exercise CPO and reserve were only moderately correlated with end-diastolic volume (r = 0·54; r = 0·46, P<0·05) and end-diastolic left ventricular internal diameter (r = 0·48; r = 0·42, P<0·05), respectively. Athletes demonstrated greater maximal cardiac pumping capability and reserve than non-athletes. The study provides new evidence that resting measures of cardiac structure and function need to be considered with caution in interpretation of maximal cardiac performance.

  17. Cardiac output during exercise: a comparison of four methods.

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P; Sørensen, H; Zaar, M; Hvidtfeldt, M; Pichon, A; Secher, N H; Lundby, C

    2015-02-01

    Several techniques assessing cardiac output (Q) during exercise are available. The extent to which the measurements obtained from each respective technique compares to one another, however, is unclear. We quantified Q simultaneously using four methods: the Fick method with blood obtained from the right atrium (Q(Fick-M)), Innocor (inert gas rebreathing; Q(Inn)), Physioflow (impedance cardiography; Q(Phys)), and Nexfin (pulse contour analysis; Q(Pulse)) in 12 male subjects during incremental cycling exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2  = 12%). While all four methods reported a progressive increase in Q with exercise intensity, the slopes of the Q/oxygen uptake (VO2) relationship differed by up to 50% between methods in both normoxia [4.9 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.2, 6.0 ± 0.4, 4.8 ± 0.2 L/min per L/min (mean ± SE) for Q(Fick-M), Q(Inn), QP hys and Q(Pulse), respectively; P = 0.001] and hypoxia (7.2 ± 0.7, 4.9 ± 0.5, 6.4 ± 0.8 and 5.1 ± 0.4 L/min per L/min; P = 0.04). In hypoxia, the increase in the Q/VO2 slope was not detected by Nexfin. In normoxia, Q increases by 5-6 L/min per L/min increase in VO2, which is within the 95% confidence interval of the Q/VO2 slopes determined by the modified Fick method, Physioflow, and Nexfin apparatus while Innocor provided a lower value, potentially reflecting recirculation of the test gas into the pulmonary circulation. Thus, determination of Q during exercise depends significantly on the applied method.

  18. A fiberoptic reflection densitometer with cardiac output calculator.

    PubMed

    Landsman, M L; Knop, N; Mook, G A; Zijlstra, W G

    1979-02-14

    A catheter-tip densitometer for indocyanine green is described consisting of a cardiac catheter containing optical fibers, an incandescent light source, a light detection unit and a processing unit. Half of the optical fibers guide the light to the blood at the tip of the catheter, the other half the back-scattered (reflected) light to the detection unit. In the detection unit the light is measured by two silicium barrier layer photocells after it has been split into two beams by a beam splitter. In the measuring channel the light passes an 800 nm filter before reaching the photocell. When fiberoptic catheters with glass fibers are employed, the other channel, used for compensation of non-specific effects such as blood flow variations, contains no filter, thus measuring light in a broad spectral band. It is shown that in this way compensation of flow effects may be about two times better than when a 920 nm filter is used. When using plastic optical fibers a 950 nm filter must be used, because above lambda = 850 nm plastic fibers transmit only a band around that wavelength (950 nm). At zero dye concentration the densitometer output or ratio of compensating and measuring photocell output R/R800 is almost insensitive to changes in haemoglobin concentration. When the blood contains dye, however, the influence of haemoglobin concentration is considerable. The densitometer output R/R800 is linearly related to dye concentration up to 50 mg . 1-1, the output R920/R800 up to 30 mg . 1(-1). The output R/R800 decreases with decreasing oxygen saturation; the slope of the calibration line, however, appears to be unaffected. The processing unit also contains an analog cardiac output calculator consisting of an integrator and a divider. Central dye dilution curves recorded from the pulmonary artery after injection of dye into the right atrium or a caval vein come down to the baseline. At this moment the reading of a digital voltmeter displaying the divider output calibrated in 1

  19. Cardiac output and venous return as interdependent and independent variables.

    PubMed

    Badeer, H S

    1981-01-01

    Under steady states the heart pumps whatever it receives and receives whatever it pumps. In other words, cardiac output (CO) and venous return (VR) are equal and the distinction between the two seems unnecessary. However, under nonsteady states the two are temporarily unequal and the distinction becomes significant. VR varies directly with the difference in pressure between the end of systemic capillaries and the right ventricle during filling and inversely with the total resistance of the venous system. Thus, the energy for VR is derived from CO. In some transient states VR becomes an independent variable and CO dependent until a new steady state is reached (e.g., exercise, hemorrhage, fevers, hyperthyroidism, severe anemia, etc.). In other conditions the opposite is true (e.g., myocardial infarction, altered ventricular contractility, etc.). Explanation of changes in cardiac output in various perturbations of circulation are based on the identification of the independent variable (VR or CO) in a given physiologic or pathologic condition during the period that a nonsteady state exists.

  20. [Non-invasive cardiac output measurement with USCOM in air rescue operation].

    PubMed

    Schedler, O; Handschak, H; Hensel, M

    2008-12-01

    In cardiac emergency events (NACA score = 3.4), a non-invasive cardiac output test involving transaortalic blood flow velocity measurement was used in the air rescue of 30 patients. An average velocity integral (Vti) of 21.9 +/- 9.9 cm was determined in the short examination time (t = 120 +/- 30 sec). Related to the middle body surface (BSA = 2.0 +/- 0.3 m (2)), the calculated cardiac index (CI) was 2.6 +/- 1.1 l/min/m (2). The CI was under 2.2 l/min/m (2) in 12 examinations (40 %). 5 patients in this group subsequently received catecholamine therapy. Thrombolysis therapy increased by 17 % in the myocardial infarction group with CI

  1. Thermodynamics of the heart: Relation between cardiac output and oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Mituo; Sakane, Kumiko K.; Bertolotti, Simone A.

    2008-06-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to derive a relation between cardiac output and rate of oxygen consumption. As an example, the relation is used to calculate the cardiac output of a young woman exercising on a treadmill. The results can be understood by undergraduates without any previous knowledge of human physiology.

  2. Immediate effect on cardiac output of reversion to sinus rhythm from rapid arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Wright, J S; Fabian, J; Epstein, E J

    1970-08-08

    Cardiac output was estimated immediately before and after conversion to sinus rhythm in nine patients with rapid arrhythmias. Conversion was by synchronized direct-current shock in eight patients, and by direct atrial wall stimulation in the other. In seven patients there was an immediate increase in cardiac output after restoration of sinus rhythm. The percentage increase in output was directly proportional to the rate of the arrhythmia immediately before conversion (r=0.91, P<0.01). The critical heart rate, above which an immediate increase in cardiac output might be expected on conversion to sinus rhythm, appeared in these patients to be about 160 beats per minute.

  3. Reproducibility of cardiac power output and other cardiopulmonary exercise indices in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Seferovic, Petar M; Nunan, David; Donovan, Gay; Trenell, Michael I; Grocott-Mason, Richard; Brodie, David A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac power output is a direct measure of overall cardiac function that integrates both flow- and pressure-generating capacities of the heart. The present study assessed the reproducibility of cardiac power output and other more commonly reported cardiopulmonary exercise variables in patients with chronic heart failure. Metabolic, ventilatory and non-invasive (inert gas re-breathing) central haemodynamic measurements were undertaken at rest and near-maximal exercise of the modified Bruce protocol in 19 patients with stable chronic heart failure. The same procedure was repeated 7 days later to assess reproducibility. Cardiac power output was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. Resting central haemodynamic variables demonstrate low CV (coefficient of variation) (ranging from 3.4% for cardiac output and 5.6% for heart rate). The CV for resting metabolic and ventilatory measurements ranged from 8.2% for respiratory exchange ratio and 14.2% for absolute values of oxygen consumption. The CV of anaerobic threshold, peak oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and respiratory exchange ratio ranged from 3.8% (for anaerobic threshold) to 6.4% (for relative peak oxygen consumption), with minute ventilation having a CV of 11.1%. Near-maximal exercise cardiac power output and cardiac output had CVs of 4.1 and 2.2%, respectively. Cardiac power output demonstrates good reproducibility suggesting that there is no need for performing more than one cardiopulmonary exercise test. As a direct measure of cardiac function (dysfunction) and an excellent prognostic marker, it is strongly advised in the assessment of patients with chronic heart failure undergoing cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

  4. Caveolae protect endothelial cells from membrane rupture during increased cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jade P.X.; Mendoza-Topaz, Carolina; Howard, Gillian; Chadwick, Jessica; Shvets, Elena; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; Crosby, Alexi; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Caveolae are strikingly abundant in endothelial cells, yet the physiological functions of caveolae in endothelium and other tissues remain incompletely understood. Previous studies suggest a mechanoprotective role, but whether this is relevant under the mechanical forces experienced by endothelial cells in vivo is unclear. In this study we have sought to determine whether endothelial caveolae disassemble under increased hemodynamic forces, and whether caveolae help prevent acute rupture of the plasma membrane under these conditions. Experiments in cultured cells established biochemical assays for disassembly of caveolar protein complexes, and assays for acute loss of plasma membrane integrity. In vivo, we demonstrate that caveolae in endothelial cells of the lung and cardiac muscle disassemble in response to acute increases in cardiac output. Electron microscopy and two-photon imaging reveal that the plasma membrane of microvascular endothelial cells in caveolin 1−/− mice is much more susceptible to acute rupture when cardiac output is increased. These data imply that mechanoprotection through disassembly of caveolae is important for endothelial function in vivo. PMID:26459598

  5. The clinical application of pulse contour cardiac output and intrathoracic volume measurements in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Nicky A; Braaf, Sandra C

    2006-08-01

    Cardiac output (CO) determination by pulmonary artery (PA) catheter has increasingly been criticised within the literature due to its invasive nature and poor correlation between the pressure measurements and intravascular volume status in mechanically ventilated patients. Consequently, alternative less invasive technologies to PA catheterisation are emerging within intensive care. One such novel technology are pulse contour CO (PCCO) systems. They establish comprehensive and continuous haemodynamic monitoring utilising a central venous catheter (CVC) and an arterial line. Furthermore, a key feature of this technology is its ability to produce intrathoracic volume measurements which may provide a better estimation of cardiac preload as well as indicate the presence and severity of pulmonary oedema. This article aims to discuss the theoretical basis and clinical application of PCCO systems, how PCCO systems differ from PA catheters and how the intrathoracic volume measurements are derived. Understanding these advanced concepts will ensure that clinicians are able to employ this innovative monitoring technology more effectively.

  6. High flow variant postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome amplifies the cardiac output response to exercise in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pianosi, Paolo T; Goodloe, Adele H; Soma, David; Parker, Ken O; Brands, Chad K; Fischer, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by chronic fatigue and dizziness and affected individuals by definition have orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia. There is considerable overlap of symptoms in patients with POTS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), prompting speculation that POTS is akin to a deconditioned state. We previously showed that adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have excessive heart rate (HR) during, and slower HR recovery after, exercise - hallmarks of deconditioning. We also noted exaggerated cardiac output during exercise which led us to hypothesize that tachycardia could be a manifestation of a high output state rather than a consequence of deconditioning. We audited records of adolescents presenting with long-standing history of any mix of fatigue, dizziness, nausea, who underwent both head-up tilt table test and maximal exercise testing with measurement of cardiac output at rest plus 2-3 levels of exercise, and determined the cardiac output () versus oxygen uptake () relationship. Subjects with chronic fatigue were diagnosed with POTS if their HR rose ≥40 beat·min(-1) with head-up tilt. Among 107 POTS patients the distribution of slopes for the , relationship was skewed toward higher slopes but showed two peaks with a split at ~7.0 L·min(-1) per L·min(-1), designated as normal (5.08 ± 1.17, N = 66) and hyperkinetic (8.99 ± 1.31, N = 41) subgroups. In contrast, cardiac output rose appropriately with in 141 patients with chronic fatigue but without POTS, exhibiting a normal distribution and an average slope of 6.10 ± 2.09 L·min(-1) per L·min(-1). Mean arterial blood pressure and pulse pressure from rest to exercise rose similarly in both groups. We conclude that 40% of POTS adolescents demonstrate a hyperkinetic circulation during exercise. We attribute this to failure of normal regional vasoconstriction during exercise, such that patients must increase flow through an

  7. Use of the single-breath method of estimating cardiac output during exercise-stress testing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Mauldin, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-breath cardiac output measurement technique of Kim et al. (1966) has been modified for use in obtaining cardiac output measurements during exercise-stress tests on Apollo astronauts. The modifications involve the use of a respiratory mass spectrometer for data acquisition and a digital computer program for data analysis. The variation of the modified method for triplicate steady-state cardiac output measurements was plus or minus 1 liter/min. The combined physiological and methodological variation seen during a set of three exercise tests on a series of subjects was 1 to 2.5 liter/min. Comparison of the modified method with the direct Fick technique showed that although the single-breath values were consistently low, the scatter of data was small and the correlation between the two methods was high. Possible reasons for the low single-breath cardiac output values are discussed.

  8. Oxygen uptake kinetics at work onset: role of cardiac output and of phosphocreatine breakdown.

    PubMed

    Francescato, M P; Cettolo, V; di Prampero, P E

    2013-01-15

    The hypothesis that variability in individual's cardiac output response affects the kinetics of pulmonary O₂ uptake (VO₂) was tested by investigating the time constants of cardiac output (Q) adjustment (τ(Q)), of PCr splitting (τ(PCr)), and of phase II pulmonary O₂ uptake (τ(VO₂)) in eight volunteers. VO₂, Q, and gastrocnemius [PCr] (by (31)P-MRS) were measured at rest and during low intensity two-legged exercise. Steady state VO₂ and Q increased (ΔVO₂(s) = 182 ± 58 mL min⁻¹; ΔQ = 1.3 ± 0.4 L min⁻¹), whereas [PCr] decreased significantly (21 ± 8%). τ(VO₂), τ(PCr) and τ(Q) were significantly different from each other (38.3 ± 4.0, 23.9 ± 2.5, 11.6 ± 4.6 s, respectively; p<0.001). τ(PCr) assumed to be equal to the time constant of VO₂ at the muscle level (τ(mVO₂)), was not related to τ(Q), whereas τ(VO₂) and τ(Q) were significantly related (p<0.05) as were τ(VO₂) and τ(PCr) (p<0.05). Venous blood O₂ stores changes, as determined from arterio-to-mixed-venous O₂ content, were essentially equal to those estimated as (τ(VO₂)-τ(PCr))·ΔVO₂(s). This suggests that cardiac output responses affect O₂ stores utilization and hence τ(VO₂) : thus τ(VO₂) is not necessarily a good estimate of τ(mVO₂).

  9. Application of bioreactance for cardiac output assessment during exercise in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Adrian; Hull, James H; Nunan, David; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Brodie, David; Ansley, Lesley

    2010-07-01

    In patients with cardiac failure, bioreactance-based cardiac output (CO) monitoring provides a valid non-invasive method for assessing cardiac performance during exercise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of this technique during strenuous exercise in healthy, trained individuals. Fourteen recreational cyclists, mean (SD) age of 34 (8) years and relative peak oxygen uptake of (VO(2)) 56 (6) ml kg(-1) min(-1), underwent incremental maximal exercise testing, whilst CO was recorded continuously using a novel bioreactance-based device (CO(bio)). The CO(bio) was evaluated against relationship with VO(2), theoretical calculation of arterial-venous oxygen difference (C(a - v) O(2)) and level of agreement with an inert gas rebreathing method (CO(rb)) using a Bland-Altman plot. Bioreactance-based CO measurement was practical and straightforward in application, although there was intermittent loss of electrocardiograph signal at high-intensity exercise. At rest and during exercise, CO(bio) was strongly correlated with VO(2) (r = 0.84; P < 0.001), however, there was evidence of systematic bias with CO(bio) providing lower values than CO(rb); mean bias (limits of agreement) -19% (14.6 to -53%). Likewise, calculated (C(a - v) O(2)) was greater when determined using CO(bio) than CO(rb) (P < 0.001), although both devices provided values in excess of those reported in invasive studies. Bioreactance-based determination of CO provides a pragmatic approach to the continuous assessment of cardiac performance during strenuous exercise in trained individuals. Our findings, however, suggest that further work is needed to refine the key measurement determinants of CO using this device to improve measurement accuracy in this setting.

  10. Evaluation of cardiac output by 5 arterial pulse contour techniques using trend interchangeability method

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Diouf, Momar; de Wilde, Robert B.P.; Dupont, Hervé; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Lorne, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac output measurement with pulse contour analysis is a continuous, mini-invasive, operator-independent, widely used, and cost-effective technique, which could be helpful to assess changes in cardiac output. The 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot have been described to compare the changes between 2 measurements performed under different conditions, and the direction of change by using different methods of measurements. However, the 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot present a number of limitations, with a risk of misinterpretation in routine clinical practice. We describe a new trend interchangeability method designed to objectively define the interchangeability of each change of a variable. Using the repeatability of the reference method, we classified each change as either uninterpretable or interpretable and then as either noninterchangeable, in the gray zone or interchangeable. An interchangeability rate can then be calculated by the number of interchangeable changes divided by the total number of interpretable changes. In this observational study, we used this objective method to assess cardiac output changes with 5 arterial pulse contour techniques (Wesseling's method, LiDCO, PiCCO, Hemac method, and Modelflow) in comparison with bolus thermodilution technique as reference method in 24 cardiac surgery patients. A total of 172 cardiac output variations were available from the 199 data points: 88 (51%) were uninterpretable, according to the first step of the method. The second step of the method, based on the 84 (49%) interpretable variations, showed that only 18 (21%) to 30 (36%) variations were interchangeable regardless of the technique used. None of pulse contour cardiac output technique could be interchangeable with bolus thermodilution to assess changes in cardiac output using the trend interchangeability method in cardiac surgery patients. Future studies may consider using this method to assess interchangeability of changes between different

  11. Increased cardiac output elicits higher V̇O2max in response to self-paced exercise.

    PubMed

    Astorino, Todd Anthony; McMillan, David William; Edmunds, Ross Montgomery; Sanchez, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a self-paced protocol demonstrated higher maximal oxygen uptake versus the traditional ramp protocol. The primary aim of the current study was to further explore potential differences in maximal oxygen uptake between the ramp and self-paced protocols using simultaneous measurement of cardiac output. Active men and women of various fitness levels (N = 30, mean age = 26.0 ± 5.0 years) completed 3 graded exercise tests separated by a minimum of 48 h. Participants initially completed progressive ramp exercise to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake followed by a verification test to confirm maximal oxygen uptake attainment. Over the next 2 sessions, they performed a self-paced and an additional ramp protocol. During exercise, gas exchange data were obtained using indirect calorimetry, and thoracic impedance was utilized to estimate hemodynamic function (stroke volume and cardiac output). One-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to determine differences in maximal oxygen uptake and cardiac output between ramp and self-paced testing. Results demonstrated lower (p < 0.001) maximal oxygen uptake via the ramp (47.2 ± 10.2 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) versus the self-paced (50.2 ± 9.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) protocol, with no interaction (p = 0.06) seen for fitness level. Maximal heart rate and cardiac output (p = 0.02) were higher in the self-paced protocol versus ramp exercise. In conclusion, data show that the traditional ramp protocol may underestimate maximal oxygen uptake compared with a newly developed self-paced protocol, with a greater cardiac output potentially responsible for this outcome.

  12. Comparison of impedance cardiography and dye dilution method for measuring cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, W; van Es, P N; de Leeuw, P W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the degree of agreement between impedance cardiography, using the NCCOM3-R7 device, and the gold standard—the dye dilution method—both under basal conditions and after stimulation of cardiac output.
Patients—35 paired measurements in five healthy male volunteers.
Interventions—To obtain higher levels of cardiac output, cardiac performance was stimulated with a dopamine infusion.
Results—In 35 paired measurements, the mean of all the impedance values was higher than that of the dye dilution values, at 10.2 v 7.4 l/min (p < 0.0001). The mean discrepancy between the two methods was 3.3 l/min, and the mean bias −2.9 l/min, with limits of agreement of −9.0 and 3.2 l/min. A change in cardiac output could not adequately be predicted by the NCCOM3-R7. In 20 of 25 measurements obtained during continuous intravenous dopamine infusions there was a rise in dye dilution cardiac output (range 0.2 to 5.9 l/min). Neither the magnitude nor the direction of the change in dye dilution values corresponded with the change measured by impedance cardiography. The mean discrepancy here between the two methods was 1.8 l/min, and the mean bias −0.8 l/min, with limits of agreement of −4.9 and 3.3 l/min.
Conclusions—In healthy volunteers, impedance cardiography with NCCOM3-R7 is inadequate for assessing cardiac output when compared with the dye dilution method.

 Keywords: cardiac output;  impedance cardiography;  dye dilution PMID:9659188

  13. Noninvasive measurement of cardiac output during exercise by inert gas rebreathing technique.

    PubMed

    Cattadori, Gaia; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Reduced exercise tolerance and dyspnea during exercise are hallmarks of heart failure syndrome. Exercise capacity and various parameters of cardiopulmonary response to exercise are of important prognostic value. All the available parameters only indirectly reflect left ventricular dysfunction and hemodynamic adaptation to an increased demand. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac output, especially during an incremental exercise stress test, would allow the direct measure of cardiac reserve and may become the gold standard for prognostic evaluation in the future.

  14. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  15. Measurement of cardiac output by earpiece dye-dilution method with automatic calibration of dye concentration.

    PubMed

    Katori, R; Hayashi, T; Kanamasa, K; Ishikawa, K

    1977-05-01

    A non-invasive method for measuring cardiac output by an earpiece dye densitometer was proposed. The densitometer is dichromatic and has an air capsule to make subject's ear bloodless by inflation, so that it can calibrate indocyanine green dye concentration without blood sampling. Duplicate measurements of cardiac output showed a good agreement in 40 cases (r = 0.97, standard deviation (S.D.) = 8.9%), which was comparable to the result of the cuvette method (r = 0.98, S.D. = 8.1%). Simultaneous measurements of cardiac output by the earpiece method (x) and the standard cuvette method (y) revealed a good agreement (r = 0.91, y = 0.96x+0.34, S.D. = 16.4%) in 52 measurements of 25 cases. A similarly good correlation was obtained between the two methods during ergometer exercise in supine position in 5 cases. These suggest that this earpiece dye-dilution method is reliable for cardiac output measurement and advantageous for clinical use because of non-invasive technique.

  16. The pioneering use of systems analysis to study cardiac output regulation.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E

    2004-11-01

    This essay examines the historical significance of an APS classic paper that is freely available online: Guyton AC, Lindsey AW, and Kaufmann BN. Effect of mean circulatory filling pressure and other peripheral circulatory factors on cardiac output. Am J Physiol 180: 463-468, 1955 (http://ajplegacy.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/180/3/463).

  17. Effect of Hemorrhage on Cardiac Output, PVP, Alodosterone and Diuresis during Immersion in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K.; Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q (sup dot) sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses.

  18. Exercise cardiac output following Skylab missions - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Mauldin, D. G.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.; Sawin, C. F.

    1976-01-01

    Cardiac output was measured during preflight and postflight exercise-stress tests on the Skylab astronauts. In the postflight tests immediately following the 28-, 59-, and 84-d earth orbital missions, the astronauts exhibited an approximate 30% decrease in cardiac output coupled with an approximate 50% decrease in cardiac stroke volume during exercise. These changes were accompanied by elevated heart rates and significant increases in total systemic peripheral vascular resistance. Mean arterial pressure was unchanged. All parameters returned to normal preflight values within 30 d of the end of the orbital period. Duration of the zero-G exposure did not appear to influence either the magnitude of the hemodynamic changes or the time-course of their return to normal. These results are discussed in relation to other cardiovascular findings and possible mechanisms responsible for the observations are outlined.

  19. Evaluation of two methods for continuous cardiac output assessment during exercise in chronic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Kemps, Hareld M C; Thijssen, Eric J M; Schep, Goof; Sleutjes, Boudewijn T H M; De Vries, Wouter R; Hoogeveen, Adwin R; Wijn, Pieter F F; Doevendans, Pieter A F M

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of two techniques for the continuous assessment of cardiac output in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF): a radial artery pulse contour analysis method that uses an indicator dilution method for calibration (LiDCO) and an impedance cardiography technique (Physioflow), using the Fick method as a reference. Ten male CHF patients (New York Heart Association class II-III) were included. At rest, cardiac output values obtained by LiDCO and Physioflow were compared with those of the direct Fick method. During exercise, the continuous Fick method was used as a reference. Exercise, performed on a cycle ergometer in upright position, consisted of two constant-load tests at 30% and 80% of the ventilatory threshold and a symptom-limited maximal test. Both at rest and during exercise LiDCO showed good agreement with reference values [bias +/- limits of agreement (LOA), -1% +/- 28% and 2% +/- 28%, respectively]. In contrast, Physioflow overestimated reference values both at rest and during exercise (bias +/- LOA, 48% +/- 60% and 48% +/- 52%, respectively). Exercise-related within-patient changes of cardiac output, expressed as a percent change, showed for both techniques clinically acceptable agreement with reference values (bias +/- LOA: 2% +/- 26% for LiDCO, and -2% +/- 36% for Physioflow, respectively). In conclusion, although the limits of agreement with the Fick method are pretty broad, LiDCO provides accurate measurements of cardiac output during rest and exercise in CHF patients. Although Physioflow overestimates cardiac output, this method may still be useful to estimate relative changes during exercise.

  20. Asymmetric sympathetic output: The dorsomedial hypothalamus as a potential link between emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky; Filho, Marcelo Limborço; Santos Machado, Natália L; de Paula, Cristiane Amorim; Souza Cordeiro, Letícia M; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Marins, Fernanda Ribeiro; Henderson, Luke; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2017-01-17

    The autonomic response to emotional stress, while involving several target organs, includes an important increase in sympathetic drive to the heart. There is ample evidence that cardiac sympathetic innervation is lateralized, and asymmetric autonomic output to the heart during stress is postulated to be a causal factor that precipitates cardiac arrhythmias. Recent animal studies provided a new picture of the central pathways involved in the cardiac sympathetic response evoked by emotional stress, pointing out a key role for the region of dorsomedial hypothalamus. However, how much of this information can be extrapolated to humans? Analysis of human functional imaging data at rest or during emotional stress shows some consistency with the components that integrate these pathways, and attention must be given to the asymmetric activation of subcortical sites. In this short review, we will discuss related findings in humans and animals, aiming to understand the neurogenic background for the origin of emotional stress-induced cardiac arrhythmias.

  1. Kinetics of Cardiac Output at the Onset of Exercise in Precapillary Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bengueddache, Samir; Ferretti, Guido; Soccal, Paola M.; Noble, Stéphane; Beghetti, Maurice; Chemla, Denis; Hervé, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Cardiac output (CO) is a cornerstone parameter in precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH). The Modelflow (MF) method offers a reliable noninvasive determination of its beat-by-beat changes. So MF allows exploration of CO adjustment with the best temporal resolution. Methods. Fifteen subjects (5 PH patients, 10 healthy controls) performed a submaximal supine exercise on a cycle ergometer after 5 min of rest. CO was continuously determined by MF (COMF). Kinetics of heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and CO were determined with 3 monoexponential models. Results. In PH patients, we observed a sudden and transitory drop of SV upon exercise onset. This implied a transitory drop of CO whose adjustment to a new steady state depended on HR increase. The kinetics of HR and CO for PH patients was slower than that of controls for all models and for SV in model 1. SV kinetics was faster for PH patients in models 2 and 3. Conclusion. This is the first description of beat-by-beat cardiovascular adjustments upon exercise onset in PH. The kinetics of HR and CO appeared slower than those of healthy controls and there was a transitory drop of CO upon exercise onset in PH due to a sudden drop of SV. PMID:27990432

  2. Kinetics of Cardiac Output at the Onset of Exercise in Precapillary Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lador, Frédéric; Bringard, Aurélien; Bengueddache, Samir; Ferretti, Guido; Bendjelid, Karim; Soccal, Paola M; Noble, Stéphane; Beghetti, Maurice; Chemla, Denis; Hervé, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Cardiac output (CO) is a cornerstone parameter in precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH). The Modelflow (MF) method offers a reliable noninvasive determination of its beat-by-beat changes. So MF allows exploration of CO adjustment with the best temporal resolution. Methods. Fifteen subjects (5 PH patients, 10 healthy controls) performed a submaximal supine exercise on a cycle ergometer after 5 min of rest. CO was continuously determined by MF (COMF). Kinetics of heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and CO were determined with 3 monoexponential models. Results. In PH patients, we observed a sudden and transitory drop of SV upon exercise onset. This implied a transitory drop of CO whose adjustment to a new steady state depended on HR increase. The kinetics of HR and CO for PH patients was slower than that of controls for all models and for SV in model 1. SV kinetics was faster for PH patients in models 2 and 3. Conclusion. This is the first description of beat-by-beat cardiovascular adjustments upon exercise onset in PH. The kinetics of HR and CO appeared slower than those of healthy controls and there was a transitory drop of CO upon exercise onset in PH due to a sudden drop of SV.

  3. Control of cardiac output in thyrotoxic calves. Evaluation of changes in the systemic circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, S; Olajos, M; Morkin, E

    1984-01-01

    The contribution of peripheral vascular factors to the high output state in thyrotoxicosis was examined in 11 calves treated with daily intramuscular injections of L-thyroxine (200 micrograms/kg) for 12-14 d. Thyroxine treatment increased cardiac output from 14.1 +/- 1.4 to 24.7 +/- 1.4 liters/min (P less than 0.001) and decreased systemic vascular resistance from 562 +/- 65 to 386 +/- 30 dyn-s/cm5 (P less than 0.01). Blood volume was increased from 65 +/- 4 ml/kg in the euthyroid state to 81 +/- 6 ml/kg when the animals were thyrotoxic (P less than 0.05). The role of low peripheral vascular resistance in maintenance of the high output state was evaluated by infusion of phenylephrine at two dosages (2.5 and 4.0 micrograms/kg per min). In the euthyroid state, no significant decrease in cardiac output was observed at either level of pressor infusion. In the thyrotoxic state, the higher dosage of phenylephrine increased peripheral resistance to the euthyroid control level and caused a small (6%) decrease in cardiac output (P less than 0.05). This small decrease in cardiac output probably could be attributed to the marked increase in left ventricular afterload caused by the pressor infusion as assessed from measurements of intraventricular pressure and dimensions. Changes in the venous circulation were evaluated by measurement of mean circulatory filling pressure and the pressure gradient for venous return in six animals during cardiac arrest induced by injection of acetylcholine into the pulmonary artery. Mean circulatory filling pressure increased from 10 +/- 1 mmHg in the euthyroid state to 16 +/- 2 mmHg (P less than 0.01) during thyrotoxicosis, while pressure gradient for venous return increased from 10 +/- 1 to 14 +/- 2 mmHg (P less than 0.02). These changes in venous return curves were not affected significantly by ganglionic blockade with trimethapan (2.0 mg/kg per min) before cardiac arrest. Thus, the high output state associated with thyrotoxicosis is not

  4. Initial Observations of the Effects of Calcium Chloride Infusions in Pediatric Patients with Low Cardiac Output.

    PubMed

    Averin, Konstantin; Villa, Chet; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Jefferies, John L; Nelson, David P; Cooper, David S; Ryan, Thomas D; Sawyer, Jaclyn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Lorts, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial contractility and relaxation are highly dependent on calcium homeostasis. Immature myocardium, as in pediatric patients, is thought to be more dependent on extracellular calcium for optimal function. For this reason, intravenous calcium chloride infusions may improve myocardial function in the pediatric patient. The objectives of this study were to report the hemodynamic changes seen after administration of continuous calcium chloride to critically ill children. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients (newborn to 17 years old) with hemodynamic instability admitted to the cardiac ICU between May 2011 and May 2012 who received a continuous infusion of calcium chloride. The primary outcome was improvement in cardiac output, assessed by arterial-mixed venous oxygen saturation (A-V) difference. Sixty-eight patients, mean age 0.87 ± 2.67 years, received a total of 116 calcium infusions. Calcium chloride infusions resulted in significant improvements in primary and secondary measures of cardiac output at 2 and 6 h. Six hours after calcium initiation, A-V oxygen saturation difference decreased by 7.4 % (32.6 ± 2.1 to 25.2 ± 2.0 %, p < 0.001), rSO2 increased by 5.5 % (63.1 vs 68.6 %, p < 0.001), and serum lactate decreased by 0.9 mmol/l (3.3 vs 2.4 mmol/l, p < 0.001) with no change in HR (149.1 vs 145.6 bpm p = 0.07). Urine output increased 0.66 ml/kg/h in the 8-h period after calcium initiation when compared to pre-initiation (p = 0.003). Neonates had the strongest evidence of effectiveness with other age groups trending toward significance. Calcium chloride infusions improve markers of cardiac output in a heterogenous group of pediatric patients in a cardiac ICU. Neonates appear to derive the most benefit from utilization of these infusions.

  5. Pilot Study: Estimation of Stroke Volume and Cardiac Output from Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Steppan, Jochen; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2017-01-01

    Background Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is increasingly replacing thermodilution pulmonary artery catheters to assess hemodynamics in patients at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity. However, one of the drawbacks of TEE compared to pulmonary artery catheters is the inability to measure real time stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) continuously. The aim of the present proof of concept study was to validate a novel method of SV estimation, based on pulse wave velocity (PWV) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods This is a retrospective observational study. We measured pulse transit time by superimposing the radial arterial waveform onto the continuous wave Doppler waveform of the left ventricular outflow tract, and calculated SV (SVPWV) using the transformed Bramwell-Hill equation. The SV measured by TEE (SVTEE) was used as a reference. Results A total of 190 paired SV were measured from 28 patients. A strong correlation was observed between SVPWV and SVTEE with the coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.71. A mean difference between the two (bias) was 3.70 ml with the limits of agreement ranging from -20.33 to 27.73 ml and a percentage error of 27.4% based on a Bland-Altman analysis. The concordance rate of two methods was 85.0% based on a four-quadrant plot. The angular concordance rate was 85.9% with radial limits of agreement (the radial sector that contained 95% of the data points) of ± 41.5 degrees based on a polar plot. Conclusions PWV based SV estimation yields reasonable agreement with SV measured by TEE. Further studies are required to assess its utility in different clinical situations. PMID:28060961

  6. Quantification of mitral regurgitation by automated cardiac output measurement: experimental and clinical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Yang, X. S.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Zhou, J.; Vazquez, C. J.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate an automated noninvasive method to quantify mitral regurgitation. BACKGROUND: Automated cardiac output measurement (ACM), which integrates digital color Doppler velocities in space and in time, has been validated for the left ventricular (LV) outflow tract but has not been tested for the LV inflow tract or to assess mitral regurgitation (MR). METHODS: First, to validate ACM against a gold standard (ultrasonic flow meter), 8 dogs were studied at 40 different stages of cardiac output (CO). Second, to compare ACM to the LV outflow (ACMa) and inflow (ACMm) tracts, 50 normal volunteers without MR or aortic regurgitation (44+/-5 years, 31 male) were studied. Third, to compare ACM with the standard pulsed Doppler-two-dimensional echocardiographic (PD-2D) method for quantification of MR, 51 patients (61+/-14 years, 30 male) with MR were studied. RESULTS: In the canine studies, CO by ACM (1.32+/-0.3 liter/min, y) and flow meter (1.35+/-0.3 liter/min, x) showed good correlation (r=0.95, y=0.89x+0.11) and agreement (deltaCO(y-x)=0.03+/-0.08 [mean+/-SD] liter/min). In the normal subjects, CO measured by ACMm agreed with CO by ACMa (r=0.90, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.09+/-0.42 liter/min), PD (r=0.87, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=0.12+/-0.49 liter/min) and 2D (r=0.84, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.16+/-0.48 liter/min). In the patients, mitral regurgitant volume (MRV) by ACMm-ACMa agreed with PD-2D (r= 0.88, y=0.88x+6.6, p < 0.0001, deltaMRV=2.68+/-9.7 ml). CONCLUSIONS: We determined that ACM is a feasible new method for quantifying LV outflow and inflow volume to measure MRV and that ACM automatically performs calculations that are equivalent to more time-consuming Doppler and 2D measurements. Additionally, ACM should improve MR quantification in routine clinical practice.

  7. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: postpartum decompensation and use of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lorello, G; Cubillos, J; McDonald, M; Balki, M

    2014-02-01

    The utility of a non-invasive cardiac output monitor (NICOM™) in guiding the peripartum management and identification of postpartum complications in a patient with severe peripartum cardiomyopathy is reported. A 31-year-old nulliparous woman at 35 weeks of gestation presented with a three-week history of worsening dyspnea and progressive functional deterioration. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction with an ejection fraction <20%. Cardiac status was monitored using NICOM™ during labor and delivery. The baseline values were: cardiac output 5.3 L/min, total peripheral resistance 1549 dynes.sec/cm(5), stroke volume 42.1 mL and stroke volume variation 18%. She received early epidural analgesia during labor, titrated slowly with a loading dose of 0.0625% bupivacaine 10 mL and fentanyl 25 μg, followed by patient-controlled epidural analgesia (0.0625% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2 μg/mL, infusion at 10 mL/h, bolus dose 5 mL and lockout interval 10 min). After epidural drug administration, total peripheral resistance decreased, cardiac output increased, and satisfactory analgesia was obtained. She had an uneventful vaginal delivery with a forceps-assisted second stage after prophylactic administration of furosemide 20 mg. NICOM™ was discontinued after delivery. Fifteen hours post-delivery, the patient developed cardiogenic shock, which resolved after aggressive therapy with inotropes and furosemide. NICOM™ can be used to guide treatment during labor and delivery in patients with critical peripartum cardiomyopathy. We suggest that use of NICOM™ be extended into the postpartum period to detect signs of cardiac decompensation in such patients.

  8. A novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time.

    PubMed

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Ukawa, Teiji; Takeda, Sunao; Ishihara, Hironori; Kazama, Tomiei; Takeda, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring cardiac output (CO) is important for the management of patient circulation in an operation room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU). We assumed that the change in pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram (ECG) and a pulse oximeter wave is correlated with the change in stroke volume (SV), from which CO is derived. The present study reports the verification of this hypothesis using a hemodynamic analysis theory and animal study. PWTT consists of a pre-ejection period (PEP), the pulse transit time through an elasticity artery (T(1)), and the pulse transit time through peripheral resistance arteries (T(2)). We assumed a consistent negative correlation between PWTT and SV under all conditions of varying circulatory dynamics. The equation for calculating SV from PWTT was derived based on the following procedures. 1. Approximating SV using a linear equation of PWTT. 2. The slope and y-intercept of the above equation were determined under consideration of vessel compliance (SV was divided by Pulse Pressure (PP)), animal type, and the inherent relationship between PP and PWTT. Animal study was performed to verify the above-mentioned assumption. The correlation coefficient of PWTT and SV became r = -0.710 (p 〈 0.001), and a good correlation was admitted. It has been confirmed that accurate continuous CO and SV measurement is only possible by monitoring regular clinical parameters (ECG, SpO2, and NIBP).

  9. Cardiac output: a central issue in patients with respiratory extracorporeal support.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Stefano; Zagli, Giovanni; Ricci, Zaccaria; Villa, Gianluca; Barbani, Francesco; Pinelli, Fulvio; De Gaudio, Raffaele; Chelazzi, Cosimo

    2017-01-01

    The iLA-activve(®) Novalung is a new extracorporeal device specifically designed for lung support in patients with hypercapnic and/or hypoxemic respiratory failure. To date, only low-flow applications for decompensated hypercapnic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have been reported in the literature. Here, we briefly report three cases of iLA-activve use in patients with hypercapnic-hypoxemic acute lung failure assisted with mid-flow (up to 2.4 L/min) and different single/double venous cannulation. The main findings of our small case series were: firstly, extracorporeal blood flows over 2.0 L/min across the membrane provided clinically satisfying decarboxylation and improved oxygenation; secondly, the ratio between blood flow through the membrane and the patient's cardiac output (CO) was a major determinant for the oxygen increase. The latter could, therefore, be a useful indicator for understanding performance in the complex and multifactorial evaluation of patients with extracorporeal veno-venous lung support.

  10. Clinical review: Guyton--the role of mean circulatory filling pressure and right atrial pressure in controlling cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Henderson, William R; Griesdale, Donald E G; Walley, Keith R; Sheel, A William

    2010-01-01

    Arthur Guyton's concepts of the determinative role of right heart filling in cardiac output continue to be controversial. This paper reviews his seminal experiments in detail and clarifies the often confusing concepts underpinning his model. One primary criticism of Guyton's model is that the parameters describing venous return had not been measured in a functioning cardiovascular system in humans. Thus, concerns have been expressed in regard to the ability of Guyton's simplistic model, with few parameters, to model the complex human circulation. Further concerns have been raised in regard to the artificial experimental preparations that Guyton used. Recently reported measurements in humans support Guyton's theoretical and animal work.

  11. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Smerup, Morten; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil; Baandrup, Ulrik T; Kristiansen, Steen Buus; Nygaard, Hans; Funder, Jonas; Aalkjær, Christian; Sauer, Cathrine; Buchanan, Rasmus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Østergaard, Kristine; Grøndahl, Carsten; Candy, Geoffrey; Hasenkam, J Michael; Secher, Niels H; Bie, Peter; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Giraffes--the tallest extant animals on Earth--are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. Arterial pressure may exceed 300 mmHg and has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It thus remains unexplained how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures. We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic pressures to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke volume characterizes the giraffe heart. The adaptations result in typical mammalian left ventricular wall tensions, but produce a lowered cardiac output.

  12. Dynamic asymmetries of cardiac output transients in response to muscular exercise in man.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T; Whipp, B J

    1994-01-01

    1. We determined the kinetics of cardiac output (Q) with respect to oxygen uptake (VO2) at the on- and off-transients of constant-load exercise. Six subjects performed constant-load exercise which consisted of 5 min rest, 5 min one-legged pedalling at 50 W and a 5 min recovery period. 2. The transient responses were characterized by first-order kinetics. There was no significant difference between the time constants for VO2 (tau VO2) at the on- (33.9 +/- 3.5 s, mean +/- S.E.M.) and off-transient (37.2 +/- 2.9 s). The time constant for Q (tau Q, 29.4 +/- 3.2 s) was consistently shorter than tau VO2 at the on-transient. However, tau Q was appreciably longer at the off-transient (44.3 +/- 3.6 s) than the on-transient. 3. The results support the contention that the time constant for the on-transient of Q is appreciably faster than that for VO2 and hence there seems little justification for the notion that the time constants for the kinetics of VO2 are determined by the limitations of blood flow in the transient. The asymmetry of Q kinetics, with the off-transient tau Q being appreciably slower than the on-transient tau Q, serves to maintain a sufficiently high oxygen flow to the muscle during recovery from exercise at a time when the muscle oxygen uptake remains high. PMID:7869250

  13. Phlebotomy eliminates the maximal cardiac output response to six weeks of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Bonne, Thomas C; Doucende, Gregory; Flück, Daniela; Jacobs, Robert A; Nordsborg, Nikolai B; Robach, Paul; Walther, Guillaume; Lundby, Carsten

    2014-05-15

    With this study we tested the hypothesis that 6 wk of endurance training increases maximal cardiac output (Qmax) relatively more by elevating blood volume (BV) than by inducing structural and functional changes within the heart. Nine healthy but untrained volunteers (Vo2max 47 ± 5 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1)) underwent supervised training (60 min; 4 times weekly at 65% Vo2max for 6 wk), and Qmax was determined by inert gas rebreathing during cycle ergometer exercise before and after the training period. After the training period, blood volume (determined in duplicates by CO rebreathing) was reestablished to pretraining values by phlebotomy and Qmax was quantified again. Resting echography revealed no structural heart adaptations as a consequence of the training intervention. After the training period, plasma volume (PV), red blood cell volume (RBCV), and BV increased (P < 0.05) by 147 ± 168 (5 ± 5%), 235 ± 64 (10 ± 3%), and 382 ± 204 ml (7 ± 4%), respectively. Vo2max was augmented (P < 0.05) by 10 ± 7% after the training period and decreased (P < 0.05) by 8 ± 7% with phlebotomy. Concomitantly, Qmax was increased (P < 0.05) from 18.9 ± 2.1 to 20.4 ± 2.3 l/min (9 ± 6%) as a consequence of the training intervention, and after normalization of BV by phlebotomy Qmax returned to pretraining values (18.1 ± 2.5 l/min; 12 ± 5% reversal). Thus the exercise training-induced increase in BV is the main mechanism increasing Qmax after 6 wk of endurance training in previously untrained subjects.

  14. Assessment of cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Calbet, José A L; Boushel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy and reproducibility of transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTd) to assess cardiac output (Q̇) in exercising men was determined using indocyanine green (ICG) dilution as a reference method. TPTd has been utilized for the assessment of Q̇ and preload indexes of global end-diastolic volume and intrathoracic blood volume, as well as extravascular lung water (EVLW) in resting humans. It remains unknown if this technique is also accurate and reproducible during exercise. Sixteen healthy men underwent catheterization of the right femoral vein (for iced saline injection), an antecubital vein (ICG injection), and femoral artery (thermistor) to determine their Q̇ by TPTd and ICG concentration during incremental one- and two-legged pedaling on a cycle ergometer and combined arm cranking with leg pedaling to exhaustion. There was a close relationship between TPTd-Q̇ and ICG-Q̇ (r = 0.95, n = 151, standard error of the estimate: 1.452 l/min, P < 0.001; mean difference of 0.06 l/min; limits of agreement -2.98 to 2.86 l/min), and TPTd-Q̇ and ICG-Q̇ increased linearly with oxygen uptake with similar intercepts and slopes. Both methods had mean coefficients of variation close to 5% for Q̇, global end-diastolic volume, and intrathoracic blood volume. The mean coefficient of variation of EVLW, assessed with both indicators (ICG and thermal) was 17% and was sensitive enough to detect a reduction in EVLW of 107 ml when changing from resting supine to upright exercise. In summary, TPTd with bolus injection into the femoral vein is an accurate and reproducible method to assess Q̇ during exercise in humans.

  15. Does targeted pre-load optimisation by stroke volume variation attenuate a reduction in cardiac output in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-Y; Lee, T-S; Chan, K-C; Jeng, C-S; Cheng, Y-J

    2012-07-01

    The prone position can reduce cardiac output by up to 25% due to reduced preload. We hypothesised that preload optimisation targeted to stroke volume variation before turning prone might alleviate this. A supine threshold stroke volume variation of 14% in a preliminary study identified patients whose cardiac outputs would decline when turned prone. In 45 patients, cardiac output declined only in the group whose supine stroke volume variation was high (mean (SD) 5.1 (2.0) to 3.9 (1.9) l.min(-1) ; p < 0.001), but not in patients in whom it was low, or in those in whom stroke volume variation was high, but who received volume preload (p = 0.525 and 0.941, respectively). We conclude that targeted preload optimisation using a supine stroke volume variation value < 14% is effective in preventing falls in cardiac output induced by the prone position.

  16. Measurement of cardiac output in ventricular rupture following acute myocardial infarction--pulmonary artery catheter vs transpulmonary thermodilution--a case report.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Konrad; Simon, Stefan; Preussler, Niels-Peter; Hüter, Lars

    2009-02-01

    We compared the cardiac output measured by the transpulmonary aortic single indicator thermodilution method with that by the pulmonary artery catheterization in a patient with ventricular septal rupture after acute myocardial infarction. Though the former cardiac output was lower than the latter, in the presence of the ventricular septal rupture, the cardiac outputs were equal after the rupture was closed. This indicates that, while the cardiac output measured by the pulmonary artery catheter is influenced by the ventricular left-to-right shunt, transpulmonary aortic thermodilution method measures the true cardiac output of the left heart, which is responsible for organ perfusion.

  17. Cardiac output assessment using oxygen consumption estimated from the left ventricular pressure-volume area.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Jorge A; Lascano, Elena C; Bertolotti, Alejandro M; Gómez, Carmen B; Rodríguez Correa, Carlos A; Favaloro, Roberto R

    2010-01-01

    Use of a majority of structural variables (age, sex, height) to estimate oxygen consumption in the calculation of cardiac output (CO) by the Fick principle does not account for changes in physiological conditions. To improve this limitation, oxygen consumption was estimated based on the left ventricular pressure-volume area. A pilot study with 10 patients undergoing right cardiac catheterization showed that this approach was successful to estimate CO (r=0,73, vs. thermodilution measured CO). Further essays changing end-diastolic-volume in the pressure-volume area formula by body weight or body surface area showed that this last yielded the best correlation with the thermodilution measured CO (slope=1, ordinate =0.01 and r=0.93). These preliminary results indicate that use of a formula originated from the pressure-volume-area concept is a good alternative to estimate oxygen consumption for CO calculation.

  18. Dynamic device properties of pulse contour cardiac output during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, Martin; Riedel, Carsten; Braeunig, Jan; Haas, Sebastian; Goepfert, Matthias S; Treede, Hendrik; Baldus, Stephan; Goetz, Alwin E; Reuter, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    This prospective single-center study aimed to determine the responsiveness and diagnostic performance of continuous cardiac output (CCO) monitors based on pulse contour analysis compared with invasive mean arterial pressure (MAP) during predefined periods of acute circulatory deterioration in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The ability of calibrated (CCO(CAL)) and self-calibrated (CCO(AUTOCAL)) pulse contour analysis to detect the hemodynamic response to 37 episodes of balloon aortic valvuloplasty enabled by rapid ventricular pacing was quantified in 13 patients undergoing TAVI. A "low" and a "high" cut-off limit were predefined as a 15 or 25 % decrease from baseline respectively. We found no significant differences between CCO(CAL) and MAP regarding mean response time [low cut-off: 8.6 (7.1-10.5) vs. 8.9 (7.3-10.8) s, p = 0.76; high cut-off: 11.4 (9.7-13.5) vs. 12.6 (10.7-14.9) s, p = 0.32] or diagnostic performance [area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC): 0.99 (0.98-1.0) vs. 1.0 (0.99-1.0), p = 0.46]. But CCOCAL had a significantly higher amplitude response [95.0 (88.7-98.8) % decrease from baseline] than MAP [41.2 (30.0-52.9) %, p < 0.001]. CCOAUTOCAL had a significantly lower AUC [0.83 (0.73-0.93), p < 0.001] than MAP. Moreover, CCO(CAL) detected hemodynamic recovery significantly earlier than MAP. In conclusion, CCO(CAL) and MAP provided equivalent responsiveness and diagnostic performance to detect acute circulatory depression, whereas CCO(AUTOCAL) appeared to be less appropriate. In contrast to CCO(CAL) the amplitude response of MAP was poor. Consequently even small response amplitudes of MAP could indicate severe decreases in CO.

  19. Measurements of cardiac output of an isolated heart using a specially designed turbine.

    PubMed

    Bunc, M; Suput, D; Zupanc, O; Rozman, J

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac output is one of the important parameters used in evaluation of heart function. A turbine which works on mechanical principles was designed. It is also suitable for cardiac output measurements on isolated pig hearts in cases where some other equipment is not, like on doppler effect based transducers. The basic principle of measuring liquid flow through a turbine is based on measurement of the time that elapses when the rotor rotates by one degree. For this purpose, the rotor is fitted with transparent foil with a ring of 360 short black lines printed close to its circumference. Two infrared light-emitting diodes are mounted on one side of the foil and two photo-transistors, used as sensors of the transmitted infrared light, are mounted on the other. Voltage-regulated output ranging from 0 to +/- 2048 V at one revolution per second gives 500 mV at the output (changeable by programming), calculating time 2 ms, 1 mV resolution (11 bits), with an external power supply of 5 V. The turbine showed a linear response at a continuous saline flow up to 3000 ml min-1 at pressure loads of between 20 and 220 cm H2O. Pressure drop across the turbine depends on the volume flow and was 1 mm Hg at 100 ml min-1 and 3 mm Hg at 7000 ml min-1. A rotating movement 1.25 x 10(-4) kg m2 s-1 was calculated. The lowest volume change of a bolus of saline solution, detected by the turbine, was 1.6 ml.

  20. On- and off-exercise kinetics of cardiac output in response to cycling and walking in COPD patients with GOLD Stages I-IV.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, M K; Vogiatzis, I; Nasis, I; Spetsioti, S; Cherouveim, E; Koskolou, M; Kortianou, E A; Louvaris, Z; Kaltsakas, G; Koutsoukou, A; Koulouris, N G; Alchanatis, M

    2012-05-31

    Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation and large intrathoracic pressure swings may compromise the normal increase in cardiac output (Q) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Therefore, it is anticipated that the greater the disease severity, the greater would be the impairment in cardiac output during exercise. Eighty COPD patients (20 at each GOLD Stage) and 10 healthy age-matched individuals undertook a constant-load test on a cycle-ergometer (75% WR(peak)) and a 6min walking test (6MWT). Cardiac output was measured by bioimpedance (PhysioFlow, Enduro) to determine the mean response time at the onset of exercise (MRTon) and during recovery (MRToff). Whilst cardiac output mean response time was not different between the two exercise protocols, MRT responses during cycling were slower in GOLD Stages III and IV compared to Stages I and II (MRTon: Stage I: 45±2, Stage II: 65±3, Stage III: 90±3, Stage IV: 106±3s; MRToff: Stage I: 42±2, Stage II: 68±3, Stage III: 87±3, Stage IV: 104±3s, respectively). In conclusion, the more advanced the disease severity the more impaired is the hemodynamic response to constant-load exercise and the 6MWT, possibly reflecting greater cardiovascular impairment and/or greater physical deconditioning.

  1. A rebreathing method for measuring lung volume, diffusing capacity and cardiac output in conscious small animals.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Johnson, Robert L; Hsia, Connie C W

    2005-04-15

    We developed a multiple gas rebreathing technique for measuring lung diffusing capacity (DL(CO)), lung volume (V(L)) and cardiac output simultaneously in conscious spontaneously breathing small animals. Lung volume was measured from the dilution of methane (CH4) or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and verified independently by a helium washout technique. Cardiac output and DL(CO) were estimated from the uptake of acetylene and carbon monoxide, respectively. We tested guinea pigs at two levels of alveolar oxygen tension in order to estimate membrane diffusing capacity and pulmonary capillary blood volume by the Roughton-Forster technique. Results show that measured DL(CO) are consistent with reported values in anesthetized guinea pigs as well as with allometric comparison across species. Lung volume estimated from SF6 dilution agreed closely with that estimated independently from helium washout; however, lung volume estimated from CH4 dilution was systematically lower due to the addition of endogenously produced CH4 to the rebreathing system. We conclude that this technique can be used to measure resting lung function in conscious unsedated small animals.

  2. NOTE: Increasing cardiac output and decreasing oxygenation sequence in pump twins of acardiac twin pregnancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Umur, Asli; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Van Bavel, Ed; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.

    2005-02-01

    An acardiac twin pregnancy is a rare but serious complication of monochorionic twinning and consists of an acardiac twin and a pump twin. The acardiac twin is a severely malformed fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart, but grows during pregnancy because it is perfused by the developmentally normal pump twin via a set of arterioarterial and venovenous placental anastomoses. Pump twins die intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases. Because the effects of an acardiac mass on the pump twin's development are incompletely known, methods for outcome prognosis are currently not available. We sought to derive simple relations for the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decreased oxygenation and to use available clinical cases for a preliminary test of the model. As a method, we used a theoretical flow model to represent the fetoplacental circulation of an acardiac twin pregnancy and estimated blood deoxygenation and reoxygenation following perfusion of the two bodies and placentas, respectively. The results show the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decrease of venous oxygen saturation to depend on the ratio of pump twin to acardiac twin umbilical blood flow, whose ratio can be measured by ultrasonography. The clinical cases show a decreasing umbilical flow ratio with gestation. In conclusion, prospective serial study is necessary to test whether measurement of umbilical flow ratios allows monitoring the pump twin's pathophysiologic development, possibly resulting in a guideline for prognosis of pump twin survival.

  3. Cardiac output and vasodilation in the vasovagal response: An analysis of the classic papers.

    PubMed

    Wieling, Wouter; Jardine, David L; de Lange, Frederik J; Brignole, Michele; Nielsen, Henning B; Stewart, Julian; Sutton, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The simple faint is secondary to hypotension and bradycardia resulting in transient loss of consciousness. According to Ohm's law applied to the circulation, BP = SVR × CO, hypotension can result from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), cardiac output (CO), or both. It is important to understand that when blood pressure (BP) is falling, SVR and CO do not change reciprocally as they do in the steady state. In 1932, Lewis, assuming that decreased SVR alone accounted for hypotension, defined "the vasovagal response" along pathophysiologic lines to denote the association of vasodilation with vagal-induced bradycardia in simple faint. Studies performed by Barcroft and Sharpey-Schafer between 1940 and 1950 used volume-based plethysmography to demonstrate major forearm vasodilation during extreme hypotension and concluded that the main mechanism for hypotension was vasodilation. Plethysmographic measurements were intermittent and not frequent enough to capture rapid changes in blood flow during progressive hypotension. However, later investigations by Weissler, Murray, and Stevens performed between 1950 and 1970 used invasive beat-to-beat BP measurements and more frequent measurements of CO using the Fick principle. They demonstrated that CO significantly fell before syncope, and little vasodilation occurred until very late in the vasovagal reaction Thus, since the 1970s, decreasing cardiac output rather than vasodilation has been regarded as the principal mechanism for the hypotension of vasovagal syncope.

  4. Effect of norepinephrine dosage and calibration frequency on accuracy of pulse contour-derived cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Continuous cardiac output monitoring is used for early detection of hemodynamic instability and guidance of therapy in critically ill patients. Recently, the accuracy of pulse contour-derived cardiac output (PCCO) has been questioned in different clinical situations. In this study, we examined agreement between PCCO and transcardiopulmonary thermodilution cardiac output (COTCP) in critically ill patients, with special emphasis on norepinephrine (NE) administration and the time interval between calibrations. Methods This prospective, observational study was performed with a sample of 73 patients (mean age, 63 ± 13 years) requiring invasive hemodynamic monitoring on a non-cardiac surgery intensive care unit. PCCO was recorded immediately before calibration by COTCP. Bland-Altman analysis was performed on data subsets comparing agreement between PCCO and COTCP according to NE dosage and the time interval between calibrations up to 24 hours. Further, central artery stiffness was calculated on the basis of the pulse pressure to stroke volume relationship. Results A total of 330 data pairs were analyzed. For all data pairs, the mean COTCP (±SD) was 8.2 ± 2.0 L/min. PCCO had a mean bias of 0.16 L/min with limits of agreement of -2.81 to 3.15 L/min (percentage error, 38%) when compared to COTCP. Whereas the bias between PCCO and COTCP was not significantly different between NE dosage categories or categories of time elapsed between calibrations, interchangeability (percentage error <30%) between methods was present only in the high NE dosage subgroup (≥0.1 μg/kg/min), as the percentage errors were 40%, 47% and 28% in the no NE, NE < 0.1 and NE ≥ 0.1 μg/kg/min subgroups, respectively. PCCO was not interchangeable with COTCP in subgroups of different calibration intervals. The high NE dosage group showed significantly increased central artery stiffness. Conclusions This study shows that NE dosage, but not the time interval between calibrations, has an

  5. Effects of acute hypoxia at moderate altitude on stroke volume and cardiac output during exercise.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Taira; Maegawa, Taketeru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Komatsu, Yutaka; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Nagai, Ryozo; Kawahara, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    It has been unclear how acute hypoxia at moderate altitude affects stroke volume (SV), an index of cardiac function, during exercise. The present study was conducted to reveal whether acute normobaric hypoxia might alter SV during exercise.Nine healthy male subjects performed maximal exercise testing under normobaric normoxic, and normobaric hypoxic conditions (O(2): 14.4%) in a randomized order. A novel thoracic impedance method was used to continuously measure SV and cardiac output (CO) during exercise. Acute hypoxia decreased maximal work rate (hypoxia; 247 + or - 6 [SE] versus normoxia; 267 + or - 8 W, P < 0.005) and VO(2) max (hypoxia; 2761 + or - 99 versus normoxia; 3039 + or - 133 mL/min, P < 0.005). Under hypoxic conditions, SV and CO at maximal exercise decreased (SV: hypoxia; 145 + or - 11 versus normoxia; 163 + or - 11 mL, P < 0.05, CO: hypoxia; 26.7 + or - 2.1 versus normoxia; 30.2 + or - 1.8 L/min, P < 0.05). In acute hypoxia, SV during submaximal exercise at identical work rate decreased. Furthermore, in hypoxia, 4 of 9 subjects attained their highest SV at maximal exercise, while in normoxia, 8 of 9 subjects did.Acute normobaric hypoxia attenuated the increment of SV and CO during exercise, and SV reached a plateau earlier under hypoxia than in normoxia. Cardiac function during exercise at this level of acute normobaric hypoxia might be attenuated.

  6. Differences between directly measured and calculated values for cardiac output in the dogfish: a criticism of the Fick method.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, J D; Butler, P J

    1982-08-01

    Cardiac output has been measured directly, and calculated by the Fick method, during normoxia and hypoxia in six artificially perfused dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) in an attempt to estimate the accuracy of this method in fish. The construction and operation of a simple extra-corporeal cardiac bypass pump is described. This pump closely mimics the flow pulse profiles of the fish's own heart and allows complete control of both cardiac stroke volume and systolic and diastolic periods. During normoxia (PO2 = 21 kPa) there was no significant difference between directly measured and calculated values for cardiac output. However, some shunting of blood past the respiratory surface of the gills may have been obscured by cutaneous oxygen uptake. In response to hypoxia (PO2 = 8.6 kPa) there is either a decrease in the amount of blood being shunted past the respiratory surface of the gills and/or an increase in cutaneous oxygen uptake such that the Fick calculated value for cardiac output is on average 38% greater than the measured value. It is proposed that the increase in the levels of circulating catecholamines that is reported to occur in response to hypoxia in this species may play an important role in the observed response to hypoxia. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the calculation of cardiac output by the Fick principle in fish.

