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Sample records for cardiac pacemaker program

  1. Generation of cardiac pacemaker cells by programming and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Husse, Britta; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2016-07-01

    A number of diseases are caused by faulty function of the cardiac pacemaker and described as "sick sinus syndrome". The medical treatment of sick sinus syndrome with electrical pacemaker implants in the diseased heart includes risks. These problems may be overcome via "biological pacemaker" derived from different adult cardiac cells or pluripotent stem cells. The generation of cardiac pacemaker cells requires the understanding of the pacing automaticity. Two characteristic phenomena the "membrane-clock" and the "Ca(2+)-clock" are responsible for the modulation of the pacemaker activity. Processes in the "membrane-clock" generating the spontaneous pacemaker firing are based on the voltage-sensitive membrane ion channel activity starting with slow diastolic depolarization and discharging in the action potential. The influence of the intracellular Ca(2+) modulating the pacemaker activity is characterized by the "Ca(2+)-clock". The generation of pacemaker cells started with the reprogramming of adult cardiac cells by targeted induction of one pacemaker function like HCN1-4 overexpression and enclosed in an activation of single pacemaker specific transcription factors. Reprogramming of adult cardiac cells with the transcription factor Tbx18 created cardiac cells with characteristic features of cardiac pacemaker cells. Another key transcription factor is Tbx3 specifically expressed in the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node and sufficient for the induction of the cardiac pacemaker gene program. For a successful cell therapeutic practice, the generated cells should have all regulating mechanisms of cardiac pacemaker cells. Otherwise, the generated pacemaker cells serve only as investigating model for the fundamental research or as drug testing model for new antiarrhythmics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  2. Radioisotope-powered cardiac pacemaker program. Clinical studies of the nuclear pacemaker model NU-5. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Beginning in February, 1970, the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) undertook a program to design, develop and manufacture a radioisotope powered cardiac pacemaker system. The scope of technical work was specified to be: establish system, component, and process cost reduction goals using the prototype Radioisotope Powered Cardiac Pacemaker (RCP) design and develop production techniques to achieve these cost reduction objectives; fabricate radioisotope powered fueled prototype cardiac pacemakers (RCP's) on a pilot production basis; conduct liaison with a Government-designated fueling facility for purposes of defining fueling requirements, fabrication and encapsulation procedures, safety design criteria and quality control and inspection requirements; develop and implement Quality Assurance and Reliability Programs; conduct performance, acceptance, lifetime and reliability tests of fueled RCP's in the laboratory; conduct liaison with the National Institutes of Health and with Government specified medical research institutions selected for the purpose of undertaking clinical evaluation of the RCP in humans; monitor and evaluate, on a continuing basis, all test data; and perform necessary safety analyses and tests. Pacemaker designs were developed and quality assurance and manufacturing procedures established. Prototype pacemakers were fabricated. A total of 126 radioisotope powered units were implanted and have been followed clinically for approximately seven years. Four (4) of these units have failed. Eighty-three (83) units remain implanted and satisfactorily operational. An overall failure rate of less than the target 0.15% per month has been achieved.

  3. The Implantable Cardiac Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, A. S.; Heimbecker, R. O.; Bigelow, W. G.

    1964-01-01

    The transistorized implanted pacemaker is proving to be an effective and reliable method for long-term pacing of the heart. All patients suffering from Stokes-Adams seizures were first given a trial period of conservative therapy, including isoproterenol (Isuprel), ephedrine, atropine and steroids. Twenty-four pacemaker implants were performed on 23 patients over a 21-month period. The preoperative insertion of a pacemaker cardiac catheter was a very valuable safety precaution. In this way the heart could be safely and reliably paced during the period of preoperative assessment and during the critical periods of anesthetic induction and thoracotomy. Infection did not occur, probably because of careful gas sterilization of the units. Various models of pacemakers are compared, and the reasons for two pacemaker failures are presented. There were two early deaths and one late death in the series. The relationship of progressive coronary disease to recent infarction is stressed. Patients having intermittent heart block frequently showed the picture of “competing pacemakers” postoperatively, but without deleterious effect. Twenty patients, between 54 and 88 years of age, are alive and well at the time of reporting, with excellent pacemaker response and no further Stokes-Adams attacks. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:14118681

  4. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N.Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  5. Trends in cardiac pacemaker batteries.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  6. [Future cardiac pacemakers – technical visions].

    PubMed

    Haeberlin, Andreas; Zurbuchen, Adrian; Pfenniger, Aloïs; Fuhrer, Jürg; Vogel, Rolf

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac pacemakers are routinely used for the treatment of bradyarrhythmias. Contemporary pacemakers are reliable and allow for a patient specific programming. However, pacemaker replacements due to battery depletion are common (~25 % of all implantation procedures) and bear the risk of complications. Batteryless pacemakers may allow overcoming this limitation. To power a batteryless pacemaker, a mechanism for intracorporeal energy harvesting is required. Such a generator may consist out of subcutaneously implanted solar cells, transforming the small amount of transcutaneously available light into electrical energy. Alternatively, intravascular turbines may harvest energy from the blood flow. Energy may also be harvested from the ventricular wall motion by a dedicated mechanical clockwork converting motion into electrical energy. All these approaches have successfully been tested in vivo. Pacemaker leads constitute another Achilles heel of contemporary pacemakers. Thus, leadless devices are desired. Miniaturized pacemaker circuits and suitable energy harvesting mechanisms (incorporated in a single device) may allow catheter-based implantation of the pacemaker in the heart. Such miniaturized battery- and leadless pacemakers would combine the advantages of both approaches and overcome major limitations of today’s systems. PMID:26227982

  7. [Future cardiac pacemakers – technical visions].

    PubMed

    Haeberlin, Andreas; Zurbuchen, Adrian; Pfenniger, Aloïs; Fuhrer, Jürg; Vogel, Rolf

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac pacemakers are routinely used for the treatment of bradyarrhythmias. Contemporary pacemakers are reliable and allow for a patient specific programming. However, pacemaker replacements due to battery depletion are common (~25 % of all implantation procedures) and bear the risk of complications. Batteryless pacemakers may allow overcoming this limitation. To power a batteryless pacemaker, a mechanism for intracorporeal energy harvesting is required. Such a generator may consist out of subcutaneously implanted solar cells, transforming the small amount of transcutaneously available light into electrical energy. Alternatively, intravascular turbines may harvest energy from the blood flow. Energy may also be harvested from the ventricular wall motion by a dedicated mechanical clockwork converting motion into electrical energy. All these approaches have successfully been tested in vivo. Pacemaker leads constitute another Achilles heel of contemporary pacemakers. Thus, leadless devices are desired. Miniaturized pacemaker circuits and suitable energy harvesting mechanisms (incorporated in a single device) may allow catheter-based implantation of the pacemaker in the heart. Such miniaturized battery- and leadless pacemakers would combine the advantages of both approaches and overcome major limitations of today’s systems.

  8. Optimal resources for implantable cardiac pacemakers. Pacemaker Study Group.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Furman, S; Smyth, N P; Bilitch, M

    1983-07-01

    In this document, the 1974 Inter-Society Commission for Heart Disease Resources (ICHD) report, Implantable Cardiac Pacemakers, has been revised and updated to emphasize the increased complexity of present-day pacing, to propose realistic guidelines for various aspects of pacing practivce, and to identify the resources needed for delivery of this important mode of health care. The first section of the report describes the several types of pacemakers currently available, how they function, and how and to what purpose they may be modified through noninvasive programming. Recommendations are given for a modified and updated version of the widely accepted ICHD code for identification of pacing modes. The emphasis of the second section of the report is on physical and personnel resources. Matters considered in some depth include the training and qualification of the various medical, technical, and paramedical specialists involved in an implantation procedure; requirements for, and methods of achieving, short and long-term surveillance of pacemaker patients; and the role of the hospital, the manufacturers, and the FDA in this new era of complex dual-chamber, multiprogrammable pacemakers. PMID:6681266

  9. Space Derived Health Aids (Cardiac Pacemaker)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division's (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) pacer is a rechargeable cardiac pacemaker that eliminates the recurring need for surgery to implant a new battery. The Programalith is an advanced cardiac pacing system which permits a physician to reprogram a patient's implanted pacemaker without surgery. System consists of a pacemaker, together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Signals are transmitted by wireless telemetry. Two-way communications, originating from spacecraft electrical power systems technology, allows physician to interrogate the pacemaker as to the status of the heart, then to fine tune the device to best suit the patient's needs.

  10. Lithium iodide cardiac pacemakers: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Burr, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    A new long-life cardiac pacemaker pulse generator powered by a lithium iodide fuel cell was introduced in Canada in 1973. The compact, hermetically sealed unit is easily implanted and reliable, has excellent patient acceptance and has an anticipated battery life of almost 14 years. Among 105 patients who received a lithium iodide pacemaker, complications occurred in 18. The lithium iodide pacemaker represents a significant advance in pacemaker generator technology and is recommended for long-term cardiac pacing; the manufacturer guarantees the pulse generator for 6 years. Images FIG. 1 PMID:974965

  11. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  12. Creating a cardiac pacemaker by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Traian M; Pogwizd, Steven M

    2007-02-01

    While electronic cardiac pacing in its various modalities represents standard of care for treatment of symptomatic bradyarrhythmias and heart failure, it has limitations ranging from absent or rudimentary autonomic modulation to severe complications. This has prompted experimental studies to design and validate a biological pacemaker that could supplement or replace electronic pacemakers. Advances in cardiac gene therapy have resulted in a number of strategies focused on beta-adrenergic receptors as well as specific ion currents that contribute to pacemaker function. This article reviews basic pacemaker physiology, as well as studies in which gene transfer approaches to develop a biological pacemaker have been designed and validated in vivo. Additional requirements and refinements necessary for successful biopacemaker function by gene transfer are discussed. PMID:17139515

  13. Sacral Neuromodulation in Patients With a Cardiac Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe our experience using sacral neuromodulation to treat urinary urgency, frequency, urge incontinence, and chronic urinary retention in patients with cardiac pacemakers. With the increasingly widespread use of InterStim for bladder function restoration, we are seeing more complex patients with multiple comorbidities, including cardiac conditions. Herein, we report 3 cases of individuals with cardiac pacemakers who underwent InterStim implantation to treat urinary conditions. This study is a case series of 3 patients with cardiac pacemakers who underwent sacral neuromodulation to treat refractory voiding dysfunction. The initial patient screening for InterStim therapy involved percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE), in which a temporary untined lead wire was placed through the S3 foramen. Patients who did not respond to PNE proceeded to a staged implant. All patients in this study had a greater than 50% improvement of their urinary symptoms during the initial trial and underwent placement of the InterStim implantable pulse generator (IPG). Postoperative programming was done under electrocardiogram monitoring by a cardiologist. No interference was observed between the Inter-Stim IPG and the cardiac pacemaker. In this group of patients, sacral neuromodulation in the presence of a cardiac pacemaker appears to have been safe. PMID:27706012

  14. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  15. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  16. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  17. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  18. Pacemaker interactions induce reentrant wave dynamics in engineered cardiac culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borek, Bartłomiej; Shajahan, T. K.; Gabriels, James; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Pacemaker interactions can lead to complex wave dynamics seen in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias. We use experimental and mathematical models of pacemakers in heterogeneous excitable media to investigate how pacemaker interactions can be a mechanism for wave break and reentrant wave dynamics. Embryonic chick ventricular cells are cultured invitro so as to create a dominant central pacemaker site that entrains other pacemakers in the medium. Exposure of those cultures to a potassium channel blocker, E-4031, leads to emergence of peripheral pacemakers that compete with each other and with the central pacemaker. Waves emitted by faster pacemakers break up over the slower pacemaker to form reentrant waves. Similar dynamics are observed in a modified FitzHugh-Nagumo model of heterogeneous excitable media with two distinct sites of pacemaking. These findings elucidate a mechanism of pacemaker-induced reentry in excitable media.

  19. Medical devices; revocation of cardiac pacemaker registry. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-11-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to revoke a regulation requiring a cardiac pacemaker registry. The registry, which was mandated by the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984, requires any physician and any provider of services who requests or receives Medicare payment for an implantation, removal, or replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker devices and pacemaker leads to submit certain information to the registry. The information is used by FDA to track the performance of permanent cardiac pacemakers and pacemaker leads and by the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) to administer its Medicare payment program for these devices. This action is being taken to implement an act to Repeal An Unnecessary Medical Device Reporting Requirement passed by Congress in 1996 to remove the cardiac pacemaker registry to eliminate duplicative and unnecessary reporting. PMID:11010690

  20. A new multiprogrammable isotopic powered cardiac pacemaker

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, N.P.; Purdy, D.L.; Sager, D.; Keshishian, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    A new multiprogrammable, isotopic-powered cardiac pacemaker was implanted in six patients as a custom device. Five were initial implants and one was a replacement. The patients were studied for up to two years. In five of the six cases it was found advantageous to change one of the programmable parameters. Multiprogrammability is obviously as important in an isotopic pulse generator as in a lithium unit, if not more so, because of the unit's greater longevity. Further studies are continuing in an FDA approved clinical trial.

  1. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). 870.5550 Section 870.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  2. Modern Perspectives on Numerical Modeling of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V.; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent “coupled-clock” theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies, such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  3. Modern perspectives on numerical modeling of cardiac pacemaker cell.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Victor A; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V; Stern, Michael D; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent "coupled-clock" theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  4. Proton Beam Therapy Interference With Implanted Cardiac Pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Oshiro, Yoshiko Sugahara, Shinji; Noma, Mio; Sato, Masato; Sakakibara, Yuzuru; Sakae, Takeji; Hayashi, Yasutaka; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tsuboi, Koji; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of proton beam therapy (PBT) on implanted cardiac pacemaker function. Methods and Materials: After a phantom study confirmed the safety of PBT in patients with cardiac pacemakers, we treated 8 patients with implanted pacemakers using PBT to a total tumor dose of 33-77 gray equivalents (GyE) in dose fractions of 2.2-6.6 GyE. The combined total number of PBT sessions was 127. Although all pulse generators remained outside the treatment field, 4 patients had pacing leads in the radiation field. All patients were monitored by means of electrocardiogram during treatment, and pacemakers were routinely examined before and after PBT. Results: The phantom study showed no effect of neutron scatter on pacemaker generators. In the study, changes in heart rate occurred three times (2.4%) in 2 patients. However, these patients remained completely asymptomatic throughout the PBT course. Conclusions: PBT can result in pacemaker malfunctions that manifest as changes in pulse rate and pulse patterns. Therefore, patients with cardiac pacemakers should be monitored by means of electrocardiogram during PBT.

  5. Effect of electric and magnetic fields near an HVDC converter terminal on implanted cardiac pacemakers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M.J.

    1980-08-01

    The electromagnetic fields associated with HVDC converters and transmission lines constitute a unique environment for persons with implanted cardiac pacemakers. A measurement program has been conducted to assess the potential interfering effects of these harmonically rich fields on implanted pacemakers. The experimental procedures that were employed take into account the combined effects of the electric and magnetic fields. The effect of the resulting body current on the response of six pacemakers was assessed in the laboratory, using a previously developed model to relate body current to pacemaker pickup voltage. The results show that R-wave pacemaker reversion can be expected at some locations within the converter facility, but that a large safety margin for unperturbed pacemaker operation exists beneath the transmission lines.

  6. Generation of murine cardiac pacemaker cell aggregates based on ES-cell-programming in combination with Myh6-promoter-selection.

    PubMed

    Rimmbach, Christian; Jung, Julia J; David, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of the "sick sinus syndrome" is based on artificial pacemakers. These bear hazards such as battery failure and infections. Moreover, they lack hormone responsiveness and the overall procedure is cost-intensive. "Biological pacemakers" generated from PSCs may become an alternative, yet the typical content of pacemaker cells in Embryoid Bodies (EBs) is extremely low. The described protocol combines "forward programming" of murine PSCs via the sinus node inducer TBX3 with Myh6-promoter based antibiotic selection. This yields cardiomyocyte aggregates consistent of >80% physiologically functional pacemaker cells. These "induced-sinoatrial-bodies" ("iSABs") are spontaneously contracting at yet unreached frequencies (400-500 bpm) corresponding to nodal cells isolated from mouse hearts and are able to pace murine myocardium ex vivo. Using the described protocol highly pure sinus nodal single cells can be generated which e.g. can be used for in vitro drug testing. Furthermore, the iSABs generated according to this protocol may become a crucial step towards heart tissue engineering. PMID:25742394

  7. [Infections secondary to implantation of cardiac pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Da Costa, A; Kirkorian, G; Chevalier, P; Cerisier, A; Chalvidan, T; Obadia, J F; Etienne, J; Isaaz, K; Touboul, P

    1998-06-01

    Infectious complications of pacemaker implantation are not common but may be particularly severe. Localised wound infections at the site of implantation have been reported in 0.5% of cases in the most recent series with an average of about 2%. The incidence of septicaemia and infectious endocarditis is lower, about 0.5% of cases. The operator's experience, the duration of the procedure and repeat procedures are considered to be predisposing factors. The main cause of these infections is though to be local contamination during the implantation. The commonest causal organism is the staphylococcus (75 to 92%), the staphylococcus aureus being the cause of acute infections whereas the staphylococcus epidermis is associated with cases of secondary infection. The usual clinical presentation is infection at the site of the pacemaker but other forms such as abscess, endocarditis, rejection of the implanted material, septic emboli and septic phlebitis have been described. The diagnosis is confirmed by local and systemic biological investigations and by echocardiography (especially transoesophageal echocardiography) in cases of right heart endocarditis. There are two axes of treatment: bactericidal double antibiotherapy and surgical ablation of the infected material either percutaneously or by cardiotomy. Though controversial, and unsupported by scientific evidence, the role of systematic, preoperative, prophylactic antibiotic therapy in the prevention of these complications seems to be increasing. PMID:9749192

  8. Pacemaker lead-associated thrombosis in cardiac resynchronisation therapy.

    PubMed

    Buttigieg, Jesmar; Asciak, Rachelle; Azzopardi, Charles Mallia

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker lead-associated thrombosis is a possible complication of any cardiac implantable electronic device. We present a case of a middle-aged woman with a history of ischaemic left ventricular failure, who presented with fever and other non-specific symptoms 4 months after cardiac resynchronisation therapy. A transoesophageal echocardiogram confirmed a vegetation-like structure originating from the pacemaker lead in the right atrium. The patient was treated with intravenous antibiotics followed by open heart surgery in order to remove this mass as well as the pacing device, including all three pacing leads. Histology and culture of the retrieved mass confirmed a sterile thrombus with no features to suggest an infected mass (vegetation). The patient made an uncomplicated recovery and there were no long-term sequelae on follow-up during the 2 years after the event. PMID:26153289

  9. Materials aspects of implantable cardiac pacemaker leads.

    PubMed

    Bruck, S D; Mueller, E P

    1988-01-01

    The reliability of the leads of the entire pacemaker system is vital as the risks of failure include: (1) loss of pacing due to the deterioration of the polymeric insulator in the physiological environment; (2) thromboembolism due to inadequate blood compatibility of the insulator; (3) tissue reactions at the electrode/tissue interface; (4) general foreign body rejection phenomena; (5) perforation of the leads; and (6) excessive stress applied by sutures causing abrasion and stress cracking. Although silicone has been used widely, some years ago Pellethane (a segmented polyetherurethane-urea) has been introduced as an alternate lead insulator, chiefly because it can be extruded using additives into smooth and thin tubes. The additives (antioxidants), extrusion aids, and low molecular weight polymer chains (oligomers) together represent up to approximately 8% by weight of leachables, depending on the extraction medium. The in vivo degradation of Pellethane is biologic in nature and is most likely associated with the absorption and premeation of body fluids from the surrounding physiologic environment leading to stress cracking via the formation of microvoids. Thermally and biologically unstable biuret and allophonate groups in this polyurethane, exposure of the polymer to high extrusion temperatures, and stresses created within the polymer also play key roles in the degradation process. In the case of electrodes, some corrosion can occur even with noble metals and ions formed with the involvement of penetrating body fluids which may combine with the urethane and/or urea groups of the polyurethane, leading to its further degradation in vivo. The totality of the situation indicates a need for the development of a standard guideline for the uniform and consistent pre-clinical testing and evaluation of new materials and fabrication processes of implantable pacemaker leads. Such guidelines should take into consideration, among others, the physiological environment

  10. Materials aspects of implantable cardiac pacemaker leads.

    PubMed

    Bruck, S D; Mueller, E P

    1988-01-01

    The reliability of the leads of the entire pacemaker system is vital as the risks of failure include: (1) loss of pacing due to the deterioration of the polymeric insulator in the physiological environment; (2) thromboembolism due to inadequate blood compatibility of the insulator; (3) tissue reactions at the electrode/tissue interface; (4) general foreign body rejection phenomena; (5) perforation of the leads; and (6) excessive stress applied by sutures causing abrasion and stress cracking. Although silicone has been used widely, some years ago Pellethane (a segmented polyetherurethane-urea) has been introduced as an alternate lead insulator, chiefly because it can be extruded using additives into smooth and thin tubes. The additives (antioxidants), extrusion aids, and low molecular weight polymer chains (oligomers) together represent up to approximately 8% by weight of leachables, depending on the extraction medium. The in vivo degradation of Pellethane is biologic in nature and is most likely associated with the absorption and premeation of body fluids from the surrounding physiologic environment leading to stress cracking via the formation of microvoids. Thermally and biologically unstable biuret and allophonate groups in this polyurethane, exposure of the polymer to high extrusion temperatures, and stresses created within the polymer also play key roles in the degradation process. In the case of electrodes, some corrosion can occur even with noble metals and ions formed with the involvement of penetrating body fluids which may combine with the urethane and/or urea groups of the polyurethane, leading to its further degradation in vivo. The totality of the situation indicates a need for the development of a standard guideline for the uniform and consistent pre-clinical testing and evaluation of new materials and fabrication processes of implantable pacemaker leads. Such guidelines should take into consideration, among others, the physiological environment

  11. Integrative Modeling of Electrical Properties of Pacemaker Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2016-06-01

    This work represents modeling of electrical properties of pacemaker (sinus) cardiac cells. Special attention is paid to electrical potential arising from transmembrane current of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions. This potential is calculated using the NaCaX model. In this respect, molar concentration of ions in the intercellular space which is calculated on the basis of the GENTEX model is essential. Combined use of two different models allows referring this approach to integrative modeling.

  12. Plethyzmography in assessment of hemodynamic results of pacemaker functions programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, Dariusz; Sionek, Piotr; Peczalski, Kazimierz; Janusek, Dariusz

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents potential role of plethyzmography in optimization of heart hemodynamic function during pacemaker programming. The assessment of optimal stroke volume in patients, with implanted dual chamber pacemaker (DDD), by plethyzmography was a goal of the study. The data were collected during pacing rhythm. 20 patients (8 female and 12 male, average 77.4+/-4.6 years) with dual chamber pacemaker (DDD) and with pacing rhythm during routine pacemaker control and study tests were incorporated in the study group. Hemodynamic parameters were assessed during modification of atrio-ventricular delay (AVD) for pacing rhythm of 70 bpm and 90 bpm. The time of atrioventricular was programmed with 20 ms steps within range 100-200 ms and data were recorded with two minutes delay between two consecutive measurements. Stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) were calculated from plethyzmographic signal by using Beatscope software (TNO Holand). Highest SV calculated for given pacing rhythm was named optimal stroke volume (OSV) and consequently highest cardiac output was named maximal cardiac output (MCO). The time of atrio-ventricular delay for OSV was named optimal atrioventricular delay (OAVD). The results have showed: mean values of OAVD for 70 bpm - 152+/-33 ms and for 90 bpm -149+/-35 ms, shortening of the mean OAVD time caused by increase of pacing rate from 70 bpm to 90 bpm what resulted in statistically significant decrease of OSV with not statistically significant increase of MCO. The analysis of consecutive patients revealed three types of response to increase of pacing rhythm: 1. typical-shortening of OAVD, 2. neutral-no change of OAVD and 3.atypical-lengthening of OAVD.

  13. Pacemaker Dependency after Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe postoperative conduction disturbances requiring permanent pacemaker implantation frequently occur following cardiac surgery. Little is known about the long-term pacing requirements and risk factors for pacemaker dependency in this population. Methods We performed a systematic review of the literature addressing rates and predictors of pacemaker dependency in patients requiring permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery. Using a comprehensive search of the Medline, Web of Science and EMBASE databases, studies were selected for review based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results A total of 8 studies addressing the endpoint of pacemaker-dependency were identified, while 3 studies were found that addressed the recovery of atrioventricular (AV) conduction endpoint. There were 10 unique studies with a total of 780 patients. Mean follow-up ranged from 6–72 months. Pacemaker dependency rates ranged from 32%-91% and recovery of AV conduction ranged from 16%-42%. There was significant heterogeneity with respect to the definition of pacemaker dependency. Several patient and procedure-specific variables were found to be independently associated with pacemaker dependency, but these were not consistent between studies. Conclusions Pacemaker dependency following cardiac surgery occurs with variable frequency. While individual studies have identified various perioperative risk factors for pacemaker dependency and non-resolution of AV conduction disease, results have been inconsistent. Well-conducted studies using a uniform definition of pacemaker dependency might identify patients who will benefit most from early permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery. PMID:26470027

  14. Direct activation of cardiac pacemaker channels by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D; Tortora, P

    1991-05-01

    Cyclic AMP acts as a second messenger in the modulation of several ion channels that are typically controlled by a phosphorylation process. In cardiac pacemaker cells, adrenaline and acetylcholine regulate the hyperpolarization-activated current (if), but in opposite ways; this current is involved in the generation and modulation of pacemaker activity. These actions are mediated by cAMP and underlie control of spontaneous rate by neurotransmitters. Whether the cAMP modulation of if is mediated by channel phosphorylation is, however, still unknown. Here we investigate the action of cAMP on if in excised patches of cardiac pacemaker cells and find that cAMP activates if by a mechanism independent of phosphorylation, involving a direct interaction with the channels at their cytoplasmic side. Cyclic AMP activates if by shifting its activation curve to more positive voltages, in agreement with whole-cell results. This is the first evidence of an ion channel whose gating is dually regulated by voltage and direct cAMP binding.

  15. Potential effects of intrinsic heart pacemaker cell mechanisms on dysrhythmic cardiac action potential firing

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Tsutsui, Kenta; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The heart's regular electrical activity is initiated by specialized cardiac pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node. The rate and rhythm of spontaneous action potential firing of sinoatrial node cells are regulated by stochastic mechanisms that determine the level of coupling of chemical to electrical clocks within cardiac pacemaker cells. This coupled-clock system is modulated by autonomic signaling from the brain via neurotransmitter release from the vagus and sympathetic nerves. Abnormalities in brain-heart clock connections or in any molecular clock activity within pacemaker cells lead to abnormalities in the beating rate and rhythm of the pacemaker tissue that initiates the cardiac impulse. Dysfunction of pacemaker tissue can lead to tachy-brady heart rate alternation or exit block that leads to long atrial pauses and increases susceptibility to other cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review evidence for the idea that disturbances in the intrinsic components of pacemaker cells may be implemented in arrhythmia induction in the heart. PMID:25755643

  16. The effects of nuclear magnetic resonance on patients with cardiac pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlicek, W.; Geisinger, M.; Castle, L.; Borkowski, G.P.; Meaney, T.F.; Bream, B.L.; Gallagher, J.H.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging on six representative cardiac pacemakers was studied. The results indicate that the threshold for initiating the asynchronous mode of a pacemaker is 17 gauss. Radiofrequency levels are present in an NMR unit and may confuse or possibly inhibit demand pacemakers, although sensing circuitry is normally provided with electromagnetic interference discrimination. Time-varying magnetic fields can generate pulse amplitudes and frequencies to mimic cardiac activity. A serious limitation in the possibility of imaging a patient with a pacemaker would be the alteration of normal pulsing parameters due to time-varying magnetic fields.

  17. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimization of cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Barker, Chris; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Mereacre, Alexandru; Paoletti, Nicola; Patane, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Implantable cardiac pacemakers are medical devices that can monitor and correct abnormal heart rhythms. To provide the necessary safety assurance for pacemaker software, both testing and verification of the code, as well as testing the entire pacemaker hardware in the loop, is necessary. In this paper, we present a hardware testbed that enables detailed hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimisation of pacemaker algorithms with respect to a heart model. Both the heart and the pacemaker models are encoded in Simulink/Stateflow™ and translated into executable code, with the pacemaker executed directly on the microcontroller. We evaluate the usefulness of the testbed by developing a parameter synthesis algorithm which optimises the timing parameters based on power measurements acquired in real-time. The experiments performed on real measurements successfully demonstrate that the testbed is capable of energy minimisation in real-time and obtains safe pacemaker timing parameters.

  18. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimization of cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Barker, Chris; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Mereacre, Alexandru; Paoletti, Nicola; Patane, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Implantable cardiac pacemakers are medical devices that can monitor and correct abnormal heart rhythms. To provide the necessary safety assurance for pacemaker software, both testing and verification of the code, as well as testing the entire pacemaker hardware in the loop, is necessary. In this paper, we present a hardware testbed that enables detailed hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimisation of pacemaker algorithms with respect to a heart model. Both the heart and the pacemaker models are encoded in Simulink/Stateflow™ and translated into executable code, with the pacemaker executed directly on the microcontroller. We evaluate the usefulness of the testbed by developing a parameter synthesis algorithm which optimises the timing parameters based on power measurements acquired in real-time. The experiments performed on real measurements successfully demonstrate that the testbed is capable of energy minimisation in real-time and obtains safe pacemaker timing parameters. PMID:26737950

  19. Excitation model of pacemaker cardiomyocytes of cardiac conduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardium includes typical and atypical cardiomyocytes - pacemakers, which form the cardiac conduction system. Excitation from the atrioventricular node in normal conditions is possible only in one direction. Retrograde direction of pulses is impossible. The most important prerequisite for the work of cardiomyocytes is the anatomical integrity of the conduction system. Changes in contractile force of the cardiomyocytes, which appear periodically, are due to two mechanisms of self-regulation - heterometric and homeometric. Graphic course of the excitation pulse propagation along the heart muscle more accurately reveals the understanding of the arrhythmia mechanism. These models have the ability to visualize the essence of excitation dynamics. However, they do not have the proper forecasting function for result estimation. Integrative mathematical model enables further investigation of general laws of the myocardium active behavior, allows for determination of the violation mechanism of electrical and contractile function of cardiomyocytes. Currently, there is no full understanding of the topography of pacemakers and ionic mechanisms. There is a need for the development of direction of mathematical modeling and comparative studies of the electrophysiological arrangement of cells of atrioventricular connection and ventricular conduction system.

  20. Pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Arrhythmia Atrial Fibrillation Heart Block Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Long QT Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI ... arrhythmias with another device called an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). An ICD is similar to a pacemaker. ...

  1. Management of radiation therapy patients with cardiac defibrillator or pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Francesca; Gomellini, Sara; Caruso, Cristina; Barbara, Raffaele; Musio, Daniela; Coppi, Tamara; Cardinale, Mario; Tombolini, Vincenzo; de Paula, Ugo

    2016-06-01

    The increasing growth of population with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as Pacemaker (PM) and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators (ICD), requires particular attention in management of patients needing radiation treatment. This paper updates and summarizes some recommendations from different international guidelines. Ionizing radiation and/or electromagnetic interferences could cause device failure. Current approaches to treatment in patients who have these devices vary among radiation oncology centres. We refer to the German Society of Radiation Oncology and Cardiology guidelines (ed. 2015); to the Society of Cardiology Australia and New Zealand Statement (ed. 2015); to the guidelines in force in the Netherlands (ed. 2012) and to the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology recommendations (ed. 2013) as reported in the guidelines for the treatment of breast cancer in patients with CIED. Although there is not a clear cut-off point, risk of device failure increases with increasing doses. Cumulative dose and pacing dependency have been combined to categorize patients into low-, medium- and high-risk groups. Measures to secure patient safety are described for each category. The use of energy ≤6MV is preferable and it's strongly recommended not to exceed a total dose of 2 Gy to the PM and 1 Gy for ICD. Given the dangers of device malfunction, radiation oncology departments should adopt all the measures designed to minimize the risk to patients. For this reason, a close collaboration between cardiologist, radiotherapist and physicist is necessary. PMID:26706454

  2. Management of radiation therapy patients with cardiac defibrillator or pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Francesca; Gomellini, Sara; Caruso, Cristina; Barbara, Raffaele; Musio, Daniela; Coppi, Tamara; Cardinale, Mario; Tombolini, Vincenzo; de Paula, Ugo

    2016-06-01

    The increasing growth of population with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as Pacemaker (PM) and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators (ICD), requires particular attention in management of patients needing radiation treatment. This paper updates and summarizes some recommendations from different international guidelines. Ionizing radiation and/or electromagnetic interferences could cause device failure. Current approaches to treatment in patients who have these devices vary among radiation oncology centres. We refer to the German Society of Radiation Oncology and Cardiology guidelines (ed. 2015); to the Society of Cardiology Australia and New Zealand Statement (ed. 2015); to the guidelines in force in the Netherlands (ed. 2012) and to the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology recommendations (ed. 2013) as reported in the guidelines for the treatment of breast cancer in patients with CIED. Although there is not a clear cut-off point, risk of device failure increases with increasing doses. Cumulative dose and pacing dependency have been combined to categorize patients into low-, medium- and high-risk groups. Measures to secure patient safety are described for each category. The use of energy ≤6MV is preferable and it's strongly recommended not to exceed a total dose of 2 Gy to the PM and 1 Gy for ICD. Given the dangers of device malfunction, radiation oncology departments should adopt all the measures designed to minimize the risk to patients. For this reason, a close collaboration between cardiologist, radiotherapist and physicist is necessary.

  3. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  4. Programmable Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Released in 1995, the Trilogy cardiac pacemaker is the fourth generation of a unit developed in the 1970s by NASA, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.). The new system incorporates the company's PDx diagnostic and programming software and a powerful microprocessor that allows more functions to be fully automatic and gives more detailed information on the patient's health and the performance of the pacing systems. The pacemaker incorporates bidirectional telemetry used for space communications for noninvasive communication with the implanted pacemaker, smaller implantable pulse generators from space microminiaturization, and longer-life batteries from technology for spacecraft electrical power systems.

  5. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Infected Pacemaker Leads After Replacement of a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device

    PubMed Central

    Said, Salah A.M.; Nijhuis, Rogier; Derks, Anita; Droste, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 70 Final Diagnosis: Pacemaker leads endocarditis Symptoms: Bacterial lead endocarditis • congestive heart failure • fever • pacemaker dysfunction Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Pacemaker box replacement due to end-of-service Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced, drug-refractory heart failure. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% in larger studies. Approximately10% of CRT patients have to undergo surgical revision because of infections, dislocations, or unacceptable electrical behavior manifested as high threshold, unstable sensing, or unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation. Case Report: A 70-year-old man with symptomatic congestive heart failure underwent implantation of a biventricular pacemaker on the left anterior chest wall in 2003 and pulse generator exchange in August 2009. The patient responded well to CRT. At follow-up, the pacing system functioned normally. In September 2009, in the context of a predialysis program, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in another hospital for assessment and evaluation of chronic kidney disease. This procedure was complicated with peripheral thrombophlebitis that was managed appropriately with complete recovery. Eight months later (May 2010), the patient was admitted to our hospital with fever, anemia, and elevated infection parameters. During admission, blood cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis. The chest X-ray, lung perfusion scintigraphy, and CT scan depicted pulmonary embolism and infarction. The right ventricular lead threshold was found to be increased to 7 volts with unsuccessful capture. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on leads. The entire pacing system was explanted, but the patient expired few days later following percutaneous removal due to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: In heart failure

  6. Possible Influences of Spark Discharges on Cardiac Pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Kuisti, Harri; Tarao, Hiroo; Virtanen, Vesa; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Dovan, Thanh; Kavet, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to spark discharges may occur beneath high voltage transmission lines when contact is initiated with a conductive object (such as a motor vehicle) with the spark discharge mediated by the ambient electric field from the line. The objective of this study was to assess whether such exposures could interfere with the normal functioning of implanted cardiac pacemakers (PMs). The experiment consisted of PMs implanted in a human-sized phantom and then exposed to spark discharge through an upper extremity. A circuit was designed that produced spark discharges between two spherical electrodes fed to the phantom's left hand. The circuit was set to deliver a single discharge per half cycle (every 10 ms) about 10 μs in duration with a peak current of 1.2-1.3 A, thus simulating conditions under a 400-kV power line operating at 50 Hz. Of 29 PMs acquired, all were tested in unipolar configuration and 20 in bipolar configuration with exposure consisting of 2 min of continuous exposure (one unit was exposed for 1 min). No interference was observed in bipolar configuration. One unit in unipolar configuration incorrectly identified ventricular extra systoles (more than 400 beats min(-1)) for 2 s. The use of unipolar configuration in new implants is extremely rare, thus further minimizing the risk of interference with the passage of time. Replication of this study and, if safety for human subjects can be assured, future testing of human subjects is also advisable. PMID:26606060

  7. Simple hand-held metal detectors are an effective means of detecting cardiac pacemakers in the deceased prior to cremation.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jason Lyle; Williams, John; Fearn, Lesley

    2010-05-01

    The hazard of undetected cardiac pacemakers exploding in crematoria is well described. This short report describes the use of an affordable hand-held metal detector to detect cardiac pacemakers. Over the course of a year, the metal detector located 100% of cardiac pacemakers in a district general hospital mortuary. A simple model using pigskin and fat is also used to demonstrate the effectiveness in vitro. Commercially purchased hand-held metal detectors should be used in all mortuaries responsible for detection and removal of cardiac pacemakers prior to cremation.

  8. Fatal cardiac thromboembolism in a patient with a pacemaker during ureteroscopic lithotripsy for ureter stone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mee Young; Chae, Su Min

    2015-01-01

    Intracardiac thrombosis is an infrequent and fatal complication in patients with an inserted pacemaker. A patient with an inserted pacemaker scheduled for ureter stone removal experienced cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation under general anesthesia. Echocardiography showed multiple intracardiac thrombi. Preoperative diagnostic workup including echocardiography for the detection of pacemaker lead thrombus, and the need for anticoagulation should be considered in patients with an inserted pacemaker and high-risk factors for thrombosis. PMID:25664159

  9. Electromagnetic interference of implantable unipolar cardiac pacemakers by an induction oven.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Minoru; Hida, Mizuho; Sato, Eiji; Kokubo, Kenichi; Nie, Masaki; Kobayashi, Hirosuke

    2005-06-01

    Induction ovens have been reported to exert electromagnetic interference on implanted cardiac pacemakers. In an attempt to quantitatively investigate the electromagnetic interference caused by an induction oven on implantable unipolar cardiac pacemakers, we measured the distribution profile of the magnetic field intensity, both with and without a pan on the induction oven. We also performed the inhibition test and asynchronous test using four kinds of pacemakers housed in the standardized Irnich human body model, and measured the maximal distance from the induction oven up to which the interference occurred. In the pan-detection mode of the oven in the absence of a pan, the distribution profile of the magnetic field intensity peaked at the center of the cooking plate, and during induction heating of a pan placed on the induction oven, it was the largest at the circular top-edge of the pan. Pacemaker pulses were inhibited by the induction oven, or generated by the reversion mechanism. The maximal interference distance from the oven was 34 cm for one of the pacemakers. Thus, the safe distance from an induction oven of a patient with an implanted cardiac pacemaker is considered to be 50 cm or more. In conclusion, in the pan-detection mode of the oven in the absence of a pan, the distribution profile of the magnetic field intensity peaked at the center of the cooking plate, and during the induction heating of a pan placed on the oven, it peaked at the circular edge of the pan. The induction oven asynchronized or generated pulses in implantable unipolar cardiac pacemakers up to a maximal distance of 34 cm from the induction oven.

  10. [Interaction of Membrane and Calcium Oscillators in Cardiac Pacemaker Cells: Mathematical Modeling].

    PubMed

    Ryvkin, A M; Zorin, N M; Moskvin, A S; Solovyova, O E; Markhasin, V S

    2015-01-01

    An integrative model of the calcium dynamics in cardiac pacemaker cells is developed taking into account a synergetic effect of the interaction between an outer membrane oscillator and an intracellular calcium oscillator ("membrane and Ca(2+)-clock"). The main feature of the model is a description of the stochastic dynamics of Ca2+ release units within the electron-conformational mechanism of the functioning of ryanodine-sensitive calcium channels. It is shown that interaction of two cellular oscillators provides a stable action potential generation in the cardiac pacemaker cells even in the case of the stochastic Ca2+ dynamics. We studied in detail the effect of ryanodine channels sensitivity to an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration in sarcoplasmic reticulum and in the dyadic space on the behavior of calcium-release system. A parametric analysis of the integrative model of pacemaker cells is performed. PMID:26841508

  11. Mechanisms underlying the cardiac pacemaker: the role of SK4 calcium-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, David; Khun, Shiraz Haron; Bueno, Hanna; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The proper expression and function of the cardiac pacemaker is a critical feature of heart physiology. The sinoatrial node (SAN) in human right atrium generates an electrical stimulation approximately 70 times per minute, which propagates from a conductive network to the myocardium leading to chamber contractions during the systoles. Although the SAN and other nodal conductive structures were identified more than a century ago, the mechanisms involved in the generation of cardiac automaticity remain highly debated. In this short review, we survey the current data related to the development of the human cardiac conduction system and the various mechanisms that have been proposed to underlie the pacemaker activity. We also present the human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte system, which is used as a model for studying the pacemaker. Finally, we describe our latest characterization of the previously unrecognized role of the SK4 Ca2+-activated K+ channel conductance in pacemaker cells. By exquisitely balancing the inward currents during the diastolic depolarization, the SK4 channels appear to play a crucial role in human cardiac automaticity. PMID:26725737

  12. Automated and manufacturer independent assessment of the battery status of implanted cardiac pacemakers by electrocardiogram analysis.

    PubMed

    Schreier, G; Hayn, D; Kollmann, A; Scherr, D; Lercher, P; Rotman, B; Klein, W

    2004-01-01

    According to international standards, cardiac pacemakers have to indicate the status of their batteries upon magnet application by specific stimulation patterns. The purpose of this study has been to assess whether this concept can be used as a basis for automated and manufacturer independent examination of the depletion level of pacemakers in the framework of a collaborative telemedical pacemaker follow-up system. A prototype of such a system was developed and tested in a real clinical environment. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded during magnet application and automatically processed to extract the specific stimulation patterns. The results were used to assign each signal a corresponding pacemaker status: "ok," "replace" or "undefined," based on the expected behavior of the devices as specified by the manufacturer. The outcome of this procedure was compared to the result of an expert examination, resulting in a positive predictive value of 100% for the detection of ECGs indicating pacemaker status "ok." The method can, therefore, be utilized to quickly, safely and manufacturer neutrally classify cases into the categories "ok" and "needs further checking," which - in a telemedical setting - may be used to increase the efficiency of pacemaker follow-up procedures in the future. PMID:17271607

  13. Capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and left heart assist devices.

    PubMed

    Bandorski, Dirk; Höltgen, Reinhard; Stunder, Dominik; Keuchel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    According to the recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration and manufacturers, capsule endoscopy should not be used in patients carrying implanted cardiac devices. For this review we considered studies indexed (until 30.06.2013) in Medline [keywords: capsule endoscopy, small bowel endoscopy, cardiac pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator, interference, left heart assist device], technical information from Given Imaging and one own publication (not listed in Medline). Several in vitro and in vivo studies included patients with implanted cardiac devices who underwent capsule endoscopy. No clinically relevant interference was noticed. Initial reports on interference with a simulating device were not reproduced. Furthermore technical data of PillCam (Given Imaging) demonstrate that the maximum transmission power is below the permitted limits for cardiac devices. Hence, impairment of cardiac pacemaker, defibrillator or left ventricular heart assist device function by capsule endoscopy is not expected. However, wireless telemetry can cause dysfunction of capsule endoscopy recording. Application of capsule endoscopy is feasible and safe in patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers, cardioverter defibrillators, and left heart assist devices. Development of new technologies warrants future re-evaluation.

  14. Capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and left heart assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Bandorski, Dirk; Höltgen, Reinhard; Stunder, Dominik; Keuchel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    According to the recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration and manufacturers, capsule endoscopy should not be used in patients carrying implanted cardiac devices. For this review we considered studies indexed (until 30.06.2013) in Medline [keywords: capsule endoscopy, small bowel endoscopy, cardiac pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator, interference, left heart assist device], technical information from Given Imaging and one own publication (not listed in Medline). Several in vitro and in vivo studies included patients with implanted cardiac devices who underwent capsule endoscopy. No clinically relevant interference was noticed. Initial reports on interference with a simulating device were not reproduced. Furthermore technical data of PillCam (Given Imaging) demonstrate that the maximum transmission power is below the permitted limits for cardiac devices. Hence, impairment of cardiac pacemaker, defibrillator or left ventricular heart assist device function by capsule endoscopy is not expected. However, wireless telemetry can cause dysfunction of capsule endoscopy recording. Application of capsule endoscopy is feasible and safe in patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers, cardioverter defibrillators, and left heart assist devices. Development of new technologies warrants future re-evaluation. PMID:24714370

  15. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  16. Self-powered cardiac pacemaker enabled by flexible single crystalline PMN-PT piezoelectric energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geon-Tae; Park, Hyewon; Lee, Jeong-Ho; Oh, SeKwon; Park, Kwi-Il; Byun, Myunghwan; Park, Hyelim; Ahn, Gun; Jeong, Chang Kyu; No, Kwangsoo; Kwon, HyukSang; Lee, Sang-Goo; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Keon Jae

    2014-07-23

    A flexible single-crystalline PMN-PT piezoelectric energy harvester is demonstrated to achieve a self-powered artificial cardiac pacemaker. The energy-harvesting device generates a short-circuit current of 0.223 mA and an open-circuit voltage of 8.2 V, which are enough not only to meet the standard for charging commercial batteries but also for stimulating the heart without an external power source. PMID:24740465

  17. Self-powered cardiac pacemaker enabled by flexible single crystalline PMN-PT piezoelectric energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geon-Tae; Park, Hyewon; Lee, Jeong-Ho; Oh, SeKwon; Park, Kwi-Il; Byun, Myunghwan; Park, Hyelim; Ahn, Gun; Jeong, Chang Kyu; No, Kwangsoo; Kwon, HyukSang; Lee, Sang-Goo; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Keon Jae

    2014-07-23

    A flexible single-crystalline PMN-PT piezoelectric energy harvester is demonstrated to achieve a self-powered artificial cardiac pacemaker. The energy-harvesting device generates a short-circuit current of 0.223 mA and an open-circuit voltage of 8.2 V, which are enough not only to meet the standard for charging commercial batteries but also for stimulating the heart without an external power source.

  18. Effects of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on cardiac pacemakers. Final report, Nov 88-Oct 89

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, V.J.

    1991-11-01

    The U.S. Army Harry Diamond Laboratories' (HDL's) Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) has conducted an investigation into the effects of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on medical electronics. This report specifically documents the findings on the effects of WRF's Army EMP Simulator Operations (AESOP) on cardiac pacemakers (CPMs). Empirical data are furnished and compared to the results of two independent analytical studies. The studies support the conclusion that damage to CPMs that might be located near the WRF boundaries is not likely. Furthermore, any upset in a CPM's operation is considered unlikely and inconsequential to the health of the CPM wearer. Cardiac pacemakers (CPMs) have experienced significant technological advancements over the last decade, evolving from simple and bulky pulse generators to the small and sophisticated computerized units implanted today. With the implementation of sensitive digital electronics in modern pacemaker designs, concerns have been expressed for the possibility of an increased sensitivity of CPMs to electromagnetic interference (EMI). To some extent these concerns have abated to the increased awareness of the EMI problem by the manufacturers, as evident in better peacemaker designs and the decline in reported malfunctions due to EMI.

  19. Cardiorespiratory Mechanical Simulator for In Vitro Testing of Impedance Minute Ventilation Sensors in Cardiac Pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, Emanuela; Cercenelli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cardiorespiratory mechanical simulator (CRMS), a system able to reproduce both the cardiac and respiratory movements, intended to be used for in vitro testing of impedance minute ventilation (iMV) sensors in cardiac pacemakers. The simulator consists of two actuators anchored to a human thorax model and a software interface to control the actuators and to acquire/process impedance signals. The actuators can be driven separately or simultaneously to reproduce the cardiac longitudinal shortening at a programmable heart rate and the diaphragm displacement at a programmable respiratory rate (RR). A standard bipolar pacing lead moving with the actuators and a pacemaker case fixed to the thorax model have been used to measure impedance (Z) variations during the simulated cardiorespiratory movements. The software is able to discriminate the low-frequency component because of respiration (Z(R)) from the high-frequency ripple because of cardiac effect (Z(C)). Impedance minute ventilation is continuously calculated from Z(R) and RR. From preliminary tests, the CRMS proved to be a reliable simulator for in vitro evaluation of iMV sensors. Respiration impedance recordings collected during cardiorespiratory movements reproduced by the CRMS were comparable in morphology and amplitude with in vivo assessments of transthoracic impedance variations.

  20. Programmable Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division, formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc., incorporated Apollo technology into the development of the programmable pacemaker system. This consists of the implantable pacemaker together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Physician can communicate with patient's pacemaker by means of wireless telemetry signals transmitted through the communicating head held over the patient's chest. Where earlier pacemakers deliver a fixed type of stimulus once implanted, Programalith enables surgery free "fine tuning" of device to best suit the patient's changing needs.

  1. A hands-on course teaching bioinstrumentation through the design and construction of a benchtop cardiac pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Matthew B; Downs, Matthew E; Jangraw, David C; Kyle, Aaron M

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a bioinstrumentation course that emphasizes practical application of engineering and biological concepts by having students focus on the development of a single biomedical device: a cardiac pacemaker. In creating their benchtop pacemaker, students learn about and design sensing circuitry, data acquisition and processing code, control system algorithms, and stimulation electronics. They also gain an understanding of cardiac anatomy and electrophysiology. The separate elements of the pacemaker created throughout the semester will be repeatedly tested, re-designed, and integrated with one another, culminating in an emulated pacemaker whose efficacy will be tested on North American bullfrogs. It is hypothesized that the hands-on learning in this course, coupled with the practical application of concepts in the context of a single biomedical device, will enhance students' skills in bioinstrumentation design.

  2. Why We Have to Use Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy-Pacemaker More.

    PubMed

    Daubert, Jean-Claude; Martins, Raphaël; Leclercq, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Both cardiac resynchronization therapy with a pacemaker (CRT-P) and with a biventricular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) are electrical treatment modalities validated for the management of chronic heart failure. There is no strong scientific evidence that a CRT-D must be offered to all candidates. Common sense should limit the prescription of these costly and complicated devices. The choice of CRT-P is currently acceptable. A direction to explore could be to downgrade from CRT-D to CRT-P at the time of battery depletion in patients with large reverse remodeling and no ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation detected. PMID:26596813

  3. Seven times replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker in 33 years to maintain adequate heart rate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanping; Liao, Derong; Yang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, recent developments in pacemaker technology from fixed-rate single-chamber pacemakers to dual chamber pacemakers with pacing algorithms have changed the therapeutic landscape resulting in better healthcare outcomes by improving rate response with minimal ventricular pacing. Here, we share our longest clinical experience with an elderly Chinese male patient who was diagnosed with third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block and was admitted in our hospital 33 years ago. An 85-year-old male patient from China was hospitalized due to dizziness and syncope, with an initial diagnosis revealing third-degree AV block with a heart rate of 35–40 beats per minute (bpm) along with Aase’s syndrome and primary hypertension. A single-chamber pacemaker (VVI) was implanted immediately giving the patient symptomatic relief. However, 5-year post-surgery VVI was replaced due to battery exhaustion, while the primary electrode catheter was kept in use. Few years later, the patient again complained of dizziness and re-examination revealed VVI battery debilitation due to premature battery exhaustion. Single-chamber pacemaker was again implanted via the same position of right upper chest. However, after adjusting the frequency of stimulation of the pacemaker to 70 bpm, patient had a symptomatic relief. Considering the severity of patient’s disease and knowing that cardiac dysfunction was reported previously, a tri-chamber pacemaker was chosen to take place of previous single-chamber pacemaker. For 33 years, the patient underwent 7 times replacement of pacemaker for battery exhaustion or inadequacy. We successfully performed overall seven pacemaker implantations and upgradation in an elderly Chinese patient diagnosed with third-degree AV block for 33 years. A long following up till now demonstrated no major complications with normal heart rate functioning. PMID:26734649

  4. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Infected Pacemaker Leads After Replacement of a Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device.

