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Sample records for cardiac risk factor

  1. Sudden cardiac death: epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Adabag, A. Selcuk; Luepker, Russell V.; Roger, Véronique L.; Gersh, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an important public-health problem with multiple etiologies, risk factors, and changing temporal trends. Substantial progress has been made over the past few decades in identifying markers that confer increased SCD risk at the population level. However, the quest for predicting the high-risk individual who could be a candidate for an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or other therapy, continues. In this article, we review the incidence, temporal trends, and triggers of SCD, and its demographic, clinical, and genetic risk factors. We also discuss the available evidence supporting the use of public-access defibrillators. PMID:20142817

  2. Cardiac risk factors: environmental, sociodemographic, and behavioral cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Anthony, David; George, Paul; Eaton, Charles B

    2014-06-01

    Several environmental exposures are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to secondhand smoke may increase the risk by as much as 25% to 30%. Exposure to third hand smoke, residual components of tobacco smoke that remain in the environment after a cigarette is extinguished, also appears to increase risk. These residual components can remain in rooms and automobiles for up to 30 years and enter the body through the skin or via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure to particulate matter air pollution from automobile emissions, power plants, and other sources is yet another environmental risk factor for CHD, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths annually in the United States. Exposure to other environmental toxins, particularly bisphenol A and phthalates, also has been linked to CHD. There are sociodemographic risks for CHD, with numerous studies showing that lower socioeconomic status is associated with higher risk. Behavioral risk factors include poor diet, such as frequent consumption of fast food and processed meals; sleep disturbance; and psychological stress, particularly related to marital or work issues. Finally, although high alcohol consumption is associated with increased CHD risk, moderate alcohol consumption (ie, less than 1 to 2 drinks/day), particularly of wine and possibly beer, appears to reduce the risk.

  3. Non-pharmacological modification of cardiac risk factors: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Eagles, C J; Gulati, R; Martin, U

    1996-10-01

    Many factors influence whether a person will develop coronary heart disease. Genetic predisposition, gender and advanced age are recognized risk factors for the development of coronary heart disease over which we have little control. On the other hand, high serum cholesterol, cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, excessive body weight and long-term physical inactivity are key risk factors over which we have considerable control. In many cases cardiac risk factors can be modified without resorting to pharmacological intervention. Current evidence suggests that individuals who follow a diet which is low in saturated fats and cholesterol, lose weight, stop cigarette smoking and take regular aerobic exercise will significantly reduce their risk of developing coronary heart disease. In addition, patients who already have evidence of coronary heart disease may improve their symptoms and prognosis by similar life-style changes. In the first of two parts, we review the role of exercise in modifying cardiac risk factors.

  4. Pharmacological Risk Factors for Delirium after Cardiac Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Lurdes; Schwarz, Stephan KW; Bowering, John B; Moore, Randell L; Burns, Kyle D; Richford, Carole M; Osborn, Jill A; Barr, Alasdair M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this review is to evaluate the literature on medications associated with delirium after cardiac surgery and potential prophylactic agents for preventing it. Source: Articles were searched in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and EMBASE with the MeSH headings: delirium, cardiac surgical procedures, and risk factors, and the keywords: delirium, cardiac surgery, risk factors, and drugs. Principle inclusion criteria include having patient samples receiving cardiac procedures on cardiopulmonary bypass, and using DSM-IV-TR criteria or a standardized tool for the diagnosis of delirium. Principal Findings: Fifteen studies were reviewed. Two single drugs (intraoperative fentanyl and ketamine), and two classes of drugs (preoperative antipsychotics and postoperative inotropes) were identified in the literature as being independently associated with delirium after cardiac surgery. Another seven classes of drugs (preoperative antihypertensives, anticholinergics, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, opioids, and statins, and postoperative opioids) and three single drugs (intraoperative diazepam, and postoperative dexmedetomidine and rivastigmine) have mixed findings. One drug (risperidone) has been shown to prevent delirium when taken immediately upon awakening from cardiac surgery. None of these findings was replicated in the studies reviewed. Conclusion: These studies have shown that drugs taken perioperatively by cardiac surgery patients need to be considered in delirium risk management strategies. While medications with direct neurological actions are clearly important, this review has shown that specific cardiovascular drugs may also require attention. Future studies that are methodologically consistent are required to further validate these findings and improve their utility. PMID:23449337

  5. Risk factors for cardiac events in patients with Brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenqing; Tian, Li; Ke, Jinshan; Sun, Yi; Wu, Ruixia; Zhu, Jianfang; Ke, Qinmei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Inconsistent results have been reported about the risk stratification of patients with Brugada syndrome. We have summarized the evidence regarding the strength of association between 6 risk factors (family history of sudden cardiac death [SCD] or syncope, inducible ventricular arrhythmias on electrophysiology study [EPS], spontaneous type 1 Brugada electrocardiogram [ECG], male sex, family history of SCD, and sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 5 [SCN5A] gene mutation) and subsequent cardiac events in Brugada syndrome patients. Methods: Pubmed, Ovid, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies published between January 1992 and March 2016. Only prospective studies (27 studies, 4494 patients) that reported estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cardiac events for the 6 risk factors were included. Results: Family history of SCD or syncope (risk ratio [RR] 4.97, 95% CI 3.96–6.23, P < 0.001), inducible ventricular arrhythmia on EPS (RR 3.56, 95% CI 1.30–9.74, P = 0.01), and spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG (RR 4.07, 95% CI 2.23–7.41, P < 0.001) were associated with an increased risk of future cardiac events. Spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG was associated with an elevated risk of future cardiac events in patients without a family history of SCD. Conclusions: Inducible ventricular arrhythmias on EPS, spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG, and family history of SCD or syncope indicate a high risk of future cardiac events in patients with Brugada syndrome. Spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG significantly increased the risk of future cardiac events in patients without family history of SCD. PMID:27472692

  6. The Influence of Cardiac Risk Factor Burden on Cardiac Stress Test Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schrock, Jon W; Li, Morgan; Orazulike, Chidubem; Emerman, Charles L

    2011-06-01

    Chest pain is the most common admission diagnosis for observation unit patients. These patients often undergo cardiac stress testing to further risk stratify for coronary artery disease (CAD). The decision of whom to stress is currently based on clinical judgment. We sought to determine the influence of cardiac risk factor burden on cardiac stress test outcome for patients tested from an observation unit, inpatient or outpatient setting. We performed a retrospective observational cohort study for all patients undergoing stress testing in our institution from June 2006 through July 2007. Cardiac risk factors were collected at the time of stress testing. Risk factors were evaluated in a summative fashion using multivariate regression adjusting for age and known coronary artery disease. The model was tested for goodness of fit and collinearity and the c statistic was calculated using the receiver operating curve. A total of 4026 subjects were included for analysis of which 22% had known CAD. The rates of positive outcome were 89 (12.0%), 95 (12.6%), and 343 (16.9%) for the OU, outpatients, and hospitalized patients respectively. While the odds of a positive test outcome increased for additional cardiac risk factors, ROC curve analysis indicates that simply adding the number of risk factors does not add significant diagnostic value. Hospitalized patients were more likely to have a positive stress test, OR 1.41 (1.10 - 1.81). Our study does not support basing the decision to perform a stress test on the number of cardiac risk factors.

  7. Midlife risk factor exposure and incidence of cardiac arrest depending on cardiac or non-cardiac origin.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Marcus Andreas; Kennedy, Linn Maria Anna; Juhlin, Tord; Melander, Olle

    2017-08-01

    Little is known about midlife risk factors of future cardiac arrest. Our objective was to evaluate cardiovascular risk factors in midlife in relation to the risk of cardiac arrest (CA) of cardiac and non-cardiac origin later in life. We cross-matched individuals of the population based Malmö Diet and Cancer study (n=30,447) with the local CA registry of the city of Malmö. Baseline exposures were related to incident CA. During a mean follow-up of 17.6±4.6years, 378 CA occurred, of whom 17.2% survived to discharge. Independent midlife risk factors for CA of cardiac origin included coronary artery disease {HR 2.84 (1.86-4.34) (p<0.001)}, diabetes mellitus {HR 2.37 (1.61-3.51) (p<0.001)} and smoking {HR 1.95 (1.49-2.55) (p<0.001)}. Dyslipidemia and history of stroke were also significantly associated with an elevated risk for CA of cardiac origin. Independent midlife risk factors for CA of non-cardiac origin included obesity (BMI>30kg/m(2)) {HR 2.37 (1.51-3.71) (p<0.001)}, smoking {HR 2.05 (1.33-3.15) (p<0.001)} and being on antihypertensive treatment {HR 2.25 (1.46-3.46) (p<0.001)}. Apart from smoking, which increases the risk of CA in general, the midlife risk factor pattern differs between CA of cardiac and non-cardiac origin. Whereas CA of cardiac origin is predicted by history of cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, the main risk factors for CA of non-cardiac origin are obesity and hypertension. In addition to control of classical cardiovascular risk factors for prevention of CA, our results suggest that prevention of midlife obesity may reduce the risk of CA of non-cardiac origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infections in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Jacob R.; Isbell, James M.; Michaels, Alex D.; Lau, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Risk factors for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgical procedures have been well documented. However, the variables associated with CAUTIs in the cardiac surgical population have not been clearly defined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors associated with CAUTIs in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. Methods: All patients undergoing cardiac surgery at a single institution from 2006 through 2012 (4,883 patients) were reviewed. Patients with U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria for CAUTI were identified from the hospital's Quality Assessment database. Pre-operative, operative, and post-operative patient factors were evaluated. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to identify significant correlations between perioperative characteristics and CAUTIs. Results: There were 55 (1.1%) documented CAUTIs in the study population. On univariate analysis, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, cardiogenic shock, urgent or emergent operation, packed red blood cell (PRBC) units transfused, and intensive care unit length of stay (ICU LOS) were all significantly associated with CAUTI [p<0.05]. On multivariable logistic regression, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, and ICU LOS remained significantly associated with CAUTI. Additionally, there was a significant association between CAUTI and 30-d mortality on univariate analysis. However, when controlling for common predictors of operative mortality on multivariable analysis, CAUTI was no longer associated with mortality. Conclusions: There are several identifiable risk factors for CAUTI in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. CAUTI is not independently associated with increased mortality, but it does serve as a marker of sicker patients more likely to die from other comorbidities or complications. Therefore, awareness of the high-risk nature of these patients should lead to

  9. The Influence of Cardiac Risk Factor Burden on Cardiac Stress Test Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Jon W.; Li, Morgan; Orazulike, Chidubem; Emerman, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chest pain is the most common admission diagnosis for observation unit patients. These patients often undergo cardiac stress testing to further risk stratify for coronary artery disease (CAD). The decision of whom to stress is currently based on clinical judgment. We sought to determine the influence of cardiac risk factor burden on cardiac stress test outcome for patients tested from an observation unit, inpatient or outpatient setting. Methods We performed a retrospective observational cohort study for all patients undergoing stress testing in our institution from June 2006 through July 2007. Cardiac risk factors were collected at the time of stress testing. Risk factors were evaluated in a summative fashion using multivariate regression adjusting for age and known coronary artery disease. The model was tested for goodness of fit and collinearity and the c statistic was calculated using the receiver operating curve. Results A total of 4026 subjects were included for analysis of which 22% had known CAD. The rates of positive outcome were 89 (12.0%), 95 (12.6%), and 343 (16.9%) for the OU, outpatients, and hospitalized patients respectively. While the odds of a positive test outcome increased for additional cardiac risk factors, ROC curve analysis indicates that simply adding the number of risk factors does not add significant diagnostic value. Hospitalized patients were more likely to have a positive stress test, OR 1.41 (1.10 - 1.81). Conclusions Our study does not support basing the decision to perform a stress test on the number of cardiac risk factors.

  10. Cardiac hypertrophy: a risk factor for QT-prolongation and cardiac sudden death.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y James

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy was viewed as a compensatory response to hemodynamic stress. However, cumulative evidence obtained from studies using more advanced technologies in human patients and animal models suggests that cardiac hypertrophy is a maladaptive process of the heart in response to intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli. Although hypertrophy can normalize wall tension, it is a risk factor for QT-prolongation and cardiac sudden death. Studies using molecular biology techniques such as transgenic and knockout mice have revealed many important molecules that are involved in the development of heart hypertrophy and have demonstrated signaling pathways leading to the pathogenesis. With the same approach, the consequence of heart hypertrophy has been examined. The significance of hypertrophy in the development of overt heart failure has been demonstrated and several critical molecular pathways involved in the process were revealed. A comprehensive understanding of the threats of heart hypertrophy to patients has helped to develop novel treatment strategies. The recognition of hypertrophy as a major risk factor for QT-prolongation and cardiac sudden death is an important advance in cardiac medicine. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of this risk aspect are currently under extensively exploring. These studies would lead to more comprehensive approaches to prevention of potential life threatening arrhythmia and cardiac sudden death. The adaptation of new approaches such as functional genomics and proteomics will further advance our knowledge of heart hypertrophy.

  11. Preoperative risk factors of malnutrition for cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Donata, Ringaitienė; Dalia, Gineitytė; Vaidas, Vicka; Tadas, Žvirblis; Jūratė, Šipylaitė; Algimantas, Irnius; Juozas, Ivaškevičius

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malnutrition (MN) is prevalent in cardiac surgery, but there are no specific preoperative risk factors of MN. The aim of this study is to assess the clinically relevant risk factors of MN for cardiac surgery patients. Materials and methods. The nutritional state of the patients was evaluated one day prior to surgery using a bioelectrical impedance analysis phase angle (PA). Two groups of patients were generated according to low PA: malnourished and well nourished. Risk factors of MN were divided into three clinically relevant groups: psychosocial and lifestyle factors, laboratory findings and disease-associated factors. Variables in each different group were entered into separate multivariate logistic regression models. Results. A total of 712 patients were included in the study. The majority of them were 65-year old men after a CABG procedure. Low PA was present in 22.9% (163) of patients. The analysis of disease-related factors of MN revealed the importance of heart functions (NYHA IV class OR: 3.073, CI95%: 1.416–6.668, p = 0.007), valve pathology (OR: 1.825, CI95%: 1.182–2.819, p = 0.007), renal insufficiency (OR: 4.091, CI95%: 1.995–8.389, p < 0.001) and body mass index (OR: 0.928, CI95%: 0.890–0.968, p < 0.001). Laboratory values related to MN were levels of haemoglobin (OR: 0.967, CI95%: 0.951–0.983, p < 0.001) and C-reactive protein (OR: 1.015, CI95%: 1.002–1.028, p = 0.0279). The lifestyle variables that qualified as risk factors concerned the intake of food (OR: 3.030, CI95%: 1.353–6.757, p = 0.007) and mobility (OR: 2.770, CI95%: 1.067–7.194, p = 0.036). Conclusions. MN risk factors comprise three different clinical groups: psychosocial and lifestyle factors, laboratory findings and disease-associated factors. The patients who are most likely to be malnourished are those with valve pathology, severe imparted heart function, insufficient renal function and high inflammatory markers. Also these patients have decreased mobility

  12. Risk factors for sudden cardiac death among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ping-Yi; Hung, Galen Chin-Lun; Jhong, Jia-Rong; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2015-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia suffer from excessive premature mortality, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is receiving growing attention as a potential cause. The present study investigated the incidence of SCD and its risk factors in a large schizophrenia cohort. We enrolled a consecutive series of 8264 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (according to DSM-III-R and DSM-IV criteria) who were admitted to a psychiatric center in northern Taiwan from January 1, 1985 through December 31, 2008. By linking with national mortality database, 64 cases of SCD were identified. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for SCD was estimated. The cases were matched with controls randomly selected using risk-set sampling in a 1:2 ratio. A standardized chart review process was used to collect socio-demographic and clinical characteristics and the prescribed drugs for each study subject. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify correlates of SCD at the index admission and the latest admission. The SMR for SCD was 4.5. For the clinical profiles at the index admission, physical disease (adjusted risk ratio [aRR]=2.91, P<.01) and aggressive behaviors (aRR=3.99, P<.01) were associated with the risk of SCD. Regarding the latest admission, electrocardiographic abnormalities (aRR=5.46, P<.05) and administration of first-generation antipsychotics (aRR=5.13, P<.01) elevated the risk for SCD. Consistently, aggressive behaviors (aRR=3.26, P<.05) were associated with increased risk as well. Apart from cardiovascular profiles and antipsychotics, physical aggression is a crucial risk factor that deserves ongoing work for clarifying the mechanisms mediating SCD in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Risk factors and risk index of cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Huang, Tao-Tao; Lin, Jian-Hua

    2012-10-01

    Pregnant women with heart disease are at high risk. Studies of risk factors of these patients are of great significance to improve maternal and fetal outcomes. In this paper, we try to discuss the main risk factors of cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease and to establish a risk assessment system. A retrospective analysis was carried out for pregnancies in 1741 women with heart disease who delivered in Shanghai Obstetrical Cardiology Intensive Care Center between January 1993 and September 2010. A Logistic regression model was used to identify independent risk factors of cardiac events and calculate the risk index in pregnant women with heart disease. The composition of heart disease in pregnant women was arrhythmia (n = 662, 38.00%), congenital heart disease (CHD; n = 529, 30.40%), cardiomyopathy (n = 327, 18.80%), rheumatic heart disease (RHD; n = 151, 8.70%), and cardiopathy induced by pre-eclampsia (n = 53, 3.00%). Main cardiac events were heart failure (n = 110, 6.32%), symptomatic arrhythmia needing medication (n = 43, 2.47%), cardiac arrest (n = 2, 0.11%), syncope (n = 3, 0.17%), and maternal death (n = 10, 0.57%). Six independent risk factors to predict cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease were cardiac events before pregnancy (heart failure, severe arrhythmia, cardiac shock, etc., P = 0.000), New York Heart Association (NYHA) class > II (P = 0.000), oxygen saturation < 90% (P = 0.018), pulmonary artery hypertention (PAH) > 50 mmHg (P = 0.025), cyanotic heart disease without surgical correction (P = 0.015), and reduced left ventricular systolic function (ejection fraction < 40%, P = 0.003). Every risk factor was calculated as 1 score. The incidence of cardiac events in patients with scores 0, 1, 2, 3, and ≥ 4 was 2.10%, 31.61%, 61.25%, 68.97%, and 100.00% respectively. Pregnancy with heart disease could lead to undesirable pregnancy outcomes. The risk of cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease could be assessed by

  14. Risk factor profile for sudden cardiac death during mountain hiking.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, M; Pachinger, O; Schocke, M F H; Ulmer, H

    2007-07-01

    Mountain hiking is associated with a death rate of about 4 deaths per 100,000 hikers annually. About 50 % of all fatalities during mountain hiking are sudden cardiac deaths (SCDs). But there are only few data available regarding risk factors and triggers associated with SCD during mountain hiking. Thus, a case-control analysis between persons who died suddenly during mountain hiking and randomly selected controls was carried out. Risk factor profiles of 179 males over the age of 34 who suffered SCD during mountain hiking were compared to those of 537 matched controls. Hikers who died suddenly during mountain hiking were much more likely to have had a prior MI (17% vs. 0.9%; p < 0.001), known coronary artery disease (CAD) without prior MI (17 % vs. 4%; p < 0.001), diabetes (6% vs. 1 %; p < 0.001), hypercholesterolemia (54 % vs. 20%; p < 0.001), and were less engaged in regular mountain sports activities (31% vs. 58%; p < 0.001) compared to hikers from the control group. Based on the reported relationship between traditional risk factors and coronary plaque morphology, acute plaque rupture with thrombus formation and subsequent lethal arrhythmias may be assumed to be a dominant mechanism precipitating SCD during hiking. In contrast, in skiers especially non-occlusive plaques may precipitate ischemia leading to an imbalance between oxygen demand and supply and subsequent lethal arrhythmias. As preventive measures recommended to hikers at risk, adaptation to regular mountain sports activities by an adequate training program and pharmacological interventions, e.g. lipid lowering drugs, aspirin, and beta-blockers, should be considered.

  15. Radiation Therapy, Cardiac Risk Factors, and Cardiac Toxicity in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, John J.; Wang Jian; McBride, Russell; Neugut, Alfred I.; Grann, Victor R. ||; Jacobson, Judith S. |; Grann, Alison; Hershman, Dawn ||. E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The benefits of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer may be counterbalanced by the risk of cardiac toxicity. We studied the cardiac effects of RT and the impact of pre-existing cardiac risk factors (CRFs) in a population-based sample of older patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database of women {>=}65 years diagnosed with Stages I to III breast cancer from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2000, we used multivariable logistic regression to model the associations of demographic and clinical variables with postmastectomy and postlumpectomy RT. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we then modeled the association between treatment and myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia in the 10 or more years after diagnosis, taking the predictors of treatment into account. Results: Among 48,353 women with breast cancer; 19,897 (42%) were treated with lumpectomy and 26,534 (55%) with mastectomy; the remainder had unknown surgery type (3%). Receipt of RT was associated with later year of diagnosis, younger age, fewer comorbidities, nonrural residence, and chemotherapy. Postlumpectomy RT was also associated with white ethnicity and no prior history of heart disease (HD). The RT did not increase the risk of MI. Presence of MI was associated with age, African American ethnicity, advanced stage, nonrural residence, more than one comorbid condition, a hormone receptor-negative tumor, CRFs and HD. Among patients who received RT, tumor laterality was not associated with MI outcome. The effect of RT on the heart was not influenced by HD or CRFs. Conclusion: It appears unlikely that RT would increase the risk of MI in elderly women with breast cancer, regardless of type of surgery, tumor laterality, or history of CRFs or HD, for at least 10 years.

  16. Modifiable Risk Factors and Major Cardiac Events Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Gregory T.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Chen, Yan; Kawashima, Toana; Yasui, Yutaka; Leisenring, Wendy; Stovall, Marilyn; Chow, Eric J.; Sklar, Charles A.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Mertens, Ann C.; Border, William; Durand, Jean-Bernard; Robison, Leslie L.; Meacham, Lillian R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative contribution of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors on the development of major cardiac events in aging adult survivors of childhood cancer. Patients and Methods Among 10,724 5-year survivors (median age, 33.7 years) and 3,159 siblings in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and obesity was determined, along with the incidence and severity of major cardiac events such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular disease, and arrhythmia. On longitudinal follow-up, rate ratios (RRs) of subsequent cardiac events associated with cardiovascular risk factors and cardiotoxic therapy were assessed in multivariable Poisson regression models. Results Among survivors, the cumulative incidence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular disease, and arrhythmia by 45 years of age was 5.3%, 4.8%, 1.5%, and 1.3%, respectively. Two or more cardiovascular risk factors were reported by 10.3% of survivors and 7.9% of siblings. The risk for each cardiac event increased with increasing number of cardiovascular risk factors (all Ptrend < .001). Hypertension significantly increased risk for coronary artery disease (RR, 6.1), heart failure (RR, 19.4), valvular disease (RR, 13.6), and arrhythmia (RR, 6.0; all P values < .01). The combined effect of chest-directed radiotherapy plus hypertension resulted in potentiation of risk for each of the major cardiac events beyond that anticipated on the basis of an additive expectation. Hypertension was independently associated with risk of cardiac death (RR, 5.6; 95% CI, 3.2 to 9.7). Conclusion Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, particularly hypertension, potentiate therapy-associated risk for major cardiac events in this population and should be the focus of future interventional studies. PMID:24002505

  17. Risk factors for decreased cardiac output after coronary artery bypass grafting: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Eduarda Ribeiro; Lopes, Camila Takao; Maria, Vera Lucia Regina; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2017-04-01

    No previous study has investigated the predictive risk factors of the nursing diagnosis of risk for decreased cardiac output after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This study aimed to identify the predictive risk factors of the nursing diagnosis of risk for decreased cardiac output after CABG. This was a prospective cohort study performed at a cardiac university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil and 257 adult patients undergoing CABG were included. Potential risk factors for low cardiac output in the immediate post-operative period were investigated using the patients' medical records. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were used to identify the predictive risk factors of decreased cardiac output. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated as a measure of accuracy. The variables that could not be analysed through logistic regression were analysed through Fisher's exact test. One hundred and ninety-five patients had low cardiac output in the immediate post-operative period. The predictive risk factors included age ⩾60 years, decreased left ventricle ejection fraction, not using the radial artery graft, positive fluid balance and post-operative arrhythmia that differed from the pre-operative arrhythmia. This model predicted the outcome with a sensitivity of 62.9%, a specificity of 87.2% and an accuracy of 81.5%. The variables analysed through Fisher's exact test included heart failure, re-exploration and bleeding-related re-exploration. The predictive risk factors for the nursing diagnosis of risk for decreased cardiac output after CABG were found. These results can be used to direct nurses in patient monitoring, staff training and nursing team staffing.

  18. Risk factors for transient dysfunction of gas exchange after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cristiane Delgado Alves; Moreira, Marcos Mello; Lima, Núbia Maria Freire Vieira; de Figueirêdo, Luciana Castilho; Falcão, Antônio Luis Eiras; Petrucci, Orlando; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2015-01-01

    Objective A retrospective cohort study was preformed aiming to verify the presence of transient dysfunction of gas exchange in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and determine if this disorder is linked to cardiorespiratory events. Methods We included 942 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery and cardiac procedures who were referred to the Intensive Care Unit between June 2007 and November 2011. Results Fifteen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (2%), 199 (27.75%) had mild transient dysfunction of gas exchange, 402 (56.1%) had moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange, and 39 (5.4%) had severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange. Hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the emergence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange postoperatively (P=0.02 and P=0.019, respectively) and were risk factors for this dysfunction (P=0.0023 and P=0.0017, respectively). Diabetes mellitus was also a risk factor for transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.03). Pneumonia was present in 8.9% of cases and correlated with the presence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.001). Severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange was associated with patients who had renal replacement therapy (P=0.0005), hemotherapy (P=0.0001), enteral nutrition (P=0.0012), or cardiac arrhythmia (P=0.0451). Conclusion Preoperative hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the occurrence of postoperative transient dysfunction of gas exchange. The preoperative risk factors included hypertension, cardiogenic shock, and diabetes. Postoperatively, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, renal replacement therapy, hemotherapy, and cardiac arrhythmia were associated with the appearance of some degree of transient dysfunction of gas exchange, which was a risk factor for reintubation, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and cardiac

  19. Sexual activity and cardiac risk: is depression a contributing factor?

    PubMed

    Roose, S P; Seidman, S N

    2000-07-20

    There is a well-documented association between depression, ischemic heart disease, and cardiovascular mortality. This association has a number of dimensions including: (1) depressed patients have a higher than expected rate of sudden cardiovascular death; (2) over the course of a lifetime, patients with depression develop symptomatic and fatal ischemic heart disease at a higher rate compared with a nondepressed group; and (3) depression after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with increased cardiac mortality. Depression is also associated with sexual dysfunction, particularly erectile dysfunction. If depression is the primary illness, then erectile dysfunction can be considered a symptom of the depressive illness. However, if the erectile dysfunction is primary, men may develop a depressive syndrome in reaction to the loss of sexual function. Regardless of whether erectile dysfunction is a symptom of depression or depression is a consequence of erectile dysfunction, these conditions are frequently comorbid. Thus, the patient with ischemic heart disease who is depressed is more likely to have erectile difficulties. An attempt by this patient to engage in sexual activity is therefore more likely to be unsuccessful and, given the increase in cardiac mortality associated with depression, it may result in a serious cardiac event.