  7. Cardiac Output Monitoring Managing Intravenous Therapy (COMMIT) to Treat Emergency Department Patients with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Peter C.; Filbin, Michael R.; Napoli, Anthony; Feldman, Joseph; Pang, Peter S.; Sankoff, Jeffrey; Lo, Bruce M.; Dickey-White, Howard; Birkhahn, Robert H.; Shapiro, Nathan I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Fluid responsiveness is proposed as a physiology-based method to titrate fluid therapy based on preload dependence. The objectives of this study were to determine if a fluid responsiveness protocol would decrease progression of organ dysfunction, and a fluid responsiveness protocol would facilitate a more aggressive resuscitation. Methods: Prospective, 10-center, randomized interventional trial. Inclusion criteria: suspected sepsis and lactate 2.0 to 4.0 mmol/L. Exclusion criteria (abbreviated): systolic blood pressure more than 90 mmHg, and contraindication to aggressive fluid resuscitation. Intervention: fluid responsiveness protocol using Non-Invasive Cardiac Output Monitor (NICOM) to assess for fluid responsiveness (>10% increase in stroke volume in response to 5 mL/kg fluid bolus) with balance of a liter given in responsive patients. Control: standard clinical care. Outcomes: primary—change in Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at least 1 over 72 h; secondary—fluids administered. Trial was initially powered at 600 patients, but stopped early due to a change in sponsor's funding priorities. Results: Sixty-four patients were enrolled with 32 in the treatment arm. There were no significant differences between arms in age, comorbidities, baseline vital signs, or SOFA scores (P > 0.05 for all). Comparing treatment versus Standard of Care—there was no difference in proportion of increase in SOFA score of at least 1 point (30% vs. 33%) (note bene underpowered, P = 1.0) or mean preprotocol fluids 1,050 mL (95% confidence interval [CI]: 786–1,314) vs. 1,031 mL (95% CI: 741–1,325) (P = 0.93); however, treatment patients received more fluids during the protocol (2,633 mL [95% CI: 2,264–3,001] vs. 1,002 mL [95% CI: 707–1,298]) (P < 0.001). Conclusions: In this study of a “preshock” population, there was no change in progression of organ dysfunction with a fluid responsiveness protocol

  8. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac output from arterial pressure profiles during exercise.

    PubMed

    Antonutto, G; Girardis, M; Tuniz, D; di Prampero, P E

    1995-01-01

    , MAPin, HR, PP, MAP are the above parameters at rest and during exercise, respectively. Also in this case, the coefficients f to 1 were determined by a computerized statistical method using Z* as the experimental reference. The values of Zcor so obtained allowed us to calculate SV from arterial pulse contour analysis as SVF = As.Z-1cor. The mean percentage error between the SVF obtained and the values simultaneously determined by PDE, was 10.0 (SD 8.7)%. It is concluded that the SV of the left ventricle, and hence cardiac output, can be determined during exercise from photoplethysmograph tracings with reasonable accuracy, provided that an initial estimate of SV at rest is made by means an independent high quality reference method.

  9. A review of intraoperative goal-directed therapy using arterial waveform analysis for assessment of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Seres, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that goal-directed hemodynamic management can improve outcomes in surgical and intensive care settings. Arterial waveform analysis is one of the different techniques used for guiding goal-directed therapy. Multiple proprietary systems have developed algorithms for obtaining cardiac output from an arterial waveform, including the FloTrac, LiDCO, and PiCCO systems. These systems vary in terms of how they analyze the arterial pressure waveform as well as their requirements for invasive line placement and calibration. Although small-scale clinical trials using these monitors show promising data, large-scale multicenter trials are still needed to better determine how intraoperative goal-directed therapy with arterial waveform analysis can improve patient outcomes. This review provides a comparative analysis of the different arterial waveform monitors for intraoperative goal-directed therapy.

  10. Low Cardiac Output Secondary to a Malpositioned Umbilical Venous Catheter: Value of Targeted Neonatal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Dany E.; Poon, Wei Bing; James, Andrew; McNamara, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic hypotension is common in very low birthweight preterm infants but the nature of the precipitating cause may be unclear. Targeted neonatal echocardiography (TnEcho) is being increasingly used to support hemodynamic decisions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), including identifying impairments in the transitional circulation of preterm infants, providing timely re-evaluation after institution of therapies and evaluating the placement of indwelling catheters. We present a case of a preterm infant with systemic hypotension and low cardiac output secondary to a large transatrial shunt induced by a malpositioned umbilical venous catheter. Repositioning of the line led to resolution of the hemodynamic disturbance and clinical instability, highlighting the utility of TnEcho in the NICU. PMID:25032055

  11. Reference values for total blood volume and cardiac output in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Much research has been devoted to measurement of total blood volume (TBV) and cardiac output (CO) in humans but not enough effort has been devoted to collection and reduction of results for the purpose of deriving typical or {open_quotes}reference{close_quotes} values. Identification of normal values for TBV and CO is needed not only for clinical evaluations but also for the development of biokinetic models for ultra-short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine (Leggett and Williams 1989). The purpose of this report is to offer reference values for TBV and CO, along with estimates of the associated uncertainties that arise from intra- and inter-subject variation, errors in measurement techniques, and other sources. Reference values are derived for basal supine CO and TBV in reference adult humans, and differences associated with age, sex, body size, body position, exercise, and other circumstances are discussed.

  12. Monitoring Cardiac Output and Transesophageal Echocardiography during Removal of a Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Demir, Aslı; Karadeniz, Ümit; Aydınlı, Bahar; Taş, Murat; Erdemli, Özcan

    2013-12-01

    A ventricular assist device (VAD) is a mechanical pump used to support heart function and blood flow in patients with poor heart functions. For selected patients who are too ill to wait for a heart transplant or are not eligible for a heart transplant because of age or other medical problems, ventricular assist devices offer life-saving therapy. This device has also become a life-saving approach for patients with acute viral myocarditis. Following the acute illness phase, when heart function has improved, the VAD is carefully removed. It is very important to continuously monitor myocardial functions during this period. In this paper, we present a patient who underwent cardiac output and transesophageal echocardiography monitoring during VAD removal.

  13. Monitoring Cardiac Output and Transesophageal Echocardiography during Removal of a Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Aslı; Karadeniz, Ümit; Aydınlı, Bahar; Taş, Murat; Erdemli, Özcan

    2013-01-01

    A ventricular assist device (VAD) is a mechanical pump used to support heart function and blood flow in patients with poor heart functions. For selected patients who are too ill to wait for a heart transplant or are not eligible for a heart transplant because of age or other medical problems, ventricular assist devices offer life-saving therapy. This device has also become a life-saving approach for patients with acute viral myocarditis. Following the acute illness phase, when heart function has improved, the VAD is carefully removed. It is very important to continuously monitor myocardial functions during this period. In this paper, we present a patient who underwent cardiac output and transesophageal echocardiography monitoring during VAD removal. PMID:27366376

  14. Accuracy of Cardiac Output by Nine Different Pulse Contour Algorithms in Cardiac Surgery Patients: A Comparison with Transpulmonary Thermodilution.

    PubMed

    Broch, Ole; Bein, Berthold; Gruenewald, Matthias; Masing, Sarah; Huenges, Katharina; Haneya, Assad; Steinfath, Markus; Renner, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Today, there exist several different pulse contour algorithms for calculation of cardiac output (CO). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of nine different pulse contour algorithms with transpulmonary thermodilution before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods. Thirty patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied before and after CPB. A passive leg raising maneuver was also performed. Measurements included CO obtained by transpulmonary thermodilution (COTPTD) and by nine pulse contour algorithms (COX1-9). Calibration of pulse contour algorithms was performed by esophageal Doppler ultrasound after induction of anesthesia and 15 min after CPB. Correlations, Bland-Altman analysis, four-quadrant, and polar analysis were also calculated. Results. There was only a poor correlation between COTPTD and COX1-9 during passive leg raising and in the period before and after CPB. Percentage error exceeded the required 30% limit. Four-quadrant and polar analysis revealed poor trending ability for most algorithms before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm revealed the best reliability. Conclusions. Estimation of CO by nine different pulse contour algorithms revealed poor accuracy compared with transpulmonary thermodilution. Furthermore, the less-invasive algorithms showed an insufficient capability for trending hemodynamic changes before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm demonstrated the highest reliability. This trial is registered with NCT02438228 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  15. Accuracy of Cardiac Output by Nine Different Pulse Contour Algorithms in Cardiac Surgery Patients: A Comparison with Transpulmonary Thermodilution

    PubMed Central

    Bein, Berthold; Gruenewald, Matthias; Masing, Sarah; Huenges, Katharina; Haneya, Assad; Steinfath, Markus; Renner, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Today, there exist several different pulse contour algorithms for calculation of cardiac output (CO). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of nine different pulse contour algorithms with transpulmonary thermodilution before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods. Thirty patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied before and after CPB. A passive leg raising maneuver was also performed. Measurements included CO obtained by transpulmonary thermodilution (COTPTD) and by nine pulse contour algorithms (COX1–9). Calibration of pulse contour algorithms was performed by esophageal Doppler ultrasound after induction of anesthesia and 15 min after CPB. Correlations, Bland-Altman analysis, four-quadrant, and polar analysis were also calculated. Results. There was only a poor correlation between COTPTD and COX1–9 during passive leg raising and in the period before and after CPB. Percentage error exceeded the required 30% limit. Four-quadrant and polar analysis revealed poor trending ability for most algorithms before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm revealed the best reliability. Conclusions. Estimation of CO by nine different pulse contour algorithms revealed poor accuracy compared with transpulmonary thermodilution. Furthermore, the less-invasive algorithms showed an insufficient capability for trending hemodynamic changes before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm demonstrated the highest reliability. This trial is registered with NCT02438228 (ClinicalTrials.gov). PMID:28116294

  16. The normal ranges of cardiovascular parameters measured using the ultrasonic cardiac output monitor.

    PubMed

    Cattermole, Giles N; Leung, P Y Mia; Ho, Grace Y L; Lau, Peach W S; Chan, Cangel P Y; Chan, Stewart S W; Smith, Brendan E; Graham, Colin A; Rainer, Timothy H

    2017-03-01

    The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive transcutaneous continuous wave Doppler method for assessing hemodynamics. There are no published reference ranges for normal values in adults (aged 18-60 years) for this device. This study aimed to (1) measure cardiovascular indices using USCOM in healthy adults aged 18-60 years; (2) combine these data with those for healthy children (aged 0-12), adolescents (aged 12-18), and the elderly (aged over 60) from our previously published studies in order to present normal ranges for all ages, and (3) establish normal ranges of USCOM-derived variables according to both weight and age. This was a population-based cross-sectional observational study of healthy Chinese subjects aged 0.5-89 years in Hong Kong. USCOM scans were performed on all subjects, to produce measurements including stroke volume, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance. Data from previously published studies (children, adolescents, and the elderly) were included. Normal ranges were defined as lying between the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles. A total of 2218 subjects were studied (mean age = 16.4, range = 0.5-89; 52% male). From previous studies, 1197 children (aged 0-12, 55% male), 590 adolescents (aged 12-18, 49% male), and 77 elderly (aged 60-89, 55% male) were included. New data were collected from 354 adults aged 18-60 (47% male). Normal ranges are presented according to age and weight. We present comprehensive normal ranges for hemodynamic parameters obtained with USCOM in healthy subjects of all ages from infancy to the elderly.

  17. Rowing increases stroke volume and cardiac output to a greater extent than cycling.

    PubMed

    Horn, P; Ostadal, P; Ostadal, B

    2015-01-01

    Exercise stimulates increases in heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). These adaptive mechanisms are strongly dependent on the type of exercise. Both rowing and cycling are widely used for physical training worldwide; however, evidence regarding the differences in major hemodynamic parameters during rowing and cycling remains insufficient. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to perform either a rowing or cycling exercise. After 20 min rest, the group who had rowed first performed the cycling exercise and vice versa. Exercise was performed at a power-to-weight ratio of 2 W/kg for 2 min. HR, SV, CO and blood pressure (BP) were measured noninvasively using pulse-wave analysis at baseline and immediately after each exercise. HR, SV and CO were significantly higher after exercise than at rest. Whereas HR was comparable between rowing and cycling, SV and CO were significantly higher after rowing than after cycling. BP was comparable among all three measurements. Rowing increased SV and CO to a greater extent than cycling, whereas HR and BP were not influenced by the type of exercise. Our data suggest that rowing leads to more extensive stimulation of cardiac contractility and/or decreases in peripheral vascular resistance compared with cycling.

  18. Noninvasive aortic bloodflow by Pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) compared to cardiac output by the direct Fick procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Left ventricular stroke volume was estimated from the systolic velocity integral in the ascending aorta by pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) and the cross sectional area of the aorta estimated by M mode echocardiography on 15 patients with coronary disease undergoing right catheterization for diagnostic purposes. Cardiac output was calculated from stroke volume and heart volume using the PDE method as well as the Fick procedure for comparison. The mean value for the cardiac output via the PDE method (4.42 L/min) was only 6% lower than for the cardiac output obtained from the Fick procedure (4.69 L/min) and the correlation between the two methods was excellent (r=0.967, p less than .01). The good agreement between the two methods demonstrates that the PDE technique offers a reliable noninvasive alternative for estimating cardiac output, requiring no active cooperation by the subject. It was concluded that the Doppler method is superior to the Fick method in that it provides beat by beat information on cardiac performance.

  19. Equipment review: New techniques for cardiac output measurement – oesophageal Doppler, Fick principle using carbon dioxide, and pulse contour analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berton, Christine; Cholley, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Measuring cardiac output is of paramount importance in the management of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit and of 'high risk' surgical patients in the operating room. Alternatives to thermodilution are now available and are gaining acceptance among practitioners who have been trained almost exclusively in the use of the pulmonary artery catheter. The present review focuses on the principles, advantages and limitations of oesophageal Doppler, Fick principle applied to carbon dioxide, and pulse contour analysis. No single method stands out or renders the others obsolete. By making cardiac output easily measurable, however, these techniques should all contribute to improvement in haemodynamic management. PMID:12133181

  20. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nillesen, M. M.; Lopata, R. G. P.; de Boode, W. P.; Gerrits, I. H.; Huisman, H. J.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was

  1. Early predictors of acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial infection: urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cardiac output as reliable tools

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, Rafael O.; Farias, Alberto Q.; Helou, Claudia M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic abnormalities and acute kidney injury (AKI) are often present in infected cirrhotic patients. Hence, an early diagnosis of AKI is necessary, which might require the validation of new predictors as the determinations of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) and cardiac output. Methods We evaluated 18 infected cirrhotic patients subdivided into two groups at admission (0 hours). In Group I, we collected urine samples at 0 hours, 6 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours for uNGAL and fractional excretion of sodium determinations. In Group II, we measured cardiac output using echocardiography. Results The age of patients was 55.0±1.9 years, and 11 patients were males. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was 21±1, whereas the Child–Pugh score was C in 11 patients and B in 7 patients. Both patients in Group I and Group II showed similar baseline characteristics. In Group I, we diagnosed AKI in 5 of 9 patients, and the mean time to this diagnosis by measuring serum creatinine was 5.4 days. Patients with AKI showed higher uNGAL levels than those without AKI from 6 hours to 48 hours. The best accuracy using the cutoff values of 68 ng uNGAL/mg creatinine was achieved at 48 hours when we distinguished patients with and without AKI in all cases. In Group II, we diagnosed AKI in 4 of 9 patients, and cardiac output was significantly higher in patients who developed AKI at 0 hours. Conclusion Both uNGAL and cardiac output determinations allow the prediction of AKI in infected cirrhotic patients earlier than increments in serum creatinine. PMID:26484038

  2. Noninvasive cardiac output measurement by inert gas rebreathing in suspected pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Farina, Stefania; Teruzzi, Giovanni; Cattadori, Gaia; Ferrari, Cristina; De Martini, Stefano; Bussotti, Maurizio; Calligaris, Giuseppe; Bartorelli, Antonio; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate inert gas rebreathing (IGR) reliability in cardiac output (CO) measurement compared with Fick method and thermodilution. IGR is a noninvasive method for CO measurement; CO by IGR is calculated as pulmonary blood flow plus intrapulmonary shunt. IGR may be ideal for follow-up of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH), sparing the need of repeated invasive right-sided cardiac catheterization. Right-sided cardiac catheterization with CO measurement by thermodilution, Fick method, and IGR was performed in 125 patients with possible PH by echocardiography. Patients were grouped according to right-sided cardiac catheterization-measured mean pulmonary and wedge pressures: normal pulmonary arterial pressure (n = 20, mean pulmonary arterial pressure = 18 ± 3 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure = 11 ± 5 mm Hg), PH and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PH-NW, n = 37 mean pulmonary arterial pressure = 42 ± 13 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure = 11 ± 6 mm Hg), and PH and high pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PH-HW, n = 68, mean pulmonary arterial pressure = 37 ± 9 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure = 24 ± 6 mm Hg). Thermodilution and Fick measurements were comparable. Fick and IGR agreement was observed in normal pulmonary arterial pressure (CO = 4.10 ± 1.14 and 4.08 ± 0.97 L/min, respectively), whereas IGR overestimated Fick in patients with PH-NW and those with PH-HW because of intrapulmonary shunting overestimation in hypoxemic patients. When patients with arterial oxygen saturation (SO2) ≤90% were excluded, IGR and Fick agreement improved in PH-NW (CO = 4.90 ± 1.70 and 4.76 ± 1.35 L/min, respectively) and PH-HW (CO = 4.05 ± 1.04 and 4.10 ± 1.17 L/min, respectively). In hypoxemic patients, we estimated pulmonary shunt as Fick - pulmonary blood flow and calculated shunt as: -0.2423 × arterial SO2 + 21.373 L/min. In conclusion, IGR is reliable for CO measurement in patients with PH

  3. The Treatment of Shock Based Upon Physiological Principles and Impedence Method for Measuring Cardiac Output in Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-01-01

    cardiogenic shock following intracoronary artery microsphere embolization. The syndrome has been previously characterized by a fall in cardiac output and a...previously been oub- jected to and survived usually lethal cardiogenic shock, 5 dogs were selected. One month after intracoronary embolization, an LD, 0 0

  4. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p< 0.05. RESULTS: Artery diameter did not change from baseline. BF increased (p<0.05) after exercise in each condition except LBFR(sub SBP) in the order of HL (12.73+/-1.42 cm3,mean+/-SE) > LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of

  5. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, and cardiac output during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Deutschman, Robert A., III; West, John B.

    1993-01-01

    We measured pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL), diffusing capacity per unit lung volume, pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), pulmonary capillary blood flow or cardiac output (Qc), and cardiac stroke volume (SV) in four subjects exposed to nine days of microgravity. DL in microgravity was elevated compared with preflight standing values and was higher than preflight supine because of the elevation of both Vc and Dm. The elevation in Vc was comparable to that measured supine in 1 G, but the increase in Dm was in sharp contrast to the supine value. We postulate that, in 0 G, pulmonary capillary blood is evenly distributed throughout the lung, providing for uniform capillary filling, leading to an increase in the surface area available for diffusion. By contrast, in the supine 1-G state, the capillaries are less evenly filled, and although a similar increase in blood volume is observed, the corresponding increase in surface area does not occur. DL and its subdivisions showed no adaptive changes from the first measurement 24 h after the start of 0 G to eight days later. Similarly, there were no trends in the postflight data, suggesting that the principal mechanism of these changes was gravitational. The increase in Dm suggests that subclinical pulmonary edema did not result from exposure to 0 G. Qc was modestly increased inflight and decreased postflight compared with preflight standing. Compared with preflight standing, SV was increased 46 percent inflight and decreased 14 percent in the 1st week postflight. There were temporal changes in Qc and SV during 0 G, with the highest values recorded at the first measurement, 24 h into the flight. The lowest values of Qc and SV occurred on the day of return.

  6. Noninvasive measurement of cardiac output during exercise in children with tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Marcuccio, Elisa; Arora, Gaurav; Quivers, Eric; Yurchak, Mary Kay; McCaffrey, Francis

    2012-10-01

    In patients with surgically repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), reported peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)) is decreased compared with control subjects. The measurement of exercise cardiac output (CO) could be a useful adjunct for assessing cardiovascular fitness. There are few data assessing noninvasive CO, cardiac index (CI), and stroke volume (SV) during exercise for these patients. This study sought to measure noninvasive CI and SV during rest and exercise in children with repaired TOF. The authors compared 21 asymptomatic children with repaired TOF ages 11-17 years during rest and exercise and 42 gender- and age-matched healthy control children without structural heart disease. Using a Bruce exercise protocol, exercise data were measured noninvasively by a novel inert gas rebreathing technique including peak duration and heart rate, as well as VO(2), CO, CI, and SV measured at 90 % of peak predicted theoretical heart rate (90 % ppHR). Statistical correlation between peak VO(2) and CI was performed. At baseline, there was no statistically significant difference in any of the measures between the groups. At 90 % ppHR, there was an increase in CI during exercise of 140 % in the TOF children and 180 % in the control children. During exercise, SV changed minimally in the patient group, whereas it increased more than 30 % in the control children. At 90 % ppHR, the patient group showed an increase in VO(2) during exercise similar to that of their healthy peers. The patients had a significantly shorter peak exercise duration than normal control subjects. The patients had a lower CI during exercise because they were less able to increase SV. Therefore, at similar heart rates, patients who have had TOF repair must rely on increased peripheral muscle extraction, with a higher arteriovenous oxygen difference (SaO(2)-MvO(2)) during exercise, which may limit peak exercise capacity. In this cohort of TOF patients, noninvasive CI measurement was feasible, and correlation with VO

  7. Acoustic output of multi-line transmit beamforming for fast cardiac imaging: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Santos, Pedro; Tong, Ling; Ortega, Alejandra; Løvstakken, Lasse; Samset, Eigil; D'hooge, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Achieving higher frame rates in cardiac ultrasound could unveil short-lived myocardial events and lead to new insights on cardiac function. Multi-line transmit (MLT) beamforming (i.e., simultaneously transmitting multiple focused beams) is a potential approach to achieve this. However, two challenges come with it: first, it leads to cross-talk between the MLT beams, appearing as imaging artifacts, and second, it presents acoustic summation in the near field, where multiple MLT beams overlap. Although several studies have focused on the former, no studies have looked into the implications of the latter on acoustic safety. In this paper, the acoustic field of 4-MLT was simulated and compared with single-line transmit (SLT). The findings suggest that standard MLT does present potential concerns. Compared with SLT, it shows a 2-fold increase in mechanical index (MI) (from 1.0 to 2.3), a 6-fold increase in spatial-peak pulse-average intensity (I(sppa)) (from 99 to 576 W∙cm(-2)) and a 12-fold increase in spatial-peak temporalaverage intensity (I(spta)) (from 119 to 1407 mW∙cm(-2)). Subsequently, modifications of the transmit pulse and delay line of MLT were studied. These modifications allowed for a change in the spatio-temporal distribution of the acoustic output, thereby significantly decreasing the safety indices (MI = 1.2, I(sppa) = 92 W∙cm(-2) and I(spta) = 366 mW∙cm(-2)). Accordingly, they help mitigate the concerns around MLT, reducing potential tradeoffs between acoustic safety and image quality.

  8. Quantification of the impaired cardiac output response to exercise in heart failure: application of a non-invasive device.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; Gujja, Pradeep; Neelagaru, Suresh; Hsu, Leon; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    An impaired cardiac output (CO) response to exercise is a hallmark of chronic heart failure (CHF), and the degree to which CO is impaired is related to the severity of CHF and prognosis. However, practical methods for obtaining cardiac output during exercise are lacking, and what constitutes and impaired response is unclear. Forty six CHF patients and 13 normal subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) while CO and other hemodynamic measurements at rest and during exercise were obtained using a novel, non-invasive, bioreactance device based on assessment of relative phase shifts of electric currents injected across the thorax, heart rate and ventricular ejection time. An abnormal cardiac output response to exercise was defined as achieving ≤ 95% of the confidence limits of the slope of the relationship between CO and oxygen uptake (VO2). An impaired CO slope identified patients with more severe CHF as evidenced by a lower peak VO2, lower peak CO, heightened VE/VCO2 slope, and lower oxygen uptake efficiency slope. CO can be estimated during exercise using a novel bioreactance technique; patients with an impaired response to exercise exhibit reduced exercise capacity and inefficient ventilation typical of more severe CHF. Non- invasive measurement of cardiac performance in response to exercise provides a simple method of identifying patients with more severe CHF and may complement the CPX in identifying CHF patients at high risk. Key pointsNon-invasive measurement of cardiac output during exercise is feasible in patients with heart failure.Impairment in the CO response to exercise identifies heart failure patients with more severe disease, lower exercise capacity and inefficient ventilation.Non-invasive measurement of cardiac performance during exercise has potentially important applications for the functional and prognostic assessment of patients with heart failure.

  9. Cardiac output but not stroke volume is similar in a Wingate and VO2peak test in young men.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Piero; Betschon, Katharina; Boutellier, Urs; Toigo, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Wingate test (WT) training programmes lasting 2-3 weeks lead to improved peak oxygen consumption. If a single 30 s WT was capable of significantly increasing stroke volume and cardiac output, the increase in peak oxygen consumption could possibly be explained by improved oxygen delivery. Thus, we investigated whether a single WT increases stroke volume and cardiac output to similar levels than those obtained at peak exercise during a graded cycling exercise test (GXT) to exhaustion. Fifteen healthy young men (peak oxygen consumption 45.0 ± 5.3 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) performed one WT and one GXT on separate days in randomised order. During the tests, we estimated cardiac output using inert gas rebreathing (nitrous oxide and sulphur hexafluoride) and subsequently calculated stroke volume. We found that cardiac output was similar (18.2 ± 3.3 vs. 17.9 ± 2.6 l min(-1); P = 0.744), stroke volume was higher (127 ± 37 vs. 94 ± 15 ml; P < 0.001), and heart rate was lower (149 ± 26 vs. 190 ± 12 beats min(-1); P < 0.001) at the end (27 ± 2 s) of a WT as compared to peak exercise during a GXT. Our results suggest that a single WT produces a haemodynamic response which is characterised by similar cardiac output, higher stroke volume and lower heart rate as compared to peak exercise during a GXT.

  10. Cardiac output and associated left ventricular hypertrophy in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Donald J; Kimball, Thomas R; Koury, Phillip R; Mitsnefes, Mark M

    2009-03-01

    A significant number of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), suggesting the role of preload overload. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased cardiac output (CO) might be a contributing factor for increased left ventricular mass index (LVMI) in these children. Patients aged 6-20 years with CKD stages 2-4 were enrolled. Echocardiograms were performed to assess LV function and geometry at rest and during exercise. Heart rate, stroke volume, and CO were also assessed at rest and during exercise. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure (AMBP) monitoring was performed. Of the patients enrolled in this study, 17% had LVH. Increased stroke volume and CO were observed in patients with LVH compared to patients without LVH. Univariate analysis revealed significant positive associations between LVMI and CO, stroke volume, body mass index, pulse pressure from mean 24-h AMBP, and mean 24-h systolic BP load. No association with heart rate, age, parathyroid hormone, glomerular filtration rate, or anemia was observed. Only CO (beta = 1.98, p = 0.0005) was independently associated with increased LVMI in multivariate modeling (model R (2) = 0.25). The results of this study suggest that increased CO might predispose to increased LVMI in pediatric patients with CKD. Adaptations may be required to meet increased metabolic demand in these patients.

  11. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  12. High Output Cardiac Failure Resolving after Repair of AV Fistula in a Six-Month-Old

    PubMed Central

    Teomete, Uygar; Gugol, Rubee Anne; Neville, Holly; Dandin, Ozgur; Young, Ming-Lon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acquired AVF in pediatrics are commonly caused by iatrogenic means, including arterial or venous punctures. These fistulae can cause great hemodynamic stress on the heart as soon as they are created. Case. A six-month-old 25-week gestation infant was referred for respiratory distress. Initial exam revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and hypertension. There was a bruit noted on her left arm. An ultrasound showed an arteriovenous fistula. Its location, however, precluded intervention because of the high risk for limb-loss. An echocardiogram showed evidence of pulmonary hypertension that was treated with sildenafil and furosemide. However, no improvement was seen. On temporary manual occlusion of the fistula, the patient was noted to have increased her blood pressure and decreased her heart rate, suggesting significant hemodynamic effect of the fistula. The fistula was subsequently ligated and the patient clinically and echocardiographically improved. Conclusion. A patient in high output cardiac failure or pulmonary artery hypertension, especially prematüre patients with preexisting lung disease, should be probed for history of multiple punctures, trauma, or surgery and should have prompt evaluation for AVF. If it can be diagnosed and repaired, most of the cases have been shown to decrease the stress on the heart and reverse the pathologic hemodynamics. PMID:26885434

  13. High Output Cardiac Failure Resolving after Repair of AV Fistula in a Six-Month-Old.

    PubMed

    Teomete, Uygar; Gugol, Rubee Anne; Neville, Holly; Dandin, Ozgur; Young, Ming-Lon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acquired AVF in pediatrics are commonly caused by iatrogenic means, including arterial or venous punctures. These fistulae can cause great hemodynamic stress on the heart as soon as they are created. Case. A six-month-old 25-week gestation infant was referred for respiratory distress. Initial exam revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and hypertension. There was a bruit noted on her left arm. An ultrasound showed an arteriovenous fistula. Its location, however, precluded intervention because of the high risk for limb-loss. An echocardiogram showed evidence of pulmonary hypertension that was treated with sildenafil and furosemide. However, no improvement was seen. On temporary manual occlusion of the fistula, the patient was noted to have increased her blood pressure and decreased her heart rate, suggesting significant hemodynamic effect of the fistula. The fistula was subsequently ligated and the patient clinically and echocardiographically improved. Conclusion. A patient in high output cardiac failure or pulmonary artery hypertension, especially prematüre patients with preexisting lung disease, should be probed for history of multiple punctures, trauma, or surgery and should have prompt evaluation for AVF. If it can be diagnosed and repaired, most of the cases have been shown to decrease the stress on the heart and reverse the pathologic hemodynamics.

  14. Increase in cardiac output and PEEP as mechanism of pulmonary optimization.

    PubMed

    Curiel, C; Martínez, R; Pinto, V; Rosales, A; D'Empaire, G; Sánchez De Leon, R

    1995-03-01

    The influence of cardiac output (CO) and PEEP on pulmonary shunt (Qs/Qt) has been the subjects of considerable investigation but findings are controversial. The role of CO and PEEP on 19 isolated rabbit lung preparations perfused with hypoxic mixture (6% CO2, 10% O2, and 84% N2), which resulted in a constant oxygen venous pressure (64 +/- 5.6 mmHg) has been studied. The first group of 11 preparations were used to study the influence of CO modifications with room air ventilation on the Qs/Qt when the CO rises in 48%; in the second group simultaneous modifications in CO and PEEP (0.5 and 10 cm H2O) were performed. A positive correlation (p < 0.01) in Qs/Qt (0.048 +/- 0.04 to 0.12933 +/- 0.09) was found when the CO increased in the first experimental group, the fluid filtration rate (FFR) also increased and the pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) remained stable. In the second group an increase of 5 and 10 cm H2O of PEEP at constant CO reduced the Qs/Qt (0.0361 +/- 0.02 to 0.0184 +/- 0.006) while it increased the arterio-venous oxygen difference, PVR and FFR. During high CO conditions increase of 5 and 10 cm H2O of PEEP reduced the Qs/Qt (0.099 +/- 0.03 to 0.027 +/- 0.02) and FFR. These data suggest that when the Qs/Qt is increased, the use of PEEP can compensate the ventilation/perfusion alterations and restore pulmonary gas exchange.

  15. Role of the autonomic nervous system in the reduced maximal cardiac output at altitude.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, Harm J; Hopkins, Susan R; Yamaya, Yoshiki; Niizeki, Kyuichi; Ziegler, Michael G; Wagner, Peter D

    2002-07-01

    After acclimatization to high altitude, maximal exercise cardiac output (QT) is reduced. Possible contributing factors include 1) blood volume depletion, 2) increased blood viscosity, 3) myocardial hypoxia, 4) altered autonomic nervous system (ANS) function affecting maximal heart rate (HR), and 5) reduced flow demand from reduced muscle work capability. We tested the role of the ANS reduction of HR in this phenomenon in five normal subjects by separately blocking the sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the ANS during maximal exercise after 2-wk acclimatization at 3,800 m to alter maximal HR. We used intravenous doses of 8.0 mg of propranolol and 0.8 mg of glycopyrrolate, respectively. At altitude, peak HR was 170 +/- 6 beats/min, reduced from 186 +/- 3 beats/min (P = 0.012) at sea level. Propranolol further reduced peak HR to 139 +/- 2 beats/min (P = 0.001), whereas glycopyrrolate increased peak HR to sea level values, 184 +/- 3 beats/min, confirming adequate dosing with each drug. In contrast, peak O(2) consumption, work rate, and QT were similar at altitude under all drug treatments [peak QT = 16.2 +/- 1.2 (control), 15.5 +/- 1.3 (propranolol), and 16.2 +/- 1.1 l/min (glycopyrrolate)]. All QT results at altitude were lower than those at sea level (20.0 +/- 1.8 l/min in air). Therefore, this study suggests that, whereas the ANS may affect HR at altitude, peak QT is unaffected by ANS blockade. We conclude that the effect of altered ANS function on HR is not the cause of the reduced maximal QT at altitude.

  16. Spontaneous baroreflex control of cardiac output during dynamic exercise, muscle metaboreflex activation, and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; O'Leary, Donal S; Hammond, Robert L; Coutsos, Matthew; Ichinose, Tomoko; Pallante, Marco; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2008-03-01

    We have previously shown that spontaneous baroreflex-induced changes in heart rate (HR) do not always translate into changes in cardiac output (CO) at rest. We have also shown that heart failure (HF) decreases this linkage between changes in HR and CO. Whether dynamic exercise and muscle metaboreflex activation (via imposed reductions in hindlimb blood flow) further alter this translation in normal and HF conditions is unknown. We examined these questions using conscious, chronically instrumented dogs before and after pacing-induced HF during mild and moderate dynamic exercise with and without muscle metaboreflex activation. We measured left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), CO, and HR and analyzed the spontaneous HR-LVSP and CO-LVSP relationships. In normal animals, mild exercise significantly decreased HR-LVSP (-3.08 +/- 0.5 vs. -5.14 +/- 0.6 beats.min(-1).mmHg(-1); P < 0.05) and CO-LVSP (-134.74 +/- 24.5 vs. -208.6 +/- 22.2 ml.min(-1).mmHg(-1); P < 0.05). Moderate exercise further decreased both and, in addition, significantly reduced HR-CO translation (25.9 +/- 2.8% vs. 52.3 +/- 4.2%; P < 0.05). Muscle metaboreflex activation at both workloads decreased HR-LVSP, whereas it had no significant effect on CO-LVSP and the HR-CO translation. HF significantly decreased HR-LVSP, CO-LVSP, and the HR-CO translation in all situations. We conclude that spontaneous baroreflex HR responses do not always cause changes in CO during exercise. Moreover, muscle metaboreflex activation during mild and moderate dynamic exercise reduces this coupling. In addition, in HF the HR-CO translation also significantly decreases during both workloads and decreases even further with muscle metaboreflex activation.

  17. Cardiac output distribution in miniature swine during locomotory exercise to VO/sub 3max/

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.B.; Delp, M.D.; Laughlin, M.H.

    1986-03-01

    Distribution of cardiac output (CO) was studied in miniature swine (22 +/- 1 kg) during level treadmill exercise up to the speed (17.7 km/hr) that elicited maximal oxygen consumption (VO/sub 2max/) (60 +/- 4 m1/min/kg). COs and tissue blood flows (BFs) were measured with the radiolabelled microsphere technique. CO increased from a preexercise value of 2.1 +/- 0.5 1/min up to 9.9 +/- 0.5 1/min at VO/sub 2max/. In preexercise standing 43% of CO went to skeletal muscle, which comprised 36 +/- 1% of body mass, 42% to viscera (12 +/- 1% mass), 5% to brain, heart, and lungs (2% +/- 0.1% mass), and 10% to skin and skeleton (35 +/- 2% mass). Preexercise could not be considered resting because of the animals' excitability. Skeletal muscle BF increased progressively with speed up to VO/sub 2max/, both in absolute terms and in percent CO. At VO/sub 2max/, 88% of CO went to muscle, 3% to viscera, 8% to brain, heart and lungs, and 1% to skin and skeleton. Thus, at VO/sub 2max/ only 4% of CO went to the inactive tissues, which constituted 47% of body mass. In 2 pigs that ran at speeds above 17 km/hr, total muscle BF leveled off at VO/sub 2max/. These findings demonstrate that muscle BF progressively increases up to VO/sub 2max/, and that VO/sub 2/ levels off at the same intensity as muscle flow.

  18. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation enhances stroke volume and cardiac output during dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Walser, Buddy; Stebbins, Charles L

    2008-10-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. We tested the hypotheses that dietary supplementation with DHA (2 g/day) + EPA (3 g/day) enhances increases in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) and decreases in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) during dynamic exercise. Healthy subjects received DHA + EPA (eight men, four women) or safflower oil (six men, three women) for 6 weeks. Both groups performed 20 min of bicycle exercise (10 min each at a low and moderate work intensity) before and after DHA + EPA or safflower oil treatment. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), SV, CO, and SVR were assessed before exercise and during both workloads. HR was unaffected by DHA + EPA and MAP was reduced, but only at rest (88 +/- 5 vs. 83 +/- 4 mm Hg). DHA + EPA augmented increases in SV (14.1 +/- 6.3 vs. 32.3 +/- 8.7 ml) and CO (8.5 +/- 1.0 vs. 10.3 +/- 1.2 L/min) and tended to attenuate decreases in SVR (-7.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -10.1 +/- 1.6 mm Hg L(-1) min(-1)) during the moderate workload. Safflower oil treatment had no effects on MAP, HR, SV, CO or SVR at rest or during exercise. DHA + EPA-induced increases in SV and CO imply that dietary supplementation with these fatty acids can increase oxygen delivery during exercise, which may have beneficial clinical implications for individuals with cardiovascular disease and reduced exercise tolerance.

  19. Invasive Hemodynamic Assessment of Cardiac Output State after MitraClip Therapy in Nonanaesthetized Patients with Functional Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Budesinsky, Tomas; Linkova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Background. Surgical correction of mitral regurgitation (MR) can lead to postoperative low cardiac output state. We aimed to assess the acute hemodynamic changes after percutaneous MitraClip therapy (a unique model without influence of factors linked to surgical procedure) in patients with functional MR without the influence of general anaesthesia. Methods. We studied invasive hemodynamic parameters in 23 patients before procedure (conscious, nonsedated patients), during procedure (intubated patients), and the first day after MitraClip implantation (conscious, extubated patients). Results. Mitral valve clipping significantly increased cardiac index (CI) (from 2.0 ± 0.5 to 3.3 ± 0.6 L/min/m2; p < 0.01). Conversely, there was significant reduction in the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) (from 18.6 ± 5.7 to 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg; p < 0.01), mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 29.8 ± 10.9 to 25.2 ± 10.3 mmHg; p = 0.03), and pulmonary vascular resistance index (from 531 ± 359 to 365 ± 193 dyn·s·cm−5/m2; p = 0.03). Conclusions. The functional MR therapy with percutaneous MitraClip device results in significant increase in CI (+66%) and concomitant decrease in PCWP (−42%). None of our patients developed low cardiac output state. Our results support the idea that significant part of low cardiac output state after cardiac surgery is due to surgery related factors rather than due to increase in afterload after MR elimination. PMID:28058260

  20. A comparison of the Nexfin® and transcardiopulmonary thermodilution to estimate cardiac output during coronary artery surgery.

    PubMed

    Broch, O; Renner, J; Gruenewald, M; Meybohm, P; Schöttler, J; Caliebe, A; Steinfath, M; Malbrain, M; Bein, B

    2012-04-01

    The newly introduced Nexfin(®) device allows analysis of the blood pressure trace produced by a non-invasive finger cuff. We compared the cardiac output derived from the Nexfin and PiCCO, using transcardiopulmonary thermodilution, during cardiac surgery. Forty patients with preserved left ventricular function undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery were studied after induction of general anaesthesia and until discharge to the intensive care unit. There was a significant correlation between Nexfin and PiCCO before (r(2) = 0.81, p < 0.001) and after (r(2) = 0.56, p < 0.001) cardiopulmonary bypass. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated the mean bias of Nexfin to be -0.1 (95% limits of agreement -0.6 to +0.5, percentage error 23%) and -0.1 (-0.8 to +0.6, 26%) l.min(-1).m(-2), before and after cardiopulmonary bypass, respectively. After a passive leg-raise was performed, there was also good correlation between the two methods, both before (r(2) = 0.72, p < 0.001) and after (r(2) = 0.76, p < 0.001) cardiopulmonary bypass. We conclude that the Nexfin is a reliable method of measuring cardiac output during and after cardiac surgery.

  1. Cardiac output method comparison studies: the relation of the precision of agreement and the precision of method.

    PubMed

    Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Cecconi, Maurizio; Saugel, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac output (CO) plays a crucial role in the hemodynamic management of critically ill patients treated in the intensive care unit and in surgical patients undergoing major surgery. In the field of cardiovascular dynamics, innovative techniques for CO determination are increasingly available. Therefore, the number of studies comparing these techniques with a reference, such as pulmonary artery thermodilution, is rapidly growing. There are mainly two outcomes of such method comparison studies: (1) the accuracy of agreement and (2) the precision of agreement. The precision of agreement depends on the precision of each method, i.e., the precision that the studied and the reference technique are able to achieve. We call this "precision of method". A decomposition of variance shows that method agreement does not only depend on the precision of method but also on another important source of variability, i.e., the method's general variability about the true values. Ignorance of that fact leads to falsified conclusions about the precision of method of the studied technique. In CO studies, serial measurements are frequently confused with repeated measurements. But as the actual CO of a subject changes from assessment to assessment, there is no real repetition of a measurement. This situation equals a scenario in which single measurements are given for multiple true values per subject. In such a case it is not possible to assess the precision of method.

  2. Non-invasive assessment of cardiac output during mechanical ventilation - a novel approach using an inert gas rebreathing method.

    PubMed

    Nickl, Werner; Bugaj, Till; Mondritzki, Thomas; Kuhlebrock, Kathrin; Dinh, Winfried; Krahn, Thomas; Sohler, Florian; Truebel, Hubert

    2011-06-01

    Measurement of cardiac output (CO) is of importance in the diagnostic of critically ill patients. The invasive approach of thermodilution (TD) via pulmonary artery catheter is clinically widely used. A new non-invasive technique of inert gas rebreathing (IGR) shows a good correlation with TD measurements in spontaneously breathing individuals. For the first time, we investigated whether IGR can also be applied to sedated and mechanically ventilated subjects with a clinical point of care device. CO data from IGR were compared with TD in six healthy mongrel dogs. Data sampling was repeated under baseline conditions (rest) and under stress challenge by applying 10 μg/kg/min of dobutamine intravenously. Switching from mechanical ventilation to IGR, as well as the rebreathing procedures, were carried out manually. Cardiac output data from IGR and TD correlated with a coefficient of r=0.90 (95% confidence interval [0.81; 0.95]). The Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias of 0.46 l/min for the IGR CO measurements. Ninety-five percent of all differences fall in the interval [-1.03; 1.95], being the limit of the ± 1.96 standard deviation lines. IGR is a new approach for non-invasive cardiac output measurement in mechanically ventilated individuals, but requires further investigation for clinical use.

  3. Assessment of the effect of vasodilators on the distribution of cardiac output by whole-body Thallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Juni, J.E.; Wallis, J.; Diltz, E.; Nicholas, J.; Lahti, D.; Pitt, B.

    1985-05-01

    Vasodilator therapy (tx) of congestive heart failure (CHF) has been shown to be effective in increasing cardiac output (CO) and lowering vascular resistance. Unfortunately, these hemodynamic effects are not usually accompanied by improved peripheral circulation of exercise capacity. To assess the effect of a new vasodilator, Cl-914, on the redistribution of CO to the peripheral circulation, the authors performed testing whole-body thallium scanning (WB-Th) on 6 patients (pts) with severe CHF. Immediately following i.v. injection of 1.5 mCi Th-201, WB scanning was performed from anterior and posterior views. Regions of interest were defined for the peripheral (P) muscles (legs and arms), central torso (C), and splanchnic bed (S). The geometric mean of activity in these regions was calculated from both views. Each pt was studied before tx and again, after 1 week on tx. Invasive measurements revealed that all pts had significant improvements in resting cardiac output (mean increase 49%) and vascular resistance (mean decrease 30%). Unlike other vasodilators, all CI-914 pts had a significant improvement in treadmill exercise capacity (mean increase 54%). WB-Th revealed a significant shift in CO to the peripheral circulation with P:C increased 33.2% (rho= .001) and P:S increased 29% (rho=.01). Vasoactive drugs may significantly alter the relative distribution of cardiac output. WB-Th scanning provides a simple quantitative means of following such changes.

  4. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure–Prone Rats

    PubMed Central

    Farraj, Aimen K.

    2013-01-01

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel engine exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance of normal cardiac function. To explore this putative mechanism, we examined cardiophysiologic responses to DE inhalation in a model of aged heart failure–prone rats without signs or symptoms of overt heart failure. We hypothesized that acute DE exposure would alter heart rhythm, cardiac electrophysiology, and ventricular performance and dimensions consistent with autonomic imbalance while increasing biochemical markers of toxicity. Spontaneously hypertensive heart failure rats (16 months) were exposed once to whole DE (4h, target PM2.5 concentration: 500 µg/m3) or filtered air. DE increased multiple heart rate variability (HRV) parameters during exposure. In the 4h after exposure, DE increased cardiac output, left ventricular volume (end diastolic and systolic), stroke volume, HRV, and atrioventricular block arrhythmias while increasing electrocardiographic measures of ventricular repolarization (i.e., ST and T amplitudes, ST area, T-peak to T-end duration). DE did not affect heart rate relative to air. Changes in HRV positively correlated with postexposure changes in bradyarrhythmia frequency, repolarization, and echocardiographic parameters. At 24h postexposure, DE-exposed rats had increased serum C-reactive protein and pulmonary eosinophils. This study demonstrates that cardiac effects of DE inhalation are likely to occur through changes in autonomic balance associated with modulation of cardiac electrophysiology and mechanical function and may offer insights into the adverse health effects of traffic-related air pollutants. PMID:23047911

  5. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert A; Hood, Sally G; Jacobson, Beverley M; West, Malcolm J; Wan, Li; May, Clive N

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2 L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5 L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4 L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9 L/min to 11.7 L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was -17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected -30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes.

  6. Effect of hemorrhage on cardiac output, vasopressin, aldosterone, and diuresis during immersion in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Simanonok, K.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to test the hypotesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q(sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses. Eight men (19-23 yr) were supine during a 2-hr control period in air, and then sat for 5-hr test periods in air at 20 C (dry control, DC); water at 34.5 C (wet control, WC); and water (34.5 C) after hemorrhage (WH) of 14.8 plus or minus 0.3 percent of their blood volume. Blood volume was -11.6 plus or minus 0.6 percent at immersion (time 0). Mean (bar-X hrs 1-5) Q(sub co) was unchanged in WC (5.3 plus or minus 0.01 l/min) and in WH (4.5 plus or minus 0.1 l/min), but decreased (P less than 0.05) in DC to 3.6 plus or minus 0.1 l/min. Mean urine excretion rates were 1.0 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for DC and 1.1 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for WH; both were lower (P less than 0.05) than that for WC of 2.0 plus or minus 0.4 ml/min. Plasma (Na+) and (Osm) were unchanged in all experiments. Mean plasma vasopressin (PVP) (bar-X hrs 1-5) was 1.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml in WC, and higher (P less than 0.05) in DC (2.1 plus or minus 0.2 pg/ml)and WH (2.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml); it was unchanged during air and water test periods. Thus, hemorrhage attenuated the immersion-induced increase in Q(sub co), eliminated the WC diuresis, maintained plasma renin activity and PVP at DC levels and did not change immersion-induced aldosterone suppression; the osmotic diuresis during control immersion is apparently not due to either aldosterone suppression or vasopressin suppression.

  7. Blood pressure reduction after gastric bypass surgery is explained by a decrease in cardiac output.

    PubMed

    van Brussel, Peter M; van den Bogaard, Bas; de Weijer, Barbara A; Truijen, Jasper; Krediet, C T Paul; Janssen, Ignace M; van de Laar, Arnold; Kaasjager, Karin; Fliers, Eric; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Serlie, Mireille J; van den Born, Bert-Jan H

    2017-02-01

    Blood pressure (BP) decreases in the first weeks after Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Yet the pathophysiology of the BP-lowering effects observed after gastric bypass surgery is incompletely understood. We evaluated BP, systemic hemodynamics, and baroreflex sensitivity in 15 obese women[mean age 42 ± 7 standard deviation (SD) yr, body mass index 45 ± 6 kg/m(2)] 2 wk before and 6 wk following Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Six weeks after gastric bypass surgery, mean body weight decreased by 13 ± 5 kg (10%, P < 0.001). Office BP decreased from 137 ± 10/86 ± 6 to 128 ± 12/81 ± 9 mmHg (P < 0.001, P < 0.01), while daytime ambulatory BP decreased from 128 ± 14/80 ± 9 to 114 ± 10/73 ± 6 mmHg (P = 0.01, P = 0.05), whereas nighttime BP decreased from 111 ± 13/66 ± 7 to 102 ± 9/62 ± 7 mmHg (P = 0.04, P < 0.01). The decrease in BP was associated with a 1.6 ± 1.2 l/min (20%, P < 0.01) decrease in cardiac output (CO), while systemic vascular resistance increased (153 ± 189 dyn·s·cm(-5), 15%, P < 0.01). The maximal ascending slope in systolic blood pressure decreased (192 mmHg/s, 19%, P = 0.01), suggesting a reduction in left ventricular contractility. Baroreflex sensitivity increased from 9.0 [6.4-14.3] to 13.8 [8.5-19.0] ms/mmHg (median [interquartile range]; P < 0.01) and was inversely correlated with the reductions in heart rate (R = -0.64, P = 0.02) and CO (R = -0.61, P = 0.03). In contrast, changes in body weight were not correlated with changes in either BP or CO. The BP reduction following Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery is correlated with a decrease in CO independent of changes in body weight. The contribution of heart rate to the reduction in CO together with enhanced baroreflex sensitivity suggests a shift toward increased parasympathetic cardiovascular control.

  8. Scalp congenital hemangioma with associated high-output cardiac failure in a premature infant: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sumedh S; Snelling, Brian M; Sur, Samir; Ramnath, Alexandra R; Bandstra, Emmalee S; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Scalp congenital hemangiomas (CHs) are rare vascular malformations among infants; they can be associated with an array of complications, including cardiac and cosmetic issues. Here, we report the endovascular treatment of a premature infant with a suspected large right parietal scalp hemangioma and associated high-output cardiac failure. Case description A two-day-old female premature infant (29 weeks gestational age; 1330 g birth weight) was referred by the neonatologists to our department for consultation and potential treatment of a large right parietal CH causing abrupt hypotension and high-output cardiac failure. Doppler ultrasound imaging at bedside revealed areas of arterial-venous shunting from the scalp and the presence of a superior sagittal sinus waveform, consistent with intracranial venous drainage. To alleviate cardiac dysfunction secondary to this lesion, trans-arterial embolization via n-butyl cyanoacrylate (nBCA) glue and deployment of detachable coils was performed via umbilical artery to occlude the right superficial temporal and occipital artery branches supplying the CH. Following treatment, the infant continued to require ventilator management, vasopressor support, and correction of coagulopathy, but by post-operative day two, her condition improved remarkably and the mass size began decreasing. The patient was discharged after a relatively uncomplicated subsequent 2½-month course in the neonatal intensive care unit. Conclusion Endovascular therapy proved effective and safe in treating cardiac failure associated with scalp CH, despite potential complications associated with neuro-interventional surgery in premature infants. Appropriate consideration in this patient population should be given to factors including blood loss, contrast use, radiation exposure, operative time, and possible intra-/post-operative complications.

  9. Cardiac output response to exercise in relation to metabolic demand in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Abudiab, Muaz M.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Olson, Thomas P.; Kass, David A.; Johnson, Bruce D.; Borlaug, Barry A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Exercise intolerance is a hallmark of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), yet its mechanisms remain unclear. The current study sought to determine whether increases in cardiac output (CO) during exercise are appropriately matched to metabolic demands in HFpEF. Methods and results Patients with HFpEF (n = 109) and controls (n = 73) exercised to volitional fatigue with simultaneous invasive (n = 96) or non-invasive (n = 86) haemodynamic assessment and expired gas analysis to determine oxygen consumption (VO2) during upright or supine exercise. At rest, HFpEF patients had higher LV filling pressures but similar heart rate, stroke volume, EF, and CO. During supine and upright exercise, HFpEF patients displayed lower peak VO2 coupled with blunted increases in heart rate, stroke volume, EF, and CO compared with controls. LV filling pressures increased dramatically in HFpEF patients, with secondary elevation in pulmonary artery pressures. Reduced peak VO2 in HFpEF patients was predominantly attributable to CO limitation, as the slope of the increase in CO relative to VO2 was 20% lower in HFpEF patients (5.9 ± 2.5 vs. 7.4 ± 2.6 L blood/L O2, P = 0.0005). While absolute increases in arterial–venous O2 difference with exercise were similar in HFpEF patients and controls, augmentation in arterial–venous O2 difference relative to VO2 was greater in HFpEF patients (8.9 ± 3.4 vs. 5.5 ± 2.0 min/dL, P < 0.0001). These differences were observed in the total cohort and when upright and supine exercise modalities were examined individually. Conclusion While diastolic dysfunction promotes congestion and pulmonary hypertension with stress in HFpEF, reduction in exercise capacity is predominantly related to inadequate CO relative to metabolic needs. PMID:23426022

  10. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  11. Effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy mutations on power output by human β-cardiac myosin.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A; Aksel, Tural; Bartholomew, Sadie R; Nag, Suman; Kawana, Masataka; Yu, Elizabeth Choe; Sarkar, Saswata S; Sung, Jongmin; Sommese, Ruth F; Sutton, Shirley; Cho, Carol; Adhikari, Arjun S; Taylor, Rebecca; Liu, Chao; Trivedi, Darshan; Ruppel, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease, with a prevalence of more than one in 500 individuals worldwide. Genetically acquired dilated cardiomyopathy is a related disease that is less prevalent. Both are caused by mutations in the genes encoding the fundamental force-generating protein machinery of the cardiac muscle sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin, the motor protein that powers ventricular contraction. Despite numerous studies, most performed with non-human or non-cardiac myosin, there is no clear consensus about the mechanism of action of these mutations on the function of human β-cardiac myosin. We are using a recombinantly expressed human β-cardiac myosin motor domain along with conventional and new methodologies to characterize the forces and velocities of the mutant myosins compared with wild type. Our studies are extending beyond myosin interactions with pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin, the roles of regulatory light chain phosphorylation on the functions of the system, and the possible roles of myosin binding protein-C and titin, important regulatory components of both cardiac and skeletal muscles.

  12. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: Comparison with radiolabeled microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, J.P.; Morrow, W.R.; Gerstmann, D.R.; Taylor, A.F.; deLemos, R.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). The authors conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress.

  13. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: comparison with radiolabeled microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, J P; Morrow, W R; Gerstmann, D R; Taylor, A F; deLemos, R A

    1991-04-01

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). We conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress.

  14. Functional and hemodynamic cardiac determinants of exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Yoran M; Bugatti, Silvia; Damman, Kevin; Willemsen, Suzan; Hartog, Jasper W L; Metra, Marco; Sipkens, Johannes S; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Voors, Adriaan A

    2012-11-01

    Decreased exercise capacity is the main symptom in patients with heart failure (HF). We assessed the association among noninvasively determined maximal cardiac output at exercise, systolic and diastolic cardiac functions at rest, and peak oxygen uptake (pVo(2)) exercise capacity in patients with congestive HF. We studied 102 patients 62 ± 11 years of age with New York Heart Association class II to IV stable HF and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction <45%. All patients underwent echocardiography and a treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise test for evaluation of pVo(2) corrected for fat-free mass. During the cardiopulmonary exercise test, cardiac output was estimated noninvasively and continuously using Nexfin HD. Fat-free mass-corrected pVo(2) was associated in an univariate linear regression analysis with peak exercise cardiac index (CI) (beta 0.511, p <0.001), LV end-diastolic pressure estimates (peak early diastolic filling velocity/early diastolic tissue velocity [E/e'], beta -0.363, p = 0.001), and right ventricular function (tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, beta 0.393, p <0.001). In multivariate analysis peak exercise CI (beta 0.380, p = 0.001), but not cardiac output or LV ejection fraction at rest, was an independent predictor of pVo(2). Other independent predictors of pVo(2) were E/e' (beta -0.276, p = 0.009) and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (beta 0.392, p <0.001), also when adjusted for age and gender. In conclusion, peak CI is an independent predictor of fat-free mass-corrected pVo(2) in patients with systolic HF. Of all echocardiographic parameters at rest, right ventricular function and E/e' were independently and significantly associated with pVo(2), whereas LV ejection fraction at rest was not.

  15. Improved hepatic arterial fraction estimation using cardiac output correction of arterial input functions for liver DCE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Manil D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Taylor, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    Liver dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI pharmacokinetic modelling could be useful in the assessment of diffuse liver disease and focal liver lesions, but is compromised by errors in arterial input function (AIF) sampling. In this study, we apply cardiac output correction to arterial input functions (AIFs) for liver DCE MRI and investigate the effect on dual-input single compartment hepatic perfusion parameter estimation and reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers (28.7  ±  1.94 years, seven males) underwent liver DCE MRI and cardiac output measurement using aortic root phase contrast MRI (PCMRI), with reproducibility (n  =  9) measured at 7 d. Cardiac output AIF correction was undertaken by constraining the first pass AIF enhancement curve using the indicator-dilution principle. Hepatic perfusion parameters with and without cardiac output AIF correction were compared and 7 d reproducibility assessed. Differences between cardiac output corrected and uncorrected liver DCE MRI portal venous (PV) perfusion (p  =  0.066), total liver blood flow (TLBF) (p  =  0.101), hepatic arterial (HA) fraction (p  =  0.895), mean transit time (MTT) (p  =  0.646), distribution volume (DV) (p  =  0.890) were not significantly different. Seven day corrected HA fraction reproducibility was improved (mean difference 0.3%, Bland–Altman 95% limits-of-agreement (BA95%LoA)  ±27.9%, coefficient of variation (CoV) 61.4% versus 9.3%, ±35.5%, 81.7% respectively without correction). Seven day uncorrected PV perfusion was also improved (mean difference 9.3 ml min‑1/100 g, BA95%LoA  ±506.1 ml min‑1/100 g, CoV 64.1% versus 0.9 ml min‑1/100 g, ±562.8 ml min‑1/100 g, 65.1% respectively with correction) as was uncorrected TLBF (mean difference 43.8 ml min‑1/100 g, BA95%LoA  ±586.7 ml min‑1/ 100 g, CoV 58.3% versus 13.3 ml min‑1/100 g, ±661.5 ml min‑1/100 g, 60

  16. Addressing Assumptions for the Use of Non-invasive Cardiac Output Measurement Techniques During Exercise in COPD.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Hélène; Richard, Ruddy; Kapchinsky, Sophia; Baril, Jacinthe; Bourbeau, Jean; Taivassalo, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial functional limitation of COPD increasingly demonstrates the need for an integrated circulatory assessment. In this study cardiac output (Qc) derived from non-inert (CO2-RB), inert (N2O-RB) gas rebreathing approaches and bioimpedance were compared to examine the limitations of currently available non-invasive techniques for exercise Qc determination in patients with chronic lung disease. Thirteen COPD patients (GOLD II-III) completed three constant cycling bouts at 20, 35, and 50% of peak work on two occasions to assess Qc with bioimpedance as well as using CO2-RB and N2O-RB for all exercise tests. Results showed significantly lower Qc using the N2O-RB or end-tidal CO2-derived Qc compared to the PaCO2-derived CO2-RB or the bioimpedance at rest and for all exercise intensities. End-tidal CO2-derived values are however not statistically different from those obtained using inert-gas rebreathing. This study show that in COPD patients, CO2-rebreathing Qc values obtained using PaCO2 contents which account for any gas exchange impairment or inadequate gas mixing are similar to those obtained using thoracic bioimpedance. Alternately, the lower values for N2O rebreathing derived Qc indicates the inability of this technique to account for gas exchange impairment in the computation of Qc. These findings indicate that the choice of a gas rebreathing technique to measure Qc in patients must be dictated by the ability to include in the derived computations a correction for either gas exchange inadequacies and/or a vascular shunt.