    PubMed

    Said, Salah A M; Nijhuis, Rogier; Derks, Anita; Droste, Herman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced, drug-refractory heart failure. Procedure-related mortality is less than 1% in larger studies. Approximately10% of CRT patients have to undergo surgical revision because of infections, dislocations, or unacceptable electrical behavior manifested as high threshold, unstable sensing, or unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation. CASE REPORT A 70-year-old man with symptomatic congestive heart failure underwent implantation of a biventricular pacemaker on the left anterior chest wall in 2003 and pulse generator exchange in August 2009. The patient responded well to CRT. At follow-up, the pacing system functioned normally. In September 2009, in the context of a predialysis program, an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in another hospital for assessment and evaluation of chronic kidney disease. This procedure was complicated with peripheral thrombophlebitis that was managed appropriately with complete recovery. Eight months later (May 2010), the patient was admitted to our hospital with fever, anemia, and elevated infection parameters. During admission, blood cultures grew Staphylococcus epidermidis. The chest X-ray, lung perfusion scintigraphy, and CT scan depicted pulmonary embolism and infarction. The right ventricular lead threshold was found to be increased to 7 volts with unsuccessful capture. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on leads. The entire pacing system was explanted, but the patient expired few days later following percutaneous removal due to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS In heart failure, replacement of the CRT device may be complicated by bacterial endocarditis. As noted from this case report, sudden elevation of the pacing lead threshold should prompt thorough and immediate investigation to unravel its causes, not only the electrical characteristics but also the anatomical features. PMID:27435910

  5. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  6. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes—A model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanani, S.; Pumir, A.; Krinsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler Reuter and in the dynamic Luo Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below ˜1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  7. Stochastic vagal modulation of cardiac pacemaking may lead to erroneous identification of cardiac ``chaos''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Q.; Holden, A. V.; Monfredi, O.; Boyett, M. R.; Zhang, H.

    2009-06-01

    Fluctuations in the time interval between two consecutive R-waves of electrocardiogram during normal sinus rhythm may result from irregularities in the autonomic drive of the pacemaking sinoatrial node (SAN). We use a biophysically detailed mathematical model of the action potentials of rabbit SAN to quantify the effects of fluctuations in acetylcholine (ACh) on the pacemaker activity of the SAN and its variability. Fluctuations in ACh concentration model the effect of stochastic activity in the vagal parasympathetic fibers that innervate the SAN and produce varying rates of depolarization during the pacemaker potential, leading to fluctuations in cycle length (CL). Both the estimated maximal Lyapunov exponent and the noise limit of the resultant sequence of fluctuating CLs suggest chaotic dynamics. Apparently chaotic heart rate variability (HRV) seen in sinus rhythm can be produced by stochastic modulation of the SAN. The identification of HRV data as chaotic by use of time series measures such as a positive maximal Lyapunov exponent or positive noise limit requires both caution and a quantitative, predictive mechanistic model that is fully deterministic.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: era of "MR Conditional" designs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiac device technology have led to the first generation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional devices, providing more diagnostic imaging options for patients with these devices, but also new controversies. Prior studies of pacemakers in patients undergoing MRI procedures have provided groundwork for design improvements. Factors related to magnetic field interactions and transfer of electromagnetic energy led to specific design changes. Ferromagnetic content was minimized. Reed switches were modified. Leads were redesigned to reduce induced currents/heating. Circuitry filters and shielding were implemented to impede or limit the transfer of certain unwanted electromagnetic effects. Prospective multicenter clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of the first generation of MR conditional cardiac pacemakers demonstrated no significant alterations in pacing parameters compared to controls. There were no reported complications through the one month visit including no arrhythmias, electrical reset, inhibition of generator output, or adverse sensations. The safe implementation of these new technologies requires an understanding of the well-defined patient and MR system conditions. Although scanning a patient with an MR conditional device following the strictly defined patient and MR system conditions appears straightforward, issues related to patients with pre-existing devices remain complex. Until MR conditional devices are the routine platform for all of these devices, there will still be challenging decisions regarding imaging patients with pre-existing devices where MRI is required to diagnose and manage a potentially life threatening or serious scenario. A range of other devices including ICDs, biventricular devices, and implantable physiologic monitors as well as guidance of medical procedures using MRI technology will require further biomedical device design changes and testing. The development and implementation of cardiac MR

  9. Early performance of a miniaturized leadless cardiac pacemaker: the Micra Transcatheter Pacing Study

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Philippe; Duray, Gabor Z.; Steinwender, Clemens; Soejima, Kyoko; Omar, Razali; Mont, Lluís; Boersma, Lucas VA; Knops, Reinoud E.; Chinitz, Larry; Zhang, Shu; Narasimhan, Calambur; Hummel, John; Lloyd, Michael; Simmers, Timothy Alexander; Voigt, Andrew; Laager, Verla; Stromberg, Kurt; Bonner, Matthew D.; Sheldon, Todd J.; Reynolds, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Aims Permanent cardiac pacing is the only effective treatment for symptomatic bradycardia, but complications associated with conventional transvenous pacing systems are commonly related to the pacing lead and pocket. We describe the early performance of a novel self-contained miniaturized pacemaker. Methods and results Patients having Class I or II indication for VVI pacing underwent implantation of a Micra transcatheter pacing system, from the femoral vein and fixated in the right ventricle using four protractible nitinol tines. Prespecified objectives were >85% freedom from unanticipated serious adverse device events (safety) and <2 V 3-month mean pacing capture threshold at 0.24 ms pulse width (efficacy). Patients were implanted (n = 140) from 23 centres in 11 countries (61% male, age 77.0 ± 10.2 years) for atrioventricular block (66%) or sinus node dysfunction (29%) indications. During mean follow-up of 1.9 ± 1.8 months, the safety endpoint was met with no unanticipated serious adverse device events. Thirty adverse events related to the system or procedure occurred, mostly due to transient dysrhythmias or femoral access complications. One pericardial effusion without tamponade occurred after 18 device deployments. In 60 patients followed to 3 months, mean pacing threshold was 0.51 ± 0.22 V, and no threshold was ≥2 V, meeting the efficacy endpoint (P < 0.001). Average R-wave was 16.1 ± 5.2 mV and impedance was 650.7 ± 130 ohms. Conclusion Early assessment shows the transcatheter pacemaker can safely and effectively be applied. Long-term safety and benefit of the pacemaker will further be evaluated in the trial. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT02004873. PMID:26045305

  10. [The current status of permanent cardiac pacing in Spain. A report of the National Pacemaker Data Bank].

    PubMed

    Coma Samartín, R

    1997-11-01

    We report the activity concerning permanent cardiac pacing in Spain during year 1995, based on data submitted to the National Pacemaker Registry corresponding to the European Pacemaker Card. We describe population, etiology and electrocardiographic alterations that determined the need for stimulation and the global distribution of stimulation modes (AAI 1.7%; DDD 20.2%; VDD 11.3% and VVI 66.8%). We emphasize, among other aspects, stimulation in A-V block cases, in sick-sinus syndrome and tendencies compared to 1994's data and limited data corresponding to 1996. PMID:9424698

  11. [An indication for a permanent pacemaker : digitialis therapy for cardiac failure with disturbed atrioventricular conduction (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Letac, B; Hubscher, C; Toussaint, C; Cazor, J L

    1978-09-01

    In twenty patients with advanced heart disease with severe cardiac failure and the presence of conduction disturbances before digitalis therapy, but in whom such disturbances were worsened or revealed by the treatment, it was necessary to insert a permanent pacemaker in order to make effective long term digitalisation possible without the risk of excessive bradycardia or pauses due to worsening of atrioventricular block. Six patients died within a period of 9 days to 34 months after insertion of the pacemaker, two were lost from sight, and the other 12 were followed-up regularly for an average period of 20 months, their condition remaining stationary and, in general, satisfactory. PMID:704314

  12. Global Bifurcation Structure and Variability of Pacemaker Rhythm in a Detailed Model of Cardiac Sinoatrial Node Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhenxing; Doi, Shinji

    As a cardiac pacemaker, sinoatrial node spontaneously generates periodic electrical signals (action potentials) in its cells. The action potential generation is deeply related to various ion channels in cell membranes, and the abnormalities of ion channels cause sinus arrhythmia. We use the Zhang model of sinoatrial node cells to investigate the relation between pacemaker rhythm (frequency of action potential generation) and ion channels. The Zhang model is described by the Hodgkin-Huxley-type nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and its parameter values vary between periphery and center cells of sinoatrial node. We analyze the bifurcation structure of the Zhang model, and investigate the variability of pacemaker rhythm and its sensitivity on ion channel conductance changes for both periphery and center cells. Moreover, these results are compared with the previous results of another sinoatrial node cell model: Yanagihara-Noma-Irisawa model.

  13. Pheochromocytoma-Induced Atrial Tachycardia Leading to Cardiogenic Shock and Cardiac Arrest: Resolution with Atrioventricular Node Ablation and Pacemaker Placement

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Mandeep; Cunningham, Glenn R.

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma should be considered in young patients who have acute cardiac decompensation, even if they have no history of hypertension. Atrioventricular node ablation and pacemaker placement should be considered for stabilizing pheochromocytoma patients with cardiogenic shock due to atrial tachyarrhythmias. A 38-year-old black woman presented with cardiogenic shock (left ventricular ejection fraction, <0.15) that did not respond to the placement of an intra-aortic balloon pump. A TandemHeart® Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Device was inserted emergently. After atrioventricular node ablation and placement of a temporary pacemaker, the TandemHeart was removed. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a pheochromocytoma. After placement of a permanent pacemaker, the patient underwent a right adrenalectomy. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of pheochromocytoma-induced atrial tachyarrhythmia that led to cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest unresolved by the placement of 2 different ventricular assist devices, but that was completely reversed by radiofrequency ablation of the atrioventricular node and the placement of a temporary pacemaker. We present the patient's clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings, and we review the relevant literature. PMID:25593537

  14. Pheochromocytoma-induced atrial tachycardia leading to cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest: resolution with atrioventricular node ablation and pacemaker placement.

    PubMed

    Shawa, Hassan; Bajaj, Mandeep; Cunningham, Glenn R

    2014-12-01

    Pheochromocytoma should be considered in young patients who have acute cardiac decompensation, even if they have no history of hypertension. Atrioventricular node ablation and pacemaker placement should be considered for stabilizing pheochromocytoma patients with cardiogenic shock due to atrial tachyarrhythmias. A 38-year-old black woman presented with cardiogenic shock (left ventricular ejection fraction, <0.15) that did not respond to the placement of an intra-aortic balloon pump. A TandemHeart(®) Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Device was inserted emergently. After atrioventricular node ablation and placement of a temporary pacemaker, the TandemHeart was removed. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a pheochromocytoma. After placement of a permanent pacemaker, the patient underwent a right adrenalectomy. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of pheochromocytoma-induced atrial tachyarrhythmia that led to cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest unresolved by the placement of 2 different ventricular assist devices, but that was completely reversed by radiofrequency ablation of the atrioventricular node and the placement of a temporary pacemaker. We present the patient's clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings, and we review the relevant literature.

  15. Multicellular automaticity of cardiac cell monolayers: effects of density and spatial distribution of pacemaker cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elber Duverger, James; Boudreau-Béland, Jonathan; Le, Minh Duc; Comtois, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Self-organization of pacemaker (PM) activity of interconnected elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for applications such as PM activity in cardiac tissue to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) are often used as experimental models in studies on cardiac electrophysiology. These monolayers exhibit automaticity (spontaneous activation) of their electrical activity. At low plated density, cells usually show a heterogeneous population consisting of PM and quiescent excitable cells (QECs). It is therefore highly probable that monolayers of NRVMs consist of a heterogeneous network of the two cell types. However, the effects of density and spatial distribution of the PM cells on spontaneous activity of monolayers remain unknown. Thus, a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm was implemented to distribute PM and QECs in a binary-like 2D network. A FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable medium was used to simulate electrical spontaneous and propagating activity. Simulations showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of PM cells. In most simulations, the first initiation sites were found to be located near the substrate boundaries. Comparison with experimental data obtained from cardiomyocyte monolayers shows important similarities in the position of initiation site activity. However, limitations in the model that do not reflect the complex beat-to-beat variation found in experiments indicate the need for a more realistic cardiomyocyte representation.

  16. Evaluation of the effects of electric fields on implanted cardiac pacemakers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, A.J.; Carstensen, E.

    1985-02-01

    The effects of extra high voltage (EHV) transmission line electric fields on pacemaker function were evaluated in 11 patients with seven different implanted pacemaker models from four manufacturers. Alteration in pacemaker function was demonstrated in five unipolar units (three different models) from two manufacturers during exposure to electric fields ranging from 2 to 9 kV/m, with total body currents from 47 to 175 ..mu..A. These electric fields and body currents are representative of values that can be encountered by individuals standing beneath EHV transmission lines. Transient alterations in pacemaker function observed in this study included inappropriate triggered activity, inhibition of impulse generation, reduction in rate, and reversion from demand to asynchronous mode. Electromagnetic interference from high voltage transmission lines can induce alterations in pacemaker function in certain designs of these devices. However, pacemaker manufacturers can incorporate appropriate circuits in the pacemaker design to eliminate this problem. 8 references.

  17. Mechano-sensitivity of cardiac pacemaker function: Pathophysiological relevance, experimental implications, and conceptual integration with other mechanisms of rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, T. Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaker cells exhibit spontaneous, rhythmic electrical excitation, termed automaticity. This automatic initiation of action potentials requires spontaneous diastolic depolarisation, whose rate determines normal rhythm generation in the heart. Pacemaker mechanisms have been split recently into: (i) cyclic changes in trans-sarcolemmal ion flows (termed the ‘membrane-clock’), and (ii) rhythmic intracellular calcium cycling (the ‘calcium-clock’). These two ‘clocks’ undoubtedly interact, as trans-sarcolemmal currents involved in pacemaking include calcium-carrying mechanisms, while intracellular calcium cycling requires trans-sarcolemmal ion flux as the mechanism by which it affects membrane potential. The split into separate ‘clocks’ is, therefore, somewhat arbitrary. Nonetheless, the ‘clock’ metaphor has been conceptually stimulating, in particular since there is evidence to support the view that either ‘clock’ could be sufficient in principle to set the rate of pacemaker activation. Of course, the same has also been shown for sub-sets of ‘membrane-clock’ ion currents, illustrating the redundancy of mechanisms involved in maintaining such basic functionality as the heartbeat, a theme that is common for vital physiological systems. Following the conceptual path of identifying individual groups of sub-mechanisms, it is important to remember that the heart is able to adapt pacemaker rate to changes in haemodynamic load, even after isolation or transplantation, and on a beat-by-beat basis. Neither the ‘membrane-’ nor the ‘calcium-clock’ do, as such, inherently account for this rapid adaptation to circulatory demand (cellular Ca2+ balance changes over multiple beats, while variation of sarcolemmal ion channel presence takes even longer). This suggests that a third set of mechanisms must be involved in setting the pace. These mechanisms are characterised by their sensitivity to the cyclically changing mechanical environment, and

  18. Improved waveform generator and cardiac simulator for sensitivity testing of ventricular programmed pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, D A; Tyers, G F; Brownlee, R R

    1978-01-01

    The need for an easily generated, simulated QRS complex to facilitate preimplantation sensitivity testing of ventricular programmed pacemakers has led to the adoption of the sine squared waveform as the standard test pulse, by the Pacemaker Standards Subcommitte of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI). A simple circuit is presented that provides an accurate sine squared pulse with easily adjustable pulse width (base frequency). A suggested circuit for incorporating this sine squared pulse generator into a complete pacemaker test waveform generator/cardiac simulator is also presented.

  19. Atrioventricular delays, cardiac output and diastolic function in patients with implanted dual chamber pacing and sensing pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, F; Toufan, Mehrnoush

    2008-10-15

    The Cardiac Output (CO), Filling Time (FT) and Myocardial Performance Index (MPI) derived optimal atrioventricular delay (AVD), were compared and systolic and diastolic performance at every optimal AVD were analyzed. Thirty-two patients with implanted DDD pacemaker were investigated from implantation time to 6 months following PM implantation, in Cardiovascular Research Center of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. The evaluation was performed during AV sequential pacing with different programmed AVDS ranged from 100 to 200 msec by steps of 20-30 msec. At every AVD, the following parameters were measured: FT, mitral VTI, ET, aortic VTI, ICT and IRT. CO and FT derived optimal AVDs were significantly different (146 +/- 37 and 126 +/- 35 msec, respectively), but their difference with MPI derived optimal AVDs was not significant (130 +/- 28 msec). ICT/ET was similar at CO, FT and MPI derived optimal AVD (0.24 +/- 0.10, 0.22 +/- 0.05 and 0.20 +/- 0.07, respectively). IRT/ET ratio was similar at CO, FT and MPI derived optimal AVDs (0.46 +/- 0.14, 0.45 +/- 0.10 and 0.42 +/- 0.10, respectively). Different methods indicate different optimal AVDs. However analysis of systolic and diastolic performance shows that different AVDs result in similar systolic or diastolic performance. At MPI optimized AVD, a high CO combined with the most advantageous conditions of both isovolumic contraction and relaxation phases is achieved.

  20. Radiation effect on implanted pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pourhamidi, A.H.

    1983-10-01

    It was previously thought that diagnostic or therapeutic ionizing radiation did not have an adverse effect on the function of cardiac pacemakers. Recently, however, some authors have reported damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on cardiac pulse generators. An analysis of a recently-extracted pacemaker documented the effect of radiation on the pacemaker pulse generator.

  1. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of cardiac pacemaker batteries with reduced heat input

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Hinkley, D.A.

    1997-03-01

    The effects of Nd:YAG laser beam welding process parameters on the resulting heat input in 304L stainless steel cardiac pacemaker batteries have been studied. By careful selection of process parameters, the results can be used to reduce temperatures near glass-to-metal seals and assure hermeticity in laser beam welding of high reliability components. Three designed response surface experiments were used to compare welding performance with lenses of varying focal lengths. The measured peak temperatures at the glass-to-metal seals varied from 65 to 140 C (149 to 284 F) and depended strongly on the levels of the experimental factors. It was found that welds of equivalent size can be made with significantly reduced temperatures. The reduction in battery temperatures has been attributed to an increase in the melting efficiency. This increase is thought to be due primarily to increased travel speeds, which were facilitated by high peak powers and low pulse energies. For longer focal length lenses, weld fusion zone widths were found to be greater even without a corresponding increase in the size of the weld. It was also found that increases in laser beam irradiance either by higher peak powers or smaller spot sizes created deeper and larger welds. These gains were attributed to an increase in the laser energy transfer efficiency.

  2. How Does a Pacemaker Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Does a Pacemaker Work? A pacemaker consists of a battery, a computerized ... these recordings to adjust your pacemaker so it works better for you. Your doctor can program the ...

  3. [Interference between cardiac pacemaker and electromagnetic anti-theft devices in stores].

    PubMed

    Beaugeard, D; Kacet, S; Bricout, M; Camblin, J

    1992-10-01

    Electromagnetic anti-theft devices in shops comprise large diameter magnetic induction coils between which the shoppers pass. This study was undertaken with a simulator to assess the behaviour of different models of single and double-chamber pacemakers when exposed to 6 stereotyped and repetitive situations of 4 different electromagnetic anti-theft devices. Of the 35 pacemakers tested, 25 developed serious dysfunctions: 14 long-lasting inhibitions (over 3 seconds), 2 stimulations at maximal frequency, 2 electrical bradycardias and 2 permanent reprogramming. These dysfunctions due to electromagnetic interference are observed in old or modern, monopolar or bipolar pacemakers, and seem to be influenced by the amplitude and complexity of the signals emitted by the detectors. These observations justify a clear signalization warning pacemaker patients of a potential danger.

  4. Measuring RF-induced currents inside implants: Impact of device configuration on MRI safety of cardiac pacemaker leads.

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Weiss, Ingo; Ehses, Philipp; Ritter, Oliver; Warmuth, Marcus; Fidler, Florian; Herold, Volker; Jakob, Peter M; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Bauer, Wolfgang R

    2009-03-01

    Radiofrequency (RF)-related heating of cardiac pacemaker leads is a serious concern in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recent investigations suggest such heating to be strongly dependent on an implant's position within the surrounding medium, but this issue is currently poorly understood. In this study, phantom measurements of the RF-induced electric currents inside a pacemaker lead were performed to investigate the impact of the device position and lead configuration on the amount of MRI-related heating at the lead tip. Seven hundred twenty device position/lead path configurations were investigated. The results show that certain configurations are associated with a highly increased risk to develop MRI-induced heating, whereas various configurations do not show any significant heating. It was possible to precisely infer implant heating on the basis of current intensity values measured inside a pacemaker lead. Device position and lead configuration relative to the surrounding medium are crucial to the amount of RF-induced heating in MRI. This indicates that a considerable number of implanted devices may incidentally not develop severe heating in MRI because of their specific configuration in the body. Small variations in configuration can, however, strongly increase the risk for such heating effects, meaning that hazardous situations might appear during MRI.

  5. Reducing RF-related heating of cardiac pacemaker leads in MRI: implementation and experimental verification of practical design changes.

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Fidler, Florian; Friedrich, Michael T; Weiss, Ingo; Warmuth, Marcus; Gensler, Daniel; Herold, Volker; Geistert, Wolfgang; Jakob, Peter M; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver; Ladd, Mark E; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Quick, Harald H

    2012-12-01

    There are serious concerns regarding safety when performing magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted conductive medical devices, such as cardiac pacemakers, and associated leads, as severe incidents have occurred in the past. In this study, several approaches for altering an implant's lead design were systematically developed and evaluated to enhance the safety of implanted medical devices in a magnetic resonance imaging environment. The individual impact of each design change on radiofrequency heating was then systematically investigated in functional lead prototypes at 1.5 T. Radiofrequency-induced heating could be successfully reduced by three basic changes in conventional pacemaker lead design: (1) increasing the lead tip area, (2) increasing the lead conductor resistance, and (3) increasing outer lead insulation conductivity. The findings show that radiofrequency energy pickup in magnetic resonance imaging can be reduced and, therefore, patient safety can be improved with dedicated construction changes according to a "safe by design" strategy. Incorporation of the described alterations into implantable medical devices such as pacemaker leads can be used to help achieve favorable risk-benefit-ratios when performing magnetic resonance imaging in the respective patient group.

  6. Shockwave lithotripsy and pacemakers: experience with 20 cases.

    PubMed

    Albers, D D; Lybrand, F E; Axton, J C; Wendelken, J R

    1995-08-01

    Lithotripsy treatment of urinary tract calculi initially excluded patients with cardiac pacemakers. Continued research and clinical study of patient outcomes has promoted a change in that initial concept. The Oklahoma Lithotripsy Center has successfully treated 20 patients with various types of pacemakers. No significant cardiovascular events occurred during treatment. Patients should be evaluated before the procedure by a cardiologist, and dual-chamber pacemakers should be reprogrammed to the single-chamber mode. Patients who cannot tolerate this should not undergo SWL. Rate-responsive pacemakers should be programmed to the non-rate-responsive (VVI) mode. The pacemaker should be at least 5 cm from the blast path. With these precautions and careful monitoring, SWL can be performed safely in most patients with pacemakers.

  7. Mechanisms of Beat-to-Beat Regulation of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell Function by Ca2+ Cycling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Maltsev, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    Whether intracellular Ca2+ cycling dynamics regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function on a beat-to-beat basis remains unknown. Here we show that under physiological conditions, application of low concentrations of caffeine (2–4 mM) to isolated single rabbit sinoatrial node cells acutely reduces their spontaneous action potential cycle length (CL) and increases Ca2+ transient amplitude for several cycles. Numerical simulations, using a modified Maltsev-Lakatta coupled-clock model, faithfully reproduced these effects, and also the effects of CL prolongation and dysrhythmic spontaneous beating (produced by cytosolic Ca2+ buffering) and an acute CL reduction (produced by flash-induced Ca2+ release from a caged Ca2+ buffer), which we had reported previously. Three contemporary numerical models (including the original Maltsev-Lakatta model) failed to reproduce the experimental results. In our proposed new model, Ca2+ releases acutely change the CL via activation of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current. Time-dependent CL reductions after flash-induced Ca2+ releases (the memory effect) are linked to changes in Ca2+ available for pumping into sarcoplasmic reticulum which, in turn, changes the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, diastolic Ca2+ releases, and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current. These results support the idea that Ca2+ regulates CL in cardiac pacemaker cells on a beat-to-beat basis, and suggest a more realistic numerical mechanism of this regulation. PMID:24094396

  8. The influence of anatomical and physiological parameters on the interference voltage at the input of unipolar cardiac pacemakers in low frequency electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, S.; Pammler, K.; Silny, J.

    2009-02-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interference of electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers has been well known for many years. An increasing number of field sources in everyday life and occupational environment leads unavoidably to an increased risk for patients with electronic implants. However, no obligatory national or international safety regulations exist for the protection of this patient group. The aim of this study is to find out the anatomical and physiological worst-case conditions for patients with an implanted pacemaker adjusted to unipolar sensing in external time-varying electric fields. The results of this study with 15 volunteers show that, in electric fields, variation of the interference voltage at the input of a cardiac pacemaker adds up to 200% only because of individual factors. These factors should be considered in human studies and in the setting of safety regulations.

  9. [Sport for pacemaker patients].

    PubMed

    Israel, C W

    2012-06-01

    Sport activity is an important issue in many patients with a pacemaker either because they performed sport activities before pacemaker implantation to reduce the cardiovascular risk or to improve the course of an underlying cardiovascular disease (e.g. coronary artery disease, heart failure) by sports. Compared to patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) the risks from underlying cardiovascular disease (e.g. ischemia, heart failure), arrhythmia, lead dysfunction or inappropriate therapy are less important or absent. Sport is contraindicated in dyspnea at rest, acute heart failure, new complex arrhythmia, acute myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction, valvular disease with indications for intervention and surgery and comorbidities which prevent physical activity. Patients with underlying cardiovascular disease (including hypertension) should preferably perform types and levels of physical activity that are aerobic (with dynamic exercise) such as running, swimming, cycling instead of sport with high anaerobic demands and high muscular workload. In heart failure, studies demonstrated advantages of isometric sport that increases the amount of muscle, thereby preventing cardiac cachexia. Sport with a risk of blows to the chest or physical contact (e.g. boxing, rugby, martial arts) should be avoided. Implantation, programming and follow-up should respect specific precautions to allow optimal physical activity with a pacemaker including implantation of bipolar leads on the side contralateral to the dominant hand, individual programming of the upper sensor and tracking rate and regular exercise testing. PMID:22854824

  10. Cardiac pacemakers: design, function and problems. January, 1976-May, 1981 (citations from the International Information Service for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1976-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This retrospective bibliography contains citations concerning the design, function, and problems of fixed rate and demand implanted cardiac pacemakers. The susceptibility of pacemakers to electromagnetic interference, and the effects of radiation therapy and microwave interception are considered. The reliability of batteries, types of batteries, and other power sources are all discussed. Nondestructive methods for the assessment of cells and pacemaker are included. (Contains 107 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  11. A rare case of "runaway" pacemaker in a modern CPU-controlled pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Makaryus, Amgad N; Patrick, Carol; Maccaro, Paul

    2005-09-01

    "Runaway" pacemaker is a rare entity that occurs when a malfunctioning artificial cardiac pacemaker abruptly accelerates its pacing rate above the set upper rate limit. This can result in life-threatening dysrhythmia. Runaway pacemaker used to occur more frequently in older model pacemakers, but now with newer pacemaker generators, runaway pacemaker is a rare entity. We report the case of a runaway pacemaker in a modern CPU-controlled pacemaker in a 79-year-old man presenting with lightheadedness and review the literature regarding this rare entity.

  12. Evaluation of patients' quality of life aspects after cardiac pacemaker implantation

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Rubens Tofano; de Carvalho, Sebastião Marcos Ribeiro; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Borges, Juliana Bassalobre Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate patients' quality of life aspects after pacemaker implantation, relating it to gender, age, and implantation timespan. Methods A total of 107 clinically stable patients of both genders (49.5% women and 50.5% men) over 18 years old (average 69.3±12.6 years) and presenting an implantation timespan of three to 12 months (average 6.36±2.99 months) were evaluated. The evaluation included personal, clinical, and implant data as well as quality of life questionnaires (AQUAREL and SF-36). Statistical analysis was conducted using the t test and Pearson correlation, with a 5% significance level. Results The lowest SF-36 score referred to physical aspects, and the highest score referred to social aspects. In AQUAREL, the lowest score referred to dyspnea, and the highest referred to discomfort. There was a significant association between gender and quality of life in SF-36 (physical functioning and emotional aspects) and in AQUAREL (dyspnea). A negative correlation was observed between age and quality of life (functional capacity in SF-36, and discomfort in AQUAREL) in relation to implantation timespan, a correlation with vitality from SF-36. Conclusion Lower quality of life scores were found in physical aspects and dyspnea; and higher scores in social aspects and discomfort. Men presented higher quality of life scores related to physical functioning, emotional aspects and dyspnea. As age increases, quality of life worsens regarding functional capacity and discomfort; and the longer the pacemaker implantation timespan, the worse quality of life when it comes to vitality. Gender, age, and implantation timespan influence quality of life; thus, these variables must be considered in strategies for improving quality of life of patients with pacemakers. PMID:24896161

  13. Cell-specific Dynamic Clamp analysis of the role of funny If current in cardiac pacemaking.

    PubMed

    Ravagli, E; Bucchi, A; Bartolucci, C; Paina, M; Baruscotti, M; DiFrancesco, D; Severi, S

    2016-01-01

    We used the Dynamic Clamp technique for i) comparative validation of conflicting computational models of the hyperpolarization-activated funny current, If, and ii) quantification of the role of If in mediating autonomic modulation of heart rate. Experimental protocols based on the injection of a real-time recalculated synthetic If current in sinoatrial rabbit cells were developed. Preliminary results of experiments mimicking the autonomic modulation of If demonstrated the need for a customization procedure to compensate for cellular heterogeneity. For this reason, we used a cell-specific approach, scaling the maximal conductance of the injected current based on the cell's spontaneous firing rate. The pacemaking rate, which was significantly reduced after application of Ivabradine, was restored by the injection of synthetic current based on the Severi-DiFrancesco formulation, while the injection of synthetic current based on the Maltsev-Lakatta formulation did not produce any significant variation. A positive virtual shift of the If activation curve, mimicking the Isoprenaline effects, led to a significant increase in pacemaking rate (+17.3 ± 6.7%, p < 0.01), although of lower magnitude than that induced by real Isoprenaline (+45.0 ± 26.1%). Similarly, a negative virtual shift of the activation curve significantly lowered the pacemaking rate (-11.8 ± 1.9%, p < 0.001), as did the application of real Acetylcholine (-20.5 ± 5.1%). The Dynamic Clamp approach, applied to the If study in cardiomyocytes for the first time and rate-adapted to manage intercellular variability, indicated that: i) the quantitative description of the If current in the Severi-DiFrancesco model accurately reproduces the effects of the real current on rabbit sinoatrial cell pacemaking rate and ii) a significant portion (50-60%) of the physiological autonomic rate modulation is due to the shift of the If activation curve.

  14. [Postmarketing surveillance in patients with cardiac pace-makers or automatic implantable defibrillators].

    PubMed

    Fauchier, L; de Bouët du Portal, H; Giraudeau, C; Froger, S; Cosnay, P; Babuty, D

    2005-01-01

    This article includes an overview of the actual French control and regulation system of the safety alerts involving pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and an evaluation of the general information and trends about the characteristics of the reported incidents obtained in the last years in that field. The national security agencies have the mission to collect the data on safety and efficacy of medical devices but manufacturers, physicians and patients also have a role to play. The technical appreciation of the necessity of a notification is not easy in some cases but the lack of notification of a severe incident may lead to heavy penal consequences. If doubtful cases, one should keep in mind the spirit of these safety systems: a collective insurance against the risks related to the use of medical devices. In the 10 last years, the annual advisory rate was increased. The pacemakers were recalled more frequently than implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in absolute value but less frequently in relative value (advisories per 100 person-years). This increase may be related to the growing number of device implants and expanding indications for device therapy, to the increasing sophistication of the devices and to the modifications in the regulation aspects of these problems with a closer attention of users and physicians to the several types of malfunctions.

  15. CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation regulates basal cardiac pacemaker function via modulation of local Ca2+ releases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Sirenko, Syevda; Riordon, Daniel R; Yang, Dongmei; Spurgeon, Harold; Lakatta, Edward G; Vinogradova, Tatiana M

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous beating of the heart pacemaker, the sinoatrial node, is generated by sinoatrial node cells (SANC) due to gradual change of the membrane potential called diastolic depolarization (DD). Spontaneous, submembrane local Ca(2+) releases (LCR) from ryanodine receptors (RyR) occur during late DD and activate an inward Na(+)/Ca(2+)exchange current to boost the DD rate and fire an action potential (AP). Here we studied the extent of basal Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activation and the role of basal CaMKII-dependent protein phosphorylation in generation of LCRs and regulation of normal automaticity of intact rabbit SANC. The basal level of activated (autophosphorylated) CaMKII in rabbit SANC surpassed that in ventricular myocytes (VM) by approximately twofold, and this was accompanied by high basal level of protein phosphorylation. Specifically, phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLB) at the CaMKII-dependent Thr(17) site was approximately threefold greater in SANC compared with VM, and RyR phosphorylation at CaMKII-dependent Ser(2815) site was ∼10-fold greater in the SA node, compared with that in ventricle. CaMKII inhibition reduced phosphorylation of PLB and RyR, decreased LCR size, increased LCR periods (time from AP-induced Ca(2+) transient to subsequent LCR), and suppressed spontaneous SANC firing. Graded changes in CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation (indexed by PLB phosphorylation at the Thr(17)site) produced by CaMKII inhibition, β-AR stimulation or phosphodiesterase inhibition were highly correlated with changes in SR Ca(2+) replenishment times and LCR periods and concomitant changes in spontaneous SANC cycle lengths (R(2) = 0.96). Thus high basal CaMKII activation modifies the phosphorylation state of Ca(2+) cycling proteins PLB, RyR, L-type Ca(2+) channels (and likely others), adjusting LCR period and characteristics, and ultimately regulates both normal and reserve cardiac pacemaker function. PMID:27402669

  16. Dosimetric perturbations due to an implanted cardiac pacemaker in MammoSite{sup Registered-Sign} treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Wonmo; Kim, Siyong; Kim, Jung-in; Lee, Jae-gi; Shin, Young-Joo; Jung, Jae-Yong; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate dose perturbations for pacemaker-implanted patients in partial breast irradiation using high dose rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to calculate dose distributions involving a pacemaker in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy. Dose perturbations by varying balloon-to-pacemaker distances (BPD = 50 or 100 mm) and concentrations of iodine contrast medium (2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, and 10.0% by volume) in the balloon were investigated for separate parts of the pacemaker (i.e., battery and substrate). Relative measurements using an ion-chamber were also performed to confirm MC results. Results: The MC and measured results in homogeneous media without a pacemaker agreed with published data within 2% from the balloon surface to 100 mm BPD. Further their dose distributions with a pacemaker were in a comparable agreement. The MC results showed that doses over the battery were increased by a factor of 3, compared to doses without a pacemaker. However, there was no significant dose perturbation in the middle of substrate but up to 70% dose increase in the substrate interface with the titanium capsule. The attenuation by iodine contrast medium lessened doses delivered to the pacemaker by up to 9%. Conclusions: Due to inhomogeneity of pacemaker and contrast medium as well as low-energy photons in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy, the actual dose received in a pacemaker is different from the homogeneous medium-based dose and the external beam-based dose. Therefore, the dose perturbations should be considered for pacemaker-implanted patients when evaluating a safe clinical distance between the balloon and pacemaker.

  17. Impact of imaging landmark on the risk of MRI-related heating near implanted medical devices like cardiac pacemaker leads.

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ritter, Oliver; Weiss, Ingo; Warmuth, Marcus; Gensler, Daniel; Burkard, Natalie; Herold, Volker; Jakob, Peter M; Ertl, Georg; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Bauer, Wolfgang R

    2011-01-01

    Implanted medical devices such as cardiac pacemakers pose a potential hazard in magnetic resonance imaging. Electromagnetic fields have been shown to cause severe radio frequency-induced tissue heating in some cases. Imaging exclusion zones have been proposed as an instrument to reduce patient risk. The purpose of this study was to further assess the impact of the imaging landmark on the risk for unintended implant heating by measuring the radio frequency-induced electric fields in a body phantom under several imaging conditions at 1.5T. The results show that global radio frequency-induced coupling is highest with the torso centered along the superior-inferior direction of the transmit coil. The induced E-fields inside the body shift when changing body positioning, reducing both global and local radio frequency coupling if body and/or conductive implant are moved out from the transmit coil center along the z-direction. Adequate selection of magnetic resonance imaging landmark can significantly reduce potential hazards in patients with implanted medical devices.

  18. A pilot study of a mindfulness based stress reduction program in adolescents with implantable cardioverter defibrillators or pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Freedenberg, Vicki A; Thomas, Sue A; Friedmann, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Adolescents with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) or pacemakers (PMs) face unique challenges that can cause psychosocial distress. Psychosocial interventions are effective for adults with cardiac devices and could potentially impact adolescents' adjustment to these devices. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a structured psycho-educational program that includes meditation, yoga, and group support and has been studied extensively among adults. This study examined the feasibility of the MBSR program for adolescents with ICDs/PMs, a population previously unexamined in the research literature. The participants completed measures of anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and coping (Responses to Stress Questionnaire) at baseline and after the six-session MBSR intervention. Mean age of the cohort (n = 10) was 15 ± 3 years, 6 were male, 6 had a PM, and 4 had an ICD. Feasibility was demonstrated by successful recruitment of 10 participants, 100 % participation and completion. Anxiety decreased significantly following the intervention, with a large effect size, t[9] = 3.67, p < .01, ŋ (2) = .59. Anxiety frequency decreased from baseline to post-intervention (Fisher's exact test p = .024), and 90 % of participants reported decreased anxiety scores post-intervention. Coping skills related negatively to anxiety (r = -.65, p = .04) and depression (r = -.88, p = .001). Post-intervention, the group independently formed their own Facebook group and requested to continue meeting monthly. Although generalizability is limited due to the small sample size, this successful pilot study paves the way for larger studies to examine the efficacy of MBSR interventions in adolescents with high-risk cardiac diagnoses.

  19. Pacemaker (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A pacemaker is a small, battery-operated electronic device which is inserted under the skin to help the heart beat regularly and at an appropriate rate. The pacemaker has leads that travel through a large vein ...

  20. Women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Ginzel, A R

    1996-01-01

    As the incidence of cardiovascular disease in women increases, the process of cardiac rehabilitation in women is becoming increasingly important to nurses. Specifically, the issue of women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation needs to be addressed by nurses. Most past and current research on cardiac rehabilitation and compliance with rehabilitation programs has been conducted on male subjects and cannot be accurately generalized to the female population. This article reviews current literature which addresses the issues of heart disease in women, cardiac rehabilitation and compliance in the general population, gender differences in cardiac rehabilitation, and compliance of women in cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:8657707

  1. Novel cardiac pacemaker-based human model of periodic breathing to develop real-time, pre-emptive technology for carbon dioxide stabilisation

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Resham; Giannoni, Alberto; Willson, Keith; Manisty, Charlotte H; Mebrate, Yoseph; Kyriacou, Andreas; Yadav, Hemang; Unsworth, Beth; Sutton, Richard; Mayet, Jamil; Hughes, Alun D; Francis, Darrel P

    2014-01-01

    Background Constant flow and concentration CO2 has previously been efficacious in attenuating ventilatory oscillations in periodic breathing (PB) where oscillations in CO2 drive ventilatory oscillations. However, it has the undesirable effect of increasing end-tidal CO2, and ventilation. We tested, in a model of PB, a dynamic CO2 therapy that aims to attenuate pacemaker-induced ventilatory oscillations while minimising CO2 dose. Methods First, pacemakers were manipulated in 12 pacemaker recipients, 6 with heart failure (ejection fraction (EF)=23.7±7.3%) and 6 without heart failure, to experimentally induce PB. Second, we applied a real-time algorithm of pre-emptive dynamic exogenous CO2 administration, and tested different timings. Results We found that cardiac output alternation using pacemakers successfully induced PB. Dynamic CO2 therapy, when delivered coincident with hyperventilation, attenuated 57% of the experimentally induced oscillations in end-tidal CO2: SD/mean 0.06±0.01 untreated versus 0.04±0.01 with treatment (p<0.0001) and 0.02±0.01 in baseline non-modified breathing. This translated to a 56% reduction in induced ventilatory oscillations: SD/mean 0.19±0.09 untreated versus 0.14±0.06 with treatment (p=0.001) and 0.10±0.03 at baseline. Of note, end-tidal CO2 did not significantly rise when dynamic CO2 was applied to the model (4.84±0.47 vs 4.91± 0.45 kPa, p=0.08). Furthermore, mean ventilation was also not significantly increased by dynamic CO2 compared with untreated (7.8±1.2 vs 8.4±1.2 L/min, p=0.17). Conclusions Cardiac pacemaker manipulation can be used to induce PB experimentally. In this induced PB, delivering CO2 coincident with hyperventilation, ventilatory oscillations can be substantially attenuated without a significant increase in end-tidal CO2 or ventilation. Dynamic CO2 administration might be developed into a clinical treatment for PB. Trial Registration number ISRCTN29344450. PMID:25332798

  2. Mapping Cardiac Pacemaker Circuits: Methodological Puzzles of the Sino-Atrial Node Optical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Efimov, Igor R.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Joung, Boyoung; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2009-01-01

    Historically, milestones in science are usually associated with methodological breakthroughs. Likewise, the advent of electrocardiography, microelectrode recordings and more recently optical mapping have ushered in new periods of significance of advancement in elucidating basic mechanisms in cardiac electrophysiology. As with any novel technique, however, data interpretation is challenging and should be approached with caution, as it cannot be simply extrapolated from previously used methodologies and with experience and time eventually becomes validated. A good example of this is the use of optical mapping in the sinoatrial node (SAN): when microelectrode and optical recordings are obtained from the same site in myocardium, significantly different results may be noted with respect to signal morphology and as a result have to be interpreted by a different set of principles. Given the rapid spread of the use of optical mapping, careful evaluation must be made in terms of methodology with respect to interpretation of data gathered by optical sensors from fluorescent potential-sensitive dyes. Different interpretations of experimental data may lead to different mechanistic conclusions. This review attempts to address the origin and interpretation of the “double component” morphology in the optical action potentials obtained from the SAN region. One view is that these two components represent distinctive signals from the sinoatrial node and atrial cells, and can be fully separated with signal processing. A second view is that the first component preceding the phase 0 activation represents the membrane currents and intracellular calcium transients induced diastolic depolarization from the SAN. While the consensus from both groups is that ionic mechanisms, namely the joint action of the membrane and calcium automaticity, are important in the SAN function, it is unresolved whether the double-component originates from the recording methodology or represents the

  3. Report of the NASPE Policy Conference training requirements for permanent pacemaker selection, implantation, and follow-up. North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D L; Naccarelli, G V; Furman, S; Parsonnet, V

    1994-01-01

    NASPE proposes and supports the concept of a two-tracked training system in cardiac pacing. Track I training will properly train physicians for the prescription of pacemakers and the monitoring of pacemaker patients, and track II training will properly prepare physicians for the implantation of pacemakers. Regardless of specialty (cardiologist or surgeon) or training venue (cardiac pacing fellowship, cardiac electrophysiology and pacing fellowship, sabbatical or mentor sponsored training), it is recommended that these minimum standards be required for hospital credentialing. NASPE also supports the voluntary institution by training program directors of core pacing training in cardiovascular disease and cardiac electrophysiology fellowships. This core training does not in itself constitute proper track I or II training for physicians interested in adequately prescribing, monitoring, or implanting cardiac pacemakers. PMID:7511233

  4. Role of sinoatrial node architecture in maintaining a balanced source-sink relationship and synchronous cardiac pacemaking.

    PubMed

    Unudurthi, Sathya D; Wolf, Roseanne M; Hund, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Normal heart rhythm (sinus rhythm) depends on regular activity of the sinoatrial node (SAN), a heterogeneous collection of specialized myocytes in the right atrium. SAN cells, in general, possess a unique electrophysiological profile that promotes spontaneous electrical activity (automaticity). However, while automaticity is required for normal pacemaking, it is not necessarily sufficient. Less appreciated is the importance of the elaborate structure of the SAN complex for proper pacemaker function. Here, we review the important structural features of the SAN with a focus on how these elements help manage a precarious balance between electrical charge generated by the SAN ("source") and the charge needed to excite the surrounding atrial tissue ("sink"). We also discuss how compromised "source-sink" balance due, for example to fibrosis, may promote SAN dysfunction, characterized by slow and/or asynchronous pacemaker activity and even failure, in the setting of cardiovascular disease (e.g., heart failure, atrial fibrillation). Finally, we discuss implications of the "source-sink" balance in the SAN complex for cell and gene therapies aimed at creating a biological pacemaker as replacement or bridge to conventional electronic pacemakers.

  5. Ca2+-Clock-Dependent Pacemaking in the Sinus Node Is Impaired in Mice with a Cardiac Specific Reduction in SERCA2 Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Logantha, Sunil Jit R. J.; Stokke, Mathis K.; Atkinson, Andrew J.; Kharche, Sanjay R.; Parveen, Sajida; Saeed, Yawer; Sjaastad, Ivar; Sejersted, Ole M.; Dobrzynski, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) pump is an important component of the Ca2+-clock pacemaker mechanism that provides robustness and flexibility to sinus node pacemaking. We have developed transgenic mice with reduced cardiac SERCA2 abundance (Serca2 KO) as a model for investigating SERCA2's role in sinus node pacemaking. Methods and Results: In Serca2 KO mice, ventricular SERCA2a protein content measured by Western blotting was 75% (P < 0.05) lower than that in control mice (Serca2 FF) tissue. Immunofluorescent labeling of SERCA2a in ventricular, atrial, sinus node periphery and center tissue sections revealed 46, 45, 55, and 34% (all P < 0.05 vs. Serca2 FF) lower labeling, respectively and a mosaic pattern of expression. With telemetric ECG surveillance, we observed no difference in basal heart rate, but the PR-interval was prolonged in Serca2 KO mice: 49 ± 1 vs. 40 ± 1 ms (P < 0.001) in Serca2 FF. During exercise, heart rate in Serca2 KO mice was elevated to 667 ± 22 bpm, considerably less than 780 ± 17 bpm (P < 0.01) in Serca2 FF. In isolated sinus node preparations, 2 mM Cs+ caused bradycardia that was equally pronounced in Serca2 KO and Serca2 FF (32 ± 4% vs. 29 ± 5%), indicating no change in the pacemaker current, If. Disabling the Ca2+-clock with 2 μM ryanodine induced bradycardia that was less pronounced in Serca2 KO preparations (9 ± 1% vs. 20 ± 3% in Serca2 FF; P < 0.05), suggesting a disrupted Ca2+-clock. Mathematical modeling was used to dissect the effects of membrane- and Ca2+-clock components on Serca2 KO mouse heart rate and sinus node action potential. Computer modeling predicted a slowing of heart rate with SERCA2 downregulation and the heart rate slowing was pronounced at >70% reduction in SERCA2 activity. Conclusions: Serca2 KO mice show a disrupted Ca2+-clock-dependent pacemaker mechanism contributing to impaired sinus node and atrioventricular node function. PMID:27313537

  6. Large Controlled Observational Study on Remote Monitoring of Pacemakers and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators: A Clinical, Economic, and Organizational Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with implantable devices such as pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) should be followed up every 3–12 months, which traditionally required in-clinic visits. Innovative devices allow data transmission and technical or medical alerts to be sent from the patient's home to the physician (remote monitoring). A number of studies have shown its effectiveness in timely detection and management of both clinical and technical events, and endorsed its adoption. Unfortunately, in daily practice, remote monitoring has been implemented in uncoordinated and rather fragmented ways, calling for a more strategic approach. Objective The objective of the study was to analyze the impact of remote monitoring for PM and ICD in a “real world” context compared with in-clinic follow-up. The evaluation focuses on how this service is carried out by Local Health Authorities, the impact on the cardiology unit and the health system, and organizational features promoting or hindering its effectiveness and efficiency. Methods A multi-center, multi-vendor, controlled, observational, prospective study was conducted to analyze the impact of remote monitoring implementation. A total of 2101 patients were enrolled in the study: 1871 patients were followed through remote monitoring of PM/ICD (I-group) and 230 through in-clinic visits (U-group). The follow-up period was 12 months. Results In-clinic device follow-ups and cardiac visits were significantly lower in the I-group compared with the U-group, respectively: PM, I-group = 0.43, U-group = 1.07, P<.001; ICD, I-group = 0.98, U-group = 2.14, P<.001. PM, I-group = 0.37, U-group = 0.85, P<.001; ICD, I-group = 1.58, U-group = 1.69, P=.01. Hospitalizations for any cause were significantly lower in the I-group for PM patients only (I-group = 0.37, U-group = 0.50, P=.005). There were no significant differences regarding use of the emergency department for both PM and ICD patients. In the I-group, 0.30 (PM

  7. [Management of patients after pacemaker implanation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Petri, H; Rudolph, W

    1978-12-01

    Although pacemaker therapy is characterized by a high degree of reliability, follow-up of pacemaker patients is necessary to provide early detection of pacemaker failure and optimal setting of programable pacemakers as well as to render adequate treatment of underlying disease. The most common cause of pacemaker failure is battery depletion. In spite of the available data on the mean life-expectancy of the various batteries, the individual time of depletion cannot be predicted with accuracy. Furthermore, a defect in the electronic circuitry and/or electrode may still be rarely encountered even though technical standards are high and, occasionally, threshold elevation or lead dislocation may occur in spite of conscientious implantation technique. For patients with programable pacemakers, follow-up monitoring also enables adjustment for optimal pacemaker function. Thus, through lowering of the current or narrowing of the pulse width, the life of the battery can be prolonged or, on incrementation of these 2 parameters, an increasing threshold can be compensated for within certain limits. More important, however, is the possibility of inductive pacemaker rate changes through external programing to yield the most favorable pulse interval with respect to the underlying disease. Since, in addition to impairment of the cardiac conduction system, other disease processes are frequently presented--approximately one in three patients has coronary artery disease and almost half of the patients have congestive heart failure--follow-up visits not only serve the purpose of monitoring pacemaker function but also provide an opportunity to insure an optimal clinical condition of the patient. Accurate interpretation of pacemaker function prerequisites knowledge of the type of stimulation (fixed rate, synchronized, hysteresis, magnet rate, interference frequencies), of the battery (mercury-zinc, lihium, nickel-cadmium, isotope), of the programability (rate, current, pulse width) as

  8. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage. 410.49 Section 410.49 Public Health CENTERS FOR... MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.49 Cardiac rehabilitation...

  9. Effects of muscle potential depression and muscle stimulation caused by different insulation coating configurations on cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Toshimi; Yamada, Kenichi; Okubo, Naoko; Nitta, Takashi; Ochi, Masami; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    Insulation coating was added to the external pacemaker surface to prevent unnecessary electric current leakage to the periphery because the pulse generator body is used as an anode in unipolar pacing. However, a model without insulation coating has recently been used, so we studied the effects on muscle potential inhibition and muscle stimulation of pacemakers in unipolar pacing with different parts of the pacemaker body coated with insulation. Case comparisons were made for the following models: insulated except for the center of one side (33, group C), insulated except for the peripheral zone (10, group E), and noncoated models (11, group N). The muscle detection threshold voltage, muscle detection threshold pulse duration, muscle potential sensing threshold (MP), and lead resistance were measured. A comparison was made of the amount of energy (En) needed to reach the muscle stimulation threshold. For MP values, there was no significant statistical difference between group C and E, whereas a significant difference was present between group C and N and between group E and N. For En values, there was a significant difference between group C and E and between group C and N, but there was no significant difference between group E and N. The muscle potential sensing threshold dose not have a change in group E and much muscle stimulation energy is needed. The muscle potential sensing threshold was low in group N, requiring much muscle stimulation energy. Based on these results, it is usually not necessary to coat the pacemaker with insulation for unipolar pacing.

  10. Mechanisms of Heart Block after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – Cardiac Anatomy, Clinical Predictors and Mechanical Factors that Contribute to Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Mark; Chilakamarri Yeshwant, Srinath; Chava, Sreedivya; Lawrence Lustgarten, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a valuable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive or increased risk for conventional surgical replacement. Consequently, patients undergoing TAVR are prone to peri-procedural complications including cardiac conduction disturbances, which is the focus of this review. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances and arrhythmias before, during or after TAVR remain a matter of concern for this high-risk group of patients, as they have important consequences on hospital duration, short- and long-term medical management and finally on decisions of device-based treatment strategies (pacemaker or defibrillator implantation). We discuss the mechanisms of atrioventricular disturbances and characterise predisposing factors. Using validated clinical predictors, we discuss strategies to minimise the likelihood of creating permanent high-grade heart block, and identify factors to expedite the decision to implant a permanent pacemaker when the latter is unavoidable. We also discuss optimal pacing strategies to mitigate the possibility of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26835105

  11. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 ounce. Most pacemakers have 2 parts: The generator contains the battery and the information to control ... are wires that connect the heart to the generator and carry the electrical messages to the heart. ...

  12. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage. (a) Definitions. As used in this section: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) means a physician-supervised program that furnishes physician... rehabilitation program at a particular site. Outcomes assessment means an evaluation of progress as it relates...

  13. Lithium pacemaker batteries - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.C.; Holmes, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    Batteries used as power sources in cardiac pacemakers are expected to have high energy density, long storage and operating life and high reliability. They must be nonhazardous under normal operating as well as abusive conditions. Intensive research activities on the past 10-15 years have resulted in the development of a variety of high energy density batteries using Li as the anode material (Li-batteries). At least six different chemical systems with Li anodes are in use as power sources for cardiac pacemakers. Some basic characteristics of these systems are discussed. 11 refs.