  20. Risk Factors Associated with Cognitive Decline after Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikil; Minhas, Jatinder S.; Chung, Emma M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Modern day cardiac surgery evolved upon the advent of cardiopulmonary bypass machines (CPB) in the 1950s. Following this development, cardiac surgery in recent years has improved significantly. Despite such advances and the introduction of new technologies, neurological sequelae after cardiac surgery still exist. Ischaemic stroke, delirium, and cognitive impairment cause significant morbidity and mortality and unfortunately remain common complications. Postoperative cognitive decline (POCD) is believed to be associated with the presence of new ischaemic lesions originating from emboli entering the cerebral circulation during surgery. Cardiopulmonary bypass was thought to be the reason of POCD, but randomised controlled trials comparing with off-pump surgery show contradictory results. Attention has now turned to the growing evidence that perioperative risk factors, as well as patient-related risk factors, play an important role in early and late POCD. Clearly, identifying the mechanism of POCD is challenging. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the literature that has investigated patient and perioperative risk factors to better understand the magnitude of the risk factors associated with POCD after cardiac surgery. PMID:26491558

  1. Incidence, presentation and risk factors of late postoperative pericardial effusions requiring invasive treatment after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Khan, Niina K; Järvelä, Kati M; Loisa, Eetu L; Sutinen, Jaakko A; Laurikka, Jari O; Khan, Jahangir A

    2017-06-01

    Occurrence and risk factors of late postoperative pericardial effusions requiring invasive treatment, i.e. pretamponade and tamponade, following cardiac surgery are incompletely described in current literature. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and presentation of late pretamponade and tamponade as well as to outline significant predisposing factors. A cohort of 1356 consecutive cardiac surgery patients treated in a tertiary academic centre between January 2013 and December 2014 was followed up for 6 months after surgery. Pericardial effusion was considered late when presenting after the 7th postoperative day. The incidence, timing and risk factors, as well as symptoms and clinical findings associated with late pretamponade and tamponade in patients surviving at least 7 days was analysed. Of 1308 patients included in the analysis, 81 (6.2%) underwent invasive treatment for late postoperative pericardial effusion, 27 (2.1%) for pretamponade and 54 (4.1%) for tamponade, respectively, with a median delay of 11 (range 8-87) days after the primary operation. Haemodynamic instability was present in 34.6%, signs of cardiac chamber compression in 54.3% and subjective symptoms, mostly dyspnoea, in 56.8% of patients, respectively. Treated patients were younger, had lower EuroSCORE-II rating, less coronary disease, better cardiac function, higher preoperative haemoglobin values and had mostly undergone elective surgery involving cardiac valves. In multivariable analysis, independent risk factors were single valve surgery and high preoperative haemoglobin level, whereas age 60-69 years was associated with lower risk. Younger, generally healthier patients undergoing valve surgery are at greatest risk for developing late tamponade or pretamponade.

  2. Risk factor paradox in the occurrence of cardiac arrest in acute coronary syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Silvia Aguiar; Timóteo, Ana Teresa; Nogueira, Marta Afonso; Belo, Adriana; Ferreira, Rui Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare patients without previously diagnosed cardiovascular risk factors) and patients with one or more risk factors admitted with acute coronary syndrome. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of patients admitted with first episode of acute coronary syndrome without previous heart disease, who were included in a national acute coronary syndrome registry. The patients were divided according to the number of risk factors, as follows: 0 risk factor (G0), 1 or 2 risk factors (G1 - 2) and 3 or more risk factors (G ≥ 3). Comparative analysis was performed between the three groups, and independent predictors of cardiac arrest and death were studied. Results A total of 5,518 patients were studied, of which 72.2% were male and the mean age was 64 ± 14 years. G0 had a greater incidence of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, with the left anterior descending artery being the most frequently involved vessel, and a lower prevalence of multivessel disease. Even though G0 had a lower Killip class (96% in Killip I; p < 0.001) and higher ejection fraction (G0 56 ± 10% versus G1 - 2 and G ≥ 3 53 ± 12%; p = 0.024) on admission, there was a significant higher incidence of cardiac arrest. Multivariate analysis identified the absence of risk factors as an independent predictor of cardiac arrest (OR 2.78; p = 0.019). Hospital mortality was slightly higher in G0, although this difference was not significant. By Cox regression analysis, the number of risk factors was found not to be associated with mortality. Predictors of death at 1 year follow up included age (OR 1.05; p < 0.001), ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (OR 1.94; p = 0.003) and ejection fraction < 50% (OR 2.34; p < 0.001). Conclusion Even though the group without risk factors was composed of younger patients with fewer comorbidities, better left ventricular function and less extensive coronary disease, the absence of risk factors was an independent predictor of cardiac arrest. PMID

  3. Ketorolac-associated renal morbidity: risk factors in cardiac surgical infants.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Brady S; Cabrera, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    We aimed to identify the risk factors for acute kidney injury in infants who have received ketorolac after a cardiac surgical procedure by identifying patients with a > or = 50% increase in serum creatinine from baseline and matching them by age with three controls that had < 50% increase in serum creatinine. Significant differences in primary surgical procedure, baseline serum creatinine, and concomitant aspirin use were noted. We conclude that the concomitant use of aspirin with ketorolac is associated with increased renal morbidity in young post-cardiac surgical infants.

  4. Risk factors for the development of postoperative pneumonia after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Vera Urquiza, Rafael; Bucio Reta, Eduardo Rafael; Berríos Bárcenas, Enrique Alexander; Choreño Machain, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Identify risk factors that determine pneumonia development in patients who have undergone cardiac surgery. Prospective study of a single cohort in a postoperative intensive care unit at a tertiary care center, encompassing all patients undergoing cardiac surgery from January to July 2014. 31 postoperative pneumonia cases were enrolled out of 211 patients (14.6%). The following independent risk factors were identified: hypertension (OR: 3.94, p=0.01), chronic renal failure (OR: 13.67, p=0.02), reintubation (OR: 22.29, p=0.001) and extubation after 6h (OR: 15.81, p=0.005). Main determinants for pneumonia after surgery were hypertension, chronic renal failure, extubation after 6h and reintubation. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  5. Thyroid gland and cerebella lesions: New risk factors for sudden cardiac death in schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Scorza, Fulvio A; Cavalheiro, Esper A; de Albuquerque, Marly; de Albuquerque, Juliana; Cysneiros, Roberta M; Terra, Vera C; Arida, Ricardo M

    2011-02-01

    People with schizophrenia show a two to threefold increased risk to die prematurely than those without schizophrenia. Patients' life style, suicide, premature development of cardiovascular disease, high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and sudden cardiac death are well-known causes of the excess mortality. The exact pathophysiological cause of sudden death in schizophrenia is unknown, but it is likely that cardiac arrhythmia and respiratory abnormalities play potential role. Some antipsychotics may be associated with cardiovascular adverse events (e.g., QT interval prolongation) and lesions in specific brain regions, such as cerebella may be associated with respiratory abnormalities, suggesting that metabolic and brain dysfunction could lead to sudden cardiac death in patients with schizophrenia. However, exact knowledge regarding the association of these findings and schizophrenia is lacking. As subclinical hyperthyroidism has been linked with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cerebella progressive atrophy has been observed in patients with schizophrenia, we propose in this paper that subclinical thyroid dysfunction and cerebella volume loss could be considered as new risk factor for sudden cardiac death in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk factors for heart failure during pregnancy among Chinese women with cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qin; Lin, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    To identify risk factors for heart failure (HF) during pregnancy among women with pre-existing cardiac disease. A retrospective review was conducted of pregnant women with cardiac disease who attended Shanghai Obstetrical Cardiology Intensive Care Center, China, for delivery between January 1, 1993, and December 31, 2013. Independent predictors of HF were identified by logistic regression analysis. Among 1086 pregnant women with cardiac disease, 116 (10.7%) developed HF. In multivariate analysis, HF was associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (odds ratio [OR] 13.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.62-47.80; P<0.001), history of HF before pregnancy (OR 11.66, 95% CI 5.83-23.33; P<0.001), twin pregnancy (OR 11.63, 95% CI 4.10-32.99; P<0.001), sinus tachycardia (OR 4.60, 95% CI 2.77-7.62; P<0.001), New York Heart Association functional class higher than II (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.11-10.25; P=0.033), and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.10-1.78; P=0.007). Women with cardiac disease who wish to become pregnant should be guided by risk factors for HF. Those who do conceive should be closely monitored during pregnancy to improve outcomes and reduce maternal mortality and morbidity. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk Factor and Prediction Modeling for Sudden Cardiac Death in Women with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Rajat; Vittinghoff, Eric; Lin, Feng; Tseng, Zian H.; Hulley, Stephen B.; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The risk of sudden cardiac death and the assessment of risk factors in prediction models have not been assessed in women with coronary artery disease (CAD). We sought to evaluate sudden cardiac death (SCD) incidence, risk factors and their predictive accuracy among a population of women with CAD. Methods The Hormone and Estrogen Replacement Study (HERS) evaluated the effects of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular events among 2,763 postmenopausal women with CAD. SCD was defined as death from cardiac origin that occurred within 1 hour of symptom onset. The associations between candidate predictor variables and SCD were evaluated in a Cox proportional hazards model. The C-index was used to compare the predictive value of the clinical risk factors with left ventricular ejection fraction alone and in combination. The net reclassification improvement (NRI) was also computed. Results Over a mean follow-up of 6.8 years, SCD comprised 136 of the 254 cardiac deaths. The annual SCD event rate was 0.79% (95% CI, 0.67–0.94%). The following variables were independently associated with SCD in the multivariate model: myocardial infarction, heart failure, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <40ml/min/1.73m2, atrial fibrillation, physical inactivity and diabetes. The incidences of SCD among women with 0 (n=683), 1 (n=1224), 2 (n=610), and 3 plus (n=246) risk factors at baseline were 0.3, 0.5, 1.2 and 2.9% per year, respectively. The combination of clinical risk factors and LVEF (C-index 0.681) were better predictors of SCD than LVEF alone (C-index 0.600) and resulted in a NRI of 0.20 (p<0.001). Conclusions SCD comprised the majority of cardiac deaths among postmenopausal women with CAD. Independent predictors of SCD including myocardial infarction, heart failure, eGFR <40ml/min/1.73m2, atrial fibrillation, physical inactivity and diabetes improved SCD prediction when used in addition to LVEF. PMID:21788534

  8. Risk factors, morbidity, and mortality associated with atrial fibrillation in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rogério Gomes da; Lima, Gustavo Glotz de; Laranjeira, Andréia; Costa, Altamiro Reis da; Pereira, Edemar; Rodrigues, Rubem

    2004-08-01

    To determine the incidence of atrial fibrillation in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery, its impact on morbidity, mortality, and hospital stay, and to analyze the risk factors in the pre, trans, and postoperative periods. Contemporary cohort study with 158 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery, of whom those with atrial fibrillation in the preoperative period were excluded. The patients were assessed with continuous cardiac monitoring and daily electrocardiograms. Any episode of irregular rhythm with the presence of f waves of variable morphology and amplitude was considered atrial fibrillation. The general incidence of atrial fibrillation was 28.5%, being 21.6% for revascularized patients and 44.3% for those undergoing valvular repair. Factors independently associated with atrial fibrillation were left heart failure in the preoperative period (p=0.05; RC=2.2), total fluid balance (p=0.01; RC=1.0), duration of surgery (p=0.03; RC=1.01) [and other associated factors, age > 70 years, aortic valvular disease, psychomotor agitation, length of installation of the drains, pulmonary congestion and respiratory insufficiency in the postoperative period]. The use of beta-blockers (p=0.01; RC=0.3) was a protective factor. Atrial fibrillation in the postoperative period was associated with an increase in the length of hospital stay (16.9+/-12.3 days versus 9.2+/-4.0 days, p<0.001) and a greater incidence of stroke or postoperative death (p=0.02). The incidence of atrial fibrillation in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery was high and caused a significant increase in morbidity, mortality, and the length of hospital stay. Among the independent risk factors, excessive fluid balance is significant. The use of beta-blockers was identified as a protective factor.

  9. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... helpful? Formal name: Cardiac Risk Assessment Related tests: Lipid Profile , VLDL Cholesterol , hs-CRP , Lp(a) Overview | Common ... on Coronary artery disease: Tests and diagnosis .) The lipid profile is the most important blood test for cardiac ...

  10. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Pericardial Effusions Requiring Readmission After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Elias, Matthew D; Glatz, Andrew C; O'Connor, Matthew J; Schachtner, Susan; Ravishankar, Chitra; Mascio, Christoper E; Cohen, Meryl S

    2017-03-01

    Pericardial effusion (PE) may require readmission after cardiac surgery and has been associated with postoperative morbidity and mortality. We sought to identify the prevalence and risk factors for postoperative PE requiring readmission in children. A retrospective analysis of the Pediatric Health Information System database was performed between January 1, 2003, and September 30, 2014. All patients ≤18 years old who underwent cardiac surgery were identified by ICD-9 codes. Those readmitted within 1 year with an ICD-9 code for PE were identified. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine risk factors for PE readmissions. Of the 142,633 surgical admissions, 1535 (1.1%) were readmitted with PE. In multivariable analysis, older age at the initial surgical admission [odds ratio (OR) 1.17, p < 0.001], trisomy 21 (OR 1.24, p = 0.015), geographic region (OR 1.33-1.48, p ≤ 0.001), and specific surgical procedures [heart transplant (OR 1.82, p < 0.001), systemic-pulmonary artery shunt (OR 2.23, p < 0.001), and atrial septal defect surgical repair (OR 1.34, p < 0.001)] were independent risk factors for readmission with PE. Of readmitted patients, 44.2% underwent an interventional PE procedure. Factors associated with interventions included shorter length of stay (LOS) for the initial surgical admission (OR 0.85, p = 0.008), longer LOS for the readmission (OR 1.37, p < 0.001), and atrial septal defect surgery (OR 1.40, p = 0.005). In this administrative database of children undergoing cardiac surgery, readmissions for PE occurred after 1.1% of cardiac surgery admissions. The risk factors identified for readmissions and interventions may allow for improved risk stratification, family counseling, and earlier recognition of PE for children undergoing cardiac surgery.

  11. Risk factors for increased in-hospital mortality: a cohort study among cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Baltopoulos, George I; Charitos, Christos; Patelarou, Evridiki; Fotos, Nikolaos V; Brokalaki-Pananoudaki, Hero

    2012-03-01

    Mortality is an important healthcare index for assessing the quality and the effectiveness of the provided nursing care. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for increased in-hospital mortality among cardiac surgery patients. We followed up prospectively 313 consecutive patients who were admitted to the cardiac surgery intensive care unit (ICU) of a general, tertiary hospital in Athens during a 1 year period. Data collection was performed by using a short questionnaire and two instruments, the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) and the logistic EuroSCORE for assessing the nursing workload (NWL) and the perioperative risk for each patient respectively. Patients with a high 1st day NAS had an almost 3.3 times greater probability of death during their hospitalization (OR 3.3, 95%CI 1.4-8). Moreover, patients with increased perioperative risk (OR 4.2, 95%CI 1.50-12) and ICU length of stay (ICU-LOS) (OR 16.8, 95%CI 4.8-58.6) had statistically significant higher in-hospital mortality. Increased level of NWL, patient perioperative risk and ICU-LOS are closely associated with increased in-hospital mortality of cardiac surgery patients. The correlation between NWL and mortality represents the strong link of the nursing profession with the improvement of the effectiveness and quality of care.

  12. Chronic kidney disease and risk factors responsible for sudden cardiac death: a whiff of hope?

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Márcio G.; Mion, Decio

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown a strong independent association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular events, including death, heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Recent clinical trials extend this range of adverse cardiovascular events, also including ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, other studies suggest structural remodeling of the heart and electrophysiological alterations in this population. These processes may explain the increased risk of arrhythmia in kidney disease and help to identify patients who are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death. Sympathetic hyperactivity is well known to increase cardiovascular risk in CKD patients and is a hallmark of essential hypertensive state that occurs early in the clinical course of the disease. In CKD, the sympathetic hyperactivity seems to be expressed at the earliest clinical stage of the disease, showing a direct relationship with the severity of the condition of renal failure, being more pronounced in the terminal stage of CKD. The sympathetic efferent and afferent neural activity in kidney failure is a key mediator for the maintenance and progression of the disease. The aim of this review was to show that the feedback loop of this cycle, due to adrenergic hyperactivity, also aggravates many of the risk factors responsible for causing sudden cardiac death and may be a potential target modifiable by percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation. If it is feasible and effective in end-stage renal disease, little is known. PMID:27069851

  13. Cardiac risk factors and risk scores vs cardiac computed tomography angiography: a prospective cohort study for triage of ED patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Ethan J; Deutsch, Jacob P; Hannaway, Maria M; Estepa, Adrian T; Kenia, Anand S; Neuburger, Kenneth J; Levin, David C

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate cardiac risk factors and risk scores for prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) and adverse outcomes in an emergency department (ED) population judged to be at low to intermediate risk for acute coronary syndrome. Informed consent was obtained from consecutive ED patients who presented with chest pain and were evaluated with coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA). Cardiac risk factors, clinical presentation, electrocardiogram, and laboratory studies were recorded; the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores were tabulated. Coronary computed tomography angiography findings were rated on a 6-level plaque burden scale and classified for significant CAD (stenosis ≥50%). Adverse cardiovascular outcomes were recorded at 30 days. Among 250 patients evaluated by cCTA, 143 (57%) had no CAD, 64 (26%) demonstrated minimal plaque (<30% stenosis), 26 (10%) demonstrated mild plaque (<50% stenosis), 9 (4%) demonstrated moderate single vessel disease (50%-70% stenosis), 2 (1%) demonstrated moderate multivessel disease, and 6 (2%) demonstrated severe disease (>70% stenosis). Six patients developed adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Among traditional cardiac risk factors, only age (older) and sex (male) were significant independent predictors of CAD. Correlation with CAD was poor for the TIMI (r = 0.12) and GRACE (r = 0.09-0.23) scores. The TIMI and GRACE scores were not useful to predict adverse outcomes. Coronary computed tomography angiography identified severe CAD in all subjects with adverse outcomes. Among ED patients who present with chest pain judged to be at low to intermediate risk for acute coronary syndrome, traditional risk factors are not useful to stratify risk for CAD and adverse outcomes. Coronary computed tomography angiography is an excellent predictor of CAD and outcome. © 2013.

  14. Incidence and Risk Factors for Postcontrast Acute Kidney Injury in Survivors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Petek, Bradley J; Bravo, Paco E; Kim, Francis; de Boer, Ian H; Kudenchuk, Peter J; Shuman, William P; Gunn, Martin L; Carlbom, David J; Gill, Edward A; Maynard, Charles; Branch, Kelley R

    2016-04-01

    Survivors of sudden cardiac arrest may be exposed to iodinated contrast from invasive coronary angiography or contrast-enhanced computed tomography, although the effects on incident acute kidney injury are unknown. The study objective was to determine whether contrast administration within the first 24 hours was associated with acute kidney injury in survivors of sudden cardiac arrest. This cohort study, derived from a prospective clinical trial, included patients with sudden cardiac arrest who survived for 48 hours, had no history of end-stage renal disease, and had at least 2 serum creatinine measurements during hospitalization. The contrast group included patients with exposure to iodinated contrast within 24 hours of sudden cardiac arrest. Incident acute kidney injury and first-time dialysis were compared between contrast and no contrast groups and then controlled for known acute kidney injury risk factors. Of the 199 survivors of sudden cardiac arrest, 94 received iodinated contrast. Mean baseline serum creatinine level was 1.3 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4 to 1.5 mg/dL) for the contrast group and 1.6 mg/dL (95% CI 1.4 to 1.7 mg/dL) for the no contrast group. Incident acute kidney injury was lower in the contrast group (12.8%) than the no contrast group (17.1%; difference 4.4%; 95% CI -9.2% to 17.5%). Contrast administration was not associated with significant increases in incident acute kidney injury within quartiles of baseline serum creatinine level or after controlling for age, sex, race, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and admission serum creatinine level by regression analysis. Older age was independently associated with acute kidney injury. Despite elevated baseline serum creatinine level in most survivors of sudden cardiac arrest, iodinated contrast administration was not associated with incident acute kidney injury even when other acute kidney injury risk factors were controlled for. Thus, although acute kidney injury is not uncommon

  15. Prior myocardial infarction is the major risk factor associated with sudden cardiac death during downhill skiing.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, M; Pachinger, O; Mittleman, M A; Ulmer, H

    2000-11-01

    More than 90% of all sudden cardiac deaths (SCDs) during downhill skiing, the most popular winter sport world-wide, are attributed to men over the age of 34. However, no data exist on additional risk factors and triggers for SCD related to downhill skiing. Therefore risk factor profiles of 68 males who died from SCD during downhill skiing were compared to those of 204 matched controls. Skiers who suffered SCD had much more frequently prior myocardial infarction (MI) (41% vs. 1.5%; p<0.001), hypertension (50% vs. 17%; p<0.001), known coronary heart disease (CHD) without prior MI (9% vs. 3%; p=0.05) and were less engaged in strenuous exercise (4% vs. 15%; p<0.05) when compared to controls. Multivariate analyses even enhanced the importance of these risk factors. Downhill skiing is considered to be a serious trigger for SCD especially in skiers with prior MI but also for those with hypertension, known CHD without prior MI, or insufficient adaptation to strenuous exercise. Skiing-related increased sympathetic activity might well disturb the autonomic balance with subsequent arrhythmias and/or may increase cardiac work and platelet aggregability with possible plaque rupture and coronary thrombosis. Therefore adaptation to high intensity exercise and therapeutic interventions or abstinence from skiing in certain cases should be considered for downhill skiers at high risk.

  16. [Sudden Cardiac Death of Young Persons: Risk Factors, Causes, Morphological Equivalents].

    PubMed

    Shilova, M A; Mamedov, M N

    2015-01-01

    The article contains literature review on the problem of causes of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among young people as well as results of author's own retrospective study of deaths of persons before 39 years based on forensic autopsies performed during 10 year period. The study of structure and dynamics of causes of death, its risk factors and the role of connective tissue dysplasia in development of terminal symptomocomlexes allowed to establish that main mechanism of SCD in young people was arrhythmogenic developing as a response to provoking factors--physical effort, psychoemotional stress, consumption of light alcoholic beverages.

  17. Epilepsy Is a Risk Factor for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Bardai, Abdennasser; Lamberts, Robert J.; Blom, Marieke T.; Spanjaart, Anne M.; Berdowski, Jocelyn; van der Staal, Sebastiaan R.; Brouwer, Henk J.; Koster, Rudolph W.; Sander, Josemir W.; Thijs, Roland D.; Tan, Hanno L.

    2012-01-01

    Background People with epilepsy are at increased risk for sudden death. The most prevalent cause of sudden death in the general population is sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular fibrillation (VF). SCA may contribute to the increased incidence of sudden death in people with epilepsy. We assessed whether the risk for SCA is increased in epilepsy by determining the risk for SCA among people with active epilepsy in a community-based study. Methods and Results This investigation was part of the Amsterdam Resuscitation Studies (ARREST) in the Netherlands. It was designed to assess SCA risk in the general population. All SCA cases in the study area were identified and matched to controls (by age, sex, and SCA date). A diagnosis of active epilepsy was ascertained in all cases and controls. Relative risk for SCA was estimated by calculating the adjusted odds ratios using conditional logistic regression (adjustment was made for known risk factors for SCA). We identified 1019 cases of SCA with ECG-documented VF, and matched them to 2834 controls. There were 12 people with active epilepsy among cases and 12 among controls. Epilepsy was associated with a three-fold increased risk for SCA (adjusted OR 2.9 [95%CI 1.1–8.0.], p = 0.034). The risk for SCA in epilepsy was particularly increased in young and females. Conclusion Epilepsy in the general population seems to be associated with an increased risk for SCA. PMID:22916156

  18. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Cardiac Patients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Considerations for Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tulloch, Heather; Greenman, Paul S.; Tassé, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on physical health, particularly cardiovascular disease. We review the literature on the role of trauma in the development of cardiovascular risk factors and disease, aftermath of a cardiac event, and risk for recurrence in cardiac patients. We explore possible mechanisms to explain these relationships, as well as appropriate assessment and treatment strategies for this population. Our main conclusion is that screening and referral for appropriate treatments are important given the high prevalence rates of PTSD in cardiac populations and the associated impact on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25545708

  19. Postoperative Arrhythmias after Cardiac Surgery: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Therapeutic Management

    PubMed Central

    Cianflone, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias are a known complication after cardiac surgery and represent a major cause of morbidity, increased length of hospital stay, and economic costs. However, little is known about incidence, risk factors, and treatment of early postoperative arrhythmias. Both tachyarrhythmias and bradyarrhythmias can present in the postoperative period. In this setting, atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder. Postoperative atrial fibrillation is often self-limiting, but it may require anticoagulation therapy and either a rate or rhythm control strategy. However, ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances can also occur. Sustained ventricular arrhythmias in the recovery period after cardiac surgery may warrant acute treatment and long-term preventive strategy in the absence of reversible causes. Transient bradyarrhythmias may be managed with temporary pacing wires placed at surgery, but significant and persistent atrioventricular block or sinus node dysfunction can occur with the need for permanent pacing. We provide a complete and updated review about mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment strategies for the main postoperative arrhythmias. PMID:24511410

  20. The impact of cardiac risk factors on short-term outcomes for children undergoing a Ladd procedure.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Luke R; Anderson, Kathryn T; Tsao, KuoJen; Kao, Lillian S; Lugo, Jane A; Lally, Kevin P; Kawaguchi, Akemi L

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the outcomes of children with and without congenital heart disease who undergo a Ladd procedure. The 2012-2014 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (NSQIP-P) data were queried for patients undergoing a Ladd procedure. Utilizing NSQIP-P definitions, patients were categorized into four cardiac risk groups (none, minor, major, severe) based on severity of cardiac anomalies, previous cardiac procedure(s), and ongoing cardiac dysfunction. Ladd procedures were elective/non-elective. Outcomes included length of stay, adverse events, and mortality. 878 patients underwent Ladd procedures. 633 (72%) patients had no cardiac risk factors and 84 (10%), 109 (12%), and 52 (6%) had minor, major, and severe cardiac risk factors, respectively. Children with congenital heart disease experienced increased morbidity and mortality and longer hospital stays (all p<0.05). Elective Ladd procedures were associated with similar morbidity but shorter length of stay and lower mortality than non-elective procedures. Older age at time of operation was associated with fewer adverse events. Although overall mortality remains low, children with higher risk cardiac disease experience increased morbidity and mortality when undergoing a Ladd procedure. Older age at the time of the Ladd procedure was associated with improved outcomes in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-term risk factor management after inpatient cardiac rehabilitation by means of a structured post-care programme.