  17. Plasma volume expansion does not increase maximal cardiac output or VO2 max in lowlanders acclimatized to altitude.

    PubMed

    Calbet, José A L; Rådegran, Göran; Boushel, Robert; Søndergaard, Hans; Saltin, Bengt; Wagner, Peter D

    2004-09-01

    With altitude acclimatization, blood hemoglobin concentration increases while plasma volume (PV) and maximal cardiac output (Qmax) decrease. This investigation aimed to determine whether reduction of Qmax at altitude is due to low circulating blood volume (BV). Eight Danish lowlanders (3 females, 5 males: age 24.0 +/- 0.6 yr; mean +/- SE) performed submaximal and maximal exercise on a cycle ergometer after 9 wk at 5,260 m altitude (Mt. Chacaltaya, Bolivia). This was done first with BV resulting from acclimatization (BV = 5.40 +/- 0.39 liters) and again 2-4 days later, 1 h after PV expansion with 1 liter of 6% dextran 70 (BV = 6.32 +/- 0.34 liters). PV expansion had no effect on Qmax, maximal O2 consumption (VO2), and exercise capacity. Despite maximal systemic O2 transport being reduced 19% due to hemodilution after PV expansion, whole body VO2 was maintained by greater systemic O2 extraction (P < 0.05). Leg blood flow was elevated (P < 0.05) in hypervolemic conditions, which compensated for hemodilution resulting in similar leg O2 delivery and leg VO2 during exercise regardless of PV. Pulmonary ventilation, gas exchange, and acid-base balance were essentially unaffected by PV expansion. Sea level Qmax and exercise capacity were restored with hyperoxia at altitude independently of BV. Low BV is not a primary cause for reduction of Qmax at altitude when acclimatized. Furthermore, hemodilution caused by PV expansion at altitude is compensated for by increased systemic O2 extraction with similar peak muscular O2 delivery, such that maximal exercise capacity is unaffected.

  18. Reliability of continuous cardiac output measurement during intra-abdominal hypertension relies on repeated calibrations: an experimental animal study

    PubMed Central

    Gruenewald, Matthias; Renner, Jochen; Meybohm, Patrick; Höcker, Jan; Scholz, Jens; Bein, Berthold

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Monitoring cardiac output (CO) may allow early detection of haemodynamic instability, aiming to reduce morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Continuous cardiac output (CCO) monitoring is recommended in septic or postoperative patients with high incidences of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH). The aim of the present study was to compare the agreement between three CCO methods and a bolus thermodilution CO technique during acute IAH and volume loading. Methods Ten pigs were anaesthetised and instrumented for haemodynamic measurements. Cardiac output was obtained using CCO by pulse power analysis (PulseCO; LiDCO monitor), using CCO by pulse contour analysis (PCCO; PiCCO monitor) and using CCO by pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution (CCOPAC), and was compared with bolus transcardiopulmonary thermodilution CO (COTCP) at baseline, after fluid loading, at IAH and after an additional fluid loading at IAH. Whereas PulseCO was only calibrated at baseline, PCCO was calibrated at each experimental step. Results PulseCO and PCCO underestimated CO, as the overall bias ± standard deviation was 1.0 ± 1.5 l/min and 1.0 ± 1.1 l/min compared with COTCP. A clinically accepted agreement between all of the CCO methods and COTCP was observed only at baseline. Whereas IAH did not influence the CO, increased CO following fluid loading at IAH was only reflected by CCOPAC and COTCP, not by uncalibrated PulseCO and PCCO. After recalibration, PCCO was comparable with COTCP. Conclusions The CO obtained by uncalibrated PulseCO and PCCO failed to agree with COTCP during IAH and fluid loading. In the critically ill patient, recalibration of continuous arterial waveform CO methods should be performed after fluid loading or before a major change in therapy is initiated. PMID:18957114

  19. Reduced central blood volume and cardiac output and increased vascular resistance during static handgrip exercise in postural tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian M; Taneja, Indu; Medow, Marvin S

    2007-09-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by exercise intolerance and sympathoactivation. To examine whether abnormal cardiac output and central blood volume changes occur during exercise in POTS, we studied 29 patients with POTS (17-29 yr) and 12 healthy subjects (18-27 yr) using impedance and venous occlusion plethysmography to assess regional blood volumes and flows during supine static handgrip to evoke the exercise pressor reflex. POTS was subgrouped into normal and low-flow groups based on calf blood flow. We examined autonomic effects with variability techniques. During handgrip, systolic blood pressure increased from 112 +/- 4 to 139 +/- 9 mmHg in control, from 119 +/- 6 to 143 +/- 9 in normal-flow POTS, but only from 117 +/- 4 to 128 +/- 6 in low-flow POTS. Heart rate increased from 63 +/- 6 to 82 +/- 4 beats/min in control, 76 +/- 3 to 92 +/- 6 beats/min in normal-flow POTS, and 88 +/- 4 to 100 +/- 6 beats/min in low-flow POTS. Heart rate variability and coherence markedly decreased in low-flow POTS, indicating uncoupling of baroreflex heart rate regulation. The increase in central blood volume with handgrip was absent in low-flow POTS and blunted in normal-flow POTS associated with abnormal splanchnic emptying. Cardiac output increased in control, was unchanged in low-flow POTS, and was attenuated in normal-flow POTS. Total peripheral resistance was increased compared with control in all POTS. The exercise pressor reflex was attenuated in low-flow POTS. While increased cardiac output and central blood volume characterizes controls, increased peripheral resistance with blunted or eliminated in central blood volume increments characterizes POTS and may contribute to exercise intolerance.

  20. Combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine for low cardiac output syndrome in children at withdrawal from cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, M; Minamikawa, O; Yokochi, H; Maki, S; Yasuda, T; Mizukawa, Y

    1980-04-01

    The combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine was applied in infants and children when it was difficult to come off cardiopulmonary bypass for low cardiac output. The rationale of this method is to prevent the alpha-adrenergic action of dopamine by phenoxybenzamine and to encourage the beta-adrenergic and direct specific action of dopamine. Dopamine was used in dosage of 10 to 30 micrograms/kg per min after the additional administration of a half of the initial dosage of phenoxybenzamine; this was infused by drip always in a dosage of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg during the first half of cardiopulmonary bypass. It was possible to come off cardiopulmonary bypass with a stable haemodynamic state (mean arterial pressure more than 60 mmHg and total peripheral vascular resistance less than 2000 bynes s cm-5) and a good urinary output.

  1. Combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine for low cardiac output syndrome in children at withdrawal from cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, M; Minamikawa, O; Yokochi, H; Maki, S; Yasuda, T; Mizukawa, Y

    1980-01-01

    The combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine was applied in infants and children when it was difficult to come off cardiopulmonary bypass for low cardiac output. The rationale of this method is to prevent the alpha-adrenergic action of dopamine by phenoxybenzamine and to encourage the beta-adrenergic and direct specific action of dopamine. Dopamine was used in dosage of 10 to 30 micrograms/kg per min after the additional administration of a half of the initial dosage of phenoxybenzamine; this was infused by drip always in a dosage of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg during the first half of cardiopulmonary bypass. It was possible to come off cardiopulmonary bypass with a stable haemodynamic state (mean arterial pressure more than 60 mmHg and total peripheral vascular resistance less than 2000 bynes s cm-5) and a good urinary output. PMID:7397040

  2. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert A.; Hood, Sally G.; Jacobson, Beverley M.; West, Malcolm J.; Wan, Li; May, Clive N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2 L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5 L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4 L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9 L/min to 11.7 L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was −17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected −30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes. PMID:22649718

  3. The comparison of a novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time and echo Doppler during exercise.

    PubMed

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Tomoyuki; Terao, Mami; Ukawa, Teiji; Ochiai, Ryoichi

    2012-01-01

    A new technology called estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) uses pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram and pulse oximeter to measure cardiac output (CO) non-invasively and continuously. This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of esCCO during exercise testing. We compared esCCO with CO measured by the echo Doppler aortic velocity-time integral (VTIao_CO). The correlation coefficient between esCCO and VTIao_CO was r= 0.87 (n= 72). Bias and precision were 0.33 ± 0.95 L/min and percentage error was 31%. The esCCO could detect change in VTIao_CO larger than 1 L/min with a concordance rate of 88%. In polar plot, 83% of data are within 0.5 L/min, and 100% of data are within 1 L/min. Those results show the acceptable accuracy and trend ability of esCCO. Change in pre-ejection period (PEP) measured by using M-mode of Diagnostic Ultrasound System accounted for approximately half of change in PWTT. This indicates that PEP included in PWTT has an impact on the accuracy of esCCO measurement. In this study, the validity of esCCO during exercise testing was assessed and shown to be acceptable. The result of this study suggests that we can expand its application.

  4. Beta-adrenergic or parasympathetic inhibition, heart rate and cardiac output during normoxic and acute hypoxic exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Susan R; Bogaard, Harm J; Niizeki, Kyuichi; Yamaya, Yoshiki; Ziegler, Michael G; Wagner, Peter D

    2003-07-15

    Acute hypoxia increases heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (Qt) at a given oxygen consumption (VO2) during submaximal exercise. It is widely believed that the underlying mechanism involves increased sympathetic activation and circulating catecholamines acting on cardiac beta receptors. Recent evidence indicating a continued role for parasympathetic modulation of HR during moderate exercise suggests that increased parasympathetic withdrawal plays a part in the increase in HR and Qt during hypoxic exercise. To test this, we separately blocked the beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in six healthy subjects (five male, one female; mean +/- S.E.M. age = 31.7+/-1.6 years, normoxic maximal VO2 (VO2,max)=3.1+/-0.3 l min(-1)) during exercise in conditions of normoxia and acute hypoxia (inspired oxygen fraction=0.125) to VO2,max. Data were collected on different days under the following conditions: (1)control, (2) after 8.0 mg propranolol i.v. and (3) after 0.8 mg glycopyrrolate i.v. Qt was measured using open-circuit acetylene uptake. Hypoxia increased venous [adrenaline] and [noradrenaline] but not [dopamine] at a given VO2 (P<0.05, P<0.01 and P=0.2, respectively). HR/VO2 and Qt/VO2 increased during hypoxia in all three conditions (P<0.05). Unexpectedly, the effects of hypoxia on HR and Qt were not significantly different from control with either beta-sympathetic or parasympathetic inhibition. These data suggest that although acute exposure to hypoxia increases circulating [catecholamines], the effects of hypoxia on HR and Qt do not necessarily require intact cardiac muscarinic and beta receptors. It may be that cardiac alpha receptors play a primary role in elevating HR and Qt during hypoxic exercise, or perhaps offer an alternative mechanism when other ANS pathways are blocked.

  5. Evaluating cardiac physiology through echocardiography in bottlenose dolphins: using stroke volume and cardiac output to estimate systolic left ventricular function during rest and following exercise.

    PubMed

    Miedler, Stefan; Fahlman, Andreas; Valls Torres, Mónica; Álvaro Álvarez, Teresa; Garcia-Parraga, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Heart-rate (fH) changes during diving and exercise are well documented for marine mammals, but changes in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) are much less known. We hypothesized that both SV and CO are also modified following intense exercise. Using transthoracic ultrasound Doppler at the level of the aortic valve, we compared blood flow velocities in the left ventricle and cardiac frequencies during rest and at 1, 3 and 4 min after a bout of exercise in 13 adult bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus, six male and seven female, body mass range 143-212 kg). Aortic cross-sectional area and ventricle blood velocity at the aortic valve were used to calculate SV, which together with fH provided estimates of left CO at rest and following exercise. fH and SV stabilized approximately 4-7 s following the post-respiratory tachycardia, so only data after the fH had stabilized were used for analysis and comparison. There were significant increases in fH, SV and CO associated with each breath. At rest, fH, SV and CO were uncorrelated with body mass, and averaged 41±9 beats min(-1), 136±19 ml and 5514±1182 l min(-1), respectively. One minute following high intensity exercise, the cardiac variables had increased by 104±43%, 63±11% and 234±84%, respectively. All variables remained significantly elevated in all animals for at least 4 min after the exercise. These baseline values provide the first data on SV and CO in awake and unrestrained cetaceans in water.

  6. Evaluation of the estimated continuous cardiac output monitoring system in adults and children undergoing kidney transplant surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takashi; Maemura, Yumi; Yoshida, Akiko; Muto, Rika; Ochiai, Ryoichi

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of the estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) allows non-invasive and continuous assessment of cardiac output. However, the applicability of this approach in children has not been assessed thus far. We compared the correlation coefficient, bias, standard deviation (SD), and the lower and upper 95 % limits of agreement for esCCO and dye densitography-cardiac output (DDG-CO) measurements by pulse dye densitometry (PDD) in adults and children. On the basis of these assessments, we aimed to examine whether esCCO can be used in pediatric patients. DDG-CO was measured by pulse dye densitometry (PDD) using indocyanine green. Modified-pulse wave transit time, obtained using pulse oximetry and electrocardiography, was used to measure esCCO. Correlations between DDG-CO and esCCO in adults and children were analyzed using regression analysis with the least squares method. Differences between the two correlation coefficients were statistically analyzed using a correlation coefficient test. Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate bias and SD for DDG-CO and esCCO in both adults and children, and 95 % limits of agreement (bias ± 1.96 SD) and percentage error (1.96 SD/mean DDG-CO) were calculated and compared. The average age of the adult patients (n = 10) was 39.3 ± 12.1 years, while the average age of the pediatric patients (n = 7) was 9.4 ± 3.1 years (p < 0.001). For adults, the correlation coefficient was 0.756; bias, -0.258 L/min; SD, 1.583 L/min; lower and upper 95 % limits of agreement for DDG-CO and esCCO, -3.360 and 2.844 L/min, respectively; and percentage error, 42.7 %. For children, the corresponding values were 0.904; -0.270; 0.908; -2.051 and 1.510 L/min, respectively; and 35.7 %. Due to the high percentage error values, we could not establish a correlation between esCCO and DDG-CO. However, the 95 % limits of agreement and percentage error were better in children than in adults. Due to the high percentage error, we could not confirm a correlation

  7. Hemodynamic monitoring in the critically ill: an overview of current cardiac output monitoring methods

    PubMed Central

    Huygh, Johan; Peeters, Yannick; Bernards, Jelle; Malbrain, Manu L. N. G.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill patients are often hemodynamically unstable (or at risk of becoming unstable) owing to hypovolemia, cardiac dysfunction, or alterations of vasomotor function, leading to organ dysfunction, deterioration into multi-organ failure, and eventually death. With hemodynamic monitoring, we aim to guide our medical management so as to prevent or treat organ failure and improve the outcomes of our patients. Therapeutic measures may include fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, or inotropic agents. Both resuscitation and de-resuscitation phases can be guided using hemodynamic monitoring. This monitoring itself includes several different techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages, and may range from invasive to less- and even non-invasive techniques, calibrated or non-calibrated. This article will discuss the indications and basics of monitoring, further elaborating on the different techniques of monitoring. PMID:28003877

  8. Automatic phase determination for retrospectively gated cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, R.; Koehler, Th.; Nielsen, T.; Hawkes, D.; Grass, M.

    2004-12-01

    The recent improvements in CT detector and gantry technology in combination with new heart rate adaptive cone beam reconstruction algorithms enable the visualization of the heart in three dimensions at high spatial resolution. However, the finite temporal resolution still impedes the artifact-free reconstruction of the heart at any arbitrary phase of the cardiac cycle. Cardiac phases must be found during which the heart is quasistationary to obtain outmost image quality. It is challenging to find these phases due to intercycle and patient-to-patient variability. Electrocardiogram (ECG) information does not always represent the heart motion with an adequate accuracy. In this publication, a simple and efficient image-based technique is introduced which is able to deliver stable cardiac phases in an automatic and patient-specific way. From low-resolution four-dimensional data sets, the most stable phases are derived by calculating the object similarity between subsequent phases in the cardiac cycle. Patient-specific information about the object motion can be determined and resolved spatially. This information is used to perform optimized high-resolution reconstructions at phases of little motion. Results based on a simulation study and three real patient data sets are presented. The projection data were generated using a 16-slice cone beam CT system in low-pitch helical mode with parallel ECG recording.

  9. Continuous cardiac output and left atrial pressure monitoring by long time interval analysis of the pulmonary artery pressure waveform: proof of concept in dogs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2009-02-01

    We developed a technique to continuously (i.e., automatically) monitor cardiac output (CO) and left atrial pressure (LAP) by mathematical analysis of the pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) waveform. The technique is unique to the few previous related techniques in that it jointly estimates the two hemodynamic variables and analyzes the PAP waveform over time scales greater than a cardiac cycle wherein wave reflections and inertial effects cease to be major factors. First, a 6-min PAP waveform segment is analyzed so as to determine the pure exponential decay and equilibrium pressure that would eventually result if cardiac activity suddenly ceased (i.e., after the confounding wave reflections and inertial effects vanish). Then, the time constant of this exponential decay is computed and assumed to be proportional to the average pulmonary arterial resistance according to a Windkessel model, while the equilibrium pressure is regarded as average LAP. Finally, average proportional CO is determined similar to invoking Ohm's law and readily calibrated with one thermodilution measurement. To evaluate the technique, we performed experiments in five dogs in which the PAP waveform and accurate, but highly invasive, aortic flow probe CO and LAP catheter measurements were simultaneously recorded during common hemodynamic interventions. Our results showed overall calibrated CO and absolute LAP root-mean-squared errors of 15.2% and 1.7 mmHg, respectively. For comparison, the root-mean-squared error of classic end-diastolic PAP estimates of LAP was 4.7 mmHg. On future successful human testing, the technique may potentially be employed for continuous hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients with pulmonary artery catheters.

  10. Minimally invasive measurement of cardiac output during surgery and critical care: a meta-analysis of accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Peyton, Philip J; Chong, Simon W

    2010-11-01

    When assessing the accuracy and precision of a new technique for cardiac output measurement, the commonly quoted criterion for acceptability of agreement with a reference standard is that the percentage error (95% limits of agreement/mean cardiac output) should be 30% or less. We reviewed published data on four different minimally invasive methods adapted for use during surgery and critical care: pulse contour techniques, esophageal Doppler, partial carbon dioxide rebreathing, and transthoracic bioimpedance, to assess their bias, precision, and percentage error in agreement with thermodilution. An English language literature search identified published papers since 2000 which examined the agreement in adult patients between bolus thermodilution and each method. For each method a meta-analysis was done using studies in which the first measurement point for each patient could be identified, to obtain a pooled mean bias, precision, and percentage error weighted according to the number of measurements in each study. Forty-seven studies were identified as suitable for inclusion: N studies, n measurements: mean weighted bias [precision, percentage error] were: pulse contour N = 24, n = 714: -0.00 l/min [1.22 l/min, 41.3%]; esophageal Doppler N = 2, n = 57: -0.77 l/min [1.07 l/min, 42.1%]; partial carbon dioxide rebreathing N = 8, n = 167: -0.05 l/min [1.12 l/min, 44.5%]; transthoracic bioimpedance N = 13, n = 435: -0.10 l/min [1.14 l/min, 42.9%]. None of the four methods has achieved agreement with bolus thermodilution which meets the expected 30% limits. The relevance in clinical practice of these arbitrary limits should be reassessed.

  11. Measurement of cardiac output during exercise in healthy, trained humans using lithium dilution and pulse contour analysis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Adrian D; Skowno, Justin; Prabhu, Mahesh; Ansley, Les

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of pulse contour analysis calibrated with lithium dilution in a single device (LiDCO) for measurement of cardiac output (Q) during exercise in healthy volunteers. We sought to; (a) compare pulse contour analysis (PulseCO) and lithium indicator dilution (LiDCO) for the measurement of Q during exercise, and (b) assess the requirement for recalibration of PulseCO with LiDCO during exercise. Ten trained males performed multi-stage cycling exercise at intensities below and above ventilatory threshold before constant load maximal exercise to exhaustion. Uncalibrated PulseCO Q (Qraw) was compared to that calibrated with lithium dilution at baseline Qbaseline, during submaximal exercise below (Qlow) and above (Qhigh) ventilatory threshold, and at each exercise stage individually (Qexercise). There was a significant difference between Qbaseline and all other calibration methods during exercise, but not at rest. No significant differences were observed between other methods. Closest agreement with Qexercise was observed for Qhigh (bias ± limits of agreement: 4.8 ± 30.0%). The difference between Qexercise and both Qlow and Qraw was characterized by low bias (4-7%) and wide limits of agreement (> ± 40%). Calibration of pulse contour analysis with lithium dilution prior to exercise leads to a systematic overestimation of exercising cardiac output. A single calibration performed during exercise above the ventilatory threshold provided acceptable limits of agreement with an approach incorporating multiple calibrations throughout exercise. Pulse contour analysis may be used for Q measurement during exercise providing the system is calibrated during exercise.

  12. The Neuromuscular Transform of the Lobster Cardiac System Explains the Opposing Effects of a Neuromodulator on Muscle Output

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alex H.; Calkins, Andrew; O'Leary, Timothy; Symonds, Renee; Marder, Eve

    2013-01-01

    Motor neuron activity is transformed into muscle movement through a cascade of complex molecular and biomechanical events. This nonlinear mapping of neural inputs to motor behaviors is called the neuromuscular transform (NMT). We examined the NMT in the cardiac system of the lobster Homarus americanus by stimulating a cardiac motor nerve with rhythmic bursts of action potentials and measuring muscle movements in response to different stimulation patterns. The NMT was similar across preparations, which suggested that it could be used to predict muscle movement from spontaneous neural activity in the intact heart. We assessed this possibility across semi-intact heart preparations in two separate analyses. First, we performed a linear regression analysis across 122 preparations in physiological saline to predict muscle movements from neural activity. Under these conditions, the NMT was predictive of contraction duty cycle but was unable to predict contraction amplitude, likely as a result of uncontrolled interanimal variability. Second, we assessed the ability of the NMT to predict changes in motor output induced by the neuropeptide C-type allatostatin. Wiwatpanit et al. (2012) showed that bath application of C-type allatostatin produced either increases or decreases in the amplitude of the lobster heart contractions. We show that an important component of these preparation-dependent effects can arise from quantifiable differences in the basal state of each preparation and the nonlinear form of the NMT. These results illustrate how properly characterizing the relationships between neural activity and measurable physiological outputs can provide insight into seemingly idiosyncratic effects of neuromodulators across individuals. PMID:24133260

  13. Clinical significance of a spiral phenomenon in the plot of CO₂ output versus O₂ uptake during exercise in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Osamu; Koike, Akira; Himi, Tomoko; Sakurada, Koji; Kato, Yuko; Suzuki, Shinya; Sato, Akira; Yamashita, Takeshi; Wasserman, Karlman; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2015-03-01

    A spiral phenomenon is sometimes noted in the plots of CO₂ output (VCO₂) against O₂ uptake (VO₂) measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) in patients with heart failure with oscillatory breathing. However, few data are available that elucidate the clinical significance of this phenomenon. Our group studied the prevalence of this phenomenon and its relation to cardiac and cardiopulmonary function. Of 2,263 cardiac patients who underwent CPX, 126 patients with a clear pattern of oscillatory breathing were identified. Cardiopulmonary indexes were compared between patients who showed the spiral phenomenon (n = 49) and those who did not (n = 77). The amplitudes of VO₂ and VCO₂ oscillations were greater and the phase difference between VO₂ and VCO₂ oscillations was longer in the patients with the spiral phenomenon than in those without it. Patients with the spiral phenomenon also had a lower left ventricular ejection fraction (43.4 ± 21.4% vs 57.1 ± 16.8%, p <0.001) and a higher level of brain natriuretic peptide (637.2 ± 698.3 vs 228.3 ± 351.4 pg/ml, p = 0.002). The peak VO₂ was lower (14.5 ± 5.6 vs 18.1 ± 6.3, p = 0.002), the slope of the increase in ventilation versus VCO₂ was higher (39.8 ± 9.5 vs 33.6 ± 6.8, p <0.001), and end-tidal PCO₂ both at rest and at peak exercise was lower in the patients with the spiral phenomenon than in those without it. In conclusion, the spiral phenomenon in the VCO₂-versus-VO₂ plot arising from the phase difference between VCO₂ and VO₂ oscillations reflects more advanced cardiopulmonary dysfunction in cardiac patients with oscillatory breathing.

  14. Influence of heart motion on cardiac output estimation by means of electrical impedance tomography: a case study.

    PubMed

    Proença, Martin; Braun, Fabian; Rapin, Michael; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Bohm, Stephan H; Lemay, Mathieu; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that can measure cardiac-related intra-thoracic impedance changes. EIT-based cardiac output estimation relies on the assumption that the amplitude of the impedance change in the ventricular region is representative of stroke volume (SV). However, other factors such as heart motion can significantly affect this ventricular impedance change. In the present case study, a magnetic resonance imaging-based dynamic bio-impedance model fitting the morphology of a single male subject was built. Simulations were performed to evaluate the contribution of heart motion and its influence on EIT-based SV estimation. Myocardial deformation was found to be the main contributor to the ventricular impedance change (56%). However, motion-induced impedance changes showed a strong correlation (r = 0.978) with left ventricular volume. We explained this by the quasi-incompressibility of blood and myocardium. As a result, EIT achieved excellent accuracy in estimating a wide range of simulated SV values (error distribution of 0.57 ± 2.19 ml (1.02 ± 2.62%) and correlation of r = 0.996 after a two-point calibration was applied to convert impedance values to millilitres). As the model was based on one single subject, the strong correlation found between motion-induced changes and ventricular volume remains to be verified in larger datasets.

  15. Measurement of cardiac output in children by pressure-recording analytical method.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Javier; López, Jorge; González, Rafael; Solana, María José; Fernández, Sarah N; Bellón, José M; López-Herce, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated two pressure-recording analytical method (PRAM) software versions (v.1 and v.2) to measure cardiac index (CI) in hemodynamically stable critically ill children and investigate factors that influence PRAM values. The working hypothesis was that PRAM CI measurements would stay within normal limits in hemodynamically stable patients. Ninety-five CI PRAM measurements were analyzed in 47 patients aged 1-168 months. Mean CI was 4.1 ± 1.4 L/min/m(2) (range 2.0-7.0). CI was outside limits defined as normal (3-5 L/min/m(2)) in 53.7% of measurements (47.8% with software v.1 and 69.2% with software v.2, p = 0.062). Moreover, 14.7% of measurements were below 2.5 L/min/m(2), and 13.6% were above 6 L/min/m(2). CI was significantly lower in patients with a clearly visible dicrotic notch than in those without (3.7 vs. 4.6 L/min/m(2), p = 0.004) and in children with a radial arterial catheter (3.5 L/min/m(2)) than in those with a brachial (4.4 L/min/m(2), p = 0.021) or femoral catheter (4.7 L/min/m(2), p = 0.005). By contrast, CI was significantly higher in children under 12 months (4.2 vs. 3.6 L/min/m(2), p = 0.034) and weighing under 10 kg (4.2 vs. 3.6 L/min/m(2), p = 0.026). No significant differences were observed between cardiac surgery patients and the rest of children. A high percentage of CI measurements registered by PRAM were outside normal limits in hemodynamically stable, critically ill children. CI measured by PRAM may be influenced by the age, weight, location of catheter, and presence of a dicrotic notch.

  16. Comparison of Levosimendan, Milrinone and Dobutamine in treating Low Cardiac Output Syndrome Following Valve Replacement Surgeries with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Sunny; Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Saikia, Manuj Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Dey, Samarjit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low Cardiac Output Syndrome (LCOS) following Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB) is common and associated with increased mortality. Maintenance of adequate cardiac output is one of the primary objectives in management of such patients. Aim To compare Levosimendan, Milrinone and Dobutamine for the treatment of LCOS after CPB in patients who underwent valve replacement surgeries. Materials and Methods Sixty eligible patients meeting LCOS were allocated into three treatment groups: Group A-Levosimendan (loading dose 10μg/kg over 10 minutes, followed by 0.1μg/kg/min); Group B-Milrinone (loading dose 50 mcg/kg over 10 minutes followed by 0.5mcg/kg/min) and Group C-Dobutamine @ 5μg/kg/min to achieve target cardiac index (CI) of > 2.5 L/min/m2. In case of failure, other drugs were added as required. Hemodynamic parameters were monitored using EV1000TM clinical platform till 30 minutes post CPB. INSTAT software was used for statistics and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results The mean±standard deviation of time taken by Dobutamine, Levosimendan and Milrinone to bring the CI to target were 11.1±8.79, 11.3±6.34 and 16.62±9.33 minutes respectively (p=0.064). Levosimendan was equally effective in increasing and maintaining adequate CI as compared to Dobutamine (p>0.05). Levosimendan and Milrinone increased MAP (Mean Arterial Pressure) equally while Dobutamine was more effective as compared to both Levosimendan and Milrinone 20th minute onwards (p<0.01). Milrinone was less effective in increasing the stroke volume as compared to Dobutamine and Levosimendan while Dobutamine and Levosimendan were equally effective. There was no difference in the HR (Heart Rate) achieved with all these three drugs. Conclusion Levosimendan is equally effective to Dobutamine and better than Milrinone for the treatment of LCOS following CPB in patients undergoing valve replacement surgeries. PMID:28208977

  17. The effect of lidocaine on regional blood flows and cardiac output in the non-stressed and the stressed foetal lamb.

    PubMed

    Friesen, C; Yarnell, R; Bachman, C; Meatheral, R; Biehl, D

    1986-03-01

    Lidocaine has been used in obstetrical anaesthesia for many years but there are still concerns about possible adverse affects of this drug on the foetus in utero. To examine in greater detail the effects of lidocaine in the foetus, the following two-part study was done. In Part A, seven pregnant ewes were surgically prepared with maternal and foetal arterial and venous catheters. After recovery from surgery lidocaine was infused intravenously, initially into the ewe and then into both ewe and foetus. Blood lidocaine concentrations were monitored and foetal regional blood flows were determined by the radioactive microsphere method. In Part B, 14 ewes were prepared as in Part A with the addition of an inflatable loop around the umbilical cord. During each study the loop was inflated to partially compress the cord and produce foetal acidosis. In all animals this cord compression was maintained for 30 minutes. In seven animals a lidocaine infusion was given, to examine the effect of lidocaine in the acidotic foetus. Organ blood flows were measured and cardiac outputs calculated. The normal foetuses in Part A showed no change in organ blood flow or cardiac output with arterial lidocaine concentrations of 1.5-3.4 mg X ml-1. In the acidotic foetuses, lidocaine concentrations of 1.4-1.5 mg X ml-1 produced a tachycardia and an increase in cerebral blood flow compared to the control acidotic foetuses. There were no other significant changes. We conclude that arterial lidocaine concentrations of less than 3.5 mg X ml-1 do not produce significant alterations in organ blood flow in normal foetal lambs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  19. Reliability of a new 4th generation FloTrac algorithm to track cardiac output changes in patients receiving phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fuhai; Li, Jian; Fleming, Neal; Rose, David; Liu, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Phenylephrine is often used to treat intra-operative hypotension. Previous studies have shown that the FloTrac cardiac monitor may overestimate cardiac output (CO) changes following phenylephrine administration. A new algorithm (4th generation) has been developed to improve performance in this setting. We performed a prospective observational study to assess the effects of phenylephrine administration on CO values measured by the 3rd and 4th generation FloTrac algorithms. 54 patients were enrolled in this study. We used the Nexfin, a pulse contour method shown to be insensitive to vasopressor administration, as the reference method. Radial arterial pressures were recorded continuously in patients undergoing surgery. Phenylephrine administration times were documented. Arterial pressure recordings were subsequently analyzed offline using three different pulse contour analysis algorithms: FloTrac 3rd generation (G3), FloTrac 4th generation (G4), and Nexfin (nf). One minute of hemodynamic measurements was analyzed immediately before phenylephrine administration and then repeated when the mean arterial pressure peaked. A total of 157 (4.6 ± 3.2 per patient, range 1-15) paired sets of hemodynamic recordings were analyzed. Phenylephrine induced a significant increase in stroke volume (SV) and CO with the FloTrac G3, but not with FloTrac G4 or Nexfin algorithms. Agreement between FloTrac G3 and Nexfin was: 0.23 ± 1.19 l/min and concordance was 51.1%. In contrast, agreement between FloTrac G4 and Nexfin was: 0.19 ± 0.86 l/min and concordance was 87.2%. In conclusion, the pulse contour method of measuring CO, as implemented in FloTrac 4th generation algorithm, has significantly improved its ability to track the changes in CO induced by phenylephrine.

  20. Uncalibrated pulse power analysis fails to reliably measure cardiac output in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Uncalibrated arterial pulse power analysis has been recently introduced for continuous monitoring of cardiac index (CI). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of arterial pulse power analysis with intermittent transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods Forty-two patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied after induction of anaesthesia, before and after CPB respectively. Each patient was monitored with the pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO) system, a central venous line and the recently introduced LiDCO monitoring system. Haemodynamic variables included measurement of CI derived by transpulmonary thermodilution (CITPTD) or CI derived by pulse power analysis (CIPP), before and after calibration (CIPPnon-cal., CIPPcal.). Percentage changes of CI (ΔCITPTD, ΔCIPPnon-cal./PPcal.) were calculated to analyse directional changes. Results Before CPB there was no significant correlation between CIPPnon-cal. and CITPTD (r2 = 0.04, P = 0.08) with a percentage error (PE) of 86%. Higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) values were significantly correlated with higher CIPPnon-cal. (r2 = 0.26, P < 0.0001). After CPB, CIPPcal. revealed a significant correlation compared with CITPTD (r2 = 0.77, P < 0.0001) with PE of 28%. Changes in CIPPcal. (ΔCIPPcal.) showed a correlation with changes in CITPTD (ΔCITPTD) only after CPB (r2 = 0.52, P = 0.005). Conclusions Uncalibrated pulse power analysis was significantly influenced by MAP and was not able to reliably measure CI compared with TPTD. Calibration improved accuracy, but pulse power analysis was still not consistently interchangeable with TPTD. Only calibrated pulse power analysis was able to reliably track haemodynamic changes and trends. PMID:21356060

  1. A comparison of the changes in cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance during exercise following high-fat meals containing DHA or EPA.

    PubMed

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G; Hall, Wendy L; Pombo-Rodrigues, Sonia; Appleton, Amber; Chung, Roxanna; Sanders, Thomas A B

    2012-08-01

    Long-chain n-3 PUFA can lower blood pressure (BP) but their acute effects on cardiac output, BP and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) in response to dynamic exercise are uncertain. We compared the effects of high-fat meals rich in EPA (20 : 5n-3), DHA (22 : 6n-3) or oleic acid (control) on cardiac output, BP and SVR in response to exercise stress testing. High-fat meals (50 g fat) containing high-oleic sunflower oil enriched with 4·7 g of either EPA or DHA v. control (high-oleic sunflower oil only) were fed to twenty-two healthy males using a randomised cross-over design. Resting measurements of cardiac output, heart rate and BP were made before and hourly over 5 h following the meal. A standardised 12 min exercise test was then conducted with further measurements made during and post-exercise. Blood samples were collected at fasting, 5 h postprandially and immediately post-exercise for the analysis of lipid, glucose and 8-isoprostane-F2α (8-iso-PGF2α). Plasma concentrations of EPA and DHA increased by 0·22 mmol/l 5 h following the EPA and DHA meals, respectively, compared with the control (P < 0·001). Resting cardiac output and 8-iso-PGF2α increased similarly following all meals and there were no significant differences in cardiac output during exercise between the meals. SVR was lower at 5 h and during exercise following the DHA but not EPA meal, compared with the control meal, by 4·9 % (95 % CI 1·3, 8·4; P < 0·01). Meals containing DHA appear to differ from EPA with regard to their effects on cardiovascular haemodynamics during exercise.

  2. Differential acute effects of carbohydrate- and protein-rich drinks compared with water on cardiac output during rest and exercise in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G; Werner, Kristin; Sanders, Thomas A B; Hall, Wendy L

    2015-08-01

    The acute effects of drinks rich in protein (PRO) versus carbohydrate (CHO) on cardiovascular hemodynamics and reactivity are uncertain. A randomized crossover design was used to compare 400-mL isoenergetic (1.1 MJ) drinks containing whey protein (PRO; 44 g) or carbohydrate (CHO; 57 g) versus 400 mL of water in 14 healthy men. The primary and secondary outcomes were changes in cardiac output, blood pressure, systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and digital volume pulse measured prior to and 30 min following consumption at rest, during 12 min of multi-stage bicycle ergometry, and 15 min postexercise. The mean change (95% confidence interval (CI)) in resting cardiac output at 30 min was greater for CHO than for PRO or water: 0.7 (0.4 to 1.0), 0.1 (-0.2 to 0.40), and 0.0 (-0.3 to 0.3) L/min (P < 0.001), respectively; the higher cardiac output following CHO was accompanied by an increase in stroke volume and a lower SVR. The mean increments (95% CI) in cardiac output during exercise were CHO 4.7 (4.4 to 5.0), PRO 4.9 (4.6 to 5.2), and water 4.6 (4.3 to 4.9) L/min with the difference between PRO versus water being significant (P < 0.025). There were no other statistically significant differences. In summary, a CHO-rich drink increased cardiac output and lowered SVR in the resting state compared with a PRO-rich drink or water but the effect size of changes in these variables did not differ during or after exercise between CHO and PRO. Neither protein nor carbohydrate affected blood pressure reactivity to exercise.

  3. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  4. Changes in cardiac output and tibial artery flow during and after progressive LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A 3.0 MHz Pulsed Doppler velocity meter (PD) was used to determine blood velocities in the ascending aorta from the suprasternal notch before, during and after progressive 5 min stages of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in 7 subjects. Changes in stroke volume were calculated from the systolic velocity integrals. A unique 20 MHz PD was used to estimate bloodflow in the posterior tibial artery. With -20 torr mean stroke volume fell 11% and then continued to decline by 48% before LBNP was terminated. Mean tibial flow fell progressively with LBNP stress, due to an increase in reverse flow component and a reduction in peak forward flow and diameter. Stroke volume increased and heart rate fell dramatically during the first 15 sec of recovery. The LBNP was terminated early in 2 subjects because of vasovagal symptons (V). During V the stroke volume rose 86% which more than compensated for the drop in heart rate. This implies that V is accompanied by a paradoxical increase in venous return and that the reduction in HR is the primary cardiovascular event. During the first 15 sec of recovery these 2 subjects had a distinctive marked rise to heart rate reminiscent of the Bainbridge reflex.

  5. Arterial pressure-based cardiac output monitoring: a multicenter validation of the third-generation software in septic patients

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Gernot; Tan, Andrew; Junker, Christopher; Van Nuffelen, Marc; Hüter, Lars; Ching, Willy; Michard, Frédéric; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Second-generation FloTrac software has been shown to reliably measure cardiac output (CO) in cardiac surgical patients. However, concerns have been raised regarding its accuracy in vasoplegic states. The aim of the present multicenter study was to investigate the accuracy of the third-generation software in patients with sepsis, particularly when total systemic vascular resistance (TSVR) is low. Methods Fifty-eight septic patients were included in this prospective observational study in four university-affiliated ICUs. Reference CO was measured by bolus pulmonary thermodilution (iCO) using 3–5 cold saline boluses. Simultaneously, CO was computed from the arterial pressure curve recorded on a computer using the second-generation (COG2) and third-generation (COG3) FloTrac software. CO was also measured by semi-continuous pulmonary thermodilution (CCO). Results A total of 401 simultaneous measurements of iCO, COG2, COG3, and CCO were recorded. The mean (95%CI) biases between COG2 and iCO, COG3 and iCO, and CCO and iCO were −10 (−15 to −5)% [−0.8 (−1.1 to −0.4) L/min], 0 (−4 to 4)% [0 (−0.3 to 0.3) L/min], and 9 (6–13)% [0.7 (0.5–1.0) L/min], respectively. The percentage errors were 29 (20–37)% for COG2, 30 (24–37)% for COG3, and 28 (22–34)% for CCO. The difference between iCO and COG2 was significantly correlated with TSVR (r2 = 0.37, p < 0.0001). A very weak (r2 = 0.05) relationship was also observed for the difference between iCO and COG3. Conclusions In patients with sepsis, the third-generation FloTrac software is more accurate, as precise, and less influenced by TSVR than the second-generation software. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-2098-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21153399

  6. Rest and exercise cardiac output and diffusing capacity assessed by a single slow exhalation of methane, acetylene, and carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Ramage, J E; Coleman, R E; MacIntyre, N R

    1987-07-01

    To study rest and exercise pulmonary capillary blood flow (Qc) and diffusing capacity (DLexh) assessed by the rapid analysis of methane, acetylene, and carbon monoxide during a single, slow exhalation, we evaluated 36 subjects during first-pass radionuclide angiography (RNA). At rest (N = 36) and at exercise (N = 21) there was no difference in the respective measurements of cardiac output (Qc = 6.0 +/- 1.7 and CORNA = 6.9 +/- 2.5 at rest; Qc = 13.7 +/- 3.2 and CORNA = 14.5 +/- 4.1 at exercise, L/min, mean +/- SD, r = .80). Mild maldistribution of ventilation, as manifested by an increased phase 3 alveolar slope for methane (CH4 slope), did not significantly influence the results. CH4 slope and DLexh did increase significantly with exercise, while total lung capacity remained unchanged (CH4 slope: 6.2 +/- 5.0 vs 12.5 +/- 6.8% delta CH4/L, mean +/- SD, p less than 0.001; Dsb: 27.7 +/- 9.2 vs 42.0 +/- 17.9 ml/min/mm Hg, mean +/- SD, p less than 0.001; TLC: 5.47 +/- .20 vs 5.96 +/- 1.20 L, mean +/- SD). DLexh was related to CORNA (r = .68) and RNA stroke volume (r = .50). Qc was significantly less than CORNA in the subset of studies with valvular regurgitation (VHD) (N = 7). On the other hand, Qc was significantly greater than CORNA in the setting of coronary artery disease (CAD) and severe wall motion abnormalities (N = 7). These differences may be attributed to regurgitant fractions in VHD, and the influence of wall motion abnormalities on the estimation of left ventricular volume by the area-length method in CAD. These two noninvasive methods compare well at rest and exercise in clinical subjects and may provide complementary information in certain cardiopulmonary diseases.

  7. A novel method of measuring cardiac output in infants following extracorporeal procedures: preliminary validation in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Richard; Darling, Edward; Terry, Bryan; Gunst, Gordy; Searles, Bruce

    2005-10-01

    In infants, technologies for obtaining rapid, quantified measurements of cardiac output (CO) following weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are not readily available. A new technique to measure CO based on ultrasound velocity dilution is described. It utilizes reusable probes placed on the extracorporeal circuit that permits convenient measurement of CO prior to decannulation. This report provides preliminary validation data in an animal model. Three Yorkshire pigs (11-14 kg) were fully heparinized and cannulated via the right common carotid artery (cannula advanced to the aortic arch) and right atrium. Both the venous and arterial lines were instrumented with ultrasonic probes connected to a computer-monitoring system. A 'stopcock bridge' between the arterial and venous cannulas provided the access for saline injection and a controlled AV-shunt. For comparison, a vascular flow probe was fitted directly to the pulmonary artery (PA) in both animals and, for the larger animal, a PA catheter was inserted to obtain standard thermodilution measurements. Linear regression analysis revealed a correlation between the CO by ultrasound dilution (CO UD) technique and the vascular probe and PA thermodilution techniques to be R2 =0.94 and 0.81. This pilot study demonstrated that the CO UD technique correlates to other benchmarks of CO measurements. This novel technology has specific application in the field of pediatric open heart surgery in that it would allow the surgeon to accurately and inexpensively measure the CO of neonatal and pediatric patients before and after surgical manipulation of the heart without the need for placement of additional catheters or probes.

  8. Accuracy and precision of minimally-invasive cardiac output monitoring in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Koichi; Joosten, Alexandre; Murphy, Linda Suk-Ling; Desebbe, Olivier; Alexander, Brenton; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Cannesson, Maxime

    2016-10-01

    Several minimally-invasive technologies are available for cardiac output (CO) measurement in children, but the accuracy and precision of these devices have not yet been evaluated in a systematic review and meta-analysis. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature in PubMed, Cochrane Library of Clinical Trials, Scopus, and Web of Science from its inception to June 2014 assessing the accuracy and precision of all minimally-invasive CO monitoring systems used in children when compared with CO monitoring reference methods. Pooled mean bias, standard deviation, and mean percentage error of included studies were calculated using a random-effects model. The inter-study heterogeneity was also assessed using an I(2) statistic. A total of 20 studies (624 patients) were included. The overall random-effects pooled bias, and mean percentage error were 0.13 ± 0.44 l min(-1) and 29.1 %, respectively. Significant inter-study heterogeneity was detected (P < 0.0001, I(2) = 98.3 %). In the sub-analysis regarding the device, electrical cardiometry showed the smallest bias (-0.03 l min(-1)) and lowest percentage error (23.6 %). Significant residual heterogeneity remained after conducting sensitivity and subgroup analyses based on the various study characteristics. By meta-regression analysis, we found no independent effects of study characteristics on weighted mean difference between reference and tested methods. Although the pooled bias was small, the mean pooled percentage error was in the gray zone of clinical applicability. In the sub-group analysis, electrical cardiometry was the device that provided the most accurate measurement. However, a high heterogeneity between studies was found, likely due to a wide range of study characteristics.

  9. Dynamic cardiac output regulation at rest, during exercise, and muscle metaboreflex activation: impact of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Coutsos, Matthew; Li, Zhenhua; Ichinose, Tomoko K; Dawe, Elizabeth; Fano, Dominic; O'Leary, Donal S

    2012-10-01

    We tested whether mild and moderate dynamic exercise and muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA) affect dynamic baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (CO), and the influence of stroke volume (SV) fluctuations on CO regulation in normal (N) and pacing-induced heart failure (HF) dogs by employing transfer function analyses of the relationships between spontaneous changes in left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and HR, LVSP and CO, HR and CO, and SV and CO at low and high frequencies (Lo-F, 0.04-0.15 Hz; Hi-F, 0.15-0.6 Hz). In N dogs, both workloads significantly decreased the gains for LVSP-HR and LVSP-CO in Hi-F, whereas only moderate exercise also reduced the LVSP-CO gain in Lo-F. MMA during mild exercise further decreased the gains for LVSP-HR in both frequencies and for LVSP-CO in Lo-F. MMA during moderate exercise further reduced LVSP-HR gain in Lo-F. Coherence for HR-CO in Hi-F was decreased by exercise and MMA, whereas that in Lo-F was sustained at a high level (>0.8) in all settings. HF significantly decreased dynamic HR and CO regulation in all situations. In HF, the coherence for HR-CO in Lo-F decreased significantly in all settings; the coherence for SV-CO in Lo-F was significantly higher. We conclude that dynamic exercise and MMA reduces dynamic baroreflex control of HR and CO, and these are substantially impaired in HF. In N conditions, HR modulation plays a major role in CO regulation. In HF, influence of HR modulation wanes, and fluctuations of SV dominate in CO variations.

  10. Importance of re-calibration time on pulse contour analysis agreement with thermodilution measurements of cardiac output: a retrospective analysis of intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Gomatam, Shanti; Forrest, Shawn; Strauss, David G

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the effect of re-calibration time on cardiac output estimation and trending performance in a retrospective analysis of an intensive care unit patient population using error grid analyses. Paired thermodilution and arterial blood pressure waveform measurements (N = 2141) from 222 patient records were extracted from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II database. Pulse contour analysis was performed by implementing a previously reported algorithm at calibration times of 1, 2, 8 and 24 h. Cardiac output estimation agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman and error grid analyses. Trending was assessed by concordance and a 4-Quadrant error grid analysis. Error between pulse contour and thermodilution increased with longer calibration times. Limits of agreement were -1.85 to 1.66 L/min for 1 h maximum calibration time compared to -2.70 to 2.41 L/min for 24 h. Error grid analysis resulted in 74.2 % of points bounded by 20 % error limits of thermodilution measurements for 1 h calibration time compared to 65 % for 24 h. 4-Quadrant error grid analysis showed <75 % of changes in pulse contour estimates to be within ±80 % of the change in the thermodilution measurement at any calibration time. Shorter calibration times improved the agreement of cardiac output pulse contour estimates with thermodilution. Use of minimally invasive pulse contour methods in intensive care monitoring could benefit from prospective studies evaluating calibration protocols. The applied pulse contour analysis method and thermodilution showed poor agreement to monitor changes in cardiac output.

  11. Comparison of stroke volume and cardiac output as measured by a single observer using four different ultrasound techniques in six clinically healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Biermann, K; Hungerbühler, S; Kästner, S B R

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess agreement and repeatability of four ultrasound methods for measuring stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) in cats. Measurement of SV and CO was performed by the Teichholz method, the Simpson's method (SM), the area length method (ALM) and a volumetric flow method across the aorta (Trace method). For each method, the coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated and agreement was determined by Bland-Altman analysis. The CV was acceptable (<20%) for all parameters, except for SV and CO obtained by SM (28.8% and 22.4%, respectively) and ALM (21.6% and 22.6%, respectively). Narrow limits of agreement were observed between both planimetric methods (SM and ALM). The Trace method was the most repeatable, followed by the Teichholz method. Despite excellent inter-method agreement, neither of the planimetric methods produced results with adequate repeatability. As the Teichholz and Trace methods were acceptably repeatable, and probably gave the most representative values, they appear to be the most useful methods for the measurement of SV and CO in cats. Further investigations are needed to compare the echocardiographic methods described here with a standard technique such as thermodilution.

  12. Evaluation of cardiac output in intensive care using a non-invasive arterial pulse contour technique (Nexfin(®)) compared with echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Taton, O; Fagnoul, D; De Backer, D; Vincent, J-L

    2013-09-01

    In this prospective study, cardiac output was measured in 38 intensive care unit patients before and after a fluid challenge, using both pulse contour analysis (Nexfin(®); BMEYE, Amsterdam, the Netherlands) and transthoracic echocardiography. The ability of the Nexfin device to detect significant changes in the velocity-time integral was evaluated. The pulse wave could not be detected by the Nexfin device in five patients (13%), leaving 33 patients for analysis. The Nexfin device adequately tracked changes in the velocity-time integral in 20 (61%) patients. Using a cut-off of a 10% increase in cardiac output estimated by the Nexfin or by echocardiography, the sensitivity of the Nexfin device to detect a response to fluid challenge was 47%, with specificity 81% and accuracy 64%. The percentage error between the Nexfin and echocardiography was 448%; lower limit of agreement -48% (95% CI -62 to -36%) and upper limit of agreement, 32% (95% CI 20-45%). We conclude that the Nexfin device does not adequately track changes in cardiac output in critically ill patients.

  13. Determining cardiac velocity fields and intraventricular pressure distribution from a sequence of Ultrafast CT cardiac images

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.M.; Napel, S. ); Leahy, R.M. . Signal and Image Processing Inst.); Brundage, B.H. . Div. of Cardiology); Boyd, D.P.

    1994-06-01

    A method of computing the velocity field and pressure distribution from a sequence of Ultrafast CT (UFCT) cardiac images is demonstrated. UFCT multi-slice cine imaging gives a series of tomographic slices covering the volume of the heart at a rate of 17 frames per second. The complete volume data set can be modeled using equations of continuum theory and through regularization, velocity vectors of both blood and tissue can be determined at each voxel in the volume. The authors present a technique to determine the pressure distribution throughout the volume of the left ventricle using the computed velocity field. A numerical algorithm is developed by discretizing the pressure Poisson equation (PPE), which is based on the Navier-Stokes equation. The algorithm is evaluated using a mathematical phantom of known velocity and pressure -- Couette flow. It is shown that the algorithm based on the PPE can reconstruct the pressure distribution using only the velocity data. Furthermore, the PPE is shown to be robust in the presence of noise. The velocity field and pressure distribution derived from a UFCT study of a patient are also presented.

  14. Reduced heart rate and cardiac output differentially affect angiogenesis, growth, and development in early chicken embryos (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Branum, Sylvia R; Yamada-Fisher, Miho; Burggren, Warren

    2013-01-01

    An increase in both vascular circumferential tension and shear stress in the developing vasculature of the chicken embryo has been hypothesized to stimulate angiogenesis in the developing peripheral circulation chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). To test this hypothesis, angiogenesis in the CAM, development, and growth were measured in the early chicken embryo, following acute and chronic topical application of the purely bradycardic drug ZD7288. At hour 56, ZD7288 reduced heart rate (f(H)) by ~30% but had no significant effect on stroke volume (~0.19 ± 0.2 μL), collectively resulting in a significant fall in cardiac output (CO) from ~27 ± 3 to 18 ± 2 μL min(-1). Mean f(H) at 72 h of development was similarly significantly lowered by acute ZD7288 treatment (250 μM) to 128 ± 0.3 beats min(-1), compared with 174.5 ± 0.3 and 174.7 ± 0.8 beats min(-1) in control and Pannett-Compton (P-C) saline-treated embryos, respectively. Chronic dosing with ZD7288-and the attendant decreases in f(H) and CO-did not change eye diameter or cervical flexion (key indicators of development rate) at 120 h but significantly reduced overall growth (wet and dry body mass decreased by 20%). CAM vessel density index (reflecting angiogenesis) measured 200-400 μm from the umbilical stalk was not altered, but ZD7288 reduced vessel numbers-and therefore vessel density-by 13%-16% more distally (500-600 μm from umbilical stalk) in the CAM. In the ZD7288-treated embryos, a decrease in vessel length was found within the second branch order (~300-400 μm from the umbilical stock), while a decrease in vessel diameter was found closer to the umbilical stock, beginning in the first branch order (~200-300 μm). Paradoxically, chronic application of P-C saline also reduced peripheral CAM vessel density index at 500 and 600 μm by 13% and 7%, respectively, likely from washout of local angiogenic factors. In summary, decreased f(H) with reduced CO did not slow development rate but reduced embryonic

  15. Determination of cardiac size from chest roentgenograms following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Gowen, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Decreased cardiothoracic transverse diameter ratios following Mercury, Gemini and Apollo space flights have been reported previously. To evaluate further changes in cardiac size, standard posteroanterior chest films in systole and diastole were obtained before flight and within a few hours after recovery on each of the Skylab astronauts. Postflight chest X-rays were visually compared to the preflight roentgenograms for possible changes in pulmonary vasculature, lung parenchyma, bony or soft tissue structures. From these roentgenograms the following measurements were obtained: cardiac and thoracic transverse diameters, cardiothoracic transverse diameter ratio, cardiac area from the product of both diagonal diameters, cardiac silhouette area by planimetry, thoracic cage area and cardiothoracic area ratio. The postflight frontal cardiac silhouette sizes were significantly decreased when compared with the respective preflight values (P0.05 or 0.01). The observed changes are thought to be related to postflight decrease in the intracardiac chamber volume.

  16. Phase I dynamics of cardiac output, systemic O2 delivery, and lung O2 uptake at exercise onset in men in acute normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lador, Frédéric; Tam, Enrico; Azabji Kenfack, Marcel; Cautero, Michela; Moia, Christian; Morel, Denis R; Capelli, Carlo; Ferretti, Guido

    2008-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that vagal withdrawal plays a role in the rapid (phase I) cardiopulmonary response to exercise. To this aim, in five men (24.6+/-3.4 yr, 82.1+/-13.7 kg, maximal aerobic power 330+/-67 W), we determined beat-by-beat cardiac output (Q), oxygen delivery (QaO2), and breath-by-breath lung oxygen uptake (VO2) at light exercise (50 and 100 W) in normoxia and acute hypoxia (fraction of inspired O2=0.11), because the latter reduces resting vagal activity. We computed Q from stroke volume (Qst, by model flow) and heart rate (fH, electrocardiography), and QaO2 from Q and arterial O2 concentration. Double exponentials were fitted to the data. In hypoxia compared with normoxia, steady-state fH and Q were higher, and Qst and VO2 were unchanged. QaO2 was unchanged at rest and lower at exercise. During transients, amplitude of phase I (A1) for VO2 was unchanged. For fH, Q and QaO2, A1 was lower. Phase I time constant (tau1) for QaO2 and VO2 was unchanged. The same was the case for Q at 100 W and for fH at 50 W. Qst kinetics were unaffected. In conclusion, the results do not fully support the hypothesis that vagal withdrawal determines phase I, because it was not completely suppressed. Although we can attribute the decrease in A1 of fH to a diminished degree of vagal withdrawal in hypoxia, this is not so for Qst. Thus the dual origin of the phase I of Q and QaO2, neural (vagal) and mechanical (venous return increase by muscle pump action), would rather be confirmed.

  17. Flow balance between the left and right cardiac output of an eccentric roller type total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Wada, H; Fukunaga, S; Watari, M; Sakai, H; Sugawara, Y; Ochikubo, H; Imai, K; Shibamura, H; Orihashi, K; Sueda, T; Matsuura, Y

    1999-08-01

    We have made an eccentric roller type total artificial heart (ERTAH). The ERTAH is a positive-displacement device comparable to a DeBakey roller pump. Its left and right outputs are determined by the size of its blood chambers, and the ratio of its left and right output is almost constant. We focused on an interatrial shunt to achieve left-right balance. We have conducted numerical simulation, a mock test, and an acute animal experiment to analyze left-right heart balance during ERTAH operation. Numerical simulation was performed under conditions in which the flow of the left artificial heart was fixed at 6 L/min, the flow of the right artificial heart was varied from 4.8 to 6 L/min, and the interatrial resistance was also varied. The relationship between the interatrial shunt flow rate and the output of the left and right artificial hearts was balanced when the flow of the right artificial heart was at 5.45 L/min. In a mock test, 2 DeBakey roller pumps were connected to the left and right sides of a Donovan mock circulatory system, and an interatrial shunt was created between the inlet ports of the left and right roller pumps. The interatrial resistance of the mock system was varied from 7.7, to 4.3, and to 2.9 mm Hg x min/L when the inner diameter of the interatrial shunt was 6, 8, and 10 mm, respectively. As in the mock test, 2 roller pumps were used to bypass the right and left hearts of a goat weighing 60 kg. The flow rate of the left heart was almost constant (4.7 L/min). The flow of the right heart was approximately 4.1 L/min when the interatrial shunt flow rate was zero. A leading consideration was that the left to left shunt through the bronchial arteries in this goat was approximately 0.6 L/min. In developing the ERTAH, we considered that creating an interatrial shunt between the inlet ports of the ERTAH as well as making a difference between the chamber volumes might be effective in balancing the left-right sides of the artificial heart.

  18. Electrophysiological Determination of Submembrane Na(+) Concentration in Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Bence; Bányász, Tamás; Shannon, Thomas R; Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T

    2016-09-20

    In the heart, Na(+) is a key modulator of the action potential, Ca(2+) homeostasis, energetics, and contractility. Because Na(+) currents and cotransport fluxes depend on the Na(+) concentration in the submembrane region, it is necessary to accurately estimate the submembrane Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]sm). Current methods using Na(+)-sensitive fluorescent indicators or Na(+) -sensitive electrodes cannot measure [Na(+)]sm. However, electrophysiology methods are ideal for measuring [Na(+)]sm. In this article, we develop patch-clamp protocols and experimental conditions to determine the upper bound of [Na(+)]sm at the peak of action potential and its lower bound at the resting state. During the cardiac cycle, the value of [Na(+)]sm is constrained within these bounds. We conducted experiments in rabbit ventricular myocytes at body temperature and found that 1) at a low pacing frequency of 0.5 Hz, the upper and lower bounds converge at 9 mM, constraining the [Na(+)]sm value to ∼9 mM; 2) at 2 Hz pacing frequency, [Na(+)]sm is bounded between 9 mM at resting state and 11.5 mM; and 3) the cells can maintain [Na(+)]sm to the above values, despite changes in the pipette Na(+) concentration, showing autoregulation of Na(+) in beating cardiomyocytes.

  19. Determination of cardiac size from chest roentgenograms following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Gowen, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The majority of crewmembers who exhibited postflight decreases in the cardiac silhouette size also showed a decreased orthostatic tolerance to lower body negative pressure. Similar findings were also reported by the Soviet investigators following 30-day bedrest studies and in cosmonauts upon return from space missions. Further radiological data from all three Skylab manned missions are presented and the physiological factors possibly involved in the cardiac silhouette changes are discussed.

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) but not (9-36) augments cardiac output during myocardial ischemia via a Frank-Starling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Tune, Johnathan D; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Sassoon, Daniel; Casalini, Eli D; Mather, Kieren J

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 (7-36) or (9-36) on myocardial oxygen consumption, function and systemic hemodynamics in vivo during normal perfusion and during acute, regional myocardial ischemia. Lean Ossabaw swine received systemic infusions of saline vehicle or GLP-1 (7-36 or 9-36) at 1.5, 3.0, and 10.0 pmol/kg/min in sequence for 30 min at each dose, followed by ligation of the left circumflex artery during continued infusion at 10.0 pmol/kg/min. Systemic GLP-1 (9-36) had no effect on coronary flow, blood pressure, heart rate or indices of cardiac function before or during regional myocardial ischemia. Systemic GLP-1 (7-36) exerted no cardiometabolic or hemodynamic effects prior to ischemia. During ischemia, GLP-1 (7-36) increased cardiac output by approximately 2 L/min relative to vehicle-controls (p = 0.003). This response was not diminished by treatment with the non-depolarizing ganglionic blocker hexamethonium. Left ventricular pressure-volume loops measured during steady-state conditions with graded occlusion of the inferior vena cava to assess load-independent contractility revealed that GLP-1 (7-36) produced marked increases in end-diastolic volume (74 ± 1 to 92 ± 5 ml; p = 0.03) and volume axis intercept (8 ± 2 to 26 ± 8; p = 0.05), without any change in the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship vs. vehicle during regional ischemia. GLP-1 (9-36) produced no changes in any of these parameters compared to vehicle. These findings indicate that short-term systemic treatment with GLP-1 (7-36) but not GLP-1 (9-36) significantly augments cardiac output during regional myocardial ischemia, via increases in ventricular preload without changes in cardiac inotropy.