  14. Cyanide inhibits the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in isolated cardiac pacemaker cells of the cane toad.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yue-kun; Allen, David G

    2005-02-01

    The effects of the metabolic inhibition on the activity of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) were studied in single isolated pacemaker cells from the cane toad. Ca2+ influx on NCX (reverse mode) was estimated by measuring the increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in response to extracellular Na+-free solution. After application of 2 mM sodium cyanide for 3-5 min, the peak [Ca2+]i in Na+-free solution was significantly decreased from 377+/-42 nM to 260+/-46 nM, suggesting inhibition of NCX. To study Ca2+ efflux on NCX (forward mode), we recorded the tail currents on repolarization which were abolished by Ni2+ and by Na+-free solution. Cyanide decreased the amplitude of tail currents by 36+/-3%. To investigate the intrinsic properties of NCX during the metabolic inhibition, we used rapid application of caffeine to trigger sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release, which then stimulates NCX current (I(NCX) ). Both the caffeine-induced peak [Ca2+]i and the peak I(NCX) were reduced by cyanide exposure. When I(NCX) was plotted against [Ca2+], the slope of the decay phase was decreased in the presence of CN- to 44+/-8% of control, indicating that for a given [Ca2+]i there was less I(NCX) produced. These results show that cyanide (CN-) inhibits NCX activity at least partly through changes in the intrinsic properties of NCX. The inhibition of NCX probably contributes to the slower firing rate of pacemaker cells in CN-. PMID:15688245

  15. Making an APPropriate Care Program for Indigenous Cardiac Disease: Customization of an Existing Cardiac Rehabilitation Program.

    PubMed

    Bradford, DanaKai; Hansen, David; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major health problem for all Australians and is the leading cause of death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. In 2010, more then 50% of all heart attack deaths were due to repeated events. Cardiac rehabilitation programs have been proven to be effective in preventing the recurrence of cardiac events and readmission to hospitals. There are however, many barriers to the use of these programs. To address these barriers, CSIRO developed an IT enabled cardiac rehabilitation program delivered by mobile phone through a smartphone app and succesfully trialed it in an urban general population. If these results can be replicated in Indigenous populations, the program has the potential to significantly improve life expectancy and help close the gap in health outcomes. The challenge described in this paper is customizing the existing cardiac health program to make it culturally relevant and suitable for Indigenous Australians living in urban and remote communities. PMID:26262068

  16. The nuclear pacemaker: Is renewed interest warranted

    SciTech Connect

    Parsonnet, V.; Berstein, A.D.; Perry, G.Y. )

    1990-10-01

    From 1973 through 1987, 155 radioisotope-powered nuclear pacemakers were implanted in 132 patients at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. The longevity of the first 15 devices, all of which were fixed-rate (VOO) pacemakers, was significantly better than that of 15 lithium-chemistry demand (VVI) pacemakers used as control devices (p = 0.0002). Of the entire cohort of 155 nuclear pacemakers, 136 were VVI devices and 19 were VOO units. The patients with VOO pacemakers needed reoperations more often than did those with VVI pacemakers, chiefly for mode change (p less than 0.001). Power-source failure was observed in only 1 case, but 47 nuclear pacemakers were removed for other reasons, including component malfunction (15 units), mode change (12 units), high pacing thresholds (8 units) and lead or connector problems (5 units). The actuarial survival at 15 years was 99% for power sources and 82% for the entire pacing systems (pulse generators plus leads). The frequency of malignancy was similar to that of the population at large and primary tumor sites were randomly distributed. Deaths most commonly were due to cardiac causes (68%). Thus, nuclear pacemakers are safe and reliable and their greater initial cost appears to be offset by their longevity and the resulting decrease in the frequency of reoperations. It is reasonable to suggest that further use be made of long-lasting nuclear power sources for modern pacemakers and other implantable rhythm-management devices.

  17. Tertiapin-Q removes a large and rapidly acting component of vagal slowing of the guinea-pig cardiac pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Bolter, Chris P; Turner, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    The participation of acetylcholine-activated potassium current (I(K,ACh)) and hyperpolarization-activated pacemaker current (I(f)) in vagal bradycardia were examined using vagally-innervated preparations of guinea-pig atria. Preparations were maintained in Krebs-Henseleit solution (36 degrees C). Before treatment, trains of vagal stimuli (10 s at 2, 5 and 10 Hz) produced graded bradycardias displaying rapid onset and offset. Tertiapin-Q (300 nM), which blocks I(K,ACh), had no effect on baseline atrial rate. In tertiapin-Q, vagal bradycardia displayed a gradual onset and offset, with a peak response ~50% of that recorded in control conditions. Cumulative addition of 1 mM ZD7288 (blocker of I(f)) caused atrial rate to fall by ~60%, but had no further effect on the amplitude of the vagal bradycardia, while response onset and offset became slightly faster. From these observations, we argue that (i) vagal bradycardia was attributable primarily to activation of I(K,ACh), (ii) vagal modulation of I(f) had a minor influence on the rate of onset and offset of bradycardia, and (iii) removal of the influence of I(K,ACh) unmasked a slow response, of undetermined origin, to vagal stimulation. In a separate set of experiments we compared the effects of 1 mM Ba(2+) and 300 nM tertiapin-Q on vagal bradycardia. Ba(2+) reduced baseline atrial rate and the response to vagal stimulation. Subsequent cumulative addition of tertiapin-Q had no additional effect on baseline atrial rate, but caused further reduction in the amplitude of vagal bradycardia, suggesting that 1 mM Ba(2+) did not achieve a complete block of I(K,ACh) in this preparation. PMID:19481505

  18. The past, present, and future of pacemaker therapies.

    PubMed

    Boink, Gerard J J; Christoffels, Vincent M; Robinson, Richard B; Tan, Hanno L

    2015-11-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice, electronic pacing has saved many lives. Despite continuous improvements, electronic pacemakers have important shortcomings, which stimulated the development of biological alternatives. Biological pacemakers generate the cardiac impulse using genes or cells to treat bradycardias. Over the past decade, significant improvements have been made in biological pacemakers, but issues remain in relation to long-term outcomes and safety. Concurrently, efforts to improve electronic pacemakers have also intensified. Whether new generations of electronic pacemakers will erase lingering concerns with regard to electronic pacing or whether biologicals will ultimately supplement or supplant electronics remains to be seen.

  19. Cardiac phase: Amplitude analysis using macro programming

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, K.W.; Hickey, K.A.

    1981-11-01

    The analysis of EKG gated radionuclide cardiac imaging data with Fourier amplitude and phase images is becoming a valuable clinical technique, demonstrating location, size, and severity of regional ventricular abnormalities. Not all commercially available nuclear medicine computer systems offer software for phase and amplitude analysis; however, many systems do have the capability of linear image arithmetic using simple macro commands which can easily be sequenced into stored macro-strings or programs. Using simple but accurate series approximations for the Fourier operations, macro programs have been written for a Digital Equipment Corporation Gamma-11 system to obtain phase and amplitude images from routine gated cardiac studies. In addition, dynamic cine-mode presentation of the onset of mechanical systole is generated from the phase data, using only a second set of macro programs. This approach is easily adapted to different data acquisition protocols, and can be used on any system with macro commands for image arithmetic. Key words: Fourier analysis, cardiac cycle, gated blood pool imaging, amplitude image, phase image

  20. A Programmable Implantable Microstimulator SoC With Wireless Telemetry: Application in Closed-Loop Endocardial Stimulation for Cardiac Pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Shuenn-Yuh Lee; Su, M Y; Ming-Chun Liang; You-Yin Chen; Cheng-Han Hsieh; Chung-Min Yang; Hsin-Yi Lai; Jou-Wei Lin; Qiang Fang

    2011-12-01

    A low-power, wireless, and implantable microstimulator system on chip with smart powering management, immediate neural signal acquisition, and wireless rechargeable system is proposed. A system controller with parity checking handles the adjustable stimulus parameters for the stimulated objective. In the current paper, the rat's intra-cardiac electrogram is employed as the stimulated model in the animal study, and it is sensed by a low-voltage and low-power monitoring analog front end. The power management unit, which includes a rectifier, battery charging and detection, and a regulator, is used for the power control of the internal circuits. The stimulation data and required clock are extracted by a phase-locked-loop-based phase shift keying demodulator from an inductive AC signal. The full chip, which consumes 48 μW only, is fabricated in a TSMC 0.35 μm 2P4M standard CMOS process to perform the monitoring and pacing functions with inductively powered communication in the in vivo study.

  1. Pacemaker assessment in the ambulant patient.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, A; Jordan, R S; Gold, R G

    1981-01-01

    A new technique for assessing implanted cardiac pacemaker function in the ambulant patient has been introduced and assessed. A modified portable electrocardiograph recorder is used to store 24 hours of electrocardiograms along with marker pulses indicating the timing of pacemaker impulses. The recorder detects this narrow impulse and records a wider marker pulse on a second channel. The false positive detection rate was estimated from recordings, each of 24 hours, taken from 10 patients. All of these patients were ambulant and none had a cardiac pacemaker. There was on average less than one false positive per 24 hours. When similar recordings were taken from a group of 15 patients with pacemakers, the average false positive rate in 13 of these patients was also less than on per 24 hours. In the two other recordings artefacts resulted in false positive rates of 28 and 960 per 24 hours. Failure to detect pacemaker pulses was confirmed in only one patient. In addition to determining the accuracy of pacemaker pulse detection, the clinical usefulness of this technique was assessed. Two patients had fixed-rate pacemakers and 13 had demand pacemakers. Of the latter, two patients had a total of three episodes of failure to sense, one patient frequently failed to capture, and six patients had episodes of inappropriate inhibition of the pacemaker, the number of episodes ranging from one to 21 in 24 hours. Paced complexes were easily identified even when they occurred as fusion complexes. The frequency of paced complexes was quantified in each patient and varied from 21 to over 100 000 impulses in the 24 hour period. PMID:7317218

  2. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  7. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive... following: (i) A description of the individual's diagnosis. (ii) The type, amount, frequency, and duration... combined with other types of exercise (that is, strengthening, stretching) as determined to be...

  8. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive... following: (i) A description of the individual's diagnosis. (ii) The type, amount, frequency, and duration... combined with other types of exercise (that is, strengthening, stretching) as determined to be...

  9. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive... following: (i) A description of the individual's diagnosis. (ii) The type, amount, frequency, and duration... combined with other types of exercise (that is, strengthening, stretching) as determined to be...

  10. Pacemaker insertion

    PubMed Central

    Kotsakou, Maria; Kioumis, Ioannis; Lazaridis, George; Pitsiou, Georgia; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A pacemaker (PM) (or artificial PM, so as not to be confused with the heart’s natural PM) is a medical device that uses electrical impulses, delivered by electrodes contracting the heart muscles, to regulate the beating of the heart. The primary purpose of this device is to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because the heart’s natural PM is not fast enough, or there is a block in the heart’s electrical conduction system. Modern PMs are externally programmable and allow the cardiologist to select the optimum pacing modes for individual patients. Some combine a PM and defibrillator in a single implantable device. PMs can be temporary or permanent. Temporary PMs are used to treat short-term heart problems, such as a slow heartbeat that’s caused by a heart attack, heart surgery, or an overdose of medicine. Permanent PMs are used to control long-term heart rhythm problems. A PM can relieve some arrhythmia symptoms, such as fatigue and fainting. A PM also can help a person who has abnormal HRs resume a more active lifestyle. In the current mini review we will focus on the insertion of a PM and the possible pneumothorax that can be caused. PMID:25815303

  11. Prenatal programming: adverse cardiac programming by gestational testosterone excess.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Arpita K; Hoang, Vanessa; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Gilbreath, Ebony; Mietelka, Kristy A

    2016-01-01

    Adverse events during the prenatal and early postnatal period of life are associated with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone (T) in sheep induces adverse reproductive and metabolic programming leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance and hypertension in the female offspring. We hypothesized that prenatal T excess disrupts insulin signaling in the cardiac left ventricle leading to adverse cardiac programming. Left ventricular tissues were obtained from 2-year-old female sheep treated prenatally with T or oil (control) from days 30-90 of gestation. Molecular markers of insulin signaling and cardiac hypertrophy were analyzed. Prenatal T excess increased the gene expression of molecular markers involved in insulin signaling and those associated with cardiac hypertrophy and stress including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), nuclear factor of activated T cells -c3 (NFATc3), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to controls. Furthermore, prenatal T excess increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Myocardial disarray (multifocal) and increase in cardiomyocyte diameter was evident on histological investigation in T-treated females. These findings support adverse left ventricular remodeling by prenatal T excess.

  12. Prenatal programming: adverse cardiac programming by gestational testosterone excess.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Arpita K; Hoang, Vanessa; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Gilbreath, Ebony; Mietelka, Kristy A

    2016-01-01

    Adverse events during the prenatal and early postnatal period of life are associated with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone (T) in sheep induces adverse reproductive and metabolic programming leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance and hypertension in the female offspring. We hypothesized that prenatal T excess disrupts insulin signaling in the cardiac left ventricle leading to adverse cardiac programming. Left ventricular tissues were obtained from 2-year-old female sheep treated prenatally with T or oil (control) from days 30-90 of gestation. Molecular markers of insulin signaling and cardiac hypertrophy were analyzed. Prenatal T excess increased the gene expression of molecular markers involved in insulin signaling and those associated with cardiac hypertrophy and stress including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), nuclear factor of activated T cells -c3 (NFATc3), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to controls. Furthermore, prenatal T excess increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Myocardial disarray (multifocal) and increase in cardiomyocyte diameter was evident on histological investigation in T-treated females. These findings support adverse left ventricular remodeling by prenatal T excess. PMID:27328820

  13. Prenatal programming: adverse cardiac programming by gestational testosterone excess

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Arpita K.; Hoang, Vanessa; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Gilbreath, Ebony; Mietelka, Kristy A.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse events during the prenatal and early postnatal period of life are associated with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone (T) in sheep induces adverse reproductive and metabolic programming leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance and hypertension in the female offspring. We hypothesized that prenatal T excess disrupts insulin signaling in the cardiac left ventricle leading to adverse cardiac programming. Left ventricular tissues were obtained from 2-year-old female sheep treated prenatally with T or oil (control) from days 30–90 of gestation. Molecular markers of insulin signaling and cardiac hypertrophy were analyzed. Prenatal T excess increased the gene expression of molecular markers involved in insulin signaling and those associated with cardiac hypertrophy and stress including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), nuclear factor of activated T cells –c3 (NFATc3), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to controls. Furthermore, prenatal T excess increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Myocardial disarray (multifocal) and increase in cardiomyocyte diameter was evident on histological investigation in T-treated females. These findings support adverse left ventricular remodeling by prenatal T excess. PMID:27328820

  14. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase 1A is highly expressed in rabbit cardiac sinoatrial nodal cells and regulates pacemaker function.

    PubMed

    Lukyanenko, Yevgeniya O; Younes, Antoine; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Tarasov, Kirill V; Riordon, Daniel R; Lee, Joonho; Sirenko, Syevda G; Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Ziman, Bruce; Tarasova, Yelena S; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J; Graham, David R; Lakatta, Edward G

    2016-09-01

    Constitutive Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-activation of adenylyl cyclases (ACs) types 1 and 8 in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANC) generates cAMP within lipid-raft-rich microdomains to initiate cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, that regulates basal state rhythmic action potential firing of these cells. Mounting evidence in other cell types points to a balance between Ca(2+)-activated counteracting enzymes, ACs and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) within these cells. We hypothesized that the expression and activity of Ca(2+)/CaM-activated PDE Type 1A is higher in SANC than in other cardiac cell types. We found that PDE1A protein expression was 5-fold higher in sinoatrial nodal tissue than in left ventricle, and its mRNA expression was 12-fold greater in the corresponding isolated cells. PDE1 activity (nimodipine-sensitive) accounted for 39% of the total PDE activity in SANC lysates, compared to only 4% in left ventricular cardiomyocytes (LVC). Additionally, total PDE activity in SANC lysates was lowest (10%) in lipid-raft-rich and highest (76%) in lipid-raft-poor fractions (equilibrium sedimentation on a sucrose density gradient). In intact cells PDE1A immunolabeling was not localized to the cell surface membrane (structured illumination microscopy imaging), but located approximately within about 150nm inside of immunolabeling of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated potassium channels (HCN4), which reside within lipid-raft-rich microenvironments. In permeabilized SANC, in which surface membrane ion channels are not functional, nimodipine increased spontaneous SR Ca(2+) cycling. PDE1A mRNA silencing in HL-1 cells increased the spontaneous beating rate, reduced the cAMP, and increased cGMP levels in response to IBMX, a broad spectrum PDE inhibitor (detected via fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy). We conclude that signaling via cAMP generated by Ca(2+)/CaM-activated AC in SANC lipid raft domains is limited by cAMP degradation by Ca(2+)/Ca

  15. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... on your chest below your collarbone. The pacemaker generator was then placed under the skin at this ... with your pacemaker. Stay away from large motors, generators, and equipment. Do not lean over the open ...

  16. Gene therapy: Biological pacemaker created by gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miake, Junichiro; Marbán, Eduardo; Nuss, H. Bradley

    2002-09-01

    The pacemaker cells of the heart initiate the heartbeat, sustain the circulation, and dictate the rate and rhythm of cardiac contraction. Circulatory collapse ensues when these specialized cells are damaged by disease, a situation that currently necessitates the implantation of an electronic pacemaker. Here we report the use of viral gene transfer to convert quiescent heart-muscle cells into pacemaker cells, and the successful generation of spontaneous, rhythmic electrical activity in the ventricle in vivo. Our results indicate that genetically engineered pacemakers could be developed as a possible alternative to implantable electronic devices.

  17. High ventricular lead impedance of a DDD pacemaker after cranial magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Baser, Kazim; Guray, Umit; Durukan, Mine; Demirkan, Burcu

    2012-09-01

    Management of electromagnetic interference in the form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with pacemakers (PMs) may be challenging. Serious consequences, especially in PM-dependent patients, may be encountered. Changes in device programming, asynchronous pacing, heating of the lead tip(s), and increased thresholds or even device dislocation may be experienced. We report of a patient with a DDD PM who underwent an emergent MRI, after which there was an increase in ventricular impedance as well as increased cardiac biomarkers.

  18. [Principle of the activity-controlled rate-adaptive cardiac pacemaker: analysis of stress and environment-induced mechanical effects on the human body].

    PubMed

    Alt, E; Matula, M; Theres, H; Heinz, M

    1989-09-01

    Rate-adaptive pacemakers are increasingly becoming part of clinical routine, the most widespread systems being activity-controlled. In order to shed more light on the foundations of mechanical forces which can possibly be utilized for controlling rate-adaptive systems, we conducted tests on six healthy volunteers and six pacemaker patients. With the aid of three orthogonal wide-band linear acceleration pick-ups attached to the body, the mechanical signals were recorded from the three axes during different activities. Along with standardized exercise on bicycle and treadmill ergometers, we tested the influence of household activities and interference influences. The results were analyzed in terms of the amplitude and frequency content of the signals. For walking activities we found a signal amplitude increasing in largely linear fashion with the walking speed, the signal amplitudes being approximately twice as high on the vertical axis as on the other two axes. Exercise on the bicycle ergometer produced mechanical signals of clearly lower amplitude than comparable walking activities. The Fast-Fourier analysis showed amplitude peaks in the low frequency range of 1 to 4 Hz for all forms of physiological exercise, while interference influences showed amplitude peaks mainly in the range above 8 Hz. The use of an acceleration pickup and a corresponding low pass filter might be a way of reducing the effect of nonphysiological interference influences on an activity-controlled pacemaker system. A sensor measuring in the horizontal axis appears to be the most favorable compromise for the various types of exercise. However, due to the considerable difference in signal amplitude for different types of exercise of the same intensity, an activity-controlled pacemaker system cannot entirely meet metabolic conditions and requirements. PMID:2815913

  19. Effects of Lifestyle Modification Programs on Cardiac Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Moaven; Fournier, Stephen; Shepard, Donald S.; Ritter, Grant; Strickler, Gail K.; Stason, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare conducted a payment demonstration to evaluate the effectiveness of two intensive lifestyle modification programs in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease: the Dr. Dean Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease (Ornish) and Cardiac Wellness Program of the Benson-Henry Mind Body Institute. This report describes the changes in cardiac risk factors achieved by each program during the active intervention year and subsequent year of follow-up. The demonstration enrolled 580 participants who had had an acute myocardial infarction, had undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention within 12 months, or had documented stable angina pectoris. Of these, 98% completed the intense 3-month intervention, 71% the 12-month intervention, and 56% an additional follow-up year. Most cardiac risk factors improved significantly during the intense intervention period in both programs. Favorable changes in cardiac risk factors and functional cardiac capacity were maintained or improved further at 12 and 24 months in participants with active follow-up. Multivariable regressions found that risk-factor improvements were positively associated with abnormal baseline values, Ornish program participation for body mass index and systolic blood pressure, and with coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Expressed levels of motivation to lose weight and maintain weight loss were significant independent predictors of sustained weight loss (p = 0.006). Both lifestyle modification programs achieved well-sustained reductions in cardiac risk factors. PMID:25490202

  20. [Which place for VDD mode single electrode pacemaker?].

    PubMed

    Zahreddine, Smiri; Haggui, A; Nadia, Barakett; Samia, Ammar; Nadim, Hajlaoui; Hedi, M'henni; Habib, Haouala

    2005-06-01

    VDD mode single electrode pacemaker is a technique of cardiac stimulation which preserves auriculo-ventricular synchronism using a single electrode. Its importance has decreased because of the numerous satisfactions previous by the DDD mode. We describe our experience with this mode and we discuss the advantages, limits and indications of this mode of cardiac stimulation.

  1. New Approaches to Biological Pacemakers: Links to Sinoatrial Node Development.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Vasanth

    2015-12-01

    Irreversible degeneration of the cardiac conduction system is a common disease that can cause activity intolerance, fainting, and death. While electronic pacemakers provide effective treatment, alternative approaches are needed when long-term indwelling hardware is undesirable. Biological pacemakers comprise electrically active cells that functionally integrate with the heart. Recent findings on cardiac pacemaker cells (PCs) within the sinoatrial node (SAN), along with developments in stem cell technology, have opened a new era in biological pacing. Recent experiments that have derived PC-like cells from non-PCs have brought the field closer than ever before to biological pacemakers that can faithfully recapitulate SAN activity. In this review, I discuss these approaches in the context of SAN biology and address the potential for clinical translation. PMID:26611337

  2. MRI-conditional pacemakers: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, António M; Costa, Francisco; Tralhão, António; Marques, Hugo; Cardim, Nuno; Adragão, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Use of both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pacing devices has undergone remarkable growth in recent years, and it is estimated that the majority of patients with pacemakers will need an MRI during their lifetime. These investigations will generally be denied due to the potentially dangerous interactions between cardiac devices and the magnetic fields and radio frequency energy used in MRI. Despite the increasing reports of uneventful scanning in selected patients with conventional pacemakers under close surveillance, MRI is still contraindicated in those circumstances and cannot be considered a routine procedure. These limitations prompted a series of modifications in generator and lead engineering, designed to minimize interactions that could compromise device function and patient safety. The resulting MRI-conditional pacemakers were first introduced in 2008 and the clinical experience gathered so far supports their safety in the MRI environment if certain conditions are fulfilled. With this technology, new questions and controversies arise regarding patient selection, clinical impact, and cost-effectiveness. In this review, we discuss the potential risks of MRI in patients with electronic cardiac devices and present updated information regarding the features of MRI-conditional pacemakers and the clinical experience with currently available models. Finally, we provide some guidance on how to scan patients who have these devices and discuss future directions in the field. PMID:24851058

  3. [A case of pacemaker-induced tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Krauss, H

    1980-05-01

    Report of a pacemaker induced tachycardia. Because of congestive heart failure therapy consisted in immediate replacement of the defective pacemaker. Analysis of the explanted pacemaker revealed a defect in the rate determining circuit. The rate protection limit prevented pacemaker runaway.

  4. Clinical assessment of pacemaker power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bilitch, M.; Parsonnet, V.; Furman, S.

    1980-01-01

    The development of power sources for cardiac pacemakers has progressed from a 15-year usage of mercury-zinc batteries to widely used and accepted lithium cells. At present, there are about 6 different types of lithium cells incorporated into commercially distributed pacemakers. The authors reviewed experience over a 5-year period with 1711 mercury-zinc, 130 nuclear (P238) and 1912 lithium powered pacemakers. The lithium units have included 698 lithium-iodide, 270 lithium-silver chromate, 135 lithium-thionyl chloride, 31 lithium-lead and 353 lithium-cupric sulfide batteries. 57 of the lithium units have failed (91.2% component failure and 5.3% battery failure). 459 mercury-zinc units failed (25% component failure and 68% battery depletion). The data show that lithium powered pacemaker failures are primarily component, while mercury-zinc failures are primarily battery related. It is concluded that mercury-zinc powered pulse generators are obsolete and that lithium and nuclear (P238) power sources are highly reliable over the 5 years for which data are available. 3 refs.

  5. Case report: use caution when applying magnets to pacemakers or defibrillators for surgery.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Peter M; Rozner, Marc A

    2013-08-01

    The application of a magnet to a pacemaker (intended to cause asynchronous pacing) or implanted cardioverter defibrillator (intended to prevent shocks) during surgery without a clear understanding of actual magnet function(s) or precautions can have unexpected, untoward, or harmful consequences. In this report, we present 3 cases in which inadequate assessment of cardiac implanted electronic device (CIED) function, coupled with magnet application, contributed to or resulted in inappropriate antitachycardia pacing or shocks, CIED damage, or patient injury. Although these cases might be rare, they reinforce the need for a timely, detailed preoperative review of CIED function and programming as recommended by the American Society of Anesthesiologists and the Heart Rhythm Society.

  6. Effects of pacemaker currents on creation and modulation of human ventricular pacemaker: theoretical study with application to biological pacemaker engineering.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Yasutaka; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Hisatome, Ichiro; Shibamoto, Toshishige

    2007-01-01

    A cardiac biological pacemaker (BP) has been created by suppression of the inward rectifier K(+) current (I(K1)) or overexpression of the hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)). We theoretically investigated the effects of incorporating I(h), T-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca,T)), sustained inward current (I(st)), and/or low-voltage-activated L-type Ca(2+) channel current (I(Ca,LD)) on 1) creation of BP cells, 2) robustness of BP activity to electrotonic loads of nonpacemaking (NP) cells, and 3) BP cell ability to drive NP cells. We used a single-cell model for human ventricular myocytes (HVMs) and also coupled-cell models composed of BP and NP cells. Bifurcation structures of the model cells were explored during changes in conductance of the currents and gap junction. Incorporating the pacemaker currents did not yield BP activity in HVM with normal I(K1) but increased the critical I(K1) conductance for BP activity to emerge. Expressing I(h) appeared to be most helpful in facilitating creation of BP cells via I(K1) suppression. In the coupled-cell model, I(st) significantly enlarged the gap conductance (G(C)) region where stable BP cell pacemaking and NP cell driving occur, reducing the number of BP cells required for robust pacemaking and driving. In contrast, I(h) enlarged the G(C) region of pacemaking and driving only when I(K1) of the NP cell was relatively low. I(Ca,T) or I(Ca,LD) exerted effects similar to those of I(st) but caused shrinkage or irregularity of BP oscillations. These findings suggest that expressing I(st) most effectively improves the structural stability of BPs to electrotonic loads and the BP ability to drive the ventricle.

  7. Pacemakers (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pulsed on and off at a rapid rate. For most patients with a pacemaker, this procedure is a relative contraindication. ● Transcutaneous electrical nerve/muscle stimulators (TENS), a method of pain control. ● Diathermy, which heats body tissues with high-frequency electromagnetic radiation or ...

  8. Delayed right-ventricular perforation by pacemaker lead; a rare complication in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Hayrettin Hakan; Akın, Alper; Ertuğrul, İlker; Karagöz, Tevfik

    2015-03-01

    Developments in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases have led to an increase in the need for intracardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation. Various complications related to these interventions can be seen in the short term (pneumothorax, pericardial effusion, cardiac perforation, etc…) and in the long term (infection, subclavian vein thrombosis, sensing and pacing problems, battery erosion and cardiac perforation). In this report, we present a rare case of cardiac perforation occurring 2 years after pacemaker implantation.

  9. Interference between pacemakers/implantable cardioverter defibrillators and video capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bandorski, Dirk; Gehron, Johannes; Höltgen, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Our Letter to the Editor, related to the article “Small bowel capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: Outcome analysis using telemetry” by Cuschieri et al, comments on some small errors, that slipped into the authors discussions. The given informations concerning the pacemaker- and implantable cardioverter defibrillators modes were inaccurate and differ between the text and the table. Moreover, as 8 of 20 patient’s pacemakers were programmed to VOO or DOO (“interference mode”) and one patient was not monitored by telemetry during capsule endoscopy, 9 of 20 patients (45%) lack the informations of possible interference between capsule endoscopy their implanted device. Another objection refers to the interpretation of an electrocardiogram (figure 1, trace B) presented: in contrast to the author’s opinion the marked spike should be interpreted as an artefact and not as ”undersensing of a fibrillatory wave”. Finally, three comments to cited reviews were not complete respectively not quoted correctly. PMID:23596547

  10. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  11. Endotoxin impairs the human pacemaker current If.

    PubMed

    Zorn-Pauly, Klaus; Pelzmann, Brigitte; Lang, Petra; Mächler, Heinrich; Schmidt, Hendrik; Ebelt, Henning; Werdan, Karl; Koidl, Bernd; Müller-Werdan, Ursula

    2007-12-01

    LPSs trigger the development of sepsis by gram-negative bacteria and cause a variety of biological effects on host cells, including alterations on ionic channels. Because heart rate variability is reduced in human sepsis and endotoxemia, we hypothesized that LPS affects the pacemaker current I(f) in human heart, which might--at least in part--explain this phenomenon. Isolated human myocytes from right atrial appendages were incubated for 6 to 10 h with LPS (1 and 10 microg/mL) and afterwards used to investigate the pacemaker current I(f). I(f) was measured with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique (at 37 degrees C). Incubation of atrial myocytes with 10 microg/mL LPS was found to significantly impair I(f) by suppressing the current at membrane potentials positive to -80 mV and slowing down current activation, but without effecting maximal current conductance. Furthermore, in incubated cells (10 microg/mL), the response of I(f) to [beta]-adrenergic stimulation (1 microM isoproterenol) was significantly larger compared with control cells (shift of half-maximal activation voltage to more positive potentials amounted to -10 and -14 mV in untreated and treated cells, respectively). Simulations using a spontaneously active sinoatrial cell model demonstrated that LPS-induced I(f) impairment reduced the responsiveness of the model cell to fluctuations of autonomic input. This study showed a direct impact of LPS on the cardiac pacemaker current I(f). The LPS-induced I(f) impairment may contribute to the clinically observed reduction in heart rate variability under septic conditions and in cardiac diseases such as heart failure, where endotoxin can be of pathophysiological relevance.

  12. Pacemaker Created in Human Ventricle by Depressing Inward-Rectifier K+ Current: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Qince; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders are common diseases which cause slow heart rate and syncope. The best way to treat these diseases by now is to implant electronic pacemakers, which, yet, have many disadvantages, such as the limited battery life and infection. Biopacemaker has been expected to replace the electronic devices. Automatic ventricular myocytes (VMs) could show pacemaker activity, which was induced by depressing inward-rectifier K+ current (IK1). In this study, a 2D model of human biopacemaker was created from the ventricular endocardial myocytes. We examined the stability of the created biopacemaker and investigated its driving capability by finding the suitable size and spatial distribution of the pacemaker for robust pacing and driving the surrounding quiescent cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that the rhythm of the pacemaker is similar to that of the single cell at final stable state. The driving force of the biopacemaker is closely related to the pattern of spatial distribution of the pacemaker. PMID:26998484

  13. The cardiac implantable electronic device power source: evolution and revolution.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Freitag, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Although the first power source for an implantable pacemaker was a rechargeable nickel-cadmium battery, it was rapidly replaced by an unreliable short-life zinc-mercury cell. This sustained the small pacemaker industry until the early 1970s, when the lithium-iodine cell became the dominant power source for low voltage, microampere current, single- and dual-chamber pacemakers. By the early 2000s, a number of significant advances were occurring with pacemaker technology which necessitated that the power source should now provide milliampere current for data logging, telemetric communication, and programming, as well as powering more complicated pacing devices such as biventricular pacemakers, treatment or prevention of atrial tachyarrhythmias, and the integration of innovative physiologic sensors. Because the current delivery of the lithium-iodine battery was inadequate for these functions, other lithium anode chemistries that can provide medium power were introduced. These include lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-manganese dioxide, and lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride hybrids. In the early 1980s, the first implantable defibrillators for high voltage therapy used a lithium-vanadium pentoxide battery. With the introduction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, the reliable lithium-silver vanadium oxide became the power source. More recently, because of the demands of biventricular pacing, data logging, and telemetry, lithium-manganese dioxide and the hybrid lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride laminate have also been used. Today all cardiac implantable electronic devices are powered by lithium anode batteries.

  14. Effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter defibrillator versus cardiac resynchronization therapy with pacemaker on mortality in heart failure patients: results of a high-volume, single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Kutyifa, Valentina; Geller, Laszlo; Bogyi, Peter; Zima, Endre; Aktas, Mehmet K; Ozcan, Emin Evren; Becker, David; Nagy, Vivien Klaudia; Kosztin, Annamaria; Szilagyi, Szabolcs; Merkely, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Aims There are limited and contradictory data on the effects of CRT with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (CRT-D) on mortality as compared with CRT with pacemaker (CRT-P). Methods and results We evaluated the long-term outcome of patients implanted with a CRT-D or CRT-P device in our high-volume single-centre experience. Data on all-cause mortality were derived from clinic visits and the Hungarian National Healthcare Fund Death Registry. Kaplan–Meier survival analyses and multivariate Cox regression models were used to evaluate all-cause mortality in patients with CRT-D vs. CRT-P, stratified by the aetiology of cardiomyopathy. From 2000 to 2011, 1122 CRT devices, 693 CRT-P (LVEF 28.2 ± 7.4%) and 429 CRT-D (LVEF 27.6 ± 6.4%), were implanted at our centre. During the median follow-up of 28 months, 379 patients died from any cause, 250 patients (36%) with an implanted CRT-P and 129 patients (30%) with an implanted CRT-D. There was no evidence of mortality benefit in patients implanted with a CRT-D compared with a CRT-P in the total cohort [hazard ratio (HR) 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–1.32, P = 0.884]. In patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, CRT-D treatment was associated with a significant 30% risk reduction in all-cause mortality compared with an implanted CRT-P (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.51–0.97, P = 0.03). In non-ischaemic patients, there was no mortality benefit of CRT-D over CRT-P (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.73–1.32, P = 0.894, interaction P-value = 0.15). Conclusions In heart failure patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, CRT-D was associated with a mortality benefit compared with CRT-P, but no benefit of CRT-D over CRT-P in mortality was observed in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25379962

  15. Defibrillator/monitor/pacemakers.

    PubMed

    2003-05-01

    Defibrillator/monitors allow operators to assess and monitor a patient's ECG and, when necessary, deliver a defibrillating shock to the heart. When integral noninvasive pacing is added, the device is called a defibrillator/monitor/pacemaker. In this Evaluation, we present our findings for two newly evaluated models, the Welch Allyn PIC 50 and the Zoll M Series CCT, and we summarize our findings for the previously evaluated models that are still on the market. We rate the models for the following applications: general crash-cart use, in-hospital transport use, and emergency medical service (EMS) use.

  16. In utero Undernutrition Programs Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Brittany; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2016-01-01

    In utero undernutrition is associated with increased risk for insulin resistance, obesity, and cardiovascular disease during adult life. A common phenotype associated with low birth weight is reduced skeletal muscle mass. Given the central role of skeletal muscle in whole body metabolism, alterations in its mass as well as its metabolic characteristics may contribute to disease risk. This review highlights the metabolic alterations in cardiac and skeletal muscle associated with in utero undernutrition and low birth weight. These tissues have high metabolic demands and are known to be sites of major metabolic dysfunction in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research demonstrates that mitochondrial energetics are decreased in skeletal and cardiac muscles of adult offspring from undernourished mothers. These effects apparently lead to the development of a thrifty phenotype, which may represent overall a compensatory mechanism programmed in utero to handle times of limited nutrient availability. However, in an environment characterized by food abundance, the effects are maladaptive and increase adulthood risks of metabolic disease. PMID:26779032

  17. [Microwave ablation of a sarcoma lung metastasis in a patient with a pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Guerra, J M; Gallego, O; Franquet, T

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with a pacemaker and a sarcoma lung metastasis treated with microwave ablation. Although the treatment of tumours with microwave ablation is a successful and minimally invasive approach, there are concerns about the safety of this procedure for patients with implanted cardiac devices, such as a pacemaker. After careful planning between radiology and cardiology, microwave ablation was indicated in the patient since it is safer and shorter than the radiofrequency technique. The lesion was treated without complications. It is important to communicate the procedures performed, as well as any complications in order to formulate guidelines for the use of microwave ablation in patients with pacemakers.

  18. Evaluation of a New Cardiac Pacemaker

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-25

    Atrial Fibrillation With 2 or 3° AV or Bifascicular Bundle Branch (BBB) Block; Normal Sinus Rhythm With 2 or 3° AV or BBB Block; Sinus Bradycardia With Infrequent Pauses or Unexplained Syncope With EP Findings

  19. 1978 Pacemaker Newspaper Awards: What Makes a Pacemaker?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasler, Wayne

    1979-01-01

    Lists the nine high school and college newspapers, and the one newsmagazine, that won Pacemaker Awards in 1978; discusses characteristics that make each of them outstanding, and provides reproductions of a front page from each publication. (GT)

  20. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heewon; Ko, Hoon; Thap, Tharoeun; Jeong, Changwon; Noh, Se-Eung; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone's built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone's built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient's HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis. PMID:27551969

  1. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heewon; Ko, Hoon; Thap, Tharoeun; Jeong, Changwon; Noh, Se-Eung; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone's built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone's built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient's HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis.

  2. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Heewon; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone’s built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone’s built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient’s HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis. PMID:27551969

  3. Pacemaker and Defibrillator Lead Extraction

    MedlinePlus

    ... to cure the infection without completely removing all hardware from the body. This requires removal of the ... Footnotes References Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Article Tools Print Citation Tools Pacemaker and Defibrillator Lead Extraction ...

  4. Position paper for management of elderly patients with pacemakers and implantable cardiac defibrillators Groupe de rythmologie et stimulation cardiaque de la Société française de cardiologie et Société française de gériatrie et gérontologie.

    PubMed

    Fauchier, Laurent; Alonso, Christine; Anselme, Frédéric; Blangy, Hugues; Bordachar, Pierre; Boveda, Serge; Clementy, Nicolas; Defaye, Pascal; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Friocourt, Patrick; Gras, Daniel; Halimi, Franck; Klug, Didier; Mansourati, Jacques; Obadia, Benjamin; Pasquié, Jean-Luc; Pavin, Dominique; Sadoul, Nicolas; Taieb, Jérôme; Piot, Olivier; Hanon, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Despite the increasingly high rate of implantation of pacemakers (PM) and cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) in elderly patients, data supporting their clinical and cost-effectiveness in this age stratum are ambiguous and contradictory. We reviewed the data regarding the applicability, safety, and effectiveness of the conventional pacing, ICD and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in elderly patients. Although peri-procedural risk may be slightly higher in the elderly, the procedure of implantation of PMs and ICDs is still relatively safe in this age group. In older patients with sinus node disease, a general consensus is that dual chamber pacing, along with the programming of an algorithm to minimise ventricular pacing is preferred. In very old patients presenting with intermittent or suspected AV block, VVI pacing may be appropriate. In terms of correcting potentially life-threatening arrhythmias, the effectiveness of ICD therapy is comparable in older and younger individuals. However, the assumption of persistent ICD benefit in the elderly population is questionable, as any advantage of the device on arrhythmic death may be attenuated by a higher total non-arrhythmic mortality. While septuagenarians and octogenarians have higher annual all-cause mortality rates, ICD therapy may remain effective in selected patients at high risk of arrhythmic death and with minimum comorbidities despite advanced age. ICD implantation among the elderly, as a group, may not be cost-effective, but the procedure may reach cost-effectiveness in those expected to live >5-7 years after implantation. The elderly patients usually experience a significant functional improvement after CRT, similar to that observed in middle-aged patients. Management of CRT non responders remains globally the same, while considering a less aggressive approach in terms of re interventions (revision of LV lead placement, addition of a RV or LV lead, LV endocardial pacing configuration). Overall, age

  5. SCAI expert consensus statement for advanced training programs in pediatric and congenital interventional cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Armsby, Laurie; Beekman, Robert H; Benson, Lee; Fagan, Thomas; Hagler, Donald J; Hijazi, Ziyad M; Holzer, Ralf; Ing, Frank; Kreutzer, Jacqueline; Lang, Peter; Levi, Daniel S; Latson, Larry; Moore, Phillip; Mullins, Charles; Ruiz, Carlos; Vincent, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric and Congenital Interventional Cardiology is the practice of catheter-based techniques that improve cardiac physiology and circulation through the treatment of heart disease in children and adults with congenital or acquired heart defects. Over the last decade, and since last published training guidelines for pediatric cardiac catheterization and interventional cardiology were published in 2005 [1] the field of Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Catheterization has evolved into a predominantly interventional discipline. As there is no sub-specialty certification for interventional cardiac catheterization in pediatrics, the Congenital Heart Disease Committee of the Society of Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions has put together this consensus statement for advanced training in pediatric and congenital interventional cardiac catheterization. The statement puts forth recommendations for program infrastructure in terms of teaching, personnel, equipment, facilities, conferences, patient volume and trainee assessment. This is meant to set a standard for training programs as well as giving applicants a basis on which to judge and compare programs.

  6. Defibrillator/monitor/pacemakers.

    PubMed

    2005-06-01

    In this Evaluation, we present our test results and ratings for two newly evaluated defibrillator/monitor/pacemakers--the Medtronic ERS Lifepak 20 and the Philips HeartStart MRx. We also summarize and update our findings for eight previously evaluated models that are still on the market. We rate the models based on their desirability for in-hospital applications, such as general crash-cart use and in-hospital transport use, and for prehospital applications, specifically emergency medical service (EMS) use. The primary function of the devices examined in this study is to allow operators to assess and monitor a patient's ECG and, when necessary, deliver a defibrillating shock to the heart. However, currently available models can also be equipped to do much more during a resuscitation attempt - from monitoring multiple physiologic parameters to providing noninvasive pacing capability to functioning as an automated external defibrillator (AED). Our testing examined all these capabilities to help hospital and EMS purchasers make effective selection decisions.

  7. Effects of a brief intervention on retention of patients in a cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Angele; Burkes, Robert; Badenhop, Dalynn; McGinnis, Ron

    2014-12-01

    This intervention assessed the effects of a brief intervention on dropout rate in a cardiac rehabilitation program. One hundred thirty five patients were recruited from a cardiac rehabilitation program and randomized to either a control or intervention group. The intervention group participated in four sessions of motivational interviewing and stress management-relaxation in addition to standard cardiac rehabilitation. The control group underwent cardiac rehabilitation alone. Patients who completed the intervention completed an average of 30 sessions while those who dropped out of the intervention completed about six (p < 0.001). Anxiety and depression measured at baseline were the primary predictors of dropout. Patients in both the intervention and controls groups who completed cardiac rehabilitation improved the distance walked, quality of life and decreased anxiety.

  8. Effects of a brief intervention on retention of patients in a cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Angele; Burkes, Robert; Badenhop, Dalynn; McGinnis, Ron

    2014-12-01

    This intervention assessed the effects of a brief intervention on dropout rate in a cardiac rehabilitation program. One hundred thirty five patients were recruited from a cardiac rehabilitation program and randomized to either a control or intervention group. The intervention group participated in four sessions of motivational interviewing and stress management-relaxation in addition to standard cardiac rehabilitation. The control group underwent cardiac rehabilitation alone. Patients who completed the intervention completed an average of 30 sessions while those who dropped out of the intervention completed about six (p < 0.001). Anxiety and depression measured at baseline were the primary predictors of dropout. Patients in both the intervention and controls groups who completed cardiac rehabilitation improved the distance walked, quality of life and decreased anxiety. PMID:25150038

  9. Current facts on pacemaker electromagnetic interference and their application to clinical care

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, D.P.

    1987-03-01

    The development of the sensing demand cardiac pacemaker brought with it the problem of interference as a result of extraneous electric current and electromagnetic fields. This problem still deserves consideration, not only because harmful disruption of pacemaker function, while infrequent, can occur but also because myths and misunderstandings have flourished on the subject. Misinformation has often led to needless patient anxiety and unnecessary restrictions in activities of daily living. Similarly, when health care practitioners are misinformed about pacemaker interference, potentially hazardous situations can occur in the clinical environment. This article is a review of current information on the sources and effects of electromagnetic interference (EMI) on pacemakers and includes a discussion of their application to patient care.

  10. Cardiac resynchronization therapy and phase resetting of the sinoatrial node: a conjecture.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Federico; Varanini, Maurizio; Macerata, Alberto; Piacenti, Marcello; Morales, Maria-Aurora; Balocchi, Rita

    2007-03-01

    Congestive heart failure is a severe chronic disease often associated with disorders that alter the mechanisms of excitation-contraction coupling that may result in an asynchronous left ventricular motion which may further impair the ability of the failing heart to eject blood. In recent years a therapeutic approach to resynchronize the ventricles (cardiac resynchronization therapy, CRT) has been performed through the use of a pacemaker device able to provide atrial-based biventricular stimulation. Atrial lead senses the spontaneous occurrence of cells depolarization and sends the information to the generator which, in turn, after a settled delay [atrioventricular (AV) delay], sends electrical impulses to both ventricles to stimulate their synchronous contraction. Recent studies performed on heart rate behavior of chronically implanted patients at different epochs after implantation have shown that CRT can lead to sustained overall improvement of heart function with a reduction in morbidity and mortality. At this moment, however, there are no studies about CRT effects on spontaneous heart activity of chronically implanted patients. We performed an experimental study in which the electrocardiographic signal of five subjects under chronic CRT was recorded during the activity of the pacemaker programmed at different AV delays and under spontaneous cardiac activity after pacemaker deactivation. The different behavior of heart rate variability during pacemaker activity and after pacemaker deactivation suggested the hypothesis of a phase resetting mechanism induced by the pacemaker stimulus on the sinoatrial (SA) node, a phenomenon already known in literature for aggregate of cardiac cells, but still unexplored in vivo. The constraints imposed by the nature of our study (in vivo tests) made it impossible to plan an experiment to prove our hypothesis directly. We therefore considered the best attainable result would be to prove the accordance of our data to the conjecture

  11. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and phase resetting of the sinoatrial node: A conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantini, Federico; Varanini, Maurizio; Macerata, Alberto; Piacenti, Marcello; Morales, Maria-Aurora; Balocchi, Rita

    2007-03-01

    Congestive heart failure is a severe chronic disease often associated with disorders that alter the mechanisms of excitation-contraction coupling that may result in an asynchronous left ventricular motion which may further impair the ability of the failing heart to eject blood. In recent years a therapeutic approach to resynchronize the ventricles (cardiac resynchronization therapy, CRT) has been performed through the use of a pacemaker device able to provide atrial-based biventricular stimulation. Atrial lead senses the spontaneous occurrence of cells depolarization and sends the information to the generator which, in turn, after a settled delay [atrioventricular (AV) delay], sends electrical impulses to both ventricles to stimulate their synchronous contraction. Recent studies performed on heart rate behavior of chronically implanted patients at different epochs after implantation have shown that CRT can lead to sustained overall improvement of heart function with a reduction in morbidity and mortality. At this moment, however, there are no studies about CRT effects on spontaneous heart activity of chronically implanted patients. We performed an experimental study in which the electrocardiographic signal of five subjects under chronic CRT was recorded during the activity of the pacemaker programmed at different AV delays and under spontaneous cardiac activity after pacemaker deactivation. The different behavior of heart rate variability during pacemaker activity and after pacemaker deactivation suggested the hypothesis of a phase resetting mechanism induced by the pacemaker stimulus on the sinoatrial (SA) node, a phenomenon already known in literature for aggregate of cardiac cells, but still unexplored in vivo. The constraints imposed by the nature of our study (in vivo tests) made it impossible to plan an experiment to prove our hypothesis directly. We therefore considered the best attainable result would be to prove the accordance of our data to the conjecture

  12. Clinical experience with nuclear pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, V; Myers, G H; Gilbert, L; Zucker, I R

    1975-12-01

    Approximately 1,400 nuclear pacemakers have been implanted in patients since April, 1970, without a single battery failure; 64 of these have been implanted at the Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. All except four of the 64 pulse generators were attached to transvenous electrodes, 39 to pacing wires already in place. Fifty-nine of the 64 units are in service and continue to function normally in a follow-up period of up to 2 years. In the total worldwide experience, 70 pacemakers are out of service, approximately half because of the patient's death, and the rest for infection or lead problems, and only three or four because of difficulties with components. The first 15 ARCO pacemakers implanted 2 years ago continue to function well. Of the 15 control pacemakers implanted at the same time, one unit has failed. We have concluded that a nuclear pacemaker should not be used in a patient with limited life expectancy or in an infant, but for the otherwise healthy young or middle-age individual, it should be the unit of choice.

  13. Devices That May Interfere with Pacemakers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the devices that may interfere with pulse generators. Carry your pacemaker ID card to prove that ... 3 watts) don't appear to damage pulse generators or affect how the pacemaker works. Technology is ...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a) Identification. A pacemaker charger is a device used transcutaneously to recharge the batteries of a...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a) Identification. A pacemaker charger is a device used transcutaneously to recharge the batteries of a...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger. (a) Identification. A pacemaker charger is a device used transcutaneously to recharge the batteries of a...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to change noninvasively one or more...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to noninvasively change one or more...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker programmers. (a) Identification. A pacemaker programmer is a device used to noninvasively change one or more...

  20. Pregnancy in sick sinus syndrome with pacemaker - two cases.

    PubMed

    Parveen, T; Begum, F; Akhter, N; Sharmin, F

    2013-04-01

    Sick sinus syndrome is a generalized abnormality of cardiac impulse formation that may be caused by extrinsic causes or by intrinsic disease of the sinus node making it unable to perform pace making function. It can be manifested for the first time in pregnancy. First case was diagnosed as sick sinus syndrome at 8 weeks of gestation having Mobitz type I heart block (Wenckebach block), and needed temporary pacemaker during caesarean section. Second case was diagnosed at 24 weeks of gestation having complete heart block and needed permanent pacemaker at 38 weeks of gestation due to exaggeration of the symptoms. Both the cases were dealt successfully by caesarean section under general anesthesia in close collaboration with cardiologists and anesthesiologists.

  1. Design and Testing of a Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Gerald E.; Zhou, Li; Zheng, Kaihui; Nicholson, Adriana; Peck, Raymond A.; Krishnan, Anjana; Silka, Michael; Pruetz, Jay; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a cardiac pacemaker with a small, cylindrical shape that permits percutaneous implantation into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which can otherwise be fatal. The device uses off-the-shelf components including a rechargeable lithium cell and a highly efficient relaxation oscillator encapsulated in epoxy and glass. A corkscrew electrode made from activated iridium can be screwed into the myocardium, followed by release of the pacemaker and a short, flexible lead entirely within the chest of the fetus to avoid dislodgement from fetal movement. Acute tests in adult rabbits demonstrated the range of electrical parameters required for successful pacing and the feasibility of successfully implanting the device percutaneously under ultrasonic imaging guidance. The lithium cell can be recharged inductively as needed, as indicated by a small decline in the pulsing rate. PMID:22855119

  2. Possible involvement of central pacemakers in clinical disorders of movement.

    PubMed

    DeLong, M R

    1978-06-01

    This review considers the evidence for possible involvement of central nervous system pacemaker neurons in several clinical disorders of movement. Two basic types of tremor are discussed from this point of view, i.e., 4--7/sec parkinsonian tremor, of possible thalamocortical origin, and 7--11/sec essential tremor of possible olivo-cerebellar origin. The importance of motor programs and abnormalities in their utilization are considered with reference to the loss of motor function in parkinsonism (? loss of motor programs), and the inappropriate release of such programs as a possible basis for the involuntary movements seen in other movement disorders, such as chorea, athetosis, dystonia, and hemiballismus. The possible role of pacemaker neurons controlling such programs is considered. Finally, the subject of locomotion and the pacemaker model of the spinal locomotor pattern generator for stepping are considered in relation to clinical disorders of gait. While critical evidence is lacking for pacemaker inovlvement in any of these disorders, their possible role is emphasized. PMID:350632

  3. How to start and sustain a successful pediatric cardiac intensive care program: A combined clinical and administrative strategy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anthony C.

    2002-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To delineate key clinical and administrative factors in starting a pediatric cardiac intensive care program and to introduce a scorecard concept to measure excellence in such a new program. Methods: Review of current clinical research data in pediatric cardiac intensive care and administrative business concepts for their application to the pediatric cardiac intensive care program. RESULTS: Although clinical concepts in cardiac intensive care are useful as basic philosophical strategies at the bedside, administrative principles are essential in operational strategies vital to the success of such a program. Using both clinical and business administrative concepts, a balanced strategy can be formulated. CONCLUSIONS: Starting a pediatric cardiac intensive care program is a difficult endeavor. A combined clinical and administrative approach is needed in starting and sustaining excellence in a pediatric cardiac intensive care program. Monitoring excellence in such a program warrants application of a scorecard system. PMID:12780977

  4. Service and business model for technology enabled and home-based cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Sarela, Antti; Whittaker, Frank; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs are comprehensive life-style programs aimed at preventing recurrence of a cardiac event. However, the current programs have globally significantly low levels of uptake. Home-based model can be a viable alternative to hospital-based programs. We developed and analysed a service and business model for home based cardiac rehabilitation based on personal mentoring using mobile phones and web services. We analysed the different organizational and economical aspects of setting up and running the home based program and propose a potential business model for a sustainable and viable service. The model can be extended to management of other chronic conditions to enable transition from hospital and care centre based treatments to sustainable home-based care.