    PubMed

    Harb, Birgit M; Wonisch, Manfred; Brandt, Dieter; Müller, Rudolf

    2011-12-01

    Initiation of a long-term improvement of cardiac risk factors is one of the major aims of a cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programme. The Health Guide collected data in terms of cardiac risk factors: blood pressure, resting pulse, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, body weight, physical activity and number of cigarettes at admission and discharge after a stationary rehabilitation programme and every 3 months. After 12 months the Health Guides were returned. In the prospective study 2664 patients (71.8% men, age: MV = 62.94 years, SD = 9.96; 28% women, MV = 67.59 years, SD = 9.53) with coronary heart disease (CHD) were included. All cardiac risk factors documented by the Health Guide improved during the cardiac rehabilitation programme. After one year, risk factors were significantly lower than at admission, apart from total cholesterol. The individual goal in terms of body weight and LDL cholesterol was partially achieved after the rehabilitation programme and maintained after one year. In the investigation years, 2004-2007, the cholesterol and blood pressure were significantly lower than in the years 2000-2003. The use of a Health Guide resulted in an improved long-term effect of a cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programme. It is a simple and cheap intervention and can help in the guidance of the patients.

  2. Cardiac related death in thalassaemia major: time trend and risk factors in a large Greek Unit.

    PubMed

    Chouliaras, Giorgos; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Berdoukas, Vasilios; Ladis, Vassilios

    2009-05-01

    Cardiac complications are the leading cause of death in thalassaemic patients (TM) worldwide. Improved management protocols including new chelators and imaging have reduced cardiac-related deaths but also require more advanced analytical methods to reflect temporal fluctuations in mortality risk. To evaluate time patterns of risk of cardiac death in TM patients according to birth cohort, gender and degree of haemosiderosis and to apply new flexible methods of analysis that may allow assessment of trends in risks as affected by innovations in management. Cardiac-free survival and time trend of the risk of cardiac-related death were assessed in 648 transfusion-depended thalassaemic patients (48.3% females) managed in a single unit located in Athens, Greece. Patients were classified according to birth cohort (prior or after 1/1/1975) and according to the severity of haemosiderosis (mild, moderate and severe) as estimated by the mean ferritin levels during the last 5 yr of follow-up. The median time of observation was 27.8 yr and 84 cardiac deaths were recorded. A parametric analysis predicted a non-monotonous time pattern for the cardiac risk with an initial increasing phase until the fourth decade of life followed by a drop off in deaths. Women have 23% longer life expectancy than men (P = 0.010) while patients born after 1975 die of heart complications at an older age compared to those born prior to 1975 (time ratio = 1.34, P = 0.003). Patients with mild and moderate haemosiderosis lived 89% (P < 0.001) and 43% (P < 0.001) longer, respectively, compared with patients with severe haemosiderosis. These results on risk of death in thalassaemia, accord with expectations. This type of analysis will be useful in the future when the expected impact of cardiac MRI with appropriate tailoring of chelation therapy using all current and future options will modify the pattern of risk of cardiac death observed to date.

  3. Perceptions of cardiac risk factors and risk-reduction behavior in women with known coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Moore, Leslie C; Kimble, Laura P; Minick, Ptlene

    2010-01-01

    Risk factor reduction has been linked to personal perceptions of risk, yet few data exist about women's personal perceptions of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, especially women who have experienced a cardiac event or intervention. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of risk for CHD and to examine perceptions of risk-reducing behaviors in women with known CHD. Because women's attitudes are conceptualized to be embedded in their everyday practices, an interpretative qualitative approach was chosen to reveal this phenomenon. The purposive sample consisted of 7 women with CHD. Interviews were conducted and transcribed verbatim. Data collection continued until saturation occurred. Efforts were made to increase trustworthiness through participant review of transcripts, peer debriefing, and using field notes. Three major themes emerged from the data: "out of sight, out of mind," "why doesn't he talk to me like that?" and "it's scary." The women indicated their CHD was currently not a major problem because they were asymptomatic or did not "feel sick," which led to decreased focus on their CHD, including risk factor reduction. They expressed the desire to return to normal, rather than focus on the chronicity of CHD. Participants felt that physicians treated them differently because they were women and that their concerns were taken less seriously. They perceived that the patient-physician relationship lacked open dialogue. Fear was experienced by all women, and many feared the unknown, especially not knowing when something was wrong with their heart. Data indicated that, during stable periods in the CHD trajectory, women may not understand the chronicity of their disease and may not recognize the importance of reducing their risk for future cardiac events. Helping women understand CHD chronicity even when they may not feel sick may assist them in engaging in risk-reducing behaviors.

  4. Degree and Direction of Change of Body Weight in Cardiac Rehabilitation and Impact on Exercise Capacity and Cardiac Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Gomadam, Pallavi S; Douglas, Christopher J; Sacrinty, Matthew T; Brady, Molly M; Paladenech, Connie C; Robinson, Killian C

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves functional capacity and reduces mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. It also improves cardiovascular risk factors and aids in weight reduction. Because of the increase in morbidly obese patients with cardiovascular disease, the prevalence of obesity and patterns of weight change in those undergoing CR merit fresh study. We studied 1,320 participants in a 12-week CR program at our academic medical center. We compared 5 categories: 69 class III obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥40) patients, 128 class II obese patients (BMI 35.0 to 39.9), 318 class I obese patients (BMI 30.0 to 34.9), 487 overweight patients (BMI 25.0 to 29.9), and 318 normal weight patients (BMI 18.5 to 24.9). Exercise capacity in METs, weight, blood pressure, and fasting lipid profile were measured before and after CR. Overall, 131 patients gained weight, 827 had no significant weight change, and 363 lost weight (176 lost 3% to 5% of their baseline weight, 161 lost 5% to 10%, and 26 lost >10%). Exercise capacity, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol improved in all patients. Class III obese patients had the smallest improvement in peak METs (p <0.001), but the greatest weight loss. Patients who lost >10% of their baseline weight had the greatest improvements in exercise capacity, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. In conclusion, after CR, a minority of patients lost weight. Most patients had no significant weight change and some even gained weight. The greatest loss was seen in class III obese patients. All patient groups showed improvements in exercise capacity and risk factors, regardless of the direction or degree of weight change.

  5. The Relationship Between Cardiac Conduction Times, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Inflammation in Patients with Early Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Turk, Samina A; Heslinga, Sjoerd C; Dekker, Jill; Britsemmer, Linda; van der Lugt, Véronique; Lems, Willem F; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Nurmohamed, Michael T

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of conduction disorders in patients with early arthritis and the relationship with inflammation and traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a 2-fold higher risk of sudden cardiac death, possibly owing to conduction disorders. This increased risk might already be present at the clinical onset of arthritis. Therefore, we assessed electrocardiography, blood pressure, 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), lipid profile, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) level in 480 patients with early arthritis at baseline and after 1 year. The prevalence of conduction disorders was 12.5%. Conduction times at baseline were not associated with DAS28, ESR, or CRP levels and did not change during antirheumatic treatment. Baseline and the improvement in DAS28 (European League Against Rheumatism response), ESR, and CRP were significantly associated with heart rate, lipid profile, and blood pressure. Elevated total cholesterol and blood pressure were associated with an increased QRS time. The change in heart rate differed 7.3 bpm between patients with the least versus largest DAS improvement. The prevalence of conduction disorders in patients with early arthritis was 12.5%, which is similar to the general population and was not associated with changes in inflammation markers. However, a high cholesterol was associated with a prolonged QRS time. Therefore, the emphasis of CV risk management in arthritis should not be only on treatment of disease activity but also on traditional CV risk factors. The relationship between the improvement in disease activity and heart rate is remarkable because this could imply a 10-year CV mortality risk difference of 24%.

  6. Agile text mining for the 2014 i2b2/UTHealth Cardiac risk factors challenge.

    PubMed

    Cormack, James; Nath, Chinmoy; Milward, David; Raja, Kalpana; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the use of an agile text mining platform (Linguamatics' Interactive Information Extraction Platform, I2E) to extract document-level cardiac risk factors in patient records as defined in the i2b2/UTHealth 2014 challenge. The approach uses a data-driven rule-based methodology with the addition of a simple supervised classifier. We demonstrate that agile text mining allows for rapid optimization of extraction strategies, while post-processing can leverage annotation guidelines, corpus statistics and logic inferred from the gold standard data. We also show how data imbalance in a training set affects performance. Evaluation of this approach on the test data gave an F-Score of 91.7%, one percent behind the top performing system.

  7. Agile Text Mining for the 2014 i2b2/UTHealth Cardiac Risk Factors Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Cormack, James; Nath, Chinmoy; Milward, David; Raja, Kalpana; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an agile text mining platform (Linguamatics’ Interactive Information Extraction Platform, I2E) to extract document-level cardiac risk factors in patient records as defined in the i2b2/UTHealth 2014 Challenge. The approach uses a data-driven rule-based methodology with the addition of a simple supervised classifier. We demonstrate that agile text mining allows for rapid optimization of extraction strategies, while post-processing can leverage annotation guidelines, corpus statistics and logic inferred from the gold standard data. We also show how data imbalance in a training set affects performance. Evaluation of this approach on the test data gave an F-Score of 91.7%, one percent behind the top performing system. PMID:26209007

  8. Pancreatic cellular injury after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: frequency, time course and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nys, Monique; Venneman, Ingrid; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Vanbelle, Sophie; Albert, Adelin; Camus, Gérard; Damas, Pierre; Larbuisson, Robert; Lamy, Maurice

    2007-05-01

    Although often clinically silent, pancreatic cellular injury (PCI) is relatively frequent after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass; and its etiology and time course are largely unknown. We defined PCI as the simultaneous presence of abnormal values of pancreatic isoamylase and immunoreactive trypsin (IRT). The frequency and time evolution of PCI were assessed in this condition using assays for specific exocrine pancreatic enzymes. Correlations with inflammatory markers were searched for preoperative risk factors. One hundred ninety-three patients submitted to cardiac surgery were enrolled prospectively. Blood IRT, amylase, pancreatic isoamylase, lipase, and markers of inflammation (alpha1-protease inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin, myeloperoxidase) were measured preoperatively and postoperatively until day 8. The postoperative increase in plasma levels of pancreatic enzymes and urinary IRT was biphasic in all patients: early after surgery and later (from day 4 to 8 after surgery). One hundred thirty-three patients (69%) experienced PCI, with mean IRT, isoamylase, and alpha1-protease inhibitor values higher for each sample than that in patients without PCI. By multiple regression analysis, we found preoperative values of plasma IRT >or=40 ng/mL, amylase >or=42 IU/mL, and pancreatic isoamylase >or=20 IU/L associated with a higher incidence of postsurgery PCI (P < 0.005). In the PCI patients, a significant correlation was found between the 4 pancreatic enzymes and urinary IRT, total calcium, myeloperoxidase, alpha1-protease inhibitor, and alpha2-macroglobulin. These data support a high prevalence of postoperative PCI after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, typically biphasic and clinically silent, especially when pancreatic enzymes were elevated preoperatively.

  9. Gaming in risk-adjusted mortality rates: effect of misclassification of risk factors in the benchmarking of cardiac surgery risk-adjusted mortality rates.

    PubMed

    Siregar, Sabrina; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Versteegh, Michel I M; Noyez, Luc; ter Burg, Willem Jan P P; Bots, Michiel L; van der Graaf, Yolanda; van Herwerden, Lex A

    2013-03-01

    Upcoding or undercoding of risk factors could affect the benchmarking of risk-adjusted mortality rates. The aim was to investigate the effect of misclassification of risk factors on the benchmarking of mortality rates after cardiac surgery. A prospective cohort was used comprising all adult cardiac surgery patients in all 16 cardiothoracic centers in The Netherlands from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2009. A random effects model, including the logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) was used to benchmark the in-hospital mortality rates. We simulated upcoding and undercoding of 5 selected variables in the patients from 1 center. These patients were selected randomly (nondifferential misclassification) or by the EuroSCORE (differential misclassification). In the random patients, substantial misclassification was required to affect benchmarking: a 1.8-fold increase in prevalence of the 4 risk factors changed an underperforming center into an average performing one. Upcoding of 1 variable required even more. When patients with the greatest EuroSCORE were upcoded (ie, differential misclassification), a 1.1-fold increase was sufficient: moderate left ventricular function from 14.2% to 15.7%, poor left ventricular function from 8.4% to 9.3%, recent myocardial infarction from 7.9% to 8.6%, and extracardiac arteriopathy from 9.0% to 9.8%. Benchmarking using risk-adjusted mortality rates can be manipulated by misclassification of the EuroSCORE risk factors. Misclassification of random patients or of single variables will have little effect. However, limited upcoding of multiple risk factors in high-risk patients can greatly influence benchmarking. To minimize "gaming," the prevalence of all risk factors should be carefully monitored. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery: risk factors and outcomes. Proposal for a predictive model].

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Bárbara; Laranjo, Sérgio; Gomes, Inês; Freitas, Isabel; Trigo, Conceição; Fragata, Isabel; Fragata, José; Pinto, Fátima

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the epidemiology and risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) after pediatric cardiac surgery in our center, to determine its association with poor short-term outcomes, and to develop a logistic regression model that will predict the risk of AKI for the study population. This single-center, retrospective study included consecutive pediatric patients with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac surgery between January 2010 and December 2012. Exclusion criteria were a history of renal disease, dialysis or renal transplantation. Of the 325 patients included, median age three years (1 day-18 years), AKI occurred in 40 (12.3%) on the first postoperative day. Overall mortality was 13 (4%), nine of whom were in the AKI group. AKI was significantly associated with length of intensive care unit stay, length of mechanical ventilation and in-hospital death (p<0.01). Patients' age and postoperative serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and lactate levels were included in the logistic regression model as predictor variables. The model accurately predicted AKI in this population, with a maximum combined sensitivity of 82.1% and specificity of 75.4%. AKI is common and is associated with poor short-term outcomes in this setting. Younger age and higher postoperative serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and lactate levels were powerful predictors of renal injury in this population. The proposed model could be a useful tool for risk stratification of these patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. The risk factors and prognostic implication of acute pulmonary edema in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae-hyun; Kim, Joonghee; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Taeyun; Kim, Kyuseok; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Yu Jin; Hwang, Seung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary edema is frequently observed after a successful resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Currently, its risk factors and prognostic implications are mostly unknown. Methods Adult OHCA patients with a presumed cardiac etiology who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in emergency department were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped according to the severity of consolidation on their initial chest X-ray (group I, no consolidation; group II, patchy consolidations; group III, consolidation involving an entire lobe; group IV, total white-out of any lung). The primary objective was to identify the risk factors of developing severe pulmonary edema (group III or IV). The secondary objective was to evaluate the association between long-term prognosis and the severity of pulmonary edema. Results One hundred and seven patients were included. Total duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors of developing severe pulmonary edema with their odds ratio (OR) being 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.04; per 1 minute) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.07; per 1 mmHg), respectively. The long term prognosis was significantly poor in patients with severe pulmonary edema with a OR for good outcome (6-month cerebral performance category 1 or 2) being 0.22 (95% CI, 0.06 to 0.79) in group III and 0.16 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.63) in group IV compared to group I. Conclusion The duration of CPR and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors for the development of severe pulmonary edema after resuscitation in emergency department. The severity of the pulmonary edema was significantly associated with long-term outcome. PMID:27752581

  12. Cardiovascular risk factors and cardiac disorders in long-term survivors of pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Baskar, Shankar; George, Peggy L; Eghtesad, Bijan; Radhakrishnan, Kadakkal; Hupertz, Vera; Aziz, Peter F; Alkhouri, Naim

    2015-02-01

    The MetS and cardiovascular disease are leading causes of late morbidity in adult liver transplantation recipients; however, limited data are available in pediatric liver transplantation. A single-center retrospective review was undertaken for patients who had a liver transplantation before 18 yr of age and were >5 yr post-transplantation, to study the prevalence of MetS, its components, and cardiac disorders. Fifty-eight patients were included in the study with a mean age at transplantation of 6.3 ± 6.1 yr and mean follow-up of 14.1 ± 6.0 yr. Of the study group, 41.4% were overweight or obese, with ongoing prednisone use and increased duration of follow-up being significant risk factors. Fifty-three patients had sufficient data for determining MetS, which was present in 17% of the patients. Although the prevalence of MetS is low in pediatric liver transplant recipients, it is associated with CKD and prednisone therapy (p < 0.05). Echocardiography data were available for 23 patients, of whom 43.4% had LVH and 13% had evidence of PH. The spectrum of cardiac disorders in this population is much wider than in adults. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Statistical methods to monitor risk factors in a clinical database: example of a national cardiac surgery registry.

    PubMed

    Siregar, Sabrina; Roes, Kit C B; van Straten, Albert H M; Bots, Michiel L; van der Graaf, Yolanda; van Herwerden, Lex A; Groenwold, Rolf H H

    2013-01-01

    Comparison of outcomes requires adequate risk adjustment for differences in patient risk and the type of intervention performed. Both unintentional and intentional misclassification (also called gaming) of risk factors might lead to incorrect benchmark results. Therefore, misclassification of risk factors should be detected. We investigated the use of statistical process control techniques to monitor the frequency of risk factors in a clinical database. A national population-based study was performed using simulation and statistical process control. All patients who underwent cardiac surgery between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, in all 16 cardiothoracic surgery centers in the Netherlands were included. Data on 46 883 consecutive cardiac surgery interventions were extracted. The expected risk factor frequencies were based on 2007 and 2008 data. Monthly frequency rates of 18 risk factors in 2009 were monitored using a Shewhart control chart, exponentially weighted moving average chart, and cumulative sum chart. Upcoding (ie, gaming) in random patients was simulated and detected in 100% of the simulations. Subtle forms of gaming, involving specifically high-risk patients, were more difficult to identify (detection rate of 44%). However, the accompanying rise in mean logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) was detected in all simulations. Statistical process control in the form of a Shewhart control chart, exponentially weighted moving average, and cumulative sum charts provide a means to monitor changes in risk factor frequencies in a clinical database. Surveillance of the overall expected risk in addition to the separate risk factors ensures a high sensitivity to detect gaming. The use of statistical process control for risk factor surveillance is recommended.

  14. [A systematic review of psychological distress as a risk factor for recurrent cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Hee; Bae, Sun Hyoung

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether psychological distress is an independent risk factor for recurrent cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). A prospective cohort of studies that measured psychological distress and the incidence of recurrent cardiac events in the adult population were included. Three computerized databases were assessed (PubMed, CINAHL, and PSYCINFO). Meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effects model to determine summary estimates of risks of major recurrent cardiac events associated with each psychological distress. Of 506 publications identified, 33 met inclusion criteria, and 24 studies were used to estimate effect size of psychological distress on recurrent cardiac events. Mean number in the research sample was 736 and mean time of follow-up was 4.0 years. Depression, anxiety, anger, and hostility as psychological factors were studied. According to estimation of effect size using random model effect, depression (OR=1.39, 95% CI: 1.22-1.57), anxiety (OR=1.22, 95% CI: 0.96-1.56), and anger/hostility (OR=1.29, 95% CI: 1.07-1.57) CAD patients in significantly increased risk for recurrent cardiac events. Finding suggests that psychological distress in forms of depression, anxiety, anger, and hostility impact unfavorably on recurrent cardiac events in CAD patients.

  15. Negative predictive Value of Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography for Perioperative Risk Stratification in Patients with Cardiac Risk Factors and Reduced Exercise Capacity undergoing Non-cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Go, Gus; Davies, Kathy T; O'Callaghan, Cara; Senior, Wendy; Kostner, Karam; Fagermo, Narelle; Prasad, Sandhir B

    2017-10-02

    Guidelines recommend functional testing for myocardial ischaemia in the perioperative setting in patients with >1 recognised cardiac risk factors and self-reported reduced exercise capacity. We sought to determine the clinical utility of dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) for perioperative risk stratification in patients undergoing major noncardiac surgery. Data on 79 consecutive patients undergoing DSE for perioperative risk stratification at a single centre was retrospectively reviewed to determine rates of Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE) during the index hospitalisation and 30 days post discharge. Echocardiography and outcomes data were obtained via folder audit and echolab database. Out of the 79 DSEs performed for perioperative risk stratification, 11(14%) were positive (DSE+ve) and 68(86%) were negative (DSE-ve). Management in the DSE+ve group included medical optimisation without invasive intervention [n=7(64%)], diagnostic coronary angiography [n=3(27%)], and coronary artery bypass graft [n=1(9%)]. None of the patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention pre-operatively. Perioperative MACE in the DSE+ve group was 36% compared to 4% in the DSE-ve group (p=0.006). DSE+ve was a powerful predictor of perioperative inpatient MACE (OR 12.4, 95% CI 2.3-67, p=0.003). The positive predictive value of DSE+ve status was 36%, whist the negative predictive value of DSE-ve status for perioperative MACE was 96%. DSE for perioperative risk stratification had a high clinical utility in patients undergoing major noncardiac surgery. In particular, a normal DSE had a high negative predictive value for perioperative MACE. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Creatinine clearance versus serum creatinine as a risk factor in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Walter, Jörg; Mortasawi, Amir; Arnrich, Bert; Albert, Alexander; Frerichs, Inez; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Ennker, Jürgen

    2003-06-17

    Renal impairment is one of the predictors of mortality in cardiac surgery. Usually a binarized value of serum creatinine is used to assess the renal function in risk models. Creatinine clearance can be easily estimated by the Cockcroft and Gault equation from serum creatinine, gender, age and body weight. In this work we examine whether this estimation of the glomerular filtration rate can advantageously replace the serum creatinine in the EuroSCORE preoperative risk assessment. In a group of 8138 patients out of a total of 11878 patients, who underwent cardiac surgery in our hospital between January 1996 and July 2002, the 18 standard EuroSCORE parameters could retrospectively be determined and logistic regression analysis performed. In all patients scored, creatinine clearance was calculated according to Cockcroft and Gault. The relationship between the predicted and observed 30-days mortality was evaluated in systematically selected intervals of creatinine clearance and significance values computed by employing Monte Carlo methods. Afterwards, risk scoring was performed using a continuous or a categorical value of creatinine clearance instead of serum creatinine. The predictive ability of several risk score models and the individual contribution of their predictor variables were studied using ROC curve analysis. The comparison between the expected and observed 30-days mortalities, which were determined in different intervals of creatinine clearance, revealed the best threshold value of 55 ml/min. A significantly higher 30-days mortality was observed below this threshold and vice versa (both with p < 0.001). The local adaptation of the EuroSCORE is better than the standard EuroSCORE and was further improved by replacing serum creatinine (SC) by creatinine clearance (CC). Differential ROC analysis revealed that CC is superior to SC in providing predictive power within the logistic regression. Variable rank comparison identified CC as the best single variable

  17. Prevalence of post-operative morbidity risk factors following cardiac surgery in patients with chronic viral hepatitis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, W C; Chen, P C; George, G; Tinica, G; Corciova, F-C

    2015-01-01

    Current cardiac risk assessments such as EuroSCORE II and the STS-Score do not take liver dysfunction into account. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and post-operative morbidity risk factors following cardiac surgery of patients with chronic viral hepatitis. The study group consisted of 105 patients with documented chronic viral hepatitis who were subject to elective cardiac surgery from 2001 to 2012. Subjects were evaluated for pre-operative liver dysfunction according to the MELD score. The average MELD score of the study group was 10.00 ± 6.00. The average EuroSCORE ii of the study group was 2.07% ± 1.62%. The primary post-operative complication was cardiac complications (n=57, 54.3%). Analysis showed significant differences in meld score, bilirubin and smoking. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the variables entering into the model included such risk factors with a significant or near significant (p < 0.2) influence on hospital morbidity and consisted in valve vs. coronary artery disease, valve/cad, aortic valve replacement vs. Coronary artery bypass graft, and bilirubin (mg/dl). it is vital that liver dysfunction is added to the risk models which are currently utilized to predict the post-operative morbidity of cardiac surgery patients.