  1. The influence of priming exercise on oxygen uptake, cardiac output, and muscle oxygenation kinetics during very heavy-intensity exercise in 9- to 13-yr-old boys.

    PubMed

    Barker, Alan R; Jones, Andrew M; Armstrong, Neil

    2010-08-01

    The present study examined the effect of priming exercise on O(2) uptake (Vo(2)) kinetics during subsequent very heavy exercise in eight 9- to 13-yr-old boys. We hypothesised that priming exercise would 1) elevate muscle O(2) delivery prior to the subsequent bout of very heavy exercise, 2) have no effect on the phase II Vo(2) tau, 3) elevate the phase II Vo(2) total amplitude, and 4) reduce the magnitude of the Vo(2) slow component. Each participant completed repeat 6-min bouts of very heavy-intensity cycling exercise separated by 6 min of light pedaling. During the tests Vo(2), muscle oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy), and cardiac output (Q) (thoracic impedance) were determined. Priming exercise increased baseline muscle oxygenation and elevated Q at baseline and throughout the second exercise bout. The phase II Vo(2) tau was not altered by priming exercise (bout 1: 22 + or - 7 s vs. bout 2: 20 + or - 4 s; P = 0.30). However, the time constant describing the entire Vo(2) response from start to end of exercise was accelerated (bout 1: 43 + or - 8 s vs. bout 2: 36 + or - 5 s; P = 0.002) due to an increased total phase II Vo(2) amplitude (bout 1: 1.73 + or - 0.33 l/min vs. bout 2: 1.80 + or - 0.59 l/min; P = 0.002) and a reduced Vo(2) slow component amplitude (bout 1: 0.18 + or - 0.08 l/min vs. bout 2: 0.12 + or - 0.09 l/min; P = 0.048). These results suggest that phase II Vo(2) kinetics in young boys is principally limited by intrinsic muscle metabolic factors, whereas the Vo(2) total phase II and slow component amplitudes may be O(2) delivery sensitive.

  2. SU-E-T-248: Determining Output Factor of Irregular Electron Cutouts at Extended SSD

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhatib, H; Gebreamlak, W; Tedeschi, D; Mihailidis, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To calculate the output factor (OPF) of any irregularly shaped electron beam at extended SSD Methods: Using Cerrobend block, circular cutouts with diameter ranging from 2.0cm to the maximum possible size for 15×15 applicator of Varian 2100C and 14×14 applicator of ELEKTA Synergy LINACs were prepared. In addition, two irregular cutouts were made. For each cutout, percentage depth dose (PDD) at standard SSD and point doses at different SSD were measured in water using Scanditronix diodes and PTW 0.125 cm{sup 3} ion-chambers, respectively. In addition, the distance at which electron fluence along the central axis becomes independent of cutout size was determined using EDR2 films. On each LINAC, electron beam energies of 6, 9, 12, and 15/20 MeV were used. Results: Using the open applicator as the reference field, the lateral buildup ratio (LBR) for each circular cutout as a function of depth was calculated. From the LBR value and radius of the cutout, the corresponding lateral spread parameter (σR(z)) was determined. Taking the cutout side dependence of σR(z)) into account, PDD of the irregular cutouts at the standard SSD were calculated. From the point dose measurement at different SSDs, the effective SSD of each cutout was calculated. Taking the calculated PDD of the irregular cutout and effective SSD (SSDeff) of the circular cutout into account, OPFs of the irregular cutout at extended SSD values were calculated. Finally, the calculated output factors were compared with the measured values. Conclusion: In this research, the improved LBR method has been generalized to calculate output factor of irregular cutouts at extended SSD. In a clinically useful region, the percentage difference between the measured and the calculated output factors of the irregular cutouts was within 2%. Similar results were obtained for all available electron energies of both Varian 2100C and ELEKTA Synergy machines.

  3. Determination of the peak power output during maximal brief pedalling bouts.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Mutoh, Y; Miyashita, M

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose an optimization procedure for determining power output during very brief maximal pedalling exercise. Twenty-six healthy male students (21-28 years) performed anaerobic tests on a Monark bicycle ergometer with maximal effort for less than 10 s at eight different loads ranging from 28.1 to 84.2 Nm in pedalling moment. The maximal pedalling rate was determined from the minimal time required for one rotation of the cycle wheel. Pedalling rate decreased linearly with the load. The relationship between load and pedalling rate was represented by two linear regression equations for each subject; one regression equation was determined from eight pairs of pedalling rates and loads (r less than -0.976) and the other from three pairs (at 28.1, 46.8, 65.5 Nm; r less than -0.969). The two regression coefficients of the respective regression equations were almost identical. Mean +/- S.D. of maximal power output (Pmax) which was determined for each subject based on the two linear regression equations for eight pairs and three pairs of pedalling rates and loads was 930 +/- 187 W (13.4 +/- 1.6 W kgBW-1) and 927 +/- 187 W (13.4 +/- 1.6 W kgBW-1), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the values of Pmax which were obtained from each equation. It was concluded that maximal anaerobic power could be simply determined by performing maximal cycling exercise at three different loads.

  4. Comparison of cardiac power output and exercise performance in patients with left ventricular assist devices, explanted (recovered) patients, and those with moderate to severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; George, Robert S; Donovan, Gay; Nunan, David; Henderson, Keiran; Bougard, Robert S; Yacoub, Magdi H; Birks, Emma J; Brodie, David A

    2010-06-15

    Peak cardiac power output (CPO), as a direct measurement of overall cardiac function, has been shown to be a most powerful predictor of prognosis for patients with chronic heart failure. The present study assessed CPO and exercise performance in patients implanted with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), those explanted due to myocardial recovery, and those with moderate to severe heart failure. Hemodynamic and respiratory gas exchange measurements were undertaken at rest and at peak graded exercise. These were performed in 54 patients-20 with moderate to severe heart failure, 18 with implanted LVADs, and 16 with explanted LVADs. At rest there was a nonsignificant difference in CPO among groups (p >0.05). Peak CPO was significantly higher in the explanted LVAD than in the heart failure and implanted LVAD groups (heart failure 1.90 +/- 0.45 W, implanted LVAD 2.37 +/- 0.55 W, explanted LVAD 3.39 +/- 0.61 W, p <0.01) as was peak cardiac output (heart failure 9.1 +/- 2.1 L/min, implanted LVAD 12.4 +/- 2.2 L/min, explanted LVD 14.6 +/- 2.9 L/min, p <0.01). Peak oxygen consumption was higher in the explanted LVAD than in the heart failure and implanted LVAD groups (heart failure 15.8 +/- 4.1 ml/kg/min, implanted LVAD 19.8 +/- 5.8 ml/kg/min, explanted LVAD 28.2 +/- 5.0 ml/kg/min, p <0.05) as was anaerobic threshold (heart failure 11.2 +/- 1.9 ml/kg/min, implanted LVAD 14.7 +/- 4.9 ml/kg/min, explanted LVAD 21.4 +/- 5.0 ml/kg/min, p <0.05). In conclusion, peak CPO differentiates well during cardiac restoration using LVADs and emphasizes the benefits of this therapy. CPO has the potential to be a key physiologic marker of heart failure severity and can guide management of patients with LVAD.

  5. Single session of sprint interval training elicits similar cardiac output but lower oxygen uptake versus ramp exercise to exhaustion in men and women

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Trevor; Roverud, Garret; Sutzko, Kandice; Browne, Melissa; Parra, Cristina; Astorino, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) elicits comparable long-term adaptations versus continuous exercise training (CEX) including increased maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and fat utilization. However, there is limited research examining acute hemodynamic responses to SIT. The aim of this study was to examine hemodynamic responses to low-volume SIT. Active men (n=6, VO2max = 39.8 ± 1.7 mL/kg/min) and women (n=7, VO2max = 37.3 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min) performed a ramp-based VO2max test (RAMP) to determine workload for the SIT session. Subjects returned within 1 wk and completed a session of SIT consisting of six 30-s bouts of “all-out” cycling at 130% maximal workload (Wmax) interspersed with 120 s of active recovery. Continuously during RAMP and exercise and recovery in SIT, VO2 was obtained and thoracic impedance was used to estimate heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and cardiac output (CO). Results revealed no significant differences in COmax (p = 0.12, 19.7 ± 2.4 L/min vs. 20.3 ± 1.8 L/min) but lower SVmax (p = 0.004, 110.4 ± 15.7 mL vs. 119.4 ± 15.5 mL) in RAMP versus SIT. HRmax from SIT (179.0 ± 11.8 b/min) was lower (p = 0.008) versus RAMP (184.4 ± 7.9 b/min). Peak VO2 (L/min) was lower (p < 0.001) in response to SIT (2.43 ± 0.82 L/min) compared to RAMP (2.84 ± 0.82 L/min). Hemodynamic variables increased linearly across SIT bouts and remained significantly elevated in recovery. Sprint interval training consisting of 3 min of supramaximal exercise elicits similar CO yet lower VO2 compared to RAMP. PMID:27785335

  6. Single session of sprint interval training elicits similar cardiac output but lower oxygen uptake versus ramp exercise to exhaustion in men and women.

    PubMed

    Horn, Trevor; Roverud, Garret; Sutzko, Kandice; Browne, Melissa; Parra, Cristina; Astorino, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) elicits comparable long-term adaptations versus continuous exercise training (CEX) including increased maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and fat utilization. However, there is limited research examining acute hemodynamic responses to SIT. The aim of this study was to examine hemodynamic responses to low-volume SIT. Active men (n=6, VO2max = 39.8 ± 1.7 mL/kg/min) and women (n=7, VO2max = 37.3 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min) performed a ramp-based VO2max test (RAMP) to determine workload for the SIT session. Subjects returned within 1 wk and completed a session of SIT consisting of six 30-s bouts of "all-out" cycling at 130% maximal workload (Wmax) interspersed with 120 s of active recovery. Continuously during RAMP and exercise and recovery in SIT, VO2 was obtained and thoracic impedance was used to estimate heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and cardiac output (CO). Results revealed no significant differences in COmax (p = 0.12, 19.7 ± 2.4 L/min vs. 20.3 ± 1.8 L/min) but lower SVmax (p = 0.004, 110.4 ± 15.7 mL vs. 119.4 ± 15.5 mL) in RAMP versus SIT. HRmax from SIT (179.0 ± 11.8 b/min) was lower (p = 0.008) versus RAMP (184.4 ± 7.9 b/min). Peak VO2 (L/min) was lower (p < 0.001) in response to SIT (2.43 ± 0.82 L/min) compared to RAMP (2.84 ± 0.82 L/min). Hemodynamic variables increased linearly across SIT bouts and remained significantly elevated in recovery. Sprint interval training consisting of 3 min of supramaximal exercise elicits similar CO yet lower VO2 compared to RAMP.

  7. Role of heart rate and stroke volume during muscle metaboreflex-induced cardiac output increase: differences between activation during and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Piras, Francesco; Filippi, Michele; Piredda, Carlo; Chiappori, Paolo; Melis, Franco; Milia, Raffaele; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto

    2011-09-01

    We hypothesized that the role of stroke volume (SV) in the metaboreflex-induced cardiac output (CO) increase was blunted when the metaboreflex was stimulated by exercise muscle ischemia (EMI) compared with post-exercise muscle ischemia (PEMI), because during EMI heart rate (HR) increases and limits diastolic filling. Twelve healthy volunteers were recruited and their hemodynamic responses to the metaboreflex evoked by EMI, PEMI, and by a control dynamic exercise were assessed. The main finding was that the blood pressure increment was very similar in the EMI and PEMI settings. In both conditions the main mechanism used to raise blood pressure was a CO elevation. However, during the EMI test CO was increased as a result of HR elevation whereas during the PEMI test CO was increased as a result of an increase in SV. These results were explainable on the basis of the different HR behavior between the two settings, which in turn led to different diastolic time and myocardial performance.

  8. Effect of increased cardiac output on liver blood flow, oxygen exchange and metabolic rate during longterm endotoxin-induced shock in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Šantak, Borislav; Radermacher, Peter; Adler, Jens; Iber, Thomas; Rieger, Karen M; Wachter, Ulrich; Vogt, Josef; Georgieff, Michael; Träger, Karl

    1998-01-01

    We investigated hepatic blood flow, O2 exchange and metabolism in porcine endotoxic shock (Control, n=8; Endotoxin, n=10) with administration of hydroxyethylstarch to maintain arterial pressure (MAP)>60 mmHg. Before and 12, 18 and 24 h after starting continuous i.v. endotoxin we measured portal venous and hepatic arterial blood flow, intracapillary haemoglobin O2 saturation (Hb-O2%) of the liver surface and arterial, portal and hepatic venous lactate, pyruvate, glyercol and alanine concentrations. Glucose production rate was derived from the plasma isotope enrichment during infusion of [6,6-2H2]-glucose. Despite a sustained 50% increase in cardiac output endotoxin caused a progressive, significant fall in MAP. Liver blood flow significantly increased, but endotoxin affected neither hepatic O2 delivery and uptake nor mean intracapillary Hb-O2% and Hb-O2% frequency distributions. Endotoxin nearly doubled endogenous glucose production rate while hepatic lactate, alanine and glycerol uptake rates progressively decreased significantly. The lactate uptake rate even became negative (P<0.05 vs Control). Endotoxin caused portal and hepatic venous pH to fall significantly concomitant with significantly increased arterial, portal and hepatic venous lactate/pyruvate ratios. During endotoxic shock increased cardiac output achieved by colloid infusion maintained elevated liver blood flow and thereby macro- and microcirculatory O2 supply. Glucose production rate nearly doubled with complete dissociation of hepatic uptake of glucogenic precursors and glucose release. Despite well-preserved capillary oxygenation increased lactate/pyruvate ratios reflecting impaired cytosolic redox state suggested deranged liver energy balance, possibly due to the O2 requirements of gluconeogenesis. PMID:9756385

  9. Determining Cardiac Fiber Orientation Using FSL and Registered Ultrasound/DTI volumes

    PubMed Central

    Dormer, James; Qin, Xulei; Shen, Ming; Wang, Silun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Jiang, Rong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    Accurate extraction of cardiac fiber orientation from diffusion tensor imaging is important for determining heart structure and function. However, the acquisition of magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor images is costly and time consuming. By comparison, cardiac ultrasound imaging is rapid and relatively inexpensive, but it lacks the capability to directly measure fiber orientations. In order to create a detailed heart model from ultrasound data, a three-dimensional (3D) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with known fiber orientations can be registered to an ultrasound volume through a geometric mask. After registration, the cardiac orientations from the template DTI can be mapped to the heart using a deformable transformation field. This process depends heavily on accurate fiber orientation extraction from the DTI. In this study, we use the FMRIB Software Library (FSL) to determine cardiac fiber orientations in diffusion weighted images. For the registration between ultrasound and MRI volumes, we achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 81.6±2.1%. For the estimation of fiber orientations from the proposed method, we achieved an acute angle error (AAE) of 22.7±3.1° as compared to the direct measurements from DTI. This work provides a new approach to generate cardiac fiber orientation that may be used for many cardiac applications. PMID:27660384

  10. Determining cardiac fiber orientation using FSL and registered ultrasound/DTI volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormer, James; Qin, Xulei; Shen, Ming; Wang, Silun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Jiang, Rong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-04-01

    Accurate extraction of cardiac fiber orientation from diffusion tensor imaging is important for determining heart structure and function. However, the acquisition of magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor images is costly and time consuming. By comparison, cardiac ultrasound imaging is rapid and relatively inexpensive, but it lacks the capability to directly measure fiber orientations. In order to create a detailed heart model from ultrasound data, a three-dimensional (3D) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with known fiber orientations can be registered to an ultrasound volume through a geometric mask. After registration, the cardiac orientations from the template DTI can be mapped to the heart using a deformable transformation field. This process depends heavily on accurate fiber orientation extraction from the DTI. In this study, we use the FMRIB Software Library (FSL) to determine cardiac fiber orientations in diffusion weighted images. For the registration between ultrasound and MRI volumes, we achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 81.6+/-2.1%. For the estimation of fiber orientations from the proposed method, we achieved an acute angle error (AAE) of 22.7+/-3.1° as compared to the direct measurements from DTI. This work provides a new approach to generate cardiac fiber orientation that may be used for many cardiac applications.

  11. Three-dimensional cardiac architecture determined by two-photon microtomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hayden; MacGillivray, Catherine; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Lammerding, Jan; Robbins, Jeffrey; Lee, Richard T.; So, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Cardiac architecture is inherently three-dimensional, yet most characterizations rely on two-dimensional histological slices or dissociated cells, which remove the native geometry of the heart. We previously developed a method for labeling intact heart sections without dissociation and imaging large volumes while preserving their three-dimensional structure. We further refine this method to permit quantitative analysis of imaged sections. After data acquisition, these sections are assembled using image-processing tools, and qualitative and quantitative information is extracted. By examining the reconstructed cardiac blocks, one can observe end-to-end adjacent cardiac myocytes (cardiac strands) changing cross-sectional geometries, merging and separating from other strands. Quantitatively, representative cross-sectional areas typically used for determining hypertrophy omit the three-dimensional component; we show that taking orientation into account can significantly alter the analysis. Using fast-Fourier transform analysis, we analyze the gross organization of cardiac strands in three dimensions. By characterizing cardiac structure in three dimensions, we are able to determine that the α crystallin mutation leads to hypertrophy with cross-sectional area increases, but not necessarily via changes in fiber orientation distribution.

  12. Efficiency of pollination and satiation of predators determine reproductive output in Iberian Juniperus thurifera woodlands.

    PubMed

    Mezquida, E T; Rodríguez-García, E; Olano, J M

    2016-01-01

    Fruit production in animal-dispersed plants has a strong influence on fitness because large crops increase the number of seeds dispersed by frugivores. Large crops are costly, and environmental control of plant resources is likely play a role in shaping temporal and spatial variations in seed production, particularly in fluctuating environments such as the Mediterranean. The number of fruits that start to develop and the proportion of viable seeds produced are also linked to the number of flowers formed and the efficiency of pollination in wind-pollinated plants. Finally, large fruit displays also attract seed predators, having a negative effect on seed output. We assessed the relative impact of environmental conditions on fruit production, and their combined effect on seed production, abortion and seed loss through three predispersal predators in Juniperus thurifera L., sampling 14 populations across the Iberian Peninsula. Wetter than average conditions during flowering and early fruit development led to larger crop sizes; this effect was amplified at tree level, with the most productive trees during more favourable years yielding fruits with more viable seeds and less empty and aborted seeds. In addition, large crops satiated the less mobile seed predator. The other two predispersal predators responded to plant traits, the presence of other seed predators and environmental conditions, but did not show a satiation response to the current-year crop. Our large-scale study on a dioecious, wind-pollinated Mediterranean juniper indicates that pollination efficiency and satiation of seed predators, mediated by environmental conditions, are important determinants of reproductive output in this juniper species.

  13. The feasibility and applications of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring, thromboelastography and transit-time flow measurement in living-related renal transplantation surgery: results of a prospective pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delayed graft function (DGF) remains a significant and detrimental postoperative phenomenon following living-related renal allograft transplantation, with a published incidence of up to 15%. Early therapeutic vasodilatory interventions have been shown to improve DGF, and modifications to immunosuppressive regimens may subsequently lessen its impact. This pilot study assesses the potential applicability of perioperative non-invasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM), transit-time flow monitoring (TTFM) of the transplant renal artery and pre-/perioperative thromboelastography (TEG) in the early prediction of DGF and perioperative complications. Methods Ten consecutive living-related renal allograft recipients were studied. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring commenced immediately following induction of anaesthesia and was maintained throughout the perioperative period. Doppler-based TTFM was performed during natural haemostatic pauses in the transplant surgery: immediately following graft reperfusion and following ureteric implantation. Central venous blood sampling for TEG was performed following induction of anaesthesia and during abdominal closure. Results A single incidence of DGF was seen within the studied cohort and one intra-operative (thrombotic) complication noted. NICOM confirmed a predictable trend of increased cardiac index (CI) following allograft reperfusion (mean CI - clamped: 3.17 ± 0.29 L/min/m2, post-reperfusion: 3.50 ± 0.35 L/min/m2; P < 0.05) mediated by a significant reduction in total peripheral resistance. Reduced TTFM at the point of allograft reperfusion (227 ml/min c.f. mean; 411 ml/min (95% CI: 358 to 465)) was identified in a subject who experienced intra-operative transplant renal artery thrombosis. TEG data exhibited significant reductions in clot lysis (LY30 (%): pre-op: 1.0 (0.29 to 1.71), post reperfusion 0.33 (0.15 to 0.80); P = 0.02) and a trend towards increased clot initiation following

  14. Assessing cardiac pumping capability by exercise testing and inotropic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, L B; Bain, R J; Littler, W A

    1989-01-01

    In heart failure both functional capacity and prognosis are primarily determined by the degree of pump dysfunction. Although data on haemodynamic function at rest may indicate impaired cardiac function, they do not assess the capacity of the heart to respond to stress. Maximal bicycle ergometry and incremental intravenous inotropic stimulation in 31 patients with moderately severe heart failure were evaluated as methods of stressing the heart to determine cardiac pumping capability, which is defined as the cardiac power obtained during maximal stimulation. There was good agreement between the cardiac pumping capabilities assessed by these two methods. Maximal cardiac power output was better than maximal cardiac output and left ventricular stroke work index in representing cardiac pumping capability, because it was less dependent on the type of stimulation used during evaluation. Inotropic challenge is at least as effective as exercise testing in assessing cardiac pumping capability in heart failure, and may be a better method in patients who find physical exercise difficult. PMID:2757870

  15. Determining six cardiac conductivities from realistically large datasets.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Barbara M; Johnston, Peter R

    2015-08-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac electrophysiological behaviour that use the bidomain model require accurate values for the bidomain extracellular and intracellular conductivities to produce useful results. This work considers an inversion algorithm, which has previously been shown, using simulated data, to be capable of retrieving six bidomain conductivities and the fibre rotation angle from measurements of electric potential made in the heart. The aim here is to see whether it is possible to improve the accuracy of the retrieved parameters. The scenario of retrieving only conductivities and not fibre rotation is examined but this does not lead to a worthwhile improvement in retrieval accuracy. It is also found that it is possible to retrieve the bidomain conductivities using not two but just one pass of the algorithm, made on a 'widely-spaced' electrode set. This appears to work because the algorithm is still very sensitive to the extracellular conductivities. However, the single-pass method is not recommended because the intracellular conductivities that are retrieved are not as accurate as those that are retrieved in the usual two-pass method, particularly for higher values of added noise. The second part of this work considers retrieving the six conductivities and fibre rotation from realistically large sets of potential measurements and identifies the best data analysis method. It is found that, even with added noise of up to 40%, the extracellular conductivities can still be retrieved extremely accurately (relative errors of around 2% on average) and so can the intracellular longitudinal conductivities and fibre rotation (errors less than 8% on average). The remaining intracellular conductivities have errors that are generally less than twice the added noise, particularly for the higher noise values.

  16. System and method for determining the net output torque from a waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Tricaud, Christophe; Ernst, Timothy C.; Zigan, James A.

    2016-12-13

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery system with a system and method for calculation of the net output torque from the waste heat recovery system. The calculation uses inputs from existing pressure and speed sensors to create a virtual pump torque sensor and a virtual expander torque sensor, and uses these sensors to provide an accurate net torque output from the WHR system.

  17. Sex differences in carotid baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure in humans: relative contribution of cardiac output and total vascular conductance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum; Deo, Shekhar H.; Vianna, Lauro C.; Balanos, George M.; Hartwich, Doreen; Fisher, James P.

    2011-01-01

    It is presently unknown whether there are sex differences in the magnitude of blood pressure (BP) responses to baroreceptor perturbation or if the relative contribution of cardiac output (CO) and total vascular conductance (TVC) to baroreflex-mediated changes in BP differs in young women and men. Since sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone is attenuated in women, we hypothesized that carotid baroreflex-mediated BP responses would be attenuated in women by virtue of a blunted vascular response (i.e., an attenuated TVC response). BP, heart rate (HR), and stroke volume were continuously recorded during the application of 5-s pulses of neck pressure (NP; carotid hypotension) and neck suction (NS; carotid hypertension) ranging from +40 to −80 Torr in women (n = 20, 21 ± 0.5 yr) and men (n = 20, 21 ± 0.4 yr). CO and TVC were calculated on a beat-to-beat basis. Women demonstrated greater depressor responses to NS (e.g., −60 Torr, −17 ± 1%baseline in women vs. −11 ± 1%baseline in men, P < 0.05), which were driven by augmented decreases in HR that, in turn, contributed to larger reductions in CO (−60 Torr, −15 ± 2%baseline in women vs. −6 ± 2%baseline in men, P < 0.05). In contrast, pressor responses to NP were similar in women and men (e.g., +40 Torr, +14 ± 2%baseline in women vs. +10 ± 1%baseline in men, P > 0.05), with TVC being the primary mediating factor in both groups. Our findings indicate that sex differences in the baroreflex control of BP are evident during carotid hypertension but not carotid hypotension. Furthermore, in contrast to our hypothesis, young women exhibited greater BP responses to carotid hypertension by virtue of a greater cardiac responsiveness. PMID:21963834

  18. Determination of small field output factors in 6 and 10 MV flattening filter free photon beams using various detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masanga, W.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Khamfongkhruea, C.; Tannanonta, C.

    2016-03-01

    The study aimed to determine appropriate detectors for output factor measurement of small fields in 6 and 10 MV flattening filter free photon beams using five different detectors. Field sizes were varied between 0.6 × 0.6 and 4.0 × 4.0 cm2. An indirect method (daisy-chaining) was applied to normalize the output factors. For the smallest field size, the variations of output factors compared among the detectors were 13%. Exradin A16 had the lowest output factor and increasing in sequence with CC01, microDiamond, microLion and EDGE detectors, respectively, for both energies. The similarity between CC01 and microDiamond output factor values were within 1.6% and 1% for all field sizes of 6 and 10 MV FFF, respectively. EDGE and microLion presented the highest values while ExradinA16 gave lowest values. In conclusion, IBACC01, Exradin A16, microLion, microDiamond and EDGE detectors seem to be the detectors of choices for small field output factor measurement of FFF beams down to 1.6 × 1.6 cm2. However, we could not guarantee which detector is the most suitable for output factor measurement in small field less than 1.6 × 1.6 cm2 of FFF beams. Further studies are required to provide reference information for validation purposes.

  19. Determination of electron beam output factors for a 20-MeV linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, M.D.; Hogstrom, K.R.; Fields, R.S.

    1985-07-01

    The demands of a busy clinic require that basic machine calculations be performed as accurately, rapidly, and simply as possible. For the electron beam of the Therac 20 Saturne linear accelerator, a method suitable for a programmable calculator is described to predict the dose output from the measurement of selected fields. One-dimensional output factors were measured; these are defined as output factors of rectangular fields where one side is always equal to the side of the square reference field. The output of an arbitrary rectangular field X, Y is given by the product of the output factors OF(X,Y) = OF(X,10) x OF(10,Y), where 10 is the side of the square reference field. The measured data indicate that the output of very large rectangular and square fields is underestimated using this method for the lower energies. A correction factor of the form CF = C x ((X-10)(Y-10)/Vertical Bar(X-10)(Y-10)Vertical Bar/sup 1//sup ///sup 2/) results in agreement with measured data to within 1.5% for all energies.

  20. Determination of electron beam output factors for a 20-MeV linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Mills, M D; Hogstrom, K R; Fields, R S

    1985-01-01

    The demands of a busy clinic require that basic machine calculations be performed as accurately, rapidly, and simply as possible. For the electron beam of the Therac 20 Saturne linear accelerator, a method suitable for a programmable calculator is described to predict the dose output from the measurement of selected fields. One-dimensional output factors were measured; these are defined as output factors of rectangular fields where one side is always equal to the side of the square reference field. The output of an arbitrary rectangular field X, Y is given by the product of the output factors OF(X,Y) = OF(X,10) X OF(10,Y), where 10 is the side of the square reference field. The measured data indicate that the output of very large rectangular and square fields is underestimated using this method for the lower energies. A correction factor of the form CF = C X [(X - 10)(Y - 10)/(X - 10)(Y - 10) 1/2] results in agreement with measured data to within 1.5% for all energies.

  1. Hypertensive crises in quadriplegic patients. Changes in cardiac output, blood volume, serum dopamine-beta-hydroxylase activity, and arterial prostaglandin PGE2.

    PubMed

    Naftchi, N E; Demeny, M; Lowman, E W; Tuckman, J

    1978-02-01

    The syndrome of autonomic dysreflexia often occurs in quadriplegic subjects and is characterized by paroxysmal hypertension, headache, vasoconstriction below and flushing of the skin above the level of transection, and bradycardia. These attacks may cause hypertnesive encephalopathy, cerebral vascular accidents, and death. In five patients during crises, the mean arterial pressure changed from 95 to 154 mm Hg, heart rate 72 to 45 beats/min, cardiac output 4.76 to 4.70 L/min, and peripheral resistance 1650 to 2660 dynes.sec.cm-5. In eight subjects the control plasma, red cell, and total blood volumes were 19.1, 10.5, and 29.6 ml/cm body height, respectively, and when hypertensive, the plasma protein concentration increased by 9.9% and the hematocrit by 9.5%. Plasma volume was only reduced by an estimated 10-15%. At that time, arterial dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH) activity increased 65% and prostaglandin E2 concentration by 68%. Thus, the augmented DbetaH activity presented primarily an elevated sympathetic tone and not hemoconcentration of that protein. The rise in prostaglandin may contribute to the severe headaches during hypertensive episodes.

  2. Continuous registration of blood velocity and cardiac output with a hot-film anemometer probe, mounted on a Swan-Ganz thermodilution catheter.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, P K; Andersen, M

    1981-01-01

    In order to construct a catheter, capable of monitoring cardiac output, a specially designed double-conical hot-film anemometer probe was fastened at the tip of a Swan-Ganz thermodilution catheter. Common sources of error for most catheter velocity probes include difficult calibration, unknown velocity profile at the point of measurement and unknown position of the probe in this profile. By using mongrel dogs and in order to exclude these sources of error, the intermittent thermodilution method was used to in vitro calibrate the hot-film anemometer, which registered velocity continuously. A mean correlation coefficient between these two methods was found to be 0.886. A mean line of regression between thermodilution (abscissa) and anemometer (ordinate) had a slope of 0.796 +/- 0.223 (+/- SD) and a y-intercept of 24 +/- 14 ml/min/kg. The slope was significantly lower than one (t test, p less than 0.05) and the y-intercept significantly larger than zero (t test, p less than 0.02). As a control of the thermodilution method, electromagnetic flow in the ascending aorta was registered and a mean correlation coefficient of 0.967 found. The hot-film sensor itself can be used as thermodilution method with the hot-film anemometer's continuous registration of velocity.

  3. The relation between cardiac output kinetics and skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate exercise in moderately impaired patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ruud F; Niemeijer, Victor M; Schoots, Thijs; Wijn, Pieter F; Doevendans, Pieter A; Kemps, Hareld M

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics are prolonged in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This may be caused by impaired oxygen delivery or skeletal muscle derangements. We investigated whether impaired cardiac output (Q̇) kinetics limit skeletal muscle oxygen delivery relative to the metabolic demands at submaximal exercise in CHF patients by evaluating the relation between Q̇ kinetics and skeletal muscle deoxygenation. Forty-three CHF patients, NYHA II-III, performed a constant-load exercise test at 80% of the ventilatory aerobic threshold (VAT) to assess V̇o2 kinetics (τV̇o2). Q̇ kinetics (τQ̇) were assessed by a radial artery pulse contour analysis method. Skeletal muscle deoxygenation was assessed by near infrared spectroscopy at the m. vastus lateralis, using the minimal value of the tissue saturation index during onset of exercise (TSImin). Patients were categorized in slow and normal Q̇ responders relative to metabolic demands (τQ̇/V̇o2 ≥1 and τQ̇/V̇o2 <1, respectively), τQ̇ (62 ± 29 s), and τV̇o2 (60 ± 21 s) were significantly related (r = 0.66, P = 0.001). There was a significant correlation between τQ̇ and TSImin in the slow Q̇ responders [rs= -0.57, P = 0.005, n = 22 (51%)]. In conclusion, in moderately impaired CHF patients with relatively slow Q̇ kinetics, central hemodynamics may limit skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate-intensity exercise.

  4. Work and power outputs determined from pedalling and flywheel friction forces during brief maximal exertion on a cycle ergometer.

    PubMed

    Hibi, N; Fujinaga, H; Ishii, K

    1996-01-01

    Work and power outputs during short-term, maximal exertion on a friction loaded cycle ergometer are usually calculated from the friction force applied to the flywheel. The inertia of the flywheel is sometimes taken into consideration, but the effects of internal resistances and other factors have been ignored. The purpose of this study was to estimate their effects by comparing work or power output determined from the force exerted on the pedals (pedalling force) with work or power output determined from the friction force and the moment of inertia of the rotational parts. A group of 22 male college students accelerated a cycle ergometer as rapidly as possible for 3 s. The total work output determined from the pedalling force (TWp) was significantly greater than that calculated from the friction force and the moment of inertia (TWf). Power output determined from the pedalling force during each pedal stroke (SPp) was also significantly greater than that calculated from the friction force and the moment of inertia. Percentage difference (% diff), defined by % diff = ¿(TWp - TWf)/TWf¿ x 100, ranged from 16.8% to 49.3% with a mean value of 30.8 (SD 9.1)%. It was observed that % diff values were higher in subjects with greater TWp or greater maximal SPp. These results would indicate that internal resistances and other factors, such as the deformation of the chain and the vibrations of the entire system, may have significant effects on the measurements of work and power outputs. The effects appear to depend on the magnitudes of pedalling force and pedal velocity.

  5. Heart mass and the maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals: implications for estimating the maximum aerobic power input of flying animals

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Empirical studies of cardiovascular variables suggest that relative heart muscle mass (relative Mh) is a good indicator of the degree of adaptive specialization for prolonged locomotor activities, for both birds and mammals. Reasonable predictions for the maximum oxygen consumption of birds during flight can be obtained by assuming that avian heart muscle has the same maximum physiological and biomechanical performance as that of terrestrial mammals. Thus, data on Mh can be used to provide quantitative estimates for the maximum aerobic power input (aerobic Pi,max) available to animals during intense levels of locomotor activity. The maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals is calculated to scale with respect to Mh (g) as 213 Mh0.88+-0.04 (ml min-1), while aerobic Pi,max is estimated to scale approximately as 11 Mh0.88+-0.09 (W). In general, estimated inter-species aerobic Pi,max, based on Mh for all bird species (excluding hummingbirds), is calculated to scale with respect to body mass (Mb in kg) as 81 Mb0.82+-0.11 (W). Comparison of family means for Mh indicate that there is considerable diversity in aerobic capacity among birds and mammals, for example, among the medium to large species of birds the Tinamidae have the smallest relative Mh (0.25 per cent) while the Otidae have unusually large relative Mh (1.6 per cent). Hummingbirds have extremely large relative Mh (2.28 per cent), but exhibit significant sexual dimorphism in their scaling of Mh and flight muscle mass, so that when considering hummingbird flight performance it may be useful to control for sexual differences in morphology. The estimated scaling of aerobic Pi,max (based on Mh and Mb in g) for male and female hummingbirds is 0.51 Mb0.83 +/-0.07 and 0.44 Mb0.85+- 0.11 (W), respectively. Locomotory muscles are dynamic structures and it might be anticipated that where additional energetic 'costs' occur seasonally (e.g. due to migratory fattening or the development of large secondary sexual

  6. Monte Carlo calculated and experimentally determined output correction factors for small field detectors in Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmakhlouf, H.; Johansson, J.; Paddick, I.; Andreo, P.

    2015-05-01

    The measurement of output factors (OF) for the small photon beams generated by Leksell Gamma Knife® (LGK) radiotherapy units is a challenge for the physicist due to the under or over estimation of these factors by a vast majority of the detectors commercially available. Output correction factors, introduced in the international formalism published by Alfonso (2008 Med. Phys. 35 5179-86), standardize the determination of OFs for small photon beams by correcting detector-reading ratios to yield OFs in terms of absorbed-dose ratios. In this work output correction factors for a number of detectors have been determined for LGK Perfexion™ 60Co γ-ray beams by Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and measurements. The calculations were made with the MC system PENELOPE, scoring the energy deposited in the active volume of the detectors and in a small volume of water; the detectors simulated were two silicon diodes, one liquid ionization chamber (LIC), alanine and TLD. The calculated LIC output correction factors were within ± 0.4%, and this was selected as the reference detector for experimental determinations where output correction factors for twelve detectors were measured, normalizing their readings to those of the LIC. The MC-calculated and measured output correction factors for silicon diodes yielded corrections of up to 5% for the smallest LGK collimator size of 4 mm diameter. The air ionization chamber measurements led to extremely large output correction factors, caused by the well-known effect of partial volume averaging. The corrections were up to 7% for the natural diamond detector in the 4 mm collimator, also due to partial volume averaging, and decreased to within about ± 0.6% for the smaller synthetic diamond detector. The LIC, showing the smallest corrections, was used to investigate machine-to-machine output factor differences by performing measurements in four LGK units with different dose rates. These resulted in OFs within ± 0.6% and ± 0

  7. Systematic review of near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral oxygenation during non-cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Henning B.

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used to monitor regional cerebral oxygenation (rScO2) during cardiac surgery but is less established during non-cardiac surgery. This systematic review aimed (i) to determine the non-cardiac surgical procedures that provoke a reduction in rScO2 and (ii) to evaluate whether an intraoperative reduction in rScO2 influences postoperative outcome. The PubMed and Embase database were searched from inception until April 30, 2013 and inclusion criteria were intraoperative NIRS determined rScO2 in adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. The type of surgery and number of patients included were recorded. There was included 113 articles and evidence suggests that rScO2 is reduced during thoracic surgery involving single lung ventilation, major abdominal surgery, hip surgery, and laparoscopic surgery with the patient placed in anti-Tredelenburg's position. Shoulder arthroscopy in the beach chair and carotid endarterectomy with clamped internal carotid artery (ICA) also cause pronounced cerebral desaturation. A >20% reduction in rScO2 coincides with indices of regional and global cerebral ischemia during carotid endarterectomy. Following thoracic surgery, major orthopedic, and abdominal surgery the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) might be related to intraoperative cerebral desaturation. In conclusion, certain non-cardiac surgical procedures is associated with an increased risk for the occurrence of rScO2. Evidence for an association between cerebral desaturation and postoperative outcome parameters other than cognitive dysfunction needs to be established. PMID:24672486

  8. [Effects of temporary dual-chamber cardiac pacing in refractory cardiac failure].

    PubMed

    Scanu, P; Lecluse, E; Michel, L; Bureau, G; Saloux, E; Cleron, S; Valette, B; Grollier, G; Potier, J C; Foucault, J P

    1996-12-01

    The authors studied 18 patients (15 men, 3 women) with an average age of 67 +/- 8 years with refractory cardiac failure. In order to determine the potential of pacing to raise cardiac output in severe cardiac failure. The average ejection fraction was 26 +/- 6.5%. All patients were in sinus rhythm:resting cardiac output was 3.35 l/min. Two temporary pacing catheters were positioned in the right atrium and at the apex of the right ventricle for dual-chamber mode pacing triggered by the spontaneous P waves. Changes in cardiac output were measured by Doppler echocardiography at different values of atrioventricular delay. Patients were considered to be responders if their cardiac outputs rose by 15%. In 7 patients meeting this criterion, the average increase in cardiac output was 27% (2.99 +/- 0.7 to 3.81 +/- 0.86 l/mn; p < 0.01); all had dilated cardiomyopathies with left bundle branch block and the optimal AV delay was 103 +/- 21 ms (80-140 ms); the duration of diastolic filling increased from 212 +/- 98 to 292 +/- 116 ms (p = 0.02). In the non-responding group (11 patients with an increase of cardiac output of only 3.6 +/- 0.09 to 3.9 +/- 0.92 l/mn; p < 0.01), the underlying disease process was mainly ischaemic. Two predictive factors of efficacy of dual-chamber pacing were identified: a short ventricular filling period (29 +/- 8% of the RR interval in the responders vs 44 +/- 9% in the non-responders; p < 0.01) and the presence of 1st degree atrioventricular block. Dual-chamber pacing could be a valuable method of increasing resting cardiac outputs in a selected group of patients with severe, refractory, cardiac failure.

  9. The effect of head up tilting on bioreactance cardiac output and stroke volume readings using suprasternal transcutaneous Doppler as a control in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Critchley, Lester A H; Lee, Daniel C W; Khaw, Kim S; Lee, Shara W Y

    2016-10-01

    To compare the performance of a bioreactance cardiac output (CO) monitor (NICOM) and transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM) during head up tilting (HUT). Healthy young adult subjects, age 22 ± 1 years, 7 male and 7 female, were tilted over 3-5 s from supine to 70° HUT, 30° HUT and back to supine. Positions were held for 3 min. Simultaneous readings of NICOM and USCOM were performed 30 s into each new position. Mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), CO and stroke volume (SV), and thoracic fluid content (TFC) were recorded. Bland-Altman, percentage changes and analysis of variance for repeated measures were used for statistical analysis. Pre-tilt NICOM CO and SV readings (6.1 ± 1.0 L/min and 113 ± 25 ml) were higher than those from USCOM (4.1 ± 0.6 L/min and 77 ± 9 ml) (P < 0.001). Bland-Altman limits of agreement for CO were wide with a percentage error of 38 %. HUT increased MBP and HR (P < 0.001). CO and SV readings decreased with HUT. However, the percentage changes in USCOM and NICOM readings did not concur (P < 0.001). Whereas USCOM provided gravitational effect proportional changes in SV readings of 23 ± 15 % (30° half tilt) and 44 ± 11 % (70° near full tilt), NICOM changes did not being 28 ± 10 and 33 ± 11 %. TFC decreased linearly with HUT. The NICOM does not provide linear changes in SV as predicted by physiology when patients are tilted. Furthermore there is a lack of agreement with USCOM measurements at baseline and during tilting.

  10. Usefulness of non-invasive measurement of cardiac output during sub-maximal exercise to predict outcome in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Goda, Ayumi; Lang, Chim C; Williams, Paula; Jones, Margaret; Farr, Mary Jane; Mancini, Donna M

    2009-12-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) is a powerful prognostic predictor of survival in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) because it provides an indirect assessment of a patient's ability to increase cardiac output (CO). However, many patients with CHF who undergo cardiopulmonary exercise testing are unable to perform maximal exercise. New metabolic carts coupled with the inert gas rebreathing technique provide a noninvasive measurement of CO. Whether the noninvasive measurement of CO at a fixed submaximal workload can predict outcome is unknown. This study's population comprised 259 patients (mean age 54 +/- 14 years, mean left ventricular ejection fraction 27 +/- 14%) with CHF who underwent symptom-limited incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Vo(2) and CO were measured at rest, at 25 W, and at peak exercise. Submaximal exercise was defined as <80% peak Vo(2). Among 259 patients, 145 had Vo(2) at 25 W <80% of peak. Vo(2) at 25 W averaged 9.3 +/- 1.8 ml/kg/min. This Vo(2) represented 62 +/- 11% of peak Vo(2), which averaged 15.4 +/- 4.4 ml/kg/min. Prospective follow-up averaged 521 +/- 337 days. In this cohort, there were 15 outcome events (death, urgent heart transplantation, or implantation of a left ventricular assist device as a bridge to transplantation). On univariate Cox hazard analysis, CO at 25 W (hazard ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.84, p = 0.002) was found to be significant predictor of events of outcome. In conclusion, CO at 25 W measured noninvasively during submaximal exercise may have potential value as a predictor of outcomes in patients with CHF.

  11. Nexfin Noninvasive Continuous Hemodynamic Monitoring: Validation against Continuous Pulse Contour and Intermittent Transpulmonary Thermodilution Derived Cardiac Output in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Van De Vijver, Katrijn; De laet, Inneke; Schoonheydt, Karen; Dits, Hilde; Bein, Berthold; Malbrain, Manu L. N. G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nexfin (Bmeye, Amsterdam, Netherlands) is a noninvasive cardiac output (CO) monitor based on finger arterial pulse contour analysis. The aim of this study was to validate Nexfin CO (NexCO) against thermodilution (TDCO) and pulse contour CO (CCO) by PiCCO (Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany). Patients and Methods. In a mix of critically ill patients (n = 45), NexCO and CCO were measured continuously and recorded at 2-hour intervals during the 8-hour study period. TDCO was measured at 0–4–8 hrs. Results. NexCO showed a moderate to good (significant) correlation with TDCO (R2 0.68, P < 0.001) and CCO (R2 0.71, P < 0.001). Bland and Altman analysis comparing NexCO with TDCO revealed a bias (± limits of agreement, LA) of 0.4 ± 2.32 L/min (with 36% error) while analysis comparing NexCO with CCO showed a bias (±LA) of 0.2 ± 2.32 L/min (37% error). NexCO is able to follow changes in TDCO and CCO during the same time interval (level of concordance 89.3% and 81%). Finally, polar plot analysis showed that trending capabilities were acceptable when changes in NexCO (ΔNexCO) were compared to ΔTDCO and ΔCCO (resp., 89% and 88.9% of changes were within the level of 10% limits of agreement). Conclusion. we found a moderate to good correlation between CO measurements obtained with Nexfin and PiCCO. PMID:24319373

  12. A Boolean Model of the Cardiac Gene Regulatory Network Determining First and Second Heart Field Identity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dao; Kestler, Hans A.; Kühl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Two types of distinct cardiac progenitor cell populations can be identified during early heart development: the first heart field (FHF) and second heart field (SHF) lineage that later form the mature heart. They can be characterized by differential expression of transcription and signaling factors. These regulatory factors influence each other forming a gene regulatory network. Here, we present a core gene regulatory network for early cardiac development based on published temporal and spatial expression data of genes and their interactions. This gene regulatory network was implemented in a Boolean computational model. Simulations reveal stable states within the network model, which correspond to the regulatory states of the FHF and the SHF lineages. Furthermore, we are able to reproduce the expected temporal expression patterns of early cardiac factors mimicking developmental progression. Additionally, simulations of knock-down experiments within our model resemble published phenotypes of mutant mice. Consequently, this gene regulatory network retraces the early steps and requirements of cardiogenic mesoderm determination in a way appropriate to enhance the understanding of heart development. PMID:23056457

  13. The FMRFamide-related peptides F1 and F2 alter hemolymph distribution and cardiac output in the crab Cancer magister.

    PubMed

    McGaw, I J; McMahon, B R

    1995-04-01

    The FMRFamide-related peptides F1 and F2, originally isolated from lobster pericardial organs, have been shown to exert cardioexcitatory effects on isolated or semi-isolated crustacean hearts. The present study sought to determine the in vivo effects of F1 and F2 on cardiac and circulatory performance of Cancer magister using a pulsed-Doppler technique. In general the effects of F1 and F2 were similar; however, F1 was more potent and its effects were of longer duration than those exerted by F2. Infusion of either F1 or F2 caused a decrease in heart rate and subsequent periods of acardia. These decreases in rate occurred concurrently with a short-term increase in stroke volume of the heart, followed by a longer-term decrease in stroke volume. Hemolymph flow rates through the anterior aorta, anterolateral arteries, sternal artery, and posterior aorta also showed the same trend, with an initial short-term increase in flow rate followed by a longer-term decrease with periods of ischemia. Hemolymph flow through the paired hepatic arteries simply decreased, but recovery to pretreatment levels was faster than in the other arterial systems. Threshold for these responses occurred at circulating concentrations between 10(-9) mol.l-1 and 10(-8) mol.l-1 for F1 and somewhat higher, between 10(-8) mol.l-1 and 10(-7) mol.l-1, for F2.

  14. Comparison of cardiac output measures by transpulmonary thermodilution, pulse contour analysis, and pulmonary artery thermodilution during off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: a subgroup analysis of the cardiovascular anaesthesia registry at a single tertiary centre.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youn Joung; Koo, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyong; Hong, Deok Man; Jeon, Yunseok

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac output measurement has a long history in haemodynamic management and many devices are now available with varying levels of accuracy. The purpose of the study was to compare the agreement and trending abilities of cardiac output, as measured by transpulmonary thermodilution and calibrated pulse contour analysis, using the VolumeView™ system, continuous thermodilution via a pulmonary artery catheter, and uncalibrated pulse contour analysis, using FloTrac™ with pulmonary artery bolus thermodilution. Twenty patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery using a pulmonary artery catheter and the VolumeView™ and FloTrac™ systems were included in this subgroup analysis of the cardiovascular anaesthesia registry at a single tertiary centre. During surgery, cardiac output was assessed after the induction of anaesthesia, after sternotomy, during the harvesting of grafts, during revascularization of the anterior and posterior/lateral wall, after protamine infusion, and after sternal fixation. In total, 145 sets of measurements were evaluated using Bland-Altman with % error calculation, correlation, concordance, and polar plot analyses. The percentage error (bias, limits of agreement) was 12.6 % (-0.12, -0.64 to 0.41 L/min), 26.7 % (-0.38, -1.50 to 0.74 L/min), 29.3 % (-0.08, -1.32 to 1.15 L/min), and 33.8 % (-0.05, -1.47 to 1.37 L/min) for transpulmonary thermodilution, pulmonary artery continuous thermodilution, calibrated, and uncalibrated pulse contour analysis, respectively, compared with pulmonary artery bolus thermodilution. All pairs of measurements showed significant correlations (p < 0.001), whereas only transpulmonary thermodilution revealed trending ability (concordance rate of 95.1 %, angular bias of 1.33°, and radial limits of agreement of 28.71°) compared with pulmonary artery bolus thermodilution. Transpulmonary thermodilution using the VolumeView™ system provides reliable data on cardiac output measurement and

  15. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.H.; Berliner, R.R.

    1994-09-13

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation. 2 figs.

  16. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William H.; Berliner, Ronald R.

    1994-01-01

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation.

  17. Motivational processes and well-being in cardiac rehabilitation: a self-determination theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rachel Jane; Hudson, Joanne; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie; Doust, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the processes underpinning changes in psychological well-being and behavioural regulation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients using self-determination theory (SDT). A repeated measures design was used to identify the longitudinal relationships between SDT variables, psychological well-being and exercise behaviour during and following a structured CR programme. Participants were 389 cardiac patients (aged 36-84 years; M(age) = 64 ± 9 years; 34.3% female) referred to a 12-week-supervised CR programme. Psychological need satisfaction, behavioural regulation, health-related quality of life, physical self-worth, anxiety and depression were measured at programme entry, exit and six month post-programme. During the programme, increases in autonomy satisfaction predicted positive changes in behavioural regulation, and improvements in competence and relatedness satisfaction predicted improvements in behavioural regulation and well-being. Competence satisfaction also positively predicted habitual physical activity. Decreases in external regulation and increases in intrinsic motivation predicted improvements in physical self-worth and physical well-being, respectively. Significant longitudinal relationships were identified whereby changes during the programme predicted changes in habitual physical activity and the mental quality of life from exit to six month follow-up. Findings provide insight into the factors explaining psychological changes seen during CR. They highlight the importance of increasing patients' perceptions of psychological need satisfaction and self-determined motivation to improve well-being during the structured component of a CR programme and longer term physical activity.

  18. Exercise capacity in patients supported with rotary blood pumps is improved by a spontaneous increase of pump flow at constant pump speed and by a rise in native cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Luc; Vancaenegem, Olivier; Pasquet, Agnès; Matte, Pascal; Poncelet, Alain; Price, Joel; Gurné, Olivier; Noirhomme, Philippe

    2011-07-01

    Exercise capacity is improved in patients supported with continuous flow rotary blood pumps (RP). The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying this improvement. Ten patients implanted with a RP underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) at 6 months after surgery with hemodynamic and metabolic measurements (RP group). A group of 10 matched heart failure patients were extracted from our heart transplant database, and the results of their last CPET before transplantation were used for comparison (heart failure [HF] group). Peak VO(2) was significantly higher in RP than in HF patients (15.8 ± 6.2 vs. 10.9 ± 3 mL O(2)/kg.min) reaching 52 ± 16% of their predicted peak VO(2). The total output measured by a Swan-Ganz catheter increased from 5.6 ± 1.6 to 9.2 ± 1.8 L/min in the RP group and was significantly higher at rest and at peak exercise than in the HF group, whose output increased from 3.5 ± 0.4 to 5.6 ± 1.6 L/min. In the RP group, the estimated pump flow increased from 5.3 ± 0.4 to 6.2 ± 0.8, whereas the native cardiac output increased from 0.0 ± 0.5 to 3 ± 1.7 L/min. Cardiac output at peak exercise was inversely correlated with age (r = -0.86, P = 0.001) and mean pulmonary artery pressure (r = -0.75, P = 0.012). Maximal exercise capacity is improved in patients supported by RP as compared to matched HF patients and reaches about 50% of the expected values. Both a spontaneous increase of pump flow at constant pump speed and an increase of the native cardiac output contribute to total flow elevation. These findings may suggest that an automatic pump speed adaptation during exercise would further improve the exercise capacity. This hypothesis should be examined.

  19. Determination of moving load characteristics by output-only identification over the Pescara beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellino, A.; Garibaldi, L.; Marchesiello, S.

    2011-07-01

    The determination of the characteristics of moving loads over bridges and beams is a topic that only recently has gained the interest of the researchers. In real applications, in fact, as for the case of bridges, it is not always possible to know the load and speed of the trains which are travelling over the bridge. Moreover, in real applications the systems analyzed cannot be always considered linear. Because of these difficulties, the present paper proposes firstly a technique for the identification of the nonlinearity, secondly a procedure to subtract its effect on the modal parameters and finally a method based on them to extract the information on the mass and the speed of the moving load crossing a beam. For this study, some reinforced concrete beams have been tested in the framework of a vast project titled "Monitoring and diagnostics of railway bridges by means of the analysis of the dynamics response due to train crossing", financed by Italian Ministry of Research. These beams show a clear softening nonlinear behaviour during the crossing of a moving carriage. The method is able to detect the load characteristics after having eliminated the nonlinear influence.

  20. Determinants of unfavorable prognosis for out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest in Bielsko-Biala district

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Jolanta U.; Krzych, Łukasz J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prognosis in out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains unfavorable and depends on a number of demographic and clinical variables, the reversibility of its causes and its mechanisms. Aim To investigate the risk factors of prehospital death in patients with OHCA in Bielsko County. Material and methods The study analyzed all dispatch cards of the National Emergency Medical Services (EMS) teams in Bielsko-Biala for the year 2013 (n = 23 400). Only the cards related to sudden cardiac arrest in adults were ultimately included in the study (n = 272; 190 men, 82 women; median age: 71 years). Results Sixty-seven victims (45 men, 22 women) were pronounced dead upon the arrival of the EMS team, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was not undertaken. In the remaining group of 205 subjects, CPR was commenced but was ineffective in 141 patients (97 male, 44 female). Although univariate analysis indicated 6 predictors of prehospital death, including OHCA without the presence of witnesses (odds ratio (OR) = 4.2), OHCA occurring in a public place (OR = 3.1), no bystander CPR (OR = 9.7), no bystander cardiac massage (OR = 13.1), initial diagnosis of non-shockable cardiac rhythm (OR = 7.0), and the amount of drugs used for CPR (OR = 0.4), logistic regression confirmed that only the lack of bystander cardiac massage (OR = 6.5) and non-shockable rhythm (OR = 4.6) were independent determinants of prehospital death (area under ROC curve = 0.801). Conclusions Non-shockable rhythm of cardiac arrest and lack of bystander cardiac massage are independent determinants of prehospital death in Bielsko-Biala inhabitants suffering from OHCA. PMID:27785135

  1. Should we stop using the determination of central venous pressure as a way to estimate cardiac preload?

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz Nañez, Manuel Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The determination of the values of central venous pressure has long been used as a guideline for volumetric therapy in the resuscitation of the critical patient, but the performance of such parameter is currently being questioned as an effective measurement of cardiac preload. This has aroused great interest in the search for more accurate parameters to determine cardiac preload and a patient's blood volume. Goals and Methods: Based on literature currently available, we aim to discuss the performance of central venous pressure as an effective parameter to determine cardiac preload. Results and Conclusion: Estimating variables such as end-diastolic ventricular area and global end-diastolic volume have a better performance than central venous pressure in determining cardiac preload. Despite the best performance of these devices, central venous pressure is still considered in our setting as the most practical and most commonly available way to assess the patient's preload. Only dynamic variables such as pulse pressure change are superior in determining an individual's blood volume. PMID:24893061

  2. Determination of cardiac size following space missions of different durations - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Gowen, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A simple method to estimate cardiac size from single frontal plane chest roentgenograms has been described. Pre- and postflight chest X-rays from Apollo 17, and Skylab 2 and 3 have been analyzed for changes in the cardiac silhouette size. The data obtained from the computed cardiothoracic areal ratios compared well with the clinical cardiothoracic diametral ratios (r = .86). Though an overall postflight decrease in cardiac size is evident, the mean difference was not statistically significant (n = 8). The individual decreases in the cardiac silhouette size postflight are thought to be due to decrements in intracardiac chamber volumes rather than in myocardial muscle mass.

  3. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  4. Determinants of CREB degradation and KChIP2 gene transcription in cardiac memory

    PubMed Central

    Özgen, Nazira; Lau, David H.; Shlapakova, Iryna N.; Sherman, Warren; Feinmark, Steven J.; Danilo, Peter; Rosen, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Left ventricular pacing (LVP) to induce cardiac memory (CM) in dogs results in a decreased transient outward K current (Ito) and reduced mRNA and protein of the Ito channel accessory subunit, KChIP2. The KChIP2 decrease is attributed to a decrease in its transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein). Objective To determine the mechanisms responsible for the CREB decrease that is initiated by LVP. Methods CM was quantified as T wave vector displacement in 18 LVP dogs. In 5 dogs, Ang II receptor blocker, saralasin, was infused before and during pacing. In 3 dogs, proteasomal inhibitor, lactacystin, was injected into the left anterior descending artery before LVP. Epicardial biopsies were taken before and after LVP. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM) were incubated with H2O2 (50 μmol/L) for 1h with or without lactacystin. Results LVP significantly displaced the T wave vector and was associated with increased lipid peroxidation and increased tissue Ang II levels. Saralasin prevented T vector displacement and lipid peroxidation. CREB was significantly decreased after 2h of LVP and was comparably decreased in H2O2–treated NRM. Lactacystin inhibited the CREB decrease in LVP dogs and H2O2 -treated NRM. LVP and H2O2 both induced CREB ubiquitination and the H2O2-induced CREB decrease was prevented by knocking down ubiquitin. Conclusion LVP initiates myocardial Ang II production and ROS synthesis leading to CREB ubiquitination and its proteasomal degradation. This sequence of events would explain the pacing-induced reduction in KChIP2, and contribute to altered repolarization and the T wave changes of cardiac memory. PMID:20346417

  5. Eccentric and concentric cardiac hypertrophy induced by exercise training: microRNAs and molecular determinants.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, T; Soci, U P R; Oliveira, E M

    2011-09-01

    Among the molecular, biochemical and cellular processes that orchestrate the development of the different phenotypes of cardiac hypertrophy in response to physiological stimuli or pathological insults, the specific contribution of exercise training has recently become appreciated. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy involves complex cardiac remodeling that occurs as an adaptive response to static or dynamic chronic exercise, but the stimuli and molecular mechanisms underlying transduction of the hemodynamic overload into myocardial growth are poorly understood. This review summarizes the physiological stimuli that induce concentric and eccentric physiological hypertrophy, and discusses the molecular mechanisms, sarcomeric organization, and signaling pathway involved, also showing that the cardiac markers of pathological hypertrophy (atrial natriuretic factor, β-myosin heavy chain and α-skeletal actin) are not increased. There is no fibrosis and no cardiac dysfunction in eccentric or concentric hypertrophy induced by exercise training. Therefore, the renin-angiotensin system has been implicated as one of the regulatory mechanisms for the control of cardiac function and structure. Here, we show that the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor is locally activated in pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy, although with exercise training it can be stimulated independently of the involvement of angiotensin II. Recently, microRNAs (miRs) have been investigated as a possible therapeutic approach since they regulate the translation of the target mRNAs involved in cardiac hypertrophy; however, miRs in relation to physiological hypertrophy have not been extensively investigated. We summarize here profiling studies that have examined miRs in pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy. An understanding of physiological cardiac remodeling may provide a strategy to improve ventricular function in cardiac dysfunction.

  6. Electromyographic response to exercise in cardiac transplant patients: a new method for anaerobic threshold determination?