  5. [Wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spikes].

    PubMed

    Romero, M; Aranda, A; Gómez, F J; Jurado, A

    2014-04-01

    The differential diagnosis and therapeutic management of wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spike is presented. The pacemaker-mediated tachycardia, tachycardia fibrillo-flutter in patients with pacemakers, and runaway pacemakers, have a similar surface electrocardiogram, but respond to different therapeutic measures. The tachycardia response to the application of a magnet over the pacemaker could help in the differential diagnosis, and in some cases will be therapeutic, as in the case of a tachycardia-mediated pacemaker. Although these conditions are diagnosed and treated in hospitals with catheterization laboratories using the application programmer over the pacemaker, patients presenting in primary care clinic and emergency forced us to make a diagnosis and treat the haemodynamically unstable patient prior to referral. PMID:23768570

  6. Cardiac arrhythmias during exercise testing in healthy men.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, E. F.; Owen, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Clinically healthy male executives who participate in a long-term physical conditioning program have demonstrated cardiac arrhythmia during and after periodic ergometric testing at submaximal and maximal levels. In 1,385 tests on 248 subjects, it was found that 34% of subjects demonstrated an arrhythmia at some time and 13% of subjects developed arrhythmia on more than one test. Premature systoles of ventricular origin were most common, but premature systoles of atrial origin, premature systoles of junctional origin, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular block, wandering pacemaker, and pre-excitation were also seen. Careful post-test monitoring and pulse rate regulated training sessions are suggested for such programs.

  7. Safety Of Mris In Patients With Pacemakers And Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Baher, Alex; Shah, Dipan

    2013-01-01

    With a burgeoning population, increases in life expectancy, and expanding indications, the number of patients with cardiac devices such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators continues to increase each year. A majority of these patients will develop an indication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in their lifetime. MRIs have established themselves as one of the most powerful imaging tools for a variety of conditions. However, given the historic safety concerns, many physicians are reluctant to use MRIs in this patient population. In this paper, we discuss the potential adverse effects of MRIs in patients with cardiac devices, review key studies that have addressed strategies to limit adverse effects, and provide our cardiovascular MRI laboratory’s protocol for imaging patients with implanted cardiac devices. PMID:24066196

  8. Forward Programming of Cardiac Stem Cells by Homogeneous Transduction with MYOCD plus TBX5

    PubMed Central

    Belian, Elisa; Noseda, Michela; Abreu Paiva, Marta S.; Leja, Thomas; Sampson, Robert; Schneider, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs) express many endogenous cardiogenic transcription factors including members of the Gata, Hand, Mef2, and T-box family. Unlike its DNA-binding targets, Myocardin (Myocd)—a co-activator not only for serum response factor, but also for Gata4 and Tbx5—is not expressed in CSCs. We hypothesised that its absence was a limiting factor for reprogramming. Here, we sought to investigate the susceptibility of adult mouse Sca1+ side population CSCs to reprogramming by supplementing the triad of GATA4, MEF2C, and TBX5 (GMT), and more specifically by testing the effect of the missing co-activator, Myocd. Exogenous factors were expressed via doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vectors in various combinations. High throughput quantitative RT-PCR was used to test expression of 29 cardiac lineage markers two weeks post-induction. GMT induced more than half the analysed cardiac transcripts. However, no protein was detected for the induced sarcomeric genes Actc1, Myh6, and Myl2. Adding MYOCD to GMT affected only slightly the breadth and level of gene induction, but, importantly, triggered expression of all three proteins examined (α-cardiac actin, atrial natriuretic peptide, sarcomeric myosin heavy chains). MYOCD + TBX was the most effective pairwise combination in this system. In clonal derivatives homogenously expressing MYOCD + TBX at high levels, 93% of cardiac transcripts were up-regulated and all five proteins tested were visualized. In summary: (1) GMT induced cardiac genes in CSCs, but not cardiac proteins under the conditions used. (2) Complementing GMT with MYOCD induced cardiac protein expression, indicating a more complete cardiac differentiation program. (3) Homogeneous transduction with MYOCD + TBX5 facilitated the identification of differentiating cells and the validation of this combinatorial reprogramming strategy. Together, these results highlight the pivotal importance of MYOCD in driving CSCs toward a cardiac muscle fate. PMID

  9. Cardiac risk stratification in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a review of protocols

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anne Kastelianne França; Barbosa, Marianne Penachini da Costa de Rezende; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda Barbosa; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2014-01-01

    Objective Gather and describe general characteristics of different protocols of risk stratification for cardiac patients undergoing exercise. Methods We conducted searches in LILACS, IBECS, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and SciELO electronic databases, using the following descriptors: Cardiovascular Disease, Rehabilitation Centers, Practice Guideline, Exercise and Risk Stratification in the past 20 years. Results Were selected eight studies addressing methods of risk stratification in patients undergoing exercise. Conclusion None of the methods described could cover every situation the patient can be subjected to; however, they are essential to exercise prescription. PMID:25140477

  10. Case study thoracic radiotherapy in an elderly patient with pacemaker: The issue of pacing leads

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Menard, Jean; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazal, Alejandro; Kirov, Krassen

    2012-07-01

    To assess clinical outcome of patients with pacemaker treated with thoracic radiation therapy for T8-T9 paravertebral chloroma. A 92-year-old male patient with chloroma presenting as paravertebral painful and compressive (T8-T9) mass was referred for radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie. The patient presented with cardiac dysfunction and a permanent pacemaker that had been implanted prior. The decision of Multidisciplinary Meeting was to deliver 30 Gy in 10 fractions for reducing the symptoms and controlling the tumor growth. The patient received a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 4-field conformal radiotherapy with 20-MV photons. The dose to pacemaker was 0.1 Gy but a part of the pacing leads was in the irradiation fields. The patient was treated the first time in the presence of his radiation oncologist and an intensive care unit doctor. Moreover, the function of his pacemaker was monitored during the entire radiotherapy course. No change in pacemaker function was observed during any of the radiotherapy fractions. The radiotherapy was very well tolerated without any side effects. The function of the pacemaker was checked before and after the radiotherapy treatment by the cardiologist and no pacemaker dysfunction was observed. Although updated guidelines are needed with acceptable dose criteria for implantable cardiac devices, it is possible to treat patients with these devices and parts encroaching on the radiation field. This case report shows we were able to safely treat our patient through a multidisciplinary approach, monitoring the patient during each step of the treatment.

  11. The cardiac implantable electronic device power source: evolution and revolution.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Freitag, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Although the first power source for an implantable pacemaker was a rechargeable nickel-cadmium battery, it was rapidly replaced by an unreliable short-life zinc-mercury cell. This sustained the small pacemaker industry until the early 1970s, when the lithium-iodine cell became the dominant power source for low voltage, microampere current, single- and dual-chamber pacemakers. By the early 2000s, a number of significant advances were occurring with pacemaker technology which necessitated that the power source should now provide milliampere current for data logging, telemetric communication, and programming, as well as powering more complicated pacing devices such as biventricular pacemakers, treatment or prevention of atrial tachyarrhythmias, and the integration of innovative physiologic sensors. Because the current delivery of the lithium-iodine battery was inadequate for these functions, other lithium anode chemistries that can provide medium power were introduced. These include lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-manganese dioxide, and lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride hybrids. In the early 1980s, the first implantable defibrillators for high voltage therapy used a lithium-vanadium pentoxide battery. With the introduction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, the reliable lithium-silver vanadium oxide became the power source. More recently, because of the demands of biventricular pacing, data logging, and telemetry, lithium-manganese dioxide and the hybrid lithium-silver vanadium oxide/carbon mono-fluoride laminate have also been used. Today all cardiac implantable electronic devices are powered by lithium anode batteries. PMID:25387600

  12. A new paradigm for post-cardiac event resistance exercise guidelines.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jenny; Cline, Matthew J; Hubbard, Matt; McCullough, Tiffany; Hartman, Julie

    2006-01-15

    Existing guidelines for resistance exercise in cardiac rehabilitation are vague and/or overly restrictive, limiting the ability of cardiac rehabilitation programs to help patients achieve their desired levels of daily activity in a timely manner after cardiac events. This study examines the illogical nature of the existing guidelines in relation to the activities of daily living patients are expected or required to carry out during the period of cardiac rehabilitation and the existing recommendations for dynamic exercise in cardiac rehabilitation. An improved method is proposed for prescribing resistance exercise in cardiac rehabilitation. A tool is presented that stratifies the risk associated with each of 13 common resistance exercises for 3 cardiac rehabilitation diagnosis groups (myocardial infarction [MI], pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation, and coronary artery bypass graft surgery) that, if used in conjunction with blood pressure and heart rate measurements, will safely facilitate more efficacious resistance training in cardiac rehabilitation patients. In conclusion, changing the approach to resistance exercise in cardiac rehabilitation will accelerate patients' return to their desired levels of daily activity, improving patient satisfaction and decreasing cardiac rehabilitation program attrition.

  13. Lithium-iodine pacemaker cell

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.A.; Snyder, S.E.; DeVan, T.; Harney, M.J.; Harney, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The lithium-iodine pacemaker cell is described as supplied by several manufacturers. The features of each design are discussed along with their effect on energy density, self-discharge and shape of the discharge curve. Differences in performance characteristics are related to morphology of the lithium iodine electrolyte and to the form of the cathode. A new, high-drain cell is mentioned which can supply 60 /mu/a/cm/sup 2/. 10 refs.

  14. Effect of 1. 5 tesla nuclear magnetic resonance imaging scanner on implanted permanent pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.L.; Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    Patients with a permanent pacemaker are currently restricted from diagnostic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging because of potential adverse effects on the pacemaker by the magnet. Previous work has shown that NMR imaging will result in asynchronous pacing of the pulse generator within a given distance of the magnet. The radiofrequency signal generated by the system may also result in rapid cardiac pacing, which may have deleterious effects. This study utilized a 1.5 tesla unit in an in vivo laboratory animal to evaluate the unit's effects on eight different pulse generators from two manufacturers. All pacemakers functioned in an asynchronous mode when placed within a certain distance of the magnet. In addition, transient reed switch inhibition was observed. Seven of the eight pulse generators paced rapidly when exposed to the radiofrequency signal and there was a dramatic decrease in arterial blood pressure. Whether effective rapid cardiac pacing would occur could not be predicted before exposure to the magnetic resonance unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields in patients with a pacemaker should continue to be avoided until the mechanism of the rapid cardiac pacing can be further delineated and either predicted or prevented.

  15. [Benefits of a cardiac rehabilitation program on some parameters of corporal composition].

    PubMed

    López Frías, Magdalena; Gómez Martínez, Mar; Ramírez López Frías, Mercedes; De Teresa Galván, Carlos; Díaz Castro, Javier; Nestares, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    The cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the principal reasons of morbidity and mortality in the world. The cardiac rehabilitation is a program of secondary prevention to complement the effects of the cardiological treatment with the participation of the patient in the control of their habits of life, as a way of promotion of its own cardiovascular health. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the long-term effects of a cardiac rehabilitation program on some parameters of corporal composition in patients that have attended or not, to the phase the III of the program. The study was performed in subjects that suffered a cardiovascular event and they were members of the Association of Cardiac Patients of Granada and Province. All the members were offered the possibility of forming a part of the study. Some parameters of body composition were measured and a nutritional evaluation was performed in all the subjects. The visceral and body fat and, which play a key role in the cardiovascular pathology, are lower in the patients attending to the cardiac rehabilitation program, revealing that are better predictors of the cardiovascular risk. Thanks to the nutritional advice received, an increase in healthy nutrients is observed and the subjects attending to the program feature major phase angle, indicating that they have a better state of hydration, together with a better integrity of the cell membranes and distribution of water between the compartments intra- and extracellular compartments.

  16. Blunt trauma-induced pacemaker failure.

    PubMed

    Brown, K R; Carter, W; Lombardi, G E

    1991-08-01

    A 54-year-old man with an artificial pacemaker sustained blunt trauma to his chest when he was struck with a baseball bat. Within 15 minutes after the injury, the patient experienced cardiovascular collapse. His pacemaker failed, and he required insertion of a temporary transvenous pacemaker. At surgery, the defect was traced to failure of the pulse generator, a rare cause of pacemaker failure. Emergency department evaluation should include prompt and continuous ECG monitoring, an overpenetrated chest radiograph, and telemetry evaluation after discharge.

  17. Cardiac pacing for severe childhood neurally mediated syncope with reflex anoxic seizures

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, K; Wilson, N; Hewitt, J; Norrie, J; Stephenson, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether permanent cardiac pacing could prevent syncope and seizures in children with frequent severe neurally mediated syncope, and if so whether dual chamber pacing was superior to single chamber ventricular pacing.
METHODS—Dual chamber pacemakers were implanted into 12 children (eight male, four female) aged 2-14 years (median 2.8 years) with frequent episodes of reflex anoxic seizures and a recorded prolonged asystole during an attack. The pacemaker was programmed to sensing only (ODO), single chamber ventricular pacing with hysteresis (VVI), and dual chamber pacing with rate drop response (DDD) for four month periods, with each patient allocated to one of the six possible sequences of these modes, according to chronological order of pacemaker implantation. The parent and patient were blinded to the pacemaker mode and asked to record all episodes of syncope or presyncope ("near miss" events). The doctor analysing the results was blinded to the patient and pacemaker mode.
RESULTS—One patient was withdrawn from the study after the pacemaker was removed because of infection. In the remaining children, both dual chamber and single chamber pacing significantly reduced the number of syncopal episodes compared with sensing only (p = 0.0078 for both). VVI was as effective as DDD for preventing syncope, but DDD was superior to VVI in reducing near miss events (p = 0.016).
CONCLUSIONS—Permanent pacing is an effective treatment for children with severe neurally mediated syncope and reflex anoxic seizures. VVI is as effective as DDD in preventing syncope and seizures, but DDD is superior in preventing overall symptoms.


Keywords: syncope; reflex anoxic seizures; pacing; paediatric cardiology PMID:10573501

  18. The challenge of staphylococcal pacemaker endocarditis in a patient with transposition of the great arteries endocarditis in congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ng, Julie; Chan, William; Lee, Paul; Joshi, Subodh; Grigg, Leanne E.; Ajani, Andrew E

    2003-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of septicaemia and infective endocarditis. The overall incidence of staphylococcal bacteraemia is increasing, contributing to 16% of all hospital-acquired bacteraemias. The use of cardiac pacemakers has revolutionized the management of rhythm disturbances, yet this has also resulted in a group of patients at risk of pacemaker lead endocarditis and seeding in the range of 1% to 7%. We describe a 26-year-old man with transposition of the great arteries who had a pacemaker implanted and presented with S. aureus septicaemia 2 years postpacemaker implantation and went on to develop pacemaker lead endocarditis. This report illustrates the risk of endocarditis in the population with congenital heart disease and an intracardiac device.

  19. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  20. Effect of a cardiac rehabilitation program on exercise oscillatory ventilation in Japanese patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Fumitake; Adachi, Hitoshi; Tomono, Jun-Ichi; Toyoda, Shigeru; Iwamatsu, Koichi; Sakuma, Masashi; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Oshima, Shigeru; Inoue, Teruo

    2016-10-01

    Although exercise oscillatory ventilation has emerged as a potent independent risk factor for adverse prognosis in heart failure, it is not well known whether cardiac rehabilitation can improve oscillatory ventilation. In this study, we investigated the magnitude of oscillations in ventilation before and after cardiac rehabilitation in chronic heart failure patients with exercise oscillatory ventilation. Cardiac rehabilitation (5-month program) was performed in 26 patients with chronic heart failure who showed an oscillatory ventilation pattern during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). After the 5-month rehabilitation program was completed, the patients again underwent CPX. To determine the magnitude of oscillations in ventilation, the amplitude and cycle length of the oscillations were calculated and compared with several other parameters, including biomarkers that have established prognostic value in heart failure. At baseline before cardiac rehabilitation, both oscillation amplitude (R = 0.625, P < 0.01) and cycle length (R = 0.469, P < 0.05) were positively correlated with the slope of minute ventilation vs. carbon dioxide production. Plasma BNP levels were positively correlated with amplitude (R = 0.615, P < 0.01) but not cycle length (R = 0.371). Cardiac rehabilitation decreased oscillation amplitude (P < 0.01) but failed to change cycle length. The change in amplitude was positively correlated with the change in BNP levels (R = 0.760, P < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that only the change in amplitude was an independent predictor of the change in BNP levels (R = 0.717, P < 0.01). A 5-month cardiac rehabilitation program improves exercise oscillatory ventilation in chronic heart failure patients by reducing the oscillation amplitude. This effect is associated with a reduction of plasma BNP levels, potentially contributing to an improvement of heart failure.

  1. National Heart Attack Alert Program position paper: chest pain centers and programs for the evaluation of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Selker, H P; Cannon, C P; Farin, H M; Gibler, W B; Goldberg, R J; Lambrew, C T; Ornato, J P; Rydman, R J; Steele, P

    2000-05-01

    The National Heart Attack Alert Program (NHAAP), which is coordinated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), promotes the early detection and optimal treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction and other acute coronary ischemic syndromes. The NHAAP, having observed the development and growth of chest pain centers in emergency departments with special interest, created a task force to evaluate such centers and make recommendations pertaining to the management of patients with acute cardiac ischemia. This position paper offers recommendations to assist emergency physicians in EDs, including those with chest pain centers, in providing comprehensive care for patients with acute cardiac ischemia. PMID:10783408

  2. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions.

  3. Pacemaker failure resulting from radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Quertermous, T.; Megahy, M.S.; Das Gupta, D.S.; Griem, M.L.

    1983-07-01

    The authors present a case of radiation-induced pacemaker failure. After 2000 rad (20 Gy) of photon irradiation for metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma, the pulse generator circuitry failed, producing a runaway rhythm. This suggests that present pacemaker circuitry may be more susceptible to irradiation than previously believed, and that even modest radiation doses can induce life-threatening arrhythmias.

  4. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger....

  5. 21 CFR 870.3670 - Pacemaker charger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker charger. 870.3670 Section 870.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3670 Pacemaker charger....

  6. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3700 - Pacemaker programmers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker programmers. 870.3700 Section 870.3700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3700 Pacemaker...

  8. Reconsideration of pacemakers and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Loewy, John; Loewy, Amanda; Kendall, Edward J

    2004-01-01

    The presence of an implanted pacemaker is widely regarded as an absolute contraindication to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; however, this viewpoint is based largely on safety concerns in the 1982-1996 period. Since 1996, changes in pacemaker electronics including decreased ferromagnetic content, increased sophistication of the circuitry, and onboard computer capabilities suggest that the absolute contraindication of MR imaging for pacemaker patients should be reconsidered. In addition, there are now data from prospective trials of 232 patients with demand pacemakers who underwent MR imaging at 0.5-1.5 T. Although a variety of pacemaker parameters were evaluated before, during, immediately after, and 3 months after MR imaging, no significant pacemaker changes were identified. No patients reported abnormal sensations such as pacemaker movement or irregular heartbeats even at direct questioning. These results suggest that peripheral locations such as the brain and knee may be considered for MR imaging. Thus, pacemaker patients should be assessed individually for their suitability for MR imaging, which may be performed safely under defined conditions.

  9. A Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Vest, Adriana N.; Chmait, Ramen H.; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Pruetz, Jay; Silka, Michael; Zheng, Kaihui; Peck, Ray; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized, self-contained pacemaker that could be implanted with a minimally invasive technique would dramatically improve the survival rate for fetuses that develop hydrops fetalis as a result of congenital heart block. We are currently validating a device that we developed to address this bradyarrhythmia. Preclinical studies in a fetal sheep model are underway to demonstrate that the device can be implanted via a minimally invasive approach, can mechanically withstand the harsh bodily environment, can induce effective contractions of the heart muscle with an adequate safety factor, and can successfully operate for the required device lifetime of three months using the previously-developed closed loop transcutaneous recharging system. PMID:25570982

  10. Cardiac rehabilitation programs and health-related quality of life. State of the art.

    PubMed

    Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Alguacil Diego, Isabel María; Alonso Martín, Joaquín Jesús; Molero Sánchez, Alberto; Miangolarra Page, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the main health problem in developed countries. Prevention is presented as the most effective and efficient primary care intervention, whereas cardiac rehabilitation programs are considered the most effective of secondary prevention interventions; however, these are underused. This literature review examines the effectiveness and the levels of evidence of cardiac rehabilitation programs, their components, their development and role in developed countries, applications in different fields of research and treatment, including their psychological aspects, and their application in heart failure as a paradigm of disease care under this type of intervention. It is completed by a review of the impact of such programs on measures of health-related quality of life, describing the instruments involved in studies in recent scientific literature. PMID:22015019

  11. High-intensity track and field training in a cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Kathleen; Adams, Jenny; Cheng, Dunlei; Berbarie, Rafic F

    2012-01-01

    A 65-year-old male athlete with coronary artery disease enrolled in our cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program after successful coronary artery bypass graft surgery following an acute myocardial infarction. Unlike the typical sedentary cardiac patient in his age group, he loved to participate in hurdle events at masters division track meets (competitions for athletes aged 30 years and older). He expressed a strong desire to return to his sport, so we designed a sport-specific, symptom-limited exercise program that enabled him to train safely but at a higher intensity than is typically allowed in conventional CR programs. Although his measured peak heart rates during the sport-specific sessions were significantly higher than the calculated maximum heart rate limits usually imposed on patients during conventional CR exercise training, the patient had no adverse events and safely reached his fitness goal. When developing a CR plan, health care professionals should consider the patient's goals, not just his or her age.

  12. Petascale computation performance of lightweight multiscale cardiac models using hybrid programming models.

    PubMed

    Pope, Bernard J; Fitch, Blake G; Pitman, Michael C; Rice, John J; Reumann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Future multiscale and multiphysics models must use the power of high performance computing (HPC) systems to enable research into human disease, translational medical science, and treatment. Previously we showed that computationally efficient multiscale models will require the use of sophisticated hybrid programming models, mixing distributed message passing processes (e.g. the message passing interface (MPI)) with multithreading (e.g. OpenMP, POSIX pthreads). The objective of this work is to compare the performance of such hybrid programming models when applied to the simulation of a lightweight multiscale cardiac model. Our results show that the hybrid models do not perform favourably when compared to an implementation using only MPI which is in contrast to our results using complex physiological models. Thus, with regards to lightweight multiscale cardiac models, the user may not need to increase programming complexity by using a hybrid programming approach. However, considering that model complexity will increase as well as the HPC system size in both node count and number of cores per node, it is still foreseeable that we will achieve faster than real time multiscale cardiac simulations on these systems using hybrid programming models.

  13. [A simple method for AV-delay determination in dual chamber pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Koglek, W; Kranig, W; Kowalski, M; Kronski, D; Brandl, J; Oberbichler, A; Suntinger, A; Wutte, M; Grimm, G; Grove, R; Lüdorff, G

    2000-12-01

    The individual adjustment of the AV intervals is a prerequisite for the hemodynamic advantages of dual-chamber pacing. The methods for the optimization of the AV-Delay (AVD) applied so far are time intensive. A simple and fast method is the approximate adjustment of the AVD with the surface-ECG. The aim of this work is the conception and validation of this new method. The optimal AVD is given if at the end of the atrial contraction the mitral valve is closed by the ventricular increase of pressure. In order to achieve this with pacemaker patients, the individually different atrial and ventricular conduction times must be considered. The different conduction times can be determined from the surface-ECG. Intra- and interatrial conduction times can be defined by the beginning of the atrial spike up to the end of the p-wave. The beginning of ventricular pressure increase corresponds to the peak of the stimulated QRS complex (beginning of the Iso-Volumetric Contraction time, ISVC) and depends on the interventricular conduction time.¶   In the case of 100 patients, who did not receive a cardiac pacemaker, the interval at the end of the p-wave (left atrial excitation, EP) up to the peak of the r-wave (ISVC) during rest and exercise was measured and an age referred average value of 100ms determined; this serves as standard value if no AV-conduction is available. The approximated optimized AVD is given if the interval of the end at the p-wave to the peak of the QRS-Complex amounts to 100ms. By means of a simple algorithm, the optimized AVD can, thus, be calculated:¶   After programming a long AVD, the interval at the end of the native or paced p-wave up to the peak of the stimulated QRS-Complex (EP/ISVC) is determined. This value EP/ISVC is then taken from the long AVD, the 100ms standard value is added and one receives the approximately optimized AVD.¶   In order to validate the described method, 13 consecutive patients (2 female, 11 male, average age

  14. Pacemakers charging using body energy.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Dinesh; Bairagi, Sweeti; Goel, Sanat; Jangra, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Life-saving medical implants like pacemakers and defibrillators face a big drawback that their batteries eventually run out and patients require frequent surgery to have these batteries replaced. With the advent of technology, alternatives can be provided for such surgeries. To power these devices, body energy harvesting techniques may be employed. Some of the power sources are patient's heartbeat, blood flow inside the vessels, movement of the body parts, and the body temperature (heat). Different types of sensors are employed, such as for sensing the energy from the heartbeat the piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled nanowires are used that convert the mechanical energy into electricity. Similarly, for sensing the blood flow energy, nanogenerators driven by ultrasonic waves are used that have the ability to directly convert the hydraulic energy in human body to electrical energy. Another consideration is to use body heat employing biothermal battery to generate electricity using multiple arrays of thermoelectric generators built into an implantable chip. These generators exploit the well-known thermocouple effect. For the biothermal device to work, it needs a 2°C temperature difference across it. But there are many parts of the body where a temperature difference of 5°C exists - typically in the few millimeters just below the skin, where it is planned to place this device. This study focuses on using body heat as an alternative energy source to recharge pacemaker batteries and other medical devices and prevent the possibility of life-risk during repeated surgery.

  15. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has... implantable pacemaker pulse generator device that was in commercial distribution before May 28, 1976, or...

  1. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions.

  2. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions. PMID:22797030

  3. A simple, wide bandwidth, biopotential amplifier to record pacemaker pulse waveform

    PubMed Central

    Bifulco, Paolo; Gargiulo, Gaetano Dario; Romano, Maria; Cesarelli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Reliable detection of pacemaker pulses is getting more and more important in electrocardiography (ECG) diagnosis. Many studies recommend ECG amplifiers with higher bandwidth to prevent errors. In the past, few pilot studies showed that analysis of pacemaker pulses waveform can enhance diagnosis (eg, lead failure and fractured wire), but they were carried out with inadequate instrumentations for clinical practice. Typically, pacemaker pulses last hundreds of microseconds, edges of pulses elapse in few microseconds, and amplitude may exhibit large variations from few millivolts to volts. Pulse waveforms change often and depend on pacemaker type and programming. A simple, biopotential amplifier made of a few off-the-shelf components is proposed. The circuit fulfills specifications for biopotential amplifiers and offers a large bandwidth (~1 MHz). Therefore, it is able to accurately record time course of pacemaker pulses and allows highly accurate pulse detection and timing. Signals can be easily displayed and acquired by means of a standard, battery-powered oscilloscope. Pacemaker pulse vectorcardiography can be obtained by using two or more, wideband channels. Some exemplificative waveforms recorded during patient’s periodic medical examination are reported. The proposed circuit offers simultaneous conventional ECG signal as an additional output.

  4. A simple, wide bandwidth, biopotential amplifier to record pacemaker pulse waveform

    PubMed Central

    Bifulco, Paolo; Gargiulo, Gaetano Dario; Romano, Maria; Cesarelli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Reliable detection of pacemaker pulses is getting more and more important in electrocardiography (ECG) diagnosis. Many studies recommend ECG amplifiers with higher bandwidth to prevent errors. In the past, few pilot studies showed that analysis of pacemaker pulses waveform can enhance diagnosis (eg, lead failure and fractured wire), but they were carried out with inadequate instrumentations for clinical practice. Typically, pacemaker pulses last hundreds of microseconds, edges of pulses elapse in few microseconds, and amplitude may exhibit large variations from few millivolts to volts. Pulse waveforms change often and depend on pacemaker type and programming. A simple, biopotential amplifier made of a few off-the-shelf components is proposed. The circuit fulfills specifications for biopotential amplifiers and offers a large bandwidth (~1 MHz). Therefore, it is able to accurately record time course of pacemaker pulses and allows highly accurate pulse detection and timing. Signals can be easily displayed and acquired by means of a standard, battery-powered oscilloscope. Pacemaker pulse vectorcardiography can be obtained by using two or more, wideband channels. Some exemplificative waveforms recorded during patient’s periodic medical examination are reported. The proposed circuit offers simultaneous conventional ECG signal as an additional output. PMID:27695369

  5. Automatic detection of cardiac contours on MR images using fuzzy logic and dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Lalande, A; Legrand, L; Walker, P M; Jaulent, M C; Guy, F; Cottin, Y; Brunotte, F

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of fuzzy logic and dynamic programming in the detection of cardiac contours in MR Images. The definition of two parameters for each pixel allows the construction of the fuzzy set of the cardiac contour points. The first parameter takes into account the grey level, and the second the presence of an edge. A corresponding fuzzy matrix is derived from the initial image. Finally, a dynamic programming with graph searching is performed on this fuzzy matrix. The method has been tested on several MR images and the results of the contouring were validated by an expert in the domain. This preliminary work clearly demonstrates the interest of this method, although a formal evaluation has to be done.

  6. Pacemaker failure associated with therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, C.; Mutter, M.

    1988-11-01

    A 48-year-old white man with a multiprogrammable Intramedics 259-01 pacemaker was treated for inoperable lung cancer with a course of cobalt-60 radiotherapy (total 3500 rad). Several weeks subsequent to his last radiation treatment, the patient presented to the emergency department with chest and abdominal pain, shortness of breath, hypotension, and tachycardia. A paced tachycardia was noted, and application of a magnet over the pacemaker completely inhibited its function, allowing a normal sinus rhythm to ensue and the patient's symptoms to be relieved. Pacemaker failure probably was a complication of radiotherapy.

  7. Alterations of field potentials in isotropic cardiomyocyte cell layers induced by multiple endogenous pacemakers under normal and hypothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Kienast, R; Stöger, M; Handler, M; Hanser, F; Baumgartner, C

    2014-10-01

    The use of autonomous contracting randomly grown cardiomyocyte monolayers cultivated on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) represents an accepted experimental setting for preclinical experimental research in the field of cardiac electrophysiology. A dominant pacemaker forces a monolayer to adhere to a regular and synchronized contraction. Randomly distributed multiple pacemakers interfere with this dominant center, resulting in more or less frequent changes of propagation direction. This study aims to characterize the impact of changing propagation directions at single electrodes of the MEA on the four intrinsic parameters of registered field potentials (FPs) FPrise, FPMIN, FPpre, and FPdur and conduction velocity (CV) under normal and hypothermal conditions. Primary cultures of chicken cardiomyocytes (n = 18) were plated directly onto MEAs and FPs were recorded in a temperature range between 37 and 29°C. The number and spatiotemporal distribution of biological and artificial pacemakers of each cell layer inside and outside of the MEA registration area were evaluated using an algorithm developed in-house. In almost every second myocardial cell layer, interfering autonomous pacemakers were detected at stable temperatures, showing random spatial distributions with similar beating rates. Additionally, a temperature-dependent change of the dominant pacemaker center was observed in n = 16 experiments. A significant spread-direction-dependent variation of CV, FPrise, FPMIN, and FPpre up to 14% could be measured between different endogenous pacemakers. In conclusion, based on our results, disregarding the spatial origin of excitation may lead to misinterpretations and erroneous conclusions of FP parameters in the verification of research hypotheses in cellular electrocardiology.

  8. [Ambulatory control and follow-up of patients carrying a unicameral pacemaker].

    PubMed

    de Juan Montiel, J; Bardají, A; Vaño, J; Toda, R; Beret, T; Ridao, C

    1990-01-01

    The follow-up schedule after pacemaker implantation should be arranged to allow close monitoring during the immediate post-implant period, and frequent observations during the life of the system. Such follow-up has as major goals the evaluation of the electrical functions of the pacing system to detect malfunctions or imminent power source depletion and the evaluation of the patient cardiac status so that reprogramming can be accomplished. PMID:2236796

  9. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    James, J; Place, V; Panda, A; Edmonson, H; Felmlee, J; Pooley, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over

  10. How Will a Pacemaker Affect My Lifestyle?

    MedlinePlus

    ... High-tension wires Metal detectors Industrial welders Electrical generators These devices can disrupt the electrical signaling of ... 2 feet away from industrial welders and electrical generators. Some medical procedures can disrupt your pacemaker. These ...

  11. Effects of protein kinase inhibitors on canine Purkinje fibre pacemaker depolarization and the pacemaker current i(f).

    PubMed Central

    Chang, F; Cohen, I S; DiFrancesco, D; Rosen, M R; Tromba, C

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of the protein kinase inhibitors H-7 and H-8 were investigated on diastolic depolarization of the action potential with microelectrodes and on the pacemaker current if with the two-microelectrode voltage clamp in canine cardiac Purkinje fibres. 2. Both 200 microM-H-7 and 100 microM-H-8 had no significant effect on the slope of diastolic depolarization but eliminated the actions of isoprenaline (1 microM). 3. We examined the actions of H-7 and H-8 on if in the presence and absence of isoprenaline. H-7 (200 microM) shifted the pacemaker current if in the negative direction on the voltage axis, whereas 100 microM-H-8 had no significant effect by itself. Both 200 microM-H-7 and 100 microM-H-8 can reverse or prevent the actions of isoprenaline (1-5 microM) on if. 4. We applied activators of the cyclic AMP cascade down-stream to the beta-receptor, to further evaluate where H-7 and H-8 might be exerting their effects. When exposing Purkinje fibres to an adenylyl cyclase activator (forskolin, 10-50 microM), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (IBMX, 100 microM) and a permeable cyclic AMP analogue (8-chlorophenylthio-cyclic AMP, 200 microM-1 mM), the amplitude of if was increased. H-7 and H-8 at 100-200 microM eliminated each of these actions. 5. These results suggest that a phosphorylation process is involved in the modulation of the pacemaker current, if, in Purkinje fibres. The different actions of H-7 and H-8 on basal if suggest the hypothesis that other protein kinases, possibly protein kinase C, might also be involved in regulating basal phosphorylation of if in Purkinje fibres. PMID:1804968

  12. [State-of-the-art and prospects of high-tech medical aid to patients with cardiac arrhythmia based at military medical facilities].

    PubMed

    Steklov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of provision of high-tech medical aid to patients with cardiac arrhythmia based at military medical facilities showed that the available means and workforce are sufficient for the purpose. In order to facilitate access to high-tech medical aid it is necessary to equip arrhythmologic departments with up-to-date-instruments and set up cabinets of electrocardiostimulation in regional (naval) hospitals for implantation of temporary and permanent pacemakers. A program is pending for education (primary specialization) and advanced training of specialists in clinical cardiac electrophysiology, interventional and surgical arrhythmology.

  13. Mangalith: a new lithium pacemaker battery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbier, G.; Lehmann, G.

    1980-01-01

    An original lithium battery system is being developed for pacemaker application. The material used, lithium-manganese dioxide, industrially available at the present time for a variety of electronic applications, has been modified and adapted for pacemaker power requirements. The utilization of a different modification of manganese dioxide offers performance advantages. The cell technology is described and performance comparisons between this new cathode material and the industrial counterpart are reported. 7 refs.

  14. Adverse pacemaker hemodynamics evaluated by pulmonary venous flow monitoring.

    PubMed

    Stierle, U; Krüger, D; Mitusch, R; Potratz, J; Taubert, G; Sheikhzadeh, A

    1995-11-01

    The pacemaker syndrome refers to symptoms and signs in the pacemaker patient caused by an inadequate timing of atrial and ventricular contractions. The lack of normal atrioventricular synchrony may result in a decreased cardiac output and venous cannon A waves. The objective of this study was to define the left atrial and pulmonary venous flow response to ventricular pacing in a group of 14 unselected consecutive patients with total heart block and sinus rhythm. Pulmonary venous flow was assessed by transesophageal pulsed Doppler echocardiography in the VVI and DDD pacing modes. An inappropriate atrial timing caused a marked augmentation of the normally small pulmonary venous z wave in all patients ("negative atrial kick," peak z wave in DDD pacing 14.5 +/- 4.6 cm/s, VVI pacing 51.8 +/- 15.0 cm/s). Restoration of AV synchrony (DDD pacing, AV interval 100 ms) abolished these "cannon z waves" in all patients, and a normal pattern of pulmonary venous flow was achieved. Abnormal pulmonary venous flow characteristics were observed in 2 of 14 patients during DDD pacing with short AV intervals (100 ms). The Doppler pattern was similar to the findings seen in VVI pacing. Assessment of pulmonary venous flow by transesophageal pulsed Doppler echocardiography may provide a simple, sensitive, and relatively noninvasive technique to evaluate patients with suspected pacing induced adverse hemodynamics.

  15. Fully automated segmentation of left ventricle using dual dynamic programming in cardiac cine MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Luan; Ling, Shan; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are becoming a leading cause of death all over the world. The cardiac function could be evaluated by global and regional parameters of left ventricle (LV) of the heart. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for segmentation of LV in short axis cardiac cine MR images. Our fully automated method consists of three major steps, i.e., LV localization, LV segmentation at end-diastolic phase, and LV segmentation propagation to the other phases. First, the maximum intensity projection image along the time phases of the midventricular slice, located at the center of the image, was calculated to locate the region of interest of LV. Based on the mean intensity of the roughly segmented blood pool in the midventricular slice at each phase, end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) phases were determined. Second, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of LV of each slice at ED phase were synchronously delineated by use of a dual dynamic programming technique. The external costs of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries were defined with the gradient values obtained from the original and enhanced images, respectively. Finally, with the advantages of the continuity of the boundaries of LV across adjacent phases, we propagated the LV segmentation from the ED phase to the other phases by use of dual dynamic programming technique. The preliminary results on 9 clinical cardiac cine MR cases show that the proposed method can obtain accurate segmentation of LV based on subjective evaluation.

  16. Transforming cardiac rehabilitation into broad-based healthy lifestyle programs to combat noncommunicable disease.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Cahalin, Lawrence P; Briggs, Paige D; Guizilini, Solange; Daugherty, John; Chan, Wai-Man; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The current incidence and prevalence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is currently a cause for great concern on a global scale; future projections are no less disconcerting. Unhealthy lifestyle patterns are at the core of the NCD crisis; physical inactivity, excess body mass, poor nutrition and tobacco use are the primary lifestyle factors that substantially increase the risk of developing one or more NCDs. We have now come to recognize that healthy lifestyle interventions are a medical necessity that should be prescribed to all individuals. Perhaps the most well-established model for healthy lifestyle interventions in the current healthcare model is cardiac rehabilitation. To have any hope of improving the outlook for NCDs on a global scale, what is currently known as cardiac rehabilitation must transform into broad-based healthy lifestyle programing, with a shifted focus on primordial and primary prevention. PMID:26511659

  17. [Permanent cardiac stimulation in a patient with isolated dextrocardia and ventricular septal defect].

    PubMed

    Słowiński, S; Derlaga, B; Kapusta, J

    A case of pacemaker implantation because of acquired atrioventricular block third degree in woman aged 39 years with rare isolated dextrocardia with inversion of cardiac ventricles, compensatory transposition of both aorta and pulmonary artery, and ventricular septal defect. The end of electrode has wedged in the apex of the arterial ventricle. Following pacemaker implantation, patients clinical course of gynaecological operation was uneventful.

  18. Deactivation of Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Daniel B.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Brock, Dan W.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIEDs), including pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), are the most effective treatment for life-threatening arrhythmias. Patients or their surrogates may request device deactivation to avoid prolongation of the dying process or in other settings, such as after device-related complications or with changes in their health care goals. Despite published guidelines outlining theoretical and practical aspects of this common clinical scenario, significant uncertainty remains for both patients and health care providers regarding the ethical and legal status of CIED deactivation. This review outlines the ethical and legal principles supporting CIED deactivation at patients’ request, centered upon patient autonomy and authority over their own medical treatment. The empirical literature describing stakeholder views and experiences surrounding CIED deactivation is described, along with lessons for future research and practice guidance surrounding the care of patients with CIEDs. PMID:23217433

  19. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling

    PubMed Central

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to

  20. Program Code Generator for Cardiac Electrophysiology Simulation with Automatic PDE Boundary Condition Handling.

    PubMed

    Punzalan, Florencio Rusty; Kunieda, Yoshitoshi; Amano, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies involving human hearts can have certain limitations. Methods such as computer simulations can be an important alternative or supplemental tool. Physiological simulation at the tissue or organ level typically involves the handling of partial differential equations (PDEs). Boundary conditions and distributed parameters, such as those used in pharmacokinetics simulation, add to the complexity of the PDE solution. These factors can tailor PDE solutions and their corresponding program code to specific problems. Boundary condition and parameter changes in the customized code are usually prone to errors and time-consuming. We propose a general approach for handling PDEs and boundary conditions in computational models using a replacement scheme for discretization. This study is an extension of a program generator that we introduced in a previous publication. The program generator can generate code for multi-cell simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. Improvements to the system allow it to handle simultaneous equations in the biological function model as well as implicit PDE numerical schemes. The replacement scheme involves substituting all partial differential terms with numerical solution equations. Once the model and boundary equations are discretized with the numerical solution scheme, instances of the equations are generated to undergo dependency analysis. The result of the dependency analysis is then used to generate the program code. The resulting program code are in Java or C programming language. To validate the automatic handling of boundary conditions in the program code generator, we generated simulation code using the FHN, Luo-Rudy 1, and Hund-Rudy cell models and run cell-to-cell coupling and action potential propagation simulations. One of the simulations is based on a published experiment and simulation results are compared with the experimental data. We conclude that the proposed program code generator can be used to

  1. Control of pacemaker rate by impedance-based respiratory minute ventilation.

    PubMed

    Alt, E; Heinz, M; Hirgstetter, C; Emslander, H P; Daum, S; Blömer, H

    1987-08-01

    Several studies have shown that the capability for exercise can be increased in patients with pacemakers by means of adjusting the rate. Respiration is one of the parameters considered for rate control. The aim of our study was to determine how respiratory parameters such as ventilation, tidal volume, and respiratory rate are capable of controlling the pacemaker rate, especially when measured indirectly by means of impedance plethysmography. We examined four volunteers and eight patients with implanted cardiac pacemakers using bicycle ergometry at increasing work loads. We recorded heart rate, uptake of oxygen, and ventilation directly (by pneumotachygraphy) and indirectly (by chest wall impedance plethysmography). A good correlation of directly to indirectly measured ventilation (r = 0.8687) was found. Our study suggests that respiratory minute volume is more appropriate for rate control of physiologic pacemakers than tidal volume or respiratory rate alone. Measurement by means of impedance plethysmography is sufficiently precise to be used for this purpose. Further studies must be conducted as to the optimum realization within an implantable device.

  2. A self-regulation lifestyle program for post-cardiac rehabilitation patients has long-term effects on exercise adherence.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Veronica; De Gucht, Veronique; van Exel, Henk; Maes, Stan

    2014-04-01

    As maintenance of lifestyle change and risk factor modification following completion of cardiac rehabilitation has been shown to be notoriously difficult, we developed a brief self-regulation lifestyle program for post-cardiac rehabilitation patients. Randomized-controlled trial. Following completion of cardiac rehabilitation 210 patients were randomized to receive either a lifestyle maintenance program (n = 112) or standard care (n = 98). The program was based on self-regulation principles and consisted of a motivational interview, 7 group sessions and home assignments. Risk factors and health behaviors were assessed at baseline (end of cardiac rehabilitation), and 6 and 15 months thereafter. ANCOVAs showed a significant effect of the lifestyle program on exercise behavior at 15-month follow-up. Mediation analysis demonstrated that the treatment effect on exercise behavior could be explained by self-regulation skills. Chi squared tests showed that patients in the intervention group had significantly fewer uncontrolled risk factors as compared to the control group. Finally, the lifestyle intervention program was associated with a 12 % reduction in self-reported cardiac hospital admission rates. This trial indicates that a relatively brief, theory-based lifestyle program is capable of inciting and maintaining improvements in exercise adherence. It is suggested that patients may need ongoing attention and guidance, for example in the form of (internet-based) booster sessions, as long-term consolidation of changes is arduous. PMID:23334387

  3. A role for Sp and nuclear receptor transcription factors in a cardiac hypertrophic growth program

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Michael N.; Disch, Dennis L.; Rockman, Howard A.; Kelly, Daniel P.

    1997-01-01

    During cardiac hypertrophy, the chief myocardial energy source switches from fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) to glycolysis—a reversion to fetal metabolism. The expression of genes encoding myocardial FAO enzymes was delineated in a murine ventricular pressure overload preparation to characterize the molecular regulatory events involved in the alteration of energy substrate utilization during cardiac hypertrophy. Expression of genes involved in the thioesterification, mitochondrial import, and β-oxidation of fatty acids was coordinately down-regulated after 7 days of right ventricular (RV) pressure overload. Results of RV pressure overload studies in mice transgenic for the promoter region of the gene encoding human medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD, which catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the FAO cycle) fused to a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter confirmed that repression of MCAD gene expression in the hypertrophied ventricle occurred at the transcriptional level. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays performed with MCAD promoter fragments and nuclear protein extracts prepared from hypertrophied and control RV identified pressure overload-induced protein/DNA interactions at a regulatory unit shown previously to confer control of MCAD gene transcription during cardiac development. Antibody “supershift” studies demonstrated that members of the Sp (Sp1, Sp3) and nuclear hormone receptor [chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF)/erbA-related protein 3] families interact with the pressure overload-responsive unit. Cardiomyocyte transfection studies confirmed that COUP-TF repressed the transcriptional activity of the MCAD promoter. The DNA binding activities and nuclear expression of Sp1/3 and COUP-TF in normal fetal mouse heart were similar to those in the hypertrophied adult heart. These results identify a transcriptional regulatory mechanism involved in the reinduction of a fetal metabolic program during pressure

  4. Development of the Health Incentive Program Questionnaire (HIP-Q) in a cardiac rehabilitation population.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Marc S; Goodman, Jack M; Alter, David A; Oh, Paul I; Faulkner, Guy E J

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire to facilitate the design of acceptable financial health incentive programs. A multiphase psychometric questionnaire development method was used. Theoretical and literature reviews and three focus groups generated a pool of content areas and items. New items were developed to ensure adequate content coverage. Field testing was conducted with a convenience sample of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients (n = 59) to establish face and construct validity (p = 0.021) and reliability (intraclass coefficients = 0.42-0.87). The final questionnaire is comprised of 23 items. This questionnaire builds on previous attempts to explore acceptability by sampling a wider range of instrumental and affective attitudes and by measuring the effect of program features on the likelihood of incentive program participation. Future research is now needed to examine whether tailoring incentives to preferences assessed by the questionnaire improves uptake and effectiveness.

  5. Pacemaker lead endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus hominis.

    PubMed

    Sunbul, Mustafa; Demirag, Mustafa Kemal; Yilmaz, Ozcan; Yilmaz, Hava; Ozturk, Recep; Leblebicioglu, Hakan

    2006-05-01

    Infective endocarditis related to pacemaker is a rare but serious condition in permanent venous tracing. A 65-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with high fever and chills. A DDD pacemaker had been implanted via the right subclavian vein because of sick sinus syndrome 6 years earlier. Transesophageal echocardiogram identified an oscillating round hyperechoic mass with a stalk near the tricuspid valve. Blood cultures grew Staphylococcus hominis. The patient was treated with antibiotics and operated on after the acute phase of the illness had subsided. We hereby report a case of lead endocarditis caused by S. hominis in a patient with pacemaker, which has been rarely reported in the English literature.

  6. Pacemaking Property of RVLM Presympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; da Silva, Melina P.; Souza, George M. P. R.; Lima-Silveira, Ludmila; Karlen-Amarante, Marlusa; Amorim, Mateus R.; Almado, Carlos E. L.; Moraes, Davi J. A.; Machado, Benedito H.

    2016-01-01

    Despite several studies describing the electrophysiological properties of RVLM presympathetic neurons, there is no consensus in the literature about their pacemaking property, mainly due to different experimental approaches used for recordings of neuronal intrinsic properties. In this review we are presenting a historical retrospective about the pioneering studies and their controversies on the intrinsic electrophysiological property of auto-depolarization of these cells in conjunction with recent studies from our laboratory documenting that RVLM presympathetic neurons present pacemaking capacity. We also discuss whether increased sympathetic activity observed in animal models of neurogenic hypertension (CIH and SHR) are dependent on changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of these cells or due to changes in modulatory inputs from neurons of the respiratory network. We also highlight the key role of INaP as the major current contributing to the pacemaking property of RVLM presympathetic neurons. PMID:27713705

  7. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker service tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker service tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710 Pacemaker repair or replacement material. (a) Identification. A pacemaker repair or replacement material is...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710 Pacemaker repair or replacement material. (a) Identification. A pacemaker repair or replacement material is...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker service tools. (a) Identification. Pacemaker service tools are devices such as screwdrivers and Allen...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710 Pacemaker repair or replacement material. (a) Identification. A pacemaker repair or replacement material is...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test magnet. (a) Identification. A pacemaker test magnet is a device used to test an inhibited or triggered...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600 Section 870.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3640 - Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3640 Section 870.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Indirect pacemaker generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. An indirect pacemaker...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3630 - Pacemaker generator function analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker generator function analyzer. 870.3630... generator function analyzer. (a) Identification. A pacemaker generator function analyzer is a device that is connected to a pacemaker pulse generator to test any or all of the generator's parameters, including...

  10. Uptake of a technology-assisted home-care cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Varnfield, Marlien; Karunanithi, Mohanraj K; Särelä, Antti; Garcia, Elsa; Fairfull, Anita; Oldenburg, Brian F; Walters, Darren L

    2011-02-21

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease, a major cause of disease burden in Australia and other developed countries, is increasing due to a rapidly ageing population and environmental, biomedical and modifiable lifestyle factors. Although cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs have been shown to be beneficial and effective, rates of referral, uptake and utilisation of traditional hospital or community centre programs are poor. Home-based CR programs have been shown to be as effective as centre-based programs, and recent advances in information and communication technologies (ICT) can be used to enhance the delivery of such programs. The Care Assessment Platform (CAP) is an integrated home-based CR model incorporating ICT (including a mobile phone and the internet) and providing all the core components of traditional CR (education, physical activity, exercise training, behaviour modification strategies and psychological counselling). The mobile phone given to patients has an integrated accelerometer and diary application for recording exercise and health information. A central database, with access to these data, allows mentors to assess patients' progress, assist in setting goals, revise targets and give weekly personal feedback. Mentors find the mobile-phone modalities practical and easy to use, and preliminary results show high usage rates and acceptance of ICT by participants. The provision of ICT-supported home-based CR programs may enable more patients in both metropolitan and remote settings to benefit from CR.

  11. Cost-Utility Analysis of a Cardiac Telerehabilitation Program: The Teledialog Project

    PubMed Central

    Kidholm, Kristian; Rasmussen, Maja Kjær; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Hansen, John; Nielsen, Gitte; Spindler, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cardiac rehabilitation can reduce mortality of patients with cardiovascular disease, but a frequently low participation rate in rehabilitation programs has been found globally. The objective of the Teledialog study was to assess the cost-utility (CU) of a cardiac telerehabilitation (CTR) program. The aim of the intervention was to increase the patients' participation in the CTR program. At discharge, an individualized 3-month rehabilitation plan was formulated for each patient. At home, the patients measured their own blood pressure, pulse, weight, and steps taken for 3 months. Materials and Methods: The analysis was carried out together with a randomized controlled trial with 151 patients during 2012–2014. Costs of the intervention were estimated with a health sector perspective following international guidelines for CU. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Results: The rehabilitation activities were approximately the same in the two groups, but the number of contacts with the physiotherapist was higher among the intervention group. The mean total cost per patient was €1,700 higher in the intervention group. The quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gain was higher in the intervention group, but the difference was not statistically significant. The incremental CU ratio was more than €400,000 per QALY gained. Conclusions: Even though the rehabilitation activities increased, the program does not appear to be cost-effective. The intervention itself was not costly (less than €500), and increasing the number of patients may show reduced costs of the devices and make the CTR more cost-effective. Telerehabilitation can increase participation, but the intervention, in its current form, does not appear to be cost-effective. PMID:26713491

  12. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  13. Understanding and practice: a 7-year follow-up study on implementation of a cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Eva; Rosenqvist, Urban

    2002-05-01

    The authors explore the perspectives of managers, health care professionals, and patients on a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program. Using qualitative methodology, they compare and analyze results from individual interviews and two conceptual modeling seminars held 7 years apart. Professionals and managers understood their own tasks in a professional-centered way that did not include the client's perspective. Patients believed they were not seen in their whole context. Initially, health care organization was fragmented, lacking clear leadership, coordination, and communication between levels of care. However, lack of common understandings of structure, process, and outcome in cardiac rehabilitation services hampered the implementation of program changes. PMID:11993563

  14. Pacing Without Wires: Leadless Cardiac Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, more than 700,000 pacemakers are implanted annually with more than 250,000 implanted in the United States. Since the first fully transvenous pacemaker implantations in the early 1960s, great technologic advances have been made in pacing systems. However, the combination of subcutaneous pulse generators and transvenous pacing leads has remained constant for more than 50 years. Leadless pacing systems offer an alternative to traditional pacing systems by eliminating the need for permanent transvenous leads while providing therapy for patients with bradyarrhythmias. Methods: We discuss the 2 leadless cardiac pacemakers (LCPs), the Nanostim Leadless Pacemaker and Micra Transcatheter Pacing System, and the 1 ultrasound-powered device, the WiCS-LV, that have been studied in humans. Currently LCPs are restricted to single-chamber pacing, specifically, ventricular pacing. Dual-chamber pacing and multichamber pacing with leadless systems have yet to be studied. Results: LCPs represent the greatest advancement in bradycardia therapy since the first transvenous pacemaker implantation more than 50 years ago. Conclusion: Initial studies of both the Nanostim and Micra LCPs show favorable efficacy and safety results compared to transvenous pacemakers. Pending US Food and Drug Administration approval, these devices will transform our ability to provide pacing for patients with bradyarrhythmias. Future developments may allow for completely leadless single-chamber and multichamber pacing, ushering in an era of pacing without wires.