  18. Effect of Intense Lifestyle Modification and Cardiac Rehabilitation on Psychosocial Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldana, Steven G.; Whitmer, William R.; Greenlaw, Roger; Avins, Andrew L.; Thomas, Dean; Salberg, Audrey; Greenwell, Andrea; Lipsenthal, Lee; Fellingham, Gill W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease and cardiac rehabilitation(CR) on psychosocial risk factors and quality of life in patients with confirmed coronary artery disease. Participants had previously undergone a revascularization procedure. The 84 patients self-selected to participate in the Ornish Program…

  19. Effect of Intense Lifestyle Modification and Cardiac Rehabilitation on Psychosocial Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldana, Steven G.; Whitmer, William R.; Greenlaw, Roger; Avins, Andrew L.; Thomas, Dean; Salberg, Audrey; Greenwell, Andrea; Lipsenthal, Lee; Fellingham, Gill W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease and cardiac rehabilitation(CR) on psychosocial risk factors and quality of life in patients with confirmed coronary artery disease. Participants had previously undergone a revascularization procedure. The 84 patients self-selected to participate in the Ornish Program…

  20. Factors associated with an increased risk of perioperative cardiac arrest in emergent and elective craniotomy and spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Timothy D; Brovman, Ethan Y; Aglio, Linda S; Urman, Richard D

    2017-10-01

    Cardiac arrest following neurosurgery is a devastating complication associated with significant postoperative morbidity and mortality. There are no published studies that have used a large and robust multicenter database to specifically examine demographic and surgical risk factors associated with cardiac arrests following craniotomy and spine surgeries, respectively. We retrospectively analyzed data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database for the period between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2013, focusing on cardiac arrest associated with craniotomy and spine surgery from the intraoperative period to 30days after surgery. A total of 73,584 neurosurgical patients were analyzed (59,609 spine surgeries and 13,975 craniotomies). There was an increased risk of cardiac arrest for both craniotomy and spine surgeries in patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status class 4 or 5, Black and Asian patients compared to White patients and patients totally dependent versus independent based on the ACS-NSQIP risk calculator. The risk of cardiac arrest for craniotomy was 66.5 per 10,000 anesthetics and for spine surgery was 21.3 per 10,000 anesthetics. Cardiac arrest associated with emergent non-traumatic craniotomy was 36.5% and with emergent non-traumatic spine surgery was only 17.3%. We found that 18% of cardiac arrests for craniotomy and 25% of cardiac arrests for spine surgery occurred from the intraoperative period through postoperative day (POD) 0. Both craniotomy and spine surgery patients who had a cardiac arrest were more likely to have acute kidney injury (AKI), failure to wean from the ventilator, postoperative dialysis, myocardial infarction (MI), venous thromboembolism (VTE) and sepsis in the postoperative period. The overall mortality rate for both craniotomy and spine surgeries who had a cardiac arrest from the intraoperative period to 30days postoperative was 61

  1. Risk Factors Involved in Central-to-Radial Arterial Pressure Gradient During Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fuda, Giuseppe; Denault, André; Deschamps, Alain; Bouchard, Denis; Fortier, Annik; Lambert, Jean; Couture, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    A central-to-radial arterial pressure gradient may occur after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), which, in some patients, may last for a prolonged time after CPB. Whenever there is a pressure gradient, the radial artery pressure measure may underestimate a more centrally measured systemic pressure, which may result in a misguided therapeutic strategy. It is clinically important to identify the risk factors that may predict the appearance of a central-to-radial pressure gradient, because more central sites of measurements might then be considered to monitor systemic arterial pressure in high-risk patients. The objective of this study was to assess preoperative and intraoperative risk factors for central-to-radial pressure gradient. Seventy-three patients undergoing cardiac surgery using CPB were included in this prospective observational study. A significant central-to-radial arterial pressure gradient was defined as a difference of 25 mm Hg in systolic pressure or 10 mm Hg in mean arterial pressure for a minimum of 5 minutes. Preoperative data included demographics, presence of comorbidities, and medications. Intraoperative data included type of surgery, CPB and aortic clamping time, use of inotropic drugs, and vasodilators or vasopressors agents. The diameter of the radial and femoral artery was measured before the induction of anesthesia using B-mode ultrasonography. Thirty-three patients developed a central-to-radial arterial pressure gradient (45%). Patients with a significant pressure gradient had a smaller weight (71.0 ± 16.9 vs 79.3 ± 17.3 kg, P = 0.041), a smaller height (162.0 ± 9.6 vs 166.3 ± 8.6 cm, P = 0.047), a smaller radial artery diameter (0.24 ± 0.03 vs 0.29 ± 0.05 cm, P < 0.001), and were at a higher risk as determined by the Parsonnet score (30.3 ± 24.9 vs 17.0 ± 10.9, P = 0.007). In addition, a longer aortic clamping time (85.8 ± 51.0 vs 64.2 ± 29.3 minutes, P = 0.036), mitral and complex surgery (P = 0.007 and P = 0.017, respectively

  2. Treatment patterns and risk factor control in patients with and without metabolic syndrome in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Gitt, Anselm; Jannowitz, Christina; Karoff, Marthin; Karmann, Barbara; Horack, Martin; Völler, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Aim Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clustering of factors that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. We aimed to investigate the proportion of patients with MetS in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation (CR), and to describe differences between patients with MetS compared to those without MetS with regard to (1) patient characteristics including demographics, risk factors, and comorbidities, (2) risk factor management including drug treatment, and (3) control status of risk factors at entry to CR and discharge from CR. Methods Post-hoc analysis of data from 27,904 inpatients (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline-Oriented Risk Factor Management registry) that underwent a CR period of about 3 weeks were analyzed descriptively in total and compared by their MetS status. Results In the total cohort, mean age was 64.3 years, (71.7% male), with no major differences between groups. Patients had been referred after a ST elevation of myocardial infarction event in 41.1% of cases, non-ST elevation of myocardial infarction in 21.8%, or angina pectoris in 16.7%. They had received a percutaneous coronary intervention in 55.1% and bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft) in 39.5%. Patients with MetS (n = 15,819) compared to those without MetS (n = 12,085) were less frequently males, and in terms of cardiac interventions, more often received coronary artery bypass surgery. Overall, statin use increased from 79.9% at entry to 95.0% at discharge (MetS: 79.7% to 95.2%). Patients with MetS compared to those without MetS received angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, oral antidiabetics, and insulin at entry and discharge more frequently, and less frequently clopidogrel and aspirin/clopidogrel combinations. Mean blood pressure was within the normal range at discharge, and did not differ substantially between groups (124/73 versus 120/72 mmHg). Overall, between entry and discharge, levels of total cholesterol, low density

  3. Low dialysate potassium concentration: an overrated risk factor for cardiac arrhythmia?

    PubMed

    Abuelo, J Gary

    2015-01-01

    Serum potassium concentrations rise with dietary potassium intake between dialysis sessions and are often at hyperkalemic levels by the next session. Conversely, potassium concentrations fall during each hemodialysis, and sometimes reach hypokalemic levels by the end. Low potassium dialysate, which rapidly decreases serum potassium and often brings it to hypokalemic levels, is almost universally considered a risk factor for life-threatening arrhythmias. While there is little doubt about the threat of lethal arrhythmias due to hyperkalemia, convincing evidence for the danger of low potassium dialysate and rapid or excess potassium removal has not been forthcoming. The original report of more frequent ventricular ectopy in early dialysis that was improved by reducing potassium removal has received very little confirmation from subsequent studies. Furthermore, the occurrence of ventricular ectopy during dialysis does not appear to predict mortality. Studies relating sudden deaths to low potassium dialysate are countered by studies with more thorough adjustment for markers of poor health. Dialysate potassium concentrations affect the excursions of serum potassium levels above or below the normal range, and have the potential to influence dialysis safety. Controlled studies of different dialysate potassium concentration and their effect on mortality and cardiac arrests have not been done. Until these results become available, I propose interim guidelines for the setting of dialysate potassium levels that may better balance risks and benefits.

  4. Risk Factors for New-Onset Cardiac Valve Calcification in Patients on Maintenance Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yunhuan; Feng, Sheng; Zhan, Zhoubing; Lu, Ying; Wang, Yancai; Jiang, Shan; Song, Kai; Shen, Huaying

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with end-stage renal disease are susceptible to cardiac valve calcification (CVC) due to mineral metabolism disorders and other factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk factors for new-onset CVC in patients on maintenance peritoneal dialysis (PD). Methods This study included patients who underwent PD catheter insertion from January 2006 to June 2013 in our Peritoneal Dialysis Center. Clinical data were collected on CVC status during echocardiography evaluations (twice) at an interval of >6 months. The data collected included intact parathyroid hormone, C-reactive protein (CRP), serum phosphorus (P), serum calcium (Ca), albumin (Alb), prealbumin and the use of five types of antihypertensive drugs, statins, active vitamin D3 and Ca tablets. Results In total, 194 patients — 105 (54.1%) men, average age 60.5 ± 13.0 years — were included. CVC was present in 50 (25.8%) patients during PD catheter placement. After an average PD duration of 20.9 ± 10.4 months, CVC was detected in 97 patients (50.0%). New-onset CVC was found in 62 patients (32.0%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only serum P levels (p = 0.01, OR = 2.569), Alb levels (p = 0.04, OR = 0.935), dialysis duration (p = 0.03, OR = 1.039) and CRP levels (p = 0.02, OR = 1.031) were associated with CVC. Conclusion Serum P, Alb and CRP levels as well as dialysis duration are independent risk factors for CVC. PMID:26989400

  5. Cardiac dysfunction induced by weaning from mechanical ventilation: incidence, risk factors, and effects of fluid removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinglun; Shen, Feng; Teboul, Jean-Louis; Anguel, Nadia; Beurton, Alexandra; Bezaz, Nadia; Richard, Christian; Monnet, Xavier

    2016-11-12

    Weaning-induced pulmonary oedema (WiPO) is a well-recognised cause of failure of weaning from mechanical ventilation, but its incidence and risk factors have not been reliably described. We wanted to determine the incidence and risk factors in a population of critically ill patients. In addition, we wanted to describe the effects of diuretics when they are administered in this context. We monitored 283 consecutive spontaneous breathing trials (SBT; T-piece trial) performed in 81 patients. In cases with cardiac output monitoring (n = 85, 29 patients), a passive leg raising (PLR) test was performed before SBT. Three experts established the diagnosis of WiPO based on various patient characteristics. SBT failed in 128 cases (45 % of all SBT). WiPO occurred in 59 % of these failing cases. Compared to patients without WiPO (n = 52), patients with at least one WiPO (n = 29) had a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (38 % vs. 12 %, respectively; p < 0.01), previous "structural" cardiopathy (dilated and/or hypertrophic and/or hypokinetic cardiopathy and/or significant valvular disease, 9 % vs. 25 %, respectively; p < 0.01), obesity (45 % vs. 17 %, respectively; p < 0.01), and low left ventricular ejection fraction (55 % vs. 21 %, respectively; p = 0.01). At logistic regression, COPD (odds ratio (OR) 8.7, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.0-37.3), previous structural cardiopathy (OR 4.5, 95 % CI 1.4-14.1), and obesity (OR 3.6, 95 % CI 1.2-12.6) were independent risk factors for experiencing at least one episode of WiPO. In 16 cases with WiPO and a negative PLR at baseline, treatment including diuretics was started. In 9 of these cases, the PLR remained negative before the following SBT. A new episode of WiPO occurred in 7 of these instances, while the two other were extubated. In 7 other cases, the PLR became positive before the following SBT. WiPO did not occur anymore in 6 of these 7 patients who were

  6. Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Caused by Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Kondo, Yutaka; Sera, Toshiki; Doi, Kent; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Limited information is available regarding stroke-related out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to assess the clinical characteristics of stroke-related OHCA and to identify the factors associated with patient outcomes. We conducted a nationwide population-based study of adult OHCA patients in Japan from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009. We examined the epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes of stroke-related OHCA compared with cardiogenic OHCA. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival. Of the 243,140 eligible patients, 18,682 (7.7%) were diagnosed with stroke-related OHCA. Compared to OHCA with a presumed cardiac etiology, stroke-related OHCA patients had a greater chance of prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (9.9% vs 5.9%, P < 0.0001) but a reduced chance of 1-month survival (3.6% vs 4.9%, P < 0.0001) or favorable neurological outcomes (1.2% vs 2.6%, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for a variety of confounding factors, the prehospital ROSC rates were higher (adjusted OR 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.34–2.62), but the neurologically favorable survival rates were lower (adjusted OR 0.66, 95%CI 0.57–0.76), among the stroke-related OHCA patients. In stroke-related OHCA cases, having a younger age, witness, and shockable 1st documented rhythm were associated with improved outcomes. Men had more favorable neurological outcomes. Seasonal or circadian factors had no critical impact on favorable neurological outcomes. Prehospital advanced life support techniques (i.e., epinephrine administration or advanced airway management) were not associated with favorable neurological outcomes. Although stroke-related OHCA had lower 1-month survival rates and poorer neurological outcomes than cardiogenic OHCA, the rates were not considered to be medically futile. Characteristically, sex differences might impact neurologically favorable survival. PMID:27057834

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac risk factors: medical record documentation and patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, C; Bengtsson, Aa; Costenbader, Kh; Jönsen, A; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S; Sturfelt, G; Nived, O

    2011-10-01

    This study explores patients' knowledge of cardiac risk factors (CRFs), analyses how information and advice about CRFs are documented in clinical practice, and assesses patient adherence to received instructions to decrease CRFs. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with ≥ 4 ACR criteria participated through completing a validated cardiovascular health questionnaire (CHQ). Kappa statistics were used to compare medical records with the self-reported CHQ (agreement) and to evaluate adherence. Two hundred and eleven (72%) of the known patients with SLE participated. The mean age of the patients was 55 years. More than 70% of the SLE patients considered hypertension, obesity, smoking and hypercholesterolaemia to be very important CRFs. The agreement between medical record documentation and patients' reports was moderate for hypertension, overweight and hypercholesterolaemia (kappa 0.42-0.60) but substantial for diabetes (kappa 0.66). Patients' self-reported adherence to advice they had received regarding medication was substantial to perfect (kappa 0.65-1.0). For lifestyle changes in patients with hypertension and overweight, adherence was only fair to moderate (kappa 0.13-0.47). Swedish SLE patients' awareness of traditional CRFs was good in this study. However, the agreement between patients' self-reports and medical record documentation of CRF profiles, and patients' adherence to medical advice to CRF profiles, could be improved.

  8. Epidemiology and outcome of major postoperative infections following cardiac surgery: Risk factors and impact of pathogen type

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luke F.; Arduino, Jean Marie; Sheng, Shubin; Muhlbaier, Lawrence H.; Kanafani, Zeina A.; Harris, Anthony D.; Fraser, Thomas G.; Allen, Keith; Corey, G. Ralph; Fowler, Vance G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Major postoperative infections (MPIs) are poorly understood complications of cardiac surgery. We examined the epidemiology, microbiology, and outcome of MPIs occurring after cardiac surgery. Methods The study cohort was drawn from the Society of Thoracic Surgeon National Cardiac Database and comprised adults who underwent cardiac surgery at 5 tertiary hospitals between 2000 and 2004. We studied the incidence, microbiology, and risk factors of MPI (bloodstream or chest wound infections within 30 days after surgery), as well as 30-day mortality. We used multivariate regression analyses to evaluate the risk of MPI and mortality. Results MPI was identified in 341 of 10,522 patients (3.2%). Staphylococci were found in 52.5% of these patients, gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in 24.3%, and other pathogens in 23.2%. High body mass index, previous coronary bypass surgery, emergency surgery, renal impairment, immunosuppression, cardiac failure, and peripheral/cerebrovascular disease were associated with the development of MPI. Median postoperative duration of hospitalization (15 days vs 6 days) and mortality (8.5% vs 2.2%) were higher in patients with MPIs. Compared with uninfected individuals, odds of mortality were higher in patients with S aureus MPIs (adjusted odds ratio, 3.7) and GNB MPIs (adjusted odds ratio, 3.0). Conclusions Staphylococci accounted for the majority of MPIs after cardiac surgery. Mortality was higher in patients with Staphylococcus aureus- and GNB-related MPIs than in patients with MPIs caused by other pathogens and uninfected patients. Preventive strategies should target likely pathogens and high-risk patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:22609237

  9. Current state of cardiac rehabilitation in Germany: patient characteristics, risk factor management and control status, by education level

    PubMed Central

    Bestehorn, Kurt; Jannowitz, Christina; Horack, Martin; Karmann, Barbara; Halle, Martin; Völler, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Background After the acute hospital stay, most cardiac patients in Germany are transferred for a 3–4-week period of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. We aim to describe patient characteristics and risk factor management of cardiac rehabilitation patients with a focus on drug treatment and control status, differentiated by education level (low level, elementary school; intermediate level, secondary modern school; high level, grammar school/university). Methods Data covering a time period between 2003 and 2008 from 68,191 hospitalized patients in cardiac rehabilitation from a large-scale registry (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline- Oriented Risk Factor Management) were analyzed descriptively. Further, a multivariate model was applied to assess factors associated with good control of risk factors. Results In the total cohort, patients with a manifestation of coronary artery disease (mean age 63.7 years, males 71.7%) were referred to cardiac rehabilitation after having received percutaneous coronary intervention (51.6%) or coronary bypass surgery (39.5%). Statin therapy increased from 76.3% at entry to 88.9% at discharge, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol < 100 mg/dL rates increased from 31.1% to 69.6%. Mean fasting blood glucose decreased from 108 mg/dL to 104 mg/dL, and mean exercise capacity increased from 78 W to 95 W. Age and gender did not differ by education. In contrast with patients having high education, those with low education had more diabetes, hypertension, and peripheral arterial disease, had lower exercise capacity, and received less treatment with statins and guideline-orientated therapy in general. In the multivariate model, good control was significantly more likely in men (odds ratio 1.38; 95% confidence interval 1.30–1.46), less likely in patients of higher age (0.99; 0.99–0.99), with diabetes (0.90; 0.85–0.95), or peripheral arterial disease (0.88; 0.82–0.95). Compared with a low level education, a mid level education

  10. Current state of cardiac rehabilitation in Germany: patient characteristics, risk factor management and control status, by education level.

    PubMed

    Bestehorn, Kurt; Jannowitz, Christina; Horack, Martin; Karmann, Barbara; Halle, Martin; Völler, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    After the acute hospital stay, most cardiac patients in Germany are transferred for a 3-4-week period of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. We aim to describe patient characteristics and risk factor management of cardiac rehabilitation patients with a focus on drug treatment and control status, differentiated by education level (low level, elementary school; intermediate level, secondary modern school; high level, grammar school/university). Data covering a time period between 2003 and 2008 from 68,191 hospitalized patients in cardiac rehabilitation from a large-scale registry (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline- Oriented Risk Factor Management) were analyzed descriptively. Further, a multivariate model was applied to assess factors associated with good control of risk factors. In the total cohort, patients with a manifestation of coronary artery disease (mean age 63.7 years, males 71.7%) were referred to cardiac rehabilitation after having received percutaneous coronary intervention (51.6%) or coronary bypass surgery (39.5%). Statin therapy increased from 76.3% at entry to 88.9% at discharge, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol < 100 mg/dL rates increased from 31.1% to 69.6%. Mean fasting blood glucose decreased from 108 mg/dL to 104 mg/dL, and mean exercise capacity increased from 78 W to 95 W. Age and gender did not differ by education. In contrast with patients having high education, those with low education had more diabetes, hypertension, and peripheral arterial disease, had lower exercise capacity, and received less treatment with statins and guideline-orientated therapy in general. In the multivariate model, good control was significantly more likely in men (odds ratio 1.38; 95% confidence interval 1.30-1.46), less likely in patients of higher age (0.99; 0.99-0.99), with diabetes (0.90; 0.85-0.95), or peripheral arterial disease (0.88; 0.82-0.95). Compared with a low level education, a mid level education was associated with poor control (0

  11. Risk Factors Influencing Complications of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Implantation: Infection, Pneumothorax and Heart Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Sheng; Hung, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Pei-Rung; Yang, Chia-Hung; Wo, Hung-Ta; Chang, Po-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Chung-Chuan; Wen, Ming-Shien; Chung, Chang-Ming; Chen, Tien-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract As the number of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is increasing annually, CIED-related complications are becoming increasingly important. The aim of the study was to assess the risks associated with CIEDs by a nationwide database. Patients were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. Admissions for CIED implantation, replacement, and revision were evaluated and the evaluation period was 14 years. Endpoints included CIED-related infection, pneumothorax, and heart perforation. The study included 40,608 patients with a mean age of 71.8 ± 13.3 years. Regarding infection, the incidence rate was 2.45 per 1000 CIED-years. Male gender, younger age, device replacement, and previous infection were risks for infection while old age and high-volume centers (>200 per year) were protectors. The incidence of pneumothorax was 0.6%, with an increased risk in individuals who had chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and cardiac resynchronized therapy (CRT). The incidence of heart perforation was 0.09%, with an increased risk in individuals who had pre-operation temporal pacing and steroid use. High-volume center was found to decrease infection rate while male gender, young people, and individuals who underwent replacements were associated with an increased risk of infection. Additionally, pre-operation temporal pacing and steroid use should be avoided if possible. Furthermore, COPD patients or those who accept CRTs should be monitored closely. PMID:25501080

  12. Incidence and risk factors of nosocomial infections after cardiac surgery in Georgian population with congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Lomtadze, M; Chkhaidze, M; Mgeladze, E; Metreveli, I; Tsintsadze, A

    2010-01-01

    Nosocomial infections still remain a serious problem in patients undergoing open heart surgery. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence, etiology and main risk factors of nosocomial infections (NI) following cardiac surgery in congenital heart diseases population. Retrospective case study was conducted. 387 patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), who underwent cardiac surgery from January 2007 to December 2008 were studied. The age of the most patients varied between 1 day to 15 years, 73 patients (18,8%) were older than 15 years. All 387 patients underwent cardiac surgery. The rate of NI was 16%. The most common infections were bloodstream infections (BSI) (7,75%) and respiratory tract infections (7%) respectively. The rate of NI was higher in patients under 1 year of age, after urgent surgery and urgent reoperation, long cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross-clamp time, also in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation, massive haemotransfusion, with open heart bone after surgery, reintubation, hospitalization in another hospital during last three month. It was concluded that the most common nosocomial infection after cardiac surgery congenital heart diseases in Georgian population was blood stream infection. The main risk factors of NI in the same setting were age under 1 year, urgent surgery, urgent reoperation, long CPB and aortic cross-clamp time, long duration of mechanical ventilation, massive haemotransfusion, open heart bone after surgery, reintubation, hospitalization in another hospital during last three month.

  13. Impact of worksite wellness intervention on cardiac risk factors and one-year health care costs.

    PubMed

    Milani, Richard V; Lavie, Carl J

    2009-11-15

    Cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training (CRET) provides health risk intervention in cardiac patients over a relatively short time frame. Worksite health programs offer a unique opportunity for health intervention, but these programs remain underused due to concerns over recouping the costs. We evaluated the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a 6-month worksite health intervention using staff from CRET. Employees (n = 308) and spouses (n = 31) of a single employer were randomized to active intervention (n = 185) consisting of worksite health education, nutritional counseling, smoking cessation counseling, physical activity promotion, selected physician referral, and other health counseling versus usual care (n = 154). Health risk status was assessed at baseline and after the 6-month intervention program, and total medical claim costs were obtained in all participants during the year before and the year after intervention. Significant improvements were demonstrated in quality-of-life scores (+10%, p = 0.001), behavioral symptoms (depression -33%, anxiety -32%, somatization -33%, and hostility -47%, all p values <0.001), body fat (-9%, p = 0.001), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (+13%, p = 0.0001), diastolic blood pressure (-2%, p = 0.01), health habits (-60%, p = 0.0001), and total health risk (-25%, p = 0.0001). Of employees categorized as high risk at baseline, 57% were converted to low-risk status. Average employee annual claim costs decreased 48% (p = 0.002) for the 12 months after the intervention, whereas control employees' costs remained unchanged (-16%, p = NS), thus creating a sixfold return on investment. In conclusion, worksite health intervention using CRET staff decreased total health risk and markedly decreased medical claim costs within 12 months.

  14. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Primary Relatives of Sudden Cardiac Death Victims

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension as risk factors in relatives of sudden death victims. The sample for both studies will be the same. 5 Chapter II The...student, Nicole Pashek, who will examine upper body obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertriglyceridemia , and hypertension as cardiovascular risk factors

  15. Urinary tract infection in children after cardiac surgery: Incidence, causes, risk factors and outcomes in a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Kabbani, Mohamed S; Ismail, Sameh R; Fatima, Anis; Shafi, Rehana; Idris, Julinar A; Mehmood, Akhter; Singh, Reetam K; Elbarabry, Mahmoud; Hijazi, Omar; Hussein, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI) increases hospitalization, cost and morbidity. In this cohort study, we aimed to determine the incidence, risk factors, etiology and outcomes of UTIs in post-operative cardiac children. To this end, we studied all post-operative patients admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PCICU) in 2012, and we divided the patients into two groups: the UTI (UTI group) and the non-UTI (control group). We compared both groups for multiple peri-operative risk factors. We included 413 children in this study. Of these, 29 (7%) had UTIs after cardiac surgery (UTI group), and 384 (93%) were free from UTIs (control group). All UTI cases were catheter-associated UTIs (CAUTIs). A total of 1578 urinary catheter days were assessed in this study, with a CAUTI density rate of 18 per 1000 catheter days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following risk factors for CAUTI development: duration of urinary catheter placement (p<0.001), presence of congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) (p<0.0041) and the presence of certain syndromes (Down, William, and Noonan) (p<0.02). Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 63% of the CAUTI. The main causes of CAUTI were Klebsiella (27%), Candida (24%) and Escherichia coli (21%). Resistant organisms caused 34% of CAUTI. Two patients (7%) died in the UTI group compared with the one patient (0.3%) who died in the control group (p<0.05). Based on these findings, we concluded that an increased duration of the urinary catheter, the presence of CAKUT, and the presence of syndromes comprised the main risk factors for CAUTI. Gram-negative organisms were the main causes for CAUTI, and one-third of them found to be resistant in this single-center study. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of cardiac lesions and risk factors associated with myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Kreuder, Christine; Miller, Melissa A; Lowenstine, Linda J; Conrad, Patricia A; Carpenter, Tim E; Jessup, David A; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2005-02-01

    To describe cardiac lesions and identify risk factors associated with myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in beach-cast southern sea otters. Free-ranging southern sea otters. Sea otters were necropsied at the Marine Wildlife Veterinary Care and Research Center from 1998 through 2001. Microscopic and gross necropsy findings were used to classify sea otters as myocarditis or DCM case otters or control otters. Univariate, multivariate, and spatial analytical techniques were used to evaluate associations among myocarditis; DCM; common sea otter pathogens; and potential infectious, toxic, and nutritional causes. Clusters of sea otters with myocarditis and DCM were identified in the southern aspect of the sea otter range from May to November 2000. Risk factors for myocarditis included age, good body condition, and exposure to domoic acid and Sarcocystis neurona. Myocarditis associated with domoic acid occurred predominantly in the southern part of the range, whereas myocarditis associated with S. neurona occurred in the northern part of the range. Age and suspected previous exposure to domoic acid were identified as major risk factors for DCM. A sample of otters with DCM had significantly lower concentrations of myocardial L-carnitine than control and myocarditis case otters. Cardiac disease is an important cause of death in southern sea otters. Domoic acid toxicosis and infection with S. neurona are likely to be 2 important causes of myocarditis in sea otters. Domoic acid-induced myocarditis appears to progress to DCM, and depletion of myocardial L-carnitine may play a key role in this pathogenesis.