    PubMed

    Lucía, A; Vaquero, A F; Pérez, M; Sánchez, O; Sánchez, V; Gómez, M A; Chicharro, J L

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible use of integrated surface electromyography (iEMG) in cardiac transplant patients (CTPs) as a new noninvasive determinant of the metabolic response to exercise by studying the relationship between the iEMG threshold (iEMGT) and other more conventional methods for anaerobic threshold (AT) determination, such as the lactate threshold (LT) and the ventilatory threshold (VT). Thirteen patients (age: 57+/-7 years, mean+/-SD; height: 163+/-7 cm; body mass: 70.5+/-8.6 kg; posttransplant time: 87+/-49 weeks) were selected as subjects. Each of them performed a ramp protocol on a cycle ergometer (starting at 0 W, the workload was increased in 10 W/min). During the tests, gas exchange data, blood lactate levels, and iEMG of the vastus lateralis were collected to determine VT, LT, and iEMGT, respectively. The results evidenced no significant difference between mean values of VT, LT, or iEMGT, when expressed either as oxygen uptake (11.1+/-2.4, 11.7+/-2.3, and 11.0+/-2.8 mL/kg/min, respectively) or as percent maximum oxygen uptake (61.6+/-7.5, 62.2+/-7.7, and 59.6+/-8.2%, respectively). In conclusion, our findings suggest that iEMG might be used as a complementary, noninvasive method for AT determination in CTPs. In addition, since the aerobic impairment of these patients is largely due to peripheral limitation, determination of iEMGT could be used to assess the effectiveness of an exercise rehabilitation program to improve muscle aerobic capacity in CTPs.

  7. Kinetics of cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are linked and determined by properties of the cardiac sarcomere

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of myocardial contraction and relaxation kinetics is currently incompletely understood. When the amplitude of contraction is increased via the Frank-Starling mechanism, the kinetics of the contraction slow down, but when the amplitude of contraction is increased with either an increase in heart rate or via β-adrenergic stimulation, the kinetics speed up. It is also unknown how physiological mechanisms affect the kinetics of contraction versus those of relaxation. We investigated contraction-relaxation coupling in isolated trabeculae from the mouse and rat and stimulated them to contract at various temperatures, frequencies, preloads, and in the absence and presence of β-adrenergic stimulation. In each muscle at least 16 different conditions were assessed, and the correlation coefficient of the speed of contraction and relaxation was very close (generally >0.98). Moreover, in all but one of the analyzed murine strains, the ratio of the minimum rate of the derivative of force development (dF/dt) over maximum dF/dt was not significantly different. Only in trabeculae isolated from myosin-binding protein-C mutant mice was this ratio significantly lower (0.61 ± 0.07 vs. 0.84 ± 0.02 in 11 other strains of mice). Within each strain, this ratio was unaffected by modulation of length, frequency, or β-adrenergic stimulation. Rat trabeculae showed identical results; the balance between kinetics of contraction and relaxation was generally constant (0.85 ± 0.04). Because of the great variety in underlying excitation-contraction coupling in the assessed strains, we concluded that contraction-relation coupling is a property residing in the cardiac sarcomere. PMID:20656885

  8. Pulse transit time measured by photoplethysmography improves the accuracy of heart rate as a surrogate measure of cardiac output, stroke volume and oxygen uptake in response to graded exercise.

    PubMed

    Pollonini, L; Padhye, N S; Re, R; Torricelli, A; Simpson, R J; Dacso, C C

    2015-05-01

    Heart rate (HR) is a valuable and widespread measure for physical training programs, although its description of conditioning is limited to the cardiac response to exercise. More comprehensive measures of exercise adaptation include cardiac output (Q̇), stroke volume (SV) and oxygen uptake (V̇O2), but these physiological parameters can be measured only with cumbersome equipment installed in clinical settings. In this work, we explore the ability of pulse transit time (PTT) to represent a valuable pairing with HR for indirectly estimating Q̇, SV and V̇O2 non-invasively. PTT was measured as the time interval between the peak of the electrocardiographic (ECG) R-wave and the onset of the photoplethysmography (PPG) waveform at the periphery (i.e. fingertip) with a portable sensor. Fifteen healthy young subjects underwent a graded incremental cycling protocol after which HR and PTT were correlated with Q̇, SV and V̇O2 using linear mixed models. The addition of PTT significantly improved the modeling of Q̇, SV and V̇O2 at the individual level ([Formula: see text] for SV, 0.548 for Q̇, and 0.771 for V̇O2) compared to predictive models based solely on HR ([Formula: see text] for SV, 0.503 for Q̇, and 0.745 for V̇O2). While challenges in sensitivity and artifact rejection exist, combining PTT with HR holds potential for development of novel wearable sensors that provide exercise assessment largely superior to HR monitors.

  9. Cardiac effects of MDMA on the metabolic profile determined with 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Shane A; Michaels, Mark S; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Hyde, Elisabeth M; Tancer, Manuel E; Galloway, Matthew P

    2009-05-01

    Despite the potential for deleterious (even fatal) effects on cardiac physiology, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) abuse abounds driven mainly by its euphoric effects. Acute exposure to MDMA has profound cardiovascular effects on blood pressure and heart rate in humans and animals. To determine the effects of MDMA on cardiac metabolites in rats, MDMA (0, 5, or 10 mg/kg) was injected every 2 h for a total of four injections; animals were sacrificed 2 h after the last injection (8 h drug exposure), and their hearts removed and tissue samples from left ventricular wall dissected. High resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 11.7 T, a specialized version of MRS aptly suited for analysis of semi-solid materials such as intact tissue samples, was used to measure the cardiac metabolomic profile, including alanine, lactate, succinate, creatine, and carnitine, in heart tissue from rats treated with MDMA. MDMA effects on MR-visible choline, glutamate, glutamine, and taurine were also determined. Body temperature was measured following each MDMA administration and serotonin and norepinephrine (NE) levels were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in heart tissue from treated animals. MDMA significantly and dose-dependently increased body temperature, a hallmark of amphetamines. Serotonin, but not NE, levels were significantly and dose-dependently decreased by MDMA in the heart wall. MDMA significantly altered the MR-visible profile with an increase in carnitine and no change in other key compounds involved in cardiomyocyte energy metabolomics. Finally, choline levels were significantly decreased by MDMA in heart. The results are consistent with the notion that MDMA has significant effects on cardiovascular serotonergic tone and disrupts the metabolic homeostasis of energy regulation in cardiac tissue, potentially increasing utilization of fatty acid metabolism. The contributions of serotonergic

  10. Cardiac effects of MDMA on the metabolic profile determined with 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the rat†

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Shane A.; Michaels, Mark S.; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Hyde, Elisabeth M.; Tancer, Manuel E.; Galloway, Matthew P.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the potential for deleterious (even fatal) effects on cardiac physiology, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) abuse abounds driven mainly by its euphoric effects. Acute exposure to MDMA has profound cardiovascular effects on blood pressure and heart rate in humans and animals. To determine the effects of MDMA on cardiac metabolites in rats, MDMA (0, 5, or 10 mg/kg) was injected every 2 h for a total of four injections; animals were sacrificed 2 h after the last injection (8 h drug exposure), and their hearts removed and tissue samples from left ventricular wall dissected. High resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at 11.7 T, a specialized version of MRS aptly suited for analysis of semi-solid materials such as intact tissue samples, was used to measure the cardiac metabolomic profile, including alanine, lactate, succinate, creatine, and carnitine, in heart tissue from rats treated with MDMA. MDMA effects on MR-visible choline, glutamate, glutamine, and taurine were also determined. Body temperature was measured following each MDMA administration and serotonin and norepinephrine (NE) levels were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in heart tissue from treated animals. MDMA significantly and dose-dependently increased body temperature, a hallmark of amphetamines. Serotonin, but not NE, levels were significantly and dose-dependently decreased by MDMA in the heart wall. MDMA significantly altered the MR-visible profile with an increase in carnitine and no change in other key compounds involved in cardiomyocyte energy metabolomics. Finally, choline levels were significantly decreased by MDMA in heart. The results are consistent with the notion that MDMA has significant effects on cardiovascular serotonergic tone and disrupts the metabolic homeostasis of energy regulation in cardiac tissue, potentially increasing utilization of fatty acid metabolism. The contributions of serotonergic

  11. Feeding difficulties in neonates following cardiac surgery: determinants of prolonged feeding-tube use.

    PubMed

    McKean, Elissa B; Kasparian, Nadine A; Batra, Shweta; Sholler, Gary F; Winlaw, David S; Dalby-Payne, Jacqueline

    2017-01-23

    Aim The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence and potential correlates of feeding difficulties in infants who underwent cardiac surgery in the neonatal period and to investigate resource utilisation by infants with feeding difficulties.

  12. A film technique for the determination of output factors and end effect times for the Leksell Gamma Knife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel

    2001-03-01

    The relative output factors of the four helmets for a model B Leksell Gamma Knife and the end effect times for each helmet have been measured. For the three helmets with the smallest-diameter collimators a technique employing Kodak XV-2 film was used. The measured output factors are in good agreement with the values recommended by the manufacturer. The end effect times vary with the collimator size, with the shorter time occurring with the smaller collimator.

  13. Age and gender dependence of human cardiac phosphorus metabolites determined by SLOOP 31P MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Köstler, Herbert; Landschütz, Wilfried; Koeppe, Sabrina; Seyfarth, Tobias; Lipke, Claudia; Sandstede, Jörn; Spindler, Matthias; von Kienlin, Markus; Hahn, Dietbert; Beer, Meinrad

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to apply (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) using spatial localization with optimal point spread function (SLOOP) to investigate possible age and gender dependencies of the energy metabolite concentrations in the human heart. Thirty healthy volunteers (18 males and 12 females, 21-67 years old, mean = 40.7 years) were examined with the use of (31)P-MRS on a 1.5 T scanner. Intra- and interobserver variability measures (determined in eight of the volunteers) were both 3.8% for phosphocreatine (PCr), and 4.7% and 8.3%, respectively, for adenosine triphosphate (ATP). High-energy phosphate (HEP) concentrations in mmol/kg wet weight were 9.7 +/- 2.4 (age < 40 years, N = 16) and 7.7 +/- 2.5 (age >or= 40 years, N = 14) for PCr, and 5.1 +/- 1.0 (age < 40 years) and 4.1 +/- 0.8 (age >or= 40 years) for ATP, respectively. Separated by gender, PCr concentrations of 9.2 +/- 2.4 (men, N = 18) and 8.0 +/- 2.8 (women, N = 12) and ATP concentrations of 4.9 +/- 1.0 (men) and 4.2 +/- 0.9 (women) were measured. A significant decrease of PCr and ATP was found for volunteers older than 40 years (P < 0.05), but the differences in metabolic concentrations between both sexes were not significant. In conclusion, age has a minor but still significant impact on cardiac energy metabolism, and no significant gender differences were detected.

  14. Endothelial, cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle exhibit different viscous and elastic properties as determined by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, A. B.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Reichert, W. M.; Kraus, W. E.; Truskey, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the hypothesis that, due to functional and structural differences, the apparent elastic modulus and viscous behavior of cardiac and skeletal muscle and vascular endothelium would differ. To accurately determine the elastic modulus, the contribution of probe velocity, indentation depth, and the assumed shape of the probe were examined. Hysteresis was observed at high indentation velocities arising from viscous effects. Irreversible deformation was not observed for endothelial cells and hysteresis was negligible below 1 microm/s. For skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle cells, hysteresis was negligible below 0.25 microm/s. Viscous dissipation for endothelial and cardiac muscle cells was higher than for skeletal muscle cells. The calculated elastic modulus was most sensitive to the assumed probe geometry for the first 60 nm of indentation for the three cell types. Modeling the probe as a blunt cone-spherical cap resulted in variation in elastic modulus with indentation depth that was less than that calculated by treating the probe as a conical tip. Substrate contributions were negligible since the elastic modulus reached a steady value for indentations above 60 nm and the probe never indented more than 10% of the cell thickness. Cardiac cells were the stiffest (100.3+/-10.7 kPa), the skeletal muscle cells were intermediate (24.7+/-3.5 kPa), and the endothelial cells were the softest with a range of elastic moduli (1.4+/-0.1 to 6.8+/-0.4 kPa) depending on the location of the cell surface tested. Cardiac and skeletal muscle exhibited nonlinear elastic behavior. These passive mechanical properties are generally consistent with the function of these different cell types.

  15. Blind Deconvolution for Distributed Parameter Systems with Unbounded Input and Output and Determining Blood Alcohol Concentration from Transdermal Biosensor Data.

    PubMed

    Rosen, I G; Luczak, Susan E; Weiss, Jordan

    2014-03-15

    We develop a blind deconvolution scheme for input-output systems described by distributed parameter systems with boundary input and output. An abstract functional analytic theory based on results for the linear quadratic control of infinite dimensional systems with unbounded input and output operators is presented. The blind deconvolution problem is then reformulated as a series of constrained linear and nonlinear optimization problems involving infinite dimensional dynamical systems. A finite dimensional approximation and convergence theory is developed. The theory is applied to the problem of estimating blood or breath alcohol concentration (respectively, BAC or BrAC) from biosensor-measured transdermal alcohol concentration (TAC) in the field. A distributed parameter model with boundary input and output is proposed for the transdermal transport of ethanol from the blood through the skin to the sensor. The problem of estimating BAC or BrAC from the TAC data is formulated as a blind deconvolution problem. A scheme to identify distinct drinking episodes in TAC data based on a Hodrick Prescott filter is discussed. Numerical results involving actual patient data are presented.

  16. Determinants of prolonged intensive care unit stay in patients after cardiac surgery: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kapadohos, Theodore; Angelopoulos, Epameinondas; Vasileiadis, Ioannis; Nanas, Serafeim; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Karabinis, Andreas; Marathias, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Background Prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay of patients after cardiac surgery has a major impact on overall cost and resource utilization. The aim of this study was to identify perioperative factors which prolong stay in ICU. Methods All adult patients from a single, specialized cardiac center who were admitted to the ICU after cardiac surgery during a 2-month period were included. Demographic and clinical characteristics, comorbidities, preoperative use of drugs, intraoperative variables, and postoperative course were recorded. Hemodynamic and blood gas measurements were recorded at four time intervals during the first 24 postoperative hours. Routine hematologic and biochemical laboratory results were recorded preoperatively and in the first postoperative hours. Results During the study period 145 adult patients underwent cardiac surgery: 65 (45%) underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery, 38 (26%) valve surgery, 26 (18%) combined surgery and 16 (11%) other types of cardiac operation. Seventy nine (54%) patients had an ICU stay of less than 24 hours. Random forests analysis identified four variables that had a major impact on the length of stay (LOS) in ICU; these variables were subsequently entered in a logistic regression model: preoperative hemoglobin [odds ratio (OR) =0.68], duration of aortic clamping (OR =1.01) and ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to inspired oxygen fraction (PaO2/FiO2) (OR =0.99) and blood glucose during the first four postoperative hours (OR =1.02). ROC curve analysis showed an AUC =0.79, P<0.001, 95% CI: 0.71–0.86. Conclusions Low preoperative hemoglobin, prolonged aortic clamping time and low PaO2/FiO2 ratio and blood glucose measured within the first postoperative hours, were strongly related with prolonged LOS in ICU. PMID:28203408

  17. Plasma cardiac natriuretic peptide determination as a screening test for the detection of patients with mild left ventricular impairment.

    PubMed Central

    Omland, T.; Aakvaag, A.; Vik-Mo, H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of measuring the cardiac natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and brain natriuretic peptide, as screening tests for identifying patients with mild left ventricular impairment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the cardiac natriuretic peptides. SETTING: Cardiac catheterisation unit, Norwegian central hospital. PATIENTS: A consecutive series of 254 patients undergoing diagnostic left-sided cardiac catheterisation. One hundred and twenty eight of these patients had a history of previous myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of normal and impaired left ventricular function, as evaluated by logistic regression analysis and estimation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (an index of overall diagnostic accuracy). Ventricular function was assessed by the measurement of left ventricular end diastolic pressure and angiographically determined left ventricular ejection fraction. RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis showed that plasma brain natriuretic peptide was the best predictor of increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure (> or = 15 mm Hg) (P < 0.001), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (< or = 45%) (P < 0.001), and the combination of left ventricular ejection fraction < or = 45% and left ventricular end diastolic pressure > or = 15 mm Hg (P < 0.001). The areas under the ROC function for the detection of left ventricular dysfunction were 0.789 for brain natriuretic peptide, 0.665 for atrial natriuretic factor, and 0.610 for N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma brain natriuretic peptide seemed to be a better indicator of left ventricular function than plasma atrial natriuretic factor or N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of circulating atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and

  18. Patterns and determinants of functional and absolute iron deficiency in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation following heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Tramarin, Roberto; Pistuddi, Valeria; Maresca, Luigi; Pavesi, Marco; Castelvecchio, Serenella; Menicanti, Lorenzo; de Vincentiis, Carlo; Ranucci, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background Anaemia and iron deficiency are frequent following major surgery. The present study aims to identify the iron deficiency patterns in cardiac surgery patients at their admission to a cardiac rehabilitation programme, and to determine which perioperative risk factor(s) may be associated with functional and absolute iron deficiency. Design This was a retrospective study on prospectively collected data. Methods The patient population included 339 patients. Functional iron deficiency was defined in the presence of transferrin saturation <20% and serum ferritin ≥100 µg/l. Absolute iron deficiency was defined in the presence of serum ferritin values <100 µg/l. Results Functional iron deficiency was found in 62.9% of patients and absolute iron deficiency in 10% of the patients. At a multivariable analysis, absolute iron deficiency was significantly ( p = 0.001) associated with mechanical prosthesis mitral valve replacement (odds ratio 5.4, 95% confidence interval 1.9-15) and tissue valve aortic valve replacement (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11). In mitral valve surgery, mitral repair carried a significant ( p = 0.013) lower risk of absolute iron deficiency (4.4%) than mitral valve replacement with tissue valves (8.3%) or mechanical prostheses (22.5%). Postoperative outcome did not differ between patients with functional iron deficiency and patients without iron deficiency; patients with absolute iron deficiency had a significantly ( p = 0.017) longer postoperative hospital stay (median 11 days) than patients without iron deficiency (median nine days) or with functional iron deficiency (median eight days). Conclusions Absolute iron deficiency following cardiac surgery is more frequent in heart valve surgery and is associated with a prolonged hospital stay. Routine screening for iron deficiency at admission in the cardiac rehabilitation unit is suggested.

  19. Determinants of biventricular cardiac function: a mathematical model study on geometry and myofiber orientation.

    PubMed

    Pluijmert, Marieke; Delhaas, Tammo; de la Parra, Adrián Flores; Kroon, Wilco; Prinzen, Frits W; Bovendeerd, Peter H M

    2017-04-01

    In patient-specific mathematical models of cardiac electromechanics, usually a patient-specific geometry and a generic myofiber orientation field are used as input, upon which myocardial tissue properties are tuned to clinical data. It remains unclear to what extent deviations in myofiber orientation and geometry between model and patient influence model predictions on cardiac function. Therefore, we evaluated the sensitivity of cardiac function for geometry and myofiber orientation in a biventricular (BiV) finite element model of cardiac mechanics. Starting out from a reference geometry in which myofiber orientation had no transmural component, two new geometries were defined with either a 27 % decrease in LV short- to long-axis ratio, or a 16 % decrease of RV length, but identical LV and RV cavity and wall volumes. These variations in geometry caused differences in both local myofiber and global pump work below 6 %. Variation of fiber orientation was induced through adaptive myofiber reorientation that caused an average change in fiber orientation of [Formula: see text] predominantly through the formation of a component in transmural direction. Reorientation caused a considerable increase in local myofiber work [Formula: see text] and in global pump work [Formula: see text] in all three geometries, while differences between geometries were below 5 %. The findings suggest that implementing a realistic myofiber orientation is at least as important as defining a patient-specific geometry. The model for remodeling of myofiber orientation seems a useful approach to estimate myofiber orientation in the absence of accurate patient-specific information.

  20. Novel approaches to determine contractile function of the isolated adult zebrafish ventricular cardiac myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Dvornikov, Alexey V; Dewan, Sukriti; Alekhina, Olga V; Pickett, F Bryan; de Tombe, Pieter P

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been used extensively in cardiovascular biology, but mainly in the study of heart development. The relative ease of its genetic manipulation may indicate the suitability of this species as a cost-effective model system for the study of cardiac contractile biology. However, whether the zebrafish heart is an appropriate model system for investigations pertaining to mammalian cardiac contractile structure–function relationships remains to be resolved. Myocytes were isolated from adult zebrafish hearts by enzymatic digestion, attached to carbon rods, and twitch force and intracellular Ca2+ were measured. We observed the modulation of twitch force, but not of intracellular Ca2+, by both extracellular [Ca2+] and sarcomere length. In permeabilized cells/myofibrils, we found robust myofilament length-dependent activation. Moreover, modulation of myofilament activation–relaxation and force redevelopment kinetics by varied Ca2+ activation levels resembled that found previously in mammalian myofilaments. We conclude that the zebrafish is a valid model system for the study of cardiac contractile structure–function relationships. PMID:24591576

  1. Cardiac cameras.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  2. Individual sarcomere length determination from isolated cardiac cells using high-resolution optical microscopy and digital image processing.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, K P; Brady, A J

    1982-01-01

    Discrete sarcomere lengths have been determined from dynamically contracting isolated cardiac cells with a high-speed, high-resolution direct optical imaging system. Calcium-tolerant cardiac cells from the rat are isolated by perfusion with collagenase and hyaluronidase. Individual sarcomere lengths can be determined by directly imaging the cell's striation pattern onto a solid-state charge-coupled device (CCD) detector interfaced with a digital computer. The precision of detection in a real light microscopic optical system is discussed in relation to the type of image detector, optical contract enhancement techniques, and digital image processing. The optical performance of the direct striation pattern image apparatus has been determined empirically with test grids under standard bright-field and Nomarski-differential interference contrast (DIC) conditions for application to real muscle imaging. Discrete striation positions of isolated cells have been detected and followed with high precision during phasic contraction-relaxation cycles down to average sarcomere lengths as short as 1.43 +/- 0.053 microns. The maximum rates of contraction and relaxation are rapid and synchronous in time course along the length of the cell. These results indicate that direct optical imaging can provide an accurate means to monitor discrete striations and sarcomere lengths along the length of Ca2+-tolerant heart cells. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:7183337

  3. Determinants of distance walked during the six-minute walk test in patients undergoing cardiac surgery at hospital discharge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of distance walked in six-minute walk test (6MWD) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery at hospital discharge. Methods The assessment was performed preoperatively and at discharge. Data from patient records were collected and measurement of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) were performed. The six-minute walk test (6MWT) was performed at discharge. Patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery, coronary artery bypass grafting or valve replacement were eligible. Patients older than 75 years who presented arrhythmia during the protocol, with psychiatric disorders, muscular or neurological disorders were excluded from the study. Results Sixty patients (44.26% male, mean age 51.53 ± 13 years) were assessed. In multivariate analysis the following variables were selected: type of surgery (P = 0.001), duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (P = 0.001), Functional Independence Measure - FIM (0.004) and body mass index - BMI (0.007) with r = 0.91 and r2 = 0.83 with P < 0.001. The equation derived from multivariate analysis: 6MWD = Surgery (89.42) + CPB (1.60) + MIF (2.79 ) - BMI (7.53) - 127.90. Conclusion In this study, the determinants of 6MWD in patients undergoing cardiac surgery were: the type of surgery, CPB time, functional capacity and body mass index. PMID:24885130

  4. Preoperative levosimendan decreases mortality and the development of low cardiac output in high-risk patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Ricardo; Degrange, Marcela; Del Mazo, Carlos; Tanus, Eduardo; Porcile, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The calcium sensitizer levosimendan has been used in cardiac surgery for the treatment of postoperative low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) and difficult weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of preoperative treatment with levosimendan on 30-day mortality, the risk of developing LCOS and the requirement for inotropes, vasopressors and intra-aortic balloon pumps in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. METHODS: Patient with severe left ventricular dysfunction and an ejection fraction <25% undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB were admitted 24 h before surgery and were randomly assigned to receive levosimendan (loading dose 10 μg/kg followed by a 23 h continuous infusion of 0.1μg/kg/min) or a placebo. RESULTS: From December 1, 2002 to June 1, 2008, a total of 252 patients were enrolled (127 in the levosimendan group and 125 in the control group). Individuals treated with levosimendan exhibited a lower incidence of complicated weaning from CPB (2.4% versus 9.6%; P<0.05), decreased mortality (3.9% versus 12.8%; P<0.05) and a lower incidence of LCOS (7.1% versus 20.8%; P<0.05) compared with the control group. The levosimendan group also had a lower requirement for inotropes (7.9% versus 58.4%; P<0.05), vasopressors (14.2% versus 45.6%; P<0.05) and intra-aortic balloon pumps (6.3% versus 30.4%; P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with severe left ventricle dysfunction (ejection fraction <25%) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB who were pretreated with levosimendan exhibited lower mortality, a decreased risk for developing LCOS and a reduced requirement for inotropes, vasopressors and intra-aortic balloon pumps. Studies with a larger number of patients are required to confirm whether these findings represent a new strategy to reduce the operative risk in this high-risk patient population. PMID:23620700

  5. Applications of minimally invasive cardiac output monitors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Because of the increasing age of the population, critical care and emergency medicine physicians have seen an increased number of critically ill patients over the last decade. Moreover, the trend of hospital closures in the United States t imposes a burden of increased efficiency. Hence, the identification of devices that facilitate accurate but rapid assessments of hemodynamic parameters without the added burden of invasiveness becomes tantamount. The purpose of this review is to understand the applications and limitations of these new technologies. PMID:22531454

  6. Determination of Krebs cycle metabolic carbon exchange in vivo and its use to estimate the individual contributions of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis to overall glucose output in man

    SciTech Connect

    Consoli, A.; Kennedy, F.; Miles, J.; Gerich, J.

    1987-11-01

    Current isotopic approaches underestimate gluconeogenesis in vivo because of Krebs cycle carbon exchange and the inability to measure intramitochondrial precursor specific activity. We therefore applied a new isotopic approach that theoretically overcomes these limitations and permits quantification of Krebs cycle carbon exchange and the individual contributions of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis to overall glucose outputex. (6-3H)Glucose was infused to measure overall glucose output; (2-14C)acetate was infused to trace phosphoenolpyruvate gluconeogenesis and to calculate Krebs cycle carbon exchange as proposed by Katz. Plasma (14C)3-OH-butyrate specific activity was used to estimate intramitochondrial acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) specific activity, and finally the ratio between plasma glucose 14C-specific activity and the calculated intracellular phosphoenolpyruvate 14C-specific activity was used to determine the relative contributions of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis to overall glucose output. Using this approach, acetyl CoA was found to enter the Krebs cycle at twice (postabsorptive subjects) and three times (2 1/2-d fasted subjects) the rate of pyruvate, respectively. Gluconeogenesis in postabsorptive subjects (3.36 +/- 0.20 mumol/kg per min) accounted for 28 +/- 2% of overall glucose output and increased twofold in subjects fasted for 2 1/2-d (P less than 0.01), accounting for greater than 97% of overall glucose output. Glycogenolysis in postabsorptive subjects averaged 8.96 +/- 0.40 mumol/kg per min and decreased to 0.34 +/- 0.08 mumol/kg per min (P less than 0.01) after a 2 1/2-d fast. Since these results agree well with previously reported values for gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis based on determinations of splanchnic substrate balance and glycogen content of serial liver biopsies.

  7. Sensory redundancy management: The development of a design methodology for determining threshold values through a statistical analysis of sensor output data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalzo, F.

    1983-01-01

    Sensor redundancy management (SRM) requires a system which will detect failures and reconstruct avionics accordingly. A probability density function to determine false alarm rates, using an algorithmic approach was generated. Microcomputer software was developed which will print out tables of values for the cummulative probability of being in the domain of failure; system reliability; and false alarm probability, given a signal is in the domain of failure. The microcomputer software was applied to the sensor output data for various AFT1 F-16 flights and sensor parameters. Practical recommendations for further research were made.

  8. An Inverse Finite Element Method for Determining the Tissue Compressibility of Human Left Ventricular Wall during the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hassaballah, Abdallah I.; Hassan, Mohsen A.; Mardi, Azizi N.; Hamdi, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the myocardium’s tissue properties is important in constructing functional finite element (FE) models of the human heart. To obtain accurate properties especially for functional modeling of a heart, tissue properties have to be determined in vivo. At present, there are only few in vivo methods that can be applied to characterize the internal myocardium tissue mechanics. This work introduced and evaluated an FE inverse method to determine the myocardial tissue compressibility. Specifically, it combined an inverse FE method with the experimentally-measured left ventricular (LV) internal cavity pressure and volume versus time curves. Results indicated that the FE inverse method showed good correlation between LV repolarization and the variations in the myocardium tissue bulk modulus K (K = 1/compressibility), as well as provided an ability to describe in vivo human myocardium material behavior. The myocardium bulk modulus can be effectively used as a diagnostic tool of the heart ejection fraction. The model developed is proved to be robust and efficient. It offers a new perspective and means to the study of living-myocardium tissue properties, as it shows the variation of the bulk modulus throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:24367544

  9. Clinical islet isolation and transplantation outcomes with deceased cardiac death donors are similar to neurological determination of death donors.

    PubMed

    Andres, Axel; Kin, Tatsuya; O'Gorman, Doug; Livingstone, Scott; Bigam, David; Kneteman, Norman; Senior, Peter; Shapiro, A M James

    2016-01-01

    In islet transplantation, deceased cardiac death (DCD) donation has been identified as a potential extended source. There are currently no studies comparing outcomes between these categories, and our goal was to compare islet isolation success rates and transplantation outcomes between DCD and neurological determination of death (NDD) donors. Islet isolations from 15 DCD and 418 NDD were performed in our centre between September 2008 and September 2014. Donor variables, islet yields, metabolic function of isolated isled and insulin requirements at 1-month post-transplant were compared. Compared to NDD, pancreata from DCD were more often procured locally and donors required less vasopressive support (P < 0.001 and P = 0.023, respectively), but the other variables were similar between groups. Pre- and postpurification islet yields were similar between NDD and DCD (576 vs. 608 × 10(3) islet equivalent, P = 0.628 and 386 vs. 379, P = 0.881, respectively). The metabolic function was similar between NDD and DCD, as well as the mean decrease in insulin requirement at 1-month post-transplantation (NDD: 64.82%; DCD: 60.17% reduction, P = 0.517). These results support the broader use of DCD pancreata for islet isolation. A much larger DCD islet experience will be required to truly determine noninferiority of both short- and long-term outcomes.

  10. Superiority of quantitative exercise thallium-201 variables in determining long-term prognosis in ambulatory patients with chest pain: a comparison with cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.; Finkelstein, D.M.; Homma, S.; Leavitt, M.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of quantitative exercise thallium-201 imaging and compare it with that of cardiac catheterization in ambulatory patients. Accordingly, long-term (4 to 9 years) follow-up was obtained in 293 patients who underwent both tests for the evaluation of chest pain: 89 had undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery within 3 months of testing and were excluded from analysis, 119 experienced no cardiac events and 91 had an event (death in 20, nonfatal myocardial infarction in 21 and coronary artery bypass operations performed greater than 3 months after cardiac catheterization in 50). When all variables were analyzed using Cox regression analysis, the quantitatively assessed lung/heart ratio of thallium-201 activity was the most important predictor of a future cardiac event (chi 2 = 40.21). Other significant predictors were the number of diseased vessels (chi 2 = 17.11), patient gender (chi 2 = 9.43) and change in heart rate from rest to exercise (chi 2 = 4.19). Whereas the number of diseased vessels was an important independent predictor of cardiac events, it did not add significantly to the overall ability of the exercise thallium-201 test to predict events. Furthermore, information obtained from thallium-201 imaging alone was marginally superior to that obtained from cardiac catheterization alone (p = 0.04) and significantly superior to that obtained from exercise testing alone (p = 0.02) in determining the occurrence of events. In addition, unlike the exercise thallium-201 test, which could predict the occurrence of all categories of events, catheterization data were not able to predict the occurrence of nonfatal myocardial infarction. The exclusion of bypass surgery and previous myocardial infarction did not alter the results.

  11. Inverter communications using output signal

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Patrick L.

    2017-02-07

    Technologies for communicating information from an inverter configured for the conversion of direct current (DC) power generated from an alternative source to alternating current (AC) power are disclosed. The technologies include determining information to be transmitted from the inverter over a power line cable connected to the inverter and controlling the operation of an output converter of the inverter as a function of the information to be transmitted to cause the output converter to generate an output waveform having the information modulated thereon.

  12. Determination of the cardiac drug amiodarone and its N-desethyl metabolite in sludge samples.

    PubMed

    Montes, R; Rodríguez, I; Casado, J; López-Sabater, M C; Cela, R

    2015-05-15

    For the first time, a procedure for the simultaneous determination of the iodinated drug amiodarone and its major metabolite, N-desethylamiodarone, in sludge from urban sewage treatment plants (STPs) is proposed. Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) followed by on-line cationic exchange clean-up, in modular configuration, was used as sample preparation technique. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), based on a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) system, was employed for the selective determination of target compounds. The optimized procedure provided exhaustive recoveries with little effect of the sample matrix in the efficiency of electrospray ionization (ESI). The overall recoveries of the method ranged between 95 and 111%, for samples spiked at different concentration levels. The achieved limits of quantification (LOQs) remained below 10ngg(-1) for both compounds, and the linear response range extended up to 2500ngg(-1). Amiodarone and N-desethylamiodarone were ubiquitous in sludge samples, from different STPs located in the Northwest of Spain, with maximum concentrations above 300ngg(-1) referred to the freeze-dried matrix. They were also present in stabilized sludge (mixed with lime and thermally dehydrated), which is mostly disposed in agriculture fields as fertilizer. Furthermore, mono-iodinated analogues of amiodarone and N-desethylamiodarone were also tentatively identified in some samples from their accurate MS and MS/MS spectra.

  13. Design of a specialized computer for on-line monitoring of cardiac stroke volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. A., Jr.; Gebben, V. D.

    1972-01-01

    The design of a specialized analog computer for on-line determination of cardiac stroke volume by means of a modified version of the pressure pulse contour method is presented. The design consists of an analog circuit for computation and a timing circuit for detecting necessary events on the pressure waveform. Readouts of arterial pressures, systolic duration, heart rate, percent change in stroke volume, and percent change in cardiac output are provided for monitoring cardiac patients. Laboratory results showed that computational accuracy was within 3 percent, while animal experiments verified the operational capability of the computer. Patient safety considerations are also discussed.

  14. MIPs-graphene nanoplatelets-MWCNTs modified glassy carbon electrode for the determination of cardiac troponin I.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya; Shen, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Hai-Shui; Tao, Jia; Huang, Jian-Zhi; Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Li-Shi

    2017-03-01

    An electrochemical sensor with high selectivity in addition to sensitivity was developed for the determination of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), based on the modification of cTnI imprinted polymer film on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The sensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer assembled graphene nanoplatelets (GS), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), chitosan (CS), glutaraldehyde (GA) composites, which can increase the electronic transfer rate and the active surface area to capture a larger number of antigenic proteins. MWCNTs/GS based imprinted polymers (MIPs/MWCNTs/GS) were synthesized by means of methacrylic acid (MAA) as the monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross linker α,α'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator and cTnI as the template. In comparison with conventional methods, the proposed electrochemical sensor is highly sensitive for cTnI, providing a better linear response range from 0.005 to 60 ng cm(-3) and a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 0.0008 ng cm(-3) under optimal experimental conditions. In addition, the electrochemical sensor exhibited good specificity, acceptable reproducibility and stability. Moreover, satisfactory results were obtained in real human serum samples, indicating that the developed method has the potential to find application in clinical detection of cTnI as an alternative approach.

  15. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization ...

  16. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient's cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  17. Urine output and resultant osmotic water shift are major determinants of plasma sodium level in syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Ataru; Ishikawa, Kota; Watanabe, Risako; Tsunekawa, Taku; Asai, Chikako; Kiyota, Atsushi; Watanabe, Minemori; Oiso, Yutaka

    2013-07-01

    Although various formulas predicting plasma sodium level ([Na]) are proposed for correction of hyponatremia, it seems that an anticipated [Na] frequently exceeds or falls below the measured [Na], especially in syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). The causative factors of the fluctuation have never been investigated clearly. The aim of this study was to identify the determining factors for accurate prediction of [Na] by comparing data from previously proposed formulas and a novel osmotic compartment model (O-C model). The O-C model, which simulates the amounts of osmoles in extracellular and intracellular fluids, can estimate resultant osmotic water shift (OWS) and [Na]. The accuracy of representative formulas was verified in a point-to-point study using blood and urine samples obtained every 4 hours from 9 patients. Among 161 measurement points, a large fluctuation of urine volume and urine sodium level was observed. The gap between anticipated and measured [Na] in the widely used Adrogue-Madias formula was -0.5 ± 0.1 mEq/L/4 h (mean ± standard error), showing a marked tendency to underestimate [Na]. The gap in the O-C model including OWS was 0.1 ± 0.1 mEq/L/4 h, and that in the O-C model eliminating OWS was 1.9 ± 0.2 mEq/L/4 h, indicating that measurement of urine output and estimation of resulting OWS are essential for a superior prediction of [Na] in SIADH. A simulation study with the O-C model including OWS unveiled a distinctive correction pattern of [Na] dependent on the urine volume and urine sodium level, providing a useful choice for the proper type and rate of infusion.

  18. Blind Deconvolution for Distributed Parameter Systems with Unbounded Input and Output and Determining Blood Alcohol Concentration from Transdermal Biosensor Data(1)

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, I.G.; Luczak, Susan E.; Weiss, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    We develop a blind deconvolution scheme for input-output systems described by distributed parameter systems with boundary input and output. An abstract functional analytic theory based on results for the linear quadratic control of infinite dimensional systems with unbounded input and output operators is presented. The blind deconvolution problem is then reformulated as a series of constrained linear and nonlinear optimization problems involving infinite dimensional dynamical systems. A finite dimensional approximation and convergence theory is developed. The theory is applied to the problem of estimating blood or breath alcohol concentration (respectively, BAC or BrAC) from biosensor-measured transdermal alcohol concentration (TAC) in the field. A distributed parameter model with boundary input and output is proposed for the transdermal transport of ethanol from the blood through the skin to the sensor. The problem of estimating BAC or BrAC from the TAC data is formulated as a blind deconvolution problem. A scheme to identify distinct drinking episodes in TAC data based on a Hodrick Prescott filter is discussed. Numerical results involving actual patient data are presented. PMID:24707065

  19. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  20. Determinants of scientific output: an in-depth view of the productivity of tropical botanist and conservationist, Luis Diego Gómez Pignataro.

    PubMed

    Monge-Nájera, Julián; Nielsen-Muñoz, Vanessa; Beatriz Azofeifa, Ana

    2010-12-01

    Bibliometric studies have found that male researchers have their greatest productivity around the age of 40, that female researchers produce less than their male colleagues, that incentives for collaboration are slow to affect productivity and that, just like humans, research institutes become larger, less productive, more expensive to maintain and less able to raise money as they grow old. Almost invariably, these conclusions come from statistical studies of large numbers of European and American scientists, and there are practically no studies about tropical researchers. We present an in-depth analysis of the productivity of an internationally recognized tropical botanist and conservationist, Luis Diego Gómez Pignataro, based on the totality of his published work and on our own knowledge, as co-workers and friends, of the life frame in which that scientific output was produced. His life output departs from the expected pattern in that he had the highest productivity before reaching the expected peak productivity age, and that when he reached it his productivity fell and never recovered. Furthermore, marriage did not produce the expected fall in productivity. A close analysis of his life indicates that in the middle of his career he switched to intense teaching and conservation activities, and this better explains why his output of scientific research articles was low afterwards. This switch may occur in other tropical scientists.

  1. [Changes in the morphology of the normal left ventricle during the phases of isovolumic contraction and relaxation. Consequences on the calculation of the volume and cardiac output by cineangiocardiographic methods].

    PubMed

    Nitenberg, A; Geschwind, H; Herreman, F

    1976-04-01

    It is well known that the left ventricular volume, as measured by the cineangiographic method, decreases during the phase of isometric contraction. What is more, the cardiac index and the ejection fraction measured by this method are definitely larger than those derived from dilution methods. These discrepancies can be explained by movements of the mitral valve during the phases of isometric contraction and relaxation. The systolic ejection volume (SEV) was measured by three different methods: 1. End-diastolic volume (EDV) -end-systolic volume (ESV) ; 2. EDV - pre-filling volume (PFV) ; 3. Pre-ejection volume (PEV) - ESV. It has emerged that the results given by the methods (2) and (3) correspond closely, and differ significantly from those given by method (1); they are also close to those obtained by the dilution method. This difference seems to arise from the fact that the movements of the mitral valve during the phase of isometric relaxation are diametrically opposite to those which occur during isometric contraction; thus, when the values EDV-ESV are used in the calculation of SEV, an overestimate is made because the mitral valve is not to be found in the same position within the ventricular cavity for both values.

  2. Cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, James A

    2004-09-01

    The pericardium envelopes the cardiac chambers and under physiological conditions exerts subtle functions, including mechanical effects that enhance normal ventricular interactions that contribute to balancing left and right cardiac outputs. Because the pericardium is non-compliant, conditions that cause intrapericardial crowding elevate intrapericardial pressure, which may be the mediator of adverse cardiac compressive effects. Elevated intrapericardial pressure may result from primary disease of the pericardium itself (tamponade or constriction) or from abrupt chamber dilatation (eg, right ventricular infarction). Regardless of the mechanism leading to increased intrapericardial pressure, the resultant pericardial constraint exerts adverse effects on cardiac filling and output. Constriction and restrictive cardiomyopathy share common pathophysiological and clinical features; their differentiation can be quite challenging. This review will consider the physiology of the normal pericardium and its dynamic interactions with the heart and review in detail the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  3. Determination of optimal whole body vibration amplitude and frequency parameters with plyometric exercise and its influence on closed-chain lower extremity acute power output and EMG activity in resistance trained males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Nikki J.

    The optimal combination of Whole body vibration (WBV) amplitude and frequency has not been established. Purpose. To determine optimal combination of WBV amplitude and frequency that will enhance acute mean and peak power (MP and PP) output EMG activity in the lower extremity muscles. Methods. Resistance trained males (n = 13) completed the following testing sessions: On day 1, power spectrum testing of bilateral leg press (BLP) movement was performed on the OMNI. Days 2 and 3 consisted of WBV testing with either average (5.8 mm) or high (9.8 mm) amplitude combined with either 0 (sham control), 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Hz frequency. Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), bicep femoris (BF) and gastrocnemius (GA) muscles for EMG analysis. MP and PP output and EMG activity of the lower extremity were assessed pre-, post-WBV treatments and after sham-controls on the OMNI while participants performed one set of five repetitions of BLP at the optimal resistance determined on Day 1. Results. No significant differences were found between pre- and sham-control on MP and PP output and on EMG activity in RF, VL, BF and GA. Completely randomized one-way ANOVA with repeated measures demonstrated no significant interaction of WBV amplitude and frequency on MP and PP output and peak and mean EMGrms amplitude and EMG rms area under the curve. RF and VL EMGrms area under the curve significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with high WBV amplitude, whereas low amplitude significantly decreased GA mean and peak EMGrms amplitude and EMGrms area under the curve. VL mean EMGrms amplitude and BF mean and peak EMGrms amplitudes were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with high WBV amplitude when compared to sham-control. WBV frequency significantly decreased (p < 0.05) VL mean and peak EMGrms amplitude. WBV frequency at 30 and 40 Hz significantly decreased (p < 0.05) GA mean EMGrms amplitude and 20 and 30 Hz significantly decreased GA peak EMGrms

  4. Conversion of cardiac performance data in analog form for digital computer entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A system is presented which will reduce analog cardiac performance data and convert the results to digital form for direct entry into a commercial time-shared computer. Circuits are discussed which perform the measurement and digital conversion of instantaneous systolic and diastolic parameters from the analog blood pressure waveform. Digital averaging over a selected number of heart cycles is performed on these measurements, as well as those of flow and heart rate. The determination of average cardiac output and peripheral resistance, including trends, is the end result after processing by digital computer.

  5. Cardiac Cephalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Nancy; Ali, Ali Turab; Katsanevaki, Alexia-Zacharoula; Nishtar, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Although most of the patients presenting with ischemic heart disease have chest pains, there are other rare presenting symptoms like cardiac cephalgia. In this report, we present a case of acute coronary syndrome with an only presentation of exertional headache. It was postulated as acute presentation of coronary artery disease, due to previous history of similar presentation associated with some chest pains with previous left coronary artery stenting. We present an unusual case with cardiac cephalgia in a young patient under the age of 50 which was not reported at that age before. There are four suggested mechanisms for this cardiac presentation. PMID:28352454

  6. Physiology of isolated anomalous pulmonary venous connection of a single pulmonary vein as determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dyme, Joshua L; Prakash, Ashwin; Printz, Beth F; Kaur, Avnit; Parness, Ira A; Nielsen, James C

    2006-07-01

    The physiology of isolated partially anomalous pulmonary venous connection of a single pulmonary vein has yet to be fully characterized. This study assessed the magnitude of the left-to-right shunt and right ventricular (RV) dilation from a single anomalous pulmonary vein using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects with >1 anomalous pulmonary vein or associated lesions, including atrial septal defects, were excluded. In the 6 subjects identified, the median pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio was 1.55 (range 1.3 to 1.6). The mean RV end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area in the subjects was significantly larger than in a normal reference cohort (108 +/- 16 vs 78 +/- 18 cm(3)/m(2), p = 0.0009) and greater than the upper limit of normal in all 6 subjects. Older age did not correlate with increased magnitude of shunting (r = 0.3, p = 0.5), but increased age did correlate with RV end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area (r = 0.96, p = 0.01). Isolated partially anomalous pulmonary venous connection with only 1 vein connecting anomalously results in a modest left-to-right shunt and mild RV dilation.

  7. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  8. A critical residue for isoform difference in tetrodotoxin affinity is a molecular determinant of the external access path for local anesthetics in the cardiac sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Sunami, Akihiko; Glaaser, Ian W.; Fozzard, Harry A.

    2000-01-01

    Membrane-impermeant quaternary derivatives of lidocaine (QX222 and QX314) block cardiac Na+ channels when applied from either side of the membrane, but they block neuronal and skeletal muscle channels poorly from the outside. To find the molecular determinants of the cardiac external QX access path, mutations of adult rat skeletal muscle (μ1) and rat heart (rH1) Na+ channels were studied by two-electrode voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes. Mutating the μ1 domain I P-loop Y401, which is the critical residue for isoform differences in tetrodotoxin block, to the heart sequence (Y401C) allowed outside QX222 block, but its mutation to brain type (Y401F) showed little block. μ1-Y401C accelerated recovery from block by internal QX222. Block by external QX222 in μ1-Y401C was diminished by chemical modification with methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium (MTSEA) to the outer vestibule or by a double mutant (μ1-Y401C/F1579A), which altered the putative local anesthetic binding site. The reverse mutation in heart rH1-C374Y reduced outside QX314 block and slowed dissociation of internal QX222. Mutation of μ1-C1572 in IVS6 to Thr, the cardiac isoform residue (C1572T), allowed external QX222 block, and accelerated recovery from internal QX222 block, as reported. Blocking efficacy of outside QX222 in μ1-Y401C was more than that in μ1-C1572T, and the double mutant (μ1-Y401C/C1572T) accelerated internal QX recovery more than μ1-Y401C or μ1-C1572T alone. We conclude that the isoform-specific residue (Tyr/Phe/Cys) in the P-loop of domain I plays an important role in drug access as well as in tetrodotoxin binding. Isoform-specific residues in the IP-loop and IVS6 determine outside drug access to an internal binding site. PMID:10681444

  9. High-output heart failure in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Maria Inês; Moniz, Marta; Ferreira, Sofia; Goulão, Augusto; Barroso, Rosalina

    2012-07-10

    High-output cardiac failure is rare in newborns. Emergent diagnosis and management of this pathology is crucial. We report the case of a child, currently 12-months old; obstetric background is non-contributory. Clinic observation on D1 was normal except for the presence of a systolic cardiac murmur; cardiological evaluation revealed mild ventricular dysfunction of the right ventricle. On the third day of life, she developed cardiac failure with gallop rhythm, hepatomegaly and a murmur in the anterior fontanel; an echocardiogram confirmed clinic aggravation with biventricular dysfunction and right cavities and superior vena cava dilatation. The cranial MRI confirmed the presence of a pial arteriovenous malformation (AVM) involving the anterior and middle cerebral arteries with an associated fronto-parietal ischaemic lesion. The infant underwent embolisations of AVM with successful flow reduction and cardiac failure improvement. The multidisciplinary follow-up showed no cardiac dysfunction or permanent lesions but confirmed a severe psycho-motor delay and left hemiparesia.

  10. Initial Field Test of a Cloud-Based Cardiac Auscultation System to Determine Murmur Etiology in Rural China.

    PubMed

    Pyles, Lee; Hemmati, Pouya; Pan, J; Yu, Xiaoju; Liu, Ke; Wang, Jing; Tsakistos, Andreas; Zheleva, Bistra; Shao, Weiguang; Ni, Quan

    2017-04-01

    A system for collection, distribution, and long distant, asynchronous interpretation of cardiac auscultation has been developed and field-tested in rural China. We initiated a proof-of-concept test as a critical component of design of a system to allow rural physicians with little experience in evaluation of congenital heart disease (CHD) to obtain assistance in diagnosis and management of children with significant heart disease. The project tested the hypothesis that acceptable screening of heart murmurs could be accomplished using a digital stethoscope and internet cloud transmittal to deliver phonocardiograms to an experienced observer. Of the 7993 children who underwent school-based screening in the Menghai District of Yunnan Province, Peoples Republic of China, 149 had a murmur noted by a screener. They had digital heart sounds and phonocardiograms collected with the HeartLink tele auscultation system, and underwent echocardiography by a cardiology resident from the First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University. The digital phonocardiograms, stored on a cloud server, were later remotely reviewed by a board-certified American pediatric cardiologist. Fourteen of these subjects were found to have CHD confirmed by echocardiogram. Using the HeartLink system, the pediatric cardiologist identified 11 of the 14 subjects with pathological murmurs, and missed three subjects with atrial septal defects, which were incorrectly identified as venous hum or Still's murmur. In addition, ten subjects were recorded as having pathological murmurs, when no CHD was confirmed by echocardiography during the field study. The overall test accuracy was 91% with 78.5% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated the feasibility of differentiating pathologic murmurs due to CHD from normal functional heart murmurs with the HeartLink system. This field study is an initial step to develop a cost-effective CHD screening strategy in low

  11. Deferasirox, deferiprone and desferrioxamine treatment in thalassemia major patients: cardiac iron and function comparison determined by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Alessia; Meloni, Antonella; Capra, Marcello; Cianciulli, Paolo; Prossomariti, Luciano; Malaventura, Cristina; Putti, Maria Caterina; Lippi, Alma; Romeo, Maria Antonietta; Bisconte, Maria Grazia; Filosa, Aldo; Caruso, Vincenzo; Quarta, Antonella; Pitrolo, Lorella; Missere, Massimiliano; Midiri, Massimo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Positano, Vincenzo; Lombardi, Massimo; Maggio, Aurelio

    2011-01-01

    Background Oral deferiprone was suggested to be more effective than subcutaneous desferrioxamine for removing heart iron. Oral once-daily chelator deferasirox has recently been made commercially available but its long-term efficacy on cardiac iron and function has not yet been established. Our study aimed to compare the effectiveness of deferasirox, deferiprone and desferrioxamine on myocardial and liver iron concentrations and bi-ventricular function in thalassemia major patients by means of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging. Design and Methods From the first 550 thalassemia subjects enrolled in the Myocardial Iron Overload in Thalassemia network, we retrospectively selected thalassemia major patients who had been receiving one chelator alone for longer than one year. We identified three groups of patients: 24 treated with deferasirox, 42 treated with deferiprone and 89 treated with desferrioxamine. Myocardial iron concentrations were measured by T2* multislice multiecho technique. Biventricular function parameters were quantitatively evaluated by cine images. Liver iron concentrations were measured by T2* multiecho technique. Results The global heart T2* value was significantly higher in the deferiprone (34±11ms) than in the deferasirox (21±12 ms) and the desferrioxamine groups (27±11 ms) (P=0.0001). We found higher left ventricular ejection fractions in the deferiprone and the desferrioxamine versus the deferasirox group (P=0.010). Liver iron concentration, measured as T2* signal, was significantly lower in the desferrioxamine versus the deferiprone and the deferasirox group (P=0.004). Conclusions The cohort of patients treated with oral deferiprone showed less myocardial iron burden and better global systolic ventricular function compared to the patients treated with oral deferasirox or subcutaneous desferrioxamine. PMID:20884710

  12. Safety and Efficacy of Prophylactic Amiodarone in Preventing Early Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia (JET) in Children After Cardiac Surgery and Determination of Its Risk Factor.

    PubMed

    Amrousy, Doaa El; Elshehaby, Walid; Feky, Wael El; Elshmaa, Nagat S

    2016-04-01

    Postoperative arrhythmia is a common complication after open heart surgery in children. JET is the most common and dangerous arrhythmia. We aimed to assess safety and efficacy of prophylactic amiodarone in preventing JET in children underwent cardiac surgery and to assess risk factors for JET among our patients. In total, 117 children who underwent cardiac surgery for CHD at Tanta University Hospital from October 2011 to April 2015 were divided in two groups; amiodarone group (65 patients) was given prophylactic amiodarone intraoperatively and placebo group (52 patients). Amiodarone is started as loading dose of 5 mg/kg IV in the operating room after induction of anesthesia and continued for 3 days as continuous infusion 10-15 μg/kg/min. Primary outcome and secondary outcomes of amiodarone administration were reported. We studied pre-, intra- and postoperative factors to determine risk factors for occurrence of JET among these children. Prophylactic amiodarone was found to significantly decrease incidence of postoperative JET from 28.9 % in placebo group to 9.2 % in amiodarone group, and symptomatic JET from 11.5 % in placebo group to 3.1 % in amiodarone group, and shorten postoperative intensive care unit and hospital stay without significant side effects. Risk factors for occurrence of JET were younger age, lower body weight, longer cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross-clamp time, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, acidosis and high dose of inotropes. JET was more associated with surgical repair of right ventricular outlet obstruction as in case of tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary stenosis. Most of JET 15/21 (71.4 %) occurred in the first day postoperatively, and 6/21 occurred in the second day (28.6 %). Prophylactic amiodarone is safe and effective in preventing early JET in children after open heart surgery.

  13. Determining the in vivo regulation of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase based on label flux from hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marie A; Atherton, Helen J; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran; Radda, George K; Tyler, Damian J

    2011-10-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key regulator of cardiac substrate selection and is regulated by both pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)-mediated phosphorylation and feedback inhibition. The extent to which chronic upregulation of PDK protein levels, acutely increased PDK activity and acute feedback inhibition limit PDH flux remains unclear because existing in vitro assessment methods inherently disrupt the regulation of the enzyme complex. We have demonstrated previously that hyperpolarised (13)C-labelled metabolic tracers coupled with MRS can monitor flux through PDH in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine the relative contributions of acute and chronic changes in PDK and PDH activities to in vivo myocardial PDH flux. We examined both fed and fasted rats with either hyperpolarised [1-(13)C]pyruvate alone or hyperpolarised [1-(13)C]pyruvate co-infused with malate [to modulate mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH/NAD(+)) and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA)/CoA ratios, which alter both PDH activity and flux]. To confirm the metabolic fate of infused malate, we performed in vitro (1)H NMR spectroscopy on cardiac tissue extracts. We observed that, in fed rats, where PDH activity was high, the presence of malate increased PDH flux by 27%, whereas, in the fasted state, malate infusion had no effect on PDH flux. These observations suggest that pyruvate oxidation is limited by feedback inhibition from acetyl-CoA only when PDH activity is high. Therefore, in the case of PDH, and potentially other enzymes, hyperpolarised (13)C MRI can be used to assess noninvasively enzymatic regulation.

  14. Governmentally amplified output volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funashima, Yoshito

    2016-11-01

    Predominant government behavior is decomposed by frequency into several periodic components: updating cycles of infrastructure, Kuznets cycles, fiscal policy over business cycles, and election cycles. Little is known, however, about the theoretical impact of such cyclical behavior in public finance on output fluctuations. Based on a standard neoclassical growth model, this study intends to examine the frequency at which public investment cycles are relevant to output fluctuations. We find an inverted U-shaped relationship between output volatility and length of cycle in public investment. This implies that periodic behavior in public investment at a certain frequency range can cause aggravated output resonance. Moreover, we present an empirical analysis to test the theoretical implication, using the U.S. data in the period from 1968 to 2015. The empirical results suggest that such resonance phenomena change from low to high frequency.

  15. Mechanical cardiac assistance.

    PubMed

    Sezai, Y

    1998-08-01

    In our institute, we have intensively introduced both pulsatile and non-pulsatile mechanical cardiac assist devices, such as the pneumatic ventricular assist device (VAD) and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS), using a centrifugal pump. From various kinds of clinical views, these cases were estimated and evaluated retrospectively according to the weaning results, long-term survival rate and cause of death. Based upon our experiences and clinical results, an alternate strategy of mechanical cardiac assistance for severe heart failure is suggested as follows. In the case of post-cardiotomy cardiogenic shock or low output syndrome, PCPS system should be applied firstly under intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) assist for a maximum of 2-3 days. If the native cardiac function does not recover and more long-term support is needed, several types of VAD, which are more powerful and durable devices should be introduced, according to end organ function and expected support duration. In order to obtain better clinical results, we have to select an appropriate device depending on the limited availability of supporting duration. Generally speaking, centrifugal pumps can support in short-term duration, while pulsatile devices cover the broad spectrum of the supporting period. Pneumatic VADs can cover short-term to long-term support up to a year, and electric VADs can cover over 1 year, and can be used as a bridge to heart transplantation.

  16. Simultaneous determination of basal and evoked output levels of aspartate, glutamate, taurine and 4-aminobutyric acid during microdialysis and from superfused brain slices.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, L; Della Corte, L; Tipton, K F

    1999-02-19

    A HPLC method, involving pre-column derivatisation with o-phthalaldehyde and fluorescence detection, is described. It allows the resolution of aspartate, glutamate, taurine and GABA, in a single run with detection limits of 3.2, 1.7, 1.4 and 2 fmol/microl of perfusate, respectively. It is sufficiently sensitive and rapid (15 min) for the determination "on line" of the four amino acids in perfusates obtained during in vivo microdialysis experiments. The procedure has been used to determine basal, K+ - or veratridine-stimulated release of these amino acids in different brain areas during microdialysis and from perfused tissue slices.

  17. Prediction of electron beam output factors.

    PubMed

    Mills, M D; Hogstrom, K R; Almond, P R

    1982-01-01

    A method to predict square and rectangular field output factors from the measurement of selected fields of electron beams on the Therac 20 Saturne has been developed. A two parameter fit of the square field output factor data, based on the functional dependence as predicted by a pencil beam calculational model, has proven clinically acceptable. The pencil beam distributions are given by the Fermi-Eyges theory of multiple Coulomb scattering. For a rectangular field, the output factor can be calculated from the square root of the product of the two square field output factors wtih sides equal to those of the rectangular field. If however, there is a significant asymmetry between the X and Y collimator systems, then rectangular field output factors should be predicted from the product of the X and Y one-dimensional output factors. One-dimensional output factors are defined as output factors of rectangular fields where one side remains constant and equal to the side of the square reference field. Measured data indicate either of the two methods of determining rectangular field output factors to be clinically acceptable for the Therac 20, the use of one-dimensional output factors demonstrating greater accuracy. Data show agreement to within approximately 1.5% at electron energies of 6, 9, 13, and 17 MeV.

  18. Dipyridamole cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Askenase, A.; Segal, B.L.; Auerbach, N.

    1988-02-01

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative technique to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole is still in the investigational phase, while oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow (due to coronary vasodilation) which is in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The disparity in the increase in coronary blood flow relative to the cardiac output results in an increase in myocardial thallium activity and an increase in the myocardial/background activity ratio. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg, and of the oral dose it is 300 to 400 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. Analysis of the thallium images has been to a large extent based on visual inspection of the planar images. Delayed images are helpful to establish the nature of the perfusion abnormalities (transient or fixed). The process of redistribution is based on disparate rates of washout from the normal and abnormal zones. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole two-dimensional echocardiography has also been used in the detection of coronary artery disease; transient (new or worsening of preexisting) wall motion abnormalities have been found to be a specific marker of coronary artery disease. Transmural as well as regional coronary steal phenomena have been postulated as the mechanism for dipyridamole-induced regional wall motion abnormalities. 65 references.

  19. Use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to determine myocardial viability in an infant with in utero septal myocardial infarction and ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Whitham, Jennifer K E; Hasan, Babar S; Schamberger, Marcus S; Johnson, Tiffanie R

    2008-09-01

    We describe the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) to determine myocardial viability and subsequently clinical prognosis in a patient with in utero septal myocardial infarction (MI) and dilated cardiomyopathy. MI is most commonly associated with congenital heart disease. These lesions include aortic atresia and stenosis, interrupted aortic arch, hypoplastic left ventricle (LV), and total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR). Within the last decade, it has been clearly established that systolic dysfunction is not always a definitive status after MI. In the presence of residual viable myocardium and an adequate myocardial perfusion, contractility might normalize-this process being related to a remarkable prognostic benefit. Until the use of CMRI, myocardial viability has been poorly characterized by other imaging modalities, thus making prognosis difficult to predict. Using myocardial delayed-enhancement CMRI, this patient was shown to have a dilated left ventricle with noncompaction, longitudinal midwall hyperenhancement consistent with nonviable tissue, and severely diminished left ventricular function. In conclusion, CMRI is the only imaging modality that can define anatomy, function, and tissue characterization simultaneously. In the future, CMRI could circumvent the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in determining the cause and prognosis of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and myocardial infarction.