  15. Pacing Without Wires: Leadless Cardiac Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, more than 700,000 pacemakers are implanted annually with more than 250,000 implanted in the United States. Since the first fully transvenous pacemaker implantations in the early 1960s, great technologic advances have been made in pacing systems. However, the combination of subcutaneous pulse generators and transvenous pacing leads has remained constant for more than 50 years. Leadless pacing systems offer an alternative to traditional pacing systems by eliminating the need for permanent transvenous leads while providing therapy for patients with bradyarrhythmias. Methods: We discuss the 2 leadless cardiac pacemakers (LCPs), the Nanostim Leadless Pacemaker and Micra Transcatheter Pacing System, and the 1 ultrasound-powered device, the WiCS-LV, that have been studied in humans. Currently LCPs are restricted to single-chamber pacing, specifically, ventricular pacing. Dual-chamber pacing and multichamber pacing with leadless systems have yet to be studied. Results: LCPs represent the greatest advancement in bradycardia therapy since the first transvenous pacemaker implantation more than 50 years ago. Conclusion: Initial studies of both the Nanostim and Micra LCPs show favorable efficacy and safety results compared to transvenous pacemakers. Pending US Food and Drug Administration approval, these devices will transform our ability to provide pacing for patients with bradyarrhythmias. Future developments may allow for completely leadless single-chamber and multichamber pacing, ushering in an era of pacing without wires. PMID:27660571

  16. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications

    PubMed Central

    Dipoce, J; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-01-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  17. Update on arrhythmias and cardiac pacing 2013.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Pombo, Marta; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; González-Rebollo, José M; Rodríguez-Font, Enrique; Martínez-Ferrer, José; Castellanos, Eduardo; García-Fernández, F Javier; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    This report discusses a selection of the most relevant articles on cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published in 2013. The first section discusses arrhythmias, classified as regular paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias, together with their treatment by means of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The next section reviews cardiac pacing, subdivided into resynchronization therapy, remote monitoring of implantable devices, and pacemakers. The final section discusses syncope.

  18. Update on arrhythmias and cardiac pacing 2013.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Pombo, Marta; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; González-Rebollo, José M; Rodríguez-Font, Enrique; Martínez-Ferrer, José; Castellanos, Eduardo; García-Fernández, F Javier; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    This report discusses a selection of the most relevant articles on cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published in 2013. The first section discusses arrhythmias, classified as regular paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias, together with their treatment by means of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The next section reviews cardiac pacing, subdivided into resynchronization therapy, remote monitoring of implantable devices, and pacemakers. The final section discusses syncope. PMID:24774592

  19. Radiology of cardiac devices and their complications.

    PubMed

    Dipoce, J; Bernheim, A; Spindola-Franco, H

    2015-02-01

    This article familiarizes the reader with several different cardiac devices including pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, intra-aortic balloon pumps, ventricular assist devices, valve replacements and repairs, shunt-occluding devices and passive constraint devices. Many cardiac devices are routinely encountered in clinical practice. Other devices are in the early stages of development, but circumstances suggest that they too will become commonly found. The radiologist must be familiar with these devices and their complications. PMID:25411826

  20. Intrapericardial pacemaker in a 2-kilogram newborn.

    PubMed

    Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel; Castillo, Rafael; Rubio, Lorena

    2012-08-01

    A 2-kilogram child had a pacemaker implanted by a subxyphoid approach with the generator located under the rectus sheath. Days later, the battery eroded the abdominal wall and the peritoneum. The whole system was removed and a new one was implanted inside the pericardium on an emergent basis.

  1. Cardiac Arrhythmias: Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Fu, Du-Guan

    2015-11-01

    The cardiac arrhythmia is characterized by irregular rhythm of heartbeat which could be either too slow (<60 beats/min) or too fast (>100 beats/min) and can happen at any age. The use of pacemaker and defibrillators devices has been suggested for heart arrhythmias patients. The antiarrhythmic medications have been reported for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias or irregular heartbeats. The diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of cardiac arrhythmias as well as the radiofrequency ablation, tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, arterial fibrillation, and recent research on the genetics of cardiac arrhythmias have been described here.

  2. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  3. Adoption of community-based cardiac rehabilitation programs and physical activity following phase III cardiac rehabilitation in Scotland: a prospective and predictive study.

    PubMed

    Sniehotta, Falko F; Gorski, Charlotta; Araujo-Soares, Vera

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about levels of physical activity and attendance at phase IV community-based Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) programs following completion of exercise-focussed, hospital-based phase III CR. This study aims to test, compare and combine the predictive utility of the Common-Sense Self-Regulation Model (CS-SRM) and the extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) with action planning for two rehabilitation behaviours: physical activity and phase IV CR attendance. Individuals diagnosed with coronary heart disease (n = 103) completed baseline measures of illness perceptions, intentions, perceived behavioural control (PBC), action planning and past physical activity in the last week of a phase III CR program, and 95 participants completed follow-up measures of physical activity and attended phase IV CR (objectively confirmed) 2 months later. Only one predictor (PBC/cyclical timeline) significantly predicted levels and change of physical activity. While illness perceptions were not predictive of phase IV CR attendance, the extended TPB model showed good predictive power with action planning and intention as the most powerful predictors. Amongst participants who planned when and where to attend phase IV CR at the end of phase III rehabilitation, 65.9% subsequently attended a phase IV CR program compared to only 18.5% of those who had not made a plan. This study adds to our understanding of cardiac rehabilitation behaviour after completion of health service delivered programs. Comparing theoretical models and rehabilitation behaviours contributes to the development of behaviour theory.

  4. Prediction of drug-related cardiac adverse effects in humans--B: use of QSAR programs for early detection of drug-induced cardiac toxicities.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anna A; Matthews, Edwin J

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the use of three quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) programs to predict drug-related cardiac adverse effects (AEs), BioEpisteme, MC4PC, and Leadscope Predictive Data Miner. QSAR models were constructed for 9 cardiac AE clusters affecting Purkinje nerve fibers (arrhythmia, bradycardia, conduction disorder, electrocardiogram, palpitations, QT prolongation, rate rhythm composite, tachycardia, and Torsades de pointes) and 5 clusters affecting the heart muscle (coronary artery disorders, heart failure, myocardial disorders, myocardial infarction, and valve disorders). The models were based on a database of post-marketing AEs linked to 1632 chemical structures, and identical training data sets were configured for three QSAR programs. Model performance was optimized and shown to be affected by the ratio of the number of active to inactive drugs. Results revealed that the three programs were complementary and predictive performances using any single positive, consensus two positives, or consensus three positives were as follows, respectively: 70.7%, 91.7%, and 98.0% specificity; 74.7%, 47.2%, and 21.0% sensitivity; and 138.2, 206.3, and 144.2 chi(2). In addition, a prospective study using AE data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) MedWatch Program showed 82.4% specificity and 94.3% sensitivity. Furthermore, an external validation study of 18 drugs with serious cardiotoxicity not considered in the models had 88.9% sensitivity. PMID:19941924

  5. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S.

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  6. Clinical Outcome After Permanent Pacemaker Implantation in Patients With a High Percentage of Ventricular Pacing.

    PubMed

    Sakatani, Tomohiko; Sakamoto, Akira; Kawamura, Kohei; Tanigaki, Toru; Tsubakimoto, Yoshinori; Isodono, Koji; Kimura, Shinzo; Matsuo, Akiko; Inoue, Keiji; Kitamura, Makoto; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that right ventricular apical pacing may lead to cardiac dysfunction. Septal pacing is thought to be superior to apical pacing in the prevention of cardiac dyssynchrony, however, there have been no reports on the contribution of septal pacing to improving clinical outcome.We retrospectively evaluated factors associated with cardiac events in patients with right ventricular pacing.The study population consisted of 256 consecutive patients newly implanted with permanent pacemakers and followed-up for 29 ± 18 months. Cardiac events, consisting of cardiac death or heart failure requiring hospitalization, occurred in 22 patients. Kaplan-Meier curves revealed that patients with a high percentage of ventricular pacing (> 90%, n = 101, group H) had a higher incidence of cardiac events than patients with a low percentage of ventricular pacing (< 10%, n = 83, group L) (P = 0.002). In group H, multivariate analysis showed that age (HR: 1.174, 95%CI: 1.066-1.291, P = 0.001), ejection fraction (EF) (HR: 0.898, 95%CI: 0.836-0.964, P = 0.003), QRS duration during cardiac pacing (HR: 1.059, 95%CI: 1.017-1.103, P = 0.006), and existing basal cardiac diseases (HR: 13.080, 95%CI: 2.463-69.479, P = 0.003) were significant predictors of cardiac events, although pacing site had no significant association with prognosis (P = 0.56).Higher age, lower EF, longer QRS duration during cardiac pacing, and existing basal cardiac diseases are associated with poor prognosis in patients with a high percentage of ventricular pacing. PMID:26549389

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation programs improve metabolic parameters in patients with the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Ignacio P; Zapata, Maria A; Cervantes, Carlos E; Jarabo, Rosario M; Grande, Cristina; Plaza, Rose; Garcia, Sara; Rodriguez, Miriam L; Crespo, Silvia; Perea, Jesús

    2010-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training program on metabolic parameters and coronary risk factors in patients with the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease. The study involved 642 patients with coronary heart disease. Of them, 171 (26.7%) fulfilled criteria for the metabolic syndrome. Clinical data, laboratory tests, and exercise testing were performed before and after the program, which lasted 2 to 3 months. Except for waist circumference, there were no significant differences between groups; blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose improvements during the follow-up were higher in patients with the metabolic syndrome (all P<.001). At study end, in patients with the metabolic syndrome, functional capacity increased by 26.45% ( P<.001), as measured by metabolic equivalents, with a slight increase of 1.25% ( P=not significant) in the double product. Patients with the metabolic syndrome who took part in this secondary prevention program reported improvements in cardiovascular risk profile and functional capacity.

  8. Termination of sustained ventricular tachycardia with a new antitachycardia pacemaker: role of the nonautomatic mode to follow pacemaker function.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Kus, T; Page, P; Shenasa, M

    1989-01-01

    The use of an antitachycardia pacemaker for the treatment of recurrent, drug resistant nonsyncopal sustained ventricular tachycardia in a 28-year-old patient is described. The report emphasizes the role of electrocardiographic recording during manual activation of the tachycardia response in an outpatient setting. The follow-up covers 12 months with 26 spontaneous tachycardia episodes forcing the patient to go to an emergency room to monitor tachycardia termination. Mean ventricular tachycardia cycle length was 340 +/- 21 ms. Tachycardias were terminated either by the primary or secondary modality without acceleration or degeneration to ventricular fibrillation. Thus, it was possible to assess the efficacy and the safety of the termination programs. Unlike during intensive in-hospital testing, restoration of stable sinus rhythm was complicated by re-emergence of ventricular tachycardia. It is concluded that manual activation with medical supervision provides safe management of selected patients with ventricular tachycardia. However, in-hospital testing overestimated, in this case, the efficacy of tachycardia response modalities to terminate spontaneous tachycardia episodes. The customization of an antitachycardia pacemaker with an automatic implantable cardioverter/defibrillator may increase the quality of life as it would allow switching to automatic pace termination.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-06-21

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With 'MR-conditional' devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With ‘MR-conditional’ devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  11. Influence of D-net (European GSM-Standard) cellular phones on pacemaker function in 50 patients with permanent pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Wilke, A; Grimm, W; Funck, R; Maisch, B

    1996-10-01

    The widespread use of cellular phones in the last years has prompted some recent studies to suggest an interference of pacemaker function by cellular phone usage. To determine the risk of pacemaker patients using D-net cellular phones, we tested 50 patients with permanent pacemakers after routine pacemaker check by short phone calls using a cellular phone (Ericsson, D-net, frequency 890-915 MHz, digital information coding, equivalent to the European Groupe Systemes Mobiles standard). A six-channel surface ECG was continuously recorded from each patient to detect any interactions between pacemakers and cellular phones. Phone calls were repeated during the following pacemaker settings: (1) preexisting setting; (2) minimum ventricular rate of 90 beats/min and preexisting sensitivity; and (3) minimum ventricular rate of 90 beats/min and maximum sensitivity without T wave oversensing. Only 2 (4%) of 50 patients repeatedly showed intermittent pacemaker inhibition during calls with the cellular phone. Both pacemakers had unipolar sensing. Therefore, although interactions between cellular phone use and pacemaker function appear to be rare in our study, pacemaker dependent patients in particular should avoid the use of cellular phones.

  12. [Magnets, pacemaker and defibrillator: fatal attraction?].

    PubMed

    Bergamin, C; Graf, D

    2015-05-27

    This article aims at clarifying the effects of a clinical magnet on pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators. The effects of electromagnetic interferences on such devices, including interferences linked to electrosurgery and magnetic resonance imaging are also discussed. In general, a magnet provokes a distinctive effect on a pacemaker by converting it into an asynchronous mode of pacing, and on an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator by suspending its own antitachyarythmia therapies without affecting the pacing. In the operating room, the magnet has to be used cautiously with precisely defined protocols which respect the type of the device used, the type of intervention planned, the presence or absence of EMI and the pacing-dependency of the patient.

  13. Extra-cardiac stimulators: what do cardiologists need to know?

    PubMed

    Guinand, Alexandre; Noble, Stéphane; Frei, Angela; Renard, Julien; Tramer, Martin R; Burri, Haran

    2016-09-01

    For several decades, treating patients with pacemakers has been the privilege of cardiologists. However, in the last 30 years, researchers have found new targets for electrical stimulation in different clinical subspecialities, such as deep brain stimulation (for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, dystonia, and some psychiatric illnesses); spinal cord stimulation (for refractory angina, chronic pain, and peripheral artery disease); and sacral (for diverse urologic and proctologic conditions), vagal (for epilepsy), and phrenic nerve stimulation (for sleep apnoea). The purpose of this article is to familiarize cardiologists with these 'extra-cardiac pacemakers' and to discuss potential issues that must be addressed when these patients undergo cardiac procedures. PMID:27234870

  14. Inhibition of bipolar demand pacemaker by diaphragmatic myopotentials.

    PubMed

    Barold, S S; Ong, L S; Falkoff, M D; Heinle, R A

    1977-10-01

    This report describes inhibition of a normally functioning bipolar demand pulse generator by diaphragmatic myopotentials. Transient pacemaker suppression occurred repeatedly with deep respiration, straining, the Valsalva maneuver, coughing, sneezing and laughing. When the magnet was applied, none of these maneuvers inhibited the pacemaker. Extensive investigations ruled out an intermittent electrode problem such as a wire fracture or insulation break. Sensing of diaphragmatic myopotentials should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pacemaker pauses. PMID:902394

  15. Pacemaker lead erosion simulating "Loch Ness Monster": conservative management.

    PubMed

    Garg, Naveen; Moorthy, Nagaraja

    2012-12-01

    The majority of pacemaker pocket or lead erosions are due to either mechanical erosion by the bulky pulse generator or secondary to pacemaker pocket infection. We describe an unusual case of delayed pacemaker lead erosion causing extrusion of a portion of the pacing lead, with separate entry and exit points, with the gap filled with new skin formation, simulating the "Loch Ness Monster", which was successfully managed conservatively by surgical reinsertion.

  16. Recurrent candidaemia and pacemaker wire infection with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, A

    2011-12-01

    Recurrent candidaemia is both a cause and a symptom of deep organ candidiasis or infection of foreign bodies (e.g. central venous line, other indwelling catheter or pacemaker wire) and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This case report demonstrates that in the event of pacemaker wire infection with Candida and when it is not possible to remove the infected pacemaker wire, treatment with an echinocandin, such as anidulafungin, can be safe and successful.

  17. In vitro characterization of HCN channel kinetics and frequency dependence in myocytes predicts biological pacemaker functionality.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Bucchi, Annalisa; Oren, Ronit V; Kryukova, Yelena; Dun, Wen; Clancy, Colleen E; Robinson, Richard B

    2009-04-01

    The pacemaker current, mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, contributes to the initiation and regulation of cardiac rhythm. Previous experiments creating HCN-based biological pacemakers in vivo found that an engineered HCN2/HCN1 chimeric channel (HCN212) resulted in significantly faster rates than HCN2, interrupted by 1-5 s pauses. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences in HCN212 and HCN2 in vivo functionality as biological pacemakers, we studied newborn rat ventricular myocytes over-expressing either HCN2 or HCN212 channels. The HCN2- and HCN212-over-expressing myocytes manifest similar voltage dependence, current density and sensitivity to saturating cAMP concentrations, but HCN212 has faster activation/deactivation kinetics. Compared with HCN2, myocytes expressing HCN212 exhibit a faster spontaneous rate and greater incidence of irregular rhythms (i.e. periods of rapid spontaneous rate followed by pauses). To explore these rhythm differences further, we imposed consecutive pacing and found that activation kinetics of the two channels are slower at faster pacing frequencies. As a result, time-dependent HCN current flowing during diastole decreases for both constructs during a train of stimuli at a rapid frequency, with the effect more pronounced for HCN2. In addition, the slower deactivation kinetics of HCN2 contributes to more pronounced instantaneous current at a slower frequency. As a result of the frequency dependence of both instantaneous and time-dependent current, HCN2 exhibits more robust negative feedback than HCN212, contributing to the maintenance of a stable pacing rhythm. These results illustrate the benefit of screening HCN constructs in spontaneously active myocyte cultures and may provide the basis for future optimization of HCN-based biological pacemakers. PMID:19171659

  18. [Pacemaking in Cracow in years 1966-1980].

    PubMed

    Machejek, Jakub; Lelakowski, Jacek; Bednarek, Jacek; Majewski, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    Permanent pacemaking, a new and effective bradycardia--treatment method, has appeared in the sixties. In Cracow the first emergency temporary stimulation by means of transvenously inserted intracardiac electrode was performed in 1966. Permanent technique of artificial pacing was introduced soon after. The number of pacemaker implantations grew successfully, obtaining 750 of the end of the seventies when the Institute of Cardiology of Nicolaus Copernicus Medical Academy was established. Assortment of implantable devices also became wider, including such rare constructions like nuclear pacemakers and an inductive coupled pacemaker.

  19. Permanent cardiac pacing in Malaysia. An update.

    PubMed

    Saw, H S; Chong, K T; Singham, A M

    1981-10-01

    Updated data on permanent cardiac pacing in Malaysia is presented. Over the past 3 1/2 years (1976-1980), 75 patients underwent insertion of pacemakers giving an annual incidence of about 20 cases as compared with a total of 21 cases in the previous 8 years (1968-1977). Many of the features reported in an earlier paper in 1977 viz mode of presentation, age and sex distribution and indications for pacing remain unchanged. Over this period only 4 patients required lead replacement. Since concentrating mainly on the use of epicardial leads implanted via a subxiphoid approach, complications have been remarkably low. The problem of availability of pacemakers has been averted. Cost remains a major consideration when recommending one pacemaker in preference over another. The details concerning clinical features, indications for pacing, complications and other problems encountered in the management of these patients are discussed.

  20. CALCIUM-DRIVEN TRANSCRIPTION OF CARDIAC SPECIFYING GENE PROGRAM IN LIVER STEM CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that a cloned liver stem cell line (WB F344) acquires a cardiac phenotype when seeded in a cardiac microenvironment in vivo and ex vivo. Here we investigated the mechanisms of this transdifferentiation in early (<72 hr) WB F344 cell, rat neonatal ventricu...

  1. Economics of cardiac adverse events after smallpox vaccination: lessons from the 2003 US Vaccination Program.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R; Sniadack, Mercedes M; Mootrey, Gina T

    2008-03-15

    Of >39,000 civilian public health responders vaccinated against smallpox in 2003, 203 reported cardiovascular adverse events (CAEs). An association exists between the US vaccinia strain and myocarditis and/or pericarditis ("myo/pericarditis" [MP]). Other associations are inconclusive. We used surveillance and follow-up survey data of CAE case patients to estimate the resources used during the 2003 smallpox vaccination program and used a probabilistic model to estimate the potential costs of CAEs in a mass vaccination campaign. For every million adult vaccinees, 3001 CAEs (including 351 MP cases) would occur, with >92% in revaccinees. CAEs would require a median of 5934 outpatient visits, 1786 emergency department visits, 533 days in general wards, 132 days in intensive care units, 5484 cardiac enzymes tests, 3504 electrocardiograms, 3049 chemistry tests, 2828 complete blood counts, and 1444 transthoracic echocardiograms, among other procedures. CAEs would reduce productivity (15,969 work days lost) and cost $11 per vaccinee. In a mass vaccination campaign, the care of a sizable number of CAEs would be resource intensive. PMID:18284356

  2. MRI Mode Programming for Safe Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With a Magnetic Resonance Conditional Cardiac Device.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Toshiko; Kurokawa, Sayaka; Ikeya, Yukitoshi; Iso, Kazuki; Takahashi, Keiko; Sasaki, Naoko; Ashino, Sonoko; Okubo, Kimie; Okumura, Yasuo; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Although diagnostically indispensable, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been, until recently, contraindicated in patients with an implantable cardiac device. MR conditional cardiac devices are now widely used, but the mode programming needed for safe MRI has yet to be established. We reviewed the details of 41 MRI examinations of patients with a MR conditional device. There were no associated adverse events. However, in 3 cases, paced beats competed with the patient's own beats during the MRI examination. We describe 2 of the 3 specific cases because they illustrate these potentially risky situations: a case in which the intrinsic heart rate increased and another in which atrial fibrillation occurred. Safe MRI in patients with an MR conditional device necessitates detailed MRI mode programming. The MRI pacing mode should be carefully and individually selected.

  3. [Study on Chaotic Detection Method of Pacemaker Contact-Less Power Supply].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenghu; Huang, Mingming; Li, Songtao

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the reliability of cardiac pacemaker contact-less power supply technology, this paper proposes a novel application of wireless feedback voltage stabilizing technology to adjust heart disease patients with inner power supply filter circuit output voltage and current control method, to keep the output voltage stability, and to ensure that the super capacitor and cardiac pacemaker to get a stable power supply. To implement the real-time accurate voltage control with considering the primary and secondary side inductance coupling coefficient changes, the change of the external power supply voltage and load, it is necessary to test thee real-time and accurate output voltage and current value after rectifying filtering. Therefore, based on the chaotic control theory, we adopted method of phase diagram on the basis of the quick observation after rectifying filtering, so that the method of voltage and current could improve the detection time of the circuit. The phase diagram of proposed control method can be divided into 8 segments, and we got 7 zero-extreme points. When these zero-extreme points are detected, according to extreme points of the zero instantaneous values, the corresponding average values of voltage and current were obtained. Simulation and experimental results showed that using the above method can shorten the response time to less than switch devices 1/2 switching cycles, thus validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed detection algorithm. PMID:27079110

  4. Quantification of fiber orientation in the canine atrial pacemaker complex using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2012-07-01

    The atrial pacemaker complex is responsible for the initiation and early propagation of cardiac impulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality with spatial resolutions of ˜1 to 15 μm, can be used to identify unique fiber orientation patterns in this region of the heart. Functionally characterized canine sinoatrial nodes (SAN) (n=7) were imaged using OCT up to ˜1 mm below the endocardial tissue surface. OCT images were directly compared to their corresponding histological sections. Fiber orientation patterns unique to the crista terminalis (CT), SAN, and surrounding atrial myocardium were identified with dominant average fiber angles of 89±12 deg, 110±16 deg, and 95±35 deg, respectively. Both the CT and surrounding atrial myocardium displayed predominantly unidirectionally based fiber orientation patterns within each specimen, whereas the SAN displayed an increased amount of fiber disarray manifested quantitatively as a significantly greater standard deviation in fiber angle distribution within specimens [33±7 deg versus 23±5 deg, atrium (p=0.02); 18±3 deg, CT (p=0.0003)]. We also identified unique, local patterns of fiber orientation specific to the functionally characterized block zone. We demonstrate the ability of OCT in detecting components of the atrial pacemaker complex which are intimately involved in both normal and abnormal cardiac conduction.

  5. [Study on Chaotic Detection Method of Pacemaker Contact-Less Power Supply].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenghu; Huang, Mingming; Li, Songtao

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the reliability of cardiac pacemaker contact-less power supply technology, this paper proposes a novel application of wireless feedback voltage stabilizing technology to adjust heart disease patients with inner power supply filter circuit output voltage and current control method, to keep the output voltage stability, and to ensure that the super capacitor and cardiac pacemaker to get a stable power supply. To implement the real-time accurate voltage control with considering the primary and secondary side inductance coupling coefficient changes, the change of the external power supply voltage and load, it is necessary to test thee real-time and accurate output voltage and current value after rectifying filtering. Therefore, based on the chaotic control theory, we adopted method of phase diagram on the basis of the quick observation after rectifying filtering, so that the method of voltage and current could improve the detection time of the circuit. The phase diagram of proposed control method can be divided into 8 segments, and we got 7 zero-extreme points. When these zero-extreme points are detected, according to extreme points of the zero instantaneous values, the corresponding average values of voltage and current were obtained. Simulation and experimental results showed that using the above method can shorten the response time to less than switch devices 1/2 switching cycles, thus validating the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed detection algorithm.

  6. Restoration of cardio-circulatory regulation by rate-adaptive pacemaker systems: the bioengineering view of a clinical problem.

    PubMed

    Werner, J; Hexamer, M; Meine, M; Lemke, B

    1999-09-01

    In the past, the development of rate-adaptive (sensor-controlled) pacemaker systems seems to have been determined primarily by the availability, compatibility and other properties of the technical sensor. This paper, however, focuses on the system-physiological aspect in an attempt to answer the question to what extent physiological cardiovascular control is restored by the pacemaker system. This is a question which should be asked before attempting to design a sensor-controlled system and especially before designing multisensor systems with infinite combinations. Four categories are defined: direct bridging ("shunting"), open loop systems, closed systems using cardiorespiratory or metabolic coupling and those using cardiac signals. Further subdivisions are shown. From the bioengineering as well as from the physiological viewpoint a system should preferably not combine sensors from one and the same of these categories. At present direct bridging is available only for the atrioventricular (AV)-block, so that for sick-sinus-syndrome (SSS) patients feedback control via cardiac signals ("inotropic" pacemaker) comes nearest the goal without, however, ideally bridging the gap. Open-loop systems should no longer be developed as single-sensor systems. A well developed activity sensor, however, which quickly pinpoints the most prominent stressor of cardiovascular control is best suited to complement another sensory system achieving closed-loop control. New and promising concepts orientated toward direct bridging are the analysis of monophasic action potentials and the "dromotropic" concept, both of which seek direct correlation with the "chronotropic" information not available in SSS patients.

  7. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870.3650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870.3650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3730 - Pacemaker service tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker service tools. 870.3730 Section 870.3730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3730 Pacemaker...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3690 - Pacemaker test magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker test magnet. 870.3690 Section 870.3690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3690 Pacemaker test...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  16. Executive functions improvement following a 5-month aquaerobics program in older adults: Role of cardiac vagal control in inhibition performance.

    PubMed

    Albinet, Cédric T; Abou-Dest, Amira; André, Nathalie; Audiffren, Michel

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the effects of aerobic exercise on measures of executive performance and their relationships with changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiac vagal control (heart rate variability) and psychological variables. Thirty-six sedentary seniors aged 60-75 years were randomly assigned to a swimming and aquaerobics program or a stretching program two times a week for 21 weeks. Executive functions (inhibition, updating of working memory and cognitive flexibility) and cardiorespiratory fitness (estimated VO2max) were assessed at the start, after 10 weeks of program and at the end of the program. Resting HRV and measures of psychological outcomes (depression, self-efficacy, decisional balance) were obtained at the start and at the end of the program. Participants of both groups significantly improved their VO2max level, their psychological state and their performance for the 2-back task. Only the participants in the aquaerobics group significantly improved their vagally-mediated HRV and their performance for the Stroop test and the verbal running-span test at the end of the program. Only improvements in cardiac vagal control and in inhibition were shown to be functionally related. These results are discussed in line with the model of neurovisceral integration. PMID:26812613

  17. Executive functions improvement following a 5-month aquaerobics program in older adults: Role of cardiac vagal control in inhibition performance.

    PubMed

    Albinet, Cédric T; Abou-Dest, Amira; André, Nathalie; Audiffren, Michel

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the effects of aerobic exercise on measures of executive performance and their relationships with changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiac vagal control (heart rate variability) and psychological variables. Thirty-six sedentary seniors aged 60-75 years were randomly assigned to a swimming and aquaerobics program or a stretching program two times a week for 21 weeks. Executive functions (inhibition, updating of working memory and cognitive flexibility) and cardiorespiratory fitness (estimated VO2max) were assessed at the start, after 10 weeks of program and at the end of the program. Resting HRV and measures of psychological outcomes (depression, self-efficacy, decisional balance) were obtained at the start and at the end of the program. Participants of both groups significantly improved their VO2max level, their psychological state and their performance for the 2-back task. Only the participants in the aquaerobics group significantly improved their vagally-mediated HRV and their performance for the Stroop test and the verbal running-span test at the end of the program. Only improvements in cardiac vagal control and in inhibition were shown to be functionally related. These results are discussed in line with the model of neurovisceral integration.

  18. Asynchronous response of coupled pacemaker neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    We study a network model of two conductance-based pacemaker neurons of differing natural frequency, coupled with either mutual excitation or inhibition, and receiving shared random inhibitory synaptic input. The networks may phase-lock spike-to-spike for strong mutual coupling. But the shared input can desynchronize the locked spike-pairs by selectively eliminating the lagging spike or modulating its timing with respect to the leading spike depending on their separation time window. Such loss of synchrony is also found in a large network of sparsely coupled heterogeneous spiking neurons receiving shared input. PMID:19257636

  19. A novel program focused on women survivors who were enrolled in a cardiac arrest pathway.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Eyal; Tamis, Jacqueline; Aziz, Emad F; Shapiro, Janet M

    2013-03-01

    The number of cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is estimated to be 300,000/year in the United States. Two landmark studies published in 2002 demonstrated that therapeutic hypothermia decreased mortality and improved neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our institutional pathway for the management of survivors of cardiac arrest stresses teamwork involving multiple disciplines, including cardiology, critical care, nursing, neurology, infectious diseases, physical therapy, social work, and pastoral care. Involvement of the patients' families is critical in the understanding of the process and in the decision making and goals of care when neurological prognosis is poor. In a unique approach, we have included the survivors in the process. Our approach to quality improvement includes a yearly conference incorporating the voices of survivors and families. This conference serves as a means to review our experience, educate clinicians, involve all healthcare providers in the outcome, and provide a model of communication and professionalism to trainees. During review of our experience, we noted the small number of women undergoing therapeutic hypothermia, accounting for only 21% of all patients undergoing this therapy after cardiac arrest. This led to a conference that focused on cardiac disease and cardiac arrest in women.

  20. Improved cardiac management with a disease management program incorporating comprehensive lipid profiling.

    PubMed

    McAna, John F; Goldfarb, Neil I; Couto, Joseph; Henry, Michelle A; Piefer, Gary; Rapier, George M

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the improved effectiveness of a disease management treatment protocol incorporating comprehensive lipid profiling and targeted lipid care based on lipid profile findings in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) or congestive heart failure (CHF) enrolled in a managed care plan. This retrospective cohort study, conducted over a 2-year period, compared outcomes between patients with a standard lipid profile to those evaluated with a comprehensive lipid profile. All adult members of the WellMed Medical Management, Inc. managed care health plan diagnosed with IHD or CHF, and continuously enrolled between July 1, 2006 and June 30, 2008, were included in the study. Cases were defined as those who had at least 1 comprehensive lipid test (the VAP [vertical auto profile] ultracentrifuge test) during this period (n=1767); they were compared to those who had no lipid testing or traditional standard lipid testing only (controls, n=289). Univariate statistics were analyzed to describe the groups, and bivariate t tests or chi-squares examined differences between the 2 cohorts. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to control for potential confounders. The results show that the case group had lower total costs ($4852.62 vs. $7413.18; P=0.0255), fewer inpatient stays (13.1% vs. 18.3% of controls; P=0.0175) and emergency department visits (11.9% vs. 15.6% of controls; P=0.0832). Prescription use and frequency of lipid measurement suggested improved control resulting from a targeted approach to managing specific dyslipidemias. A treatment protocol incorporating a comprehensive lipid profile appears to improve care and reduce utilization and costs in a disease management program for cardiac patients.

  1. In-vitro mapping of E-fields induced near pacemaker leads by simulated MR gradient fields

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with implanted cardiac pacemakers is generally contraindicated but some clinicians condone scanning certain patients. We assessed the risk of inducing unintended cardiac stimulation by measuring electric fields (E) induced near lead tips by a simulated MRI gradient system. The objectives of this study are to map magnetically induced E near distal tips of leads in a saline tank to determine the spatial distribution and magnitude of E and compare them with E induced by a pacemaker pulse generator (PG). Methods We mapped magnetically induced E with 0.1 mm resolution as close as 1 mm from lead tips. We used probes with two straight electrodes (e.g. wire diameter of 0.2 mm separated by 0.9 mm). We generated magnetic flux density (B) with a Helmholtz coil throughout 0.6% saline in a 24 cm diameter tank with (dB/dt) of 1 T/sec (1 kHz sinusoidal waveform). Separately, we measured E near the tip of leads when connected to a PG set to a unipolar mode. Measurements were non-invasive (not altering the leads or PG under study). Results When scaled to 30 T/s (a clinically relevant value), magnetically-induced E exceeded the E produced by a PG. The magnetically-induced E only occurred when B was coincident with or within 15 msec of implantable pacemaker's pulse. Conclusions Potentially hazardous situations are possible during an MR scan due to gradient fields. Unintended stimulation can be induced via abandoned leads and leads connected to a pulse generator with loss of hermetic seal at the connector. Also, pacemaker-dependent patients can receive drastically altered pacing pulses. PMID:20003479

  2. Stochastic Aspects of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerma, Claudia; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Guevara, Michael; Glass, Leon

    2007-07-01

    Abnormal cardiac rhythms (cardiac arrhythmias) often display complex changes over time that can have a random or haphazard appearance. Mathematically, these changes can on occasion be identified with bifurcations in difference or differential equation models of the arrhythmias. One source for the variability of these rhythms is the fluctuating environment. However, in the neighborhood of bifurcation points, the fluctuations induced by the stochastic opening and closing of individual ion channels in the cell membrane, which results in membrane noise, may lead to randomness in the observed dynamics. To illustrate this, we consider the effects of stochastic properties of ion channels on the resetting of pacemaker oscillations and on the generation of early afterdepolarizations. The comparison of the statistical properties of long records showing arrhythmias with the predictions from theoretical models should help in the identification of different mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmias.

  3. Re-use of explanted DDD pacemakers as VDD- clinical utility and cost effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Namboodiri, K K N; Sharma, Y P; Bali, H K; Grover, A

    2004-01-01

    Re-use of DDD pulse generators explanted from patients died of unrelated causes is associated with an additional cost of two transvenous leads if implanted as DDD itself, and high rate of infection according to some studies. We studied the clinical and economical aspects of reutilization of explanted DDD pacemakers programmed to VDD mode. Out of 28 patients who received VDD pacemaker during the period, October 2000- September 2001 in the Department of Cardiology, PGIMER, Chandigarh, 5 poor patients were implanted with explanted DDD pulse generators programmed to VDD mode. Each implantation was planned and carried out according to a standard protocol. The age ranged from 45 to 75 (mean-61) years. The indications for pacing were complete heart block (4) and second degree AV block (1). The clinical profile, costs and complications, if any were noted and followed up at regular intervals. The results were compared with patients who received new DDD pulse generators during this period. The additional cost for the atrial lead was not required in these patients. None of these patients had any local site infection. Compared to the two-lead system, the single lead system provided more rapid implantation and minimized complications associated with placement of an atrial lead. The explanted DDD pacemaker can be safely reused as VDD mode with same efficacy in selected patient population. This is associated with lower cost and complications compared to reimplantation as DDD itself.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complex cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, L.; Courtemanche, M.; Shrier, A.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Periodic stimulation of a nonlinear cardiac oscillator in vitro gives rise to complex dynamics that is well described by one-dimensional finite difference equations. As stimulation parameters are varied, a large number of different phase-locked and chaotic rhythms is observed. Similar rhythms can be observed in the intact human heart when there is interaction between two pacemaker sites. Simplified models are analyzed, which show some correspondence to clinical observations.

  5. Y2K: effects on pacemaker and implantable defibrillator programmers.

    PubMed

    Flynn, D P; Daubert, J P; Huang, D T; Ocampo, C M; O'Gorman, E

    1999-01-01

    All permanent pacemakers and implantable defibrillators (PPM/ICDs) will continue to function as programmed without regard to the date in the year 2000 (Y2K). All manufacturers contacted reassured us that some of these devices incorporate a day/year clock in the circuitry; however, these are not involved in sensing or delivering programmed therapy. Some manufacturers' device programmers will roll over to the year 2000 without any problems at all, whereas others may have difficulty with date and time stamping on printed reports. We tested 14 different types of PPM/ICD programmers for Y2K compliance using 8 tests. Five of the 14 models passed each test and were labeled at our institution with a green "Y2K" sticker to identify them as Y2K compatible and needing no special attention after December 31, 1999. The most common test failed was the ability to roll the date forward from December 31, 1999, with the programmer power off. Organizations should consider testing and replacing noncompliant device programmers or placing a red sticker with "Y2K" crossed out on noncompliant pieces. The red sticker alerts the advanced practice nurse or physician to the need to confirm the appropriate date and time in the programmer after startup in the year 2000 and before interrogating or programming any PPM/ICD, to avoid inappropriate date and time stamping on printed reports from that programmer.

  6. Endogenous pacemaker activity of rat tumour somatotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecien, Renata; Robert, Christophe; Cannon, Robert; Vigues, Stephan; Arnoux, Annie; Kordon, Claude; Hammond, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Cells derived from a rat pituitary tumour (GC cell line) that continuously release growth hormone behave as endogenous pacemakers. In simultaneous patch clamp recordings and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) imaging, they displayed rhythmic action potentials (44.7 ± 2.7 mV, 178 ± 40 ms, 0.30 ± 0.04 Hz) and concomitant [Ca2+]i transients (374 ± 57 nM, 1.0 ± 0.2 s, 0.27 ± 0.03 Hz). Action potentials and [Ca2+]i transients were reversibly blocked by removal of external Ca2+, addition of nifedipine (1 μM) or Ni2+ (40 μM), but were insensitive to TTX (1 μM). An L-type Ca2+ current activated at -33.6 ± 0.4 mV (holding potential (Vh), −40 mV), peaked at -1.8 ± 1.3 mV, was reduced by nifedipine and enhanced by S-(+)-SDZ 202 791. A T/R-type Ca2+ current activated at -41.7 ± 2.7 mV (Vh, -80 or -60 mV), peaked at -9.2 ± 3.0 mV, was reduced by low concentrations of Ni2+ (40 μM) or Cd2+ (10 μM) and was toxin resistant. Parallel experiments revealed the expression of the class E calcium channel α1-subunit mRNA. The K+ channel blockers TEA (25 mM) and charybdotoxin (10–100 nM) enhanced spike amplitude and/or duration. Apamin (100 nM) also strongly reduced the after-spike hyperpolarization. The outward K+ tail current evoked by a depolarizing step that mimicked an action potential reversed at −69.8 ± 0.3 mV, presented two components, lasted 2–3 s and was totally blocked by Cd2+ (400 μM). The slow pacemaker depolarization (3.5 ± 0.4 s) that separated consecutive spikes corresponded to a 2- to 3-fold increase in membrane resistance, was strongly Na+ sensitive but TTX insensitive. Computer simulations showed that pacemaker activity can be reproduced by a minimum of six currents: an L-type Ca2+ current underlies the rising phase of action potentials that are repolarized by a delayed rectifier and Ca2+-activated K+ currents. In between spikes, the decay of Ca2+-activated K+ currents and a persistent inward cationic current depolarize the membrane

  7. Of pacemakers and statistics: the actuarial method extended.

    PubMed

    Dussel, J; Wolbarst, A B; Scott-Millar, R N; Obel, I W

    1980-01-01

    Pacemakers cease functioning because of either natural battery exhaustion (nbe) or component failure (cf). A study of four series of pacemakers shows that a simple extension of the actuarial method, so as to incorporate Normal statistics, makes possible a quantitative differentiation between the two modes of failure. This involves the separation of the overall failure probability density function PDF(t) into constituent parts pdfnbe(t) and pdfcf(t). The approach should allow a meaningful comparison of the characteristics of different pacemaker types.

  8. Preliminary experience with the use of a programmable pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Morse, D; Fernandez, J; Samuel, A; Lemole, G; Parsonnet, V

    1975-05-01

    One hundred sixty-four patients, in whom new externally programmable pacemakers had been inserted, were studied over a two year period, beginning July, 1972. Following implantation, the rate and current output of this pacemaker could be changed at any time by a non-invasive technique involving electromagnetic pulse trains emitted by an external "programmer". In 89 percent of the patients it was possible to reduce battery output by half, implying greater longevity of the pacer in these cases. In 15 percent of the patients, manipulative control of the pacemaker rate was employed and found beneficial.

  9. The cardiovascular effects of normobaric hyperoxia in patients with heart rate fixed by permanent pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K J; Harten, J M; Booth, M G; Berry, C; McConnachie, A; Rankin, A C; Kinsella, J

    2010-02-01

    To investigate whether the established reductions in heart rate and cardiac output with hyperoxia in humans are primary effects or secondary to increases in systemic vascular resistance, we paced the hearts of nine patients with permanent pacemakers at a fixed rate when breathing either medical air (inspired O(2) fraction 0.21) or oxygen (inspired O(2) fraction 0.80) in a randomised, double-blind fashion. A thoracic bio-impedance machine was used to measure heart rate, stroke volume and blood pressure and calculate cardiac index and systemic vascular resistance index. Oxygen caused no change in cardiac index (p = 0.18), stroke index (p = 0.44) or blood pressure (p = 0.52) but caused a small (5.5%) increase in systemic vascular resistance index (p = 0.03). This suggests that hyperoxia has no direct myocardial depressant effects, but that the changes in cardiac output reported in previous studies are secondary to changes in systemic vascular resistance. PMID:20003116

  10. Myosin helical pitch angle as a quantitative imaging biomarker for characterization of cardiac programming in fetal growth restriction measured by polarization second harmonic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amat-Roldan, I.; Psilodimitrakopoulos, S.,; Eixarch, E.,; Torre, I.; Wotjas, B.; Crispi, F.; Figueras, F.; Artigas, D.,; Loza-Alvarez, P.; Gratacos, E.,

    2009-07-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) has recently shown a strong association with cardiac programming which predisposes to cardiovascular mortality in adulthood. Polarization Second Harmonic Microscopy can quantify molecular architecture changes with high sensitivity in cardiac myofibrils. In this work, we use myosin helical pitch angle as an example to quantify such alterations related to this high risk population. Importantly, this shows a potential use of the technique as an early diagnostic tool and an alternative method to understand pathophysiological processes.

  11. [Competitive pacing in a patient with DDD pacemaker and bigeminal ventricular extrasystoles].

    PubMed

    Carbone, Vincenzo; Candelmo, Fiore; Todaro, Chiara; Oreto, Giuseppe

    2008-11-01

    The ECG recorded from a patient with DDD pacemaker showed variable responses of the pacing system to bigeminal ventricular extrasystoles, dependent on the coupling interval of premature beats. For relatively short coupling intervals, the premature spontaneous event was detected by the pacemaker, inhibiting both atrial and ventricular output, and resulting in a relatively long pacing pause. In slightly less premature end-diastolic extrasystoles, in contrast, the pacing system delivered an atrial spike that was superimposed upon the spontaneous premature QRS complex (pseudo-pseudofusion); under these circumstances, the atrial spike was followed, at the end of the programmed atrioventricular interval, by a ventricular spike falling on the extrasystolic T wave apex (competitive ventricular pacing). This phenomenon, however, did not express a sensing malfunction, but was due to post-atrial ventricular blanking (PAVB), a short period initiated by the atrial spike during which ventricular sensing is temporarily disabled, so that no signal can be detected. Finally, whenever premature end-diastolic impulses occurred after PAVB, during the brief interval defined ventricular safety pacing, the spontaneous event was sensed, being followed by an earlier-than-expected ventricular spike, whose prematurity was aimed at avoiding the occurrence of an artificial impulse upon the T wave of extrasystole. In conclusion, despite several not sensed ventricular extrasystoles and competitive pacing, no sensing malfunction was present. This case demonstrates how complex can be the electrocardiographic analysis of a DDD pacemaker, owing to the many complicating phenomena related to this pacing mechanism.

  12. Engineered Biological Pacemakers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Aging's Cellular Biophysics Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological pacemakers.

  13. Evaluation of a Standardized Patient Education Program for Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: Impact on Illness Knowledge and Self-Management Behaviors up to 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Karin; Seekatz, Bettina; Haug, Günter; Mosler, Gabriele; Schwaab, Bernhard; Worringen, Ulrike; Faller, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Patient education is an essential part of the treatment of coronary heart disease in cardiac rehabilitation. In Germany, no standardized and evaluated patient education programs for coronary heart disease have been available so far. In this article, we report the evaluation of a patient-oriented program. A multicenter quasi-experimental,…

  14. Venous obstruction in permanent pacemaker patients: an isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Pauletti, M.; Di Ricco, G.; Solfanelli, S.; Marini, C.; Contini, C.; Giuntini, C.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope venography was used to study the venous circulation proximal to the superior vena cava in two groups of pacemaker patients, one with a single endocavitary electrode and the other with multiple pacing catheters. A control group of patients without pacemakers was also studied. Numerous abnormalities were found, especially in the group with multiple electrodes. These findings suggest that venous obstruction is a common complication of endocardial pacing.

  15. Interaction of a commercial heart rate monitor with implanted pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Joglar, J A; Hamdan, M H; Welch, P J; Page, R L

    1999-03-01

    Dry-electrode heart rate monitors allow display of heart rate by transmitting a signal to the receiving device, which typically is on the wrist or exercise machine, but due to the potential for electromagnetic interference, their use has been contraindicated in patients with pacemakers. In 12 patients, we found no adverse effect on pacemaker function; in addition, the monitors generally were accurate in measuring heart rate during pacing.

  16. Intracardiac Origin of Heart Rate Variability, Pacemaker Funny Current and their Possible Association with Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Vasilios E; Verkerk, Arie O; Amin, Ahmed S; de Bakker, Jaques MT

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indirect estimator of autonomic modulation of heart rate and is considered a risk marker in critical illness, particularly in heart failure and severe sepsis. A reduced HRV has been found in critically ill patients and has been associated with neuro-autonomic uncoupling or decreased baroreflex sensitivity. However, results from human and animal experimental studies indicate that intracardiac mechanisms might also be responsible for interbeat fluctuations. These studies have demonstrated that different membrane channel proteins and especially the so-called ‘funny’ current (If), an hyperpolarization-activated, inward current that drives diastolic depolarization resulting in spontaneous activity in cardiac pacemaker cells, are altered during critical illness. Furthermore, membrane channels kinetics seem to have significant impact upon HRV, whose early decrease might reflect a cellular metabolic stress. In this review article we present research findings regarding intracardiac origin of HRV, at the cellular level and in both isolated sinoatrial node and whole ex vivo heart preparations. In addition, we will review results from various experimental studies that support the interrelation between If and HRV during endotoxemia. We suggest that reduced HRV during sepsis could also be associated with altered pacemaker cell membrane properties, due to ionic current remodeling. PMID:22920474

  17. Cardiac fluid dynamics anticipates heart adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Martiniello, Alfonso R; Bianchi, Valter; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Caso, Pio; Tonti, Giovanni

    2015-01-21

    Hemodynamic forces represent an epigenetic factor during heart development and are supposed to influence the pathology of the grown heart. Cardiac blood motion is characterized by a vortical dynamics, and it is common belief that the cardiac vortex has a role in disease progressions or regression. Here we provide a preliminary demonstration about the relevance of maladaptive intra-cardiac vortex dynamics in the geometrical adaptation of the dysfunctional heart. We employed an in vivo model of patients who present a stable normal heart function in virtue of the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, bi-ventricular pace-maker) and who are expected to develop left ventricle remodeling if pace-maker was switched off. Intra-ventricular fluid dynamics is analyzed by echocardiography (Echo-PIV). Under normal conditions, the flow presents a longitudinal alignment of the intraventricular hemodynamic forces. When pacing is temporarily switched off, flow forces develop a misalignment hammering onto lateral walls, despite no other electro-mechanical change is noticed. Hemodynamic forces result to be the first event that evokes a physiological activity anticipating cardiac changes and could help in the prediction of longer term heart adaptations.

  18. Pacemaker and defibrillator deactivation in competent hospice patients: an ethical consideration.

    PubMed

    Ballentine, Jennifer M

    2005-01-01

    The Denver Community Bioethics Committee (DCBC) is an independent, community-based group that undertakes ethics consultations for any individual or organization. Its members include adult protection professionals, physicians, elder-law attorneys, chaplains, nurses, social workers, and lay persons. In its 11-year history, the Committee has heard numerous cases concerning end-of-life care, futile treatment, and patients' rights. In 2003, a Colorado hospice provider asked the DCBC for assistance in developing a policy on deactivation of pacemakers and defibrillators in competent hospice patients. The hospice had encountered concerns from some physicians and cardiac care clinicians that deactivating such devices treads the fine line between legitimate withdrawal of burdensome treatment and assisted death. Although the specific deliberations of the DCBC are confidential, this article summarizes contributions from the committee's discussion, as well as independent research undertaken by the author.

  19. Radiation induced failures of complementary metal oxide semiconductor containing pacemakers: a potentially lethal complication

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.A.; Serago, C.F.; Schwade, J.G.; Abitbol, A.A.; Margolis, S.C.

    1984-10-01

    New multi-programmable pacemakers frequently employ complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). This circuitry appears more sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation when compared to the semiconductor circuits used in older pacemakers. A case of radiation induced runaway pacemaker in a CMOS device is described. Because of this and other recent reports of radiation therapy-induced CMOS type pacemaker failure, these pacemakers should not be irradiated. If necessary, the pacemaker can be shielded or moved to a site which can be shielded before institution of radiation therapy. This is done to prevent damage to the CMOS circuit and the life threatening arrythmias which may result from such damage.

  20. Long-term secondary prevention programs after cardiac rehabilitation for the reduction of future cardiovascular events: focus on regular physical activity.

    PubMed

    Scrutinio, Domenico; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Passantino, Andrea; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo

    2009-05-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs are recognized as integral to the comprehensive care of patients with coronary heart disease, and as such are recommended in most contemporary clinical practice guidelines. The interventions are aimed at reducing disability, optimizing cardiovascular risk reduction by drug therapy and promoting healthy behavior. Healthy lifestyle habits must be recognized as capable of substantially reducing the risk for cardiovascular events in patients with coronary heart disease. This review highlights the recommended components of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs, with special emphasis on regular physical activity.

  1. Simulation of Ectopic Pacemakers in the Heart: Multiple Ectopic Beats Generated by Reentry inside Fibrotic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa de Barros, Bruno; Weber dos Santos, Rodrigo; Lobosco, Marcelo; Alonso, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of nonconducting media, mimicking cardiac fibrosis, in two models of cardiac tissue produces the formation of ectopic beats. The fraction of nonconducting media in comparison with the fraction of healthy myocytes and the topological distribution of cells determines the probability of ectopic beat generation. First, a detailed subcellular microscopic model that accounts for the microstructure of the cardiac tissue is constructed and employed for the numerical simulation of action potential propagation. Next, an equivalent discrete model is implemented, which permits a faster integration of the equations. This discrete model is a simplified version of the microscopic model that maintains the distribution of connections between cells. Both models produce similar results when describing action potential propagation in homogeneous tissue; however, they slightly differ in the generation of ectopic beats in heterogeneous tissue. Nevertheless, both models present the generation of reentry inside fibrotic tissues. This kind of reentry restricted to microfibrosis regions can result in the formation of ectopic pacemakers, that is, regions that will generate a series of ectopic stimulus at a fast pacing rate. In turn, such activity has been related to trigger fibrillation in the atria and in the ventricles in clinical and animal studies. PMID:26583127

  2. Influence of electromagnetic interference on implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Motoyuki; Mizutani, Noboru; Waseda, Katsuhisa

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the susceptibility of implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices to electromagnetic interference in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car [High-Speed Surface Transport (HSST)]. During the study, cardiac devices were connected to a phantom model that had similar characteristics to the human body. Three pacemakers from three manufacturers and one implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) were evaluated in and around the magnetically levitated vehicle. The system is based on a normal conductive system levitated by the attractive force of magnets and propelled by a linear induction motor without wheels. The magnetic field strength at 40 cm from the vehicle in the nonlevitating state was 0.12 mT and that during levitation was 0.20 mT. The magnetic and electric field strengths on a seat close to the variable voltage/variable frequency inverter while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.13 mT, 2.95 V/m and 0.04 mT, 0.36 V/m, respectively. Data recorded on a seat close to the reactor while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.09 mT, 2.45 V/m and 0.05 mT, 1.46 V/m, respectively. Measured magnetic and electric field strengths both inside and outside the linear motor car were too low to result in device inactivation. No sensing, pacing, or arrhythmic interactions were noted with any pacemaker or ICD programmed in either bipolar and unipolar configurations. In conclusion, our data suggest that a permanent programming change or a device failure is unlikely to occur and that the linear motor car system is probably safe for patients with one of the four implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices used in this study under the conditions tested.