  17. Heart disease occurs in a biological, psychological, and social matrix: cardiac risk factors, symptom presentation, and recovery as illustrative examples.

    PubMed

    Suls, Jerry; Martin, René

    2011-04-01

    Despite the basic premise of behavioral medicine that understanding and treatment of physical well-being require a full appreciation of the confluence of micro-, molar-, and macro-variables, the field tends to focus on linear, causal relationships. In this paper, we argue that more attention be given to a dynamic matrix approach, which assumes that biological, psychological, and social elements are interconnected and continually influence each other (consistent with the biopsychosocial model). To illustrate, the authors draw from their independent and collaborative research programs on overlapping cardiac risk factors, symptom interpretation, and treatment delay for cardiac care and recovery from heart disease. "Cabling" across biological, psychological, and social variables is considered as a transformative strategy for medicine and the other health-related disciplines.

  18. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Delirium After Cardiac Surgery at a Quaternary Care Center: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tse, Lurdes; Schwarz, Stephan K W; Bowering, John B; Moore, Randell L; Barr, Alasdair M

    2015-12-01

    Delirium after cardiac surgery is associated with persistent cognitive deficits and increased mortality. The authors' objective was to determine the incidence of and risk factors for delirium in a mixed cohort of patients undergoing on-pump and off-pump cardiac surgery and transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI) in a Canadian quaternary care center. This study followed a pilot from the same center on patients treated in 2007. A retrospective cohort study. A quaternary care center in Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass grafts (CABG), conventional valve replacements, combined CABG-valve replacements, transfemoral TAVI, or transapical TAVI in 2008. Data from 679 charts on demographics, medical history, medications, laboratory results, surgical procedure, and anesthesia were abstracted and analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Nurses screened for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method, and the final diagnoses were made clinically by physicians. Risk factors were identified using logistic regression and bootstrapping. Delirium occurred in 28% of patients. Delirium was most common in transapical TAVI (47%), and least common in transfemoral TAVI (17%). Delirious patients were older and had greater preoperative cardiac and neurologic burdens than nondelirious patients. Age≥64 years, history of delirium, history of stroke/transient ischemic attack, cognitive impairment, depression, and preoperative use of beta-blocker(s) were associated independently with delirium. The incidence of delirium varied greatly with the type of procedure. The authors' logistic regression model showed that age and certain pre-existing neurologic conditions could predict delirium after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac risk stratification and protection.

    PubMed

    Halub, Meghan E; Sidwell, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    The goal of preoperative cardiac evaluation is to screen for undiagnosed cardiac disease or to find evidence of known conditions that are poorly controlled to allow management that reduces the risk of perioperative cardiac complications. A careful history and physical examination combined with the procedure-specific risk is the cornerstone of this assessment. This article reviews a brief history of prior cardiac risk stratification indexes, explores current practice guidelines by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association Task Force, reviews current methods for preoperative evaluation, discusses revascularization options, and evaluates perioperative medication recommendations.

  20. Perceptions of risk factors of cardiovascular disease and cardiac rehabilitation: a cross-sectional study targeting the Chinese population in the Midlands, UK

    PubMed Central

    Za, Tay; Lau, Jeff C F; Wong, Arthur C K; Wong, Alice W S; Lui, Sally; Fong, James W D; Chow, Patrick Y C; Jolly, Kate B

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To find out and explore the knowledge and opinion of Chinese people on cardiovascular disease and awareness of cardiac rehabilitation. Design A cross-sectional study using 14-item bilingual (Chinese and English) questionnaires that include information on demographics, health status, cardiovascular disease related knowledge and perception, and awareness and understanding of the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Setting Chinese community groups in the Midlands, UK from January to April 2008. Participants 436 questionnaires from Chinese adults over 18 were obtained. Main outcome measures Current knowledge and attitude towards cardiovascular disease and awareness of cardiac rehabilitation. Results Obesity was the most common risk factor identified by 80.7% of participants. Those originated from China had significantly less knowledge compared with subjects from other countries (p<0.001). People who have had exposure or experience of cardiac disease rated a higher risk of cardiac disease for Chinese living in the UK than people without experience. A majority (81.7%) used orthodox medicine and perceived it to be most effective against cardiac disease. Only 30% of participants were aware of cardiac rehabilitation. Conclusion The coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors of Chinese population have increased significantly in the last decade. Cardiac rehabilitation awareness was poor among the sample population of this study and language barrier is still a problem. More large studies on Chinese population assessing CAD risk should be done to provide more evidence on CAD prevention for this growing population in the Western world. PMID:27326032

  1. Risk factors and outcomes of in-hospital cardiac arrest following pediatric heart operations of varying complexity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Punkaj; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Jeffries, Howard E; Scanlon, Matthew C; Ghanayem, Nancy S; Daufeldt, Jennifer; Rice, Tom B; Wetzel, Randall C

    2016-08-01

    Multi center data regarding cardiac arrest in children undergoing heart operations of varying complexity are limited. Children <18 years undergoing heart surgery (with or without cardiopulmonary bypass) in the Virtual Pediatric Systems (VPS, LLC) Database (2009-2014) were included. Multivariable mixed logistic regression models were adjusted for patient's characteristics, surgical risk category (STS-EACTS Categories 1, 2, and 3 classified as "low" complexity and Categories 4 and 5 classified as "high" complexity), and hospital characteristics. Overall, 26,909 patients (62 centers) were included. Of these, 2.7% had cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery with an associated mortality of 31%. The prevalence of cardiac arrest was lower among patients undergoing low complexity operations (low complexity vs. high complexity: 1.7% vs. 5.9%). Unadjusted outcomes after cardiac arrest were significantly better among patients undergoing low complexity operations (mortality: 21.6% vs. 39.1%, good neurological outcomes: 78.7% vs. 71.6%). In adjusted models, odds of cardiac arrest were significantly lower among patients undergoing low complexity operations (OR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.46-0.66). Adjusted models, however, showed no difference in mortality or neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest regardless of surgical complexity. Further, our results suggest that incidence of cardiac arrest and mortality after cardiac arrest are a function of patient characteristics, surgical risk category, and hospital characteristics. Presence of around the clock in-house attending level pediatric intensivist coverage was associated with lower incidence of post-operative cardiac arrest, and presence of a dedicated cardiac ICU was associated with lower mortality after cardiac arrest. This study suggests that the patients undergoing high complexity operations are a higher risk group with increased prevalence of post-operative cardiac arrest. These data further suggest that patients undergoing high

  2. Multicenter Study of Temporal Trends in the Achievement of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Goals During Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Neil F; Salmon, Richard D; Sperling, Laurence S; Wright, Brenda S; Faircloth, George C; Gordon, Terri L; Berk, Martin R; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Franklin, Barry A

    2017-01-01

    Secondary prevention risk factor goals have been established by the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology, and the American Heart Association has further delineated ideal cardiovascular health metrics. We evaluated risk factor goal achievement during early-outpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and temporal trends in risk factor control. Patients completed assessments on entry into and exit from CR at 35 centers between 2000 and 2009 and were categorized into 3 cohorts: entire (N = 12 984), 2000-2004 (n = 5468), and 2005-2009 (n = 7516) cohorts. Improvements occurred in multiple risk factors during CR. For the entire cohort, the percentages of patients at goal at CR completion ranged from 95.5% for smoking to 21.9% for body mass index (BMI) of <25.0 kg/m. Compared with 2000-2004, the percentage of the 2005-2009 cohort at goal was higher (P < .001) for blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and physical activity, lower (P = .005) for BMI, and not significantly different (P > .05) for fasting glucose and smoking. At CR completion, of those in the entire, 2000-2004, and 2005-2009 cohorts, 4.4%, 3.9%, and 4.8% (P = .219 vs 2000-2004), respectively, had all biomarkers at the goal for ideal cardiovascular health and, of those with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, 70.8%, 71.5%, and 70.3% (P = .165 vs 2000-2004), respectively, were receiving statins. The percentage of patients at goal at CR completion increased for some, but not all, risk factors during 2005-2009 versus 2000-2004. Despite the benefits of CR, risk factor profiles are often suboptimal after CR. There remains room for improvement in risk factor management during CR and a need for continued intervention thereafter.

  3. Selective contribution of diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors to cardiac autonomic dysfunction in the general population.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, D; Zentai, C; Perz, S; Rathmann, W; Haastert, B; Meisinger, C; Löwel, H

    2006-04-01

    Both cardiac autonomic dysfunction adn cardiovascular risk factors are related to and excess risk of mortality. We sought to determine whether the major cardiovascular risk factors are associated with diminished heart rate variability (HRV), prolonged QTc interval, or increased QT dispersion (QTD). Male (n = 1030) and female (n = 957) subjects, aged 55-74 years, who participated in the population-based MONICA Augsburg survey 1989/90 were assessed for the presence of cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, smoking, and low physical activity. Lowest quartiles for time domain indexes of HRV (SD of R-R intervals [SDNN], max-min difference), QTc > 440 ms, and QTD > 60 ms determined from 12-lead resting ECG were used as cutpoints. In men, after adjustment for age and alcohol consumption, significant independent determinants for the lowest quartiles of SDNN were diabetes, obesity, and smoking. Independent contributors to prolonged QTc were hypertension, obesity, smoking, and low physical activity, whereas for increased QTD it was only hypertension. In women, diabetes was the only contributor to low SDNN, and hypertension was the only determinant of prolonged QTc. In conclusion, diabetes is the primary determinant of reduced HRV in the general population, while hypertension is the primary contributor to prolonged QTc in both sexes. However, obesity and smoking contribute to autonomic dysfunction in men but not women. Thus, a selectivity and sex-related differences exist among the various cardiovascular risk factors as to their influence on autonomic dysfunction.

  4. [Cardiac and metabolic risk factors in severe mental disorders. Task of a prevention manager].

    PubMed

    Lederbogen, F; Schwarz, P; Häfner, S; Schweiger, U; Bohus, M; Deuschle, M

    2015-07-01

    People with severe mental disorders have a reduction in life expectancy of 13-30 % compared with the general population. This severe disadvantage is primarily due to an increased prevalence of cardiac and metabolic disorders, especially coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus and are the result of untoward health behavior characterized by smoking, low levels of physical activity and unhealthy dietary habits. Obesity, arterial hypertension and lipid disorders are also associated with this behavior and further increase the risk of CHD and type 2 diabetes. Thus, people with mental disorders constitute a population with a high risk of cardiovascular events. Appropriate measures for prevention and therapy are urgently indicated but rarely applied. This article presents new organizational structures to overcome this deficit with a prevention manager playing a central role in organizing and applying preventive and therapeutic care. Results from cardiology and diabetic medicine have shown the effectiveness of pooling this responsibility. The measure has the potential to reduce the increased mortality of people with severe mental disorders.

  5. Low heart rate variability is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Ito, Chikako; Sasaki, Hideo; Yamane, Kiminori; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart rate variability (HRV) in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes and to determine whether low HRV can predict SCD in type 2 diabetes. Subjects were 8917 consecutively examined persons (3089 diabetic, and 5828 nondiabetic subjects) aged 35-69 years who underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) together with electrocardiography (ECG). HRV was calculated from the 12-lead ECG as the coefficient of variance for 100 R-R intervals (CV(R-R)). During a median observation period of 5.2 years, SCD occurred in 56 subjects (33 diabetic, and 23 nondiabetic). Among diabetic subjects, mortality from SCD tended to be higher in subjects with a low CV(R-R) (P=0.004). After adjustment for age, gender, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), BMI, ischemic ECG change, and smoking history, relative risk (RR) of SCD was 2.07 (95% CI 1.02-4.17) in diabetic subjects with a CV(R-R) <2.2% compared with those with a CV(R-R) > or =2.2%. Diabetic subjects with a CV(R-R) <2.2% had significantly higher cumulative mortality from SCD than those with a CV(R-R) > or =2.2% (P=0.007). In type 2 diabetes, a low CV(R-R) carried an increased risk of SCD.

  6. Epidemiological Surveillance of Surgical Site Infection and its Risk Factors in Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Figuerola-Tejerina, Angels; Rodríguez-Caravaca, Gil; Bustamante-Munguira, Juan; María San Román-Montero, Jesús; Durán-Poveda, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Surgical site infection in cardiac surgery is uncommon. The aim of the present study was to examine the incidence of this infection, compare it with national and international data, and evaluate its risk factors. This prospective cohort study included patients who underwent valve surgery or coronary revascularization during a 6-year period. The incidence of surgical site infection was studied. Associations between risk factors and infection were evaluated using odds ratios (OR). The infection rate was compared with Spanish and American data using the standardized infection ratio. A total of 1557 patients were included. The overall cumulative incidence of infection was 4% (95% confidence interval [95%CI], 3.6%-5.6%), 3.6% in valve surgery (95%CI, 2.5%-4.7%) and 4.3% in coronary revascularization (95%CI, 2.3%-6.3%). Risk factors for surgical site infection in valve surgery were diabetes mellitus (OR=2.8; P<.05) and obesity (OR=6.6; P<.05). Risk factors for surgical site infection in coronary revascularization were diabetes mellitus (OR=2.9; P<.05) and reoperation for bleeding (OR=8.8; P<.05). Diabetes mellitus and obesity favor surgical site infection in valve surgery, whereas diabetes mellitus and reoperation for bleeding favor surgical site infection in coronary revascularization. Infection surveillance and control programs permit evaluation and comparison of infection rates in cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Fifty Men, 3510 Marathons, Cardiac Risk Factors, and Coronary Artery Calcium Scores.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William O; Schwartz, Robert S; Garberich, Ross F; Carlson, Samantha; Knickelbine, Thomas; Schwartz, Jonathan G; Peichel, Gretchen; Lesser, John R; Wickstrom, Kelly; Harris, Kevin M

    2017-07-17

    Many male marathon runners have elevated coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores despite high physical activity. We examined the association between CAC scores, cardiovascular risk factors, and lifestyle habits in long term marathoners. We recruited men who had run ≥1 marathon annually for 25 consecutive years. CAC was assessed using coronary computed tomography angiography. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CAD) risk factors were measured with a 12-lead ECG, serum lipid panel, height, weight, resting blood pressure and heart rate, and a risk factor questionnaire. Fifty males, mean age 59 ± 0.9 years with a combined total of 3,510 marathons (median 58.5; range 27-171), had a mean BMI of 22.44 m/kg ± 0.4, HDL and LDL cholesterols of 58 ± 1.6 and 112 ± 3.7 mg/dL, and CAC scores from 0 to 3,153. CAC scores varied from zero in 16 runners, to 1-100 in 12, 101-400 in 12, and >400 in 10. There was no statistical difference in the number of marathons run between the 4 groups. Compared to marathoners with no CAC, marathoners with moderate and extensive CAC were older (p=0.002), started running at an older age (p=0.003), were older when they ran their first marathon (p=0.006), and had more CAD risk factors (p=0.005); and marathoners with more CAC had higher rates of previous tobacco use (p=0.002) and prevalence of hyperlipidemia (p=0.01). Among experienced males who have run marathons for 26-34 years and completed between 27-171 marathons, CAC score is related to CAD risk factors and not the number of marathons run or years of running. This suggests that among long-term marathoners, more endurance exercise is not associated with an increased risk of CAC.

  8. Comparison of ejection fraction and Goldman risk factor analysis to dipyridamole-thallium 201 studies in the evaluation of cardiac morbidity after aortic aneurysm surgery

    SciTech Connect

    McEnroe, C.S.; O'Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Yeager, A.; Konstam, M.; Mackey, W.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Associated coronary artery disease is the critical factor that influences early and late mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. Dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy, left ventricular ejection fraction, and Goldman risk factor analysis have been suggested as preoperative noninvasive screening methods to detect significant coronary artery disease. In this series of 95 elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy was highly predictive of the absence of perioperative cardiac morbidity (96% specificity, 44/46 normal scans, no cardiac morbidity), whereas ejection fraction (73% specificity, 31/42 normal ejection fraction, no cardiac morbidity) and Goldman risk factor analysis (84% specificity, 44/51 class I, no cardiac morbidity) were less. Furthermore, thallium redistribution on dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy leading to coronary angiography identified a significant number of patients with occult coronary artery disease who required preoperative coronary revascularization (8%, 8/95) and might have remained undetected on the basis of left ventricular ejection fraction or Goldman risk factor analysis. Finally, fixed thallium deficit, which some investigators have interpreted as a low probability finding for cardiac morbidity, was associated with a higher than expected incidence of cardiac complications. Forty-six percent (7/15) of all postoperative cardiac complications (three myocardial infarctions, three ischemic events, one death) occurred in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms with fixed deficits. This suggests that patients with fixed deficits on dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy should be considered for later delayed (4 hours) thallium images or coronary angiography or both.

  9. Primary cardiac disease in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: protective and risk factors--data from a multi-ethnic Latin American cohort.

    PubMed

    García, Mercedes A; Alarcón, Graciela S; Boggio, Gabriela; Hachuel, Leticia; Marcos, Ana Inés; Marcos, Juan Carlos; Gentiletti, Silvana; Caeiro, Francisco; Sato, Emilia I; Borba, Eduardo F; Brenol, João C Tavares; Massardo, Loreto; Molina-Restrepo, José Fernando; Vásquez, Gloria; Guibert-Toledano, Marlene; Barile-Fabris, Leonor; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Huerta-Yáñez, Guillermo F; Cucho-Venegas, Jorge M; Chacón-Diaz, Rosa; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cumulative incidence, risk and protective factors and impact on mortality of primary cardiac disease in SLE patients (disease duration ≤2 years) from a multi-ethnic, international, longitudinal inception cohort (34 centres, 9 Latin American countries). Risk and protective factors of primary cardiac disease (pericarditis, myocarditis, endocarditis, arrhythmias and/or valvular abnormalities) were evaluated. Of 1437 patients, 202 (14.1%) developed one or more manifestations: 164 pericarditis, 35 valvulopathy, 23 arrhythmias, 7 myocarditis and 1 endocarditis at follow-up; 77 of these patients also had an episode of primary cardiac disease at or before recruitment. In the multivariable parsimonious model, African/Latin American ethnicity [odds ratio (OR) 1.80, 95% CI 1.13, 2.86], primary cardiac disease at or before recruitment (OR 6.56, 95% CI 4.56, 9.43) and first SLICC/ACR Damage Index for SLE assessment (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.14, 1.50) were risk factors for the subsequent occurrence of primary cardiac disease. CNS involvement (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.25, 0.75) and antimalarial treatment (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44, 0.89) at or before recruitment were negatively associated with the occurrence of primary cardiac disease risk. Primary cardiac disease was not independently associated with mortality. Primary cardiac disease occurred in 14.1% of SLE patients of the Grupo Latino Americano de Estudio de Lupus cohort and pericarditis was its most frequent manifestation. African origin and lupus damage were found to be risk factors, while CNS involvement at or before recruitment and antimalarial treatment were protective. Primary cardiac disease had no impact on mortality. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Kinking of internal carotid artery: is it a risk factor for cerebro-vascular damage in patients undergoing cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Borioni, R; Garofalo, M; Actis Dato, G M; Pierri, M D; Caprara, E; Albano, P; Chiariello, L

    1994-08-01

    The incidence of carotid artery kinking is reported from 4% to 25% in different studies. During cardiopulmonary by-pass (CPB) in cardiac surgery the hemodynamic effects related to the kinking could produce hypoperfusion especially if associated with atherosclerotic lesions of the carotid arteries. We report our experience of 653 patients (538 males, 115 females, mean age 58.3 years) studied by coronaroangiography and internal carotid artery duplex scanning during the period January 1991-December 1992. Thirty-seven patients (22 males, 15 females, mean age 64.9 years), revealed anomalies of the internal carotid artery classificated as tortuosity (9 patients; 24.4%), and kinking (28 patients; 75.6%). All but 4 patients underwent cardiac surgery isolated or associated with carotid thrombo-endarterectomy (TEA) with Dacron patch arterioplasty. Three patients died (8.1%), one of them from cerebrovascular accident. He was a patient who had thromboembolism from the ascending aorta but without associated atherosclerotic lesions of carotid arteries. Asymptomatic isolated internal carotid artery kinking does not seem to be a risk factor for neurological complications during CPB. If carotid kinking is symptomatic and associated with atherosclerotic plaque producing internal carotid artery stenosis greater than 75%, we strongly suggest surgical treatment before cardiac operation.

  11. Suboptimal control of atherosclerotic disease risk factors after cardiac and cerebrovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Eric M; Asch, Steve M; Brook, Robert H; Vassar, Stefanie D; Jacob, Erin L; Lee, Martin L; Chang, Donald S; Sacco, Ralph L; Hsiao, An-Fu; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2007-03-01

    Undergoing a carotid endarterectomy, a coronary artery bypass graft, or a percutaneous coronary intervention provides an opportunity to optimize control of blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein. Using Veterans Administration databases, we determined whether patients who underwent a carotid endarterectomy (n=252), coronary artery bypass graft (n=486), or percutaneous coronary intervention (n=720) in 2002 to 2003 at 5 Veterans Administration Healthcare Systems had guideline-recommended control of blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein in 12-month periods before and after a vascular procedure. Postprocedure control of risk factors across procedure groups was compared using chi(2) tests and multivariate logistic regression. The proportion of patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy who had optimal control of both blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein increased from 23% before the procedure to 33% after the procedure (P=0.05) compared with increases from 32% to 43% for coronary artery bypass graft (P=0.001) and from 29% to 45% for percutaneous coronary intervention (P=0.002). Compared with the carotid endarterectomy group, the percutaneous coronary intervention group was more likely to achieve optimal control of blood pressure (OR: 1.92, 95% CI: 1.42 to 2.59) or low-density lipoprotein (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.01 to 2.26) and the coronary artery bypass graft group was more likely to achieve optimal control of blood pressure (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.42 to 2.59). Postprocedure cardiology visits, increase in medication intensity, and greater frequency of outpatient visits were also associated with optimal postprocedure risk factor control. Although modest improvements in risk factor control were detected, a majority of patients in each vascular procedure group did not achieve optimal risk factor control. More effective risk factor control programs are needed among most vascular procedure patients.

  12. Non-pharmacological modification of cardiac risk factors: part 3. Smoking cessation and alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Eagles, C J; Martin, U

    1998-02-01

    Smoking cessation (SC) is probably the single most important risk factor modification for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Interventions to stop smoking are highly cost effective. SC produces reductions in mortality and morbidity that generally outweigh any increase in risk due to weight gain, unless the gain is so great that it is accompanied by adverse changes in blood pressure, lipid profile or glucose tolerance. There is clear evidence that SC improves the lipid profile, decreases thrombotic tendency, reduces vascular endothelial damage and improves insulin sensitivity. Epidemiological studies consistently demonstrate a reduced risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD) with moderate alcohol consumption (showing protection at < or = 2 drinks per day), but an increased risk at higher alcohol consumption levels. Potential mediators of these cardioprotective effects include an increase in high-density cholesterol (HDL-C), decreased clotting propensity, enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, and a possible lowering of blood pressure at low consumption levels in women. Alcohol consumption may not, however, compensate for the large increase in risk produced by smoking. Whereas moderate alcohol consumption slightly reduces the risk of death between the ages of 35 and 69 years, cigarette smoking approximately doubles the risk.

  13. Risk factors for, and prevalence of, sleep apnoea in cardiac rehabilitation facilities in Germany: The Reha-Sleep registry.

    PubMed

    Skobel, Erik; Kamke, Wolfram; Bönner, Gerd; Alt, Bernd; Purucker, Hans-Christian; Schwaab, Bernhard; Einwang, Hans-Peter; Schröder, Klaus; Langheim, Eike; Völler, Heinz; Brandenburg, Alexandra; Graml, Andrea; Woehrle, Holger; Krüger, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of, and the risk factors for, sleep apnoea in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) facilities in Germany. 1152 patients presenting for CR were screened for sleep-disordered breathing with 2-channel polygraphy (ApneaLink™; ResMed). Parameters recorded included the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), number of desaturations per hour of recording (ODI), mean and minimum nocturnal oxygen saturation and number of snoring episodes. Patients rated subjective sleep quality on a scale from 1 (poor) to 10 (best) and completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Clinically significant sleep apnoea (AHI ≥15/h) was documented in 33% of patients. Mean AHI was 14 ± 16/h (range 0-106/h). Sleep apnoea was defined as being of moderate severity in 18% of patients (AHI ≥15-29/h) and severe in 15% (AHI ≥30/h). There were small, but statistically significant, differences in ESS score and subjective sleep quality between patients with and without sleep apnoea. Logistic regression model analysis identified the following as risk factors for sleep apnoea in CR patients: age (per 10 years) (odds ratio (OR) 1.51; p<0.001), body mass index (per 5 units) (OR 1.31; p=0.001), male gender (OR 2.19; p<0.001), type 2 diabetes mellitus (OR 1.45; p=0.040), haemoglobin level (OR 0.91; p=0.012) and witnessed apnoeas (OR 1.99; p<0.001). The findings of this study indicate that more than one-third of patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation in Germany have sleep apnoea, with one-third having moderate-to-severe SDB that requires further evaluation or intervention. Inclusion of sleep apnoea screening as part of cardiac rehabilitation appears to be appropriate. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Prevalence and risk factors for central diabetes insipidus in cardiac arrest survivor treated with targeted temperature management.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Byung Kook; Song, Kyoung Hwan; Jung, Yong Hun; Park, Jung Soo; Lee, Sung Min; Cho, Yong Soo; Kim, Jin Woong; Jeung, Kyung Woon

    2016-08-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a marker of severe brain injury. Here we aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CDI in cardiac arrest survivors treated with targeted temperature management (TTM). This retrospective observational study included consecutive adult cardiac arrest survivors treated with TTM between 2008 and 2014. Central diabetes insipidus was confirmed if all of the following criteria were met: urine volume >50 cc kg(-1) d(-1), serum osmolarity >300 mmol/L, urine osmolarity <300 mmol/L, and serum sodium >145 mEq/L. The primary outcome was the incidence of CDI. Of the 385 included patients, 45 (11.7%) had confirmed central CDI. Univariate analysis showed that younger age, nonwitness of collapse, nonshockable rhythm, a high incidence of asphyxia arrest, longer downtime, and lower initial core temperature were associated with CDI development. Patients with CDI had a higher incidence of poor neurologic outcomes at discharge and higher in-hospital mortality rate (20/45 vs 76/340, P= .001) as well as 180-day mortality (44/45 vs 174/340, P< .001). Multivariate analysis revealed that age (odds ratio [OR], 0.963; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.942-0.984), shockable rhythm (OR, 0.077; 95% CI, 0.009-0.662), downtime (OR, 1.025; 95% CI, 1.006-1.044), and asphyxia etiology (OR, 6.815; 95% CI, 2.457-18.899) were independently associated with CDI development. Central diabetes insipidus developed in 12% of cardiac arrest survivors treated with TTM, and those with CDI showed poor neurologic outcomes and high mortality rates. Younger age, nonshockable rhythm, long downtime, and asphyxia arrest were significant risk factors for development of CDI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Body fat distribution predicts cardiac risk factors in older female coronary patients.