  20. Simultaneous determination of various cardiac glycosides by liquid chromatography-hybrid mass spectrometry for the purity assessment of the therapeutic monitored drug digoxin.

    PubMed

    Josephs, Ralf Dieter; Daireaux, Adeline; Westwood, Steven; Wielgosz, Robert Ian

    2010-07-02

    A high performance liquid chromatography-hybrid tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)) method utilising electrospray ionisation has been developed and implemented for the simultaneous determination of several cardiac glycosides (CGs) as well as their corresponding aglycones formed by and extracted from herbaceous plants of the genus Digitalis. The method has been validated in-house and its performance characteristics (linearity, repeatability, limits of detection, etc.) were assessed for use in the quantification of CGs and their corresponding aglycones. LODs from 38 to 936pgg(-1) in solution, corresponding to mass fraction impurity levels from 0.0009 (or 0.00008%) to 0.019mgg(-1) (or 0.0019%) detectable in the pure materials have been realized. Moreover, the method was used to characterize and to determine the inherent CG impurities in batches of the therapeutic monitored drug digoxin which served as candidate reference material for an organic purity assessment inter-laboratory study (CCQM-P20.f) organised by the BIPM Chemistry Section and carried out within the framework of the Organic Analysis Working Group (OAWG) of the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance - Metrology in Chemistry (CCQM). Digoxin was selected from materials required for the establishment of reference measurement systems for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine.

  1. Determination of visible coordinates of the low-orbit space objects and their photometry by the CCD camera with the analogue output. Initial image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakun, L. S.; Koshkin, N. I.

    2014-06-01

    The number of artificial space objects in the low Earth orbit has been continuously increasing. That raises the requirements for the accuracy of measurement of their coordinates and for the precision of the prediction of their motion. The accuracy of the prediction can be improved if the actual current orientation of the non-spherical satellite is taken into account. In so doing, it becomes possible to directly determine the atmospheric density along the orbit. The problem solution is to regularly conduct the photometric surveillances of a large number of satellites and monitor the parameters of their rotation around the centre of mass. To do that, it is necessary to get and promptly process large video arrays, containing pictures of a satellite against the background stars. In the present paper, the method for the simultaneous measurement of coordinates and brightness of the low Earth orbit space objects against the background stars when they are tracked by telescope KT-50 with the mirror diameter of 50 cm and with video camera WAT-209H2 is considered. The problem of determination of the moments of exposures of images is examined in detail. The estimation of the accuracy of measuring both the apparent coordinates of stars and their photometry is given on the example of observation of the open star cluster. In the presented observations, the standard deviation of one position measured is 1σ, the accuracy of determination of the moment of exposure of images is better than 0.0001 s. The estimate of the standard deviation of one measurement of brightness is 0.1m. Some examples of the results of surveillances of satellites are also presented in the paper.

  2. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your risk of future heart problems, and to improve your health and quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation programs increase ... exercise routine at home or at a local gym. You may also continue to ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and weight loss ...

  3. Perioperative optimal blood pressure as determined by ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy and its association with postoperative acute kidney injury in cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Daijiro; Hogue, Charles; Adachi, Hideo; Max, Laura; Price, Joel; Sciortino, Christopher; Zehr, Kenton; Conte, John; Cameron, Duke; Mandal, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Perioperative blood pressure management by targeting individualized optimal blood pressure, determined by cerebral blood flow autoregulation monitoring, may ensure sufficient renal perfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in the optimal blood pressure for individual patients, determined during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and during early postoperative period in intensive care unit (ICU). A secondary aim was to examine if excursions below optimal blood pressure in the ICU are associated with risk of cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI). METHODS One hundred and ten patients undergoing cardiac surgery had cerebral blood flow monitored with a novel technology using ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy (UT-NIRS) during CPB and in the first 3 h after surgery in the ICU. The correlation flow index (CFx) was calculated as a moving, linear correlation coefficient between cerebral flow index measured using UT-NIRS and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Optimal blood pressure was defined as the MAP with the lowest CFx. Changes in optimal blood pressure in the perioperative period were observed and the association of blood pressure excursions (magnitude and duration) below the optimal blood pressure [area under the curve (AUC) < OptMAP mmHgxh] with incidence of CSA-AKI (defined using Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria) was examined. RESULTS Optimal blood pressure during early ICU stay and CPB was correlated (r = 0.46, P < 0.0001), but was significantly higher in the ICU compared with during CPB (75 ± 8.7 vs 71 ± 10.3 mmHg, P = 0.0002). Thirty patients (27.3%) developed CSA-AKI within 48 h after the surgery. AUC < OptMAP was associated with CSA-AKI during CPB [median, 13.27 mmHgxh, interquartile range (IQR), 4.63–20.14 vs median, 6.05 mmHgxh, IQR 3.03–12.40, P = 0.008], and in the ICU (13.72 mmHgxh, IQR 5.09–25.54 vs 5.65 mmHgxh, IQR 1.71–13.07, P = 0.022). CONCLUSIONS Optimal blood pressure during

  4. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  5. Determinants of thiopental induction dose requirements.

    PubMed

    Avram, M J; Sanghvi, R; Henthorn, T K; Krejcie, T C; Shanks, C A; Fragen, R J; Howard, K A; Kaczynski, D A

    1993-01-01

    Dose requirements for thiopental anesthetic induction have significant age- and gender-related variability. We studied the association of the patient characteristics age, gender, weight, lean body mass, and cardiac output with thiopental requirements. Doses of thiopental, infused at 150 mg/min, required to reach both a clinical end-point and an electroencephalographic (EEG) end-point were determined in 30 males and 30 females, aged 18-83 yr. Univariate least squares linear regression analysis revealed outliers in the relationships of age, weight, lean body mass, and cardiac output to thiopental dose at clinical and EEG endpoints. Differential weighting of data points minimized the effect of outliers in the construction of a robust multiple linear regression model of the relationship between several selected independent variables and the dependent variables thiopental dose at clinical and EEG endpoints. The multiple linear regression model for thiopental dose at the clinical end-point selecting the regressor variables age, weight, and gender (R2 = 0.76) was similar to that for age, lean body mass, and gender (R2 = 0.75). Thiopental dose at the EEG endpoint was better described by models selecting the variables age, weight, and cardiac output (R2 = 0.88) or age, lean body mass, and cardiac output (R2 = 0.87). Although cardiac output varied with age, age always remained a selected variable. Because weight and lean body mass differed with gender, their selection as variables in the model eliminated gender as a selected variable or minimized its importance.

  6. Hypothermic liquid ventilation prevents early hemodynamic dysfunction and cardiovascular mortality after coronary artery occlusion complicated by cardiac arrest in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Darbera, Lys; Chenoune, Mourad; Lidouren, Fanny; Kohlhauer, Matthias; Adam, Clovis; Bruneval, Patrick; Ghaleh, Bijan; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Carli, Pierre; Vivien, Benoit; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Berdeaux, Alain; Tissier, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    Objective Ultrafast and whole-body cooling can be induced by total liquid ventilation (TLV) with temperature-controlled perfluorocarbons. Our goal was to determine whether this can afford maximal cardio- and neuroprotections through cooling rapidity when coronary occlusion is complicated by cardiac arrest. Design Prospective, randomized animal study. Setting Academic research laboratory. Subjects Male New-Zealand rabbits. Interventions Chronically instrumented rabbits were submitted to coronary artery occlusion and ventricular fibrillation. After 8-min of cardiac arrest, animals were resuscitated and submitted to a normothermic follow-up (Control group) or to 3-h of mild hypothermia induced by TLV (TLV group) or by combination of cold saline infusion and cold blankets application (Saline group). Coronary reperfusion was permitted 40-min after the onset of occlusion. After awakening, rabbits were followed during 7 days. Measurements and main results Ten animals were resuscitated in each group. In the Control group, all animals secondarily died from cardiac/respiratory failure (8/10) or neurological dysfunction (2/10). In the Saline group, the target temperature of 32°C was achieved within 30–45 min after cooling initiation. This slightly reduced infarct size vs Control (41±16% vs 54±8% of risk zone, respectively; p<0.05) but failed to significantly improve cardiac output, neurological recovery and survival rate (3 survivors, 6 death from cardiac/respiratory failure and 1 from neurological dysfunction). Conversely, the 32°C temperature was achieved within 5–10 min in the TLV group. This led to a dramatic reduction in infarct size (13±4%; p<0.05 vs other groups) and improvements in cardiac output, neurological recovery and survival (8 survivors, 2 deaths from cardiac/respiratory failure). Conclusions Achieving hypothermia rapidly is critical to improve the cardiovascular outcome after cardiac arrest with underlying myocardial infarction. PMID:24126441

  7. An Exploratory Study to Determine Whether BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Have Higher Risk of Cardiac Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sajjad, Monique; Fradley, Michael; Sun, Weihong; Kim, Jongphil; Zhao, Xiuhua; Pal, Tuya; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-01-01

    Anthracycline-based cardiotoxicity is concerning for women with breast cancer and portends a dose-dependent risk of developing left ventricular dysfunction. Overall, the prevalence of heart failure (HF) is ≈2% of the total US population; however, BRCA-deficient mice have shown increased HF. We evaluated for the inherent risk of HF in women with BRCA mutations to determine whether treatment with anthracycline-based therapy increased this risk. We obtained results on BRCA mutation carriers regarding cancer treatment and HF, identified through the BRCA patient advocacy organization Facing Our Risk for Cancer Empowered (FORCE) and the Moffitt-based Inherited Cancer Registry. In our patient group (232 BRCA1 and 159 BRCA2 patients; 10 with both mutations), 7.7% reported HF, with similar proportions in BRCA1 versus BRCA2 carriers (7.4% and 8.2%, respectively). These proportions are significantly higher than published rates (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in HF rates comparing anthracycline-treated versus anthracycline-naïve patients however (7.1% vs. 8.3%; p = 0.67). In addition, 9.1% of BRCA1 carriers and 8.2% of BRCA2 carriers reported arrhythmias. BRCA mutation carriers showed increased risk of cardiotoxicity versus the general population and an overall increased risk of cardiotoxicity from anthracycline-based therapy. Our study supports data that BRCA carriers have increased non-cancer mortality from cardiotoxicity. A prospective trial to determine HF and conduction abnormalities in this population is warranted. PMID:28157161

  8. Determination of Tube Output (kVp) and Exposure Mode for Breast Phantom of Various Thicknesses/Glandularity for Digital Mammography

    PubMed Central

    IZDIHAR, Kamal; KANAGA, Kumari Chelliah; KRISHNAPILLAI, Vijayalakshimi; SULAIMAN, Tamanang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Optimisation of average glandular dose (AGD) for two-dimensional (2D) mammography is important, as imaging using ionizing radiation has the probability to induce cancer resulting from stochastic effects. This study aims to observe the effects of kVp, anode/filter material, and exposure mode on the dose and image quality of 2D mammography. Methods: This experimental study was conducted using full-field digital mammography. The entrance surface air kerma was determined using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) 100H and ionization chamber (IC) on three types of Computerized Imaging Reference System (CIRS) phantom with 50/50, 30/70, and 20/80 breast glandularity, respectively, in the auto-time mode and auto-filter mode. The Euref protocol was used to calculate the AGD while the image quality was evaluated using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), figure of merit (FOM), and image quality figure (IQF). Results: It is shown that AGD values in the auto-time mode did not decrease significantly with the increasing tube voltage of the silver filter (r = −0.187, P > 0.05) and rhodium filter (r = −0.131, P > 0.05) for all the phantoms. The general linear model showed that AGD for all phantoms had a significant effect between different exposure factors [F (6,12.3) = 4.48 and mode of exposure F (1,86) = 4.17, P < 0.05, respectively] but there is no significant difference between the different anode/filter combination [F (1,4) = 0.571]. Conclusion: In summary, the 28, 29, and 31 kVp are the optimum kVp for 50%, 30%, and 20% breast glandularity, respectively. Besides the auto-filter mode is suitable for 50%, 30%, and 20% breast glandularity because it is automatic, faster, and may avoid error done by the operator. PMID:25892949

  9. An HPLC method for determination of inosine and hypoxanthine in human plasma from healthy volunteers and patients presenting with potential acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Farthing, Don; Sica, Domenic; Gehr, Todd; Wilson, Bill; Fakhry, Itaf; Larus, Terri; Farthing, Christine; Karnes, H Thomas

    2007-07-01

    A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method utilizing ultraviolet (UV) detection was developed for the determination of inosine and hypoxanthine in human plasma. For component separation, a monolithic C(18) column at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min with an aqueous mobile phase of trifluoroacetic acid (0.1% TFA in deionized water pH 2.2, v/v) and methanol gradient was used. The method employed a one-step sample preparation utilizing centrifugal filtration with high component recoveries (approximately 98%) from plasma, which eliminated the need of an internal standard. The method demonstrated excellent linearity (0.25-5 microg/mL, R>0.9990) for both inosine and hypoxanthine with detection limits of 100 ng/mL. This simple and cost effective method was utilized to evaluate potential endogenous plasma biomarker(s), which may aid hospital emergency personnel in the early detection of acute cardiac ischemia in patients presenting with non-traumatic chest pain.

  10. Diodes stabilize LED output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Small-signal diodes are placed in series with light-emitting diodes (LED's) to stabilize LED output against temperature fluctuations. Simple inexpensive method compensates for thermal fluctuations over a broad temperature range. Requiring few components, technique is particularly useful where circuit-board space is limited.

  11. Binding constants determined from Ca2+ current responses to rapid applications and washouts of nifedipine in frog cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Méry, P F; Hove-Madsen, L; Mazet, J L; Hanf, R; Fischmeister, R

    1996-07-01

    1. A fast perfusion system was used to analyse the kinetics of the response of L-type calcium current (ICa) to rapid applications and washouts of the dihydropyridine antagonist nifedipine in whole-cell patch-clamped frog ventricular myocytes. 2. Both the inhibition of ICa induced by nifedipine and the recovery from inhibition upon washout of the drug behaved as mono-exponential functions of time. 3. During application or washout of 100 nM nifedipine, only the peak amplitude of ICa varied but not its time course of activation or inactivation. 4. The rate constant of the onset of ICa inhibition increased with the concentration of nifedipine. However, the time course of the recovery from inhibition was independent of drug concentration. 5. Both rate constants were strongly sensitive to the holding potential but insensitive to the test potential. 6. Using simple rate equations and a one-binding-site analysis it was possible to determine the rate constants for association (k1) and dissociation (k-1) and the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of the reaction between nifedipine and Ca2+ channels. KD values for nifedipine were identical to IC50 values obtained from classical steady-state experiments. 7. With depolarized holding potentials, KD decreased strongly due to a large reduction in k-1 and a modest increase in k1. Assuming that these changes result from the distribution of Ca2+ channels between resting and inactivated states, a low-affinity binding to the resting state (R) and a high-affinity binding to the inactivated state (I) were obtained with the binding constants: k1R = 1.0 x 10(6) M-1 S-1, k-1R = 0.077 S-1, and KDR = 77 nM for the resting state; k1I = 4.47 x 10(6) M-1 S-1, k-1I = 7.7 x 10(-4) S-1, and KDI = 0.17 nM for the inactivated state. 8. Rapid application/washout experiments provide a unique way to determine, in an intact cell and in a relatively short period (2-4 min), the binding rate constants and the KD value of the reaction between a

  12. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  13. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  14. Optimal Output Trajectory Redesign for Invertible Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, Santosh

    1996-01-01

    Given a desired output trajectory, inversion-based techniques find input-state trajectories required to exactly track the output. These inversion-based techniques have been successfully applied to the endpoint tracking control of multi-joint flexible manipulators and to aircraft control. The specified output trajectory uniquely determines the required input and state trajectories that are found through inversion. These input-state trajectories exactly track the desired output; however, they might not meet acceptable performance requirements. For example, during slewing maneuvers of flexible structures, the structural deformations, which depend on the required state trajectories, may be unacceptably large. Further, the required inputs might cause actuator saturation during an exact tracking maneuver for example, in the flight control of conventional takeoff and landing aircraft. In such situations, a compromise is desired between the tracking requirement and other goals such as reduction of internal vibrations and prevention of actuator saturation; the desired output trajectory needs to be redesigned.

  15. Human Thymus Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Augment Force Production in Self-Organized Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sondergaard, Claus S.; Hodonsky, Chani J.; Khait, Luda; Shaw, John; Sarkar, Bedabrata; Birla, Ravi; Bove, Edward; Nolta, Jan; Si, Ming-Sing

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells have been recently isolated from thymus gland tissue discarded after surgical procedures. The role of this novel cell type in heart regeneration has yet to be defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells using self-organized cardiac tissue as an in vitro platform for quantitative assessment. Methods Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from discarded thymus tissue from neonates undergoing heart surgery and were incubated in differentiation media to demonstrate multipotency. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes self-organized into cardiac tissue fibers in a custom culture dish either alone or in combination with varying numbers of mesenchymal stromal cells. A transducer measured force generated by spontaneously contracting self-organized cardiac tissue fibers. Work and power outputs were calculated from force tracings. Immunofluorescence was performed to determine the fate of the thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Results Mesenchymal stromal cells were successfully isolated from discarded thymus tissue. After incubation in differentiation media, mesenchymal stromal cells attained the expected phenotypes. Although mesenchymal stromal cells did not differentiate into mature cardiomyocytes, addition of these cells increased the rate of fiber formation, force production, and work and power outputs. Self-organized cardiac tissue containing mesenchymal stromal cells acquired a defined microscopic architecture. Conclusions Discarded thymus tissue contains mesenchymal stromal cells, which can augment force production and work and power outputs of self-organized cardiac tissue fibers by several-fold. These findings indicate the potential utility of mesenchymal stromal cells in treating heart failure. PMID:20732499

  16. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  17. Climate Model Output Rewriter

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K. E.; Doutriaux, C.

    2004-06-21

    CMOR comprises a set of FORTRAN 90 dunctions that can be used to produce CF-compliant netCDF files. The structure of the files created by CMOR and the metadata they contain fulfill the requirements of many of the climate community’s standard model experiments (which are referred to here as "MIPS", which stands for "model intercomparison project", including, for example, AMIP, CMIP, CFMIP, PMIP, APE, and IPCC scenario runs), CMOR was not designed to serve as an all-purpose wfiter of CF-compliant netCDF files, but simply to reduce the effort required to prepare and manage MIP data. Although MIPs encourage systematic analysis of results across models, this is only easy to do if the model output is written in a common format with files structured similarly and with sufficient metadata uniformly stored according to a common standard. Individual modeling groups store their data in different ways. but if a group can read its own data with FORTRAN, then it should easily be able to transform the data, using CMOR, into the common format required by the MIPs, The adoption of CMOR as a standard code for exchanging climate data will facilitate participation in MIPs because after learning how to satisfy the output requirements of one MIP, it will be easy to prepare output for the other MIPs.

  18. Comparison of NOGA Endocardial Mapping and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Determining Infarct Size and Infarct Transmurality for Intramyocardial Injection Therapy Using Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Pavo, Noemi; Jakab, Andras; Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Strebinger, Georg; Wolint, Petra; Zimmermann, Matthias; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan; Hoerstrup, Simon P.; Maurer, Gerald; Gyöngyösi, Mariann

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We compared the accuracy of NOGA endocardial mapping for delineating transmural and non-transmural infarction to the results of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) with late gadolinium enhancement (LE) for guiding intramyocardial reparative substance delivery using data from experimental myocardial infarction studies. Methods Sixty domestic pigs underwent diagnostic NOGA endocardial mapping and cMRI-LE 60 days after induction of closed-chest reperfused myocardial infarction. The infarct size was determined by LE of cMRI and by delineation of the infarct core on the unipolar voltage polar map. The sizes of the transmural and non-transmural infarctions were calculated from the cMRI transmurality map using signal intensity (SI) cut-offs of>75% and>25% and from NOGA bipolar maps using bipolar voltage cut-off values of <0.8 mV and <1.9 mV. Linear regression analysis and Bland-Altman plots were used to determine correlations and systematic differences between the two images. The overlapping ratios of the transmural and non-transmural infarcted areas were calculated. Results Infarct size as determined by 2D NOGA unipolar voltage polar mapping correlated with the 3D cMRI-LE findings (r = 0.504, p<0.001) with a mean difference of 2.82% in the left ventricular (LV) surface between the two images. Polar maps of transmural cMRI and bipolar maps of NOGA showed significant association for determining of the extent of transmural infarction (r = 0.727, p<0.001, overlap ratio of 81.6±11.1%) and non-transmural infarction (r = 0.555, p<0.001, overlap ratio of 70.6±18.5%). NOGA overestimated the transmural scar size (6.81% of the LV surface) but slightly underestimated the size of the non-transmural infarction (−3.04% of the LV surface). Conclusions By combining unipolar and bipolar voltage maps, NOGA endocardial mapping is useful for accurate delineation of the targeted zone for intramyocardial therapy and is comparable to cMRI-LE. This may be useful

  19. About Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Mar 10,2017 What is cardiac arrest? Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart ...

  20. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  1. Pharmacology of cardiac potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Tamargo, Juan; Caballero, Ricardo; Gómez, Ricardo; Valenzuela, Carmen; Delpón, Eva

    2004-04-01

    Cardiac K+ channels are membrane-spanning proteins that allow the passive movement of K+ ions across the cell membrane along its electrochemical gradient. They regulate the resting membrane potential, the frequency of pacemaker cells and the shape and duration of the cardiac action potential. Additionally, they have been recognized as potential targets for the actions of neurotransmitters and hormones and class III antiarrhythmic drugs that prolong the action potential duration (APD) and refractoriness and have been found effective to prevent/suppress cardiac arrhythmias. In the human heart, K+ channels include voltage-gated channels, such as the rapidly activating and inactivating transient outward current (Ito1), the ultrarapid (IKur), rapid (IKr) and slow (IKs) components of the delayed rectifier current and the inward rectifier current (IK1), the ligand-gated channels, including the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive (IKATP) and the acetylcholine-activated (IKAch) currents and the leak channels. Changes in the expression of K+ channels explain the regional variations in the morphology and duration of the cardiac action potential among different cardiac regions and are influenced by heart rate, intracellular signalling pathways, drugs and cardiovascular disorders. A progressive number of cardiac and noncardiac drugs block cardiac K+ channels and can cause a marked prolongation of the action potential duration (i.e. an acquired long QT syndrome, LQTS) and a distinct polymorphic ventricular tachycardia termed torsades de pointes. In addition, mutations in the genes encoding IKr (KCNH2/KCNE2) and IKs (KCNQ1/KCNE1) channels have been identified in some types of the congenital long QT syndrome. This review concentrates on the function, molecular determinants, regulation and, particularly, on the mechanism of action of drugs modulating the K+ channels present in the sarcolemma of human cardiac myocytes that contribute to the different phases of the cardiac action

  2. Cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Robert J; Garan, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    As more women with repaired congenital heart disease survive to their reproductive years and many other women are delaying pregnancy until later in life, a rising concern is the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy. Naturally occurring cardiovascular changes during pregnancy increase the likelihood that a recurrence of a previously experienced cardiac arrhythmia or a de novo arrhythmia will occur. Arrhythmias should be thoroughly investigated to determine if there is a reversible etiology, and risks/benefits of treatment options should be fully explored. We discuss the approach to working up and treating various arrhythmias during pregnancy with attention to fetal and maternal risks as well as treatment of fetal arrhythmias. Acute management in stable patients includes close monitoring and intravenous pharmacologic therapy, while DC cardioversion should be used to terminate arrhythmias in hemodynamically unstable patients. Long-term management may require continued oral antiarrhythmic therapy, with particular attention to fetal safety, to prevent complications associated with arrhythmias.

  3. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional unenhanced and contrast-enhanced echocardiographies versus cineventriculography versus cardiac magnetic resonance for determination of left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Rainer; von Bardeleben, Stephan; Barletta, Giuseppe; Pasques, Agnes; Kasprzak, Jaroslaw; Greis, Christian; Becher, Harald

    2014-01-15

    Contrast enhancement has been shown to improve detection of regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) in 2-dimensional (2D) echocardiography. This study determined the use of contrast enhancement in the setting of 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography for definition of left ventricular RWMA compared with 2D echocardiography, cineventriculography, and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). In 63 patients, unenhanced and contrast-enhanced (SonoVue; Bracco Imaging S.p.A., Milan, Italy) 2D and 3D echocardiographies, CMR, and cineventriculography were performed. Hypokinesia in ≥1 segment defined the presence of RWMA. Interreader agreement (IRA) between 2 blinded off-site readers on presence of RWMA was determined within each imaging technique. Intermethod agreement among imaging techniques was analyzed. A standard of truth for the presence of RWMA was obtained by an independent expert panel decision. IRA on presence of RWMA expressed as Cohen's κ coefficient was 0.27 for unenhanced 3D echocardiography, 0.40 for unenhanced 2D echocardiography, 0.57 for CMR, and 0.51 for cineventriculography. The use of contrast increased IRA on RWMA to 0.42 for 3D echocardiography and to 0.56 for 2D echocardiography. Agreement with CMR on RWMA increased for 3D echocardiography when contrast enhancement was used (κ 0.40 vs 0.22 for unenhanced 3D echocardiography). Similarly, agreement of 2D echocardiography with CMR on RWMA increased with contrast enhancement (κ 0.50 vs 0.32). Accuracy to detect expert panel-defined RWMA was highest for CMR (84%) followed by 2D contrast echocardiography (78%) and 3D contrast echocardiography (76%). It was lesser for 2D and 3D unenhanced echocardiographies. In conclusion, analysis of RWMA is characterized by considerable interreader variability even using high-quality imaging techniques. IRA on RWMA is lower with 3D echocardiography compared with 2D echocardiography. IRA on RWMA and accuracy to detect panel-defined RWMA improve with contrast enhancement

  4. Cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quan; Chen, Dongmei; Wang, Yonggang; Zhao, Xin; Zheng, Yang

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the distribution characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves and to explore the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia. DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed for papers examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerves, using heart, autonomic nerve, sympathetic nerve, vagus nerve, nerve distribution, rhythm and atrial fibrillation as the key words. SELECTION CRITERIA: A total of 165 studies examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerve were screened, and 46 of them were eventually included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The distribution and characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves were observed, and immunohistochemical staining was applied to determine the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase (main markers of cardiac autonomic nerve distribution). In addition, the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and cardiac arrhythmia was investigated. RESULTS: Cardiac autonomic nerves were reported to exhibit a disordered distribution in different sites, mainly at the surface of the cardiac atrium and pulmonary vein, forming a ganglia plexus. The distribution of the pulmonary vein autonomic nerve was prominent at the proximal end rather than the distal end, at the upper left rather than the lower right, at the epicardial membrane rather than the endocardial membrane, at the left atrium rather than the right atrium, and at the posterior wall rather than the anterior wall. The main markers used for cardiac autonomic nerves were tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase. Protein gene product 9.5 was used to label the immunoreactive nerve distribution, and the distribution density of autonomic nerves was determined using a computer-aided morphometric analysis system. CONCLUSION: The uneven distribution of the cardiac autonomic nerves is the leading cause of the occurrence of arrhythmia, and the cardiac autonomic nerves play an important role in

  5. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Andrew P.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  6. Cardiac output and cardiac contractility by impedance cardiography during exercise of runners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubicek, W. G.; Tracy, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Most of the solid state electronic engineering of the system now generally known as the Minnesota Impedance Cardiograph was performed with the support of a five-year contract, NAS9-4500, with the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. This contract ran from 1965 to 1970. In addition to the engineering design and development of the hardware, the contract called for testing on both animals and human subjects. This project also provided funds to construct twenty impedance cardiographs and place them in selected research and clinical facilities for further evaluation. This, then, led to the First Symposium on Impedance Cardiography, held at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, 2-4 June 1969. Twenty-four excellent papers were presented.

  7. Mammalian clock output mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Yi, Chun-Xia; Cailotto, Cathy; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Buijs, Ruud M

    2011-06-30

    In mammals many behaviours (e.g. sleep-wake, feeding) as well as physiological (e.g. body temperature, blood pressure) and endocrine (e.g. plasma corticosterone concentration) events display a 24 h rhythmicity. These 24 h rhythms are induced by a timing system that is composed of central and peripheral clocks. The highly co-ordinated output of the hypothalamic biological clock not only controls the daily rhythm in sleep-wake (or feeding-fasting) behaviour, but also exerts a direct control over many aspects of hormone release and energy metabolism. First, we present the anatomical connections used by the mammalian biological clock to enforce its endogenous rhythmicity on the rest of the body, especially the neuro-endocrine and energy homoeostatic systems. Subsequently, we review a number of physiological experiments investigating the functional significance of this neuro-anatomical substrate. Together, this overview of experimental data reveals a highly specialized organization of connections between the hypothalamic pacemaker and neuro-endocrine system as well as the pre-sympathetic and pre-parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system.

  8. Regulation of central blood volume and cardiac filling in endurance athletes: the Frank-Starling mechanism as a determinant of orthostatic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Levine, B D

    1993-06-01

    Orthostatic intolerance may result from either an abnormally large postural decrease in central blood volume, cardiac filling pressures, and stroke volume, or inadequate neurohumoral responses to orthostasis. Endurance athletes have been reported as having a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance, which has been attributed primarily to abnormalities in baroreflex regulation of heart rate and peripheral resistance. In this review, we present evidence that athletes also have structural changes in the cardiovascular system that although beneficial during exercise, lead to an excessively large decrease in stroke volume during orthostasis and contribute to orthostatic intolerance. A unifying hypothesis based on cardiac mechanics that may explain the divergence of findings in conditions such as bed rest or spaceflight, and short- and long-term endurance training is presented.

  9. Regulation of central blood volume and cardiac filling in endurance athletes: the Frank-Starling mechanism as a determinant of orthostatic tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance may result from either an abnormally large postural decrease in central blood volume, cardiac filling pressures, and stroke volume, or inadequate neurohumoral responses to orthostasis. Endurance athletes have been reported as having a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance, which has been attributed primarily to abnormalities in baroreflex regulation of heart rate and peripheral resistance. In this review, we present evidence that athletes also have structural changes in the cardiovascular system that although beneficial during exercise, lead to an excessively large decrease in stroke volume during orthostasis and contribute to orthostatic intolerance. A unifying hypothesis based on cardiac mechanics that may explain the divergence of findings in conditions such as bed rest or spaceflight, and short- and long-term endurance training is presented.

  10. Loss of Lung Health from Young Adulthood and Cardiac Phenotypes in Middle Age

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Laura A.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Lima, Joao; Kishi, Satoru; Arynchyn, Alexander; Jacobs, David R.; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Liu, Kiang; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Kalhan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic lung diseases are associated with cardiovascular disease. How these associations evolve from young adulthood forward is unknown. Understanding the preclinical history of these associations could inform prevention strategies for common heart-lung conditions. Objectives: To use the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study to explore the development of heart-lung interactions. Methods: We analyzed cardiac structural and functional measurements determined by echocardiography at Year 25 of CARDIA and measures of pulmonary function over 20 years in 3,000 participants. Measurements and Main Results: Decline in FVC from peak was associated with larger left ventricular mass (β = 6.05 g per SD of FVC decline; P < 0.0001) and greater cardiac output (β = 0.109 L/min per SD of FVC decline; P = 0.001). Decline in FEV1/FVC ratio was associated with smaller left atrial internal dimension (β = −0.038 cm per SD FEV1/FVC decline; P < 0.0001) and lower cardiac output (β = −0.070 L/min per SD of FEV1/FVC decline; P = 0.03). Decline in FVC was associated with diastolic dysfunction (odds ratio, 3.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.37–8.36; P = 0.006). Conclusions: Patterns of loss of lung health are associated with specific cardiovascular phenotypes in middle age. Decline in FEV1/FVC ratio is associated with underfilling of the left heart and low cardiac output. Decline in FVC with preserved FEV1/FVC ratio is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Cardiopulmonary interactions apparent with common complex heart and lung diseases evolve concurrently from early adulthood forward. PMID:25876160

  11. Cardiac xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    DiSesa, V J

    1997-12-01

    Heart failure is an important medical and public health problem. Although medical therapy is effective for many people, the only definitive therapy is heart transplantation, which is limited severely by the number of donors. Mechanical devices presently are used as "bridges" to transplantation. Their widespread use may solve the donor shortage problem, but at present, mechanical devices are limited by problems related to blood clotting, power supply, and foreign body infection. Cardiac xenotransplantation using animal donors is a potential biologic solution to the donor organ shortage. The immune response, consisting of hyperacute rejection, acute vascular rejection, and cellular rejection, currently prevents clinical xenotransplantation. Advances in the solution of these problems have been made using conventional immunosuppressive drugs and newer agents whose use is based on an understanding of important steps in xenoimmunity. The most exciting approaches use tools of molecular biology to create genetically engineered donors and to induce states of donor and recipient bone marrow chimerism and tolerance in xenogeneic organ recipients. The successful future strategy may use a combination of a genetically engineered donor and a chimeric recipient with or without nonspecific immunosuppressive drugs.

  12. Cardiac Function Remains Impaired Despite Reversible Cardiac Remodeling after Acute Experimental Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Gotzhein, Frauke; Escher, Felicitas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Westermann, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Background. Infection with Coxsackievirus B3 induces myocarditis. We aimed to compare the acute and chronic phases of viral myocarditis to identify the immediate effects of cardiac inflammation as well as the long-term effects after resolved inflammation on cardiac fibrosis and consequently on cardiac function. Material and Methods. We infected C57BL/6J mice with Coxsackievirus B3 and determined the hemodynamic function 7 as well as 28 days after infection. Subsequently, we analyzed viral burden and viral replication in the cardiac tissue as well as the expression of cytokines and matrix proteins. Furthermore, cardiac fibroblasts were infected with virus to investigate if viral infection alone induces profibrotic signaling. Results. Severe cardiac inflammation was determined and cardiac fibrosis was consistently colocalized with inflammation during the acute phase of myocarditis. Declined cardiac inflammation but no significantly improved hemodynamic function was observed 28 days after infection. Interestingly, cardiac fibrosis declined to basal levels as well. Both cardiac inflammation and fibrosis were reversible, whereas the hemodynamic function remains impaired after healed viral myocarditis in C57BL/6J mice. PMID:28352641

  13. Small fields output factors measurements and correction factors determination for several detectors for a CyberKnife{sup Registered-Sign} and linear accelerators equipped with microMLC and circular cones

    SciTech Connect

    Bassinet, C.; Huet, C.; Derreumaux, S.; Baumann, M.; Trompier, F.; Roch, P.; Clairand, I.; Brunet, G.; Gaudaire-Josset, S.; Chea, M.; Boisserie, G.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The use of small photon fields is now an established practice in stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. However, due to a lack of lateral electron equilibrium and high dose gradients, it is difficult to accurately measure the dosimetric quantities required for the commissioning of such systems. Moreover, there is still no metrological dosimetric reference for this kind of beam today. In this context, the first objective of this work was to determine and to compare small fields output factors (OF) measured with different types of active detectors and passive dosimeters for three types of facilities: a CyberKnife{sup Registered-Sign} system, a dedicated medical linear accelerator (Novalis) equipped with m3 microMLC and circular cones, and an adaptive medical linear accelerator (Clinac 2100) equipped with an additional m3 microMLC. The second one was to determine the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors introduced in a recently proposed small field dosimetry formalism for different active detectors.Methods: Small field sizes were defined either by microMLC down to 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 mm{sup 2} or by circular cones down to 4 mm in diameter. OF measurements were performed with several commercially available active detectors dedicated to measurements in small fields (high resolution diodes: IBA SFD, Sun Nuclear EDGE, PTW 60016, PTW 60017; ionizing chambers: PTW 31014 PinPoint chamber, PTW 31018 microLion liquid chamber, and PTW 60003 natural diamond). Two types of passive dosimeters were used: LiF microcubes and EBT2 radiochromic films.Results: Significant differences between the results obtained by several dosimetric systems were observed, particularly for the smallest field size for which the difference in the measured OF reaches more than 20%. For passive dosimeters, an excellent agreement was observed (better than 2%) between EBT2 and LiF microcubes

  14. High-output heart failure in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Maria Inês; Moniz, Marta; Ferreira, Sofia; Goulão, Augusto; Barroso, Rosalina

    2012-01-01

    High-output cardiac failure is rare in newborns. Emergent diagnosis and management of this pathology is crucial. We report the case of a child, currently 12-months old; obstetric background is non-contributory. Clinic observation on D1 was normal except for the presence of a systolic cardiac murmur; cardiological evaluation revealed mild ventricular dysfunction of the right ventricle. On the third day of life, she developed cardiac failure with gallop rhythm, hepatomegaly and a murmur in the anterior fontanel; an echocardiogram confirmed clinic aggravation with biventricular dysfunction and right cavities and superior vena cava dilatation. The cranial MRI confirmed the presence of a pial arteriovenous malformation (AVM) involving the anterior and middle cerebral arteries with an associated fronto-parietal ischaemic lesion. The infant underwent embolisations of AVM with successful flow reduction and cardiac failure improvement. The multidisciplinary follow-up showed no cardiac dysfunction or permanent lesions but confirmed a severe psycho-motor delay and left hemiparesia. PMID:22783011

  15. What Limits Cardiac Performance during Exercise in Normal Subjects and in Healthy Fontan Patients?

    PubMed Central

    La Gerche, André; Gewillig, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Exercise is an important determinant of health but is significantly reduced in the patient with a univentricular circulation. Normal exercise physiology mandates an increase in pulmonary artery pressures which places an increased work demand on the right ventricle (RV). In a biventricular circulation with pathological increases in pulmonary vascular resistance and/or reductions in RV function, exercise-induced augmentation of cardiac output is limited. Left ventricular preload reserve is dependent upon flow through the pulmonary circulation and this requires adequate RV performance. In the Fontan patient, the reasons for exercise intolerance are complex. In those patients with myocardial dysfunction or other pathologies of the circulatory components, it is likely that these abnormalities serve as a limitation to cardiac performance during exercise. However, in the healthy Fontan patient, it may be the absence of a sub-pulmonary pump which limits normal increases in pulmonary pressures, trans-pulmonary flow requirements and cardiac output. If so, performance will be exquisitely dependent on pulmonary vascular resistance. This provides a potential explanation as to why pulmonary vasodilators may improve exercise tolerance. As has recently been demonstrated, these agents may offer an important new treatment strategy which directly addresses the physiological limitations in the Fontan patient. PMID:20871839

  16. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  17. CMOS output buffer wave shaper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, L.; Whitaker, S.; Merrell, R.

    1990-01-01

    As the switching speeds and densities of Digital CMOS integrated circuits continue to increase, output switching noise becomes more of a problem. A design technique which aids in the reduction of switching noise is reported. The output driver stage is analyzed through the use of an equivalent RLC circuit. The results of the analysis are used in the design of an output driver stage. A test circuit based on these techniques is being submitted to MOSIS for fabrication.

  18. Pharmacology of cardiac potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Gui-Rong; Dong, Ming-Qing

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac K(+) channels are cardiomyocyte membrane proteins that regulate K(+) ion flow across the cell membrane on the electrochemical gradient and determine the resting membrane potential and the cardiac action potential morphology and duration. Several K(+) channels have been well studied in the human heart. They include the transient outward K(+) current I(to1), the ultra-rapidly activating delayed rectifier current I(Kur), the rapidly and slowly activating delayed rectifier currents I(Kr) and I(Ks), the inward rectifier K(+) current I(K1), and ligand-gated K(+) channels, including adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K(+) current (I(KATP)) and acetylcholine-activated current (I(KACh)). Regional differences of K(+) channel expression contribute to the variable morphologies and durations of cardiac action potentials from sinus node and atrial to ventricular myocytes, and different ventricular layers from endocardium and midmyocardium to epicardium. They also show different responses to endogenous regulators and/or pharmacological agents. K(+) channels are well-known targets for developing novel anti-arrhythmic drugs that can effectively prevent/inhibit cardiac arrhythmias. Especially, atrial-specific K(+) channel currents (I(Kur) and I(KACh)) are the targets for developing atrial-selective anti-atrial fibrillation drugs, which has been greatly progressed in recent years. This chapter concentrates on recent advances in intracellular signaling regulation and pharmacology of cardiac K(+) channels under physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  19. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  20. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1-3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling.

  1. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na+/K+-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1–3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na+/K+-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na+/K+-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling. PMID:27667975

  2. The Prognostic Value of Using Ultrasonography in Cardiac Resuscitation of Patients with Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bolvardi, Ehsan; Pouryaghobi, Seyyed Mohsen; Farzane, Roohye; Chokan, Niaz Mohamad Jafari; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Reihani, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest is the final result of many diseases and therefore, need for a careful implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) protocols in these cases is undeniably important. The introduction of ultrasound into the emergency department has potentially allowed the addition of an extra data point in the decision about when to cease cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of cardiac ultrasonography performed by emergency physicians to predict resuscitation outcome in adult cardiac arrest patients. Ultrasonographic examination of the subxiphoid cardiac area was made immediately after admission to the emergency department with pulseless cardiac arrest. Sonographic cardiac activity was defined as any detectable motion within the heart including the atria, ventricles or valves. Successful resuscitation was defined as: return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min; return of breathing; palpable pulse; measurable blood pressure. The present study includes 159 patients. The presence of sonographic cardiac activity at the beginning of resuscitation was significantly associated with a successful outcome (41/49 [83.7%] versus 15/110 [13.6%] patients without cardiac activity at the beginning of resuscitation). Ultrasonographic detection of cardiac activity may be useful in determining prognosis during cardiac arrest. Further studies are needed to elucidate the predictive value of ultrasonography in cardiac arrest patients. PMID:27829827

  3. Effect of N-2-mercaptopropionyl glycine on exercise-induced cardiac adaptations.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Matthew J; Harris, M Brennan; Boluyt, Marvin O; Hwang, Hyun Seok; Starnes, Joseph W

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that exercise-induced cardiac adaptations would be attenuated by the free radical scavenger N-2-mercaptopropionyl glycine (MPG). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups (n = 9-13 per group) for 3-4 wk: sedentary (S), S+MPG (100 mg/kg ip daily), exercised on a treadmill (E) (60 min/day, 5 days/wk, at a speed of 20 m/min up a 6° grade in a 6°C room), or E+MPG given 10 min prior to exercise. Additional rats (n = 55) were used to determine acute exercise effects on myocardial redox state [nonprotein nonglutathione sulfhydryls (NPNGSH)] and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation. Compared with S, NPNGSH levels were 48% lower in E (P < 0.05) and unchanged in E+MPG (P > 0.05). MPG also attenuated exercise-induced activation of the signaling proteins Akt and S6. Hearts from the 4-wk groups were weighed, and cardiac function was evaluated using an isolated perfused working heart preparation. Similar increases (P < 0.05) in both exercised groups were observed for heart weight and heart weight-to-body weight ratio. Cardiac function improved in E vs. S, as indicated by greater (P < 0.05) external work performed (cardiac output × systolic pressure) and efficiency of external work (work/Vo(2)). MPG prevented these exercise-induced functional improvements. Skeletal muscle mitochondria content increased to similar levels in E and E+MPG. This study provides evidence that free radicals do not play an essential role in the development of exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy; however, they appear to be involved in functional cardiac adaptations, which may be mediated through the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  4. Electrochemistry in Organisms: Electron Flow and Power Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chirpich, Thomas P.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a series of calculations, appropriate for the freshman level, to determine the flow of electrons to oxygen along the electron transport chain. States that living organisms resemble fuel cells and develops calculations for determining power output. (GS)

  5. Cardiac tamponade (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiac tamponade is a condition involving compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the space ... they cannot adequately fill or pump blood. Cardiac tamponade is an emergency condition that requires hospitalization.

  6. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system's electrical activity in the heart.

  7. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  8. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  9. Neurons within the same network independently achieve conserved output by differentially balancing variable conductance magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Ransdell, Joseph L; Nair, Satish S; Schulz, David J

    2013-06-12

    Biological and theoretical evidence suggest that individual neurons may achieve similar outputs by differentially balancing variable underlying ionic conductances. Despite the substantial amount of data consistent with this idea, a direct biological demonstration that cells with conserved output, particularly within the same network, achieve these outputs via different solutions has been difficult to achieve. Here we demonstrate definitively that neurons from native neural networks with highly similar output achieve this conserved output by differentially tuning underlying conductance magnitudes. Multiple motor neurons of the crab (Cancer borealis) cardiac ganglion have highly conserved output within a preparation, despite showing a 2-4-fold range of conductance magnitudes. By blocking subsets of these currents, we demonstrate that the remaining conductances become unbalanced, causing disparate output as a result. Therefore, as strategies to understand neuronal excitability become increasingly sophisticated, it is important that such variability in excitability of neurons, even among those within the same individual, is taken into account.

  10. Vagal tone regulates cardiac shunts during activity and at low temperatures in the South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus.

    PubMed

    Filogonio, Renato; Wang, Tobias; Taylor, Edwin W; Abe, Augusto S; Leite, Cléo A C

    2016-12-01

    The undivided ventricle of non-crocodilian reptiles allows for intracardiac admixture of oxygen-poor and oxygen-rich blood returning via the atria from the systemic circuit and the lungs. The distribution of blood flow between the systemic and pulmonary circuits may vary, based on differences between systemic and pulmonary vascular conductances. The South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus, has a single pulmonary artery, innervated by the left vagus. Activity in this nerve controls pulmonary conductance so that left vagotomy abolishes this control. Experimental left vagotomy to abolish cardiac shunting had no effect on long-term survival and failed to identify a functional role in determining metabolic rate, growth or resistance to food deprivation. Accordingly, the present investigation sought to evaluate the extent to which cardiac shunt patterns are actively controlled during changes in body temperature and activity levels. We compared hemodynamic parameters between intact and left-vagotomized rattlesnakes held at different temperatures and subjected to enforced physical activity. Increased temperature and enforced activity raised heart rate, cardiac output, pulmonary and systemic blood flow in both groups, but net cardiac shunt was reversed in the vagotomized group at lower temperatures. We conclude that vagal control of pulmonary conductance is an active mechanism regulating cardiac shunts in C. durissus.

  11. Sulfide intoxication induced circulatory failure is mediated by a depression in cardiac contractility

    PubMed Central

    Sonobe, Takashi; Haouzi, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) intoxication produces a rapid cardio-circulatory failure leading to cardiac arrest. In non-lethal forms of sulfide exposure, the presence of a circulatory shock is associated with long-term neurological sequelae. Our aim was to clarify the mechanisms of H2S-induced circulatory failure. In anesthetized paralyzed and mechanically ventilated rats, cardiac output, arterial pressure and ventricular pressures were determined while NaHS was infused to increase arterial concentration of soluble H2S (CgH2S) from undetectable to levels leading to circulatory failure. Compared to control/saline infusion, blood pressure started to decrease significantly along with a modest drop in peripheral vascular resistance (-19 ± 5%, P<0.01), when CgH2S reached about 1 microM. As CgH2S exceeded 2-3 microM, parameters of ventricular contractility diminished with no further reduction in peripheral resistance. Whenever H2S exposure was maintained at a higher level (CgH2S over 7 microM), a clear inhibition of cardiac contractility was observed, leading to asystole within minutes, but with no evidence of peripheral vasoplegia. The immediate and long-term neurological effects of specifically counteracting sulfide induced cardiac contractility depression following H2S exposure remain to be investigated. PMID:25616319

  12. Respiration as a reliable physiological sensor for controlling cardiac pacing rate.

    PubMed

    Rossi, P; Plicchi, G; Canducci, G; Rognoni, G; Aina, F

    1984-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine whether variations in the respiration rate during physical exercise could be used as a physiological variable in controlling the rate of an implanted pacemaker. The relation between respiration rate and heart rate was significantly correlated in 73 patients (19 with normal lung function, four with restrictive pulmonary disease, and 50 with obstructive airways disease) during repeated calibrated ergometric tests; no significant differences were found between the subgroups. An external computerised programmable system with algorithm control activated by a radio frequency system was used to vary the cardiac stimulation rate in relation to respiration rate in 11 patients implanted with ventricular inhibited pacemakers. In addition, a prototype programmable pacemaker dependent on respiration rate was implanted in two patients. Maximum values of oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, and work time were increased during the exercise stress tests when the variable cardiac pacing rate was used. Thus respiration rate appears to be a valid and stable physiological variable for controlling the cardiac stimulation rate in order to improve cardiac output in patients dependent on pacemakers.

  13. [Hemodynamic control by optimization of the cardiac pump].

    PubMed

    Metry, S; Fromageot, C; Brocas, J; Cherruault, Y; Guillez, A; Lelong, F

    1981-11-01

    Transport of energy appears as the ultimate finality of the force convection cardiovascular system. Blood pressure cardiac output and vascular resistances are the three major components of the circulatory system. Among them, blood pressure is regarded as the regulated parameter whose control value is the best adapted parameter, to each kind of activity, neurogenic mechanisms. The authors, considering the physiological variations of blood pressure during increasing energetic loads imposed on the organism, propose a new control function: optimization of cardiac mechanical power necessary to assure convection of the energy needed by the organism. Blood pressure is no more regarded as a constant. Simultaneous changes in cardiac output and blood pressure are both significant, adjusted to realize energetic minimisation of the cardiac pump. This cardiovascular regulation is described by a system of equations whose resolution leads to results in good accordance with physiological data.

  14. Collector-Output Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glandorf, D. R.; Phillips, Robert F., II

    1986-01-01

    Collector-Output Analysis Program (COAP) programmer's aid for analyzing output produced by UNIVAC collector (MAP processor). COAP developed to aid in design of segmentation structures for programs with large memory requirements and numerous elements but of value in understanding relationships among components of any program. Crossreference indexes and supplemental information produced. COAP written in FORTRAN 77.

  15. Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dunham, Mark E.; Morley, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

  16. The effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Houghton, David; Jones, Thomas W; Cassidy, Sophie; Siervo, Mario; MacGowan, Guy A; Trenell, Michael I; Jakovljevic, Djordje G

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cardiac and vascular function are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to define the effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function. Haemodynamic and gas exchange measurements were performed at rest and peak exercise in healthy individuals. Augmentation index was measured at rest. Cardiac power output, a measure of overall cardiac function, was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Augmentation index was significantly higher in older than younger participants (27.7 ± 10.1 vs. 2.5 ± 10.1%, P<0.01). Older people demonstrated significantly higher stroke volume and mean arterial blood pressure (P<0.05), but lower heart rate (145 ± 13 vs. 172 ± 10 beats/min, P<0.01) and peak oxygen consumption (22.5 ± 5.2 vs. 41.2 ± 8.4 ml/kg/min, P<0.01). There was a significant negative relationship between augmentation index and peak exercise cardiac power output (r=-0.73, P=0.02) and cardiac output (r=-0.69, P=0.03) in older participants. Older people maintain maximal cardiac function due to increased stroke volume. Vascular function is a strong predictor of overall cardiac function in older but in not younger people.

  17. Revisiting Cardiac Cellular Composition

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Alexander R.; Ilinykh, Alexei; Ivey, Malina J.; Kuwabara, Jill T.; D'Antoni, Michelle L.; Debuque, Ryan; Chandran, Anjana; Wang, Lina; Arora, Komal; Rosenthal, Nadia; Tallquist, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Accurate knowledge of the cellular composition of the heart is essential to fully understand the changes that occur during pathogenesis and to devise strategies for tissue engineering and regeneration. Objective To examine the relative frequency of cardiac endothelial cells, hematopoietic-derived cells and fibroblasts in the mouse and human heart. Methods and Results Using a combination of genetic tools and cellular markers, we examined the occurrence of the most prominent cell types in the adult mouse heart. Immunohistochemistry revealed that endothelial cells constitute over 60%, hematopoietic-derived cells 5–10%, and fibroblasts under 20% of the non-myocytes in the heart. A refined cell isolation protocol and an improved flow cytometry approach provided an independent means of determining the relative abundance of non-myocytes. High dimensional analysis and unsupervised clustering of cell populations confirmed that endothelial cells are the most abundant cell population. Interestingly, fibroblast numbers are smaller than previously estimated, and two commonly assigned fibroblast markers, Sca-1 and CD90, underrepresent fibroblast numbers. We also describe an alternative fibroblast surface marker that more accurately identifies the resident cardiac fibroblast population. Conclusions This new perspective on the abundance of different cell types in the heart demonstrates that fibroblasts comprise a relatively minor population. By contrast, endothelial cells constitute the majority of non-cardiomyocytes and are likely to play a greater role in physiologic function and response to injury than previously appreciated. PMID:26635390

  18. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  19. Multi-output differential technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidare, Srinivas R.

    1997-01-01

    A differential is a very old and proven mechanical device that allows a single input to be split into two outputs having equal torque irrespective of the output speeds. A standard differential is capable of providing only two outputs from a single input. A recently patented multi-output differential technology known as `Plural-Output Differential' allows a single input to be split into many outputs. This new technology is the outcome of a systematic study of complex gear trains (Bidare 1992). The unique feature of a differential (equal torque at different speeds) can be applied to simplify the construction and operation of many complex mechanical devices that require equal torque's or forces at multiple outputs. It is now possible to design a mechanical hand with three or more fingers with equal torque. Since these finger are powered via a differential they are `mechanically intelligent'. A prototype device is operational and has been used to demonstrate the utility and flexibility of the design. In this paper we shall review two devices that utilize the new technology resulting in increased performance, robustness with reduced complexity and cost.

  20. Practical dosimetry methods for the determination of effective skin and breast dose for a modern CT system, incorporating partial irradiation and prospective cardiac gating

    PubMed Central

    Loader, R J; Gosling, O; Roobottom, C; Morgan-Hughes, G; Rowles, N

    2012-01-01

    Objective For CT coronary angiography (CTCA), a generic chest conversion factor returns a significant underestimate of effective dose. The aim of this manuscript is to communicate new dosimetry methods to calculate weighted CT dose index (CTDIw), effective dose, entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to the breast for prospectively gated CTCA. Methods CTDIw in 32 cm diameter Perspex phantom was measured using an adapted technique, accounting for the segmented scan characteristic. Gafchromic XRCT film (International Speciality Products, New Jersey, NJ) was used to measure the distribution and magnitude of ESD. Breast dose was measured using high sensitivity metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors and compared to the computer based imaging performance assessment of CT scanners (ImPACT) dosimetry calculations. Results For a typical cardiac scan the mean ESD remained broadly constant (7–9 mGy) when averaged over the circumference of the Perspex phantom. Typical absorbed dose to the breast with prospectively gated protocols was within the range 2–15 mGy. The subsequent lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence to the breast was found at 0.01–0.06 for a 20-year-old female. This compares favourably to 100 mGy (LAR ∼0.43) for a retrospectively gated CTCA. Conclusions Care must be taken when considering radiation dosimetry associated with prospectively gated scanning for CTCA and a method has been conveyed to account for this. Breast doses for prospectively gated CTCA are an order of magnitude lower than retrospectively gated scans. Optimisation of cardiac protocols is expected to show further dose reduction. PMID:21896660

  1. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  2. Matrix identity and tractional forces influence indirect cardiac reprogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yen P.; Carrion, Bita; Singh, Rahul K.; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2013-12-01

    Heart regeneration through in vivo cardiac reprogramming has been demonstrated as a possible regenerative strategy. While it has been reported that cardiac reprogramming in vivo is more efficient than in vitro, the influence of the extracellular microenvironment on cardiac reprogramming remains incompletely understood. This understanding is necessary to improve the efficiency of cardiac reprogramming in order to implement this strategy successfully. Here we have identified matrix identity and cell-generated tractional forces as key determinants of the dedifferentiation and differentiation stages during reprogramming. Cell proliferation, matrix mechanics, and matrix microstructure are also important, but play lesser roles. Our results suggest that the extracellular microenvironment can be optimized to enhance cardiac reprogramming.

  3. Cardiac Trauma: Clinical and Experimental Correlations of Myocardial Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Donald B.; Anderson, Alan E.; Rose, Earl F.; Go, Raymundo T.; Chiu, Chiang L.; Ehrenhaft, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Clinical and experimental observations in myocardial contusion have been correlated. Cardiac arrhythmia is always an important consequence and may be fatal. Reduction in cardiac output often accompanies significant cardiac injury. The coronary arterial circulation is not interrupted and is generally enhanced to the area of injury. Healing of the injury under these circulatory conditions may result in patchy scarring and peculiar adynamic areas of myocardium. Early diagnosis of myocardial contusion may be aided using radionuclide imaging with 99mTc-Sn-polyphosphate. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8. PMID:4412327

  4. CAP2 in cardiac conduction, sudden cardiac death and eye development.

    PubMed

    Field, Jeffrey; Ye, Diana Z; Shinde, Manasi; Liu, Fang; Schillinger, Kurt J; Lu, MinMin; Wang, Tao; Skettini, Michelle; Xiong, Yao; Brice, Angela K; Chung, Daniel C; Patel, Vickas V

    2015-11-30

    Sudden cardiac death kills 180,000 to 450,000 Americans annually, predominantly males. A locus that confers a risk for sudden cardiac death, cardiac conduction disease, and a newly described developmental disorder (6p22 syndrome) is located at 6p22. One gene at 6p22 is CAP2, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein that regulates actin dynamics. To determine the role of CAP2 in vivo, we generated knockout (KO) mice. cap2(-)/cap2(-) males were underrepresented at weaning and ~70% died by 12 weeks of age, but cap2(-)/cap2(-) females survived at close to the expected levels and lived normal life spans. CAP2 knockouts resembled patients with 6p22 syndrome in that mice were smaller and they developed microphthalmia and cardiac disease. The cardiac disease included cardiac conduction disease (CCD) and, after six months of age, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), most noticeably in the males. To address the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes, we used Cre-mediated recombination to knock out CAP2 in cardiomyocytes. We found that the mice developed CCD, leading to sudden cardiac death from complete heart block, but no longer developed DCM or the other phenotypes, including sex bias. These studies establish a direct role for CAP2 and actin dynamics in sudden cardiac death and cardiac conduction disease.

  5. CAP2 in cardiac conduction, sudden cardiac death and eye development

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey; Ye, Diana Z.; Shinde, Manasi; Liu, Fang; Schillinger, Kurt J.; Lu, MinMin; Wang, Tao; Skettini, Michelle; Xiong, Yao; Brice, Angela K.; Chung, Daniel C.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death kills 180,000 to 450,000 Americans annually, predominantly males. A locus that confers a risk for sudden cardiac death, cardiac conduction disease, and a newly described developmental disorder (6p22 syndrome) is located at 6p22. One gene at 6p22 is CAP2, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein that regulates actin dynamics. To determine the role of CAP2 in vivo, we generated knockout (KO) mice. cap2−/cap2− males were underrepresented at weaning and ~70% died by 12 weeks of age, but cap2−/cap2− females survived at close to the expected levels and lived normal life spans. CAP2 knockouts resembled patients with 6p22 syndrome in that mice were smaller and they developed microphthalmia and cardiac disease. The cardiac disease included cardiac conduction disease (CCD) and, after six months of age, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), most noticeably in the males. To address the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes, we used Cre-mediated recombination to knock out CAP2 in cardiomyocytes. We found that the mice developed CCD, leading to sudden cardiac death from complete heart block, but no longer developed DCM or the other phenotypes, including sex bias. These studies establish a direct role for CAP2 and actin dynamics in sudden cardiac death and cardiac conduction disease. PMID:26616005

  6. Resolution of abnormal cardiac MRI T2 signal following immune suppression for cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Crouser, Elliott D; Ruden, Emily; Julian, Mark W; Raman, Subha V

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac MR (CMR) with late gadolinium enhancement is commonly used to detect cardiac damage in the setting of cardiac sarcoidosis. The addition of T2 mapping to CMR was recently shown to enhance cardiac sarcoidosis detection and correlates with increased cardiac arrhythmia risk. This study was conducted to determine if CMR T2 abnormalities and related arrhythmias are reversible following immune suppression therapy. A retrospective study of subjects with cardiac sarcoidosis with abnormal T2 signal on baseline CMR and a follow-up CMR study at least 4 months later was conducted at The Ohio State University from 2011 to 2015. Immune suppression treated participants had a significant reduction in peak myocardial T2 value (70.0±5.5 vs 59.2±6.1 ms, pretreatment vs post-treatment; p=0.017), and 83% of immune suppression treated subjects had objective improvement in cardiac arrhythmias. Two subjects who had received inadequate immune suppression treatment experienced progression of cardiac sarcoidosis. This report indicates that abnormal CMR T2 signal represents an acute inflammatory manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis that is potentially reversible with adequate immune suppression therapy.

  7. Output optics for laser velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H. (Inventor); Gunter, William D. (Inventor); Mcalister, Kenneth W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Space savings are effected in the optical output system of a laser velocimeter. The output system is comprised of pairs of optical fibers having output ends from which a beam of laser light emerges, a transfer lens for each light beam, and at least one final (LV) lens for receiving the light passing through the transfer lenses and for focussing that light at a common crossing point or area. In order to closely couple the transfer lenses to the final lens, each transfer lens is positioned relative to the final lens receiving light therefrom such that the output waist of the corresponding beam received by the final lens from the transfer lens is a virtual waist located before the transfer lens.

  8. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of the main results obtained during the course of research on output feedback control. The term output feedback is used to denote a controller design approach which does not rely on an observer to estimate the states of the system. Thus, the order of the controller is fixed, and can even be zero order, which amounts to constant gain ouput feedback. The emphasis has been on optimal output feedback. That is, a fixed order controller is designed based on minimizing a suitably chosen quadratic performance index. A number of problem areas that arise in this context have been addressed. These include developing suitable methods for selecting an index of performance, both time domain and frequency domain methods for achieving robustness of the closed loop system, developing canonical forms to achieve a minimal parameterization for the controller, two time scale design formulations for ill-conditioned systems, and the development of convergent numerical algorithms for solving the output feedback problem.