  3. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  4. Synergism of coupled subsarcolemmal Ca2+ clocks and sarcolemmal voltage clocks confers robust and flexible pacemaker function in a novel pacemaker cell model

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that sinoatrial node cells (SANC) generate spontaneous, rhythmic, local subsarcolemmal Ca2+ releases (Ca2+ clock), which occur during late diastolic depolarization (DD) and interact with the classic sarcolemmal voltage oscillator (membrane clock) by activating Na+-Ca2+ exchanger current (INCX). This and other interactions between clocks, however, are not captured by existing essentially membrane-delimited cardiac pacemaker cell numerical models. Using wide-scale parametric analysis of classic formulations of membrane clock and Ca2+ cycling, we have constructed and initially explored a prototype rabbit SANC model featuring both clocks. Our coupled oscillator system exhibits greater robustness and flexibility than membrane clock operating alone. Rhythmic spontaneous Ca2+ releases of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)-based Ca2+ clock ignite rhythmic action potentials via late DD INCX over much broader ranges of membrane clock parameters [e.g., L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL) and/or hyperpolarization-activated (“funny”) current (If) conductances]. The system Ca2+ clock includes SR and sarcolemmal Ca2+ fluxes, which optimize cell Ca2+ balance to increase amplitudes of both SR Ca2+ release and late DD INCX as SR Ca2+ pumping rate increases, resulting in a broad pacemaker rate modulation (1.8–4.6 Hz). In contrast, the rate modulation range via membrane clock parameters is substantially smaller when Ca2+ clock is unchanged or lacking. When Ca2+ clock is disabled, the system parametric space for fail-safe SANC operation considerably shrinks: without rhythmic late DD INCX ignition signals membrane clock substantially slows, becomes dysrhythmic, or halts. In conclusion, the Ca2+ clock is a new critical dimension in SANC function. A synergism of the coupled function of Ca2+ and membrane clocks confers fail-safe SANC operation at greatly varying rates. PMID:19136600

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  6. What is role of sex and age differences in marital conflict and stress of patients under Cardiac Rehabilitation Program?

    PubMed Central

    Komasi, Saeid; Saeidi, Mozhgan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To investigate the role of sex and age differences in marital conflict and stress of patients who were under cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program. METHODS The data of this cross-sectional study were collected from the database of the CR Department of Imam Ali Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran. The demographics and medical data of 683 persons were collected from January 2003 and January 2010 using medical records, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hudson’s Index of Marital Stress, and the Structured Clinical Interview for axis I disorders. Data were analyzed through Analysis of Covariance and Bonferroni test. RESULTS About 74.8% of the subjects were male. After adjustment for age, educational level, anxiety, and depression-the findings showed that women in CR program had a higher level of marital stress compared to men (54.75 ± 2.52 vs. 49.30 ± 0.89; P = 0.042). Furthermore, it was revealed that women who aged 56-65 years and more experienced higher level of marital stress compared to younger patients (P < 0.050); however, no significant difference was observed between different age groups in male patients (P > 0.050). CONCLUSION Marital conflict and stress threaten healthiness of women who aged 56-65 years more prominently than does in males or younger patients. Regarding the effect of marital stress on recurrence of the disease and cardiac-related morbidity and mortality in women, providing effective education and interventions to this group of patients, especially older women and even their spouses could be one of the useful objectives of CR programs. PMID:27752271

  7. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  8. Automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI using local binary fitting model and dynamic programming techniques.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huaifei; Gao, Zhiyong; Liu, Liman; Liu, Haihua; Gao, Junfeng; Xu, Shengzhou; Li, Wei; Huang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle is very important to quantitatively analyze global and regional cardiac function from magnetic resonance. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm for segmenting left ventricle on short-axis cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) to improve the performance of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. In this research, an automatic segmentation method for left ventricle is proposed on the basis of local binary fitting (LBF) model and dynamic programming techniques. The validation experiments are performed on a pool of data sets of 45 cases. For both endo- and epi-cardial contours of our results, percentage of good contours is about 93.5%, the average perpendicular distance are about 2 mm. The overlapping dice metric is about 0.91. The regression and determination coefficient between the experts and our proposed method on the LV mass is 1.038 and 0.9033, respectively; they are 1.076 and 0.9386 for ejection fraction (EF). The proposed segmentation method shows the better performance and has great potential in improving the accuracy of computer-aided diagnosis systems in cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Biasing the pacemaker in the behavioral theory of timing.

    PubMed

    Bizo, L A; White, K G

    1995-09-01

    In the behavioral theory of timing, pacemaker rate is determined by overall rate of reinforcement. A two-alternative free-operant psychophysical procedure was employed to investigate whether pacemaker period was also sensitive to the differential rate of reinforcement. Responding on a left key during the first 25 s and on a right key during the second 25 s of a 50-s trial was reinforced at variable intervals, and variable-interval schedule values during the two halves of the trials were varied systematically. Responding on the right key during the first 25 s and on the left key during the second 25 s was not reinforced. Estimates of pacemaker period were derived from fits of a function predicted by the behavioral theory of timing to right-key response proportions in consecutive 5-s bins of the 50-s trial. Estimates of pacemaker period were shortest when the differential reinforcer rate most strongly favored right-key responses, and were longest when the differential reinforcer rate most strongly favored left-key responses. The results were consistent with the conclusion that pacemaker rate is influenced by relative reinforcer rate.

  10. The neurochemical basis of photic entrainment of the circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, Michael A.; Buckley, Becky; Lutton, Lewis M.

    1992-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity in mammals is controlled by the action of a light-entrainable hypothalamus, in association with two cell clusters known as the supra chiasmatic nuclei (SCN). In the absence of temporal environmental clues, this pacemaker continues to measure time by an endogenous mechanism (clock), driving biochemical, physiological, and behavioral rhythms that reflect the natural period of the pacemaker oscillation. This endogenous period usually differs slightly from 24 hours (i.e., circadian). When mammals are maintained under a 24 hour light-dark (LD) cycle, the pacemaker becomes entrained such that the period of the pacemaker oscillation matches that of the LD cycle. Potentially entraining photic information is conveyed to the SCN via a direct retinal projection, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). RHT neurotransmission is thought to be mediated by the release of excitatory amino acids (EAA) in the SCN. In support of this hypothesis, recent experiments using nocturnal rodents have shown that EAA antagonists block the effects of light on pacemaker-driven behavioral rhythms, and attenuate light induced gene expression in SCN cells. An understanding of the neurochemical basis of the photic entrainment process would facilitate the development of pharmacological strategies for maintaining synchrony among shift workers in environments, such as the Space Station, which provide unreliable or conflicting temporal photic clues.

  11. Biasing the pacemaker in the behavioral theory of timing

    PubMed Central

    Bizo, Lewis A.; White, K. Geoffrey

    1995-01-01

    In the behavioral theory of timing, pacemaker rate is determined by overall rate of reinforcement. A two-alternative free-operant psychophysical procedure was employed to investigate whether pacemaker period was also sensitive to the differential rate of reinforcement. Responding on a left key during the first 25 s and on a right key during the second 25 s of a 50-s trial was reinforced at variable intervals, and variable-interval schedule values during the two halves of the trials were varied systematically. Responding on the right key during the first 25 s and on the left key during the second 25 s was not reinforced. Estimates of pacemaker period were derived from fits of a function predicted by the behavioral theory of timing to right-key response proportions in consecutive 5-s bins of the 50-s trial. Estimates of pacemaker period were shortest when the differential reinforcer rate most strongly favored right-key responses, and were longest when the differential reinforcer rate most strongly favored left-key responses. The results were consistent with the conclusion that pacemaker rate is influenced by relative reinforcer rate. PMID:16812769

  12. Spiral-pacemaker interactions in a mathematical model of excitable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajahan, T. K.; Borek, Bartłomiej; Shrier, Alvin; Glass, Leon

    2013-02-01

    Interactions of a spiral wave with a pacemaker is studied in a mathematical model of two dimensional excitable medium. Faster pacemakers emitting target waves can abolish spirals by driving them to the border of the medium. Our study shows that a slower pacemaker can modify spiral wave behavior by changing the motion of the spiral core. We analyze the dynamics of the spiral wave near the spiral core and away from the core as a function of size and period of the pacemaker. The pacemaker can cause the spiral wave to drift towards it, and either speed up or slow down the reentrant activity. Furthermore, the drift induced by the pacemaker can result in irregular or quasiperiodic dynamics even at sites away from the pacemaker. These results highlight the influence of pacemakers on complex spiral wave dynamics.

  13. A common Shox2-Nkx2-5 antagonistic mechanism primes the pacemaker cell fate in the pulmonary vein myocardium and sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenduo; Wang, Jun; Song, Yingnan; Yu, Diankun; Sun, Cheng; Liu, Chao; Chen, Fading; Zhang, Yanding; Wang, Fen; Harvey, Richard P; Schrader, Laura; Martin, James F; Chen, YiPing

    2015-07-15

    In humans, atrial fibrillation is often triggered by ectopic pacemaking activity in the myocardium sleeves of the pulmonary vein (PV) and systemic venous return. The genetic programs that abnormally reinforce pacemaker properties at these sites and how this relates to normal sinoatrial node (SAN) development remain uncharacterized. It was noted previously that Nkx2-5, which is expressed in the PV myocardium and reinforces a chamber-like myocardial identity in the PV, is lacking in the SAN. Here we present evidence that in mice Shox2 antagonizes the transcriptional output of Nkx2-5 in the PV myocardium and in a functional Nkx2-5(+) domain within the SAN to determine cell fate. Shox2 deletion in the Nkx2-5(+) domain of the SAN caused sick sinus syndrome, associated with the loss of the pacemaker program. Explanted Shox2(+) cells from the embryonic PV myocardium exhibited pacemaker characteristics including node-like electrophysiological properties and the capability to pace surrounding Shox2(-) cells. Shox2 deletion led to Hcn4 ablation in the developing PV myocardium. Nkx2-5 hypomorphism rescued the requirement for Shox2 for the expression of genes essential for SAN development in Shox2 mutants. Similarly, the pacemaker-like phenotype induced in the PV myocardium in Nkx2-5 hypomorphs reverted back to a working myocardial phenotype when Shox2 was simultaneously deleted. A similar mechanism is also adopted in differentiated embryoid bodies. We found that Shox2 interacts with Nkx2-5 directly, and discovered a substantial genome-wide co-occupancy of Shox2, Nkx2-5 and Tbx5, further supporting a pivotal role for Shox2 in the core myogenic program orchestrating venous pole and pacemaker development.

  14. A common Shox2–Nkx2-5 antagonistic mechanism primes the pacemaker cell fate in the pulmonary vein myocardium and sinoatrial node

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenduo; Wang, Jun; Song, Yingnan; Yu, Diankun; Sun, Cheng; Liu, Chao; Chen, Fading; Zhang, Yanding; Wang, Fen; Harvey, Richard P.; Schrader, Laura; Martin, James F.; Chen, YiPing

    2015-01-01

    In humans, atrial fibrillation is often triggered by ectopic pacemaking activity in the myocardium sleeves of the pulmonary vein (PV) and systemic venous return. The genetic programs that abnormally reinforce pacemaker properties at these sites and how this relates to normal sinoatrial node (SAN) development remain uncharacterized. It was noted previously that Nkx2-5, which is expressed in the PV myocardium and reinforces a chamber-like myocardial identity in the PV, is lacking in the SAN. Here we present evidence that in mice Shox2 antagonizes the transcriptional output of Nkx2-5 in the PV myocardium and in a functional Nkx2-5+ domain within the SAN to determine cell fate. Shox2 deletion in the Nkx2-5+ domain of the SAN caused sick sinus syndrome, associated with the loss of the pacemaker program. Explanted Shox2+ cells from the embryonic PV myocardium exhibited pacemaker characteristics including node-like electrophysiological properties and the capability to pace surrounding Shox2− cells. Shox2 deletion led to Hcn4 ablation in the developing PV myocardium. Nkx2-5 hypomorphism rescued the requirement for Shox2 for the expression of genes essential for SAN development in Shox2 mutants. Similarly, the pacemaker-like phenotype induced in the PV myocardium in Nkx2-5 hypomorphs reverted back to a working myocardial phenotype when Shox2 was simultaneously deleted. A similar mechanism is also adopted in differentiated embryoid bodies. We found that Shox2 interacts with Nkx2-5 directly, and discovered a substantial genome-wide co-occupancy of Shox2, Nkx2-5 and Tbx5, further supporting a pivotal role for Shox2 in the core myogenic program orchestrating venous pole and pacemaker development. PMID:26138475

  15. The effect of a text message and telephone follow-up program on cardiac self-efficacy of patients with coronary artery disease: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Boroumand, Saba; Moeini, Mahin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac self-efficacy is an essential factor in persistence of healthy behaviors in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Today, telenursing methods have numerous applications in health care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of a text message and telephone follow-up program on cardiac self-efficacy of patients with CAD. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on 70 patients with CAD who were hospitalized in Shahid Chamran Hospital (Isfahan, Iran). The participants were randomly assigned to the experimental and control groups. Collection of data on cardiac self-efficacy was performed before, 3 months after, and 4 months after the beginning of the intervention using Cardiac Self-Efficacy Scale designed by Sullivan et al. During the 3 months of intervention, six messages were sent to the subjects each week and calls were made twice a week in the first month and once a week during the second and third months. The statistical analysis of data was performed using independent t-test, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U test, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Before the intervention, there was no significant difference between the mean scores of cardiac self-efficacy of the two groups. However, 3 months and 4 months after the beginning of the intervention, the mean score of cardiac self-efficacy in the experimental group was significantly higher than in the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The text message and telephone follow-up program is effective in promoting the cardiac self-efficacy of patients with CAD. PMID:27095991

  16. Surgical removal of infected pacemaker leads without cardiopulmonary bypass after failed extraction using the Excimer Laser Sheath Extraction System.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Chiho; Enomoto, Yoshiharu; Sato, Fujio; Kanemoto, Shinya; Matsushita, Shonosuke; Hiramatsu, Yuji; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sakakibara, Yuzuru

    2012-03-01

    With the growing number of cardiac pacemakers and internal cardioverter defibrillator implantations, problems with endocardial lead infection have been increasing. The newly developed Excimer Laser Sheath Lead Extraction System has been recognized as being highly useful for removing chronic infected leads. However, serious bleeding complications are a concern when this system is used. Here we report our experience with a 67-year-old man who was diagnosed with pacemaker endocarditis. Initially, lead removal was attempted using the Excimer Laser Sheath Extraction System, though this was abandoned because of severe adhesion of the leads and the junction of the supra vena cava (SVC) with the right atrium. Surgical removal of the leads was performed without using cardiopulmonary bypass and the leads were removed without any complications. During surgery, we found there was a silent perforation of the innominate vein brought about by the Excimer Laser Sheath System. Also, the junction of the SVC with the right atrium was thought to be an area potentially at high risk of perforation, because of a lack of surrounding tissue. It is our opinion that those who carry out procedures with the Excimer Laser Sheath System should understand the potential risk of perforation based on cardiac anatomy and should be prepared for lethal bleeding complications. Also, for emergent situations, we believe that close backup by a cardiovascular surgical team should be considered essential for performing the Excimer Laser Sheath Lead Extraction safely.

  17. Cardiac rehabilitation: a comprehensive program for the management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Mary; Genovese, Janet

    2007-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the major health problems found in the United States today. Medical and interventional therapies play an important role in the treatment of this chronic condition, but they create a huge economic burden on the health care system. Nonpharmacologic interventions need further exploration. This article reviews research that examined the relationship between exercise and heart failure. A variety of exercise modalities measured outcomes of functional capacity and quality of life in both supervised and nonsupervised settings. Many investigators found exercise training to be safe and to confer benefits, especially on functional capacity, quality of life, and survival. The most favorable outcomes were observed in supervised settings. Cardiac rehabilitation provides an ideal environment for safe exercise and management of the health care needs of patients with heart failure. The multidisciplinary staff is adept at providing a paced approach to activity based on individualized exercise prescriptions, education, and management of this population's many comorbidities. PMID:17541318

  18. [{sup 13}N] Ammonia Cardiac Program At West Virginia University Health Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Armbruster, John M.

    2011-06-01

    Due to the shortage of the more traditional cardiac imagining isotopes, specifically, Technicium-99, the Cardiologists at WVU have had to look to alternative imagining techniques such as PET. This has led to a dramatic increase in the use of [{sup 13}N] Ammonia PET scans at the Health Sciences Center. The patient load has gone from one to two patients one day a week to typically two to three patients, two days a week, with occasional add-on in-house patients; each patient typically requiring two target irradiations. In this paper, we will discuss the process that is being used to meet this increased demand from the production of the isotope through the final result.

  19. Positional convulsant syncope in a pacemaker patient following insulation break of the right ventricular lead

    PubMed Central

    Ben Lassoued, Mehdi; Baatour, Makram; Haggui, Abdeddayem; Lamine, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the advances made in the technology of pacemakers which resulted in a decrease in the incidence of pacemaker lead fracture, the latter remains a potential complication of implanted pacemakers manufactured in the early days. In this report, we present a case of fracture of the unipolar electrode diagnosed by an emergency physician in a patient on a pacemaker for 10 years who presented to the emergency department with positional convulsant syncopes. PMID:24827652

  20. Technology utilization program report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The application of aerospace technology to the solution of public health and industrial problems is reported. Data cover: (1) development of an externally rechargeable cardiac pacemaker, (2) utilization of ferrofluids-colloidal suspensions of ferrite particles - in the efficient separation of nonferrous metals as Ni, Zn, Cu, and Al from shredded automobile scrap, and (3) development of a breathing system for fire fighters.

  1. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coronary artery disease - cardiac rehab; Angina - cardiac rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab ... have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery ...

  2. [Migration of an epicardial pacemaker into the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Barabás, János Imre; Hüttl, Tivadar; Hartyánszky, István; Fazekas, Levente; Oláh, Zoltán; Zima, Endre; Paulovich, Erzsébet; Kőszegi, Andrea; Szabolcs, Zoltán

    2015-01-25

    Migration of a permanent pacemaker generator from their intramuscular pocket to the abdominal cavity is a less frequent, but potentially life-threatening complication. The authors present the case of a 69-year-old woman, who visited the emergency department of the clinic, with complains of non-specific abdominal symptoms. Her past medical history included a complete atrioventricular block diagnosed in 2009 during the mitral valve replacement and since then she had an epicardial permanent pacemaker; the pulse generator was placed into an intramuscular pouch created in the left subcostal region. Surprisingly, radiologic examinations showed that the generator migrated into the pouch of Douglas. Considering patient safety, first a new intracardiac pacemaker was implanted and then the migrated device was removed surgically. The patient was discharged on the seventh postoperative day.

  3. Surgical Management of the Patient with an Implanted Cardiac Device

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, John D.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Chen, Jonathan; Spotnitz, Henry M.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Edwards, Niloo

    1999-01-01

    Objective To identify the sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) that may alter the performance of implanted cardiac devices and develop strategies to minimize their effects on patient hemodynamic status. Summary Background Data Since the development of the sensing demand pacemaker, EMI in the clinical setting has concerned physicians treating patients with such devices. Implanted cardiovertor defibrillators (ICDs) and ventricular assist devices (VADs) can also be affected by EMI. Methods All known sources of interference to pacemakers, ICDs, and VADs were evaluated and preventative strategies were devised. Results All devices should be thoroughly evaluated before and after surgery to make sure that its function has not been permanently damaged or changed. If electrocautery is to be used, pacemakers should be placed in a triggered or asynchronous mode; ICDs should have arrhythmia detection suspended before surgery. If defibrillation is to be used, the current flow between the paddles should be kept as far away from and perpendicular to the lead system as possible. Both pacemakers and ICDs should be properly shielded if magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, or radiation therapy is to be used. The effect of EMI on VADs depends on the model. Magnetic resonance imaging adversely affects all VADs except the Abiomed VAD, and therefore its use should be avoided in this population of patients. Conclusions The patient with an implanted cardiac device can safely undergo surgery as long as certain precautions are taken. PMID:10561087

  4. Medium-Term Effectiveness of a Comprehensive Internet-Based and Patient-Specific Telerehabilitation Program With Text Messaging Support for Cardiac Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dominique; Coninx, Karin; Vandervoort, Pieter; Vandijck, Dominique; Hens, Niel; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline; Van Driessche, Niels; Dendale, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac telerehabilitation has been introduced as an adjunct or alternative to conventional center-based cardiac rehabilitation to increase its long-term effectiveness. However, before large-scale implementation and reimbursement in current health care systems is possible, well-designed studies on the effectiveness of this new additional treatment strategy are needed. Objective The aim of this trial was to assess the medium-term effectiveness of an Internet-based, comprehensive, and patient-tailored telerehabilitation program with short message service (SMS) texting support for cardiac patients. Methods This multicenter randomized controlled trial consisted of 140 cardiac rehabilitation patients randomized (1:1) to a 24-week telerehabilitation program in combination with conventional cardiac rehabilitation (intervention group; n=70) or to conventional cardiac rehabilitation alone (control group; n=70). In the telerehabilitation program, initiated 6 weeks after the start of ambulatory rehabilitation, patients were stimulated to increase physical activity levels. Based on registered activity data, they received semiautomatic telecoaching via email and SMS text message encouraging them to gradually achieve predefined exercise training goals. Patient-specific dietary and/or smoking cessation advice was also provided as part of the telecoaching. The primary endpoint was peak aerobic capacity (VO2 peak). Secondary endpoints included accelerometer-recorded daily step counts, self-assessed physical activities by International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and health-related quality of life (HRQL) assessed by the HeartQol questionnaire at baseline and at 6 and 24 weeks. Results Mean VO2 peak increased significantly in intervention group patients (n=69) from baseline (mean 22.46, SD 0.78 mL/[min*kg]) to 24 weeks (mean 24.46, SD 1.00 mL/[min*kg], P<.01) versus control group patients (n=70), who did not change significantly (baseline: mean 22.72, SD 0.74 m

  5. Experimental evidence of a chaotic region in a neural pacemaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hua-Guang; Jia, Bing; Chen, Guan-Rong

    2013-03-01

    In this Letter, we report the finding of period-adding scenarios with chaos in firing patterns, observed in biological experiments on a neural pacemaker, with fixed extra-cellular potassium concentration at different levels and taken extra-cellular calcium concentration as the bifurcation parameter. The experimental bifurcations in the two-dimensional parameter space demonstrate the existence of a chaotic region interwoven with the periodic region thereby forming a period-adding sequence with chaos. The behavior of the pacemaker in this region is qualitatively similar to that of the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model in a well-known comb-shaped chaotic region in two-dimensional parameter spaces.

  6. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    PubMed

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly. PMID:1493823

  7. Measurement of functional capacity requirements of police officers to aid in development of an occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training program.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jenny; Schneider, Jonna; Hubbard, Matthew; McCullough-Shock, Tiffany; Cheng, Dunlei; Simms, Kay; Hartman, Julie; Hinton, Paul; Strauss, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the functional capacity of healthy subjects during strenuous simulated police tasks, with the goal of developing occupation-specific training for cardiac rehabilitation of police officers. A calibrated metabolic instrument and an oxygen consumption data collection mask were used to measure the oxygen consumption and heart rates of 30 Dallas Police Academy officers and cadets as they completed an 8-event obstacle course that simulated chasing, subduing, and handcuffing a suspect. Standard target heart rates (85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate, or 0.85 x [220 - age]) and metabolic equivalents (METs) were calculated; a matched-sample t test based on differences between target and achieved heart rate and MET level was used for statistical analysis. Peak heart rates during the obstacle course simulation were significantly higher than the standard target heart rates (those at which treadmill stress tests in physicians' offices are typically stopped) (t(29) = 12.81, P < 0.001) and significantly higher than the suggested maximum of 150 beats/min during cardiac rehabilitation training (t(29) = 17.84, P < 0.001). Peak MET levels during the obstacle course simulation were also significantly higher than the goal level (8 METs) that patients typically achieve in a cardiac rehabilitation program (t(29) = 14.73, P < 0.001). We conclude that police work requires a functional capacity greater than that typically attained in traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs. Rehabilitation professionals should consider performing maximal stress tests and increasing the intensity of cardiac rehabilitation workouts to effectively train police officers who have had a cardiac event.

  8. Anomalies of cardiac venous drainage associated with abnormalities of cardiac conduction system.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D R; Hanratty, C G; Dixon, L J; Trimble, M; O'Keeffe, D B

    2002-07-01

    The embryological development of the superior vena cava (SVC) is complex. If the left common cardinal vein fails to occlude it can, along with the left duct of Cuvier form a left SVC, which frequently drains into the coronary sinus. This may result in abnormalities in the anatomy of this structure. A persistent left SVC occurs in 0.5% of the normal population, and 3% to 4.3% of patients with congenital heart anomalies. The pacemaking tissue of the heart is derived from two sites near the progenitors of the superior vena cava. The right-sided site forms the sinoatrial node, the left-sided site is normally carried down to an area near the coronary sinus. Out of 300 patients with cardiac rhythm abnormalities, who have undergone electrophysiological studies (EPS), or permanent pacemaker insertion (PPI), we identified 12 patients with cardiac conduction abnormalities and anomalies of venous drainage. Anomalies of the coronary sinus may be associated with abnormalities of the conduction system of the heart. This may be due to the close proximity of the coronary sinus to the final position of the left-sided primitive pacemaking tissue. In our series of 300 patients, 4% had an associated left SVC, a similar incidence to that found in previous studies of congenital heart disease.

  9. Can course format influence the performance of students in an advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) program?

    PubMed

    Garrido, F D; Romano, M M D; Schmidt, A; Pazin-Filho, A

    2011-01-01

    Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) is a problem-based course that employs simulation techniques to teach the standard management techniques of cardiovascular emergencies. Its structure is periodically revised according to new versions of the American Heart Association guidelines. Since it was introduced in Brazil in 1996, the ACLS has been through two conceptual and structural changes. Detailed documented reports on the effect of these changes on student performance are limited. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of conceptual and structural changes of the course on student ACLS performance at a Brazilian training center. This was a retrospective study of 3266 students divided into two groups according to the teaching model: Model 1 (N = 1181; 1999-2003) and Model 2 (N = 2085; 2003-2007). Model 2 increased practical skill activities to 75% of the total versus 60% in Model 1. Furthermore, the teaching material provided to the students before the course was more objective than that used for Model 1. Scores greater than 85% in the theoretical evaluation and approval in the evaluation of practice by the instructor were considered to be a positive outcome. Multiple logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders (specialty, residency, study time, opportunity to enhance practical skills during the course and location where the course was given). Compared to Model 1, Model 2 presented odds ratios (OR) indicating better performance in the theoretical (OR = 1.34; 95%CI = 1.10-1.64), practical (OR = 1.19; 95%CI = 0.90-1.57), and combined (OR = 1.38; 95%CI = 1.13-1.68) outcomes. Increasing the time devoted to practical skills did not improve the performance of ACLS students.

  10. [Practical questions around individual with a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator].

    PubMed

    Manaouil, Cécile; Fantoni, Sophie; Montpellier, Dominique; Tordjman, Eric; Jarde, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    An individual with a pacemaker can ask his GP for information about potential problems associated with the device. Should a pacemaker continue to be used by end-of-life patients? Should a pacemaker be stopped in a limited care situation? What precautions should be taken when treating a patient with a pacemaker? Pacemakers and implantable defibrillators are sensitive to electromagnetic interference (EMI). Medically, MRIs are theoretically contraindicated, even though examinations could be performed without a major problem, and special precautions should be taken when using an electrosurgical cutter or radiotherapy. In case of death, a doctor or embalmer must remove the patient's pacemaker due to its risk of explosion during cremation. Doctors who sign cremation forms have a legal obligation to provide such information. It may affect an employee's ability to work. Are there some professions that are not well suited for individuals with a pacemaker? PMID:22138293

  11. Pacemaker lead infection: echocardiographic features, management, and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Victor, F; De Place, C; Camus, C; Le Breton, H; Leclercq, C; Pavin, D; Mabo, P; Daubert, C

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To compare transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE, TOE) in patients with permanent pacemaker lead infection and to evaluate the safety of medical extraction in cases of large vegetations.
Methods—TTE and TOE were performed in 23 patients with definite pacemaker lead infection. Seventeen patients without previous infection served as a TOE reference for non-infected leads.
Results—TTE was positive in seven cases (30%) whereas with TOE three different types of vegetations attached to the leads were visualised in 21 of the 23 cases (91%). Of the 20 patients with vegetations and lead culture, 17 (85%) had bacteriologically active infection. Left sided valvar endocarditis was diagnosed in two patients. In the control group, strands were visualised by TOE in five patients, and vegetations in none. Medical extraction of vegetations ⩾ 10 mm was performed in 12 patients and was successful in nine (75%) without clinical pulmonary embolism. After 31.2 (19.1) months of follow up (mean (SD)), all patients except one were cured of infection; three died from other causes.
Conclusions—Combined with bacteriological data, vegetations seen on TOE strongly suggest pacemaker lead infection. Normal TTE examinations do not exclude this diagnosis because of its poor sensitivity. Medical extraction of even large vegetations appeared to be safe.

 Keywords: pacemaker lead infection;  transoesophageal echocardiography PMID:10220550

  12. Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Somali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Marcapasos y desfibrilador implantable Ukrainian (Українська) Pacemaker Електрокардіостимулятор - Українська ( ...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710 Section 870.3710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720...

  17. Factors defining a pacemaker region for synchrony in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wittner, Lucia; Miles, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Synchronous activities of neuronal populations are often initiated in a pacemaker region and spread to recruit other regions. Here we examine factors that define a pacemaker site. The CA3a region acts as the pacemaker for disinhibition induced synchrony in guinea pig hippocampal slices and CA3b is a follower region. We found CA3a pyramidal cells were more excitable and fired in bursts more frequently than CA3b cells. CA3a cells had more complex dendritic arbors than CA3b cells especially in zones targetted by recurrent synapses. The product of the density of pyramidal cell axon terminals and dendritic lengths in innervated zones predicted a higher recurrent synaptic connectivity in the CA3a than in the CA3b region. We show that some CA3a cells but few CA3b cells behave as pacemaker cells by firing early during population events and by recruiting follower cells to fire. With a greater excitability and enhanced synaptic connectivity these CA3a cells may also possess initiating functions for other hippocampal ensemble activities initiated in this region. PMID:17823211

  18. [Telemedicine in pacemaker therapy and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Schuchert, A

    2009-12-01

    Present-day remote systems for cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) provide, in contrast to previous solutions, a broad range of data about the patient and the implanted device ("remote control"). Telemedicine includes remote monitoring as well as remote follow-up: Remote monitoring is the continual interrogation of the device to detect patient- or device-related adverse events earlier than with standard follow-up visits. Remote follow-up aims to replace scheduled and unscheduled face-to-face follow-up visits due to the interrogation of the automatic pacemaker functions. Currently available remote systems, such as Home Monitoring, CareLink, Merlin.net, and Latitude, have in common that they interrogate the device, send these data to a server, and provide the data to the physician on a secured web site. Automatic wireless interrogation of the device is the preferred solution; however, the devices must have been equipped with a micro-antenna, which is usually restricted to more recent pacemaker models. Knowledge about remote control in pacemaker patients is limited, because most remote applications were evaluated in ICD and CRT patients. While the most frequently reported clinical event in pacemaker patients is atrial fibrillation, the impact in routine clinical follow-up still has to be evaluated in detail. Device-related adverse events are rare. Large, long-term, randomized trials are comparing remote and conventional approaches with the aim of demonstrating the benefits of telemedicine in this patient group.

  19. Measurement of functional capacity requirements to aid in development of an occupation-specific rehabilitation training program to help firefighters with cardiac disease safely return to work.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jenny; Roberts, Joanne; Simms, Kay; Cheng, Dunlei; Hartman, Julie; Bartlett, Charles

    2009-03-15

    We designed a study to measure the functional capacity requirements of firefighters to aid in the development of an occupation-specific training program in cardiac rehabilitation; 23 healthy male firefighters with no history of heart disease completed a fire and rescue obstacle course that simulated 7 common firefighting tasks. They wore complete personal protective equipment and portable metabolic instruments that included a data collection mask. We monitored each subject's oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and working heart rate, then calculated age-predicted maximum heart rates (220 - age) and training target heart rates (85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate). During performance of the obstacle course, the subjects' mean working heart rates and peak heart rates were higher than the calculated training target heart rates (t(22) = 5.69 [working vs target, p <0.001] and t(22) = 15.14 [peak vs target, p <0.001]). These findings, with mean results for peak VO(2) (3,447 ml/min) and metabolic equivalents (11.9 METs), show that our subjects' functional capacity greatly exceeded that typically attained by patients in traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs (5 to 8 METs). In conclusion, our results indicate the need for intense, occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training that will help firefighters safely return to work after a cardiac event.

  20. Exercise Programming for Cardiacs--A New Direction for Physical Therapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutin, Bernard

    This speech begins with the presentation of a conceptual scheme of the physical working capacity of a person starting a training program. The scheme shows that after exercise, when recovery begins and sufficient time elapses, the individual recovers and adapts to a level of physical working capacity which is higher than his starting level. From…

  1. Flexibility and Strength Measures in Children Participating in a Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Barbara M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A 12-week structured rehabilitation program featuring warm-up exercises, increased aerobic exercise, cool down, and home-based continuation of exercise helped 12 children with surgically corrected congenital heart disease improve lower extremity strength and flexibility. (Author/CB)

  2. [Cardiac resynchronization through a persistent left superior vena cava].

    PubMed

    Moriña-Vázquez, P; Barba-Pichardo, R; Venegas Gamero, J; Herrera Carranza, M

    2006-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy is effective in the treatment of patients with severe heart failure and intraventricular dysynchrony. However, we are sometimes faced with the unexpected presence of a persistent left superior vena cava. We report the case of a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular dysynchrony in which we implanted a resynchronization pacemaker exclusively through a persistent left superior vena cava that did not communicate with the right vena cava. PMID:17194405

  3. Are Electronic Cardiac Devices Still Evolving?

    PubMed Central

    Mabo, P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The goal of this paper is to review some important issues occurring during the past year in Implantable devices. Methods First cardiac implantable device was proposed to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because the heart’s natural pacemaker is not fast enough, or there is a block in the heart’s electrical conduction system. During the last forty years, pacemakers have evolved considerably and become programmable and allow to configure specific patient optimum pacing modes. Various technological aspects (electrodes, connectors, algorithms diagnosis, therapies, …) have been progressed and cardiac implants address several clinical applications: management of arrhythmias, cardioversion / defibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy. Results Observed progress was the miniaturization of device, increased longevity, coupled with efficient pacing functions, multisite pacing modes, leadless pacing and also a better recognition of supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia’s in order to deliver appropriate therapy. Subcutaneous implant, new modes of stimulation (leadless implant or ultrasound lead), quadripolar lead and new sensor or new algorithm for the hemodynamic management are introduced and briefly described. Each times, the main result occurring during the two past years are underlined and repositioned from the history, remaining limitations are also addressed. Conclusion Some important technological improvements were described. Nevertheless, news trends for the future are also considered in a specific session such as the remote follow-up of the patient or the treatment of heart failure by neuromodulation. PMID:25123732

  4. [Future of implantable electrical cardiac devices].

    PubMed

    Daubert, Jean-Claude; Behaghel, Albin; Leclercq, Christophe; Mabo, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    Major improvements in implantable electrical cardiac devices have been made during the last two decades, notably with the advent of automatic internal defibrillation (ICD) to prevent sudden arrhythmic death, and cardiac resynchronisation (CRT) to treat the discoordinated failing heart. They now constitute a major therapeutic option and may eventually supersede drug therapy. The coming era will be marked by a technological revolution, with improvements in treatment delivery, safety and efficacy, and an expansion of clinical indications. Leadless technologyfor cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators is already in the pipeline, endovascular leads currently being responsible for most long-term complications (lead failure, infection, vein thrombosis, etc.). Miniaturized pacemakers based on nanotechnology can now be totally implanted inside the right ventricle through the transvenous route, thus eliminating leads, pockets and scarring In the same way, totally subcutaneous ICD systems are now available, although they are currently only capable of delivering shocks, without pacing (including antitachycardia pacing). In CRT optimised delivery is important to improve clinical responses and to reduce the non-response rate (around 30 % with current technology). Endocardial left ventricular pacing could be a solution if it can be achieved at an acceptable risk. Multisite ventricular pacing is an alternative. Besides CRT neuromodulation, especially by vagal stimulation, is another important field of device researchfor heart failure. Preliminary clinical results are encouraging. PMID:26427291

  5. The Acute Effects of Changes to AV Delay on Blood Pressure and Stroke Volume: Potential Implications for Design of Pacemaker Optimization Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Manisty, Charlotte H.; Al-Hussaini, Ali; Unsworth, Beth; Baruah, Resham; Pabari, Punam A.; Mayet, Jamil; Hughes, Alun D.; Whinnett, Zachary I.; Francis, Darrel P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Atrioventricular (AV) delay optimization of biventricular pacemakers (cardiac resynchronization therapy, CRT) may maximise hemodynamic benefit, but consumes specialist time to conduct echocardiographically. Non-invasive blood pressure monitoring is a potentially-automatable alternative, but it is unknown whether it gives the same information, and similar precision (signal-to-noise ratio). Moreover, the immediate blood pressure increment on optimization has been reported to decay away: it is unclear whether this is the result of an (undesirable) fall in stroke volume or a (desirable) compensatory relief of peripheral vasoconstriction. Methods and Results To discriminate between these alternative mechanisms, we measured simultaneous beat-to-beat stroke volume (flow) using Doppler echocardiography, and blood pressure (BP) using finger photoplethysmography, during and after atrioventricular delay changes from 40 to 120 ms in 19 subjects with cardiac pacemakers. BP and stroke volume both increased immediately (p<0.001, within one heartbeat). BP showed a clear decline a few seconds later (average rate −0.65mmHg/beat, r=0.95 [95% CI 0.86 to 0.98]); in contrast, stroke volume did not decline (p=0.87). The immediate BP increment correlated strongly with the stroke volume increment (r=0.74, p<0.001). Signal-to-noise ratio was threefold better for BP than stroke volume (6.8±3.5 versus 2.3±1.4, p<0.001). Conclusions Improving atrioventricular delay immediately increases blood pressure, but the effect begins to decay within a few seconds. Reassuringly this is due to compensatory vasodilatation rather than reduction in cardiac function. Pacemaker optimization will never be reliable unless there is adequate signal-to-noise ratio. Using BP rather than Doppler minimises noise. The early phase – before vascular compensation – has the richest signal lode. PMID:22095639

  6. Biomechanics of Early Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Goenezen, Sevan; Rennie, Monique Y.

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanics affect early cardiac development, from looping to the development of chambers and valves. Hemodynamic forces are essential for proper cardiac development, and their disruption leads to congenital heart defects. A wealth of information already exists on early cardiac adaptations to hemodynamic loading, and new technologies, including high resolution imaging modalities and computational modeling, are enabling a more thorough understanding of relationships between hemodynamics and cardiac development. Imaging and modeling approaches, used in combination with biological data on cell behavior and adaptation, are paving the road for new discoveries on links between biomechanics and biology and their effect on cardiac development and fetal programming. PMID:22760547

  7. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Methods/Design The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n = 540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients’ self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. Discussion This

  8. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  9. Evaluation of a standardized patient education program for inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: impact on illness knowledge and self-management behaviors up to 1 year.

    PubMed

    Meng, Karin; Seekatz, Bettina; Haug, Günter; Mosler, Gabriele; Schwaab, Bernhard; Worringen, Ulrike; Faller, Hermann

    2014-04-01

    Patient education is an essential part of the treatment of coronary heart disease in cardiac rehabilitation. In Germany, no standardized and evaluated patient education programs for coronary heart disease have been available so far. In this article, we report the evaluation of a patient-oriented program. A multicenter quasi-experimental, sequential cohort design study of patients with coronary heart disease (n = 434) in inpatient cardiac rehabilitation was conducted. Intervention patients received the new patient-oriented program, control patients a traditional lecture-based program (usual care). Primary outcome illness knowledge and secondary behavioral and health outcomes were assessed at admission, discharge and 6- and 12-months follow-up. We found a significant, small between-group intervention effect in both patients' medical illness and treatment knowledge and behavior change knowledge at discharge (medical: η(2) = 0.013; behavior change: η(2) = 0.011) and after 12 months (medical: η(2) = 0.015). Furthermore, a significant, small effect was observed for physical activity after 12 months (η(2) = 0.011), but no effects on healthy diet and medication adherence emerged. Superiority of the patient-oriented educational program for patients with coronary heart disease was partially confirmed. The program produced improved illness knowledge and physical activity compared with usual care after 1 year.

  10. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  11. Transient apical dyskinesia with a pacemaker: Electrocardiographic features.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Feltes, Gisela I; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Biagioni, Corina; De Agustín, J Alberto; Vivas, David; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Transient apical dyskinesia syndromes present features similar to acute coronary syndromes, but with normal coronary arteries and rapid complete resolution of wall motion alterations. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital because of typical chest pain at rest after her brother's death. She had had a pacemaker implanted in 2001. Troponin levels were elevated and apical hypokinesia was shown by ventriculography and echocardiography, with normal coronary arteries. Evolving ECG alterations were observed in spite of the continued pacing rhythm. All these alterations were fully resolved after discharge. This case shows that, even in the presence of a pacemaker, evolving ECG alterations can be observed in Takotsubo syndrome.

  12. Transient apical dyskinesia with a pacemaker: Electrocardiographic features.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Feltes, Gisela I; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Biagioni, Corina; De Agustín, J Alberto; Vivas, David; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Transient apical dyskinesia syndromes present features similar to acute coronary syndromes, but with normal coronary arteries and rapid complete resolution of wall motion alterations. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital because of typical chest pain at rest after her brother's death. She had had a pacemaker implanted in 2001. Troponin levels were elevated and apical hypokinesia was shown by ventriculography and echocardiography, with normal coronary arteries. Evolving ECG alterations were observed in spite of the continued pacing rhythm. All these alterations were fully resolved after discharge. This case shows that, even in the presence of a pacemaker, evolving ECG alterations can be observed in Takotsubo syndrome. PMID:25840647

  13. [Representations, myths, and behaviors among Chagas disease patients with pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Magnani, Claudia; Oliveira, Bruna Guimarães; Gontijo, Eliane Dias

    2007-07-01

    This anthropological study aimed to evaluate the incorporation of pacemakers into the lives of individuals with Chagas disease. An ethnographic methodology was used, based on an open interview focusing on the personal perceptions of 15 patients with chronic Chagas cardiopathy who had required pacemaker implants at the Federal University Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. As part of a broader quality of life analysis, the study investigated the cultural, physical, and psychological resources used by patients to confront, explain, and accept the disease process, including mental representations on the cultural perception of the illness and definition of social relations. The study was intended to contribute to comprehensive patient care by health professionals, including psychosocial aspects. Decoded and integrated orientation in the cultural sphere assumes an important role in order to prevent disinformation from perpetuating the dissemination of popular myths as active elements in patient stigmatization. PMID:17572811

  14. Overdrive suppression of implanted pacemakers in patients with AV block.

    PubMed Central

    Grendahl, H; Miller, M; Kjekshus, J

    1978-01-01

    Patients being permanently paced for symptomatic AV block were studied by overdrive suppression of the QRS-inhibited pacemaker, in order to observe the underlying heart rhythm. The chest wall stimulation method was used. In complete AV block the escape rhythm recovery time proved highly reproducible on repeated testing on the same day, and in many patients remained so over months or years. Occasionally, a doubling of the escape rhythm recovery time was seen, suggesting initial exit block of the escape focus. Resetting of the escape rhythm usually followed an exponential curve until stabilisation after about 3 minutes. An early escape rhythm with a recovery time of less than 4 seconds was found on every occasion in 21 of 58 patients with complete AV block, and inconstantly in 23 more; in 14 it was never observed. Accidental pacing failure was seen in 15 patients. The overdrive suppression test was helpful in selecting pacemaker dependent patients. PMID:637960

  15. Endocarditis related to transvenous pacemakers. Syndromes and surgical implications.

    PubMed

    Bryan, C S; Sutton, J P; Saunders, D E; Longaker, D W; Smith, C W

    1978-05-01

    Two cases of microbial endocarditis related to transvenous pacemakers illustrate syndromes whose pathogenesis we consider to be distinctive. Acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa endocarditis related to a pacemaker developed in a 75-year-old man, an event which to our knowledge has not been previously described. There was no evidence of generator site infection, and the sequence of events indicated metastatic implantation of bacteria on traumatized endothelium. A 76-year-old women with a 3 year history of local generator site infection and recurrent fever was found to have extensive vegatative Staphylococcus epidermidis endocarditis at cardiotomy. The sequence of events indicated gradual spread of infection locally, related to the contaminated foreign body. Awareness of these separate pathogenetic mechanisms should facilitate recognition and appropriate management. Removal of the entire pacing system and prolonged antibiotic therapy were considered to be essential to cure of infection in both instances. PMID:417221

  16. Development of the cardiac conduction system in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Poon, Kar-Lai; Liebling, Michael; Kondrychyn, Igor; Brand, Thomas; Korzh, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    The cardiac conduction system (CCS) propagates and coordinates the electrical excitation that originates from the pacemaker cells, throughout the heart, resulting in rhythmic heartbeat. Its defects result in life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Understanding of the factors involved in the formation and function of the CCS remains incomplete. By transposon assisted transgenesis, we have developed enhancer trap (ET) lines of zebrafish that express fluorescent protein in the pacemaker cells at the sino-atrial node (SAN) and the atrio-ventricular region (AVR), termed CCS transgenics. This expression pattern begins at the stage when the heart undergoes looping morphogenesis at 36 h post fertilization (hpf) and is maintained into adulthood. Using the CCS transgenics, we investigated the effects of perturbation of cardiac function, as simulated by either the absence of endothelium or hemodynamic stimulation, on the cardiac conduction cells, which resulted in abnormal compaction of the SAN. To uncover the identity of the gene represented by the EGFP expression in the CCS transgenics, we mapped the transposon integration sites on the zebrafish genome to positions in close proximity to the gene encoding fibroblast growth homologous factor 2a (fhf2a). Fhf2a is represented by three transcripts, one of which is expressed in the developing heart. These transgenics are useful tools for studies of development of the CCS and cardiac disease. PMID:27593944

  17. Un Corazón Saludable: factors influencing outcomes of an exercise program designed to impact cardiac and metabolic risks among urban Latinas.

    PubMed

    Harralson, Tina L; Emig, Julie Cousler; Polansky, Marcia; Walker, Renee E; Cruz, Joanna Otero; Garcia-Leeds, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    A high prevalence of physical inactivity, metabolic risk factors, and depression place Latinas in peril of developing cardiovascular disease. "Un Corazón Saludable: A Healthy Heart" was developed to engage urban Latinas in physical activity and increase awareness of cardiac and metabolic risk factors. Two hundred and twenty-five Latinas enrolled in the program that included salsa aerobics and culturally sensitive health education modules. Cardiac and metabolic risk factors measured in this study were body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, abdominal obesity, and blood pressure. Psychosocial risk factors measured included depressive symptoms and perceived social support. Fifty-two percent of the enrollees completed the program. Results indicated decreases in BMI, abdominal obesity, and symptoms of depression among Latinas who completed the program. Those who did not complete the program were younger, had greater depressive symptomatology, reported poorer social support, and they tended to be caregivers and U.S. born. Focus groups of program participants ascertained that caregiving and family obligations were major barriers to exercise while social support was a major facilitator of exercise. This research indicates that programs developed to recognize and address cultural barriers can impact physical and psychosocial risk factors among urban Latinas who are able to attend. Program retention may improve if future exercise programs conducted through community-base organizations offered support to Latinas regarding issues that interfere with self-care and health promotion. Future programs should consider including mental health and social service case management as part of comprehensive exercise/educational programs.

  18. Physiological effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanahan, T. L.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physiology of the human circadian pacemaker and its influence and on the daily organization of sleep, endocrine and behavioral processes is an emerging interest in science and medicine. Understanding the development, organization and fundamental properties underlying the circadian timing system may provide insight for the application of circadian principles to the practice of clinical medicine, both diagnostically (interpretation of certain clinical tests are dependent on time of day) and therapeutically (certain pharmacological responses vary with the time of day). The light-dark cycle is the most powerful external influence acting upon the human circadian pacemaker. It has been shown that timed exposure to light can both synchronize and reset the phase of the circadian pacemaker in a predictable manner. The emergence of detectable circadian rhythmicity in the neonatal period is under investigation (as described elsewhere in this issue). Therefore, the pattern of light exposure provided in the neonatal intensive care setting has implications. One recent study identified differences in both amount of sleep time and weight gain in infants maintained in a neonatal intensive care environment that controlled the light-dark cycle. Unfortunately, neither circadian phase nor the time of day has been considered in most clinical investigations. Further studies with knowledge of principles characterizing the human circadian timing system, which governs a wide array of physiological processes, are required to integrate these findings with the practice of clinical medicine.

  19. Gold-coated pacemaker implantation for a patient with type IV allergy to titanium.

    PubMed

    Kypta, Alexander; Blessberger, Hermann; Lichtenauer, Michael; Lambert, Thomas; Kammler, Juergen; Steinwender, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was scheduled for pacemaker implantation for symptomatic sick-sinus-syndrome (SSS). He suffered from multiple drug-allergies and allergies to several metals like quicksilver and titanium. Gold-coated pacemaker generators and polyurethane leads are effective in avoiding allergic reactions to pacing system components. Therefore, we decided to implant a custom-made gold-coated DDDR-pacemaker generator and polyurethane leads. PMID:27479204

  20. A Permanent Epicardial Pacemaker Lead That Penetrated the Esophageal Wall 26 years After Implantation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shinya; Hashizume, Kenichi; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Hotoda, Kentaro; Shinozaki, Hiroharu

    2016-09-01

    We treated a patient in whom a permanent epicardial pacemaker lead penetrated the esophageal wall 26 years after the index pacemaker implantation. A 28-year-old man with loss of appetite and weight loss underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and was found to have a foreign body protruding into the esophagus. Computed tomography revealed an epicardial lead penetrating the esophageal wall. He had undergone pacemaker implantation with permanent epicardial leads when he was 2 years old. The lead was surgically removed. PMID:27549536

  1. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, G.S.; Calubiran, O.; Cunha, B.A. )

    1990-05-01

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan.

  2. Gold-coated pacemaker implantation for a patient with type IV allergy to titanium

    PubMed Central

    Kypta, Alexander; Blessberger, Hermann; Lichtenauer, Michael; Lambert, Thomas; Kammler, Juergen; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was scheduled for pacemaker implantation for symptomatic sick-sinus-syndrome (SSS). He suffered from multiple drug-allergies and allergies to several metals like quicksilver and titanium. Gold-coated pacemaker generators and polyurethane leads are effective in avoiding allergic reactions to pacing system components. Therefore, we decided to implant a custom-made gold-coated DDDR-pacemaker generator and polyurethane leads. PMID:27479204

  3. Individual-, Family-, Community-, and Policy-Level Impact of a School-Based Cardiovascular Risk Detection Screening Program for Children in Underserved, Rural Areas: The CARDIAC Project

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Lesley; Murphy, Emily; Lilly, Christa L.; Ritchie, Susan K.; Minor, Valerie; Neal, William A.

    2013-01-01

    The Coronary Artery Risk Detection In Appalachian Communities (CARDIAC) Project has screened more than 80,000 children (10–12 years) for cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors over the past 15 years. Simultaneous referral and intervention efforts have also contributed to the overall program impact. In this study, we examined evidence of programmatic impact in the past decade at the individual, family, community, and policy levels from child screening outcomes, referral rates, participation in subsequent services, and policies that embed the activities of the project as a significant element. Within this period of time, fifth-grade overweight and obesity rates were maintained at a time when rates elsewhere increased. 107 children were referred for additional screening and treatment for probable familial hypercholesterolemia (FH); 82 family members were subsequently screened in family-based screening efforts. 58 grants were distributed throughout the state for community-appropriate obesity intervention. A state wellness policy embedded CARDIAC as the method of assessment and national child cholesterol screening guidelines were impacted by CARDIAC findings. The sustainability and successful impact of this school-based program within a largely underserved, rural Appalachian state are also discussed. PMID:23840946

  4. Bifurcations in a nonlinear model of the baroreceptor-cardiac reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, H.; Herzel, H.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate the dynamic properties of a nonlinear model of the human cardio-baroreceptor control loop. As a new feature we use a phase effectiveness curve to describe the experimentally well-known phase dependency of the cardiac pacemaker's sensitivity to neural activity. We show that an increase of sympathetic time delays leads via a Hopf bifurcation to sustained heart rate oscillations. For increasing baroreflex sensitivity or for repetitive vagal stimulation we observe period-doubling, toroidal oscillations, chaos, and entrainment between the rhythms of the heart and the control loop. The bifurcations depend crucially on the involvement of the cardiac pacemaker's phase dependency. We compare the model output with experimental data from electrically stimulated anesthetized dogs and discuss possible implications for cardiac arrhythmias.