    PubMed

    Ross, S J; Poehlman, E T; Johnson, R K; Ades, P A

    1997-01-01

    After myocardial infarction, women have higher rates of recurrent coronary events than men. This is caused, at least in part, by a higher prevalence of obesity-related coronary risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, sedentary lifestyle, insulin resistance, and diabetes. We studied the relationship between measures of body fat distribution, body composition, aerobic fitness, and dietary intake and several coronary risk factors including lipids, glucose, and insulin levels. The study population included 20 women > 60 years of age with recently diagnosed coronary heart disease and a comparison group of 50 healthy women with low-risk coronary risk profiles. Dependent variables included lipid subfractions (fasting, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol), glucose levels, and serum insulin levels. Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) was the best predictor of serum triglyceride levels (r = .65, P = .002), HDL cholesterol level (r = .46, P = .05), and fasting serum insulin levels (r = .76, P < .001) whereas peak oxygen consumption (Peak VO2) was the best predictor of LDL cholesterol (r = .73, P < .001). In a combined population of the 20 coronary patients and 50 healthy age-matched controls, WHR remained the best predictor of serum triglyceride levels (r = .57, P < .001) and insulin levels (r = .63, P < .001) and Peak V02 was the best predictor of HDL (r = .40, P < .001) and LDL cholesterol (r = .57, P = .004). Body fat distribution and peak aerobic fitness, both modifiable factors, are significant predictors of risk factors for second coronary events in older female coronary patients.

  16. Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury after Congenital Cardiac Surgery in Infants and Children: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunhee; Park, Jung Bo; Kim, Youngwon; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook; Kim, Chung Su

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) after pediatric cardiac surgery is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Modifiable risk factors for postoperative AKI including perioperative anesthesia-related parameters were assessed. The authors conducted a single-center, retrospective cohort study of 220 patients (aged 10 days to 19 years) who underwent congenital cardiac surgery between January and December 2012. The incidence of AKI within 7 days postoperatively was determined using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Ninety-two patients (41.8%) developed AKI and 18 (8.2%) required renal replacement therapy within the first postoperative week. Among patients who developed AKI, 57 patients (25.9%) were KDIGO stage 1, 27 patients (12.3%) were KDIGO stage 2, and eight patients (3.6%) were KDIGO stage 3. RACHS-1 (Risk-Adjusted classification for Congenital Heart Surgery) category, perioperative transfusion and fluid administration as well as fluid overload were compared between patients with and without AKI. Multivariable logistic regression analyses determined the risk factors for AKI. AKI was associated with longer hospital stay or ICU stay, and frequent sternal wound infections. Younger age (<12 months) [odds ratio (OR), 4.01; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.77–9.06], longer cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time (OR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.24–4.84), and low preoperative hemoglobin (OR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.07–5.40) were independent risk factors for AKI. Fluid overload was not a significant predictor for AKI. When a variable of hemoglobin concentration increase (>3 g/dl) from preoperative level on POD1 was entered into the multivariable analysis, it was independently associated with postoperative AKI (OR, 6.51; 95% CI, 2.23–19.03 compared with no increase). This association was significant after adjustment with patient demographics, medication history and RACHS-1 category (hemoglobin increase >3g/dl vs. no increase: adjusted OR, 6.94; 95% CI, 2.33–20

  17. Differences in risk factors associated with surgical site infections following two types of cardiac surgery in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Morikane, K; Honda, H; Yamagishi, T; Suzuki, S

    2015-05-01

    Differences in the risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) following open heart surgery and coronary artery bypass graft surgery are not well described. To identify and compare risk factors for SSI following open heart surgery and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. SSI surveillance data on open heart surgery (CARD) and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CBGB) submitted to the Japan Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (JANIS) system between 2008 and 2010 were analysed. Factors associated with SSI were analysed using univariate modelling analysis followed by multi-variate logistic regression analysis. Non-binary variables were analysed initially to determine the most appropriate category. The cumulative incidence rates of SSI for CARD and CBGB were 2.6% (151/5895) and 4.1% (160/3884), respectively. In both groups, the duration of the operation and a high American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) score were significant in predicting SSI risk in the model. Wound class was independently associated with SSI in CARD but not in CBGB. Implants, multiple procedures and emergency operations predicted SSI in CARD, but none of these factors predicted SSI in CBGB. There was a remarkable difference in the prediction of risk for SSI between the two types of cardiac surgery. Risk stratification in CARD could be improved by incorporating variables currently available in the existing surveillance systems. Risk index stratification in CBGB could be enhanced by collecting additional variables, because only two of the current variables were found to be significant for the prediction of SSI. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cancer Therapy-Related Cardiac Dysfunction and Heart Failure Part 1: Definitions, Pathophysiology, Risk Factors, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Michelle W.; Hamo, Carine E.; Cardinale, Daniela; Ky, Bonnie; Nohria, Anju; Baer, Lea; Skopicki, Hal; Lenihan, Daniel J.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Lyon, Alexander R.; Butler, Javed

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cancer therapy have resulted in significant improvement in long-term survival for many types of cancer, but have also resulted in untoward side effects associated with treatment. One such complication that has become increasingly recognized is the development of cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Whether a previously healthy person from a cardiovascular perspective develops cancer therapy related cardiac dysfunction or a high-risk cardiovascular patient requires cancer therapy, the team of oncologists and cardiologists must be better equipped with an evidence-based approach to care for these patients across the spectrum. Although the toxicities associated with various cancer therapies are well recognized, limitations to our understanding of the appropriate course of action remain. In this first of a 2-part review, we discuss the epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, risk factors, and imaging aspects of cancer therapy related cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. In a subsequent second part, we discuss the prevention and treatment aspects, concluding with a section on evidence gap and future directions. We focus on adult patients in all stages of cancer therapy from pre-treatment surveillance, to ongoing therapy, and long-term follow up. PMID:26747861

  19. Effect of Long-Term Physical Activity Practice after Cardiac Rehabilitation on Some Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyssin, Celine, Jr.; Blanc, Philippe; Verkindt, Chantal; Maunier, Sebastien; Prieur, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term physical activity practice after a cardiac rehabilitation program on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance. The Dijon Physical Activity Score was used to identify two groups: sedentary and active. Weight, distance at the 6-min walk test and the small artery elasticity…

  20. Effect of Long-Term Physical Activity Practice after Cardiac Rehabilitation on Some Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyssin, Celine, Jr.; Blanc, Philippe; Verkindt, Chantal; Maunier, Sebastien; Prieur, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term physical activity practice after a cardiac rehabilitation program on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance. The Dijon Physical Activity Score was used to identify two groups: sedentary and active. Weight, distance at the 6-min walk test and the small artery elasticity…

  1. Haematologic parameters as risk factors for cardiac infarction, in an occupational health care setting.

    PubMed

    Knottnerus, J A; Swaen, G M; Slangen, J J; Volovics, A; Durinck, J

    1988-01-01

    It is still controversial, whether moderately high haematocrit (Ht) and haemoglobin (Hb) values are risk factors for coronary heart disease. Using the computerized data-system of the Periodical Medical Examination (PME) of Phillips' International Electrical Company, a case-control study was carried out. Cases were male workers (n = 104, from 50 to 60 years of age) who had suffered a first, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and who had had a PME prior (on the average 16 months) to the occurrence of infarction. For each case two age-matched healthy controls were selected from the PME-attendancy list (= 208). For each subject information was abstracted from the PME-records about haematologic parameters and covariates (smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure, pulse-rate, weight, height, FEV5, consumption of antihypertensive agents). After dichotomizing the haematocrit and haemoglobin values at their whole sample means (0.46 l/l and 9.7 mmol/l respectively) in "low" (lower than or equal to the mean) and "high" (greater than the mean), crude odds-ratio's of 2.7 (95% CI: 1.6-4.6) and 2.1 (95% CI: 1.2-3.6) were found for Ht and Hb respectively, when comparing "high" with "low" levels. The associations between Ht and Hb, and the occurrence of myocardial infarction were still present after controlling for covariates using multiple logistic regression models, entering the continuous variables with their exact values. After adjustment, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) also appeared to be correlated with infarction. Our results confirm the hypothesis that moderately high haematocrit and--to a lesser extent--haemoglobin and MCV-values are risk factors for the occurrence of myocardial infarction.

  2. Effects of exercise and weight loss on cardiac risk factors associated with syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Lana L; Sherwood, Andrew; Feinglos, Mark; Hinderliter, Alan; Babyak, Michael; Gullette, Elizabeth; Waugh, Robert; Blumenthal, James A

    2003-09-08

    Patients with high blood pressure (BP) often exhibit syndrome X, an aggregation of abnormalities in carbohydrate and lipoprotein metabolism associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The present study evaluated the effects of a 6-month intervention involving either aerobic exercise training alone (EX only) or exercise combined with a structured weight loss program (EX + WL) on CHD risk factors associated with syndrome X. A total of 53 men and women were selected from a larger behavioral intervention trial, who showed the hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, and high BP characteristic of syndrome X. Participants were randomly assigned to EX only (n = 21), EX + WL (n = 21), or a waiting list control group (n = 11). Before and following treatment, participants underwent measurement of glucose tolerance, lipid levels, and clinical BP. Hyperinsulinemic responses to glucose challenge were significantly reduced in both the EX + WL group (P<.001) and the EX-only group (P =.003). Participants who showed the largest amount of weight loss showed the most robust improvements in abnormal insulin responses (EX + WL group, 47% reduction; EX-only group, 27% reduction). Diastolic BP was significantly reduced in the EX + WL group (96 +/- 4 to 87 +/- 5 mm Hg [mean +/- SD]; P =.01), but not in the EX-only group (93 +/- 4 to 89 +/- 5 mm Hg [mean +/- SD]; P =.08). Lipid profile was not significantly improved by either intervention. These results suggest that EX + WL is an effective treatment for hyperinsulinemia and lowering of diastolic BP in patients with the syndrome X.

  3. Cardiac structure and function in relation to cardiovascular risk factors in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiac structure and function are well-studied in Western countries. However, epidemiological data is still scarce in China. Methods Our study was conducted in the framework of cardiovascular health examinations for the current and retired employees of a factory and their family members. According to the American Society of Echocardiography recommendations, we performed echocardiography to evaluate cardiac structure and function, including left atrial volume, left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Results The 843 participants (43.0 years) included 288 (34.2%) women, and 191 (22.7%) hypertensive patients, of whom 82 (42.9%) took antihypertensive drugs. The prevalence of left atrial enlargement, left ventricular hypertrophy and concentric remodeling was 2.4%, 5.0% and 12.7%, respectively. The prevalence of mild and moderate-to-severe left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was 14.2% and 3.3%, respectively. The prevalence of these cardiac abnormalities significantly (P ≤ 0.002) increased with age, except for the moderate-to-severe left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. After adjustment for age, gender, body height and body weight, left atrial enlargement was associated with plasma glucose (P = 0.009), and left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction were significantly associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P ≤ 0.03), respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of cardiac structural and functional abnormalities increased with age in this Chinese population. Current drinking and plasma glucose had an impact on left atrial enlargement, whereas systolic and diastolic blood pressures were major correlates for left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction, respectively. PMID:23035836

  4. Socioeconomic Status and Improvements in Lifestyle, Coronary Risk Factors, and Quality of Life: The Multisite Cardiac Lifestyle Intervention Program

    PubMed Central

    Govil, Sarah R.; Merritt-Worden, Terri; Ornish, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to clarify whether patients of low socioeconomic status (SES) can make lifestyle changes and show improved outcomes in coronary heart disease (CHD), similar to patients with higher SES. Methods. We examined lifestyle, risk factors, and quality of life over 3 months, by SES and gender, in 869 predominantly White, nonsmoking CHD patients (34% female) in the insurance-sponsored Multisite Cardiac Lifestyle Intervention Program. SES was defined primarily by education. Results. At baseline, less-educated participants were more likely to be disadvantaged (e.g., past smoking, sedentary lifestyle, high fat diet, overweight, depression) than were higher-SES participants. By 3 months, participants at all SES levels reported consuming 10% or less dietary fat, exercising 3.5 hours per week or more, and practicing stress management 5.5 hours per week or more. These self-reports were substantiated by improvements in risk factors (e.g., 5-kg weight loss, and improved blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and exercise capacity; P < .001), and accompanied by improvements in well-being (e.g., depression, hostility, quality of life; P < .001). Conclusions. The observed benefits for CHD patients with low SES indicate that broadening accessibility of lifestyle programs through health insurance should be strongly encouraged. PMID:18923113

  5. High and low contact frequency cardiac rehabilitation programmes elicit similar improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    LaHaye, Stephen A; Lacombe, Shawn P; Koppikar, Sahil; Lun, Grace; Parsons, Trisha L; Hopkins-Rosseel, Diana

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a proven intervention that substantially improves physical health and decreases death and disability following a cardiovascular event. Traditional CR typically involves 36 on-site exercise sessions spanning a 12-week period. To date, the optimal dose of CR has yet to be determined. This study compared a high contact frequency CR programme (HCF, 34 on-site sessions) with a low contact frequency CR programme (LCF, eight on-site sessions) of equal duration (4 months). A total of 961 low-risk cardiac patients (RARE score <4) self-selected either a HCF (n = 469) or LCF (n = 492) CR programme. Cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular risk factors were measured on admission and discharge. Similar proportions of patients completed HCF (n = 346) and LCF (n = 351) (p = 0.398). Patients who were less fit (<8 METs) were more likely to drop out of the LCF group, while younger patients (<60 years) were more likely to drop out of the HCF group. Both groups experienced similar reductions in weight (-2.3 vs. -2.4 kg; p = 0.779) and improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (+1.5 vs. +1.4 METs; p = 0.418). Patients in the LCF programme achieved equivalent results to those in the HCF programme. Certain subgroups of patients, however, may benefit from participation in a HCF programme, including those patients who are predisposed to prematurely discontinuing the programme and those patients who would benefit from increased monitoring. The LCF model can be employed as an alternative option to widen access and participation for patients who are unable to attend HCF programmes due to distance or time limitations. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Those Who Perceive Their Disease as a Physiological or Psychological Risk Factor Experience More Anxiety at the Beginning of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Mozhgan; Komasi, Saeid; Heydarpour, Behzad; Momeni, Khodamorad; Zakiei, Ali

    2016-11-01

    In a cardiac patient, anxiety is the result of the individual's perception of the treatment and is characterized by inability to predict, control, or achieve the desired treatment outcomes. This study was carried out to investigate the extent of clinical anxiety in patients who underwent a cardiac rehabilitation program with different attitudes toward the disease risk factors. The administrative data of this retrospective study were obtained from the database of the cardiac rehabilitation department of a hospital in Iran. The demographic and clinical information of 603 patients from April 2006 to April 2011 was collected using compiled forms of this database, the Beck anxiety inventory, and the structured clinical interview for axis I disorders. The univariate analysis of variance and the Bonferroni post-hoc analysis were used for data analysis. After controlling for gender and educational level, we observed statistically significant differences in the modified means between the patients who considered the behavioral risk factors and those who considered the physiological risk factors (P = 0.012, MD = 5.03) and between the patients who regarded the behavioral risk factors and those who regarded the psychological risk factors (P = 0.0005, MD = 5.32) as the underlying cause of their cardiac condition, which means that the level of anxiety in the physiological and psychological groups was higher than that in the behavioral group. The anxiety of patients can be controlled through alteration in their attitudes toward the disease risk factors on the grounds that psychological or physiological factors per se do not trigger the occurrence of the disease, whereas behavioral risk factors, as the controlling agent, significantly influence its occurrence.

  7. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... HRS Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... people of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  8. Risk factors of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dafaalla, Mohamed D; Nimir, Mohammed N; Mohammed, Mosab I; Ali, Omer A; Hussein, Abbashar

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to stratify the possible risk factors for diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN). We did a meta-analysis of risk factors of CAN. We did a web-based search for literature in MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus database and CENTRAL database up to August 2015. We included clinical trials or cohort studies that provide data about relationship between CAN and variables of interest. Our risk factors of interest were age, sex, duration of diabetes, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (sBP) and diastolic blood pressure (dBP), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (HDL and LDL), triglycerides, retinopathy and nephropathy. We generated Forest plots, χ(2) test and I(2) as tests for heterogeneity, risk ratio (RR), mean difference (MD), CIs and p values by ReVMan V.5.3 software. We found a total of 882 related items. We excluded 873 studies from the title and abstract and 4 studies after review of full reports. Four studies were included. Our meta-analysis showed significant association between CAN and age (MD=4.94 (3.46 to 6.42)), duration of diabetes (MD=4.51 (2.51 to 6.52)), HbA1c (MD=0.48 (0.28 to 0.67)), BMI (MD=0.55 (0.08 to 1.01)), serum triglycerides (MD=0.09 (0.01 to 0.17)), proliferative retinopathy (RR=3.69 (1.20 to 11.34)), microalbuminuria (RR=2.47 (1.43 to 4.29)), hypertension (RR=4.18 (2.52 to 6.91)) and sBP (MD=4.10 (2.20 to 6.00)). We neither discovered the absence of significant association between the development of CAN and male sex (RR=1.57 (0.45 to 5.39)), dBP (MD=0.89 (-0.36 to 2.14)), cholesterol level (MD=1.19 (-0.99 to 3.36)), LDL (MD=0.12 (-0.15 to 0.39)), nor HDL level (MD=-0.28 (-0.58 to 0.03)). Age, duration of diabetes, HbA1c, BMI, serum triglycerides, proliferative retinopathy, microalbuminuria, hypertension and sBP are directly related to the risk of development of diabetic CAN.

  9. Sudden cardiac death risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Deyell, Marc W; Krahn, Andrew D; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2015-06-05

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be caused by ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation or pulseless electric activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our healthcare and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD because of pulseless electric activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized.

  10. Musculoskeletal complaints in cardiac rehabilitation: Prevalence and impact on cardiovascular risk factor profile and functional and psychosocial status.

    PubMed

    Rocha, José Afonso; Allison, Thomas G; Santoalha, José Miguel; Araújo, Vítor; Pereira, Fernando Parada; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2015-02-01

    To assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints and their association with risk factor profile and functional and psychosocial status in patients on a cardiac rehabilitation program. In this cross-sectional study of 449 patients admitted within three months of an acute coronary syndrome, patients were divided into those with (MSC+) and those without (MSC-) musculoskeletal complaints. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Short Form 36 Health Survey were used to assess psychosocial status and quality of life, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire for physical activity. Functional capacity was estimated from exercise testing. Musculoskeletal pain was present in 119 patients (27%), mainly in the lower limbs (56%). MSC+ were older (mean 56.5±9.9 vs. 53.2±9.5 years; p<0.001) and more frequently women (20.2% vs. 9.1%; p<0.001). MSC+ had a higher prevalence of dyslipidemia (68.6% vs. 51.2%; p<0.001), hypertension (51.7% vs. 35.5%; p<0.001), obesity (29.4% vs. 17.9%; p<0.001) and metabolic syndrome (44.5% vs. 31.5%; p<0.001). MSC+ showed higher body mass index and waist circumference, and lower physical activity levels (p<0.05), as well as lower functional capacity (8.6±2.2 vs. 9.6±2.1 MET; p<0.05), higher scores for depression (6 [3-9] vs. 3 [1-7]; p<0.05) and anxiety (7 [3-10] vs. 5 [2-8]; p<0.05), and lower scores for physical (44.1±8.7 vs. 47.6±7.6; p<0.05) and mental (39.2±13.0 vs. 44.0±13.0; p<0.05) quality of life. Musculoskeletal complaints are common in cardiac rehabilitation and predict lower levels of physical activity, worse cardiovascular risk factor profile, and poorer functional capacity and psychosocial status, irrespective of age and gender. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Paced QT interval as a risk factor for new-onset left ventricular systolic dysfunction and cardiac death after permanent pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Jeong; Park, Seung-Jung; Park, Kyoung Min; On, Young Keun; Kim, June Soo

    2016-01-15

    Prolongation of corrected QT (QTc) interval reflects an increased risk of fatal arrhythmia and cardiac death in various populations. However, it is not clear whether the paced-QTc (p-QTc) interval is associated with new-onset left ventricular systolic dysfunction (new-LVSD) or cardiac death. In 491 consecutive patients (64 ± 14 years) with preserved LV ejection fraction (64 ± 7%), the p-QTc interval was measured within 2 weeks after PPM implantation. We assessed the rates of new-LVSD and cardiac death based on the degree of p-QTc interval. During the follow-up period (78 ± 51 months), new-LVSD and cardiac death were identified in 53 (10.8%) and 26 (5.3%) patients, respectively. Patients with new-LVSD had more frequent atrioventricular block (P=0.041), a higher percentage of ventricular pacing (P=0.005), a longer p-QRS duration (P<0.001), and more prolonged p-QTc interval (P<0.001) compared to those without new-LVSD. There was a graded increase in the rates of new-LVSD (P<0.001) and cardiac death (P=0.001) from the patients in the lowest to those in the highest tertile of the p-QTc interval. Additionally, the incidence of cardiac death was significantly elevated especially in the patients with new-LVSD and wider p-QTc interval. In Cox regression analyses, the p-QTc interval was independently associated with new-LVSD and cardiac death even after adjusted with various relevant confounding factors. Prolonged p-QTc interval was closely associated with new-LVSD and cardiac death after PPM implantation in patients with preserved LV systolic function. The rate of cardiac death significantly increased especially in patients who showed more p-QTc widening along with new-LVSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T.; ...

    2015-06-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9more » days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20–120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease.« less

  13. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T.; Komorowski, Richard; Fish, Brian L.; Migrino, Raymond Q.; Harmann, Leanne; Hopewell, John W.; Kronenberg, Amy; Patel, Shailendra; Moulder, John E.; Baker, John E.

    2015-06-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9 days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20–120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease.

  14. Aggregating traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors to assess the cardiometabolic health of childhood cancer survivors: An analysis from the Cardiac Risk Factors in Childhood Cancer Survivors Study

    PubMed Central

    Landy, David C.; Miller, Tracie L.; Lopez-Mitnik, Gabriela; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Hinkle, Andrea S.; Constine, Louis S.; French, Carol A.; Rovitelli, Amy M. K.; Adams, M. Jacob; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which may be associated with traditional CVD risk factors. We used CVD risk aggregation instruments to describe survivor cardiometabolic health and compared their results with sibling controls. Methods Traditional CVD risk factors measured in 110 survivors and 31 sibling controls between 15 and 39 years old were aggregated using Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) scores and the Framingham Risk Calculator (FRC) and expressed as ratios. The PDAY odds ratio represents the increased odds of currently having an advanced coronary artery lesion, and the FRC risk ratio represents the increased risk of having a myocardial infarction, stroke, or coronary death in the next 30 years. Ratios are relative to an individual of similar age and sex without CVD risk factors. Results The median PDAY odds ratio for survivors was 2.2 (interquartile range 1.3-3.3), with 17% N4. The median FRC risk ratio was 1.7 (interquartile range 1.0-2.0), with 12% N4. Survivors and siblings had similar mean PDAY odds ratios (2.33 vs 2.29, P = .86) and FRC risk ratios (1.72 vs 1.53, P = .24). Cancer type and treatments were not associated with cardiometabolic health. There was a suggested association for physical inactivity with PDAY odds ratios (r = 0.17, P = .10) and FRC risk ratios (r = 0.19, P = .12). Conclusions Cardiometabolic health is poor in childhood cancer survivors but not different than that of their siblings, highlighting the importance of managing traditional CVD risk factors and considering novel exposures in survivors. PMID:22305850

  15. Coronary calcium score in 12-year breast cancer survivors after adjuvant radiotherapy with low to moderate heart exposure - Relationship to cardiac radiation dose and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tjessem, Kristin Holm; Bosse, Gerhard; Fosså, Kristian; Reinertsen, Kristin V; Fosså, Sophie D; Johansen, Safora; Fosså, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We explored the relation between coronary artery calcium (CAC) and cardiac radiation doses in breast cancer survivors (BCS) treated with radiotherapy (RT). Additionally, we examined the impact of other risk factors and biomarkers of coronary artery disease (CAD). 236 BCS (median age 51years [range 30-70], median observation time 12years [9.2-15.7]), treated with 4-field RT of 50GY, were included and examined in 2004 (T1), 2007 (T2) and 2011 (T3) with clinical examination, blood tests and questionnaires. At T3, cardiac computed tomography was performed with quantification of CAC using Agatston score (AS). For 106 patients cardiac dose volume histograms were available. The cohort-based median of the mean cardiac dose was 2.5 (range 0.5-7.0) Gy. There was no correlation between measures of cardiac dose and AS. AS was correlated with high cholesterol at T1/T2 (p=0.022), high proBNP at T1/T2 (p<0.022) and T3 (p<0.022) and high HbA1c at T3 (p=0.022). In addition, a high AS was significantly associated with hypertension (p=0.022). Age (p<0.001) and cholesterol at T1/T2 (p=0.001) retained significant associations in multivariate analysis. Traditional, modifiable risk factors of CAD correlate with CAC and may be important for the long term risk of CAD after RT. With low to moderate cardiac radiation exposure, a contribution of radiation dose to CAC could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Trends in sudden cardiac death and its risk factors in Japan from 1981 to 2005: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS)

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Minako; Ohira, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Maeda, Kenji; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Noda, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Shimamoto, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Objective There is little evidence whether sudden cardiac death (SCD) is increasing in Asia, although the incidence of coronary heart disease among urban middle-aged Japanese men has increased recently. We examined trends in the incidence of SCD and its risk factors in the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study. Design and setting This was a population-based longitudinal study. Surveillance of men and women for SCD incidence and risk factors was conducted from 1981 to 2005. Subjects The surveyed population was all men and women aged 30–84 years who lived in three rural communities and one urban community in Japan. Main outcome measures Trends in SCD incidence and its risk factors. Results Age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence of SCD decreased from 1981–1985 to 1991–1995, and plateaued thereafter. The annual incidence per 100 000 person-years was 76.0 in 1981–1985, 57.9 in 1986–1990, 39.3 in 1991–1995, 31.6 in 1996–2000 and 36.8 in 2001–2005. The prevalence of hypertension decreased from 1981–1985 to 1991–1995, and plateaued thereafter for men and women. The age-adjusted prevalence of current smoking for men decreased while that of diabetes mellitus increased for both sexes from 1981–1985 to 2001–2005. Conclusions The incidence of SCD decreased from 1981 to 1995 but was unchanged from 1996 to 2005. Continuous surveillance is necessary to clarify future trends in SCD in Japan because of an increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus. PMID:22446988

  17. Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) colonization as a risk factor for developing ESBL infections in pediatric cardiac surgery patients: "retrospective cohort study".