  9. Publish or Perish: Evaluating and Promoting Scholarly Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Min, Low Hui; Abdullah, Amelia; Mohamed, Abdul Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Scholarly output, particularly in the form of journal publication is a key indicator in various levels of university performance. It contributes to university ranking, faculty ranking and academicians' scholarship credentials. Therefore, scholarly output has become a standard measure used to determine intake, promotion and tenure renewal of…

  10. Regulation of cardiac function during a cold pressor test in athletes and untrained subjects.

    PubMed

    Ifuku, Hirotoshi; Moriyama, Kayo; Arai, Kuniko; Shiraishi-Hichiwa, Yumiko

    2007-09-01

    By using (dP/dt)/P of carotid artery pulse, a non-invasive index of cardiac contractility, we examined the regulatory mechanism of cardiac function during a cold pressor test in athletes and untrained subjects. Twenty-four healthy subjects (9 athletes, 8 untrained subjects, and 7 hyperreactors of 4 athletes and 3 untrained subjects with a rise of 15 mmHg or greater in systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure) underwent the cold pressor test according to Hines and Brown (Am Heart J 11:1-9, 1936): immersion of the right hand in 4 degrees C water for 1 min. Although mean blood pressure increased during the cold stress in all the groups, cardiac function differed. In athletes, heart rate and cardiac contractility caused cardiac output to increase while total peripheral resistance (TPR) did not change. In untrained subjects, however, heart rate and cardiac contractility tended to decrease cardiac output and thus TPR increased. In hyperreactors, heart rate and cardiac contractility increased during cold stress, and also TPR increased. After the end of the test, heart rate and cardiac contractility decreased only in untrained group. The findings that during a cold pressor test heart rate and cardiac contractility are enhanced in athletes but depressed in untrained subjects indicate that the state of physical training influences cardiac sympathetic neural reactivity to cold stress, except for hyperreactors.

  11. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  12. Renal Doppler Resistive Index as a Marker of Oxygen Supply and Demand Mismatch in Postoperative Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Francesco; Brusasco, Claudia; Paparo, Francesco; Manca, Tullio; Santori, Gregorio; Benassi, Filippo; Molardi, Alberto; Gallingani, Alan; Ramelli, Andrea; Gherli, Tiziano; Vezzani, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective. Renal Doppler resistive index (RDRI) is a noninvasive index considered to reflect renal vascular perfusion. The aim of this study was to identify the independent hemodynamic determinants of RDRI in mechanically ventilated patients after cardiac surgery. Methods. RDRI was determined in 61 patients by color and pulse Doppler ultrasonography of the interlobar renal arteries. Intermittent thermodilution cardiac output measurements were obtained and blood samples taken from the tip of pulmonary artery catheter to measure hemodynamics and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). Results. By univariate analysis, RDRI was significantly correlated with SvO2, oxygen extraction ratio, left ventricular stroke work index, and cardiac index, but not heart rate, central venous pressure, mean artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, systemic vascular resistance index, oxygen delivery index, oxygen consumption index, arterial lactate concentration, and age. However, by multivariate analysis RDRI was significantly correlated with SvO2 only. Conclusions. The present data suggests that, in mechanically ventilated patients after cardiac surgery, RDRI increases proportionally to the decrease in SvO2, thus reflecting an early vascular response to tissue hypoxia. PMID:26605339

  13. Cardiac arrhythmias in paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Chan, K Y; Loke, K Y; Yip, W C; Tay, J S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical data of patients with cardiac arrhythmias managed between May 1986 and March 1988 were reviewed to determine their mode of presentation and clinical course. Of the 5,768 admissions, 62 (1.07%) patients had arrhythmias. During the same period, 21 patients were managed as outpatients with 13 being new referrals. Thirty-eight patients had undergone corrective cardiac procedures, 8 others had congenital heart lesions, 3 were associated with acquired cardiac pathology and the remaining had isolated arrhythmias. The cardiac arrhythmias were: right bundle branch block 36, premature atrial and ventricular contractions 15, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) 15, atrioventricular (AV) block 7, sinus bradycardia 3, atrial fibrillation 2, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation 2, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome without SVT 2, bradytachyarrhythmia 1. There were 3 patients with foetal SVT, one persisting till day 1. High grade AV block occurred in 2 patients post-surgically and needed pacing. Only 2 others were symptomatic. Other than the 38 patients who underwent corrective procedures (2 had balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary stenosis), 8 others had structural heart disease. There was 1 sudden death and 5 died from their primary heart disease.

  14. Automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jane P

    2008-01-01

    The pervasive negative impact of cardiovascular disease in the United States is well documented. Although advances have been made, the campaign to reduce the occurrence, progression, and mortality continues. Determining evidence-based data is only half the battle. Implementing new and updated clinical guidelines into daily practice is a challenging task. Cardiac rehabilitation is an example of a proven intervention whose benefit is hindered through erratic implementation. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the American Heart Association (AHA) have responded to this problem by publishing the AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 Performance Measures on Cardiac Rehabilitation for Referral to and Delivery of Cardiac Rehabilitation/Secondary Prevention Services. This new national guideline recommends automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation for every eligible patient (performance measure A-1). This article offers guidance for the initiation of an automatic referral system, including individualizing your protocol with regard to electronic or paper-based order entry structures.

  15. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    correction factors for the MOSFET organ dose measurements in the following studies. Minor angular dependence (< +/-20% at all angles tested, < +/-10% at clinically relevant angles in cardiac catheterization) was observed. Second, the cardiac dose for common fluoroscopic imaging techniques for pediatric patients in the two age groups was measured. Imaging technique settings with variations of individual key imaging parameters were tested to observe the quantitative effect of imaging optimization or lack thereof. Along with each measurement, the two standard system output indices, the Air Kerma (AK) and Dose-Area Product (DAP), were also recorded and compared to the measured cardiac and skin doses -- the lack of correlation between the indices and the organ doses shed light to the substantial limitation of the indices in representing patient radiation dose, at least within the scope of this dissertation. Third, the effective dose (ED) for Posterior-Anterior and Lateral fluoroscopic imaging techniques for pediatric patients in the two age groups was determined. In addition, the dosimetric effect of removing the anti-scatter grid was studied, for which a factor-of-two ED rate reduction was observed for the imaging techniques. The Clinical Component involved analytical research to develop a validated retrospective cardiac dose reconstruction formulation and to propose the new Optimization Index which evaluates the level of optimization of the clinician's imaging usage during a procedure; and small sample group of actual procedures were used to demonstrate applicability of these formulations. In its entirety, the research represents a first-of-its-kind comprehensive approach in radiation dosimetry for pediatric cardiac catheterization; and separately, it is also modular enough that each individual section can serve as study templates for small-scale dosimetric studies of similar purposes. The data collected and algorithmic formulations developed can be of use in areas of

  16. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohamed A. A.; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction.

  17. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed A A; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-10-07

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction.

  18. Cardiac energetics: sense and nonsense.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Colin L

    2003-08-01

    1. The background to current ideas in cardiac energetics is outlined and, in the genomic era, the need is stressed for detailed knowledge of mouse heart mechanics and energetics. 2. The mouse heart is clearly different to the rat in terms of its excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and the common assumption that heart rate difference between mice and humans will account for the eightfold difference in myocardial oxygen consumption is wrong, because the energy per beat of the mouse heart is approximately one-third that of the human heart. 3. In vivo evidence suggests that there may well be an eightfold species difference in the non-beating metabolism of mice and human hearts. It is speculated that the magnitude of basal metabolism in the heart is regulatable and that, in the absence of perfusion, it falls to approximately one-quarter of its in vivo rate and that in clinical conditions, such as hibernation, it probably decreases; its magnitude may be controlled by the endothelium. 4. The active energy balance sheet is briefly discussed and it is suggested that the activation heat accounts for 20-25% of the active energy per beat and cross-bridge turnover accounts for the balance. It is argued that force, not shortening, is the major determinant of cardiac energy usage. 5. The outcome of recent cardiac modelling with variants of the Huxley and Hill/Eisenberg models is described. It has been necessary to invoke 'loose coupling' to replicate the low cardiac energy flux measured at low afterloads (medium to high velocities of shortening). 6. Lastly, some of the unexplained or 'nonsense' energetic data are outlined and eight unsolved problems in cardiac energetics are discussed.

  19. Relation between strain dyssynchrony index determined by comprehensive assessment using speckle-tracking imaging and long-term outcome after cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Matsumoto, Kensuke; Kaneko, Akihiro; Tsuji, Takayuki; Ryo, Keiko; Fukuda, Yuko; Norisada, Kazuko; Onishi, Tetsuari; Yoshida, Akihiro; Kawai, Hiroya; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2012-04-15

    Strain dyssynchrony index (SDI), which was a marker of dyssynchrony and residual myocardial contractility, can predict left ventricular reverse remodeling short-term after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). We investigated SDI-predicted long-term outcome after CRT in patients with heart failure (HF). We studied 74 patients with HF who underwent CRT. SDI was calculated as the average difference between peak and end-systolic strain from 6 segments for radial and circumferential SDIs and 18 segments for longitudinal SDI using 2-dimensional speckle-tracking strain. Based on our previous findings, the predefined cutoff for significant dyssynchrony and residual myocardial contractility was a radial SDI ≥6.5%, a circumferential SDI ≥3.2%, and a longitudinal SDI ≥3.6%. The predefined principal outcome variable was the combined end point of death or hospitalization owing to deteriorating HF. Long-term follow-up after CRT was tracked over 4 years. The primary end point of prespecified events occurred in 14 patients (19%). An association with a favorable long-term outcome after CRT was observed in patients with significant radial, circumferential, and longitudinal SDIs (p <0.001, <0.005, and 0.010 vs patients without significant SDIs, respectively). Furthermore, cardiovascular event-free rate after CRT in patients with positivity of 3 for the 3 SDIs was 100% better than that in patients with positivity of 1 (52%, p <0.005) or 0 (31%, p <0.001) for the 3 SDIs. In conclusion, SDIs can successfully predict long-term outcome after CRT in patients with HF. Moreover, the approach combining the 3 types of SDI leads to a more accurate prediction than the use of individual parameters. These findings may have clinical implications in patients with CRT.

  20. Quantifying PV power Output Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Thomas E.; Perez, Richard

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents a novel approach to rigorously quantify power Output Variability from a fleet of photovoltaic (PV) systems, ranging from a single central station to a set of distributed PV systems. The approach demonstrates that the relative power Output Variability for a fleet of identical PV systems (same size, orientation, and spacing) can be quantified by identifying the number of PV systems and their Dispersion Factor. The Dispersion Factor is a new variable that captures the relationship between PV Fleet configuration, Cloud Transit Speed, and the Time Interval over which variability is evaluated. Results indicate that Relative Output Variability: (1) equals the inverse of the square root of the number of systems for fully dispersed PV systems; and (2) could be further minimized for optimally-spaced PV systems. (author)

  1. Return of Viable Cardiac Function After Sonographic Cardiac Standstill in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Katherine; Thompson, W Reid; Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Su, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Sonographic cardiac standstill during adult cardiac arrest is associated with failure to get return to spontaneous circulation. This report documents 3 children whose cardiac function returned after standstill with extracorporeal membranous oxygenation. Sonographic cardiac standstill may not predict cardiac death in children.

  2. [Prevalence of supraventricular tachycardia and tachyarrhythmias in resuscitated cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Brembilla-Perrot, B; Marcon, O; Blangy, H; Terrier de la Chaise, A; Louis, P; Sadoul, N; Claudon, O; Nippert, M; Popovic, B; Belhakem, H

    2006-01-01

    Supraventricular arrhythmias are considered to be benign when the ventricular rate is slowed and treated by anticoagulants. The aim of this study was to determine the possible influence of these arrhythmias in resuscitated cardiac arrest. Between 1980 and 2002, 151 patients were admitted after a cardiac arrest. Supraventricular arrhythrmias were identified as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest in 21 patients. They underwent echocardiography, exercise stress test, Holter ECG monitoring , coronary angiography and electrophysiological investigation. After these investigations, three patients had a malignant form of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, two were asymptomatic and, in the third patient, ventricular fibrillation was induced by treatment with diltiazem. In 8 patients, a rapid supraventricular arrhythmia was considered to be the cause of cardiac arrest by cardiogenic shock; 2 patients had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 5 had severe dilated cardiomyopathy which regressed in one patient. In ten patients, cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation was provoked by a rapid (> 220 beats/min) supraventricular arrhythmia; two patients had no apparent underlying cardiac pathology. In the others, myocardial ischaemia or acute cardiac failure were considered to be the cause of the cardiac arrest. The authors conclude that rapid supraventricular arrhythmias may cause cardiac arrest either by cardiogenic shock or degenerescence to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Usually, this event occurs in patients with severe cardiac disease but it may occur in subjects without cardiac disease or by an arrhythmia-induced cardiomyopathy.

  3. Control of cardiac function and venous return in thyrotoxic calves.

    PubMed

    Gay, R; Lee, R W; Appleton, C; Olajos, M; Martin, G V; Morkin, E; Goldman, S

    1987-03-01

    The mechanisms responsible for maintenance of the high-output state associated with thyrotoxicosis have been investigated by measurement of cardiac-function curves and venous compliance during ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan. Thirteen calves were injected daily with L-thyroxine (200 micrograms/kg) for 12-14 days. Thyroxine treatment increased heart rate (70%), left ventricular systolic pressure (22%), cardiac output (120%), left ventricular maximum rate of pressure development (dP/dt) (56%), and total blood volume (18%) and decreased systemic vascular resistance (39%). These hemodynamic changes persisted during ganglionic blockade or autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol. Cardiac-function curves in conscious thyrotoxic calves were displaced upward and to the left. Mean circulatory filling pressure (MCFP), measured during anesthesia, was increased from 8 +/- 1 to 12 +/- 1 mmHg. During autonomic and ganglionic blockade MCFP remained elevated after treatment with thyroxine. Venous compliance decreased from 2.1 +/- 0.2 to 1.3 +/- 0.1 ml X mmHg-1 X kg-1 after thyroxine. Unstressed vascular volume was increased from 52.3 +/- 1.1 to 67.1 +/- 0.9 ml/kg. Thus the elevated cardiac output and new cardiac-function curve in thyrotoxicosis are associated with a combination of increased inotropic state, increased blood volume, and decreased venous compliance. These effects are not the result of autonomic influences and may represent direct actions of thyroid hormone on the heart and peripheral venous circulation.

  4. The Transfer Functions of Cardiac Tissue during Stochastic Pacing

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The restitution properties of cardiac action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity (CV) are important factors in arrhythmogenesis. They determine alternans, wavebreak, and the patterns of reentrant arrhythmias. We developed a novel approach to characterize restitution using transfer functions. Transfer functions relate an input and an output quantity in terms of gain and phase shift in the complex frequency domain. We derived an analytical expression for the transfer function of interbeat intervals (IBIs) during conduction from one site (input) to another site downstream (output). Transfer functions can be efficiently obtained using a stochastic pacing protocol. Using simulations of conduction and extracellular mapping of strands of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we show that transfer functions permit the quantification of APD and CV restitution slopes when it is difficult to measure APD directly. We find that the normally positive CV restitution slope attenuates IBI variations. In contrast, a negative CV restitution slope (induced by decreasing extracellular [K+]) amplifies IBI variations with a maximum at the frequency of alternans. Hence, it potentiates alternans and renders conduction unstable, even in the absence of APD restitution. Thus, stochastic pacing and transfer function analysis represent a powerful strategy to evaluate restitution and the stability of conduction. PMID:19134481

  5. Cardiac assessment of African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Black, Peter A; Marshall, Cecilia; Seyfried, Alice W; Bartin, Anne M

    2011-03-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) at postmortem exam. To date, treatment attempts have been mostly empirical and unrewarding. The objective of this study was to determine reference cardiac values for captive African hedgehogs based on echocardiogram, electrocardiogram (ECG), and radiographs. Adult African hedgehogs with no clinical signs of cardiac disease (n = 13) were selected. Each animal was anesthetized with isoflurane via facemask and an echocardiogram, ECG, and radiographs were performed. Standard measurements were taken and the descriptive statistics performed. Values were comparable to limited data available in other hedgehog species and other similar-sized exotic species. Two animals were removed from consideration of reference values due to valvular defects that were considered significant. These data are the first establishing cardiac parameters in normal African hedgehogs using radiographic cardiac measurement, echocardiogram, and ECG. Evaluating animals with possible cardiomyopathy may allow for earlier diagnosis and more successful treatment.

  6. Pentraxin 3 Is Highly Specific for Predicting Anatomical Complexity of Coronary Artery Stenosis as Determined by the Synergy between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery Score

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Mohammad Hasan; Saadat, Habibollah; Safi, Morteza; Vakili, Hossein; Alipourparsa, Saeed; Bozorgmanesh, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that pentraxin 3 (PTX3) can have a diagnostic value for predicting anatomical complexity of coronary artery stenosis as measured by the Synergy between PCI with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX) score. Subjects and Methods We investigated the association of systemic arterial PTX3 with SYNTAX score among 500 patients with ischemic heart disease assigned to medical treatment (251), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (197), or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) (52). Results The clinical judgment of the cardiologists was near-perfectly concordant with the SYNTAX score. Mean {99% confidence intervals (CIs)} SYNTAX scores were 5.8 (5.1-6.6), 18.4 (17.1-19.8), and 33.2 (32.8-33.6) in patients assigned to medical therapy, PCI, and CABG, respectively. The AROC (95% CIs) for discriminating between patients with and without a high SYNTAX score (>23) was 0.920 (0.895-0.946) for systemic arterial levels of PTX3. As the systemic arterial level of PTX3 increased, the SYNTAX scores also increased almost in a curvilinear fashion, with the value corresponding to the SYNTAX score of 23 being 0.29 ng · dL-1. This cutpoint achieved a sensitivity of 0.66 (0.57-0.74), a specificity of 0.94 (0.91-0.96), a positive predictive value of 0.79 (0.70-0.87), and a negative predictive value of 0.89 (0.85-0.92). Conclusion We observed that systemic arterial levels of PTX3 were associated with the SYNTAX score in a curvilinear fashion. The discriminatory power of systemic arterial levels of PTX3 for a high SYNTAX score was excellent. The interesting finding of this study was the near perfect concordance between the decisions made by the cardiologists based on their clinical judgment and the SYNTAX score. The systemic arterial PTX3 level of 0.29 ng · dL-1 was highly specific for diagnosing complex coronary artery stenosis. PMID:25089133

  7. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  8. Classroom Interaction and Language Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qiaoying; Castro, Carolyn D.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of classroom interactions between a) students and students and b) students and teachers on the learning of English passivization by L1 Chinese adult learners of English as a foreign language during the language input and output treatments. In phase 1, both groups were asked to read and underline the input…

  9. Studies on Feedback Control of Cardiac Alternans

    PubMed Central

    Dubljevic, Stevan; Lin, Shien-Fong; Christofides, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    A beat-to-beat variation in the electric wave propagation morphology in myocardium is referred to as cardiac alternans and it has been linked to the onset of life threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Experimental studies have demonstrated that alternans can be annihilated by the feedback modulation of the basic pacing interval in a small piece of cardiac tissue. In this work, we study the capability of feedback control to suppress alternans both spatially and temporally in an extracted rabbit heart and in a cable of cardiac cells. This work demonstrates real-time control of cardiac alternans in an extracted rabbit heart and provides an analysis of the control methodology applied in the case of a one-dimensional (1D) cable of cardiac cells. The real-time system control is realized through feedback by proportional perturbation of the basic pacing cycle length (PCL). The measurements of the electric wave propagation are obtained by optical mapping of fluorescent dye from the surface of the heart and are fed into a custom-designed software that provides the control action signal that perturbs the basic pacing cycle length. In addition, a novel pacing protocol that avoids conduction block is applied. A numerical analysis, complementary to the experimental study is also carried out, by the ionic model of a 1D cable of cardiac cells under a self-referencing feedback protocol, which is identical to the one applied in the experimental study. Further, the amplitude of alternans linear parabolic PDE that is associated with the 1D ionic cardiac cell cable model under full state feedback control is analyzed. We provide an analysis of the amplitude of alternans parabolic PDE which admits a standard evolutionary form in a well defined functional space. Standard modal decomposition techniques are used in the analysis and the controller synthesis is carried out through pole-placement. State and output feedback controller realizations are developed and the important

  10. Liver Abnormalities in Cardiac Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Alicia M.; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is characterized by the inability of systemic perfusion to meet the body's metabolic demands and is usually caused by cardiac pump dysfunction and may occasionally present with symptoms of a noncardiac disorder such as hepatic dysfunction. The primary pathophysiology involved in hepatic dysfunction from HF is either passive congestion from increased filling pressures or low cardiac output and the consequences of impaired perfusion. Passive hepatic congestion due to increased central venous pressure may cause elevations of liver enzymes and both direct and indirect serum bilirubin. Impaired perfusion from decreased cardiac output may be associated with acute hepatocellular necrosis with marked elevations in serum aminotransferases. Cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis (“shock liver”) may ensue following an episode of profound hypotension in patients with acute HF. We discuss pathophysiology and identification of liver abnormalities that are commonly seen in patients with HF. PMID:22942628

  11. The timing of onset of mechanical systole and diastole in reference to the QRS-T complex: a study to determine performance criteria for a non-invasive diastolic timed vibration massage system in treatment of potentially unstable cardiac disorders.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harjit; Hoffmann, Andrew

    2010-12-01

    Our institution is in development of a low frequency, non-invasive Diastolic Timed Vibrator (DTV) for use in emergency treatment of ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI). It is preferable to avoid vibration emissions during the IsoVolumetric Contraction Period (IVCP) and at least the majority of mechanical systole thereafter, as systolic vibration may cause a negative inotropic effect in the ischemic heart. Furthermore diastolic vibration should preferably include the IsoVolumetric Relaxation Period (IVRP) which has been shown in clinical studies to improve cardiac performance and enhance coronary flow. Electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring can be used to enable diastolic tracking, however, the timing of the phases of the cardiac cycle in relation to the ECG waveform must first be verified. The objective of this study was therefore to determine timing of onset of mechanical systole and diastole in reference to the QRS-T Complex. One hundred and twenty-three adult echocardiographic studies were assessed for the point of mitral and aortic valve closure in relation to the QRS complex and T wave in a representative population. We found that onset of mechanical systole occurred on and usually shortly after the peak of a first dominant QRS complex deflection, and onset of diastole occurred at the earliest on and most commonly beyond the peak or midpoint of the T wave. A DTV should ideally be able to stop vibrating on or before the peak of the first dominant deflection of a QRS complex, and begin vibrating near the peak of the T wave. Given early detection of ventricular depolarization can occur 10-20 ms prior to R wave peak, it is proposed that a DTV should preferably be able to stop vibrating within 10 ms of a triggered stop command. Onset of vibration during peak of T wave could be approximated by a rate adapted Q-T interval regression equation, and then fine tuned by manual adjustment during therapy.

  12. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  13. Ultrasound imaging in teaching cardiac physiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher D; Montgomery, Laura E A; Quinn, Joe G; Roe, Sean M; Stewart, Michael T; Tansey, Etain A

    2016-09-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such as stroke volume, ejection fraction, and cardiac output. By repeating the measurements from a subject after a brief exercise period, an increase in stroke volume and ejection fraction are easily demonstrable, potentially with or without an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (which indicates preload). Thus, factors that affect cardiac performance can readily be discussed. This activity may be performed as a practical demonstration and visualized using an overhead projector or networked computers, concentrating on using the ultrasound images to teach basic physiological principles. This has proved to be highly popular with students, who reported a significant improvement in their understanding of Frank-Starling's law of the heart with ultrasound imaging.

  14. Imaging of cardiac electrical excitation conduction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D F; Jiang, S Q; Zhu, J C; Zhao, C; Yan, Y R; Gronemeyer, D; Van Leeuwen, P

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiple time windows beamformer (MTWB) method of solving the inverse problem of magnetic field and non-invasively imaging the cardiac electrical excitation conduction using the magnetocardiac signals acquired by a 61-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The MTWB constructs spatial filters for each location in source space, one for each component of the source moment based on the distributed source model, and estimates the cardiac equivalent current sources. The output of spatial filters is the source strength estimated in three-dimensional space and the weight matrix calculated with magnetocardiac signals in multiple time windows. A signal subspace projection technique is used to suppress noise. Then, the characteristics of cardiac electrical excitation conduction among two healthy subjects and two coronary vessel stenosis (CVS) patients are extracted from reconstructed current sources with maximum strength at each instant during QRS complex and ST-T segment, and a series of two-dimensional cardiac electrical excitation conduction maps (EECM) are obtained. It is demonstrated that two healthy subjects are of similar and the stronger electrical activities than those of two CVS patients. This technique can be used as an effective tool for the diagnosis of heart diseases.

  15. Cardiac arrest due to a missed diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jennifer; Spitzer, David; Phylactou, Maria; Glasser, Martin

    2016-05-06

    A 91-year-old presented with a rare cause of cardiac arrest. He was initially admitted with severe back pain following vomiting and diagnosed with probable aspiration pneumonia. On day 3 of admission, he was discovered in cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. On intubation, a left-sided pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema were noted. Needle decompression showed gastric fluid leaking from the cannula. The patient regained a cardiac output, and a subsequent CT scan confirmed a large pneumomediastinum with air tracking to the neck and chest, and bilateral pneumothoraces. A diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was made. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit but did not survive. This case demonstrates the importance of looking for and treating the rarer reversible causes of cardiac arrest, and of maintaining a high index of suspicion for Boerhaave's syndrome. Despite its rarity, Boerhaave's syndrome is often misdiagnosed on initial presentation, leading to delayed treatment and poor outcomes.

  16. The optimal hemodynamics management of post-cardiac arrest shock.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Tommaso; Sanfilippo, Filippo; Ristagno, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest develop a pathophysiological state named "post-cardiac arrest syndrome." Post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction is a common feature of this syndrome, and many patients eventually die from cardiovascular failure. Cardiogenic shock accounts for most deaths in the first 3 days, when post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction peaks. Thus, identification and treatment of cardiovascular failure is one of the key therapeutic goals during hospitalization of post-cardiac arrest patients. Patients with hemodynamic instability may require advanced cardiac output monitoring. Inotropes and vasopressors should be considered if hemodynamic goals are not achieved despite optimized preload. If these measures fail to restore adequate organ perfusion, a mechanical circulatory assistance device may be considered. Adequate organ perfusion should be ensured in the absence of definitive data on the optimal target pressure goals. Hemodynamic goals should also take into account targeted temperature management and its effect on the cardiovascular function.

  17. Influence of the coronary circulation on thermal tolerance and cardiac performance during warming in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Andreas; Axelsson, Michael; Gräns, Albin; Brijs, Jeroen; Sandblom, Erik

    2017-04-01

    Thermal tolerance in fish may be related to an oxygen limitation of cardiac function. While the hearts of some fish species receive oxygenated blood via a coronary circulation, the influence of this oxygen supply on thermal tolerance and cardiac performance during warming remain unexplored. Here, we analyzed the effect in vivo of acute warming on coronary blood flow in adult sexually mature rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) and the consequences of chronic coronary ligation on cardiac function and thermal tolerance in juvenile trout. Coronary blood flow at 10°C was higher in females than males (0.56 ± 0.08 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08 ml·min(-1)·g ventricle(-1)), and averaged 0.47 ± 0.07 ml·min(-1)·g ventricle(-1) across sexes. Warming increased coronary flow in both sexes until 14°C, at which it peaked and plateaued at 0.78 ± 0.1 and 0.61 ± 0.1 ml·min(-1)·g ventricle(-1) in females and males, respectively. Thus, the scope for increasing coronary flow was 101% in males, but only 39% in females. Coronary-ligated juvenile trout exhibited elevated heart rate across temperatures, reduced Arrhenius breakpoint temperature for heart rate (23.0 vs. 24.6°C), and reduced upper critical thermal maximum (25.3 vs. 26.3°C). To further analyze the effects of coronary flow restriction on cardiac rhythmicity, electrocardiogram characteristics were determined before and after coronary occlusion in anesthetized trout. Occlusion resulted in reduced R-wave amplitude and an elevated S-T segment, indicating myocardial ischemia, while heart rate was unaffected. This suggests that the tachycardia in ligated trout across temperatures in vivo was mainly to compensate for reduced cardiac contractility to maintain cardiac output. Moreover, our findings show that coronary flow increases with warming in a sex-specific manner. This may improve whole animal thermal tolerance, presumably by sustaining cardiac oxygenation and contractility at high temperatures.

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the blood plasma properties of cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Gwoździński, Krzysztof; Pieniążek, Anna; Czepas, Jan; Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Jegier, Anna; Pawlicki, Lucjan

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves exercise tolerance and general function. However, its effects on blood plasma in cardiac patients remain uncertain. Our aim was to examine the effect of comprehensive CR on the oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant plasma status in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) after cardiac interventions. Exercise-based rehabilitation was established as ergometer training, adjusted for individual patients' physical efficiency. Training was repeated three times a week for two months. The standard biochemical (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) and metabolic parameters (peak oxygen uptake [VO2] and peak workload) were determined. We assessed plasma viscosity, lipid peroxidation, carbonyl compounds levels, glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (ASC) levels and the non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity of plasma in 12 patients with CAD before and after CR. Parameters were examined before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 1 h later. We also compared morphological and biochemical parameters of blood, as well as other parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure (resting and exercise), VO2max and peak workload (W) before and after CR. Before CR, a significant decrease in GSH concentration was observed 1 h after exercise. Conversely, after CR, GSH, and ASC levels remained unchanged immediately after exercise. However, ASC increased after CR after exercise and 1 h later in comparison to before CR. There was a significant increase in ferric reduction ability of plasma immediately after exercise after CR, when compared with before CR. CR improved several blood biochemical parameters, peak VO2, induced an increase in systolic blood pressure peak, and patients' peak workload. After CR, improvements were detected in oxidative stress parameters, except in the level of carbonyls. These changes may contribute to the increased functional heart capacity and better tolerance to exercise and

  19. Microgyroscope with closed loop output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Cargille, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A micro-gyroscope (10) having closed loop operation by a control voltage (V.sub.TY), that is demodulated by an output signal of the sense electrodes (S1, S2), providing Coriolis torque rebalance to prevent displacement of the micro-gyroscope (10) on the output axis (y-axis). The present invention provides wide-band, closed-loop operation for a micro-gyroscope (10) and allows the drive frequency to be closely tuned to a high Q sense axis resonance. A differential sense signal (S1-S2) is compensated and fed back by differentially changing the voltage on the drive electrodes to rebalance Coriolis torque. The feedback signal is demodulated in phase with the drive axis signal (K.sub..omega..crclbar..sub.x) to produce a measure of the Coriolis force.

  20. UFO - The Universal FEYNRULES Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrande, Céline; Duhr, Claude; Fuks, Benjamin; Grellscheid, David; Mattelaer, Olivier; Reiter, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so-called Universal FEYNRULES Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a PYTHON module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the MATHEMATICA package FEYNRULES that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

  1. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Kramer, F. S.

    1985-01-01

    In designing fixed order compensators, an output feedback formulation has been adopted by suitably augmenting the system description to include the compensator states. However, the minimization of the performance index over the range of possible compensator descriptions was impeded due to the nonuniqueness of the compensator transfer function. A controller canonical form of the compensator was chosen to reduce the number of free parameters to its minimal number in the optimization. In the MIMO case, the controller form requires a prespecified set of ascending controllability indices. This constraint on the compensator structure is rather innocuous in relation to the increase in convergence rate of the optimization. Moreover, the controller form is easily relatable to a unique controller transfer function description. This structure of the compensator does not require penalizing the compensator states for a nonzero or coupled solution, a problem that occurs when following a standard output feedback synthesis formulation.

  2. Nano-JASMINE: Simulation of Data Outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Yano, T.; Hatsutori, Y.; Gouda, N.; Murooka, J.; Niwa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2011-02-01

    We simulated the data outputs of the first Japanese astrometry satellite Nano-JASMINE, which is scheduled to be launched by the Cyclone-4 rocket in August 2011. The simulations were carried out using existing stellar catalogues such as the Hipparcos catalogue, the Tycho catalogue, and the Guide Star catalogue version 2.3. Several statics are shown such as the number of stars those will be measured distances using annual aberration observations. The method for determining the initial direction of the satellite's spin axis has also been discussed. In this case, the frequency of bright stars observed by the satellite is an important factor.

  3. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment.

    PubMed

    Mankad, Rekha; Herrmann, Joerg

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001-0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  4. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mankad, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses. PMID:27600455

  5. Vocal output in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, L; Sigman, M; Cohen, S E; Parmelee, A H

    1977-11-01

    Data on vocal output of 51 preterm infants and 16 term infants were obtained during naturalistic home observations at 1, 3, and 8 months; during the administration of a preference-for-novelty paradigm in the laboratory at 8 months; and by the administration of the Gesell Developmental Schedules at 9 months. Preterm and term infant groups were found to show both similarities and differences: both groups vocalized a similar amount in the preference-for-novelty situation; both groups earned similar scores on the language subtest of the Gesell; both groups increased the percentage of awake time they spent in nondistress vocalization from 1 to 8 months. Term infants showed an earlier increase than did preterm infants: term infants significantly increased during the 1-3 month period, whereas preterm infants only increased significantly during the 3-8 month period. The developmental differences suggest a link between vocal output and perinatal conditions in that caregiver behavior was not found to be different among groups. Within the preterm groups, some relationships were found between vocal output and later test performance: infants who vocalized more during mutual gazing with the mother earned significantly higher scores on the language subtest of the Gesell.

  6. Numerical simulation of the influence of gravity and posture on cardiac performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Kristy; Ozawa, Edwin T.; Pantalos, George M.; Sharp, M. Keith

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model of the cardiovascular system was used to quantify the influences on cardiac function of intrathoracic pressure and intravascular and intraventricular hydrostatic pressure, which are fundamental biomechanical stimuli for orthostatic response. The model included a detailed arterial circulation with lumped parameter models of the atria, ventricles, pulmonary circulation, and venous circulation. The venous circulation was divided into cranial, central, and caudal regions with nonlinear compliance. Changes in intrathoracic pressure and the effects of hydrostatic pressure were simulated in supine, launch, sitting, and standing postures for 0, 1, and 1.8 G. Increasing intrathoracic pressure experienced with increasing gravity caused 12% and 14% decreases in cardiac output for 1 and 1.8 G supine, respectively, compared to 0 G. Similar results were obtained for launch posture, in which the effects of changing intrathoracic pressure dominated those of hydrostatic pressure. Compared to 0 G, cardiac output decreased 0.9% for 1 G launch and 15% for 1.8 G launch. In sitting and standing, the position of the heart above the hydrostatic indifference level caused the effects of changing hydrostatic pressure to dominate those of intrathoracic pressure. Compared to 0 G, cardiac output decreased 13% for 1 G sitting and 23% for 1.8 G sitting, and decreased 17% for 1 G standing and 31% for 1.8 G standing. For a posture change from supine to standing in 1 G, cardiac output decreased, consistent with the trend necessary to explain orthostatic intolerance in some astronauts during postflight stand tests. Simulated lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in 0 G reduced cardiac output and mean aortic pressure similar to I G standing, suggesting that LBNP provides at least some cardiovascular stimuli that may be useful in preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. A unifying concept, consistent with the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart, was that cardiac output was

  7. Numerical simulation of the influence of gravity and posture on cardiac performance.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kristy; Ozawa, Edwin T; Pantalos, George M; Sharp, M Keith

    2002-02-01

    A numerical model of the cardiovascular system was used to quantify the influences on cardiac function of intrathoracic pressure and intravascular and intraventricular hydrostatic pressure, which are fundamental biomechanical stimuli for orthostatic response. The model included a detailed arterial circulation with lumped parameter models of the atria, ventricles, pulmonary circulation, and venous circulation. The venous circulation was divided into cranial, central, and caudal regions with nonlinear compliance. Changes in intrathoracic pressure and the effects of hydrostatic pressure were simulated in supine, launch, sitting, and standing postures for 0, 1, and 1.8 G. Increasing intrathoracic pressure experienced with increasing gravity caused 12% and 14% decreases in cardiac output for 1 and 1.8 G supine, respectively, compared to 0 G. Similar results were obtained for launch posture, in which the effects of changing intrathoracic pressure dominated those of hydrostatic pressure. Compared to 0 G, cardiac output decreased 0.9% for 1 G launch and 15% for 1.8 G launch. In sitting and standing, the position of the heart above the hydrostatic indifference level caused the effects of changing hydrostatic pressure to dominate those of intrathoracic pressure. Compared to 0 G, cardiac output decreased 13% for 1 G sitting and 23% for 1.8 G sitting, and decreased 17% for 1 G standing and 31% for 1.8 G standing. For a posture change from supine to standing in 1 G, cardiac output decreased, consistent with the trend necessary to explain orthostatic intolerance in some astronauts during postflight stand tests. Simulated lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in 0 G reduced cardiac output and mean aortic pressure similar to I G standing, suggesting that LBNP provides at least some cardiovascular stimuli that may be useful in preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. A unifying concept, consistent with the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart, was that cardiac output was

  8. Cardiac alternans and intracellular calcium cycling

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Joshua N.; Blatter, Lothar A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac alternans refers to a condition in which there is a periodic beat-to-beat oscillation in electrical activity and the strength of cardiac muscle contraction at a constant heart rate. Clinically, cardiac alternans occurs in settings that are typical for cardiac arrhythmias and has been causally linked to these conditions. At the cellular level, alternans is defined as beat-to-beat alternations in contraction amplitude (mechanical alternans), action potential duration (APD; electrical or APD alternans), and Ca2+ transient amplitude (Ca2+ alternans). The cause of alternans is multifactorial, however alternans always originate from disturbances of the bi-directional coupling between membrane voltage (Vm) and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). Bi-directional coupling refers to the fact that in cardiac cells, Vm depolarization and the generation of action potentials cause the elevation of [Ca2+]i that is required for contraction (a process referred to as excitation-contraction coupling), the changes of [Ca2+]i on the other hand control Vm because important membrane currents are Ca2+-dependent. Evidence is mounting that alternans is ultimately caused by disturbances of cellular Ca2+ signaling. Here we review how two key factors of cardiac cellular Ca2+ cycling - the release of Ca2+ from internal stores and the capability of clearing the cytosol from Ca2+ after each beat - determine the conditions under which alternans occurs. The contributions from key Ca2+ handling proteins - surface membrane channels, ion pumps and transporters, and internal Ca2+ release channels - are discussed. PMID:25040398

  9. Autonomic cardiac innervation: development and adult plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these "non-classical" cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  10. Airway Management of the Cardiac Surgical Patients: Current Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Arindam; Gupta, Nishkarsh; Magoon, Rohan; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2017-01-01

    The difficult airway (DA) is a common problem encountered in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, the challenge is not only just establishment of airway but also maintaining a definitive airway for the safe conduct of cardiopulmonary bypass from initiation to weaning after surgical correction or palliation, de-airing of cardiac chambers. This review describes the management of the DA in a cardiac theater environment. The primary aims are recognition of DA both anatomical and physiological, necessary preparations for (and management of) difficult intubation and extubation. All patients undergoing cardiac surgery should initially be considered as having potentially DA as many of them have poor physiologic reserve. Making the cardiac surgical theater environment conducive to DA management is as essential as it is to deal with low cardiac output syndrome or acute heart failure. Tube obstruction and/or displacement should be suspected in case of a new onset ventilation problem, especially in the recovery unit. Cardiac anesthesiologists are often challenged with DA while inducing general endotracheal anesthesia. They ought to be familiar with the DA algorithms and possess skill for using the latest airway adjuncts. PMID:28074820

  11. [Cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial diseases].

    PubMed

    Ritzenthaler, Thomas; Luis, David; Hullin, Thomas; Fayssoil, Abdallah

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are multi-system disorders in relation with mitochondrial DNA and/or nuclear DNA abnormalities. Clinical pictures are heterogeneous, involving endocrine, cardiac, neurologic or sensory systems. Cardiac involvements are morphological and electrical disturbances. Prognosis is worsened in case of cardiac impairment. Treatments are related to the type of cardiac dysfunction including medication or pacemaker implantation.

  12. Experimental characterization of variable output refractive beamshapers using freeform elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Jason A.; Smilie, Paul J.; Dutterer, Brian S.; Davies, Matthew A.; Suleski, Thomas J.

    2014-09-01

    We present experimental results from variable output refractive beam shapers based on freeform optical surfaces. Two freeform elements in close proximity comprise a beam shaper that maps a circular Gaussian input to a circular `flat-top' output. Different lateral relative shifts between the elements result in a varying output diameter while maintaining the uniform irradiance distribution. We fabricated the beam shaping elements in PMMA using multi-axis milling on a Moore Nanotech 350FG diamond machining center and tested with a 632.8 nm Gaussian input. Initial optical testing confirmed both the predicted beam shaping and variable functionality, but with poor output uniformity. The effects of surface finish on optical performance were investigated using LightTrans VirtualLabTM to perform physical optics simulations of the milled freeform surfaces. These simulations provided an optimization path for determining machining parameters to improve the output uniformity of the beam shaping elements. A second variable beam shaper based on a super-Gaussian output was designed and fabricated using the newly determined machining parameters. Experimental test results from the second beam shaper showed outputs with significantly higher quality, but also suggest additional areas of study for further improvements in uniformity.

  13. Development of optical biosensor technologies for cardiac troponin recognition.

    PubMed

    Abdolrahim, Mojgan; Rabiee, Mohammad; Alhosseini, Sanaz Naghavi; Tahriri, Mohammadreza; Yazdanpanah, Sara; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-09-15

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of death among cardiovascular diseases. Among the numerous attempts to develop coronary marker concepts into clinical strategies, cardiac troponin is known as a specific marker for coronary events. The cardiac troponin concentration level in blood has been shown to rise rapidly for 4-10 days after onset of AMI, making it an attractive approach for a long diagnosis window for detection. The extremely low clinical sensing range of cardiac troponin levels consequently makes the methods of detection highly sensitive. In this review, by taking into consideration optical methods applied for cardiac troponin detection, we discuss the most commonly used methods of optical immunosensing and provide an overview of the various diagnostic cardiac troponin immunosensors that have been employed for determination of cardiac troponin over the last several years.

  14. Optimization of electrical stimulation parameters for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wan, Leo; Park, Hyoungshin; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2011-06-01

    In vitro application of pulsatile electrical stimulation to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured on polymer scaffolds has been shown to improve the functional assembly of cells into contractile engineered cardiac tissues. However, to date, the conditions of electrical stimulation have not been optimized. We have systematically varied the electrode material, amplitude and frequency of stimulation to determine the conditions that are optimal for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes, exhibiting the highest charge-injection capacity and producing cardiac tissues with the best structural and contractile properties, were thus used in tissue engineering studies. Engineered cardiac tissues stimulated at 3 V/cm amplitude and 3 Hz frequency had the highest tissue density, the highest concentrations of cardiac troponin-I and connexin-43 and the best-developed contractile behaviour. These findings contribute to defining bioreactor design specifications and electrical stimulation regime for cardiac tissue engineering.

  15. Optimization of Electrical Stimulation Parameters for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wan, Leo; Park, Hyoungshin; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    In vitro application of pulsatile electrical stimulation to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured on polymer scaffolds has been shown to improve the functional assembly of cells into contractile cardiac tissue constrcuts. However, to date, the conditions of electrical stimulation have not been optimized. We have systematically varied the electrode material, amplitude and frequency of stimulation, to determine the conditions that are optimal for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes, exhibiting the highest charge-injection capacity and producing cardiac tissues with the best structural and contractile properties, and were thus used in tissue engineering studies. Cardiac tissues stimulated at 3V/cm amplitude and 3Hz frequency had the highest tissue density, the highest concentrations of cardiac troponin-I and connexin-43, and the best developed contractile behavior. These findings contribute to defining bioreactor design specifications and electrical stimulation regime for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21604379

  16. Clinical Associations of Early Dysnatremias in Critically Ill Neonates and Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Jon; Phadke, Daniel; Tong, Suhong; Eshelman, Jennifer; Newman, Sarah; Ruzas, Christopher; da Cruz, Eduardo M; Osorio, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    Dysnatremias (DN) are common electrolyte disturbances in cardiac critical illness and are known risk factors for adverse outcomes in certain populations. Little information exists on DN in children with cardiac disease admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) after undergoing cardiac surgery, either corrective or palliative. The aim was to determine the incidence and adverse outcomes associated with DN in neonates and infants undergoing cardiac surgery. Retrospective cohort and single center study performed at Children's Hospital Colorado from May 2013 to May 2014, in children under 1 year old admitted to the CICU after undergoing surgery for congenital or acquired cardiac disease. 183 subjects were analyzed.

  17. Comparison and relation of indirect and direct dynamic indexes of cardiac pumping capacity in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Williams, Simon G; Tzeng, Bing-H; Barker, Diane; Tan, Lip-Bun

    2005-10-15

    Cardiac power output (CPO), the product of cardiac output (CO) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), is a direct measure of cardiac pumping capability and is strongly indicative of prognosis and exercise ability in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). However, it is not as easily measured as indirect indicators of cardiac function, such as peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)) or peak "circulatory power" (CircP), the product of VO(2) and MAP. The relation between direct and indirect indexes of cardiac pumping capacity was evaluated in 219 ambulatory patients with CHF. CircP was found to have a direct and consistent relation with CPO, overall (R = 0.93, p <0.0001) and at peak exercise (R = 0.84, p < 0.0001). The results suggest CircP to be an adequate measure of cardiac pumping capacity when the more directly measured CPO is not available.

  18. Uncertainty and variability in computational and mathematical models of cardiac physiology

    PubMed Central

    Mirams, Gary R.; Pathmanathan, Pras; Gray, Richard A.; Challenor, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Key points Mathematical and computational models of cardiac physiology have been an integral component of cardiac electrophysiology since its inception, and are collectively known as the Cardiac Physiome.We identify and classify the numerous sources of variability and uncertainty in model formulation, parameters and other inputs that arise from both natural variation in experimental data and lack of knowledge.The impact of uncertainty on the outputs of Cardiac Physiome models is not well understood, and this limits their utility as clinical tools.We argue that incorporating variability and uncertainty should be a high priority for the future of the Cardiac Physiome.We suggest investigating the adoption of approaches developed in other areas of science and engineering while recognising unique challenges for the Cardiac Physiome; it is likely that novel methods will be necessary that require engagement with the mathematics and statistics community. Abstract The Cardiac Physiome effort is one of the most mature and successful applications of mathematical and computational modelling for describing and advancing the understanding of physiology. After five decades of development, physiological cardiac models are poised to realise the promise of translational research via clinical applications such as drug development and patient‐specific approaches as well as ablation, cardiac resynchronisation and contractility modulation therapies. For models to be included as a vital component of the decision process in safety‐critical applications, rigorous assessment of model credibility will be required. This White Paper describes one aspect of this process by identifying and classifying sources of variability and uncertainty in models as well as their implications for the application and development of cardiac models. We stress the need to understand and quantify the sources of variability and uncertainty in model inputs, and the impact of model structure and complexity and

  19. Cardiac Catheterization (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... done during a cardiac catheterization include: closing small holes inside the heart repairing leaky or narrow heart ... bandage. It's normal for the site to be black and blue, red, or slightly swollen for a ...

  20. Cardiac Catheterization (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person will have only a small puncture hole where the catheter was put in. Doctors usually ... done using a cardiac catheterization, including: closing small holes inside the heart repairing leaky or narrow heart ...

  1. Cardiac glycoside overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in the leaves of the digitalis (foxglove) plant. This plant is the original source of this medicine. People ... Digitoxin (Crystodigin) Digoxin (Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin) Besides the foxglove plant, cardiac glycosides also occur naturally in plants such ...

  2. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  3. Vagus nerve stimulation mitigates intrinsic cardiac neuronal remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic pressure overload in guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Eric; Wright, Gary L; Southerland, Elizabeth M; Li, Ying; Chui, Ray; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2016-05-15

    Our objective was to determine whether chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) mitigates pressure overload (PO)-induced remodeling of the cardioneural interface. Guinea pigs (n = 48) were randomized to right or left cervical vagus (RCV or LCV) implant. After 2 wk, chronic left ventricular PO was induced by partial (15-20%) aortic constriction. Of the 31 animals surviving PO induction, 10 were randomized to RCV VNS, 9 to LCV VNS, and 12 to sham VNS. VNS was delivered at 20 Hz and 1.14 ± 0.03 mA at a 22% duty cycle. VNS commenced 10 days after PO induction and was maintained for 40 days. Time-matched controls (n = 9) were evaluated concurrently. Echocardiograms were obtained before and 50 days after PO. At termination, intracellular current-clamp recordings of intrinsic cardiac (IC) neurons were studied in vitro to determine effects of therapy on soma characteristics. Ventricular cardiomyocyte sizes were assessed with histology along with immunoblot analysis of selected proteins in myocardial tissue extracts. In sham-treated animals, PO increased cardiac output (34%, P < 0.004), as well as systolic (114%, P < 0.04) and diastolic (49%, P < 0.002) left ventricular volumes, a hemodynamic response prevented by VNS. PO-induced enhancements of IC synaptic efficacy and muscarinic sensitivity of IC neurons were mitigated by chronic VNS. Increased myocyte size, which doubled in PO (P < 0.05), was mitigated by RCV. PO hypertrophic myocardium displayed decreased glycogen synthase (GS) protein levels and accumulation of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GS. These PO-induced changes in GS were moderated by left VNS. Chronic VNS targets IC neurons accompanying PO to obtund associated adverse cardiomyocyte remodeling.

  4. Cholecystokinin as a regulator of cardiac function and postprandial gastrointestinal blood flow in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Seth, Henrik; Gräns, Albin; Axelsson, Michael

    2010-05-01

    We have studied the potential role of CCK as a regulator/modulator of the postprandial increase in gastrointestinal blood flow. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes to measure the effects of CCK on cardiac output and gastrointestinal blood flow. Furthermore, vascular preparations were used to study the direct effects of CCK on the vessels. In addition, we used in situ perfused hearts to further study the effects of CCK on the cardiovascular system. When the sulfated form of CCK-8 was injected at a physiological concentration (0.19 pmol/kg) in vivo, there was a significant increase in the gastrointestinal blood flow (18 +/- 4%). This increase in gastrointestinal blood flow was followed by a subsequent increase in cardiac output (30 +/- 6%). When the dose was increased to 0.76 pmol/kg, there was only a 14 +/- 6% increase in gastrointestinal blood flow; possibly due to a dose-dependent increase in the gill vascular resistance as previously reported or a direct effect on the heart. Nevertheless, CCK did not affect the isolated vessel preparations, and thus, it seems unlikely that CCK has a direct effect on the blood vessels of the second or third order. CCK did, however, have profound effects on the dynamics of the heart, and without a change in cardiac output, there was a significant increase in the amplitude (59 +/- 4%) and rate (dQ/dt: 55 +/- 4%; -dQ/dt: 208 +/- 49%) of the phasic flow profile. If and how this might be coupled to a postprandial gastrointestinal hyperemia remains to be determined. We conclude that CCK has the potential as a regulator of the postprandial gastrointestinal blood flow in fish and most likely has its effect by inducing a gastrointestinal hyperemia. The mechanism by which CCK acts is at present unknown.

  5. [Intrinsic cardiac ganglia].

    PubMed

    Birand, Ahmet

    2008-12-01

    Heart has been considered as the source and the seat of emotions, passion and love. But from the dawn of XIXth century, scientists have emphasized that the heart, though life depends on its ceaseless activity, is merely a electromechanical pump, pumping oxygenated blood. Nowadays, we all know that heart pumps blood commensurate with the needs of the body and this unending toil, and its regulation depends on the intrinsic properties of the myocardium, Frank-Starling Law and neurohumoral contribution. It has been understood, though not clearly enough, that these time-tensions may cause structural or functional cardiac impairments and arrhythmias are related to the autonomic nervous system. Less well known and less taken in account in daily cardiology practice is the fact that heart has an intrinsic cardiac nervous system, or "heart brain" consisting of complex ganglia, intrinsic cardiac ganglia containing afferent (receiving), local circuit (interneurons) and efferent (transmitting) sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons. This review enlightens structural and functional aspects of intrinsic cardiac ganglia as the very first step in the regulation of cardiac function. This issue is important for targets of pharmacological treatment and techniques of cardiac surgery interventions as repair of septal defects, valvular interventions and congenital corrections.

  6. Cardiac septic pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xin yu; Li, Shan; Cao, Jian; Xu, Kai; Huang, Hui; Xu, Zuo jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Based on the source of the embolus, septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) can be classified as cardiac, peripheral endogenous, or exogenous. Cardiac SPEs are the most common. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 patients with cardiac SPE hospitalized between 1991 and 2013 at a Chinese tertiary referral hospital. The study included 14 males and 6 females with a median age of 38.1 years. Fever (100%), cough (95%), hemoptysis (80%), pleuritic chest pain (80%), heart murmur (80%), and moist rales (75%) were common clinical manifestations. Most patients had a predisposing condition: congenital heart disease (8 patients) and an immunocompromised state (5 patients) were the most common. Staphylococcal (8 patients) and Streptococcal species (4 patients) were the most common causative pathogens. Parenchymal opacities, nodules, cavitations, and pleural effusions were the most common manifestations observed via computed tomography (CT). All patients exhibited significant abnormalities by echocardiography, including 15 patients with right-sided vegetations and 4 with double-sided vegetations. All patients received parenteral antimicrobial therapy as an initial treatment. Fourteen patients received cardiac surgery, and all survived. Among the 6 patients who did not undergo surgery, only 1 survived. Most patients in our cardiac SPE cohort had predisposing conditions. Although most exhibited typical clinical manifestations and radiography, they were nonspecific. For suspected cases of SPE, blood culture, echocardiography, and CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) are important measures to confirm an early diagnosis. Vigorous early therapy, including appropriate antibiotic treatment and timely cardiac surgery to eradicate the infective source, is critical. PMID:27336870

  7. Determining the minimum number of detectable cardiac-transplanted 111In-tropolone-labelled bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells by SPECT.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuan; Kong, Huafu; Stodilka, Rob Z; Wells, R Glenn; Zabel, Pamela; Merrifield, Peter A; Sykes, Jane; Prato, Frank S

    2005-10-07

    In this work, we determined the minimum number of detectable 111In-tropolone-labelled bone-marrow-derived stem cells from the maximum activity per cell which did not affect viability, proliferation and differentiation, and the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of 111In by SPECT. Canine bone marrow mesenchymal cells were isolated, cultured and expanded. A number of samples, each containing 5x10(6) cells, were labelled with 111In-tropolone from 0.1 to 18 MBq, and cell viability was measured afterwards for each sample for 2 weeks. To determine the MDA, the anthropomorphic torso phantom (DataSpectrum Corporation, Hillsborough, NC) was used. A point source of 202 kBq 111In was placed on the surface of the heart compartment, and the phantom and all compartments were then filled with water. Three 111In SPECT scans (duration: 16, 32 and 64 min; parameters: 128x128 matrix with 128 projections over 360 degrees) were acquired every three days until the 111In radioactivity decayed to undetectable quantities. 111In SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with and without background, scatter or attenuation corrections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the reconstructed image was calculated, and MDA was set equal to the 111In activity corresponding to a CNR of 4. The cells had 100% viability when incubated with no more than 0.9 MBq of 111In (80% labelling efficiency), which corresponded to 0.14 Bq per cell. Background correction improved the detection limits for 111In-tropolone-labelled cells. The MDAs for 16, 32 and 64 min scans with background correction were observed to be 1.4 kBq, 700 Bq and 400 Bq, which implies that, in the case where the location of the transplantation is known and fixed, as few as 10,000, 5000 and 2900 cells respectively can be detected.

  8. Determining the minimum number of detectable cardiac-transplanted 111In-tropolone-labelled bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells by SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuan; Kong, Huafu; Stodilka, Rob Z.; Wells, R. Glenn; Zabel, Pamela; Merrifield, Peter A.; Sykes, Jane; Prato, Frank S.

    2005-10-01

    In this work, we determined the minimum number of detectable 111In-tropolone-labelled bone-marrow-derived stem cells from the maximum activity per cell which did not affect viability, proliferation and differentiation, and the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of 111In by SPECT. Canine bone marrow mesenchymal cells were isolated, cultured and expanded. A number of samples, each containing 5 × 106 cells, were labelled with 111In-tropolone from 0.1 to 18 MBq, and cell viability was measured afterwards for each sample for 2 weeks. To determine the MDA, the anthropomorphic torso phantom (DataSpectrum Corporation, Hillsborough, NC) was used. A point source of 202 kBq 111In was placed on the surface of the heart compartment, and the phantom and all compartments were then filled with water. Three 111In SPECT scans (duration: 16, 32 and 64 min; parameters: 128 × 128 matrix with 128 projections over 360°) were acquired every three days until the 111In radioactivity decayed to undetectable quantities. 111In SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with and without background, scatter or attenuation corrections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the reconstructed image was calculated, and MDA was set equal to the 111In activity corresponding to a CNR of 4. The cells had 100% viability when incubated with no more than 0.9 MBq of 111In (80% labelling efficiency), which corresponded to 0.14 Bq per cell. Background correction improved the detection limits for 111In-tropolone-labelled cells. The MDAs for 16, 32 and 64 min scans with background correction were observed to be 1.4 kBq, 700 Bq and 400 Bq, which implies that, in the case where the location of the transplantation is known and fixed, as few as 10 000, 5000 and 2900 cells respectively can be detected.

  9. Dendronized polyaniline nanotubes for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moura, Renata Mendes; de Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar

    2011-05-01

    Today, nanobiomaterials represent a very important class of biomaterials because they differ dramatically in their bulk precursors. The properties of these materials are determined by the size and morphology, thus creating a fascinating line in their physicochemical properties. Polyaniline nanotubes (PANINTs) are one of the most promising nanobiomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering applications due to their electroactive properties. The biocompatibility and low hydrophilic properties of PANINTs can be improved by their functionalization with the highly hydrophilic polyglycerol dendrimers (PGLDs). Hydrophilicity plays a fundamental role in tissue regeneration and fundamental forces that govern the process of cell adhesion and proliferation. In this work, the biocompatible properties and cardiomyocyte proliferation onto PANINTs modified by PGLD are described. PGLDs were immobilized onto PANINTs via surface-initiated anionic ring-opening polymerization of glycidol. The microstructure and morphology of PGLD-PANINTs was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The cardiac cell growth on the PGLD-PANINTs was investigated. The PGLD-coated PANINTs showed noncytotoxic effects to Chinese hamster ovary cells. It was observed that the application of microcurrent stimulates the differentiation of cardiac cells cultured on PGLD-PANINTs scaffolds. The electroactive and biocompatible results of PGLD-PANINTs observed in this work demonstrate the potential of this nanobiomaterial for the culture of cardiac cells and open the possibility of using this material as a biocompatible electroactive three-dimensional matrix in cardiac tissue engineering.

  10. Impairment of cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Raine, A E; Seymour, A M; Roberts, A F; Radda, G K; Ledingham, J G

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure in the rat (5/6 nephrectomy) have been investigated by means of an isolated perfused working heart preparation and an isometric Langendorff preparation using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR). 4 wk after nephrectomy cardiac output of isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) at all levels of preload and afterload in the renal failure groups than in the pair-fed sham operated control group. In control hearts, cardiac output increased with increases in perfusate calcium from 0.73 to 5.61 mmol/liter whereas uremic hearts failed in high calcium perfusate. Collection of 31P NMR spectra from hearts of renal failure and control animals during 30 min normoxic Langendorff perfusion showed that basal phosphocreatine was reduced by 32% to 4.7 mumol/g wet wt (P < 0.01) and the phosphocreatine to ATP ratio was reduced by 32% (P < 0.01) in uremic hearts. During low flow ischemia, there was a substantial decrease in phosphocreatine in the uremic hearts and an accompanying marked increase in release of inosine into the coronary effluent (14.9 vs 6.1 microM, P < 0.01). We conclude that cardiac function is impaired in experimental renal failure, in association with abnormal cardiac energetics and increased susceptibility to ischemic damage. Disordered myocardial calcium utilization may contribute to these derangements. PMID:8254048

  11. Cardiac-specific overexpression of caveolin-3 induces endogenous cardiac protection by mimicking ischemic preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Yasuo M.; Horikawa, Yousuke T.; Jennings, Michelle M.; Kidd, Michael W.; Niesman, Ingrid R.; Yokoyama, Utako; Head, Brian P.; Hagiwara, Yasuko; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Patel, Piyush M.; Insel, Paul A.; Patel, Hemal H.; Roth, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Caveolae, lipid-rich microdomains of the sarcolemma, localize and enrich cardiac protective signaling molecules. Caveolin-3 (Cav-3), the dominant isoform in cardiac myocytes, is a determinant of caveolae formation. We hypothesized that cardiac myocyte-specific overexpression of Cav-3 would enhance the formation of caveolae and augment cardiac protection in vivo. Methods and Results Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) in vivo increased formation of caveolae. Adenovirus for Cav-3 increased caveolar formation and phosphorylation of survival kinases in cardiac myocytes. A transgenic (TG) mouse with cardiac myocyte-specific overexpression of Cav-3 (Cav-3 OE) showed enhanced formation of caveolae on the sarcolemma. Cav-3 OE mice subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury had a significantly reduced infarct size relative to TGneg mice. Endogenous cardiac protection in Cav-3 OE mice was similar to wild-type mice undergoing IPC; no increased protection was observed in preconditioned Cav-3 OE mice. Cav-3 knockout mice did not show endogenous protection and showed no protection in response to IPC. Cav-3 OE mouse hearts had increased basal Akt and GSK3β phosphorylation comparable to wild-type mice exposed to IPC. Wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, attenuated basal phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β and blocked cardiac protection in Cav-3 OE mice. Cav-3 OE mice had improved functional recovery and reduced apoptosis at 24 h of reperfusion. Conclusion Expression of caveolin-3 is both necessary and sufficient for cardiac protection, a conclusion that unites long-standing ultrastructural and molecular observations in the ischemic heart. The current results indicate that increased expression of caveolins, apparently via actions that depend on PI3K, has the potential to protect hearts exposed to ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:18936328

  12. Developing Tsunami Warnings Based on Model Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Stewart; Greenslade, Diana

    2010-05-01

    The Joint Australian Tsunami Warning Centre is responsible for issuing tsunami warnings for the Australian mainland and offshore territories. Warnings are currently based on model output from the T2 scenario database. When a tsunami event occurs, the closest scenario is selected from the T2 scenario database according to the seismic parameters. The values of the maximum amplitude for the scenario are assessed within coastal regions to determine the threat level. Tsunami warnings are issued according to whether the maximum amplitudes exceed pre-determined threshold values. The threshold values have been derived empirically by consideration of past events and observed coastal impacts. This presentation will describe recent developments that have been made to improve this technique, such as consideration of percentile values of the maximum amplitude.