  5. The role of acute hyperinsulinemia in the development of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Drimba, László; Döbrönte, Róbert; Hegedüs, Csaba; Sári, Réka; Di, Yin; Németh, Joseph; Szilvássy, Zoltán; Peitl, Barna

    2013-05-01

    Patients with perturbed metabolic control are more prone to develop cardiac rhythm disturbances. The main purpose of the present preclinical study was to investigate the possible role of euglycemic hyperinsulinemia in development of cardiac arrhythmias. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemia was induced in conscious rabbits equipped with a right ventricular pacemaker electrode catheter by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp (HEGC) applying two different rates of insulin infusion (5 and 10 mIU/kg/min) and variable rate of glucose infusion to maintain euglycemia (5.5 ± 0.5 mmol/l). The effect of hyperinsulinemia on cardiac electrophysiological parameters was continuously monitored by means of 12-lead surface ECG recording. Arrhythmia incidence was determined by means of programmed electrical stimulation (PES). The possible role of adrenergic activation was investigated by determination of plasma catecholamine levels and intravenous administration of a beta adrenergic blocking agent, metoprolol. All of the measurements were performed during the steady-state period of HEGC and subsequent to metoprolol administration. Both 5 and 10 mIU/kg/min insulin infusion prolonged significantly QTend, QTc, and Tpeak-Tend intervals. The incidence of ventricular arrhythmias generated by PES was increased significantly by euglycemic hyperinsulinemia and exhibited linear relationship to plasma levels of insulin. No alteration on plasma catecholamine levels could be observed; however, metoprolol treatment restored the prolonged QTend, QTc, and Tpeak-Tend intervals and significantly reduced the hyperinsulinemia-induced increase of arrhythmia incidence. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemia can exert proarrhythmic effect presumably due to the enhancement of transmural dispersion of repolarization. Metoprolol treatment may be of benefit in hyperinsulinemia associated with increased incidence of cardiac arrhythmias.

  6. A self-tuning effect of membership functions in a fuzzy-logic-based cardiac pacing system.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, T; Sugiura, N; Kazui, T; Harada, Y

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a self-tuning method of membership functions in a fuzzy-logic-based cardiac pacing system and validates its feasibility in a double sensor system which has minute ventilation and oxygen saturation level as its guides for the rate regulation. Though the agreement between the pacing rates (fuzzy rates) calculated with three linguistic variables for each parameter and the target rates were not satisfactory, it was improved significantly by tuning the membership functions. Almost the same evaluated values with those obtained by using six linguistic variables for each parameter were obtained. Time required for the self-tuning process was about 40 s (386CPU, 20 MHz) which was fast enough for the system. The smaller number of linguistic labels results in a smaller number of rules, which is beneficial in implantable cardiac pacemakers with limited memory capacity. A fuzzy-logic-based cardiac pacing system is promising for the realization of custom-made cardiac pacemakers.

  7. Powering pacemakers from heartbeat vibrations using linear and nonlinear energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Karami, M.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric devices are introduced to continuously recharge the batteries of the pacemakers by converting the vibrations from the heartbeats to electrical energy. The power requirement of a pacemaker is very low. However, after few years, patients require another surgical operation just to replace their pacemaker battery. Linear low frequency and nonlinear mono-stable and bi-stable energy harvesters are designed according to the especial signature of heart vibrations. The proposed energy harvesters are robust to variation of heart rate and can meet the power requirement of pacemakers.

  8. TBX18 gene induces adipose-derived stem cells to differentiate into pacemaker-like cells in the myocardial microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Zhang, Ge-Ge; Wang, Teng; Wang, Xi; Tang, Yan-Hong; Huang, He; Barajas-Martinez, Hector; Hu, Dan; Huang, Cong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    T-box 18 (TBX18) plays a crucial role in the formation and development of the head of the sinoatrial node. The objective of this study was to induce adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to produce pacemaker-like cells by transfection with the TBX18 gene. A recombinant adenovirus vector carrying the human TBX18 gene was constructed to transfect ADSCs. The ADSCs transfected with TBX18 were considered the TBX18-ADSCs. The control group was the GFP-ADSCs. The transfected cells were co-cultured with neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVMs). The results showed that the mRNA expression of TBX18 in TBX18-ADSCs was significantly higher than in the control group after 48 h and 7 days. After 7 days of co-culturing with NRVMs, there was no significant difference in the expression of the myocardial marker cardiac troponin I (cTnI) between the two groups. RT-qPCR and western blot analysis showed that the expression of HCN4 was higher in the TBX18-ADSCs than in the GFP-ADSCs. The If current was detected using the whole cell patch clamp technique and was blocked by the specific blocker CsCl. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSCMs) showed approximately twice the current density compared with the ADSCs. Our study indicated that the TBX18 gene induces ADSCs to differentiate into pacemaker-like cells in the cardiac microenvironment. Although further experiments are required in order to assess safety and efficacy prior to implementation in clinical practice, this technique may provide new avenues for the clinical therapy of bradycardia. PMID:27632938

  9. "Subclinical" pacemaker syndrome: a randomised study of symptom free patients with ventricular demand (VVI) pacemakers upgraded to dual chamber devices.

    PubMed Central

    Sulke, N; Dritsas, A; Bostock, J; Wells, A; Morris, R; Sowton, E

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether symptom free patients with single chamber pacemakers benefit from dual chamber pacing. DESIGN--A randomised double blind crossover comparison of ventricular demand (VVI), dual chamber demand (DDI), and dual chamber universal (DDD) modes after upgrading from a VVI device. SETTING--Cardiology outpatient department. PATIENTS--Sixteen patients aged 41-84 years who were symptom free during VVI mode pacing for three or more years. INTERVENTION--Pacemaker upgrade during routine generator change. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Change in subjective (general health perception, symptoms) and objective (clinical assessment, treadmill exercise, and radiological and echocardiographic indices) results between pacing modes before and after upgrading. RESULTS--75% preferred DDD, 68% found VVI least acceptable with 12% expressing no preference. Perceived general well-being and exercise capacity (p less than 0.01) and treadmill times (p less than 0.05) were improved in DDD mode but VVI and DDI modes were similar. Clinical, echocardiographic, radiological, and electrophysiological indices confirmed the absence of overt pacemaker syndrome, although mitral and tricuspid regurgitation was greatest in VVI mode (p less than 0.01). CONCLUSIONS--Most patients who were satisfied with long term pacing in VVI mode benefited from upgrading to DDD mode pacing suggesting the existence of "subclinical" pacemaker syndrome in up to 75% of such patients. The DDI mode offered little subjective or objective benefit over VVI mode in this population and should be reserved for patients with paroxysmal atrial arrhythmias. VVI mode pacing should be used only for patients with very intermittent symptomatic bradycardia or atrial fibrillation with a good chronotropic response during exercise. PMID:1739528

  10. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the last in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the primary level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, spelling, printing, listening, planning and problem solving, social behavior,…

  11. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the second in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subjects areas on the primary grade level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, listening, planning, problem solving, social behavior, art, music, and…

  12. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the third in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the primary grade level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, spelling, printing, listening, planning, problem solving, social behavior,…

  13. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the first in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the kindergarten level: arithmetic concepts, number concepts, reading readiness, vocabulary, language, listening, social behavior,…

  14. Differences between Korea and Japan in Physician Decision Making Regarding Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung-Won; Rho, Robert W; Kim, Tae-Seok; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Shin, Woo-Seung; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Oh, Yong-Seog; Lee, Man Young; Zen, Eiwa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The number of permanent pacemakers (PPMs) implanted in patients in Japan and Korea differs significantly. We aimed to investigate the differences in decision making processes of implanting a PPM. Materials and Methods Our survey included 15 clinical case scenarios based on the 2008 AHA/ACC/HRS guidelines for device-based therapy of cardiac rhythm abnormalities (class unspecified). Members of the Korean and Japanese Societies of Cardiology were asked to rate each scenario according to a 5-point scale and to indicate their decisions for or against implantation. Results Eighty-nine Korean physicians and 192 Japanese physicians replied to the questionnaire. For the case scenarios in which there was a class I indication for PPM implantation, the decision to implant a PPM did not differ significantly between the two physician groups. However, the Japanese physicians were significantly more likely than the Korean physicians to choose implantation in class IIa scenarios (48% vs. 37%, p<0.001), class IIb scenarios (40% vs. 19%, p<0.001), and class III scenarios (36% vs. 18%, p<0.001). These results did not change when the cases were categorized based on disease entity, such as sinus node dysfunction and conduction abnormality. Conclusion Korean physicians are less likely than Japanese physicians to favor a PPM implantation when considering a variety of clinical case scenarios, which probably contributes to the relatively small number of PPMs implanted in patients in Korea as compared with those in Japan.

  15. Cardiac sarcoidosis mimicking right ventricular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Jun; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Shimoo, Kazutoshi; Katsume, Asako; Mani, Hiroki; Kobara, Miyuki; Shirayama, Takeshi; Azuma, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Masao

    2003-02-01

    A 59-year-old woman with skin sarcoidosis was admitted to hospital for assessment of complete atrioventricular block. Cross-sectional echocardiography showed that the apical free wall of the right ventricle was thin and dyskinetic with dilation of the right ventricle. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging revealed a normal distribution. Both gallium-67 and technetium-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy revealed no abnormal uptake in the myocardium. Right ventriculography showed chamber dilation and dyskinesis of the apical free wall, whereas left ventriculography showed normokinesis, mimicking right ventricular dysplasia. Cardiac sarcoidosis was diagnosed on examination of an endomyocardial biopsy specimen from the right ventricle. A permanent pacemaker was implanted to manage the complete atrioventricular block. After steroid treatment, electrocardiography showed first-degree atrioventricular block and echocardiography revealed an improvement in the right ventricular chamber dilation. Reports of cardiac sarcoidosis mimicking right ventricular dysplasia are extremely rare and as this case shows, right ventricular involvement may be one of its manifestations.

  16. A Comparative Survey of Pacemaker Implantation in Trinidad and Tobago in 2005 and 2009

    PubMed Central

    Henry, R; Dookie, T; Primus, E

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The indications for permanent pacemaker implantations in Trinidad have expanded from initially symptomatic bradycardia to now include complex devices. A retrospective review of the available data was conducted to better understand the evolving trends in device implantation in Trinidad and Tobago. Methods: Data were collated from the two major implanting teams in Trinidad for the years 2005 and 2009. The two implanting centres were the Advanced Cardiovascular Institute (ACI) at Westshore Medical Centre and the Catheterization Laboratory of the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex (EWMSC). Data were based on retrospective collation using the implantation records. Results: The implantation rate for new devices increased from 39 per million to 103 per million population. The most common indications for new device implants in 2009 were high degree atrioventricular (AV) block (53%) and sick sinus syndrome (22%), with the notable appearance of congestive cardiomyopathy (13%) which was not present in the earlier cohort. Of particular note, 23 high-end devices were implanted in 2009. These were five cardiac-resynchronization therapy (CRT-P) devices, 14 automatic implantable cardio-defibrillator (AICD) devices and four combined cardiac-resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) devices versus none in 2005. Conclusions: In summary, over the period 2005 to 2009, a substantial increase in device implantation rates has occurred which now include high-end complex devices. Absolute rates, however, remain far below that of developed countries, indicating that the true need remains underserved. Furthermore, adjustment for gross domestic product suggests that the relatively buoyant economy of Trinidad and Tobago is capable of servicing a greater proportion of this need than is currently met. PMID:26108119

  17. The Prevalence and Contents of Advance Directives in Patients With Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Pasalic, Dario; Tajouri, Tanya H.; Ottenberg, Abigale L.; Mueller, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the use of advance directives (ADs) in patients who have implantable cardiac pacemakers (PMs). Methods We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, who underwent implantation of a cardiac PM at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minnesota) during 2006 and 2007 and determined the prevalence and contents of ADs in these patients. Results During the study period, 205 residents of Olmsted County (men, 53%) underwent PM implantation (mean age [SD] at implantation, 77 [15] years). Overall, 120 patients (59%) had ADs. Of these, 63 ADs (53%) were executed more than 12 months before and 33 (28%) were executed after PM implantation. Many patients specifically mentioned life-prolonging treatments in their ADs: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 76 (63%); mechanical ventilation, 56 (47%); and hemodialysis, 31 (26%). Pain control was mentioned in 79 ADs (66%) and comfort measures were mentioned in 42 ADs (35%). Furthermore, the AD of many patients contained a general statement about end-of-life care (eg, no “heroic measures”). However, only 1 AD (1%) specifically addressed the end-of-life management of the PM. Conclusions More than half of the patients with PMs in our study had executed an AD, but only 1 patient specifically mentioned her PM in her AD. These results suggest that patients with PMs should be encouraged to execute ADs and, specifically address end-of-life device management in their ADs. Doing so may prevent end-of-life ethical dilemmas related to PM management. PMID:24215172

  18. Pacemaker implantation in a patient with brugada and sick sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Bundgaard, Henning; Jabbari, Reza; Haunsø, Stig; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2013-03-26

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare and inherited primary arrhythmic syndrome characterized by ST-segment elevations in the right precordial leads (V1-V3) with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Arrhythmias in BrS are often nocturne, and brady-arrhythmias are often seen in patients with loss-of-function mutations in SCN5A. In this case-report we present a 75-year old woman referred to our outpatient clinic for inherited cardiac diseases for a familial clinical work-up. Since childhood she had suffered from dizziness, absence seizures, and countless Syncope's. In 2004 sick sinus syndrome was suspected and she was treated with implantation of a pacemaker (PM) at another institution. An inherited cardiac disease was one day suddenly suspected, as the patient had a 61-year old brother who was diagnosed with symptomatic BrS, and treated with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) after aborted SCD. A mutation screening revealed a SCN5A [S231CfsX251 (c.692-693delCA)] loss-of-function mutation not previously reported, and as a part of the cascade screening in relatives she was therefore referred to our clinic. In the 7 year period after PM implantation she had experienced no cardiac symptoms, although her electrocardiogram changes now were consistent with a BrS type 1 pattern. A genetic test confirmed that she had the same mutation in SCN5A as her brother. In this case-report we present a loss-of function mutation in SCN5A not previously associated with BrS nor presented in healthy controls. Sinus node dysfunction has previously been documented in patients with symptomatic BrS, which suggests it is not a rare concomitant. The only accepted treatment of BrS is today implantation of an ICD. In the future studies should evaluate if PM in some cases of symptomatic BrS can be used instead of ICDs in patients with a loss-of-function SCN5A mutations.

  19. Exercise Rehabilitation for Chronic Heart Failure Patients with Cardiac Device Implants

    PubMed Central

    Haennel, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade a significant development in the management and rehabilitation of people with chronic heart failure (CHF) has been the utilization of cardiac devices. The use of biventricular pacemakers, referred to as Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) can yield improvements in functional abilities for a select group of CHF patients and the inclusion of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) may reduce the risk of sudden death. This review provides physical therapists with a basic understanding of how to prescribe exercise for people with CHF who have these device implants. PMID:22993499

  20. Inter-Association Task Force Recommendations on Emergency Preparedness and Management of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in High School and College Athletic Programs: A Consensus Statement

    PubMed Central

    Drezner, Jonathan A; Courson, Ron W; Roberts, William O; Mosesso, Vincent N; Link, Mark S; Maron, Barry J

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assist high school and college athletic programs prepare for and respond to a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). This consensus statement summarizes our current understanding of SCA in young athletes, defines the necessary elements for emergency preparedness, and establishes uniform treatment protocols for the management of SCA. Background: Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in young athletes. The increasing presence of and timely access to automated external defibrillators (AEDs) at sporting events provides a means of early defibrillation and the potential for effective secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. An Inter-Association Task Force was sponsored by the National Athletic Trainers' Association to develop consensus recommendations on emergency preparedness and management of SCA in athletes. Recommendations: Comprehensive emergency planning is needed for high school and college athletic programs to ensure an efficient and structured response to SCA. Essential elements of an emergency action plan include establishment of an effective communication system, training of anticipated responders in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and AED use, access to an AED for early defibrillation, acquisition of necessary emergency equipment, coordination and integration of on-site responder and AED programs with the local emergency medical services system, and practice and review of the response plan. Prompt recognition of SCA, early activation of the emergency medical services system, the presence of a trained rescuer to initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and access to early defibrillation are critical in the management of SCA. In any collapsed and unresponsive athlete, SCA should be suspected and an AED applied as soon as possible for rhythm analysis and defibrillation if indicated. PMID:17597956

  1. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  2. High-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a commercial pilot who, after percutaneous coronary intervention, wanted to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjay; Lawrence, Anne; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    After undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, a 64-year-old commercial pilot was referred to cardiac rehabilitation. His stated goals were to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program at a community workout facility and to resume working as a pilot. To help him meet those goals, we designed and implemented a regimen of high-intensity exercises, with quick transitions between a variety of tasks that are not typically included in cardiac rehabilitation programs (e.g., medicine ball throws, push-ups, dead lifts, squats, military presses, sprints, and lunges). The training was symptom limited, enabling the patient to reach extreme levels of physical exertion in a controlled, monitored setting. By studying his training data (heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion), we were able to give him specific recommendations for controlling his exercise intensity after graduating from our program. More than 18 months later, he continues to exercise vigorously 3 days per week and is working as a commercial pilot. PMID:26722183

  3. High-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a commercial pilot who, after percutaneous coronary intervention, wanted to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sanjay; Adams, Jenny; Lawrence, Anne; Schussler, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    After undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, a 64-year-old commercial pilot was referred to cardiac rehabilitation. His stated goals were to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program at a community workout facility and to resume working as a pilot. To help him meet those goals, we designed and implemented a regimen of high-intensity exercises, with quick transitions between a variety of tasks that are not typically included in cardiac rehabilitation programs (e.g., medicine ball throws, push-ups, dead lifts, squats, military presses, sprints, and lunges). The training was symptom limited, enabling the patient to reach extreme levels of physical exertion in a controlled, monitored setting. By studying his training data (heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion), we were able to give him specific recommendations for controlling his exercise intensity after graduating from our program. More than 18 months later, he continues to exercise vigorously 3 days per week and is working as a commercial pilot.

  4. Circadian Activators Are Expressed Days before They Initiate Clock Function in Late Pacemaker Neurons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianxin; Mahesh, Guruswamy; Houl, Jerry H; Hardin, Paul E

    2015-06-01

    Circadian pacemaker neurons in the Drosophila brain control daily rhythms in locomotor activity. These pacemaker neurons can be subdivided into early or late groups depending on whether rhythms in period (per) and timeless (tim) expression are initiated at the first instar (L1) larval stage or during metamorphosis, respectively. Because CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimers initiate circadian oscillator function by activating per and tim transcription, a Clk-GFP transgene was used to mark when late pacemaker neurons begin to develop. We were surprised to see that CLK-GFP was already expressed in four of five clusters of late pacemaker neurons during the third instar (L3) larval stage. CLK-GFP is only detected in postmitotic neurons from L3 larvae, suggesting that these four late pacemaker neuron clusters are formed before the L3 larval stage. A GFP-cyc transgene was used to show that CYC, like CLK, is also expressed exclusively in pacemaker neurons from L3 larval brains, demonstrating that CLK-CYC is not sufficient to activate per and tim in late pacemaker neurons at the L3 larval stage. These results suggest that most late pacemaker neurons develop days before novel factors activate circadian oscillator function during metamorphosis.

  5. A Novel Way Of Repair Of Insulation Breaks During Pacemaker Generator Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor Ali, Syed; Iqbal, Khurshid; Tramboo, Nisar A; Lone, Aijaz A; Kaul, Suresh; Kaul, Neelam; Hafiz, Imran

    2009-01-01

    Minor abrasions can occur while mobilising old lead during pacemaker generator replacement necesittating placement of additional lead adding to the financial burden and junk in heart. We describe a novel way of repair of old pacemaker lead preventing additional lead placement. PMID:19763196

  6. Migration of an abandoned pacemaker generator into the pouch of Douglas in a child with complex congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    May, Joseph W; Shmorhun, Daniel P

    2007-07-01

    A young girl with complex congenital heart disease underwent Fontan procedure and multiple pacemaker revisions, including abandonment of an intraabdominal pacemaker generator at age eight. She presented two years later with constipation and abdominal twitching. Radiographs, pacemaker interrogation, and laparoscopy confirmed dislocation of the abandoned generator and intraperitoneal migration into the pouch of Douglas. The device was removed surgically without incident.

  7. Studies of poly(ether)urethane pacemaker lead insulation oxidation.

    PubMed

    Thoma, R J; Phillips, R E

    1987-04-01

    Published reports suggest that silver ions may catalyze the oxidation of poly(ether)urethane soft-segments resulting in the failure of urethane insulations of specific models of pacemaker leads. Attempted oxidation of soft-segment models, poly(tetra-methylene ether)glycols, by silver nitrate has shown that metal-ion catalyzed oxidative-reduction (MICOR) does not adequately explain observed failures unless antioxidants are removed in process. Such cracking can, however, be explained in terms of a metal ion enhanced environmental stress cracking. PMID:3584162

  8. Multiple photoreceptor systems control the swim pacemaker activity in box jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Garm, A; Mori, S

    2009-12-01

    Like all other cnidarian medusae, box jellyfish propel themselves through the water by contracting their bell-shaped body in discrete swim pulses. These pulses are controlled by a swim pacemaker system situated in their sensory structures, the rhopalia. Each medusa has four rhopalia each with a similar set of six eyes of four morphologically different types. We have examined how each of the four eye types influences the swim pacemaker. Multiple photoreceptor systems, three of the four eye types, plus the rhopalial neuropil, affect the swim pacemaker. The lower lens eye inhibits the pacemaker when stimulated and provokes a strong increase in the pacemaker frequency upon light-off. The upper lens eye, the pit eyes and the rhopalial neuropil all have close to the opposite effect. When these responses are compared with all-eye stimulations it is seen that some advanced integration must take place. PMID:19946073

  9. Pacemaker-driven tachycardia induced by electrocardiograph monitoring in the recovery room.

    PubMed

    Hu, R; Cowie, D A

    2006-04-01

    Monitoring devices are known to induce tachycardia in minute-ventilation rate-responsive pacemakers. This is because some monitoring devices measure the same parameter as do the pacemakers (change in thoracic impedance). Hence, the biological signal to the pacemaker is increased and is misconstrued as increased minute ventilation causing tachycardia which resolves when the monitoring device is removed. Whilst this could occur for all minute-volume rate responsive pacemakers, most reported interactions have been with the Telectronics META series. We present a case of an interaction between a Telectronics Tempo DR pacemaker (St. Jude Medical) and an Agilent Patient Care System (Philips). Failure to recognise the true nature and cause of such tachycardias may lead to mismanagement of the patient, including the inappropriate use of cardio-active medications.

  10. Linear and nonlinear energy harvesters for powering pacemakers from heart beat vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, M. Amin; Inman, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    Linear and nonlinear piezoelectric devices are introduced to continuously recharge the batteries of the pacemakers by converting the vibrations from the heartbeats to electrical energy. The power requirement of the pacemakers is very low. At the same time, after about 10 years from the original implantation of the pacemakers, patients have to go through another surgical operation just to replace the batteries of their pacemakers. We investigate using vibration energy harvesters to significantly increase the battery life of the pace makers. The major source of vibrations in chest area is due to heartbeats. Linear low frequency and nonlinear mono-stable and bi-stable energy harvesters are designed according to especial signature of heart vibrations. The proposed energy harvesters are robust to variations of heart beat frequency and can meet the power requirement of the pacemakers.

  11. Cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shanewise, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a proven, accepted mode of therapy for selected patients with end-stage heart failure, but the inadequate number of suitable donor hearts available ultimately limits its application. This chapter reviews adult cardiac transplantation, with an emphasis on the anesthetic considerations of the heart transplant operation itself.

  12. The Autonomic Nervous System Regulates the Heart Rate through cAMP-PKA Dependent and Independent Coupled-Clock Pacemaker Cell Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Joachim; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Zhang, Jin; Yaniv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) generate spontaneous action potentials (APs) that control the cardiac rate. The brain modulates SANC automaticity, via the autonomic nervous system, by stimulating membrane receptors that activate (adrenergic) or inactivate (cholinergic) adenylyl cyclase (AC). However, these opposing afferents are not simply additive. We showed that activation of adrenergic signaling increases AC-cAMP/PKA signaling, which mediates the increase in the SANC AP firing rate (i.e., positive chronotropic modulation). However, there is a limited understanding of the underlying internal pacemaker mechanisms involved in the crosstalk between cholinergic receptors and the decrease in the SANC AP firing rate (i.e., negative chronotropic modulation). We hypothesize that changes in AC-cAMP/PKA activity are crucial for mediating either decrease or increase in the AP firing rate and that the change in rate is due to both internal and membrane mechanisms. In cultured adult rabbit pacemaker cells infected with an adenovirus expressing the FRET sensor AKAR3, PKA activity and AP firing rate were tightly linked in response to either adrenergic receptor stimulation (by isoproterenol, ISO) or cholinergic stimulation (by carbachol, CCh). To identify the main molecular targets that mediate between PKA signaling and pacemaker function, we developed a mechanistic computational model. The model includes a description of autonomic-nervous receptors, post- translation signaling cascades, membrane molecules, and internal pacemaker mechanisms. Yielding results similar to those of the experiments, the model simulations faithfully reproduce the changes in AP firing rate in response to CCh or ISO or a combination of both (i.e., accentuated antagonism). Eliminating AC-cAMP-PKA signaling abolished the core effect of autonomic receptor stimulation on the AP firing rate. Specifically, disabling the phospholamban modulation of the SERCA activity resulted in a significantly reduced effect

  13. Evaluation of the Genetic Basis of Familial Aggregation of Pacemaker Implantation by a Large Next Generation Sequencing Panel

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Hillel A.; Uradu, Andrea; Lynnes, Ty C.; Groh, William J.; Miller, John M.; Lin, Hai; Gao, Hongyu; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Yunlong; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Vatta, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Background The etiology of conduction disturbances necessitating permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation is often unknown, although familial aggregation of PPM (faPPM) suggests a possible genetic basis. We developed a pan-cardiovascular next generation sequencing (NGS) panel to genetically characterize a selected cohort of faPPM. Materials and Methods We designed and validated a custom NGS panel targeting the coding and splicing regions of 246 genes with involvement in cardiac pathogenicity. We enrolled 112 PPM patients and selected nine (8%) with faPPM to be analyzed by NGS. Results Our NGS panel covers 95% of the intended target with an average of 229x read depth at a minimum of 15-fold depth, reaching a SNP true positive rate of 98%. The faPPM patients presented with isolated cardiac conduction disease (ICCD) or sick sinus syndrome (SSS) without overt structural heart disease or identifiable secondary etiology. Three patients (33.3%) had heterozygous deleterious variants previously reported in autosomal dominant cardiac diseases including CCD: LDB3 (p.D117N) and TRPM4 (p.G844D) variants in patient 4; TRPM4 (p.G844D) and ABCC9 (p.V734I) variants in patient 6; and SCN5A (p.T220I) and APOB (p.R3527Q) variants in patient 7. Conclusion FaPPM occurred in 8% of our PPM clinic population. The employment of massive parallel sequencing for a large selected panel of cardiovascular genes identified a high percentage (33.3%) of the faPPM patients with deleterious variants previously reported in autosomal dominant cardiac diseases, suggesting that genetic variants may play a role in faPPM. PMID:26636822

  14. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  15. Mechanism of programmed cell death factor 4/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway in porcine coronary micro-embolization-induced cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiang; Wang, Jiangyou; Zhou, You; Liu, Yangchun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the programmed cell death factor 4 (PDCD4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in coronary micro-embolism (CME)-induced inflammatory responses and cardiac dysfunction in a porcine model. Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into four groups (n = 5 per group). Micro-embolization balls or saline were infused through a microcatheter in the left anterior descending (LAD) artery in the CME and Sham groups, respectively. PDCD4 siRNA or control siRNA mixed with transfection reagent was infused via the LAD artery 72 h before CME induction in the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 and siRNA-control groups, respectively. Cardiac function was evaluated with ultrasound. Tissue biopsy was stained with hematoxylin–eosin (HE) and hematoxylin basic fuchsin picric acid (HBFP) to measure infarction area. Myocardial PDCD4 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by quantitative PCR and Western blotting. NF-κB activity was evaluated in gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Echocardiographic parameters showed that compared with the sham group, the CME group had impaired heart function, manifested as systolic dysfunction and left ventricular dilatation (reduced left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], left ventricular fractional shortening [FS], and cardiac output [CO] [P < 0.05] and increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter [LVEDd] [P < 0.05]). Compared with the CME group, the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 group had attenuated CME-induced cardiac function damage (increased LVEF, FS and CO [P < 0.05] and reduced LVEDd [P < 0.05]). Compared with the sham group, the CME group had significantly increased PDCD4 and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression and increased NF-κB activity (P < 0.05). These effects were significantly inhibited in the CME + siRNA-PDCD4 group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, PDCD4/NF-κB signaling pathway activation is an important mechanism for CME

  16. The behavioral theory of timing: Reinforcer rate determines pacemaker rate.

    PubMed

    Bizo, L A; White, K G

    1994-01-01

    In the behavioral theory of timing, pulses from a hypothetical Poisson pacemaker produce transitions between states that are correlated with adjunctive behavior. The adjunctive behavior serves as a discriminative stimulus for temporal discriminations. The present experiments tested the assumption that the average interpulse time of the pacemaker is proportional to interreinforcer interval. Responses on a left key were reinforced at variable intervals for the first 25 s since the beginning of a 50-s trial, and right-key responses were reinforced at variable intervals during the second 25 s. Psychometric functions relating proportion of right-key responses to time since trial onset, in 5-s intervals across the 50-s trial, were sigmoidal in form. Average interpulse times derived by fitting quantitative predictions from the behavioral theory of timing to obtained psychometric functions decreased when the interreinforcer interval was decreased and increased when the interreinforcer interval was increased, as predicted by the theory. In a second experiment, average interpulse times estimated from trials without reinforcement followed global changes in interreinforcer interval, as predicted by the theory. Changes in temporal discrimination as a function of interreinforcer interval were therefore not influenced by the discrimination of reinforcer occurrence. The present data support the assumption of the behavioral theory of timing that interpulse time is determined by interreinforcer interval.

  17. X-ray effects on pacemaker type circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Blamires, N.G.; Myatt, J.

    1982-03-01

    Queries have been raised concerning the potential hazards of X-ray irradiation on patients using the new generation of heart pacemakers based on digital circuitry. The present study was undertaken to provide some answers to these queries. The work was conducted in two parts. First, a literature search was done and, second, circuits using current state of the art digital technology were irradiated with X-rays. Watch circuits were chosen because of their availability and built-in facilities by which their function could be tested. Doses up to 330 rads were administered to them using energies of 46, 114, and 141 KeV. The conclusion drawn from both parts of the study was that X-rays used for diagnostic purposes were unlikely to affect the performance of this type of circuit in any way. It was accepted that for therapeutic purposes doses far in excess of this are administered and circuit malfunctions are likely to occur. To assess the probability of a digital pacemaker malfunctioning, samples of that particular type would have to be irradiated at the relevant dose.

  18. DsRNA as a stimulator of cell pacemaker activity

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetyan, S.N.; Zakharyan, R.A.; Rychkov, G.E.; Dadalyan, S.S.; Bakunts, I.S.; Agabalyan, A.S.

    1986-03-01

    The authors study the action of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) on the characteristics of neuron pacemaker activity which permits prediction of the character of action of dsRNA on the pacemaker activity of cells and organs, and takes the investigators closer to an understanding of the membrane mechanisms underlying the action of dsRNA on the cell. The methods for isolating and fractionating dsRNA from yeasts and the intracellular recording of the electrical activity of the snail giant neuron have been described by the authors earlier. The authors determined the dependence of Ca/sup 2 +/ entry upon dsRNA concentration using the isotope /sup 45/Ca. Preweighed ganglia were incubated five each for an hour in 2 ml Ringer's solution containing dsRNA and 5 microliters /sup 45/CaCl/sub 2/ of 12.5 mCi activity. After incubation, the ganglia were rinsed three times for 8 min each time in normal Ringers solution. The washed ganglia were dissolved for one day in KOH. The amount of isotope entering was counted using Brav's scintillator and an RGT counter tuned to the /sup 45/Ca isotope. The physiological saline used for the isolated ganglion contained 85 mmole NaCl, 4 mmole KCl, 8 mmole CaCl/sub 2/, 10 mmole MgCl/sub 2/, 10 mmole Tris-HCl, and 5 mmole glucose.

  19. Phase shifting two coupled circadian pacemakers - Implications for jet lag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, P. H.; Kronauer, R. E.; Graeber, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Two Van der Pol oscillators with reciprocal linear velocity coupling are utilized to model the response of the human circadian timing system to abrupt displacements of the environmental time cues (zeitgebers). The core temperature rhythm and sleep-wake cycle simulated by the model are examined. The relationship between the masking of circadian rhythms by environmental variables and behavioral and physiological events and the rates of resynchronization is studied. The effects of zeitgeber phase shifts and zeitgeber strength on the resynchronization rates are analyzed. The influence of intrinsic pacemakers periods and coupling strength on resynchronization are investigated. The simulated data reveal that: resynchronization after a time zone shift depends on the magnitude of the shift; the time of day of the shift has little influence on resynchronization; the strength of zeitgebers affects the rate and direction of the resynchronization; the intrinsic pacemaker periods have a significant effect on resynchronization; and increasing the coupling between the oscillators results in an increase in the rate of resynchronization. The model data are compared to transmeridian flight studies data and similar resynchronization patterns are observed.

  20. Pacemaker dynamics in the full Morris-Lecar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Miranda, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    This article reports the finding of pacemaker dynamics in certain region of the parameter space of the three-dimensional version of the Morris-Lecar model for the voltage oscillations of a muscle cell. This means that the cell membrane potential displays sustained oscillations in the absence of an external electrical stimulation. The development of this dynamic behavior is shown to be tied to the strength of the leak current contained in the model. The approach followed is mostly based on the use of linear stability analysis and numerical continuation techniques. In this way it is shown that the oscillatory dynamics is associated to the existence of two Hopf bifurcations, one subcritical and other supercritical. Moreover, it is explained that in the region of parameter values most commonly studied for this model such pacemaker dynamics is not displayed because of the development of two fold bifurcations, with the increase of the strength of the leak current, whose interaction with the Hopf bifurcations destroys the oscillatory dynamics.

  1. MedlinePlus: Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... available Research Clinical Trials Journal Articles Resources Reference Desk Find an Expert For You Patient Handouts Summary Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or ...

  2. Nerves projecting from the intrinsic cardiac ganglia of the pulmonary veins modulate sinoatrial node pacemaker function

    PubMed Central

    Zarzoso, Manuel; Rysevaite, Kristina; Milstein, Michelle L.; Calvo, Conrado J.; Kean, Adam C.; Atienza, Felipe; Pauza, Dainius H.; Jalife, José; Noujaim, Sami F.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Pulmonary vein ganglia (PVG) are targets for atrial fibrillation ablation. However, the functional relevance of PVG to the normal heart rhythm remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate whether PVG can modulate sinoatrial node (SAN) function. Methods and results Forty-nine C57BL and seven Connexin40+/EGFP mice were studied. We used tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH) and choline-acetyltransferase immunofluorescence labelling to characterize adrenergic and cholinergic neural elements. PVG projected postganglionic nerves to the SAN, which entered the SAN as an extensive, mesh-like neural network. PVG neurones were adrenergic, cholinergic, and biphenotypic. Histochemical characterization of two human embryonic hearts showed similarities between mouse and human neuroanatomy: direct neural communications between PVG and SAN. In Langendorff perfused mouse hearts, PVG were stimulated using 200–2000 ms trains of pulses (300 μs, 400 µA, 200 Hz). PVG stimulation caused an initial heart rate (HR) slowing (36 ± 9%) followed by acceleration. PVG stimulation in the presence of propranolol caused HR slowing (43 ± 13%) that was sustained over 20 beats. PVG stimulation with atropine progressively increased HR. Time-course effects were enhanced with 1000 and 2000 ms trains (P < 0.05 vs. 200 ms). In optical mapping, PVG stimulation shifted the origin of SAN discharges. In five paroxysmal AF patients undergoing pulmonary vein ablation, application of radiofrequency energy to the PVG area during sinus rhythm produced a decrease in HR similar to that observed in isolated mouse hearts. Conclusion PVG have functional and anatomical biphenotypic characteristics. They can have significant effects on the electrophysiological control of the SAN. PMID:23559611

  3. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Lakatta, Edward G

    2013-06-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca(2+)-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca(2+) cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O₂ consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O₂ consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca(2+)m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca(2+)m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca(2+)m and an increase in Ca(2+) activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level.

  4. Optogenetics for in vivo cardiac pacing and resynchronization therapies.

    PubMed

    Nussinovitch, Udi; Gepstein, Lior

    2015-07-01

    Abnormalities in the specialized cardiac conduction system may result in slow heart rate or mechanical dyssynchrony. Here we apply optogenetics, widely used to modulate neuronal excitability, for cardiac pacing and resynchronization. We used adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 to express the Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) transgene at one or more ventricular sites in rats. This allowed optogenetic pacing of the hearts at different beating frequencies with blue-light illumination both in vivo and in isolated perfused hearts. Optical mapping confirmed that the source of the new pacemaker activity was the site of ChR2 transgene delivery. Notably, diffuse illumination of hearts where the ChR2 transgene was delivered to several ventricular sites resulted in electrical synchronization and significant shortening of ventricular activation times. These findings highlight the unique potential of optogenetics for cardiac pacing and resynchronization therapies.

  5. Glocal Clinical Registries: Pacemaker Registry Design and Implementation for Global and Local Integration – Methodology and Case Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Kátia Regina; Costa, Roberto; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Lacerda, Marianna Sobral; de Moraes Albertini, Caio Marcos; Filho, Martino Martinelli; Santana, José Eduardo; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Barros, Jacson V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings. Purpose Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems. Methods and Results We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1) Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2) Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), (3) Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4) Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5) Data quality control and (6) Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT) we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry. Conclusion This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework

  6. Regional Difference in Dynamical Property of Sinoatrial Node Pacemaking: Role of Na+ Channel Current

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Yasutaka; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Hisatome, Ichiro; Shibamoto, Toshishige

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the regional differences in sinoatrial node pacemaking mechanisms, we investigated 1), bifurcation structures during current blocks or hyperpolarization of the central and peripheral cells, 2), ionic bases of regional differences in bifurcation structures, and 3), the role of Na+ channel current (INa) in peripheral cell pacemaking. Bifurcation analyses were performed for mathematical models of the rabbit sinoatrial node central and peripheral cells; equilibrium points, periodic orbits, and their stability were determined as functions of parameters. Structural stability against applications of acetylcholine or electrotonic modulations of the atrium was also evaluated. Blocking L-type Ca2+ channel current (ICa,L) stabilized equilibrium points and abolished pacemaking in both the center and periphery. Critical acetylcholine concentration and gap junction conductance for pacemaker cessation were higher in the periphery than in the center, being dramatically reduced by blocking INa. Under hyperpolarized conditions, blocking INa, but not eliminating ICa,L, abolished peripheral cell pacemaking. These results suggest that 1), ICa,L is responsible for basal pacemaking in both the central and peripheral cells, 2), the peripheral cell is more robust in withstanding hyperpolarizing loads than the central cell, 3), INa improves the structural stability to hyperpolarizing loads, and 4), INa-dependent pacemaking is possible in hyperpolarized peripheral cells. PMID:18390617

  7. Rhabdomyosarcoma associated with the lead wire of a pacemaker generator implant.

    PubMed

    Thieman Mankin, Kelley M; Dunbar, Mark D; Toplon, David; Ginn, Pamela; Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Risselada, Marije

    2014-06-01

    An 11-year-old female spayed Labrador Retriever was presented for a draining, painful subcutaneous mass palpated over a previously implanted pacemaker generator. Infection was suspected and the mass was removed surgically. On cut surface, the mass was friable and mottled tan to brown with firm pale tan nodules, surrounding the pacemaker lead wire adjacent to the pacemaker generator. Cytologic interpretation of impression smears was consistent with a sarcoma, and suggestive of a rhabdomyosarcoma due to the presence of strap-like cells. On histopathologic examination, a highly invasive nodular mass surrounded the pacemaker lead, composed of pleomorphic round, spindle and strap cells, and multinucleated giant cells. The population exhibited microscopic invasion into the deep portion of the fibrous capsule surrounding the pacemaker generator. There were tumor emboli within small to medium subcutaneous veins adjacent to the mass. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells stained positive for α-sarcomeric actin and vimentin, and negative for α-smooth muscle actin, consistent with a rhabdomyosarcoma arising at the site of the pacemaker generator. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a rhabdomyosarcoma associated with the lead wire of a pacemaker generator in a dog.

  8. Teaching cardiac electrophysiology modeling to undergraduate students: laboratory exercises and GPU programming for the study of arrhythmias and spiral wave dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bartocci, Ezio; Singh, Rupinder; von Stein, Frederick B; Amedome, Avessie; Caceres, Alan Joseph J; Castillo, Juan; Closser, Evan; Deards, Gabriel; Goltsev, Andriy; Ines, Roumwelle Sta; Isbilir, Cem; Marc, Joan K; Moore, Diquan; Pardi, Dana; Sadhu, Sandeep; Sanchez, Samuel; Sharma, Pooja; Singh, Anoopa; Rogers, Joshua; Wolinetz, Aron; Grosso-Applewhite, Terri; Zhao, Kai; Filipski, Andrew B; Gilmour, Robert F; Grosu, Radu; Glimm, James; Smolka, Scott A; Cherry, Elizabeth M; Clarke, Edmund M; Griffeth, Nancy; Fenton, Flavio H

    2011-12-01

    As part of a 3-wk intersession workshop funded by a National Science Foundation Expeditions in Computing award, 15 undergraduate students from the City University of New York(1) collaborated on a study aimed at characterizing the voltage dynamics and arrhythmogenic behavior of cardiac cells for a broad range of physiologically relevant conditions using an in silico model. The primary goal of the workshop was to cultivate student interest in computational modeling and analysis of complex systems by introducing them through lectures and laboratory activities to current research in cardiac modeling and by engaging them in a hands-on research experience. The success of the workshop lay in the exposure of the students to active researchers and experts in their fields, the use of hands-on activities to communicate important concepts, active engagement of the students in research, and explanations of the significance of results as the students generated them. The workshop content addressed how spiral waves of electrical activity are initiated in the heart and how different parameter values affect the dynamics of these reentrant waves. Spiral waves are clinically associated with tachycardia, when the waves remain stable, and with fibrillation, when the waves exhibit breakup. All in silico experiments were conducted by simulating a mathematical model of cardiac cells on graphics processing units instead of the standard central processing units of desktop computers. This approach decreased the run time for each simulation to almost real time, thereby allowing the students to quickly analyze and characterize the simulated arrhythmias. Results from these simulations, as well as some of the background and methodology taught during the workshop, is presented in this article along with the programming code and the explanations of simulation results in an effort to allow other teachers and students to perform their own demonstrations, simulations, and studies.

  9. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heartbeats ( arrhythmias ) ... due to medicine) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  10. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  11. [Long-term results in electric pacemaker therapy].

    PubMed

    Trenckmann, H; Hofmann, M; Emmrich, K

    1976-12-15

    It is reported on experiences and results in 317 patients with altogether 690 implantations of pacemakers from 1963 to 1974 and under comparison and with reference to the up to now existing long-term results published in literature state and tendency of the medical and technical development of the electric heart stimulation are discussed. The average age of outpatients was 62.9 years with a peak of age of 46% in the 7th decade of life. 60% were male patients, 40% female ones. With about 50% the constant total atrioventricular block was the most frequent indication. 63% of the familiar types of pacemakers were biotronic apparatuses, 36% of them with fixed frequency. The average duration of the function of all apparatuses was calculated with 20.1 months. Hereby the biotronic types had the longest average function times of 26.7 months (frequency fixed) or 26.3 months (regulated). In 373 reimplantations is shown that 2.17 apparatuses were implanted in each patient. The total number of complications was 21.2% related to the total number of implantations. With 8.9% breaks of the cable were in the first place in myocardial electrodes. Dislocations of transvenous electrodes were observed only in 4.5% of our cases. With 5.8% pressure necroses and infections were the cause of complications stood in the second place concerning frequency. The total lethality was 23.7% with an age peak of 38% in the 8th decade of life. 13.4% of the cases of death belong to an early lethality with a prevailing part of epicardial implantations. In our patients the cumulative survival rate was after 1 year 89.3%, after 5 years 62.3% and after 8 years 47.7%. The 50% survival rate was ca. 7.3 years. In comparison to the population of the same age the average expectance of life is transgressed by about 6 years. The prolongation of the survival time by electrostimulation compared with the conservative treatment of the total atrioventricular block with Adams-Stokes-syndrome is the essential result of

  12. Anaesthesia Application for Cardiac Denervation in a Patient with Long QT Syndrome and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karadeniz, Ümit; Demir, Aslı; Koçulu, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Long QT syndrome is a congenital disorder that is characterized by a prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiograms and a propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias, which may lead to syncope, cardiac arrest or sudden death. Cardiomyopathy and pulmonary hypertension diseases have additional risks in anaesthesia management. In this study, we emphasize on one lung ventilation, pacemaker-implantable cardioverter–defibrillator and the anaesthesia management process in a patient with long QT syndrome, cardiomyopathy and pulmonary hypertension who underwent thoracic sympathectomy. PMID:27366557

  13. The Different Effects of BMI and WC on Organ Damage in Patients from a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program after Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Hui; Qiu, Jian; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Hongqiang; Cai, Zekun; Lin, Wan-Hua; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    One of the purposes of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is to monitor and control weight of the patient. Our study is to compare the different obesity indexes, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), through one well-designed CR program (CRP) with ACS in Guangzhou city of Guangdong Province, China, in order to identify different effects of BMI and WC on organ damage. In our work, sixty-one patients between October 2013 and January 2014 fulfilled our study. We collected the vital signs by medical records, the clinical variables of body-metabolic status by fasting blood test, and the organ damage variables by submaximal exercise treadmill test (ETT) and ultrasonic cardiogram (UCG) both on our inpatient and four-to-five weeks of outpatient part of CRP after ACS. We mainly used two-tailed Pearson's test and liner regression to evaluate the relationship of BMI/WC and organ damage. Our results confirmed that WC could be more accurate than BMI to evaluate the cardiac function through the changes of left ventricular structure on the CRP after ACS cases. It makes sense of early diagnosis, valid evaluation, and proper adjustment to ACS in CRP of the obesity individuals in the future. PMID:26247035

  14. The Different Effects of BMI and WC on Organ Damage in Patients from a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program after Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Hui; Qiu, Jian; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Hongqiang; Cai, Zekun; Lin, Wan-Hua; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    One of the purposes of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is to monitor and control weight of the patient. Our study is to compare the different obesity indexes, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), through one well-designed CR program (CRP) with ACS in Guangzhou city of Guangdong Province, China, in order to identify different effects of BMI and WC on organ damage. In our work, sixty-one patients between October 2013 and January 2014 fulfilled our study. We collected the vital signs by medical records, the clinical variables of body-metabolic status by fasting blood test, and the organ damage variables by submaximal exercise treadmill test (ETT) and ultrasonic cardiogram (UCG) both on our inpatient and four-to-five weeks of outpatient part of CRP after ACS. We mainly used two-tailed Pearson's test and liner regression to evaluate the relationship of BMI/WC and organ damage. Our results confirmed that WC could be more accurate than BMI to evaluate the cardiac function through the changes of left ventricular structure on the CRP after ACS cases. It makes sense of early diagnosis, valid evaluation, and proper adjustment to ACS in CRP of the obesity individuals in the future.

  15. A perspective on atrioventricular delay optimization in patients with a dual chamber pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Cristina Porciani, Maria; Fantini, Fabio; Musilli, Nicola; Sabini, Alessandra; Michelucci, Antonio; Colella, Andrea; Pieragnoli, Paolo; Demarchi, Gabriele; Padeletti, Luigi

    2004-03-01

    Atrioventricular delay (AVD) is critical in patients with DDD pacemakers (PM). Echo/Doppler evaluation of AVD providing the longest left ventricular filling time (FT) or the highest cardiac output (CO) is used for AVD optimization. Recently myocardial performance index (MPI) has been shown to improve by optimizing AVD. The aim was to compare the CO, FT, MPI derived optimal AVD, and to analyze systolic and diastolic performance at every optimal AVD. Twenty-five patients, 16 men 68 +/- 11 years, ejection fraction >or= 50%, with a DDD PM for third-degree AV block, without other major cardiomyopathies, underwent echo/Doppler AVD optimization. CO, FT, and MPI derived optimal AVDs were identified as the AVDs providing the highest CO, the longest FT, and the minimum MPI, respectively. Isovolumic contraction and relaxation time (ICT, IRT), ejection time (ET), ICT/ET, and IRT/ET ratios were also evaluated at every optimal AVD. CO, FT, and MPI derived optimal AVDs were significantly different (148 +/- 36 ms, 116 +/- 34 ms, and 127 +/- 33 ms, respectively). ICT/ET was similar at CO, FT, and MPI derived optimal AVD (0.22 +/- 0.10, 0.23 +/- 0.11, and 0.21 +/- 0.10, respectively). IRT/ET ratio was similar at FT and MPI derived optimal AVDs (0.34 +/- 0.15 and 0.33 +/- 0.15, respectively) and significantly shorter (P < 0.02) than at CO derived optimal AVD (0.40 +/- 0.15). Different methods indicate different optimal AVDs. However analysis of systolic and diastolic performance shows that different AVDs result in similar systolic or diastolic performance. At MPI optimized AVD, a high CO combined with the most advantageous conditions of both isovolumic contraction and relaxation phases is achieved.

  16. Left Ventricular Synchrony and Function in Pediatric Patients with Definitive Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Michel Cabrera; Morejón, Adel Eladio Gonzales; Ricardo, Giselle Serrano

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic right ventricular pacing (RVP) induces a dyssynchronous contraction pattern, producing interventricular and intraventricular asynchrony. Many studies have shown the relationship of RVP with impaired left ventricular (LV) form and function. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate LV synchrony and function in pediatric patients receiving RVP in comparison with those receiving LV pacing (LVP). Methods LV systolic and diastolic function and synchrony were evaluated in 80 pediatric patients with either nonsurgical or postsurgical complete atrioventricular block, with pacing from either the RV endocardium (n = 40) or the LV epicardium (n = 40). Echocardiographic data obtained before pacemaker implantation, immediately after it, and at the end of a mean follow-up of 6.8 years were analyzed. Results LV diastolic function did not change in any patient during follow-up. LV systolic function was preserved in patients with LVP. However, in children with RVP the shortening fraction and ejection fraction decreased from medians of 41% ± 2.6% and 70% ± 6.9% before implantation to 32% ± 4.2% and 64% ± 2.5% (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001), respectively, at final follow-up. Interventricular mechanical delay was significantly larger with RVP (66 ± 13 ms) than with LVP (20 ± 8 ms). Similarly, the following parameters were significantly different in the two groups: LV mechanical delay (RVP: 69 ± 6 ms, LVP: 30 ± 11 ms, p < 0.0001); septal to lateral wall motion delay (RVP: 75 ± 19 ms, LVP: 42 ± 10 ms, p < 0.0001); and, septal to posterior wall motion delay (RVP: 127 ± 33 ms, LVP: 58 ± 17 ms, p < 0.0001). Conclusion Compared with RV endocardium, LV epicardium is an optimal site for pacing to preserve cardiac synchrony and function. PMID:24061683

  17. Pacemakers in large arrays of oscillators with nonlocal coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Gabriela; Scheel, Arnd

    2016-02-01

    We model pacemaker effects of an algebraically localized heterogeneity in a 1 dimensional array of oscillators with nonlocal coupling. We assume the oscillators obey simple phase dynamics and that the array is large enough so that it can be approximated by a continuous nonlocal evolution equation. We concentrate on the case of heterogeneities with positive average and show that steady solutions to the nonlocal problem exist. In particular, we show that these heterogeneities act as a wave source. This effect is not possible in 3 dimensional systems, such as the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, where the wavenumber of weak sources decays at infinity. To obtain our results we use a series of isomorphisms to relate the nonlocal problem to the viscous eikonal equation. We then use Fredholm properties of the Laplace operator in Kondratiev spaces to obtain solutions to the eikonal equation, and by extension to the nonlocal problem.