    PubMed

    Cheikh, Amine; Belefquih, Bouchra; Chajai, Younes; Cheikhaoui, Younes; El Hassani, Amine; Benouda, Amina

    2017-03-29

    Children with cardiac defects need many hospitalizations and repetitive antibiotic therapies, with an increasing risk of colonization with multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDRB) such as extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) Post-operative infections with these bacteria in paediatric cardiac surgery are life threatening. This article aims to study the prevalence of ESBL colonization among paediatric cardiac surgery patients, and to compare occurrence of post-operative infections with and without ESBL colonization. We also aim to study the correlation between the onset of postoperative infection and other parameters such as age, length of stay and preoperative antibiotic therapy. A retrospective cohort study included paediatric cardiac surgery patients in Cheikh Zaid hospital in Rabat, Morocco, between the 1st of January 2011 and 31 December 2014. A screening for ESBL colonization was requested for children who had a risk factor (previous hospitalization and/or taking antibiotics) at admission. Swabs were collected from three sites (throat, nose and anus). Two groups were compared - patients colonized and not colonized with ESBLs. Statistical analysis was performed using R software. ESBL colonization screening was performed in 111 patients. Positive colonization was detected in 17 cases (15%). Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP): 9 (53%) was the most frequently isolated species. Among the 17 patients, 23.5% (4/17) developed a postoperative infection due to ESBLs versus only one patient without colonization (1%). There was a statically significant difference in terms of occurrence of postoperative infection between the two groups (p = 0.001). Relative risk of developing a postoperative infection with positive colonization was 22 (95% CI, 8.37-58.5). The analysis of colonization with multidrug-resistant bacteria and the prevention of nosocomial infections appear to be important challenges for paediatric cardiac surgery. Systematic screening of ESBL

  18. Aging is a primary risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias: disruption of intracellular Ca2+ regulation as a key suspect.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Fiona; Lancaster, Matthew K; Jones, Sandra A

    2011-08-01

    Aging is an inevitable time-dependent progression associated with a functional decline of the cardiovascular system even in 'healthy' individuals. Age positively correlates with an increasing risk of cardiac problems including arrhythmias. Not only the prevalence but also the severity of arrhythmias escalates with age. The reasons for this are multifactorial but dysregulation of intracellular calcium within the heart is likely to play a key role in initiating and perpetuating these life-threatening events. We now know that several aspects of cardiac calcium regulation significantly change with advancing age - changes that could produce electrical instability. Further development of knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these changes will allow us to reduce what currently is an inevitable increase in the incidence of arrhythmias in the elderly.

  19. Quantitative Impact of Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Vascular Closure Devices on the Femoral Artery after Repeat Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Tiroch, Klaus A.; Matheny, Michael E.; Resnic, Frederic S.

    2010-01-01

    Background We evaluated the exact quantitative long-term impact of repeated catheterizations, vascular closure devices (VCDs) and cardiovascular risk factors on the femoral artery after cardiac catheterization. Methods A total of 2,102 available femoral angiograms from 827 consecutive patients were analyzed using caliper-based quantitative vascular analysis (QVA). These patients underwent coronary interventions between 01/2005-04/2007, and had at least one additional catheterization procedure through the ipsilateral femoral access site from 12/2001 until 01/2008. Multivariate analysis was performed to control for confounding variables. The primary outcome was change in artery size. Results The average punctured artery diameter was 6.5mm±2.1mm. The average time between first case and last follow-up was 349 days. There was no significant change of the punctured artery size over time after the index procedure (P=0.15) and no change associated with the use of VCDs (P=0.25) after multivariate analysis. Smaller arteries were associated with female gender (−1.22mm, P<0.0001), presence of angiographic peripheral vascular disease (PVD, −1.19mm, P<0.0001), and current (−0.48mm, P=0.001) or former (−0.23mm, P=0.01) smoking status, while previous statin therapy was associated with an increase in artery size (+0.47mm, P<0.0001). VCDs were used less often compared to manual compression in cases preceding the first detection of angiographic PVD (P<0.001). Conclusion VCDs are not associated with a change in the artery size or progression of PVD. Overall, there is no change in vessel size over time after repeat catheterizations, with a decrease in vessel size associated with current and former smoking, and an increase with previous statin therapy. PMID:20102878

  20. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in Semaphorin 3A as a Risk Factor for Human Unexplained Cardiac Arrest with Documented Ventricular Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yukiko; Chayama, Kazuaki; Ochi, Hidenori; Toshishige, Masaaki; Hayashida, Yasufumi; Miki, Daiki; Hayes, C. Nelson; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tokuyama, Takehito; Oda, Noboru; Suenari, Kazuyoshi; Uchimura-Makita, Yuko; Kajihara, Kenta; Sairaku, Akinori; Motoda, Chikaaki; Fujiwara, Mai; Watanabe, Yoshikazu; Yoshida, Yukihiko; Ohkubo, Kimie; Watanabe, Ichiro; Nogami, Akihiko; Hasegawa, Kanae; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Endo, Naoto; Aiba, Takeshi; Shimizu, Wataru; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Arihiro, Koji; Tashiro, Satoshi; Makita, Naomasa; Kihara, Yasuki

    2013-01-01

    Unexplained cardiac arrest (UCA) with documented ventricular fibrillation (VF) is a major cause of sudden cardiac death. Abnormal sympathetic innervations have been shown to be a trigger of ventricular fibrillation. Further, adequate expression of SEMA3A was reported to be critical for normal patterning of cardiac sympathetic innervation. We investigated the relevance of the semaphorin 3A (SEMA3A) gene located at chromosome 5 in the etiology of UCA. Eighty-three Japanese patients diagnosed with UCA and 2,958 healthy controls from two different geographic regions in Japan were enrolled. A nonsynonymous polymorphism (I334V, rs138694505A>G) in exon 10 of the SEMA3A gene identified through resequencing was significantly associated with UCA (combined P = 0.0004, OR 3.08, 95%CI 1.67–5.7). Overall, 15.7% of UCA patients carried the risk genotype G, whereas only 5.6% did in controls. In patients with SEMA3A I334V, VF predominantly occurred at rest during the night. They showed sinus bradycardia, and their RR intervals on the 12-lead electrocardiography tended to be longer than those in patients without SEMA3A I334V (1031±111 ms versus 932±182 ms, P = 0.039). Immunofluorescence staining of cardiac biopsy specimens revealed that sympathetic nerves, which are absent in the subendocardial layer in normal hearts, extended to the subendocardial layer only in patients with SEMA3A I334V. Functional analyses revealed that the axon-repelling and axon-collapsing activities of mutant SEMA3A I334V genes were significantly weaker than those of wild-type SEMA3A genes. A high incidence of SEMA3A I334V in UCA patients and inappropriate innervation patterning in their hearts implicate involvement of the SEMA3A gene in the pathogenesis of UCA. PMID:23593010

  1. Caryocar brasiliense oil improves cardiac function by increasing Serca2a/PLB ratio despite no significant changes in cardiovascular risk factors in rats.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lidiane Guedes; Moreno, Lauane Gomes; Melo, Dirceu Sousa; Costa-Pereira, Liliane Vanessa; Carvalho, Mayara Medeiros de Freitas; Silva, Paulo Henrique Evangelista; Alves, Ana Maria; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Dias-Peixoto, Marco Fabrício; Esteves, Elizabethe Adriana

    2017-02-08

    Caryocar brasiliense (pequi) oil is high in monounsaturated fat acids (MUFA), especially oleic, and in carotenoids, which have been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease. However, this food is poorly studied in this context, especially in the cardiac function. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a long-term intake of pequi oil in systemic cardiovascular risk factors and in the ex vivo cardiac function of rats. Previously, we determined fatty acids and carotenoids in pequi oil. Next, male rats were divided in C - control group feed a standard diet, and PO - pequi oil group fed the same diet added pequi oil (+2.25 g.100 g(-1)). After 15 weeks, plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, blood pressure, heart rate, hepatic lipids were accessed and visceral fat pads were harvested. Hearts were used for the ex vivo cardiac function, histologic assays, SERCA2a and phospholanban (PLB) determinations. In agreement with scientific data, pequi oil had expressive amounts MUFA, especially oleic acid, and carotenoids. Hepatic triglycerides (TG) were reduced by pequi oil intake (p < 0.05). All others cardiovascular risk factors were not changed. The intrinsic heart rate was lower in PO group (p < 0.05). SERCA2a content was higher in this group (p < 0.05), without affecting PLB. Also, SERCA2a/PLB ratio increased in PO group (p < 0.05). Pequi oil intake improved cardiac function ex vivo, despite no significant changes in systemic cardiovascular risk factors. The higher lipid offer in pequi oil diet, its composition in oleic acid and carotenoids could be related to those effects.

  2. Risk factors among people surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and their thoughts about what lifestyle means to them: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The known risk factors for coronary heart disease among people prior suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with validated myocardial infarction aetiology and their thoughts about what lifestyle means to them after surviving have rarely been described. Therefore the aim of the study was to describe risk factors and lifestyle among survivors. Methods An explanatory mixed methods design was used. All people registered in the Northern Sweden MONICA myocardial registry between the year 1989 to 2007 who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with validated myocardial infarction aetiology and were alive at the 28th day after the onset of symptoms (n = 71) were included in the quantitative analysis. Thirteen of them participated in interviews conducted in 2011 and analysed via a qualitative manifest content analysis. Results About 60% of the people had no history of ischemic heart disease before the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but 20% had three cardiovascular risk factors (i.e., hypertension, diabetes mellitus, total cholesterol of more or equal 5 mmol/l or taking lipid lowering medication, and current smoker). Three categories (i.e., significance of lifestyle, modifying the lifestyle to the new life situation and a changed view on life) and seven sub-categories emerged from the qualitative analysis. Conclusions For many people out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was the first symptom of coronary heart disease. Interview participants were well informed about their cardiovascular risk factors and the benefits of risk factor treatment. In spite of that, some chose to ignore this knowledge to some extent and preferred to live a “good life”, where risk factor treatment played a minor part. The importance of the support of family members in terms of feeling happy and having fun was highlighted by the interview participants and expressed as being the meaning of lifestyle. Perhaps the person with illness together with health care workers should focus

  3. [The high risk cardiac patient in anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Francke, A

    1996-01-01

    As a result of more offensive therapeutic measures and the given abilities of modern medicine and the increasing number of geriatric patients who are characterized by multimorbidity, more perioperative complications, in particular those of cardiac origin, can be expected. As in any other medical discipline, the safety of anaesthesiological care of the patient very much depends on the individual professional qualification and competence of the physician. For the field of anaesthesiology it can be concluded that it is necessary to tackle the specific problems of this risk group in order to reduce the rate of complications to a minimum. In line with a number of studies showing equal manifestation of cardiac risk factors during the pre-, intra- and postoperative periods, we should concentrate on the consistent use of all preventive and therapeutic measures available during these three periods. Besides evaluation of the cardiac risk factors and planning of the intra- and postoperative management, premedication is of particular importance in the preoperative period. To avoid sympathicoadrenergic contraregulations, benzodiazepines are particularly recommended because of their anxiolytic and sedative effects. The selection of a special anaesthetic method suitable for the patient with high cardiac risk should be influenced not only by anaesthesiological aspects but also by the complex effects of anaesthetic drugs on the determinants of the myocardial oxygen balance. In this connection, an increased sympathicoadrenergic tonus is of particular importance, i.e. extreme changes in blood pressure or heart rate--compared to preanaesthetic values--and an increase in diastolic wall tension should be avoided. An anaesthetic regime comprising gentle general anaesthesia combined with epidural block and small doses of opioids or local anaesthetics meets these requirements, as does a combination of opioids with low doses of volatile anaesthetics or intravenous hypnotics. The quality of

  4. Diabetes, glucose tolerance, and the risk of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Eranti, Antti; Kerola, Tuomas; Aro, Aapo L; Tikkanen, Jani T; Rissanen, Harri A; Anttonen, Olli; Junttila, M Juhani; Knekt, Paul; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2016-02-24

    Diabetes predisposes to sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, it is uncertain whether greater proportion of cardiac deaths are sudden among diabetes patients than other subjects. It is also unclear whether the risk of SCD is pronounced already early in the course of the disease. The relationship of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and SCD is scarcely documented. A general population cohort of 10594 middle-aged subjects (mean age 44 years, 52.6 % male, follow-up duration 35-41 years) was divided into diabetes patients (n = 82), subjects with IGT (n = 3806, plasma glucose ≥9.58 mmol/l in one-hour glucose tolerance test), and controls (n = 6706). Diabetes patients had an increased risk of SCD after adjustment confounders (hazard ratio 2.62, 95 % confidence interval 1.46-4.70, p = 0.001) but risk for non-sudden cardiac death was similarly increased and the proportion of SCD of cardiac deaths was not increased. The SCD risk persisted after exclusion of subjects with baseline cardiac disease or non-fatal cardiac events during the follow-up. Subjects with IGT were at increased risk for SCD (univariate hazard ratio 1.51; 95 % confidence interval 1.31-1.74; p < 0.001) and also for non-sudden cardiac deaths and non-fatal cardiac events but adjustments for other risk factors attenuated these effects. Diabetes was associated with increased risk of SCD but also the risk of non-sudden cardiac death was similarly increased. The proportion of cardiac deaths being sudden in subjects with diabetes was not increased. The higher SCD risk in diabetes patients was independent of known cardiac disease at baseline or occurrence of non-fatal cardiac event during the follow-up.

  5. Evidence Based Review: Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Phillips, Tiffany R.; Brown, Angela K.; Arzeno, Natalia M.; Levine, Benjamin; Summers, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Very little research has systematically evaluated the prevalence (or potential risk) of cardiac arrhythmias during space flight. There are several observational reports of non life-threatening but potentially concerning arrhythmias. At least two potential risk factors for arrhythmias have been reported either during or immediately after space flight: cardiac atrophy and a prolonged QTc interval. The potential severity of the mission impact of a serious arrhythmia requires that a systematic evaluation be conducted of the risk of arrhythmia due to space flight.

  6. Emotion Risk-Factor in Patients With Cardiac Diseases: The Role of Cognitive Emotion Regulation Strategies, Positive Affect and Negative Affect (A Case-Control Study)

    PubMed Central

    Bahremand, Mostafa; Alikhani, Mostafa; Zakiei, Ali; Janjani, Parisa; Aghaei, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Application of psychological interventions is essential in classic treatments for patient with cardiac diseases. The present study compared cognitive emotion regulation strategies, positive affect, and negative affect for cardiac patients with healthy subjects. This study was a case-control study. Fifty subjects were selected using convenient sampling method from cardiac (coronary artery disease) patients presenting in Imam Ali medical center of Kermanshah, Iran in the spring 2013. Fifty subjects accompanied the patients to the medical center, selected as control group, did not have any history of cardiac diseases. For collecting data, the cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire and positive and negative affect scales were used. For data analysis, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was applied using the SPSS statistical software (ver. 19.0). In all cognitive emotion regulation strategies, there was a significant difference between the two groups. A significant difference was also detected regarding positive affect between the two groups, but no significant difference was found regarding negative affect. We found as a result that, having poor emotion regulation strategies is a risk factor for developing heart diseases. PMID:26234976

  7. Un Corazón Saludable: factors influencing outcomes of an exercise program designed to impact cardiac and metabolic risks among urban Latinas.

    PubMed

    Harralson, Tina L; Emig, Julie Cousler; Polansky, Marcia; Walker, Renee E; Cruz, Joanna Otero; Garcia-Leeds, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    A high prevalence of physical inactivity, metabolic risk factors, and depression place Latinas in peril of developing cardiovascular disease. "Un Corazón Saludable: A Healthy Heart" was developed to engage urban Latinas in physical activity and increase awareness of cardiac and metabolic risk factors. Two hundred and twenty-five Latinas enrolled in the program that included salsa aerobics and culturally sensitive health education modules. Cardiac and metabolic risk factors measured in this study were body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, abdominal obesity, and blood pressure. Psychosocial risk factors measured included depressive symptoms and perceived social support. Fifty-two percent of the enrollees completed the program. Results indicated decreases in BMI, abdominal obesity, and symptoms of depression among Latinas who completed the program. Those who did not complete the program were younger, had greater depressive symptomatology, reported poorer social support, and they tended to be caregivers and U.S. born. Focus groups of program participants ascertained that caregiving and family obligations were major barriers to exercise while social support was a major facilitator of exercise. This research indicates that programs developed to recognize and address cultural barriers can impact physical and psychosocial risk factors among urban Latinas who are able to attend. Program retention may improve if future exercise programs conducted through community-base organizations offered support to Latinas regarding issues that interfere with self-care and health promotion. Future programs should consider including mental health and social service case management as part of comprehensive exercise/educational programs.

  8. Diabetes, cardiac disorders and asthma as risk factors for severe organ involvement among adult dengue patients: A matched case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Junxiong; Hsu, Jung Pu; Yeo, Tsin Wen; Leo, Yee Sin; Lye, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Progression to severe organ involvement due to dengue infection has been associated with severe dengue disease, intensive care treatment, and mortality. However, there is a lack of understanding of the impact of pre-existing comorbidities and other risk factors of severe organ involvement among dengue adults. The aim of this retrospective case-control study is to characterize and identify risk factors that predispose dengue adults at risk of progression with severe organ involvement. This study involved 174 dengue patients who had progressed with severe organ involvement and 865 dengue patients without severe organ involvement, matched by the year of presentation of the cases, who were admitted to Tan Tock Seng Hospital between year 2005 and 2008. Age group of 60 years or older, diabetes, cardiac disorders, asthma, and having two or more pre-existing comorbidities were independent risk factors of severe organ involvement. Abdominal pain, clinical fluid accumulation, and hematocrit rise and rapid platelet count drop at presentation were significantly associated with severe organ involvement. These risk factors, when validated in a larger study, will be useful for triage by clinicians for prompt monitoring and clinical management at first presentation, to minimize the risk of severe organ involvement and hence, disease severity. PMID:28045096

  9. Have risk factors for mortality after heart transplantation changed over time? Insights from 19 years of Cardiac Transplant Research Database study.

    PubMed

    Tallaj, José A; Pamboukian, Salpy V; George, James F; Kirklin, James K; Brown, Robert N; McGiffin, David C; Acharya, Deepak; Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo; Melby, Spencer J; Bourge, Robert C; Naftel, David C

    2014-12-01

    The Cardiac Transplant Research Database (CTRD) collected data from 26 U.S. institutions from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2008 providing the opportunity for construction of a comprehensive multivariable model of risk for death after transplantation. We analyzed risk factors for death over 19 years of experience to determine how risk profiles have changed over time and how they interact with age. A multivariable parametric hazard model for death was created for 7,015 patients entered into the CTRD. Variables collected over 19 years of experience were examined as potential risk factors and tested for interaction with date of transplantation to determine if their relative risk (RR) changed over time. The hazard for death post-transplant occurred in 2 phases: an early phase of acute risk lasting <1 year, and a late phase of relatively low, gradually increasing risk (<0.1 event/year). In the early phase, predictive models showed that ventricular assist device (VAD) at the time of transplant did not increase the RR of death for recipient transplant at 30 years of age, but the RR of death was increased by 60% (p = 0.04) at 60 years of age. Of the late-phase variables found to be risk factors, the RR of age, date of transplant and pulmonary vascular resistance changed with respect to transplant year. The overall risk of death dropped importantly over the study period, but the RR of all other variables remained unchanged. RR was 2.6 (p < 0.0001) for 25-year-old African-American (AA) versus non-AA recipients and 1.6 for 60-year-old AA recipients (p = 0.02). Over 19 years, the baseline risk of death has decreased, but the specific risk factors and the magnitudes of their RR have remained unchanged. Therefore, despite advances in clinical management and improvement in overall survival, the risk profile for death after cardiac transplantation is similar to that in 1990. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc

  10. Cardiac fibrillation risk of Taser weapons.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    The debate on potential health hazards associated with delivering electric discharges to incapacitated subjects, in particular on whether electric discharge weapons are lethal, less lethal or non-lethal, is still controversial. The cardiac fibrillation risks of Taser weapons X26 and X3 have been investigated by measuring the delivered high-tension pulses in dependence on load impedance. Excitation thresholds and sinus-to-Taser conversion factors have been determined by numerical modeling of endocardial, myocardial, and epicardial cells. Detailed quantitative assessment of cardiac electric exposure has been performed by numerical simulation at the normal-weighted anatomical model NORMAN. The impact of anatomical variation has been quantified at an overweight model (Visible Man), both with a spatial resolution of 2 × 2 × 2 mm voxels. Spacing and location of dart electrodes were systematically varied and the worst-case position determined. Based on volume-weighted cardiac exposure assessment, the fibrillation probability of the worst-case hit was determined to 30% (Taser X26) and 9% (Taser X3). The overall risk assessment of Taser application accounting for realistic spatial hit distributions was derived from training sessions of police officers under realistic scenarios and by accounting for the influence of body (over-)weight as well as gender. The analysis of the results showed that the overall fibrillation risk of Taser use is not negligible. It is higher at Taser X26 than at Taser X3 and amounts to about 1% for Europeans with an about 20% higher risk for Asians. Results demonstrate that enhancement as well as further reduction of fibrillation risk depends on responsible use or abuse of Taser weapons.

  11. Cardiovascular risk factors in two Ecuadorian urban and rural populations. The Ecuadorian-Japan Cooperative CARDIAC Study Group.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo, G; Davalos, P; Yamori, Y

    1990-01-01

    We examined the specific hypotheses linking the intake of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and protein to blood pressure (BP) and the relationship between dietary factors and mortality from the major cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the Ecuadorian populations. Two Ecuadorian populations, the urban and the rural, were selected from Quito and Vilcabamba, respectively. From Quito: 87 men and 83 women; from Vilcabamba: 71 men and 91 women aged 50-54 were randomly selected for BP measurement, 24-h urine collection, and blood sampling according to the Cardiovascular Disease and Alimentary Comparison (CARDIAC) Study protocol. Samples were analyzed at CARDIAC center in Izumo, Japan. Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) was not much different in the two populations, but mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and body mass index (BMI) were significantly lower in Vilcabamba (p less than 0.001). Mortality from stroke was higher in Vilcabamba, whereas coronary death rate was higher in Quito. Both sodium intake and sodium/potassium ratio were higher in Vilcabamba (p less than 0.001). Protein intake and serum cholesterol were higher in Quito (p less than 0.001). Urinary taurine excretion was higher in Quito. There was no difference in W3/W6 fatty acids ratio between the two populations. Multiple regression analyses of intracommunity correlation indicated that both SBP and DBP were highly significantly related with BMI in Quito and that urinary excretions were inversely related to SBP. Serum cholesterol was positively related to coronary death rate. Mortality from stroke was inversely related to both serum cholesterol and protein and was positively related to salt consumption.

  12. Adverse events rates and risk factors in adults undergoing cardiac catheterization at pediatric hospitals--results from the C3PO.

    PubMed

    Learn, Christopher P; Holzer, Ralf J; Daniels, Curt J; Torres, Alejandro J; Vincent, Julie A; Moore, John W; Armsby, Laurie B; Landzberg, Michael J; Bergersen, Lisa

    2013-05-01

    Determine the frequency and risk factors for adverse events (AE) for adults undergoing cardiac catheterization at pediatric hospitals. Adult catheterization AE rates at pediatric hospitals are not well understood. The Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes (C3PO) collects data on all catheterizations at eight pediatric institutions. Adult (≥ 18 years) case characteristics and AE were reviewed and compared with those of pediatric (<18 years) cases. Cases were classified into procedure risk categories from 1 to 4 based on highest risk procedure/intervention performed. AE were categorized by level of severity. Using a multivariate model for high severity AE (HSAE), standardized AE rates (SAER) were calculated by dividing the observed rates of HSAE by the expected rates. 2,061 cases (15% of total) were performed on adults and 11,422 cases (85%) were performed on children. Adults less frequently underwent high-risk procedure category cases than children (19% vs. 30%). AE occurred in 10% of adult cases and 13% of pediatric cases (P < 0.001). HSAE occurred in 4% of adult and 5% of pediatric cases (P = 0.006). Procedure-type risk category (Category 2, 3, 4 OR = 4.8, 6.0, 12.9) and systemic ventricle end diastolic pressure ≥ 18 mm Hg (OR 3.1) were associated with HSAE, c statistic 0.751. There were no statistically significant differences in SAER among institutions. Adults undergoing catheterization at pediatric hospitals encountered AE less frequently than children did. The congenital heart disease adjustment for risk method for adults with congenital heart disease is a new tool for assessing procedural risk in adult patients. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cardiac risk factors and metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia admitted to a general hospital psychiatric unit

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Nebhinani, Naresh; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit; Basu, Debasish; Kulhara, Parmanand; Mattoo, Surendra Kumar; Malhotra, Savita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of cardiovascular risk (CVR) factors and metabolic syndrome (MS) in patients with schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: By consecutive sampling, 143 patients (of age ≥ 20 years), out of total 159 patients with schizophrenia admitted to the inpatient unit were evaluated for the coronary heart disease (CHD) risk as per Framingham (10-year all CHD events) function/risk equation and systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE) - 10-year cardiovascular mortality risk (CMR). Prevalence of MS was estimated by using the consensus definition. Results: Fifty-two (36.4%) patients fulfilled the criteria for MS. 10-year CHD risk was 1.65%, and 10-year CMR was 1.39%. Compared to females, males had higher Framingham score (1.96 ± 2.74 vs. 1.09 ± 0.41, U value 1987.5*, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Patients of schizophrenia have a high prevalence of MS and CVR factors. Hence, there is a need to screen the patient of schizophrenia for the same and manage the same as early as possible during the course of illness. PMID:25568478

  14. Cardiac risk evaluation for elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Purath, J; Lansinger, T; Ragheb, C

    1995-06-01

    This study examined cardiac risk factors in school-age children. Specific risk factors focused on were smoking, hypertension, elevated blood cholesterol, obesity, physical inactivity, and nutritional imbalances. All consenting students in grades one through five participated. Components of the study included screenings and a questionnaire. Children (N = 357) were screened for height/weight, resting pulse, blood pressure, cholesterol, skin-fold thickness, and fitness. The questionnaire included an assessment of family diseases and family health practices. Results showed no significant relationships between cholesterol and family history of hypercholesterolemia or coronary heart disease, cholesterol and overweight, cholesterol and amount of time students exercised and the amount of time student's mothers exercised (r = -0.25, p = .0028), cholesterol elevation and exercise (r = -0.25, p-value = 0.007), and exercise and the frequency of eating out in a restaurant (r = -0.18, p-value = 0.03).