  13. Baroreceptor output during normal and obstructed breathing and Mueller maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R S; Robotham, J L; Anand, A

    1981-05-01

    Cardiovascular control during asthma and other forms of obstructed breathing has not been extensively investigated. Previous studies in dogs have shown that obstructed breathing or an inspiratory effort against a blocked airway (Mueller maneuver) provoke large oscillations in blood pressure. During the inspiratory phase transmural systolic pressure relative to atmosphere drops initially, but transmural systolic pressure relative to intrathoracic pressure can remain unchanged or even increase. Because the carotid baroreceptors are located in the extrathoracic circulation, whereas the aortic baroreceptors are located in the intrathoracic circulation, and each responds to local transmural arterial pressure, simultaneous baroreceptor output from these two areas was measured in the anesthetized cat during normal and obstructed breathing and during Mueller maneuvers. Both whole-nerve and single-fiber preparations showed a significantly decreased output from the carotid baroreceptors during obstructed inspiratory efforts, whereas aortic baroreceptor output decreased significantly less or not at all. Transmural systolic pressure decreased significantly less in the aorta than in the carotid regions. Further, the aortic baroreceptors were more sensitive to changes in pulse pressure than were the carotid baroreceptors. These results suggest a mechanism for stabilizing the cardiac responses to precipitous falls in blood pressure that occur in obstructed breathing.

  14. Intensive Care Unit Admission Parameters Improve the Accuracy of Operative Mortality Predictive Models in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ranucci, Marco; Ballotta, Andrea; Castelvecchio, Serenella; Baryshnikova, Ekaterina; Brozzi, Simonetta; Boncilli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Background Operative mortality risk in cardiac surgery is usually assessed using preoperative risk models. However, intraoperative factors may change the risk profile of the patients, and parameters at the admission in the intensive care unit may be relevant in determining the operative mortality. This study investigates the association between a number of parameters at the admission in the intensive care unit and the operative mortality, and verifies the hypothesis that including these parameters into the preoperative risk models may increase the accuracy of prediction of the operative mortality. Methodology 929 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery were admitted to the study. The preoperative risk profile was assessed using the logistic EuroSCORE and the ACEF score. A number of parameters recorded at the admission in the intensive care unit were explored for univariate and multivariable association with the operative mortality. Principal Findings A heart rate higher than 120 beats per minute and a blood lactate value higher than 4 mmol/L at the admission in the intensive care unit were independent predictors of operative mortality, with odds ratio of 6.7 and 13.4 respectively. Including these parameters into the logistic EuroSCORE and the ACEF score increased their accuracy (area under the curve 0.85 to 0.88 for the logistic EuroSCORE and 0.81 to 0.86 for the ACEF score). Conclusions A double-stage assessment of operative mortality risk provides a higher accuracy of the prediction. Elevated blood lactates and tachycardia reflect a condition of inadequate cardiac output. Their inclusion in the assessment of the severity of the clinical conditions after cardiac surgery may offer a useful tool to introduce more sophisticated hemodynamic monitoring techniques. Comparison between the predicted operative mortality risk before and after the operation may offer an assessment of the operative performance. PMID:21042411

  15. Overload protection circuit for output driver

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Roger G.

    1982-05-11

    A protection circuit for preventing excessive power dissipation in an output transistor whose conduction path is connected between a power terminal and an output terminal. The protection circuit includes means for sensing the application of a turn on signal to the output transistor and the voltage at the output terminal. When the turn on signal is maintained for a period of time greater than a given period without the voltage at the output terminal reaching a predetermined value, the protection circuit decreases the turn on signal to, and the current conduction through, the output transistor.

  16. Relationship between peak cardiac pumping capability and indices of cardio-respiratory fitness in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Popadic-Gacesa, Jelena Z; Barak, Otto F; Nunan, David; Donovan, Gay; Trenell, Michael I; Grujic, Nikola G; Brodie, David A

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac power output (CPO) is a unique and direct measure of overall cardiac function (i.e. cardiac pumping capability) that integrates both flow- and pressure-generating capacities of the heart. The present study assessed the relationship between peak exercise CPO and selected indices of cardio-respiratory fitness. Thirty-seven healthy adults (23 men and 14 women) performed an incremental exercise test to volitional fatigue using the Bruce protocol with gas exchange and ventilatory measurements. Following a 40-min recovery, the subjects performed a constant maximum workload exercise test at or above 95% of maximal oxygen consumption. Cardiac output was measured using the exponential CO(2) rebreathing method. The CPO, expressed in W, was calculated as the product of the mean arterial blood pressure and cardiac output. At peak exercise, CPO was well correlated with cardiac output (r = 0·92, P<0·01), stroke volume (r = 0·90, P<0·01) and peak oxygen consumption (r = 0·77, P<0·01). The coefficient of correlation was moderate between CPO and anaerobic threshold (r = 0·47, P<0·01), oxygen pulse (r = 0·57, P<0·01), minute ventilation (r = 0·53, P<0·01) and carbon dioxide production (r = 0·56, P<0·01). Small but significant relationship was found between peak CPO and peak heart rate (r = 0·23, P<0·05). These findings suggest that only peak cardiac output and stroke volume truly reflect CPO. Other indices of cardio-respiratory fitness such as oxygen consumption, anaerobic threshold, oxygen pulse, minute ventilation, carbon dioxide production and heart rate should not be used as surrogates for overall cardiac function and pumping capability of the heart.

  17. [Psychosomatic aspects of cardiac arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Martin; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2010-07-01

    Emotional stress facilitates the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. The prevalence of anxiety and depression is increased in cardiac patients as compared to the normal population. The risk of cardiovascular mortality is enhanced in patients suffering from depression. Comorbid anxiety disorders worsen the course of cardiac arrhythmias. Disturbance of neurocardiac regulation with predominance of the sympathetic tone is hypothesized to be causative for this. The emotional reaction to cardiac arrhythmias is differing to a large extent between individuals. Emotional stress may result from coping with treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias may influence each other in the sense of a vicious circle. Somatoform cardiac arrhythmias are predominantly of psychogenic origin. Instrumental measures and frequent contacts between physicians and patients may facilitate disease chronification. The present review is dealing with the multifaceted relationships between cardiac arrhythmias and emotional stress. The underlying mechanisms and corresponding treatment modalities are discussed.

  18. The role of cardiac sympathetic innervation and skin thermoreceptors on cardiac responses during heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Umemoto, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Tokio; Kouda, Ken; Ito, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Crandall, Craig G.; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) for the changes in cardiac function during heat stress remain unknown. This study tested two unique hypotheses. First, sympathetic innervation to the heart is required for increases in cardiac systolic function during heat stress. This was accomplished by comparing responses during heat stress between paraplegics versus tetraplegics, with tetraplegics having reduced/absent cardiac sympathetic innervation. Second, stimulation of skin thermoreceptors contributes to cardiovascular adjustments that occur during heat stress in humans. This was accomplished by comparing responses during leg only heating between paraplegic versus able-bodied individuals. Nine healthy able-bodied, nine paraplegics, and eight tetraplegics participated in this study. Lower body (i.e., nonsensed area for para/tetraplegics) was heated until esophageal temperature had increased by ∼1.0°C. Echocardiographic indexes of diastolic and systolic function were performed before and at the end of heat stress. The heat stress increased cardiac output in all groups, but the magnitude of this increase was attenuated in the tetraplegics relative to the able-bodied (1.3 ± 0.4 vs. 2.3 ± 1.0 l/min; P < 0.05). Diastolic function was maintained in all groups. Indexes of left atrial and ventricular systolic function were enhanced in the able-bodied, but did not change in tetraplegics, while these changes in paraplegics were attenuated relative to the able-bodied. These data suggest that the cardiac sympathetic innervation is required to achieve normal increases in cardiac systolic function during heat stress but not required to maintain diastolic function during this exposure. Second, elevated systolic function during heat stress primarily occurs as a result of increases in internal temperature, although stimulation of skin thermoreceptors may contribute. PMID:25795714

  19. Compensatory mechanisms for cardiac dysfunction in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ertl, G; Gaudron, P; Eilles, C; Schorb, W; Kochsiek, K

    1991-01-01

    Loss of contractile myocardial tissue by myocardial infarction would result in depressed cardiac output if compensatory mechanisms would not be operative. Frank-Straub-Starling-mechanism and increased heart rate and contractility due to sympathetic stimulation are unlikely to chronically compensate for cardiac dysfunction. Structural left ventricular dilatation may be compensatory, but results in increased wall stress and, ultimately, in progressive dilatation and heart failure. In patients with myocardial infarction, we have shown left-ventricular dilatation in dependence of infarct size and time after infarction. Dilatation is compensatory first and normalizes stroke volume. However, left ventricular dilatation progresses without further hemodynamic profit and, thus, may participate in development of heart failure.

  20. Intensive insulin therapy in the intensive cardiac care unit.

    PubMed

    Hasin, Tal; Eldor, Roy; Hammerman, Haim

    2006-01-01

    Treatment in the intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) enables rigorous control of vital parameters such as heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, oxygen saturation, serum electrolyte levels, urine output and many others. The importance of controlling the metabolic status of the acute cardiac patient and specifically the level of serum glucose was recently put in focus but is still underscored. This review aims to explain the rationale for providing intensive control of serum glucose levels in the ICCU, especially using intensive insulin therapy and summarizes the available clinical evidence suggesting its effectiveness.

  1. The effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, David; Jones, Thomas W.; Cassidy, Sophie; Siervo, Mario; MacGowan, Guy A.; Trenell, Michael I.; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cardiac and vascular function are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to define the effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function. Haemodynamic and gas exchange measurements were performed at rest and peak exercise in healthy individuals. Augmentation index was measured at rest. Cardiac power output, a measure of overall cardiac function, was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Augmentation index was significantly higher in older than younger participants (27.7 ± 10.1 vs. 2.5 ± 10.1%, P < 0.01). Older people demonstrated significantly higher stroke volume and mean arterial blood pressure (P < 0.05), but lower heart rate (145 ± 13 vs. 172 ± 10 beats/min, P < 0.01) and peak oxygen consumption (22.5 ± 5.2 vs. 41.2 ± 8.4 ml/kg/min, P < 0.01). There was a significant negative relationship between augmentation index and peak exercise cardiac power output (r = −0.73, P = 0.02) and cardiac output (r = −0.69, P = 0.03) in older participants. Older people maintain maximal cardiac function due to increased stroke volume. Vascular function is a strong predictor of overall cardiac function in older but in not younger people. PMID:26590322

  2. Berberine attenuates cardiac dysfunction in hyperglycemic and hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Fen; Hong, Ying; Liu, Ming; Hao, Ying-Zhi; Yu, Hai-Shi; Liu, Yang; Sun, Jian-Ning

    2011-06-25

    The positive effects of berberine (30 mg/kg/day, i.g. for 6 weeks) on cardiac dysfunction were evaluated in the rat model of hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia. Hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia were induced by feeding high-sucrose/fat diet (HSFD) consisting of 20% sucrose, 10% lard, 2.5% cholesterol, 1% bile salt for 12 weeks and streptozotocin (30 mg/kg, i.p.). The plasma sugar, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were significantly increased (422, 194 and 82%, respectively) in the HSFD/streptozotocin-treated rats, when compared with control animals receiving normal diet and vehicle. Berberine treatment reduced the plasma sugar and lipid levels by 24-69% in the rat model of hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia. Cardiac functions signed as values of cardiac output, left ventricular systolic pressure, the maximum rate of myocardial contraction (+dp/dtmax), left ventricular end diastolic pressure and the maximum rate of myocardial diastole (-dp/dtmax) were injured by 16-55% in the hyperglycemic/hypercholesterolemic rats. Berberine increased cardiac output, left ventricular systolic pressure and +dp/dtmax by 64, 16 and 79%, but decreased left ventricular end diastolic pressure and -dp/dtmax by 121 and 61% in the rats receiving HSFD/streptozotocin, respectively, when compared with the drug-untreated rats of hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia. Berberine caused significant increase in cardiac fatty acid transport protein-1 (159%), fatty acid transport proteins (56%), fatty acid beta-oxidase (52%), as well as glucose transporter-4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), but decrease in PPARα mRNA and protein expression in hyperglycemic/hypercholesterolemic rats. These results indicated that berberine exerted protective effects on cardiac dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia/hypercholesterolemia through alleviating cardiac lipid accumulation and promoting glucose transport.

  3. Determination of the value of glycated hemoglobin HbA1c and fructosamine in assessing the risk of perioperative complications after cardiac surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wróbel, Marta; Rokicka, Dominika; Szymborska-Kajanek, Aleksandra; Foremny, Jerzy; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Zembala, Marian; Strojek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with diabetes have a worse postoperative course and longer length of hospital stay after surgery. A good indicator of proper long-term (3 months) glycemic control is glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and fructosamine in the short term (2–3 weeks). Aim To determine the degree of glycemic control evaluated preoperatively by HbA1c and/or fructosamine influence on the postoperative course of patients with diabetes undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in 2014–2015. Material and methods Before the operation HbA1c (N < 7.0) and fructosamine (N < 280 µmol/l) were measured and depending on the results the respondents were divided into 4 groups: group I (n = 46) – normal both parameters; group II (n = 22) – high both values; group III (n = 4) – normal fructosamine/HbA1c high; group IV (n = 33) – high HbA1c/fructosamine normal. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test assuming p < 0.05 to be statistically significant. Results One hundred and five patients were treated by CABG/OPCAB (39 female, 66 males). The mean age was 65.7 ±7.3, HbA1c: 7.23 ±1.2%, fructosamine: 261.8 ±43.8. There was no difference in the incidence of other postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusions Glycated hemoglobin and fructosamine levels to a similar extent define the risk of perioperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. In patients in whom there is a need to quickly compensate for elevated blood glucose consider enabling determination of fructosamine. PMID:28096825

  4. Embryonic caffeine exposure acts via A1 adenosine receptors to alter adult cardiac function and DNA methylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Buscariollo, Daniela L; Fang, Xiefan; Greenwood, Victoria; Xue, Huiling; Rivkees, Scott A; Wendler, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.09% NaCl) i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2-4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8-10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation.

  5. Intracoronary secretin increases cardiac perfusion and function in anaesthetized pigs through pathways involving β-adrenoceptors and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Molinari, Claudio; Morsanuto, Vera; Mary, David A S G; Vacca, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Secretin has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation through its specific receptors, as well as through β-adrenoceptors and nitric oxide, although data on its direct effect on coronary blood flow and cardiac function have remained scarce. The present study aimed to determine the primary in vivo effect of secretin on cardiac function and perfusion and the mechanisms related to the autonomic nervous system, secretin receptors and NO. In addition, in coronary endothelial cells the intracellular pathways involved in the effects of secretin on NO release were also examined. In 30 pigs, intracoronary secretin infusion at 2.97 pg for each millilitre per minute of coronary blood flow at constant heart rate and aortic blood pressure increased coronary blood flow, maximal rate of change of left ventricular pressure, segmental shortening, cardiac output and coronary NO release (P<0.05). These responses were graded in a further five pigs. Moreover, while blockade of muscarinic cholinoreceptors (n=5) and of α-adrenoceptors (n=5) did not abolish the observed responses to secretin, blockade of β1-adrenoceptors (n=5) prevented the effects of secretin on cardiac function. In addition, blockade of β2-adrenoceptors (n=5) and NO synthase inhibition (n=5) prevented the coronary response and the effect of secretin on NO release. All these effects were abolished by a secretin receptor inhibitor (n=5). In coronary endothelial cells, the increased NO production caused by secretin was found to be related to cAMP/protein kinase A signalling activated as downstream effectors of stimulation of secretin receptors and β2-adrenoceptors. In conclusion, in anaesthetized pigs secretin primarily increased cardiac function and perfusion through the involvement of specific receptors, β-adrenoceptors and NO release.

  6. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    PubMed

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  7. Evidence of epigenetic tags in cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Zullo, Alberto; Soricelli, Andrea; Infante, Teresa; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Napoli, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    In cardiac fibrosis, following an injury or a stress, non-functional fibrotic tissue substitutes normal myocardium, thus leading to progressive heart failure. Activated fibroblasts are principal determinants of cardiac fibrosis by producing excessive fibrotic extracellular matrix and causing hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and miRNAs have been involved in these mechanisms. Therefore, there is a strong interest in reverting such epigenetic transformations in order to arrest myocardial fibrotic degeneration. Demethylating agents, such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-azacytidine, some selective histone deacetylase inhibitors, including mocetinostat, trichostatin A, and MPT0E014, have a direct action on important inducers of cardiac fibrosis. Also dietary compounds, such as resveratrol, can suppress the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Although in vivo and in vitro studies suggest specific epigenetic therapies to treat cardiac fibrosis, the related clinical trials are still lacking. A better understanding of the epigenetic effects of dietary compounds (e.g. curcumin and green tea catechins) on the onset and progression of cardiac fibrosis, will allow the identification of protective dietary patterns and/or the generation of novel potential epidrugs.

  8. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2013-10-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management. This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

  9. Complex Dynamics Along One Dimensional Cardiac Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jeff; Stubna, Mike; Hua, Fei; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gilmour, Robert

    2001-03-01

    Beat-to-beat alternation of cardiac electrical properties (electrical alternans; EA) may destabilize spiral waves in cardiac tissue, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recent studies have suggested that propagation of EA may not be uniform, resulting in concordant (in phase) and discordant (out of phase) EA across spatially distributed systems. In this study we induced EA in canine cardiac Purkinje fibers by pacing at short cycle lengths (CL). At CL between 110-150 ms, discordant EA occurred distal to the site of stimulation, whereas at CL less than 110 ms, complex dynamics (period 4 and higher) appeared. The mechanism for this behavior was studied using a model of a cardiac fiber in which local dynamics were determined by action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity restitution curves. We investigated the stability of spatially extended EA and observed discordant EA. We also showed that models in which the APD restitution curve has a local minimum exhibited complex activation patterns. The dispersion of electrical properties caused by such patterns may facilitate reentrant excitation.

  10. A New Frontier for Cardiac Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    CardioDynamics International Corporation (CDIC) has created the BioZ(TM) System through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) award from Johnson Space Center, providing patients and physicians with a cost-effective and highly accurate monitoring system.The BioZ non-invasive heart monitor is based on a technology known as Impedance Cardiography (ICG). BioZ provides the physician with vital information about the heart's ability to deliver blood to the body, the force one's heart exerts with each beat, and the amount of fluid in the chest. Specially designed bioimpedance sensors placed on the neck and chest monitor 12 different parameters, including cardiac output, contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and thoracic fluid content. These sensors monitor the electrical conductivity of the body-information that is converted into blood flow data and is displayed in real time on a monitoring screen. BioZ.com(TM) and BioZ.pc(TM) are two additional products that incorporate the same sensors present in the original BioZ system. The "com" in BioZ.com stands for cardiac output monitor. This fully integrated system is essentially a smaller version of the BioZ, combining the same abilities with a compact, lightweight design, while providing greater portability.

  11. Mechano-chemo-transduction in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T

    2017-01-18

    The heart has the ability to adjust to changing mechanical loads. The Frank-Starling law and the Anrep effect describe exquisite intrinsic mechanisms the heart has for autoregulating the force of contraction to maintain cardiac output under preload and afterload. Although these mechanisms have been known for more than a century, their cellular and molecular underpinnings are still debated. How does the cardiac myocyte sense a change in preload or afterload? How does the myocyte adjust its response to compensate for such changes? In cardiac myocytes Ca(2+) is a crucial regulator of contractile force and in this review we compare and contrast recent results from different labs that address two important questions. The "dimensionality" of the mechanical milieu under which experiments are carried out provide important clues to the location of the mechanosensors and the kinds of mechanical forces they can sense and respond to. As a first approximation, sensors inside the myocyte appear to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) while sensors on the cell surface appear to also modulate nitric oxide (NO) signalling; both signalling pathways affect Ca(2+) handling. Undoubtedly, further studies will add layers to this simplified picture. Clarifying the intimate links from cellular mechanics to ROS and NO signalling and to Ca(2+) handling will deepen our understanding of the Frank-Starling law and the Anrep effect, and also provide a unified view on how arrhythmias may arise in seemingly disparate diseases that have in common altered myocyte mechanics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of gravity on cardiac performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantalos, G. M.; Sharp, M. K.; Woodruff, S. J.; O'Leary, D. S.; Lorange, R.; Everett, S. D.; Bennett, T. E.; Shurfranz, T.

    1998-01-01

    Results obtained by the investigators in ground-based experiments and in two parabolic flight series of tests aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft with a hydraulic simulator of the human systemic circulation have confirmed that a simple lack of hydrostatic pressure within an artificial ventricle causes a decrease in stroke volume of 20%-50%. A corresponding drop in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) was observed over a range of atrial pressures (AP), representing a rightward shift of the classic CO versus AP cardiac function curve. These results are in agreement with echocardiographic experiments performed on space shuttle flights, where an average decrease in SV of 15% was measured following a three-day period of adaptation to weightlessness. The similarity of behavior of the hydraulic model to the human system suggests that the simple physical effects of the lack of hydrostatic pressure may be an important mechanism for the observed changes in cardiac performance in astronauts during the weightlessness of space flight.

  13. The Psycholinguistics of the Output Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bot, Kees

    1996-01-01

    Elucidates the psycholinguistic mechanics of the "output hypothesis" and argues that output serves an important role in second language acquisition because it generates specific input the cognitive system needs to build up a coherent set of knowledge. The article hypothesizes that the locus of the effect of output is in the transition of…

  14. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy.

  15. Autoantibodies and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hon-Chi; Huang, Kristin T. L.; Wang, Xiao-Li; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, afflicting about 5% of the population of the United States. They encompass a wide range of disorders that affect all organs of the human body and have a predilection for women. In the past, autoimmune pathogenesis was not thought to be a major mechanism for cardiovascular disorders, and potential relationships remain understudied. However, accumulating evidence suggests that a number of vascular and cardiac conditions are autoimmune-mediated. Recent studies indicate that autoantibodies play an important role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation, modulation of autonomic influences on heart rate and rhythm, conduction system abnormalities, and ventricular arrhythmias. This manuscript will review the current evidence for the role of autoantibodies in the development of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:21740882

  16. Toothache of cardiac origin.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, M; Okeson, J P

    1999-01-01

    Pain referred to the orofacial structures can sometimes be a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. In some instances, a patient may complain of tooth pain that is completely unrelated to any dental source. This poses a diagnostic and therapeutic problem for the dentist. Cardiac pain most commonly radiates to the left arm, shoulder, neck, and face. In rare instances, angina pectoris may present as dental pain. When this occurs, an improper diagnosis frequently leads to unnecessary dental treatment or, more significantly, a delay of proper treatment. This delay may result in the patient experiencing an acute myocardial infarction. It is the dentist's responsibility to establish a proper diagnosis so that the treatment will be directed toward the source of pain and not to the site of pain. This article reviews the literature concerning referred pain of cardiac origin and presents a case report of toothache of cardiac origin.

  17. Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations in Cardiac Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Victoria L.; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M.; Magoon, Bindiya T.; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Adams, Karen T.; Rosing, Douglas R.; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G.; Horvath, Keith A.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least one third of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in one of 17 genes. While these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for less than 0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of fifteen patients with cardiac paraganglioma was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic work-up, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 cases (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen cases (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; one additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to comorbities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, we extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  18. Action of SNAIL1 in Cardiac Myofibroblasts Is Important for Cardiac Fibrosis following Hypoxic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Hirak; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic injury to the heart results in cardiac fibrosis that leads to cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. SNAIL1 is a zinc finger transcription factor implicated in fibrosis following organ injury and cancer. To determine if the action of SNAIL1 contributed to cardiac fibrosis following hypoxic injury, we used an endogenous SNAIL1 bioluminescence reporter mice, and SNAIL1 knockout mouse models. Here we report that SNAIL1 expression is upregulated in the infarcted heart, especially in the myofibroblasts. Utilizing primary cardiac fibroblasts in ex vivo cultures we find that pro-fibrotic factors and collagen I increase SNAIL1 protein level. SNAIL1 is required in cardiac fibroblasts for the adoption of myofibroblast fate, collagen I expression and expression of fibrosis-related genes. Taken together this data suggests that SNAIL1 expression is induced in the cardiac fibroblasts after hypoxic injury and contributes to myofibroblast phenotype and a fibrotic scar formation. Resultant collagen deposition in the scar can maintain elevated SNAIL1 expression in the myofibroblasts and help propagate fibrosis. PMID:27706205

  19. Cardiac ferroportin regulates cellular iron homeostasis and is important for cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Wolna, Magda; Carr, Carolyn A.; Miller, Jack J. J.; Christian, Helen C.; Ball, Vicky; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Stillion, Richard; Holdship, Philip; Clarke, Kieran; Davies, Benjamin; Robbins, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential to the cell. Both iron deficiency and overload impinge negatively on cardiac health. Thus, effective iron homeostasis is important for cardiac function. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron-exporting protein, plays an essential role in iron homeostasis at the systemic level. It increases systemic iron availability by releasing iron from the cells of the duodenum, spleen, and liver, the sites of iron absorption, recycling, and storage respectively. However, FPN is also found in tissues with no known role in systemic iron handling, such as the heart, where its function remains unknown. To explore this function, we generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Fpn. We show that these animals have severely impaired cardiac function, with a median survival of 22 wk, despite otherwise unaltered systemic iron status. We then compared their phenotype with that of ubiquitous hepcidin knockouts, a recognized model of the iron-loading disease hemochromatosis. The phenotype of the hepcidin knockouts was far milder, with normal survival up to 12 mo, despite far greater iron loading in the hearts. Histological examination demonstrated that, although cardiac iron accumulates within the cardiomyocytes of Fpn knockouts, it accumulates predominantly in other cell types in the hepcidin knockouts. We conclude, first, that cardiomyocyte FPN is essential for intracellular iron homeostasis and, second, that the site of deposition of iron within the heart determines the severity with which it affects cardiac function. Both findings have significant implications for the assessment and treatment of cardiac complications of iron dysregulation. PMID:25713362

  20. Drug Treatment of Cardiac Failure

    PubMed Central

    Achong, M. R.; Kumana, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of cardiac failure should first be aimed at reversing or ameliorating the underlying pathological processes. This review highlights the common problems and pitfalls in the use of digoxin, diuretics and vasodilators in patients with cardiac failure. PMID:21289849

  1. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  2. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  3. Acute cardiac support with intravenous milrinone promotes recovery from early brain injury in a murine model of severe subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tomoko; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Yukiko; Tsuru, Yoshiharu; Tsubone, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Taki, Yasuyuki

    2016-12-23

    Early brain injury/ischemia (EBI) is a serious complication early after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that contributes to development of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). This study aimed to determine the role of inotropic cardiac support using milrinone (MIL) on restoring acute cerebral hypoperfusion attributable to EBI and improving outcomes after experimental SAH. Forty-three male C57BL/6 mice were assigned to either sham surgery (SAH-sham), SAH induced by endovascular perforation plus postconditioning with 2% isoflurane (Control), or SAH plus isoflurane combined with MIL with and without hypoxia-inducible factor inhibitor (HIF-I) pretreatment. Cardiac output (CO) during intravenous MIL infusion (0.25-0.75 μg/kg/min) between 1.5 and 2.5h after SAH induction was monitored with Doppler-echocardiography. MRI-continuous arterial spin labeling was used for quantitative CBF measurements. Neurobehavioral function was assessed daily by neurological score and open field test. DCI was analyzed 3 days later by determining infarction on MRI. Mild reduction of cardiac output (CO) and global cerebral blood flow (CBF) depression were notable early after SAH. MIL increased CO in a dose-dependent manner (P <0.001), which was accompanied by improved hypoperfusion, incidence of DCI and functional recovery than Control (P <0.05). The neuroprotective effects afforded by MIL or Control were attenuated by HIF inhibition (P <0.05). These results suggest that MIL improves acute hypoperfusion by its inotropic effect, leading to neurobehavioral improvement in mice after severe SAH, in which HIF may be acting as a critical mediator. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. T-box factors determine cardiac design.

    PubMed

    Hoogaars, W M H; Barnett, P; Moorman, A F M; Christoffels, V M

    2007-03-01

    The heart of higher vertebrates is a structurally complicated multi-chambered pump that contracts synchronously. For its proper function a number of distinct integrated components have to be generated, including force-generating compartments, unidirectional valves, septa and a system in charge of the initiation and coordinated propagation of the depolarizing impulse over the heart. Not surprisingly, a large number of regulating factors are involved in these processes that act in complex and intertwined pathways to regulate the activity of target genes responsible for morphogenesis and function. The finding that mutations in T-box transcription factor-encoding genes in humans lead to congenital heart defects has focused attention on the importance of this family of regulators in heart development. Functional and genetic analyses in a variety of divergent species has demonstrated the critical roles of multiple T-box factor gene family members, including Tbx11, -2, -3, -5, -18 and -20, in the patterning, recruitment, specification, differentiation and growth processes underlying formation and integration of the heart components. Insight into the roles of T-box factors in these processes will enhance our understanding of heart formation and the underlying molecular regulatory pathways.

  5. Emergency Cardiac Care: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors review the new guidelines for basic life support and advanced cardiac life support and the recommended changes to the standards. The changes recommended for basic life support will simplify the psychomotor skills required. The recommended changes to the guidelines for advanced cardiac life support, which include discontinuing the use of isoproterenol and limiting the use of sodium bicarbonate in cardiac arrest, are likely to improve survival rates. Controversies in the management of cardiac arrest are also discussed. PMID:21253157

  6. Model output: fact or artefact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, Lieke

    2015-04-01

    As a third-year PhD-student, I relatively recently entered the wonderful world of scientific Hydrology. A science that has many pillars that directly impact society, for example with the prediction of hydrological extremes (both floods and drought), climate change, applications in agriculture, nature conservation, drinking water supply, etcetera. Despite its demonstrable societal relevance, hydrology is often seen as a science between two stools. Like Klemeš (1986) stated: "By their academic background, hydrologists are foresters, geographers, electrical engineers, geologists, system analysts, physicists, mathematicians, botanists, and most often civil engineers." Sometimes it seems that the engineering genes are still present in current hydrological sciences, and this results in pragmatic rather than scientific approaches for some of the current problems and challenges we have in hydrology. Here, I refer to the uncertainty in hydrological modelling that is often neglected. For over thirty years, uncertainty in hydrological models has been extensively discussed and studied. But it is not difficult to find peer-reviewed articles in which it is implicitly assumed that model simulations represent the truth rather than a conceptualization of reality. For instance in trend studies, where data is extrapolated 100 years ahead. Of course one can use different forcing datasets to estimate the uncertainty of the input data, but how to prevent that the output is not a model artefact, caused by the model structure? Or how about impact studies, e.g. of a dam impacting river flow. Measurements are often available for the period after dam construction, so models are used to simulate river flow before dam construction. Both are compared in order to qualify the effect of the dam. But on what basis can we tell that the model tells us the truth? Model validation is common nowadays, but validation only (comparing observations with model output) is not sufficient to assume that a

  7. Optical Waveguide Output Couplers Fabricated in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Abushagur, Mustafa A. G.; Ashley, Paul R.; Johnson-Cole, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Waveguide output couplers fabricated in Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA) #81 and AMOCO Ultradel 9020D polyimide are investigated. The output couplers are implemented using periodic relief gratings on a planar waveguide. Design theory of the couplers is based on the perturbation approach. Coupling of light from waveguide propagation modes to output radiation modes is described by coupled mode theory and the transmission line approximation of the perturbed area (grating structure). Using these concepts, gratings can be accurately designed to output a minimum number of modes at desired output angles. Waveguide couplers were designed using these concepts. These couplers were fabricated and analyzed for structural accuracy, output beam accuracy, and output efficiency. The results for the two different materials are compared.

  8. Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy in adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph; Glaser, Alex E; Wolf, Matthew J

    2013-07-01

    In response to stress and extracellular signals, the heart undergoes a process called cardiac hypertrophy during which cardiomyocytes increase in size. If untreated, cardiac hypertrophy can progress to overt heart failure that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The identification of molecular signals that cause or modify cardiomyopathies is necessary to understand how the normal heart progresses to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is essential for normal human cardiac function, and the inhibition of RTKs can cause dilated cardiomyopathies. However, neither investigations of activated RTK signaling pathways nor the characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the adult fly heart has been previously described. Therefore, we developed strategies using Drosophila as a model to circumvent some of the complexities associated with mammalian models of cardiovascular disease. Transgenes encoding activated EGFR(A887T), Ras85D(V12) and Ras85D(V12S35), which preferentially signal to Raf, or constitutively active human or fly Raf caused hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as determined by decreased end diastolic lumen dimensions, abnormal cardiomyocyte fiber morphology and increased heart wall thicknesses. There were no changes in cardiomyocyte cell numbers. Additionally, activated Raf also induced an increase in cardiomyocyte ploidy compared with control hearts. However, preventing increases in cardiomyocyte ploidy using fizzy-related (Fzr) RNAi did not rescue Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that Raf-mediated polyploidization is not required for cardiac hypertrophy. Similar to mammals, the cardiac-specific expression of RNAi directed against MEK or ERK rescued Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. However, the cardiac-specific expression of activated ERK(D334N), which promotes hyperplasia in non-cardiac tissues, did not cause myocyte hypertrophy. These results suggest that ERK is necessary, but not sufficient, for

  9. Integrin binding angiopoietin-1 monomers reduce cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Dallabrida, Susan M.; Ismail, Nesreen S.; Pravda, Elke A.; Parodi, Emily M.; Dickie, Renee; Durand, Ellen M.; Lai, Jean; Cassiola, Flavia; Rogers, Rick A.; Rupnick, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    Angiopoietins were thought to be endothelial cell-specific via the tie2 receptor. We showed that angiopoietin-1 (ang1) also interacts with integrins on cardiac myocytes (CMs) to increase survival. Because ang1 monomers bind and activate integrins (not tie2), we determined their function in vivo. We examined monomer and multimer expressions during physiological and pathological cardiac remodeling and overexpressed ang1 monomers in phenylephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Cardiac ang1 levels (mRNA, protein) increased during postnatal development and decreased with phenylephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophy, whereas tie2 phosphorylations were unchanged. We found that most or all of the changes during cardiac remodeling were in monomers, offering an explanation for unchanged tie2 activity. Heart tissue contains abundant ang1 monomers and few multimers (Western blotting). We generated plasmids that produce ang1 monomers (ang1–256), injected them into mice, and confirmed cardiac expression (immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR). Ang1 monomers localize to CMs, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. In phenylephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophy, ang1–256 reduced left ventricle (LV)/tibia ratios, fetal gene expressions (atrial and brain natriuretic peptides, skeletal actin, β-myosin heavy chain), and fibrosis (collagen III), and increased LV prosurvival signaling (akt, MAPKp42/44), and AMPKT172. However, tie2 phosphorylations were unchanged. Ang1–256 increased integrin-linked kinase, a key regulator of integrin signaling and cardiac health. Collectively, these results suggest a role for ang1 monomers in cardiac remodeling.—Dallabrida, S. M., Ismail, N. S., Pravda, E. A., Parodi, E. M., Dickie, R., Durand, E. M., Lai, J., Cassiola, F., Rogers, R. A., Rupnick, M. A. Integrin binding angiopoietin-1 monomers reduce cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:18502941

  10. Data analysis in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Pedrón-Torecilla, Jorge; Hernández, Ismael; Liberos, Alejandro; Climent, Andreu M; Guillem, María S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an increasingly present in developed countries and represent a major health and economic burden. The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is closely linked to the electrical function of the heart. Consequently, the analysis of the electrical signal generated by the heart tissue, either recorded invasively or noninvasively, provides valuable information for the study of cardiac arrhythmias. In this chapter, novel cardiac signal analysis techniques that allow the study and diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias are described, with emphasis on cardiac mapping which allows for spatiotemporal analysis of cardiac signals.Cardiac mapping can serve as a diagnostic tool by recording cardiac signals either in close contact to the heart tissue or noninvasively from the body surface, and allows the identification of cardiac sites responsible of the development or maintenance of arrhythmias. Cardiac mapping can also be used for research in cardiac arrhythmias in order to understand their mechanisms. For this purpose, both synthetic signals generated by computer simulations and animal experimental models allow for more controlled physiological conditions and complete access to the organ.

  11. Cardiac PACS: strategies for planning, integration & vendor selection.

    PubMed

    Bruski, Georgann B; Cutler, Sara

    2003-01-01

    Cardiologists are clamoring for better imaging techniques, the ability to view images from their office or home, and for the resulting improvement in efficiency which translates into increased profitability. The future is here; are you ready? Cardiac systems have developed into full-blown information management and digital imaging systems. Hospitals are moving aggressively to update their cardiac information systems and identifying the significant role the CIS (cardiac information system) plays in the selection process. It is important to plan the infrastructure of your cardiac PACS (picture archival communication system) and determine how it will integrate with the radiology PACS. Equally important is the integration potential with other hospital information systems such as the laboratory, pharmacy and billing, etc. Answers to these decision factors are provided in addition to information pertaining to the overall cardiac PACS planning process and vendor offerings.

  12. Matrix identity and tractional forces influence indirect cardiac reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yen P.; Carrion, Bita; Singh, Rahul K.; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Heart regeneration through in vivo cardiac reprogramming has been demonstrated as a possible regenerative strategy. While it has been reported that cardiac reprogramming in vivo is more efficient than in vitro, the influence of the extracellular microenvironment on cardiac reprogramming remains incompletely understood. This understanding is necessary to improve the efficiency of cardiac reprogramming in order to implement this strategy successfully. Here we have identified matrix identity and cell-generated tractional forces as key determinants of the dedifferentiation and differentiation stages during reprogramming. Cell proliferation, matrix mechanics, and matrix microstructure are also important, but play lesser roles. Our results suggest that the extracellular microenvironment can be optimized to enhance cardiac reprogramming. PMID:24326998

  13. Cardiac safety in vascular access surgery and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Malik, Jan; Kudlicka, Jaroslav; Tesar, Vladimir; Linhart, Ales

    2015-01-01

    More than 50% of all end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients die from cardiovascular complications. Among them, heart failure and pulmonary hypertension play a major role, and published studies document significantly higher mortality rates in patients with these two states. Arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) and arteriovenous grafts (AVG) are the preferred types of vascular access (VA). However, both AVF and AVG increase cardiac output and in turn could contribute to (the decompensation of) heart failure or pulmonary hypertension. No really safe access flow volume exists, and the ESRD patients' reactions to it vary considerably. We review the mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular consequences of increased cardiac output and available literary data. The link between access flow volume and increased mortality due to pulmonary hypertension or heart failure probably exists, but still has not been directly evidenced. Regular echocardiography is advisable especially in patients with symptoms or with high VA flow (>1,500 ml/min).

  14. Cardiac troponins and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Michael J; Jarolim, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Measurement of circulating cardiac troponins I and T has become integral to the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. This article discusses the structure and function of the troponin complex and the release of cardiac troponin molecules from the injured cardiomyocyte into the circulation. An overview of current cardiac troponin assays and their classification according to sensitivity is presented. The diagnostic criteria, role, and usefulness of cardiac troponin for myocardial infarction are discussed. In addition, several examples are given of the usefulness of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays for short-term and long-term prediction of adverse events.

  15. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment.

  16. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment. PMID:26085764

  17. Cardiac arrhythmias produced by ultrasound and contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Claudio

    Ultrasound is used widely in medicine for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Ultrasound contrast agents are suspensions of gas-filled microbubbles used to enhance diagnostic imaging. Microbubble contrast agents can increase the likelihood of bioeffects of ultrasound associated with acoustic cavitation. Under certain exposure conditions, the interaction of ultrasound with cardiac tissues can produce cardiac arrhythmias. The general objective of this thesis was to develop a greater understanding of ultrasound-induced premature cardiac beats. The hypothesis guiding this work was that acoustic cavitation is the physical mechanism for the production of arrhythmias with ultrasound. This hypothesis was tested through a series of experiments with mice in vivo and theoretical investigations. Results of this research supported the acoustic cavitation hypothesis. The acoustic pressure threshold for premature beats was significantly lower with microbubble contrast agents present in the blood than without. With microbubbles, the threshold for premature beats was below the current output limits of diagnostic devices. The threshold was not significantly dependent upon contrast agent type and was not influenced by contrast agent dose over three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the dependence of the threshold on acoustic frequency was consistent with the frequency dependence of acoustic cavitation. Experimentally determined thresholds for premature beats in vivo were in excellent agreement with theoretically estimated thresholds for inertial cavitation. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to measure the acoustic emissions produced by cavitating microbubbles in vivo. A direct correlation between the amplitude of the PCD and the percentage of ultrasound pulses producing a premature beat was consistent with cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect. Although this thesis focused on the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound-induced arrhythmias, more persistent

  18. Short-term effects of oral dronedarone administration on cardiac function, blood pressure and electrocardiogram in conscious telemetry dogs

    PubMed Central

    SAENGKLUB, Nakkawee; YOUNGBLOOD, Brad; DEL RIO, Carlos; SAWANGKOON, Suwanakiet; HAMLIN, Robert L.; KIJTAWORNRAT, Anusak

    2016-01-01

    Dronedarone is a multichannel blocking antiarrhythmic drug that has been used for management of atrial fibrillation in humans, but the data in veterinary medicine are inadequate. The objective of this study was to determine the short-term effects of oral dronedarone on cardiac inotropy and lusitropy, blood pressure and electrocardiogram (ECG) in healthy dogs. A total of 6 beagle dogs were instrumented with telemetry units and sono-micrometry crystals to obtain left ventricular pressure-volume relationship, mean blood pressure (MBP) and ECG. Dogs were given orally dronedarone (20 mg/kg, twice per day) for 7 days. All parameters were obtained hourly at 4–8 hr after the first dose and at 12-, 96- (day 4) and 168-hr (day 7) after dosing. The results showed that dronedarone had no effect on inotropy and lusitropy, while it significantly lengthened PQ interval (P<0.001) and lowered MBP (P<0.05). Dronedarone also tended to reduce cardiac output (P=0.237) and heart rate (P=0.057). These results suggested that short-term effects of oral dronedarone administration at a dose of 20 mg/kg, twice per day, produced negative dromotropy with minimal effect on cardiac function in conscious dogs. PMID:26922916

  19. Cardiac T1 Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    T1 mapping of the heart has evolved into a valuable tool to evaluate myocardial tissue properties, with or without contrast injection, including assessment of myocardial edema and free water content, extra-cellular volume (expansion), and most recently cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The MRI pulse sequence techniques developed for these applications have had to address at least two important considerations for cardiac applications: measure magnetization inversion recoveries during cardiac motion with sufficient temporal resolution for the shortest expected T1 values, and, secondly, obtain these measurements within a time during which a patient can comfortably suspend breathing. So-called Look-Locker techniques, and variants thereof, which all sample multiple points of a magnetization recovery after each magnetization preparation have therefore become a mainstay in this field. The rapid pace of advances and new findings based on cardiac T1 mapping for assessment of diffuse fibrosis, or myocardial edema show that these techniques enrich the capabilities of MRI for myocardial tissue profiling, which is arguably unmatched by other cardiac imaging modalities. PMID:24509619

  20. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Yasser Mahrous; Yehia, Reem

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases PMID:24653793

  1. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  2. Paradoxical hypertension with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Herzog, Eyal; Halpern, Dan G; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-10-01

    Subacute (medical) tamponade develops over a period of days or even weeks. Previous studies have shown that subacute tamponade is uncommonly associated with hypotension. On the contrary, many of those patients are indeed hypertensive at initial presentation. We sought to determine the prevalence and predictors of hypertensive cardiac tamponade and hemodynamic response to pericardial effusion drainage. We conducted a retrospective study of patients who underwent pericardial effusion drainage for subacute pericardial tamponade. Diagnosis of pericardial tamponade was established by the treating physician based on clinical data and supportive echocardiographic findings. Patients were defined as hypertensive if initial systolic blood pressure (BP) was ≥140 mm Hg. Thirty patients with subacute tamponade who underwent pericardial effusion drainage were included in the analysis. Eight patients (27%) were hypertensive with a mean systolic BP of 167 compared to 116 mm Hg in 22 nonhypertensive patients. Hypertensive patients with tamponade were more likely to have advanced renal disease (63% vs 14%, p <0.05) and pre-existing hypertension (88% vs 46, p <0.05) and less likely to have systemic malignancy (0 vs 41%, p <0.05). Systolic BP decreased significantly in patients with hypertensive tamponade after pericardial effusion drainage. Those results are consistent with previous studies with an estimated prevalence of hypertensive tamponade from 27% to 43%. In conclusion, a hypertensive response was observed in approximately 1/3 of patients with subacute pericardial tamponade. Relief of cardiac tamponade commonly resulted in a decrease in BP.

  3. Cardiac safety of liposomal anthracyclines.

    PubMed

    Ewer, Michael S; Martin, Francis J; Henderson, Craig; Shapiro, Charles L; Benjamin, Robert S; Gabizon, Alberto A

    2004-12-01

    Conventional anthracyclines are active against many tumor types, but cardiotoxicity related to the cumulative dose may limit their use; this is particularly problematic for patients with risk factors for increased toxicity, for those who have received any anthracycline in the past, or for those who are to receive other cardiotoxic agents. Preclinical studies determined that encapsulating conventional anthracyclines in liposomes reduced the incidence and severity of cumulative dose-related cardiomyopathy while preserving antitumor activity. In controlled clinical trials, the risk of cardiotoxicity was significantly lower when nonpegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Myocet [NPLD]) was substituted for conventional doxorubicin, but the risk was not significantly different when NPLD was used in place of conventional epirubicin. Direct comparisons to conventional doxorubicin therapy showed comparable efficacy but significantly lower risk of cardiotoxicity with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil/Caelyx [PLD]) therapy. Retrospective and prospective trials have not identified a maximum "cardiac safe" dose of PLD, despite use of cumulative doses exceeding 2,000 mg/m2 in some patients. Liposomal daunorubicin (DaunoXome [DNX]) may be associated with a lower risk of cardiotoxicity than conventional anthracyclines, but comparative trials are not available. With respect to combination chemotherapy, early results of clinical trials suggest that combining trastuzumab or a taxane with NPLD or PLD instead of a conventional anthracycline significantly reduces cardiotoxicity risk without reducing chemotherapeutic efficacy. Further results are eagerly awaited from ongoing controlled trials of cardiac safety with long-term liposomal anthracycline therapy, either alone or in combination with other potentially cardiotoxic agents.

  4. PREVIMER : Meteorological inputs and outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenel, H.; Lecornu, F.; Kerléguer, L.

    2009-09-01

    PREVIMER is a pre-operational system aiming to provide a wide range of users, from private individuals to professionals, with short-term forecasts about the coastal environment along the French coastlines bordering the English Channel, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Mediterranean Sea. Observation data and digital modelling tools first provide 48-hour (probably 96-hour by summer 2009) forecasts of sea states, currents, sea water levels and temperatures. The follow-up of an increasing number of biological parameters will, in time, complete this overview of coastal environment. Working in partnership with the French Naval Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine, SHOM), the French National Weather Service (Météo-France), the French public science and technology research institute (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, IRD), the European Institute of Marine Studies (Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, IUEM) and many others, IFREMER (the French public institute fo marine research) is supplying the technologies needed to ensure this pertinent information, available daily on Internet at http://www.previmer.org, and stored at the Operational Coastal Oceanographic Data Centre. Since 2006, PREVIMER publishes the results of demonstrators assigned to limited geographic areas and to specific applications. This system remains experimental. The following topics are covered : Hydrodynamic circulation, sea states, follow-up of passive tracers, conservative or non-conservative (specifically of microbiological origin), biogeochemical state, primary production. Lastly, PREVIMER provides researchers and R&D departments with modelling tools and access to the database, in which the observation data and the modelling results are stored, to undertake environmental studies on new sites. The communication will focus on meteorological inputs to and outputs from PREVIMER. It will draw the lessons from almost 3 years during

  5. The left ventricle as a mechanical engine: from Leonardo da Vinci to the echocardiographic assessment of peak power output-to-left ventricular mass.

    PubMed

    Dini, Frank L; Guarini, Giacinta; Ballo, Piercarlo; Carluccio, Erberto; Maiello, Maria; Capozza, Paola; Innelli, Pasquale; Rosa, Gian M; Palmiero, Pasquale; Galderisi, Maurizio; Razzolini, Renato; Nodari, Savina

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the heart as a mechanical engine dates back to the teachings of Leonardo da Vinci, who was the first to apply the laws of mechanics to the function of the heart. Similar to any mechanical engine, whose performance is proportional to the power generated with respect to weight, the left ventricle can be viewed as a power generator whose performance can be related to left ventricular mass. Stress echocardiography may provide valuable information on the relationship between cardiac performance and recruited left ventricular mass that may be used in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Peak power output-to-mass, obtained during exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography, is a measure that reflects the number of watts that are developed by 100 g of left ventricular mass under maximal stimulation. Power output-to-mass may be calculated as left ventricular power output per 100 g of left ventricular mass: 100× left ventricular power output divided by left ventricular mass (W/100 g). A simplified formula to calculate power output-to-mass is as follows: 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean blood pressure (mmHg)/left ventricular mass (g). When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a mismatch becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and left ventricular mass; when this occurs, a reduction of the peak power output-to-mass index is observed.

  6. Stroke of a cardiac myxoma origin

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2015-01-01

    Objective The clinical features of cardiac myxoma stroke have not been sufficiently described. Debates remain concerning the options and timing of treatment and the clinical outcomes are unknown. This article aims to highlight the pertinent aspects of this rare condition. Methods Data source of the present study came from a comprehensive literature collection of cardiac myxoma stroke in PubMed, Google search engine and Highwire Press for the year range 2000-2014. Results Young adults, female predominance, single cerebral vessel (mostly the middle cerebral artery), multiple territory involvements and solitary left atrial myxoma constituted the outstanding characteristics of this patient setting. The most common affected cerebral vessel (the middle cerebral artery) and areas (the basal ganglion, cerebellum and parietal and temporal regions) corresponded well to the common manifestations of this patient setting, such as conscious alteration, ataxia, hemiparesis and hemiplegia, aphasia and dysarthria. Initial computed tomography scan carried a higher false negative rate for the diagnosis of cerebral infarction than magnetic resonance imaging did. A delayed surgical resection of cardiac myxoma was associated with an increased risk of potential consequences in particular otherwise arterial embolism. The mortality rate of this patient population was 15.3%. Conclusion Cardiac myxoma stroke is rare. Often does it affect young females. For an improved diagnostic accuracy, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and echocardiography are imperative for young stroke patients in identifying the cerebral infarct and determining the stroke of a cardiac origin. Immediate thrombolytic therapy may completely resolve the cerebral stroke and improve the neurologic function of the patients. An early surgical resection of cardiac myxoma is recommended in patients with not large territory cerebral infarct. PMID:26107455

  7. Ethical Issues in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kavarana, Minoo N.; Sade, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    While ethical behavior has always been part of cardiac surgical practice, ethical deliberation has only recently become an important component of cardiac surgical practice. Issues such as informed consent, conflict of interest, and professional self-regulation, among many others, have increasingly attracted the attention of cardiac surgeons. This review covers several broad topics of interest to cardiac surgeons and cardiologists, and treats several other topics more briefly. There is much uncertainty about what the future holds for cardiac surgical practice, research, and culture, and we discuss the background of ethical issues to serve as a platform for envisioning what is to come. PMID:22642634

  8. When the heart stops: a review of cardiac arrest in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Gillian; Paglia, Michael; Bourjeily, Ghada

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is a rare occurrence in pregnancy and may be related to obstetric or medical causes. Pregnancy is associated with profound physiologic changes that prepare the gravida for the challenges of labor and delivery, and resuscitation of the pregnant patient needs to take these changes into consideration. Cardiac output and plasma volume increase in pregnancy and distribute differently with the uterine circulation receiving approximately 17% of the total cardiac output. On the other hand, cardiac output is sensitive to positional changes in the second half of pregnancy but may improve with a lateral tilt of the gravida. Both oxygen reserve and upper airway size decrease in pregnancy, leading to difficulties surrounding airway management. Changes in the volume of distribution, renal and hepatic clearance may impact drug effects and need to be recognized. This review will discuss an overview of pregnancy physiology that is relevant to cardiac resuscitation, detail the challenges in the various resuscitative steps including a synopsis on perimortem delivery, and describe obstetric and nonobstetric causes of mortality and cardiac arrest in pregnancy.

  9. Signal and background at the output of a laser receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepliakov, I. M.

    1985-04-01

    The noise spectrum at the output of a laser receiver (photodetector) in a laser communications or lidar system under the effect of a signal and an external background is determined. It is shown that the spectrum consists of quantum noise and a beat-noise spectrum analogous to the beat-noise spectrum of radio receivers.

  10. Genetics of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Bezzina, Connie R; Lahrouchi, Najim; Priori, Silvia G

    2015-06-05

    Sudden cardiac death occurs in a broad spectrum of cardiac pathologies and is an important cause of mortality in the general population. Genetic studies conducted during the past 20 years have markedly illuminated the genetic basis of the inherited cardiac disorders associated with sudden cardiac death. Here, we review the genetic basis of sudden cardiac death with a focus on the current knowledge on the genetics of the primary electric disorders caused primarily by mutations in genes encoding ion channels, and the cardiomyopathies, which have been attributed to mutations in genes encoding a broader category of proteins, including those of the sarcomere, the cytoskeleton, and desmosomes. We discuss the challenges currently faced in unraveling genetic factors that predispose to sudden cardiac death in the setting of sequela of coronary artery disease and present the genome-wide association studies conducted in recent years on electrocardiographic parameters, highlighting their potential in uncovering new biological insights into cardiac electric function.

  11. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  12. Effects of Obesity on Cardiovascular Hemodynamics, Cardiac Morphology, and Ventricular Function.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Martin A; Omran, Jad; Bostick, Brian P

    2016-12-01

    Obesity produces a variety of hemodynamic alterations that may cause changes in cardiac morphology which predispose to left and right ventricular dysfunction. Various neurohormonal and metabolic alterations commonly associated with obesity may contribute to these abnormalities of cardiac structure and function. These changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, cardiac morphology, and ventricular function may, in severely obese patients, predispose to heart failure, even in the absence of other forms of heart disease (obesity cardiomyopathy). In normotensive obese patients, cardiac involvement is commonly characterized by elevated cardiac output, low peripheral vascular resistance, and increased left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure. Sleep-disordered breathing may lead to pulmonary arterial hypertension and, in association with left heart failure, may contribute to elevation of right heart pressures. These alterations, in association with various neurohormonal and metabolic abnormalities, may produce LV hypertrophy; impaired LV diastolic function; and less commonly, LV systolic dysfunction. Many of these alterations are reversible with substantial voluntary weight loss.

  13. Therapeutic application of inhaled nitric oxide in adult cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Makker, Robina; Mehta, Yatin; Trehan, Naresh; Bapna, Rk

    2006-01-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance can be detrimental to the cardiac output in post-operative cardiac surgical patients. Pulmonary vasodilator therapy by systemic pharmacologic agents is non-selective. Inhaled nitric oxide is a selective pulmonary vasodilator and does not cause systemic hypotension. In this prospective study, 14 adult post-operative cardiac surgical patients with pulmonary hypertension underwent inhaled nitric oxide therapy and their hemodynamic changes were evaluated. Inhaled nitric oxide was administered in doses of 5 ppm-25 ppm. The result was a decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance from 456.57 +/- 137.13 to 357.64 +/- 119.80 dynes-sec- Continued. - See Free Full Text.

  14. Reverse Cardiac Remodeling: A Marker of Better Prognosis in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Reis, José Rosino de Araújo Rocha; Cardoso, Juliano Novaes; Cardoso, Cristina Martins dos Reis; Pereira-Barretto, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In heart failure syndrome, myocardial dysfunction causes an increase in neurohormonal activity, which is an adaptive and compensatory mechanism in response to the reduction in cardiac output. Neurohormonal activity is initially stimulated in an attempt to maintain compensation; however, when it remains increased, it contributes to the intensification of clinical manifestations and myocardial damage. Cardiac remodeling comprises changes in ventricular volume as well as the thickness and shape of the myocardial wall. With optimized treatment, such remodeling can be reversed, causing gradual improvement in cardiac function and consequently improved prognosis. PMID:26131706

  15. Toward microendoscopy-inspired cardiac optogenetics in vivo: technical overview and perspective.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Aleksandra; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    The ability to perform precise, spatially localized actuation and measurements of electrical activity in the heart is crucial in understanding cardiac electrophysiology and devising new therapeutic solutions for control of cardiac arrhythmias. Current cardiac imaging techniques (i.e. optical mapping) employ voltage- or calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes to visualize the electrical signal propagation through cardiac syncytium in vitro or in situ with very high-spatiotemporal resolution. The extension of optogenetics into the cardiac field, where cardiac tissue is genetically altered to express light-sensitive ion channels allowing electrical activity to be elicited or suppressed in a precise cell-specific way, has opened the possibility for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology. In vivo application of cardiac optogenetics faces multiple challenges and necessitates suitable optical systems employing fiber optics to actuate and sense electrical signals. In this technical perspective, we present a compendium of clinically relevant access routes to different parts of the cardiac electrical conduction system based on currently employed catheter imaging systems and determine the quantitative size constraints for endoscopic cardiac optogenetics. We discuss the relevant technical advancements in microendoscopy, cardiac imaging, and optogenetics and outline the strategies for combining them to create a portable, miniaturized fiber-based system for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology in vivo.

  16. Toward microendoscopy-inspired cardiac optogenetics in vivo: technical overview and perspective

    PubMed Central

    Klimas, Aleksandra; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to perform precise, spatially localized actuation and measurements of electrical activity in the heart is crucial in understanding cardiac electrophysiology and devising new therapeutic solutions for control of cardiac arrhythmias. Current cardiac imaging techniques (i.e. optical mapping) employ voltage- or calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes to visualize the electrical signal propagation through cardiac syncytium in vitro or in situ with very high-spatiotemporal resolution. The extension of optogenetics into the cardiac field, where cardiac tissue is genetically altered to express light-sensitive ion channels allowing electrical activity to be elicited or suppressed in a precise cell-specific way, has opened the possibility for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology. In vivo application of cardiac optogenetics faces multiple challenges and necessitates suitable optical systems employing fiber optics to actuate and sense electrical signals. In this technical perspective, we present a compendium of clinically relevant access routes to different parts of the cardiac electrical conduction system based on currently employed catheter imaging systems and determine the quantitative size constraints for endoscopic cardiac optogenetics. We discuss the relevant technical advancements in microendoscopy, cardiac imaging, and optogenetics and outline the strategies for combining them to create a portable, miniaturized fiber-based system for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology in vivo. PMID:25117076

  17. Motor vehicle output and GDP, 1968-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, D. J.; Poyer, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we assess the performance of the BEA series 'value of motor vehicle output' as an indicator of the business cycle over the period 1968-2007. We statistically assess the causal relationship between real motor vehicle output (RMVO) and real gross domestic product (RGDP). This is accomplished by standard estimation and statistical methods used to assess vector autoregressive models. This assessment represents the initial results of a more encompassing research project, the intent of which is to determine the dynamic interaction of the transport sector with the overall economy. It's a start to a more comprehensive assessment of how transport and economic activity interrelate.

  18. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rod S; Dalal, Hayes; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Zawada, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of cardiovascular disease world-wide is one of great concern to patients and health care agencies alike. Traditionally centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and prevent further cardiac illness. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes compared with supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health-related quality of life and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Search methods We updated the search of a previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2007, Issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from 2001 to January 2008. We checked reference lists and sought advice from experts. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (e.g. hospital, gymnasium, sports centre) with home-based programmes, in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone revascularisation. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected independently by two reviewers, and data extracted by a single reviewer and checked by a second one. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missin