  18. Recovery after cardiac events.

    PubMed

    Davidson, D M; Maloney, C A

    1985-12-01

    This article describes an interdisciplinary program of cardiac rehabilitation that integrates physical therapy with medical, nursing, nutritional, and psychological assessment and treatment. Hospitalized patients recovering from myocardial infarction or cardiac surgery progress through a seven-level program of physical activity, education, and emotional support. These components of the program continue during their early home period and again are integrated during the active training period. In the active training period, patients participate in support groups and receive nutritional, exercise, and medical education and engage in one hour of exercise three times weekly. In all phases, considerable attention is given to the development of behavioral skills necessary for long-term adherence to healthy life style habits.

  19. The Immunoendocrine Thymus as a Pacemaker of Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-06-01

    The thymus develops from an endocrine area of the foregut, and retains the ancient potencies of this region. However, later it is populated by bone marrow originated lymphatic elements and forms a combined organ, which is a central part of the immune system as well as an influential element of the endocrine orchestra. Thymus produces self-hormones (thymulin, thymosin, thymopentin, and thymus humoral factor), which are participating in the regulation of immune cell transformation and selection, and also synthesizes hormones similar to that of the other endocrine glands such as melatonin, neuropeptides, and insulin, which are transported by the immune cells to the sites of requests (packed transport). Thymic (epithelial and immune) cells also have receptors for hormones which regulate them. This combined organ, which is continuously changing from birth to senescence seems to be a pacemaker of life. This function is basically regulated by the selection of self-responsive thymocytes as their complete destruction helps the development (up to puberty) and their gradual release in case of weakened control (after puberty) causes the erosion of cells and intercellular material, named aging. This means that during aging, self-destructive and non-protective immune activities are manifested under the guidance of the involuting thymus, causing the continuous irritation of cells and organs. Possibly the pineal body is the main regulator of the pacemaker, the neonatal removal of which results in atrophy of thymus and wasting disease and its later corrosion causes the insufficiency of thymus. The co-involution of pineal and thymus could determine the aging and the time of death without external intervention; however, external factors can negatively influence both of them. PMID:27352969

  20. Pericarditis-Induced Hyponatremia after Cardiac Electronic Implantable Device (CEID) Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshan, Elnaz; Mirabbasi, Seyed Abbas; Khalighi, Bahar; Khalighi, Koroush

    2015-01-01

    Case series Patient: Female, 87 • Female, 83 Final Diagnosis: Hyponatremia induced by pericardial effusion Symptoms: Shortness of breath Medication: Colchicine Clinical Procedure: Cardiac Electronic Implantable Device (CEID) Specialty: Cardiology • Cardiac Electrophysiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Pericardial effusion along with pleural effusion is one of the rare complications of permanent pacemaker placement. Although extremely uncommon, it is more prevalent in elderly patients and may be complicated with hyponatremia. Case Report: We observed development of hyponatremia in association with pericardial effusion and pleural effusion, within one month after pacemaker placement in two women with BMI of <20. Case 1: An 87-year-old woman underwent implantation of a transvenous AV sequential pacemaker because of severe bradycardia and complete heart block. Three weeks later, she complained of progressive left-sided rib cage pain and poor oral intake. Her echocardiography showed a moderately large amount of pericardial ef-fusion, but no evidence of tamponade. She also had hyponatremia (Na=119 mEq/dl). Extensive work-up suggested hyponatremia presumably due to SIADH, caused by pericardial/pleural effusion. Case 2: An 83-year-old woman with history of severe sick sinus syndrome required a transvenous Av sequential pacemaker 3 weeks before. She then presented with generalized weakness, fatigue, and poor oral intake of over one week. There was a small-moderate pericardial effusion echocardiographically, and her serum sodium was 116 mEq/dl. Conclusions: Although extremely uncommon, pericarditis can develop following transvenous pacemaker insertion, which may result in hyponatremia, likely due to SIADH. The most common scenario is an elderly, petite woman with low BMI (<20), usually after using a helical screw/active fixation pacing leads, several weeks post-implant. Early recognition and therapy can significantly improve outcome and morbidity. PMID

  1. [Cardiac resynchronisation therapy as a cause of the electrical storm].

    PubMed

    Krupa, Wojciech; Lackowski, Jacek; Sielski, Sławomir; Dobosiewicz, Ryszard; Kubica, Jacek

    2007-11-01

    We report a case of young patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and implanted cardioverter-defibrillator in which resynchronisation therapy (CRT-D) induced an electrical storm. One month after implantation of a cardiac resynchronisation pacemaker (CRT-P) the patient suffered from ventricular tachycardia with poor haemodynamic status and was treated by implantation of a CRT-D with a Y adaptor. After replacement of the CRT-D due to Y adaptor damage (new device without a Y adaptor) we observed an electrical storm during ventricular pacing (biventricular, right and left ventricular pacing respectively). Changing pacing mode from DDDR to AAIR resolved ventricular tachycardias in that patient.

  2. Haemodynamic instability secondary to cardiac involvement by lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lal, Kumar Siddharth; Tariq, Rana Zouveenoor; Okwuosa, Tochi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in lymphomas is not uncommon, but it is often missed due to the variability in its presentation. We present a case of bradycardia and complete heart block resulting in haemodynamic instability in a patient with recurrent diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Timely diagnosis and appropriate management of such patients is crucial and requires a high index of suspicion. Our patient required temporary pacemaker implantation and intravenous corticosteroid therapy. His complete heart block and bradycardia eventually resolved after a course of radiation therapy. PMID:27307428

  3. Endoscopic Electrosurgery in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Myong Ki; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lee, Yoon Bum; Hwang, Seawon; Lee, Bong-Woo; Choi, Hye Jin; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Yong-Seog; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) undergoing endoscopic electrosurgery (EE) are at a risk of electromagnetic interference (EMI). We aimed to analyze the effects of EE in CIED patients. Methods: Patients with CIED who underwent EE procedures such as snare polypectomy, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) were retrospectively analyzed. Postprocedural symptoms as well as demographic and outpatient follow-up data were reviewed through medical records. Electrical data, including preprocedural and postprocedural arrhythmia records, were reviewed through pacemaker interrogation, 24-hour Holter monitoring, or electrocardiogram. Results: Fifty-nine procedures in 49 patients were analyzed. Fifty procedures were performed in 43 patients with a pacemaker, and nine were performed in six patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. There were one gastric and 44 colon snare polypectomies, five gastric and one colon ESDs, and eight ERCPs with EST. Fifty-five cases of electrical follow-up were noted, with two postprocedural changes not caused by EE. Thirty-one pacemaker interrogations had procedure recordings, with two cases of asymptomatic tachycardia. All patients were asymptomatic with no adverse events. Conclusions: Our study reports no adverse events from EE in patients with CIED, suggesting that this procedure is safe. However, because of the possibility of EMI, recommendations on EE should be followed. PMID:26867552

  4. SU-E-I-42: Normalized Embryo/fetus Doses for Fluoroscopically Guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures Calculated Using a Monte Carlo Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, J; Stratakis, J; Solomou, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well known that pacemaker implantation is sometimes needed in pregnant patients with symptomatic bradycardia. To our knowledge, there is no reported experience regarding radiation doses to the unborn child resulting from fluoroscopy during pacemaker implantation. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for estimating embryo/fetus dose from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all trimesters of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study. Three mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing the average pregnant patient at the first, second and third trimesters of gestation were generated using Bodybuilder software (White Rock science, White Rock, NM). The normalized embryo/fetus dose from the posteroanterior (PA), the 30° left-anterior oblique (LAO) and the 30° right-anterior oblique (RAO) projections were calculated for a wide range of kVp (50–120 kVp) and total filtration values (2.5–9.0 mm Al). Results: The results consist of radiation doses normalized to a) entrance skin dose (ESD) and b) dose area product (DAP) so that the dose to the unborn child from any fluoroscopic technique and x-ray device used can be calculated. ESD normalized doses ranged from 0.008 (PA, first trimester) to 2.519 μGy/mGy (RAO, third trimester). DAP normalized doses ranged from 0.051 (PA, first trimester) to 12.852 μGy/Gycm2 (RAO, third trimester). Conclusion: Embryo/fetus doses from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be estimated using the method developed in this study. This study was supported by the Greek Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Operational Program ‘Education and Lifelong Learning’, ARISTIA (Research project: CONCERT)

  5. Cardiac or Other Implantable Electronic Devices and Sleep-disordered Breathing – Implications for Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bitter, Thomas; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is of growing interest in cardiology because SDB is a highly prevalent comorbidity in patients with a variety of cardiovascular diseases. The prevalence of SDB is particularly high in patients with cardiac dysrhythmias and/or heart failure. In this setting, many patients now have implantable cardiac devices, such as pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators or implanted cardiac resynchronisation therapy devices (CRT). Treatment of SDB using implantable cardiac devices has been studied previously, with atrial pacing and CRT being shown not to bring about satisfactory results in SDB care. The latest generations of these devices have the capacity to determine transthoracic impedance, to detect and quantify breathing efforts and to identify SDB. The capability of implantable cardiac devices to detect SDB is of potential importance for patients with cardiovascular disease, allowing screening for SDB, monitoring of the course of SDB in relation to cardiac status, and documenting of the effects of treatment. PMID:26835077

  6. A Sodium Leak Current Regulates Pacemaker Activity of Adult Central Pattern Generator Neurons in Lymnaea Stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tom Z.; Feng, Zhong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The resting membrane potential of the pacemaker neurons is one of the essential mechanisms underlying rhythm generation. In this study, we described the biophysical properties of an uncharacterized channel (U-type channel) and investigated the role of the channel in the rhythmic activity of a respiratory pacemaker neuron and the respiratory behaviour in adult freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Our results show that the channel conducts an inward leak current carried by Na+ (ILeak-Na). The ILeak-Na contributed to the resting membrane potential and was required for maintaining rhythmic action potential bursting activity of the identified pacemaker RPeD1 neurons. Partial knockdown of the U-type channel suppressed the aerial respiratory behaviour of the adult snail in vivo. These findings identified the Na+ leak conductance via the U-type channel, likely a NALCN-like channel, as one of the fundamental mechanisms regulating rhythm activity of pacemaker neurons and respiratory behaviour in adult animals. PMID:21526173

  7. Monitoring the radiation dose to a multiprogrammable pacemaker during radical radiation therapy: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Muller-Runkel, R.; Orsolini, G.; Kalokhe, U.P. )

    1990-11-01

    Multiprogrammable pacemakers, using complimentary metaloxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry, may fail during radiation therapy. We report about a patient who received 6,400 cGy for unresectable carcinoma of the left lung. In supine treatment position, arms raised above the head, the pacemaker was outside the treated area by a margin of at least 1 cm, shielded by cerrobend blocking mounted on a tray. From thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements, we estimate that the pacemaker received 620 cGy in scatter doses. Its function was monitored before, during, and after completion of radiation therapy. The pacemaker was functioning normally until the patient's death 5 months after completion of treatment. The relevant electrocardiograms (ECGs) are presented.

  8. A fully implantable pacemaker for the mouse: from battery to wireless power.

    PubMed

    Laughner, Jacob I; Marrus, Scott B; Zellmer, Erik R; Weinheimer, Carla J; MacEwan, Matthew R; Cui, Sophia X; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Efimov, Igor R

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have become a popular platform for the investigation of the molecular and systemic mechanisms of pathological cardiovascular physiology. Chronic pacing studies with implantable pacemakers in large animals have led to useful models of heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Unfortunately, molecular and genetic studies in these large animal models are often prohibitively expensive or not available. Conversely, the mouse is an excellent species for studying molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease through genetic engineering. However, the large size of available pacemakers does not lend itself to chronic pacing in mice. Here, we present the design for a novel, fully implantable wireless-powered pacemaker for mice capable of long-term (>30 days) pacing. This design is compared to a traditional battery-powered pacemaker to demonstrate critical advantages achieved through wireless inductive power transfer and control. Battery-powered and wireless-powered pacemakers were fabricated from standard electronic components in our laboratory. Mice (n = 24) were implanted with endocardial, battery-powered devices (n = 14) and epicardial, wireless-powered devices (n = 10). Wireless-powered devices were associated with reduced implant mortality and more reliable device function compared to battery-powered devices. Eight of 14 (57.1%) mice implanted with battery-powered pacemakers died following device implantation compared to 1 of 10 (10%) mice implanted with wireless-powered pacemakers. Moreover, device function was achieved for 30 days with the wireless-powered device compared to 6 days with the battery-powered device. The wireless-powered pacemaker system presented herein will allow electrophysiology studies in numerous genetically engineered mouse models as well as rapid pacing-induced heart failure and atrial arrhythmia in mice.

  9. The oral cavity is not a primary source for implantable pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillator infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To test the hypothesis that the oral cavity is a potential source for implantable pacemaker and cardioverter defibrillators infections, the bacterial diversity on explanted rhythm heart management devices was investigated and compared to the oral microbiome. Methods A metagenomic approach was used to analyze the bacterial diversity on the surfaces of non-infected and infected pacemakers. The DNA from surfaces swaps of 24 non-infected and 23 infected pacemaker were isolated and subjected to bacterial-specific DNA amplification, single strand conformation polymorphism- (SSCP) and sequencing analysis. Species-specific primer sets were used to analyze for any correlation between bacterial diversity on pacemakers and in the oral cavity. Results DNA of bacterial origin was detected in 21 cases on infected pacemakers and assigned to the bacterial phylotypes Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus schleiferi and Stapyhlococcus. In 17 cases bacterial DNA was found on pacemakers with no clinical signs of infections. On the basis of the obtained sequence data, the phylotypes Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus and an uncultured bacterium were identified. Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis were the only bacteria detected in pacemeaker (n = 25) and oral samples (n = 11). Conclusions The frequency of the coincidental detection of bacteria on infected devices and in the oral cavity is low and the detected bacteria are highly abundant colonizers of non-oral human niches. The transmission of oral bacteria to the lead or device of implantable pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillators is unlikely relevant for the pathogenesis of pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillators infections. PMID:23575037

  10. A Fully Implantable Pacemaker for the Mouse: From Battery to Wireless Power

    PubMed Central

    Zellmer, Erik R.; Weinheimer, Carla J.; MacEwan, Matthew R.; Cui, Sophia X.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have become a popular platform for the investigation of the molecular and systemic mechanisms of pathological cardiovascular physiology. Chronic pacing studies with implantable pacemakers in large animals have led to useful models of heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Unfortunately, molecular and genetic studies in these large animal models are often prohibitively expensive or not available. Conversely, the mouse is an excellent species for studying molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease through genetic engineering. However, the large size of available pacemakers does not lend itself to chronic pacing in mice. Here, we present the design for a novel, fully implantable wireless-powered pacemaker for mice capable of long-term (>30 days) pacing. This design is compared to a traditional battery-powered pacemaker to demonstrate critical advantages achieved through wireless inductive power transfer and control. Battery-powered and wireless-powered pacemakers were fabricated from standard electronic components in our laboratory. Mice (n = 24) were implanted with endocardial, battery-powered devices (n = 14) and epicardial, wireless-powered devices (n = 10). Wireless-powered devices were associated with reduced implant mortality and more reliable device function compared to battery-powered devices. Eight of 14 (57.1%) mice implanted with battery-powered pacemakers died following device implantation compared to 1 of 10 (10%) mice implanted with wireless-powered pacemakers. Moreover, device function was achieved for 30 days with the wireless-powered device compared to 6 days with the battery-powered device. The wireless-powered pacemaker system presented herein will allow electrophysiology studies in numerous genetically engineered mouse models as well as rapid pacing-induced heart failure and atrial arrhythmia in mice. PMID:24194832

  11. Regulation of the pacemaker activities in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal by Citrus unshiu peel extracts.

    PubMed

    Shim, Ji Hwan; Lee, Soo Jin; Gim, Huijin; Kim, Hyun Jung; Han, Taewon; Kim, Jae Goo; Lim, Eun Yeong; Kim, Yun Tai; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-10-01

    The Citrus unshiu peel has been widely used for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders in Eastern traditional medicine. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Citrus unshiu peel extract (CPE) on the pacemaker activity of the GI tract in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) derived from the mouse small intestine. The whole‑cell patch‑clamp configuration was used to record pacemaker potentials. In current clamp mode, exposure to CPE caused membrane pacemaker depolarization in a concentration‑dependent manner. In the presence of the muscarinic M2 receptor antagonist, methoctramine, CPE induced membrane pacemaker depolarization, whereas treatment with the muscarinic M3 receptor antagonist, 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide, inhibited CPE‑induced responses. When the pipette solution contained guanosine 5'-(β-thio) diphosphate trilithium salt (1 mM), CPE marginally induced membrane pacemaker depolarization. In addition, CPE‑induced membrane pacemaker depolarization was inhibited following exposure to the active phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U‑73122, but not the inactive PLC inhibitor U‑73343. In the presence of a p42/p44 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor (PD98059), a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) or a c‑jun NH2‑terminal kinase (JNK) II inhibitor, CPE failed to induce membrane pacemaker depolarization. These results suggest that CPE may affect GI motility through modulating ICC pacemaker activity by activating the muscarinic M3 receptor and inducing the G‑protein dependent PLC and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:27572234

  12. Development of pacemaker properties and rhythmogenic mechanisms in the mouse embryonic respiratory network

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Marc; Toporikova, Natalia; Simmers, John; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Breathing is a vital rhythmic behavior generated by hindbrain neuronal circuitry, including the preBötzinger complex network (preBötC) that controls inspiration. The emergence of preBötC network activity during prenatal development has been described, but little is known regarding inspiratory neurons expressing pacemaker properties at embryonic stages. Here, we combined calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings in mouse embryo brainstem slices together with computational modeling to reveal the existence of heterogeneous pacemaker oscillatory properties relying on distinct combinations of burst-generating INaP and ICAN conductances. The respective proportion of the different inspiratory pacemaker subtypes changes during prenatal development. Concomitantly, network rhythmogenesis switches from a purely INaP/ICAN-dependent mechanism at E16.5 to a combined pacemaker/network-driven process at E18.5. Our results provide the first description of pacemaker bursting properties in embryonic preBötC neurons and indicate that network rhythmogenesis undergoes important changes during prenatal development through alterations in both circuit properties and the biophysical characteristics of pacemaker neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16125.001 PMID:27434668

  13. Sphingosine and FTY720 Modulate Pacemaking Activity in Interstitial Cells of Cajal from Mouse Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Joo Hyun; Kim, Woo Kyung; Kim, Byung Joo

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemakers of the gastrointestinal tract, and transient receptor potential melastatin type 7 (TRPM7) and Ca2+ activated Cl− channels (ANO1) are candidate the generators of pacemaker potentials in ICCs. The effects of D-erythro-sphingosine (SPH) and structural analogues of SPH, that is, N,N-dimethyl-Derythro-sphingosine (N,N-DMS), FTY720, and FTY720-P on the pacemaking activities of ICCs were examined using the whole cell patch clamp technique. SPH, N,N-DMS, and FTY720 decreased the amplitudes of pacemaker potentials in ICC clusters, but resting membrane potentials displayed little change. Also, perfusing SPH, N,N-DMS, or FTY720 in the bath reduced both inward and outward TRPM7-like currents in single ICCs, and inhibited ANO1 currents. The another structural analogue of SPH, FTY720-P was ineffective at the pacemaker potentials in ICC clusters and the TRPM7-like currents in single ICCs. Furthermore, FTY720- P had no effect on ANO1. These results suggest that SPH, N,N-DMS, and FTY720 modulate the pacemaker activities of ICCs, and that TRPM7 and ANO1 channels affect intestinal motility. PMID:23912597

  14. Irregular excitation patterns in reaction-diffusion systems due to perturbation by secondary pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenk, Claudia; Einax, Mario; Maass, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    Spatiotemporal excitation patterns in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model are studied, which result from the disturbance of a primary pacemaker by a secondary pacemaker. The primary and secondary pacemakers generate regular waves with frequencies fpace and fpert, respectively. The pacemakers are spatially separated, but waves emanating from them encounter each other via a small bridge. This leads to three different types I-III of irregular excitation patterns in disjunct domains of the fpace-fpert plane. Types I and II are caused by detachments of waves coming from the two pacemakers at corners of the bridge. Type III irregularities are confined to a boundary region of the system and originate from a partial penetration of the primary waves into a space, where circular wave fronts from the secondary pacemaker prevail. For this type, local frequencies can significantly exceed fpace and fpert. The degree of irregularity found for the three different types is quantified by the entropy of the local frequency distribution and an order parameter for phase coherence.

  15. The East Asian Summer Monsoon in pacemaker experiments driven by ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hui; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Lu, Jian; Cash, Ben

    2015-03-01

    The variability of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is studied using a pacemaker technique driven by ENSO in an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) coupled to a slab mixed layer model. In the pacemaker experiments, sea surface temperature (SST) is constrained to observations in the eastern equatorial Pacific through a q- flux that measures the contribution of ocean dynamics to SST variability, while the AGCM is coupled to the slab model. An ensemble of pacemaker experiments is analyzed using a multivariate EOF analysis to identify the two major modes of variability of the EASM. The results show that the pacemaker experiments simulate a substantial amount (around 45 %) of the variability of the first mode (the Pacific-Japan pattern) in ERA40 from 1979 to 1999. Different from previous work, the pacemaker experiments also simulate a large part (25 %) of the variability of the second mode, related to rainfall variability over northern China. Furthermore, we find that the lower (850 hPa) and the upper (200 hPa) tropospheric circulation of the first mode display the same degree of reproducibility whereas only the lower part of the second mode is reproducible. The basis for the success of the pacemaker experiments is the ability of the experiments to reproduce the observed relationship between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the EASM.

  16. The East Asian Summer Monsoon in pacemaker experiments driven by ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hui; Greatbatch, Richard; Lu, Jian

    2014-05-01

    The variability of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is studied using a pacemaker technique in a atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) coupled to a slab mixed layer model. In the pacemaker experiment, sea surface temperature (sst) is constrained to observations in the eastern equatorial Pacific throughout a q-flux that measures the contribution of ocean dynamics to SST variability, while the AGCM is still coupled to the slab model. An ensemble of pacemaker experiments is analysed using a multivariate EOF analysis to identify the two major modes of variability of the EASM. Results show that the pacemaker experiments simulate part of the variability of the first mode seen in the ERA40 reanalysis (correlation up to 0.67 for the model ensemble mean), as expected. Different from previous study, the pacemaker experiments also simulate part of the variabilty (correlation up to 0.51 for the model ensemble mean) of the second mode, a mode of variability that is related to that of the Indian Summer Monsoon. A possible reason is the success of the pacemaker experiments at reproducing the relationship between El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the second mode of EASM.

  17. Using the Virtual Heart Model to validate the mode-switch pacemaker operation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihao; Connolly, Allison; Mangharam, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Artificial pacemakers are one of the most widely-used implantable devices today, with millions implanted worldwide. The main purpose of an artificial pacemaker is to treat bradycardia, or slow heart beats, by pacing the atrium and ventricles at a faster rate. While the basic functionality of the device is fairly simple, there are many documented cases of death and injury due to device malfunctions. The frequency of malfunctions due to firmware problems will only increase as the pacemaker operations become more complex in an attempt to expand the use of the device. One reason these malfunctions arise is that there is currently no methodology for formal validation and verification of medical device software, as there are in the safety-critical domains of avionics and industrial control automation. We have developed a timed-automata based Virtual Heart Model (VHM) to act as platform for medical device software validation and verification. Through a case study involving multiple arrhythmias, this investigation shows how the VHM can be used with closed-loop operation of a pacemaker to validate the necessity and functionality of the complex mode-switch pacemaker operation. We demonstrate the correct pacemaker operation, to switch from one rhythm management mode to another, in patients with supraventricular tachycardias. (1).

  18. Development of pacemaker properties and rhythmogenic mechanisms in the mouse embryonic respiratory network.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Marc; Toporikova, Natalia; Simmers, John; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel

    2016-07-19

    Breathing is a vital rhythmic behavior generated by hindbrain neuronal circuitry, including the preBötzinger complex network (preBötC) that controls inspiration. The emergence of preBötC network activity during prenatal development has been described, but little is known regarding inspiratory neurons expressing pacemaker properties at embryonic stages. Here, we combined calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings in mouse embryo brainstem slices together with computational modeling to reveal the existence of heterogeneous pacemaker oscillatory properties relying on distinct combinations of burst-generating INaP and ICAN conductances. The respective proportion of the different inspiratory pacemaker subtypes changes during prenatal development. Concomitantly, network rhythmogenesis switches from a purely INaP/ICAN-dependent mechanism at E16.5 to a combined pacemaker/network-driven process at E18.5. Our results provide the first description of pacemaker bursting properties in embryonic preBötC neurons and indicate that network rhythmogenesis undergoes important changes during prenatal development through alterations in both circuit properties and the biophysical characteristics of pacemaker neurons.

  19. The new criterion for cardiac resynchronization therapy treatment assessed by two channels impedance cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peczalski, K.; Palko, T.; Wojciechowski, D.; Dunajski, Z.; Kowalewski, M.

    2013-04-01

    The cardiac resynchronization therapy is an effective treatment for systolic failure patients. Independent electrical stimulation of left and right ventricle corrects mechanical ventricular dyssynchrony. About 30-40% treated patients do not respond to therapy. In order to improve clinical outcome authors propose the two channels impedance cardiography for assessment of ventricular dyssynchrony. The proposed method is intended for validation of patients diagnosis and optimization of pacemaker settings for cardiac resynchronization therapy. The preliminary study has showed that bichannel impedance cardiography is a promising tool for assessment of ventricular dyssynchrony.

  20. Undiagnosed myocardial sarcoidosis presenting as life threatening cardiac dysrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Davis, Stacy A; Moore, Walter J; Oliver, Alyce M

    2011-04-13

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by its pathological hallmark of non-caseating granuloma. Definitive diagnosis requires compatible clinical and imaging features as well as pathogenic identification of non-caseating granulomas in at least one organ. The disease has a wide variety of clinical and radiological manifestations but is associated with low mortality. However, cardiac involvement which is clinically only identified in 5% significantly worsens prognosis due to complications such as congestive heart failure, ventricular tachyarrhythmia, pulmonary hypertension or conduction disturbance leading to sudden death. Cardiac involvement is implicated in 77-85% of deaths directly related to sarcoidosis. Autopsy series in sarcoidosis patients show cardiac involvement with sarcoidosis in up to 79% cases. This case details the clinical course of a 56-year-old female who had experienced refractory cardiac dysrhythmias for many years in the context of also having biopsy proven pulmonary sarcoidosis. She had failed multiple antiarrhythmics as well as pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. It was not until she presented as a potentially fatal ventricular tachycardia that the possibility of cardiac involvement from her sarcoidosis was entertained as the aetiology of her cardiac problems. Confirmation of myocardial sarcoidosis with PET CT imaging and subsequent treatment with prednisone resulted in her clinical improvement.

  1. Effects of thallium on membrane currents at diastolic potentials in canine cardiac Purkinje strands.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I S; Mulrine, N K

    1986-01-01

    A two-micro-electrode voltage-clamp technique was used to record membrane currents from canine cardiac Purkinje strands during hyperpolarizing steps to potentials between -70 and -150 mV in Tyrode solutions containing K+ and/or Tl+. Complete replacement of external K+ by equimolar Tl+ increases the instantaneous inwardly rectifying current. The inwardly rectifying region of the instantaneous I-V relation is shifted to more positive potentials and its slope is increased. The diastolic time-dependent current is reduced or reversed. Partial substitution of equimolar Tl+ for K+ reduces the diastolic time-dependent current. The instantaneous I-V relation is shifted inward for molar fractions of Tl+ (YTl) greater than 0.5, and is slightly more inward or unchanged for YTl less than or equal to 0.5. Addition of small amounts of Tl+ shifts the instantaneous I-V relation inward and reduces the diastolic time-dependent current. Addition of Tl+ in solutions containing Ba2+ to block the background inward rectifier has no effect on the instantaneous I-V relation; the diastolic time-dependent (pace-maker) current is reduced. Block of the pace-maker current by Tl+ is largely independent of potential in Ba2+ Tyrode solution. Since Tl+ has opposite effects on the pace-maker current and the inward rectifier, these findings support other evidence that the pace-maker current is not part of the background inward rectifier.

  2. Cardiac Conduction through Engineered Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Stamm, Christof; Hammer, Peter E.; Kwaku, Kevin F.; Marler, Jennifer J.; Friehs, Ingeborg; Jones, Mara; Rader, Christine M.; Roy, Nathalie; Eddy, Mau-Thek; Triedman, John K.; Walsh, Edward P.; McGowan, Francis X.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Cowan, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    In children, interruption of cardiac atrioventricular (AV) electrical conduction can result from congenital defects, surgical interventions, and maternal autoimmune diseases during pregnancy. Complete AV conduction block is typically treated by implanting an electronic pacemaker device, although long-term pacing therapy in pediatric patients has significant complications. As a first step toward developing a substitute treatment, we implanted engineered tissue constructs in rat hearts to create an alternative AV conduction pathway. We found that skeletal muscle-derived cells in the constructs exhibited sustained electrical coupling through persistent expression and function of gap junction proteins. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction analyses, myogenic cells in the constructs were shown to survive in the AV groove of implanted hearts for the duration of the animal’s natural life. Perfusion of hearts with fluorescently labeled lectin demonstrated that implanted tissues became vascularized and immunostaining verified the presence of proteins important in electromechanical integration of myogenic cells with surrounding recipient rat cardiomyocytes. Finally, using optical mapping and electrophysiological analyses, we provide evidence of permanent AV conduction through the implant in one-third of recipient animals. Our experiments provide a proof-of-principle that engineered tissue constructs can function as an electrical conduit and, ultimately, may offer a substitute treatment to conventional pacing therapy. PMID:16816362

  3. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Caroline; Angermann, Christiane E; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of multisystem disorders, which are characterized by an extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Typically affected are the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. More than half of the patients die due to cardiac involvement. Clinical signs of cardiac amyloidosis are edema of the lower limbs, hepatomegaly, ascites and elevated jugular vein pressure, frequently in combination with dyspnea. There can also be chest pain, probably due to microvessel disease. Dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system or arrhythmias may cause low blood pressure, dizziness, or recurrent syncope. The AL amyloidosis caused by the deposition of immunoglobulin light chains is the most common form. It can be performed by monoclonal gammopathy. The desirable treatment therapy consists of high-dose melphalan therapy twice followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Due to the high peritransplantation mortality, selection of appropriate patients is mandatory. The ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the amyloidogenic form of transthyretin, a plasmaprotein that is synthesized in the liver. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative therapy. The symptomatic treatment of cardiac amyloidosis is based on the current guidelines for chronic heart failure according to the patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) state. Further types of amyloidosis with possible cardiac involvement comprise the senile systemic amyloidosis caused by the wild-type transthyretin, secondary amyloidosis after chronic systemic inflammation, and the beta(2)-microglobulin amyloidosis after long-term dialysis treatment. PMID:18344065

  4. Is metabolic rate a universal 'pacemaker' for biological processes?

    PubMed

    Glazier, Douglas S

    2015-05-01

    A common, long-held belief is that metabolic rate drives the rates of various biological, ecological and evolutionary processes. Although this metabolic pacemaker view (as assumed by the recent, influential 'metabolic theory of ecology') may be true in at least some situations (e.g. those involving moderate temperature effects or physiological processes closely linked to metabolism, such as heartbeat and breathing rate), it suffers from several major limitations, including: (i) it is supported chiefly by indirect, correlational evidence (e.g. similarities between the body-size and temperature scaling of metabolic rate and that of other biological processes, which are not always observed) - direct, mechanistic or experimental support is scarce and much needed; (ii) it is contradicted by abundant evidence showing that various intrinsic and extrinsic factors (e.g. hormonal action and temperature changes) can dissociate the rates of metabolism, growth, development and other biological processes; (iii) there are many examples where metabolic rate appears to respond to, rather than drive the rates of various other biological processes (e.g. ontogenetic growth, food intake and locomotor activity); (iv) there are additional examples where metabolic rate appears to be unrelated to the rate of a biological process (e.g. ageing, circadian rhythms, and molecular evolution); and (v) the theoretical foundation for the metabolic pacemaker view focuses only on the energetic control of biological processes, while ignoring the importance of informational control, as mediated by various genetic, cellular, and neuroendocrine regulatory systems. I argue that a comprehensive understanding of the pace of life must include how biological activities depend on both energy and information and their environmentally sensitive interaction. This conclusion is supported by extensive evidence showing that hormones and other regulatory factors and signalling systems coordinate the processes of

  5. Is metabolic rate a universal 'pacemaker' for biological processes?

    PubMed

    Glazier, Douglas S

    2015-05-01

    A common, long-held belief is that metabolic rate drives the rates of various biological, ecological and evolutionary processes. Although this metabolic pacemaker view (as assumed by the recent, influential 'metabolic theory of ecology') may be true in at least some situations (e.g. those involving moderate temperature effects or physiological processes closely linked to metabolism, such as heartbeat and breathing rate), it suffers from several major limitations, including: (i) it is supported chiefly by indirect, correlational evidence (e.g. similarities between the body-size and temperature scaling of metabolic rate and that of other biological processes, which are not always observed) - direct, mechanistic or experimental support is scarce and much needed; (ii) it is contradicted by abundant evidence showing that various intrinsic and extrinsic factors (e.g. hormonal action and temperature changes) can dissociate the rates of metabolism, growth, development and other biological processes; (iii) there are many examples where metabolic rate appears to respond to, rather than drive the rates of various other biological processes (e.g. ontogenetic growth, food intake and locomotor activity); (iv) there are additional examples where metabolic rate appears to be unrelated to the rate of a biological process (e.g. ageing, circadian rhythms, and molecular evolution); and (v) the theoretical foundation for the metabolic pacemaker view focuses only on the energetic control of biological processes, while ignoring the importance of informational control, as mediated by various genetic, cellular, and neuroendocrine regulatory systems. I argue that a comprehensive understanding of the pace of life must include how biological activities depend on both energy and information and their environmentally sensitive interaction. This conclusion is supported by extensive evidence showing that hormones and other regulatory factors and signalling systems coordinate the processes of

  6. Adherence to lifestyle modifications after a cardiac rehabilitation program and endothelial progenitor cells. A six-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Cesari, F; Marcucci, R; Gori, A M; Burgisser, C; Francini, S; Roberts, A T; Sofi, F; Gensini, G F; Abbate, R; Fattirolli, F

    2014-07-01

    An increase of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) among acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients participating in a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program has been reported, but no data on the impact of adherence to lifestyle recommendations provided during a CR program on EPCs are available. It was our aim to investigate the effect of adherence to lifestyle recommendations on EPCs, inflammatory and functional parameters after six months of a CR program in AMI patients. In 110 AMI patients (90 male/20 female; mean age 57.9 ± 9.4 years) EPCs, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP) levels, and cardiopulmonary testings were determined at the end of the CR (T1) and at a six-month follow-up (T2). At T2 we administered a questionnaire assessing dietary habits and physical activity. At T2, we observed a decrease of EPCs (p<0.05), of hsCRP (p=0.009) and of NT-ProBNP (p<0.0001). Patient population was divided into three categories by Healthy Lifestyle (HL) score (none/low, moderate and high adherence to lifestyle recommendations). We observed a significant association between adherence to lifestyle recommendations, increase in EPCs and exercise capacity between T1 and T2 (Δ EPCs p for trend <0.05; ΔWatt max p for trend=0.004). In a multivariate logistic regression analyses, being in the highest tertile of HL score affected the likelihood of an increase of EPC levels at T2 [OR (95% confidence interval): 3.36 (1.0-10.72) p=0.04]. In conclusion, adherence to lifestyle recommendations provided during a CR program positively influences EPC levels and exercise capacity.

  7. Olmesartan Reduces New-onset Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Fibrillation Burden after Dual-chamber Pacemaker Implantation in Atrioventricular Block Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Pan, Chang; Zhang, Juan; Zhu, Lin-Lin; Huang, Kai; Zhong, Yun; Hu, Zuo-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent tachyarrhythmia in patients with a permanent pacemaker. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists have a protective effect against the occurrence of AF in patients with heart diseases. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of olmesartan in the prevention of new-onset AF and AF burden in atrioventricular block (AVB) patients with dual-chamber (DDD) pacemaker implantation. Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, randomized, single-blind, controlled clinical study. A total of 116 AVB patients, who received DDD pacemakers implantation with the percentage of ventricular pacing (VP%) ≥40% from April 22, 2011 to December 24, 2012, were prospectively randomized to olmesartan group (20 mg per day; n = 57) or control group (n = 59). Patients were followed up using pacemaker programming, 12-lead electrocardiography in the intrinsic sinus rhythm, laboratory examinations, and transthoracic echocardiography at 24 months. Atrial high rate events (AHREs) were defined as 180 beats/min over a minimum of 5 min. AF burden was calculated by the number of hours with AHREs divided by the number of measurement hours. Results: Ten (17.5%) patients in the olmesartan group and 24 patients (40.7%) in the control group occurred new-onset AF, and the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.04). AF burden was lower in olmesartan group than that in control group (8.02 ± 3.10% vs. 13.66 ± 6.14%, P = 0.04). There were no significant differences in mean days to the first occurrence of AHREs and mean cumulative numbers of AHREs between two groups (P = 0.89 and P = 0.42, respectively). Moreover, olmesartan group had smaller values of maximal P-wave durations and P-wave dispersion (PD) after 24 months follow-up compared with the control group (109.5 ± 7.4 ms vs. 113.4 ± 7.1 ms, P = 0.00; and 40.6 ± 4.5 ms vs. 43.3 ± 4.4 ms, P = 0.02, respectively). Left ventricular end-diastolic diameter and left

  8. Revisiting the reticulum: feedforward and feedback contributions to motor program parameters in the crab cardiac ganglion microcircuit.

    PubMed

    García-Crescioni, Keyla; Miller, Mark W

    2011-10-01

    The neurogenic heartbeat of crustaceans is controlled by the cardiac ganglion (CG), a central pattern generator (CPG) microcircuit composed of nine neurons. In most decapods, five "large" motor neurons (MNs) project from the CG to the myocardium, where their excitatory synaptic signals generate the rhythmic heartbeat. The processes of four "small" premotor neurons (PMNs) are confined to the CG, where they provide excitatory drive to the MNs via impulse-mediated chemical signals and electrotonic coupling. This study explored feedforward and feedback interactions between the PMNs and the MNs in the CG of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). Three methods were used to compare the activity of the MNs and the PMNs in the integrated CG to their autonomous firing patterns: 1) ligatures were tightened on the ganglion trunk that connects the PMNs and MNs; 2) TTX was applied focally to suppress selectively PMN or MN activity; and 3) sucrose pools were devised to block reversibly PMN or MN impulse conduction. With all treatments, the PMNs and MNs continued to produce autonomous rhythmic bursting following disengagement. Removal of PMN influence resulted in a significantly reduced MN duty cycle that was mainly attributable to a lower autonomous burst frequency. Conversely, after removal of MN feedback, the PMN duty cycle was increased, primarily due to a prolonged burst duration. Application of sucrose to block impulse conduction without eliminating PMN oscillations disclosed significant contributions of spike-mediated PMN-to-MN signals to the initiation and prolongation of the MN burst. Together, these observations support a view of the Callinectes CG composed of two classes of spontaneously bursting neurons with distinct endogenous rhythms. Compartmentalized feedforward and feedback signaling endow this microcircuit with syncytial properties such that the intrinsic attributes of the PMNs and MNs both contribute to shaping all parameters of the motor patterns transmitted to

  9. Cardiac natriuretic peptides act via p38 MAPK to induce the brown fat thermogenic program in mouse and human adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bordicchia, Marica; Liu, Dianxin; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ailhaud, Gerard; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Zhang, Chaoying; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Sarzani, Riccardo; Collins, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    The ability of mammals to resist body fat accumulation is linked to their ability to expand the number and activity of “brown adipocytes” within white fat depots. Activation of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) can induce a functional “brown-like” adipocyte phenotype. As cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs) and β-AR agonists are similarly potent at stimulating lipolysis in human adipocytes, we investigated whether NPs could induce human and mouse adipocytes to acquire brown adipocyte features, including a capacity for thermogenic energy expenditure mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). In human adipocytes, atrial NP (ANP) and ventricular NP (BNP) activated PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and UCP1 expression, induced mitochondriogenesis, and increased uncoupled and total respiration. At low concentrations, ANP and β-AR agonists additively enhanced expression of brown fat and mitochondrial markers in a p38 MAPK–dependent manner. Mice exposed to cold temperatures had increased levels of circulating NPs as well as higher expression of NP signaling receptor and lower expression of the NP clearance receptor (Nprc) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT). NPR-C–/– mice had markedly smaller WAT and BAT depots but higher expression of thermogenic genes such as Ucp1. Infusion of BNP into mice robustly increased Ucp1 and Pgc-1α expression in WAT and BAT, with corresponding elevation of respiration and energy expenditure. These results suggest that NPs promote “browning” of white adipocytes to increase energy expenditure, defining the heart as a central regulator of adipose tissue biology. PMID:22307324

  10. Ectopic jejunal pacemakers and gastric emptying after Roux gastrectomy: Effect of intestinal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstrom, L.; Kelly, K.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether ectopic pacemakers are present after meals in the Roux limbs of dogs after vagotomy and Roux gastrectomy, whether these pacemakers slow gastric emptying of liquids or solids, and whether abolishing the pacemakers with electric pacing might speed any slow emptying that occurs. In six dogs that underwent vagotomy and Roux gastrectomy and in four dogs that underwent vagotomy and Billroth gastrectomy (controls), myoelectric activity of the Roux limb or duodenum was measured during gastric emptying of a 500 kcal mixed meal of 99mTc-labeled cooked egg and 111In-labeled milk. Roux dogs were tested with and without pacing of the Roux limb. Roux dogs showed ectopic pacemaker in the Roux limb that drove the pacesetter potentials of the limb in a reverse, or orad, direction during 57% of the postprandial recordings. Billroth dogs had no ectopic pacemakers (p less than 0.05). Liquids emptied more slowly in Roux dogs (half-life (t1/2) = 121 +/- 15 minutes) than in Billroth dogs (t1/2 = 43 +/- 9 minutes; p less than 0.05), but solids emptied similarly in both groups of dogs (t1/2 approximately 8 hours). Pacing the Roux limb abolished the ectopic pacemakers, restored the slow emptying of liquids to the more rapid rate found in the Billroth dogs (t1/2: paced Roux, 72 +/- 15 minutes; Billroth, 43 +/- 9 minutes; p greater than 0.05) and did not change emptying of solids. The conclusion was that ectopic pacemakers present in the Roux limb after vagotomy and Roux gastrectomy drove the limb in a reverse direction and slowed emptying of liquids after the operation. The defect was corrected by pacing the Roux limb in a forward direction.

  11. Caffeine increases light responsiveness of the mouse circadian pacemaker.

    PubMed

    van Diepen, Hester C; Lucassen, Eliane A; Yasenkov, Roman; Groenen, Inske; Ijzerman, Adriaan P; Meijer, Johanna H; Deboer, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used psychoactive stimulant worldwide. It reduces sleep and sleepiness by blocking access to the adenosine receptor. The level of adenosine increases during sleep deprivation, and is thought to induce sleepiness and initiate sleep. Light-induced phase shifts of the rest-activity circadian rhythms are mediated by light-responsive neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, where the circadian clock of mammals resides. Previous studies have shown that sleep deprivation reduces circadian clock phase-shifting capacity and decreases SCN neuronal activity. In addition, application of adenosine agonists and antagonists mimics and blocks, respectively, the effect of sleep deprivation on light-induced phase shifts in behaviour, suggesting a role for adenosine. In the present study, we examined the role of sleep deprivation in and the effect of caffeine on light responsiveness of the SCN. We performed in vivo electrical activity recordings of the SCN in freely moving mice, and showed that the sustained response to light of SCN neuronal activity was attenuated after 6 h of sleep deprivation prior to light exposure. Subsequent intraperitoneal application of caffeine was able to restore the response to light. Finally, we performed behavioural recordings in constant conditions, and found enhanced period lengthening during chronic treatment with caffeine in drinking water in constant light conditions. The data suggest that increased homeostatic sleep pressure changes circadian pacemaker functioning by reducing SCN neuronal responsiveness to light. The electrophysiological and behavioural data together provide evidence that caffeine enhances clock sensitivity to light.

  12. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from heartbeat vibrations for leadless pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. H.; Karami, M. Amin

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies energy harvesting from heartbeat vibrations using fan-folded piezoelectric beams. The generated energy from the heartbeat can be used to power a leadless pacemaker. In order to utilize the available 3 dimensional space to the energy harvester, we chose the fan-folded design. The proposed device consists of several piezoelectric beams stacked on top of each other. The size for this energy harvester is 2 cm by 0.5 cm by 1 cm, which makes the natural frequency very high. High natural frequency is one major concern about the micro-scaled energy harvesters. By utilizing the fan-folded geometry and adding tip mass and link mass to the configuration, this natural frequency is reduced to the desired range. This fan-folded design makes it possible to generate more than 10 μW of power. The proposed device does not incorporate magnets and is thus Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible. Although our device is a linear energy harvester, it is shown that the device is relatively insensitive to the heartrate. The natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the device are calculated. An analytical solution is presented and the method is verified by experimental investigation. We use a closed loop shaker controller and a shaker to simulate the heartbeat vibrations. The developed analytical model is verified through comparison of theoretical and experimental tip displacement and acceleration frequency response functions.

  13. Rescue of a trafficking defective human pacemaker channel via a novel mechanism: roles of Src, Fyn, and Yes tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Huang, Jianying; Kan, Hong; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Yu, Han-Gang

    2009-10-30

    Therapeutic strategies such as using channel blockers and reducing culture temperature have been used to rescue some long QT-associated voltage-gated potassium Kv trafficking defective mutant channels. A hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated HCN4 pacemaker channel mutant (D553N) has been recently found in a patient associated with cardiac arrhythmias including long QT. D553N showed the defective trafficking to the cell surface, leading to little ionic current expression (loss-of-function). We show in this report that enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation mediated by Src, Fyn, and Yes kinases was able to restore the surface expression of D553N for normal current expression. Src or Yes, but not Fyn, significantly increased the current density and surface expression of D553N. Fyn accelerated the activation kinetics of the rescued D553N. Co-expression of D553N with Yes exhibited the slowest activation kinetics of D553N. Src, Fyn, and Yes significantly enhanced the tyrosine phosphorylation of D553N. A combination of Src, Fyn, and Yes rescued the current expression and the gating of D553N comparable with those of wild-type HCN4. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel mechanism using three endogenous Src kinases to rescue a trafficking defective HCN4 mutant channel (D553N) by enhancing the tyrosine phosphorylation of the mutant channel protein.

  14. Clinical applications of magnets on cardiac rhythm management devices.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sony; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Maheshwari, Rahul; Haddad, John W; Padanilam, Benzy J; John, Sinoj K

    2011-09-01

    The growing indications for permanent pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation have increased the number of patients with these cardiac rhythm management devices (CRMDs). Cardiac rhythm management devices occasionally perform inappropriately in response to electromagnetic interference (e.g. surgical electrocautery) or lead noise over-sensing (e.g. lead fracture). Temporary reprogramming of the CRMDs using device programmers can prevent these untoward device responses. However, these programmers are device manufacturer specific and require technically qualified personnel to operate. This could cause delayed patient care and increased use of resources in certain clinical situations. Alternatively, clinical magnets, when appropriately positioned over the device site, can change the pacing to an asynchronous mode in pacemakers and suspend tachycardia therapies in ICDs. Although readily available, clinical magnets have not been widely used for this purpose, perhaps due to the unfamiliarity with the variable responses of CRMDs to magnet application. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current literature on the mechanism of action and the specific responses of various CRMDs to clinical magnets.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of the heartbeat II. Subharmonic bifurcations of the cardiac interbeat interval in sinus node disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Bhargava, Valmik; West, Bruce J.; Mandell, Arnold J.

    1985-10-01

    Changing the coupling of electronic relaxation oscillators may be associated with the emergence of complex periodic behavior. The electrocardiographic record of a patient with the “sick sinus syndrome” demonstrated periodic behavior including subharmonic bifurcations in an attractor of his interbeat interval. Such nonlinear dynamics which may emerge from alterations in the coupling of oscillating pacemakers are not predicted by traditional models in cardiac electrophysiology. An understanding of the nonlinear behavior of physical and mathematical systems may generalize to pathophysiological processes.

  16. Complications of Cardiac Perforation and Lead Dislodgement with an MRI-Conditional Pacing Lead: a Korean Multi-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Medtronic CapSureFix MRI 5086 pacing lead (5086; Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) has been reported to be associated with increased cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement. This study aimed to compare the incidence of cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement within 30 days after pacemaker implantation between 5086 MRI lead and previous Medtronic CapSureFix Novus 5076 non-MRI pacing lead. This was a nationwide, multicenter retrospective study in which we compared the incidence of adverse events between 277 patients implanted with 5086 lead and 205 patients implanted with 5076 lead between March 2009 and September 2014. Cardiac perforation within 30 days of pacemaker implantation occurred in 4 patients (1.4%) with the 5086 lead and in no patient with the 5076 lead (P = 0.084). Lead dislodgement occurred in 8 patients (2.9%) with the 5086 lead and in 5 patients (2.4%) with the 5076 lead (P = 0.764). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, age was significantly associated with cardiac perforation. Congestive heart failure and implantation of right atrial (RA) lead at RA free wall or septum were significant factors for the incidence of lead dislodgement and lead revision. The incidence of cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement were not statistically different between the patients with 5086 lead and the patients with 5076 lead. However, careful attention for cardiac perforation may be needed when using the 5086 MRI lead, especially in elderly patients. PMID:27510382

  17. Complications of Cardiac Perforation and Lead Dislodgement with an MRI-Conditional Pacing Lead: a Korean Multi-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang Hee; Choi, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun; Jo, Uk; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Woo Seok; Kim, Yoo Ri; Lee, Soo Yong; Whang, Ki Won; Yang, Jihyun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Oh, Yong Seog; Park, Kyoung Min; Nam, Gi Byoung; Choi, Kee Joon; Kim, You Ho

    2016-09-01

    Medtronic CapSureFix MRI 5086 pacing lead (5086; Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) has been reported to be associated with increased cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement. This study aimed to compare the incidence of cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement within 30 days after pacemaker implantation between 5086 MRI lead and previous Medtronic CapSureFix Novus 5076 non-MRI pacing lead. This was a nationwide, multicenter retrospective study in which we compared the incidence of adverse events between 277 patients implanted with 5086 lead and 205 patients implanted with 5076 lead between March 2009 and September 2014. Cardiac perforation within 30 days of pacemaker implantation occurred in 4 patients (1.4%) with the 5086 lead and in no patient with the 5076 lead (P = 0.084). Lead dislodgement occurred in 8 patients (2.9%) with the 5086 lead and in 5 patients (2.4%) with the 5076 lead (P = 0.764). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, age was significantly associated with cardiac perforation. Congestive heart failure and implantation of right atrial (RA) lead at RA free wall or septum were significant factors for the incidence of lead dislodgement and lead revision. The incidence of cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement were not statistically different between the patients with 5086 lead and the patients with 5076 lead. However, careful attention for cardiac perforation may be needed when using the 5086 MRI lead, especially in elderly patients. PMID:27510382

  18. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  19. Modeling and experimental verification of a fan-folded vibration energy harvester for leadless pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. H.; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies energy harvesting from heartbeat vibrations for powering leadless pacemakers. Unlike traditional pacemakers, leadless pacemakers are implanted inside the heart and the pacemaker is in direct contact with the myocardium. A leadless pacemaker is in the shape of a cylinder. Thus, in order to utilize the available 3-dimensional space for the energy harvester, we choose a fan-folded 3D energy harvester. The proposed device consists of several piezoelectric beams stacked on top of each other. The volume of the energy harvester is 1 cm3 and its dimensions are 2 cm × 0.5 cm × 1 cm. Although high natural frequency is generally a major concern with micro-scale energy harvesters, by utilizing the fan-folded geometry and adding tip mass and link mass to the configuration, we reduced the natural frequency to the desired range. This fan-folded design makes it possible to generate more than 10 μ W of power per cubic centimeter. The proposed device is compatible with Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Although the proposed device is a linear energy harvester, it is relatively insensitive to the heart rate. The natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the device are calculated analytically. The accuracy of the analytical model is verified by experimental investigations. We use a closed loop shaker system to precisely replicate heartbeat vibrations in vitro.

  20. The six-minute walk--an adequate exercise test for pacemaker patients?

    PubMed

    Langenfeld, H; Schneider, B; Grimm, W; Beer, M; Knoche, M; Riegger, G; Kochsiek, K

    1990-12-01

    In many pacemaker patients bicycle and treadmill ergometry are not practicable. As an alternative, we performed a 6-minute walk on a 20-m corridor in 97 pacemaker patients, who were asked to walk as far as possible determining their speed by themselves. Results were compared with those of bicycle ergometry in 42 of these patients and with treadmill exercise of a group of 92 other pacemaker patients. In the 6-minute walk, performance and maximal heart rate were slightly lower (49 +/- 18 W; 96 +/- 23 beats/min) than in bicycle (57 +/- 16 W; 110 +/- 26 beats/min) and treadmill ergometry (50 +/- 37 W; 102 +/- 35 beats/min). A good correlation was found between walking and bicycling (r = 0.74) and in subgroups of patients with different pacemaker indications. All patients preferred the walk to bicycle ergometry considering it to be more related to daily physical activity. In conclusion, a 6-minute walk is a simple and physiological exercise test for nearly all pacemaker patients with good correlation to other types of exercise. It seems to be preferable to other tests because of its better acceptance and practicability. PMID:1704537