  15. Noncoronary Measures Enhance the Predictive Value of Cardiac CT Above Traditional Risk Factors and CAC Score in the General Population.

    PubMed

    Mahabadi, Amir A; Lehmann, Nils; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Pundt, Noreen; Dykun, Iryna; Roggenbuck, Ulla; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund; Kälsch, Hagen

    2016-10-01

    volume, and TAC from non-contrast-enhanced cardiac CT improves the prediction of incident hard cardiovascular events above CAC and established risk factors, indicating that quantification of these noncoronary measures may improve the prognostic value of this imaging technology. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase are risk factors for perioperative acute myocardial infarction after cardiac surgery: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Viktória; Gasz, Balazs; Balatonyi, Borbala; Jaromi, Luca; Kisfali, Peter; Borsiczky, Balazs; Jancso, Gabor; Marczin, Nandor; Szabados, Sandor; Melegh, Bela; Nasri, Alotti; Roth, Elisabeth

    2014-04-01

    In the present study we explored glutathione S-transferase (GST) polymorphisms in selected patients who experienced accelerated myocardial injury following open heart surgery and compared these to a control group of patients without postoperative complications. 758 Patients were enrolled from which 132 patients were selected to genotype analysis according to exclusion criteria. Patients were divided into the following groups: Group I: control patients (n = 78) without and Group II.: study patients (n = 54) with evidence of perioperative myocardial infarction. Genotyping for GSTP1 A (Ile105Ile/Ala113Ala), B (Ile105Val/Ala113Ala) and C (Ile105Val/Ala113Val) alleles was performed by using real-time-PCR. The heterozygous AC allele was nearly three times elevated (18.5 vs. 7.7 %) in the patients who suffered postoperative myocardial infarction compared to controls. Contrary, we found allele frequency of 14.1 % for homozygous BB allele in the control group whereas no such allele combination was present in the study group. These preliminary results may suggest the protective role for the B and C alleles during myocardial oxidative stress whereas the A allele may represent predisposing risk for cellular injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  17. Safety and Efficacy of Prophylactic Amiodarone in Preventing Early Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia (JET) in Children After Cardiac Surgery and Determination of Its Risk Factor.

    PubMed

    Amrousy, Doaa El; Elshehaby, Walid; Feky, Wael El; Elshmaa, Nagat S

    2016-04-01

    Postoperative arrhythmia is a common complication after open heart surgery in children. JET is the most common and dangerous arrhythmia. We aimed to assess safety and efficacy of prophylactic amiodarone in preventing JET in children underwent cardiac surgery and to assess risk factors for JET among our patients. In total, 117 children who underwent cardiac surgery for CHD at Tanta University Hospital from October 2011 to April 2015 were divided in two groups; amiodarone group (65 patients) was given prophylactic amiodarone intraoperatively and placebo group (52 patients). Amiodarone is started as loading dose of 5 mg/kg IV in the operating room after induction of anesthesia and continued for 3 days as continuous infusion 10-15 μg/kg/min. Primary outcome and secondary outcomes of amiodarone administration were reported. We studied pre-, intra- and postoperative factors to determine risk factors for occurrence of JET among these children. Prophylactic amiodarone was found to significantly decrease incidence of postoperative JET from 28.9 % in placebo group to 9.2 % in amiodarone group, and symptomatic JET from 11.5 % in placebo group to 3.1 % in amiodarone group, and shorten postoperative intensive care unit and hospital stay without significant side effects. Risk factors for occurrence of JET were younger age, lower body weight, longer cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross-clamp time, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, acidosis and high dose of inotropes. JET was more associated with surgical repair of right ventricular outlet obstruction as in case of tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary stenosis. Most of JET 15/21 (71.4 %) occurred in the first day postoperatively, and 6/21 occurred in the second day (28.6 %). Prophylactic amiodarone is safe and effective in preventing early JET in children after open heart surgery.

  18. Intermediate-term mortality and cardiac transplantation in infants with single-ventricle lesions: risk factors and their interaction with shunt type.

    PubMed

    Tweddell, James S; Sleeper, Lynn A; Ohye, Richard G; Williams, Ismee A; Mahony, Lynn; Pizarro, Christian; Pemberton, Victoria L; Frommelt, Peter C; Bradley, Scott M; Cnota, James F; Hirsch, Jennifer; Kirshbom, Paul M; Li, Jennifer S; Pike, Nancy; Puchalski, Michael; Ravishankar, Chitra; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Laussen, Peter C; McCrindle, Brian W

    2012-07-01

    The study objective was to identify factors associated with death and cardiac transplantation in infants undergoing the Norwood procedure and to determine differences in associations that might favor the modified Blalock-Taussig shunt or a right ventricle-to-pulmonary artery shunt. We used competing risks methodology to analyze death without transplantation, cardiac transplantation, and survival without transplantation. Parametric time-to-event modeling and bootstrapping were used to identify independent predictors. Data from 549 subjects (follow-up, 2.7 ± 0.9 years) were analyzed. Mortality risk was characterized by early and constant phases; transplant was characterized by only a constant phase. Early phase factors associated with death included lower socioeconomic status (P = .01), obstructed pulmonary venous return (P < .001), smaller ascending aorta (P = .02), and anatomic subtype. Constant phase factors associated with death included genetic syndrome (P < .001) and lower gestational age (P < .001). The right ventricle-to-pulmonary artery shunt demonstrated better survival in the 51% of subjects who were full term with aortic atresia (P < .001). The modified Blalock-Taussig shunt was better among the 4% of subjects who were preterm with a patent aortic valve (P = .003). Lower pre-Norwood right ventricular fractional area change, pre-Norwood surgery, and anatomy other than hypoplastic left heart syndrome were independently associated with transplantation (all P < .03), but shunt type was not (P = .43). Independent risk factors for intermediate-term mortality include lower socioeconomic status, anatomy, genetic syndrome, and lower gestational age. Term infants with aortic atresia benefited from a right ventricle-to-pulmonary artery shunt, and preterm infants with a patent aortic valve benefited from a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt. Right ventricular function and anatomy, but not shunt type, were associated with transplantation. Copyright © 2012 The American

  19. Ultrasound-guided femoral arterial access in pediatric cardiac catheterizations: A prospective evaluation of the prevalence, risk factors, and mechanism for acute loss of arterial pulse.

    PubMed

    Alexander, John; Yohannan, Thomas; Abutineh, Iman; Agrawal, Vijaykumar; Lloyd, Hannah; Zurakowski, David; Waller, B Rush; Sathanandam, Shyam

    2016-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence, mechanisms, and identify risk factors for acute loss of arterial pulse (LOP) in children who had ultrasound-guided femoral arterial access (UGFAA) during cardiac catheterization. LOP is a known complication in children following femoral arterial (FA) access for cardiac catheterization. The prevalence of LOP requiring treatment ranges between 4% and 8%. A prospective study was performed including 486 cardiac catheterizations using UGFAA in children ≤18 years over a 3 years period. Ultrasound and Doppler evaluations were performed prior to and at the end of the procedure. LOP was identified in 33 cases (6.8%) with 23 (4.7%) requiring treatment. For children ≤6 months, the prevalence of LOP requiring treatment was 13.6%. FA diameter <3 mm was the only significant independent predictor for LOP (OR: 8.44, 95% CI: 2.07-34.5, P < 0.001). Smaller patient size, number of access attempts, time required for access, operator experience, sheath size, and length of procedure were not found to be significant predictors. Children with LOP had a greater percentage decrease in vessel diameter (median 62% vs 18%, P < 0.001) compared to those without LOP. FA thrombus was diagnosed only in 9 patients (27% of those with LOP). The prevalence of LOP requiring treatment is 4.7% when UGFAA is used during pediatric cardiac catheterizations. Arterial spasm was more common than thrombus as a cause of LOP. FA diameter <3 mm was the only independent predictor for LOP in this carefully designed prospective study. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Preoperative mood disorders in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: risk factors and postoperative morbidity in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Navarro-García, Miguel A; Marín-Fernández, Blanca; de Carlos-Alegre, Vanessa; Martínez-Oroz, Amparo; Martorell-Gurucharri, Ainhara; Ordoñez-Ortigosa, Esther; Prieto-Guembe, Patricia; Sorbet-Amóstegui, Maria R; Induráin-Fernández, Silvia; Elizondo-Sotro, Arantzazu; Irigoyen-Aristorena, Maria I; García-Aizpún, Yolanda

    2011-11-01

    To estimate the preoperative levels of anxiety and depression in patients awaiting heart surgery and to identify the risk factors associated with the development of these mood disorders. To evaluate the relationship between preoperative anxiety and depression and postoperative morbidity. Prospective longitudinal study in a sample of 100 patients undergoing heart surgery. We carried out a preoperative structured interview in which the patient completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and sociodemographic (age, sex, marital status, and income) and surgical variables (surgical risk, type of surgery, length of preoperative hospital stay, and surgical history) were also recorded. Pain, analgesic use, and postoperative morbidity were evaluated in the intensive care unit. Thirty-two percent of the patients developed preoperative anxiety and 19%, depression. Age < 65 years (odds ratio=3.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-7.3) was the only significant risk factor for developing preoperative anxiety. A length of preoperative hospital stay ≥ 3 days was the main risk factor for preoperative depression (odds ratio=4.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-13.17). Preoperative anxiety significantly increased the postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. Neither anxiety nor depression significantly modified the rest of the postoperative variables associated with morbidity in the intesive care unit. Anxiety and depression are mood disorders that are detected in patients awaiting heart surgery, with age <65 years and a prolonged preoperative hospital stay being decisive factors in the development of these conditions. Although preoperative anxiety increased the postoperative pain in these patients, their state of mind did not modify their postoperative course. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk index proposal to predict atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rogério Gomes da; Lima, Gustavo Glotz de; Guerra, Nelma; Bigolin, André Vicente; Petersen, Lucas Celia

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication following cardiac surgery and is associated with an increased patient morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to develop a risk index proposal to predict AF after cardiac surgery. A prospective observational study in that 452 patients were selected to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with postoperative AF. Only patients following cardiac surgery were selected. Continuous cardiac monitor and daily electrocardiogram were assessed. The most associated in a multivariable logistic model were selected for the risk index. The average incidence of AF was 22.1%. The most associated factors with AF were: patients older than 75 years of age, mitral valve disease, no use of a beta blocker, withdrawal of a beta-blocker and a positive fluid balance. The absence risk factor determined 4.6% chance to postoperative AF, and for one, two and three or more risk factors, the chance was 16.6%, 25.9% and 46.3%, respectively. In a multivariable logistic model was possible to develop a risk index proposal to predict postoperative AF with a major risk of 46.3% in the presence of three or more risk factors.

  2. Relative Risk Factors for Cardiac Erosion Following Transcatheter Closure of Atrial Septal Defects: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    McElhinney, Doff B; Quartermain, Michael D; Kenny, Damien; Alboliras, Ernerio; Amin, Zahid

    2016-05-03

    Transcatheter closure of secundum atrial septal defects (ASD) using the Amplatzer septal occluder is generally safe and effective, but erosion into the pericardial space or aorta has been described. Although the absolute risk of this complication is low, there has been no assessment of relative risk factors. All erosions reported to St. Jude Medical after ASD closure with an Amplatzer septal occluder (cases) were compared with controls (matched 2:1) who underwent ASD closure but did not develop an erosion. A total of 125 erosions were reported between 2002 and 2014, including 95 with an available echocardiogram. The median duration from implant to erosion was 14 days, but was >1 year in 16 patients. Nine patients (all age ≥17 years) who died were more likely to have an oversized device, and to have erosion into the aorta, than survivors. Aortic or superior vena cava rim deficiencies were more common in cases than in controls. In addition, larger balloon-sized ASD diameter, Amplatzer septal occluder device size, and device size-ASD diameter difference, and smaller weight:device size ratio were associated with erosion. On multivariable analysis, deficiency of any rim, device >5 mm larger than ASD diameter, and weight:device size ratio were associated with erosion. In addition to aortic rim deficiency, which was almost universal among erosion cases, there were several relative risk factors for erosion after ASD closure with the Amplatzer septal occluder device. To understand the mechanisms of and absolute risk factors for this uncommon but serious complication, an adequately powered prospective study with thorough echocardiographic evaluation will be critical. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Incidence, risk factors and prediction of post-operative acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery for active infective endocarditis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is frequently needed in patients with infective endocarditis (IE). Acute kidney injury (AKI) often complicates IE and is associated with poor outcomes. The purpose of the study was to determine the risk factors for post-operative AKI in patients operated on for IE. Methods A retrospective, non-interventional study of prospectively collected data (2000–2010) included patients with IE and cardiac surgery with cardio-pulmonary bypass. The primary outcome was post-operative AKI, defined as the development of AKI or progression of AKI based on the acute kidney injury network (AKIN) definition. We used ensemble machine learning (“Super Learning”) to develop a predictor of AKI based on potential risk factors, and evaluated its performance using V-fold cross validation. We identified clinically important predictors among a set of risk factors using Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation. Results 202 patients were included, of which 120 (59%) experienced a post-operative AKI. 65 (32.2%) patients presented an AKI before surgery while 91 (45%) presented a progression of AKI in the post-operative period. 20 patients (9.9%) required a renal replacement therapy during the post-operative ICU stay and 30 (14.8%) died during their hospital stay. The following variables were found to be significantly associated with renal function impairment, after adjustment for other risk factors: multiple surgery (OR: 4.16, 95% CI: 2.98-5.80, p<0.001), pre-operative anemia (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.34-2.66, p<0.001), transfusion requirement during surgery (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.55-3.63, p<0.001), and the use of vancomycin (OR: 2.63, 95% CI: 2.07-3.34, p<0.001), aminoglycosides (OR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.13-1.83, p=0.004) or contrast iodine (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.37-2.12, p<0.001). Post-operative but not pre-operative AKI was associated with hospital mortality. Conclusions Post-operative AKI following cardiopulmonary bypass for IE results from additive hits to the kidney. We

  4. Phosphate excretion is decreased in older cardiac patients with normal kidney function: an emerging dietary risk factor?

    PubMed

    Jozefacki, Alexis; White, Christine A; Shobeiri, Navid S; Hopman, Wilma M; Johri, Amer M; Adams, Michael A; Holden, Rachel M

    2016-04-01

    Serum phosphate independently predicts cardiovascular events and mortality. Sixteen healthy adults and 9 adults with cardiovascular disease (CVD) ingested 500 mg of sodium phosphate after an over-night fast. In control subjects, the urine phosphate/creatinine ratio was significantly higher at 2 h (3.12 ± 1.02) than at baseline (1.98 ± 0.58, p < 0.001) but no change was observed in CVD patients. Decreased postprandial urinary excretion of phosphate could accelerate vascular calcification and may be an under-recognized risk factor for CVD.

  5. A novel approach to cardiovascular health by optimizing risk management (ANCHOR): a primary prevention initiative examining the impact of health risk factor assessment and management on cardiac wellness.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jafna L; Carr, Brendan; Vallis, T Michael; Szpilfogel, Claudine; O'Neill, Blair J

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents an increasing burden to health care systems. Modifiable risk factors figure prominently in the population-attributable risk for premature coronary artery disease. Primary care is well placed to facilitate CVD risk improvement. We plan to evaluate the ability of a novel primary care intervention providing systematic risk factor screening, risk-weighted behavioural counselling and pharmacological intervention to achieve 2 objectives: (1) optimized management of global CVD risk of patients and (2) increased patient adherence to lifestyle and pharmaceutical interventions aimed at decreasing global CVD risk. A pre-post longitudinal prospective design with a nonrandomized comparison group is being undertaken in 2 geographically diverse primary care practices in Nova Scotia with differing reimbursement models. Participants will complete a readiness to change and pre-post health risk assessment (HRA), that will trigger a 1-year intervention individualized around risk and readiness. The primary outcome will be the proportion of participants with Framingham moderate and high-risk strata that reduce their absolute risk by 10% and 25%, respectively. The secondary outcome will be the proportion of moderate and high-risk participants who reduce their risk category. The impact of the intervention on clinical and behavioural variables will also be examined. Low risk participants will be separately analyzed. Data from participants unable to change from the high risk category because of diabetes mellitus or established atherosclerotic disease will also be analyzed separately, with changes in clinical measures from baseline being assessed. A health economic analysis is planned. Copyright © 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors A risk factor is anything that affects ... these are risk factors for exocrine pancreatic cancer . Risk factors that can be changed Tobacco use Smoking ...

  7. Influence of acute kidney injury on short- and long-term outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: risk factors and prognostic value of a modified RIFLE classification.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Esteve, Francisco; Torrado, Herminia; Rodríguez-Castro, David; Carrio, Maria L; Farrero, Elisabet; Javierre, Casimiro; Ventura, Josep L; Manez, Rafael

    2013-12-13

    The development of acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with poor outcome. The modified RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of kidney function, and end-stage renal failure) classification for AKI, which classifies patients with renal replacement therapy needs according to RIFLE failure class, improves the predictive value of AKI in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Our aim was to assess risk factors for post-operative AKI and the impact of renal function on short- and long-term survival among all AKI subgroups using the modified RIFLE classification. We prospectively studied 2,940 consecutive cardiosurgical patients between January 2004 and July 2009. AKI was defined according to the modified RIFLE system. Pre-operative, operative and post-operative variables usually measured on and during admission, which included main outcomes, were recorded together with cardiac surgery scores and ICU scores. These data were evaluated for association with AKI and staging in the different RIFLE groups by means of multivariable analyses. Survival was analyzed via Kaplan-Meier and a risk-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression model. A complete follow-up (mean 6.9 ± 4.3 years) was performed in 2,840 patients up to April 2013. Of those patients studied, 14% (n = 409) were diagnosed with AKI. We identified one intra-operative (higher cardiopulmonary bypass time) and two post-operative (a longer need for vasoactive drugs and higher arterial lactate 24 hours after admission) predictors of AKI. The worst outcomes, including in-hospital mortality, were associated with the worst RIFLE class. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed survival of 74.9% in the RIFLE risk group, 42.9% in the RIFLE injury group and 22.3% in the RIFLE failure group (P <0.001). Classification at RIFLE injury (Hazard ratio (HR) = 2.347, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.122 to 4.907, P = 0.023) and RIFLE failure (HR = 3.093, 95% CI 1.460 to 6.550, P = 0.003) were independent predictors for

  8. Influence of acute kidney injury on short- and long-term outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: risk factors and prognostic value of a modified RIFLE classification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The development of acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with poor outcome. The modified RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of kidney function, and end-stage renal failure) classification for AKI, which classifies patients with renal replacement therapy needs according to RIFLE failure class, improves the predictive value of AKI in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Our aim was to assess risk factors for post-operative AKI and the impact of renal function on short- and long-term survival among all AKI subgroups using the modified RIFLE classification. Methods We prospectively studied 2,940 consecutive cardiosurgical patients between January 2004 and July 2009. AKI was defined according to the modified RIFLE system. Pre-operative, operative and post-operative variables usually measured on and during admission, which included main outcomes, were recorded together with cardiac surgery scores and ICU scores. These data were evaluated for association with AKI and staging in the different RIFLE groups by means of multivariable analyses. Survival was analyzed via Kaplan-Meier and a risk-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression model. A complete follow-up (mean 6.9 ± 4.3 years) was performed in 2,840 patients up to April 2013. Results Of those patients studied, 14% (n = 409) were diagnosed with AKI. We identified one intra-operative (higher cardiopulmonary bypass time) and two post-operative (a longer need for vasoactive drugs and higher arterial lactate 24 hours after admission) predictors of AKI. The worst outcomes, including in-hospital mortality, were associated with the worst RIFLE class. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed survival of 74.9% in the RIFLE risk group, 42.9% in the RIFLE injury group and 22.3% in the RIFLE failure group (P <0.001). Classification at RIFLE injury (Hazard ratio (HR) = 2.347, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.122 to 4.907, P = 0.023) and RIFLE failure (HR = 3.093, 95% CI 1.460 to 6.550, P = 0.003) were

  9. Multidimensional Health Locus of Control and Causal Attributions as Predictors of Health and Risk Factor Status after Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkimer, John C.; And Others

    Compliance with many health-promoting regimens is often poor, even among individuals with known chronic disease. Lifestyle changes recommended by cardiac rehabilitation educators are often not adopted or not maintained by clients having suffered myocardial infarction and/or coronary graft bypass surgery. Subjects were graduates (N=117) of a Phase…

  10. Prediction of cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Morise, A.P.; McDowell, D.E.; Savrin, R.A.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabrielle, O.F.; Oliver, F.N.; Nullet, F.R.; Bekheit, S.; Jain, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to determine whether noninvasive cardiac testing could be used to assess cardiac risk in patients undergoing surgery for vascular disease, the authors studied 96 patients. Seventy-seven patients eventually underwent major vascular surgery with 11 (14%) experiencing a significant cardiac complication. Thallium imaging was much more likely to be positive (p less than 0.01) in patients with a cardiac complication; however, there was a significant number of patients with cardiac complications who had a positive history or electrocardiogram for myocardial infarction. When grouped by complication and history of infarction, thallium imaging, if negative, correctly predicted low cardiac risk in the group with a history of infarction. Thallium imaging, however, did not provide a clear separation of risk in those without a history of infarction. Age and coronary angiography, on the other hand, did reveal significant differences within the group without a history of infarction. The resting radionuclide ejection fraction followed a similar pattern to thallium imaging. It is concluded that a positive history of myocardial infarction at any time in the past is the strongest risk predictor in this population and that the predictive value of noninvasive testing is dependent on this factor. Considering these findings, a proposed scheme for assessing risk that will require further validation is presented.

  11. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Sudden Cardiac Death in Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Report from the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Elfriede; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Canter, Charles E.; Hsu, Daphne T.; Lu, Minmin; Webber, Steven A.; Colan, Steven D.; Kantor, Paul F.; Everitt, Melanie D.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Jefferies, John L.; Kaufman, Beth D.; Wilkinson, James D.; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To establish the incidence of, and risk factors for, SCD in pediatric DCM. Background The incidence of SCD in children with DCM is unknown. The ability to predict patients at high risk for SCD will help define who may benefit most from ICDs. Methods The cohort was 1803 children in the PCMR diagnosed with DCM from 1990-2009. Cumulative incidence competing-risks event rates were estimated. We achieved risk stratification using CART methodology. Results Five-year incidence rates were 29% for heart transplant, 12.1% non-sudden cardiac death (non-SCD), 4.0% death from unknown cause, and 2.4% for SCD. Of 280 deaths, 35 were SCD and cause was unknown for 56. The 5-year rate for SCD incorporating a subset of the unknown deaths is 3%. Patients receiving anti-arrhythmic medication were at higher risk of SCD (hazard ratio 3.0, 95% CI 1.1-8.3, p =0.025). A risk stratification model based on most recent echocardiographic values had 86% sensitivity and 57% specificity. Thirty of 35 SCDs occurred in patients who met all of these criteria: LV end-systolic dimension z score > 2.6, age at diagnosis <14.3 years, and ratio of LVPWT:EDD <0.14. Sex, ethnicity, cause of DCM, and family history were not associated with SCD. Conclusions The 5-year incidence of SCD in children with DCM is 3%. A risk stratification rule (86% sensitivity) included diagnosis age < 14.3 years, LV dilation, and LV posterior wall thinning. Patients who consistently meet these criteria should be considered for ICD placement. PMID:22300696

  12. The Joanna Briggs Institute Best Practice Information Sheet: Nurse-led interventions to reduce cardiac risk factors in adults.

    PubMed

    2010-09-01

    This Best Practice Information Sheet updates and supersedes an earlier publication of the Joanna Briggs Institute in 2005. The information that is contained in this publication is based upon a systematic review of six randomized clinical trials. Additional information has been derived from a second systematic review; thus, in total, the information is derived from 22 randomized controlled trials. The original references can be sourced from the systematic reviews. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the major cause of illness in Western society and it is becoming increasingly important to establish effective strategies in order to reduce the incidence of CHD. Nurse-led clinics are becoming more prominent in community settings and the importance of nurse interventions in the management of CHD and risk factor reduction is recognized in terms of improved health outcomes for patients. However, the variation in outcome measures and inconsistent findings between some studies make it difficult to draw firm conclusions.

  13. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  14. [Evaluation of the cardiac risks in non-cardiac surgery in patients with heart failure].

    PubMed

    Pinaud, M

    2002-02-01

    Cardiac insufficiency represents a major risk factor in patients about to undergo non-cardiac surgery. The post-operative mortality is linked to the severity of the pre-operative functional impairment: rising from 4% in NYHA class 1 to 67% in class IV. The operative risk is greater when the cardiac insufficiency is more disabling, the patient is older (> 70 years) and if there is a history of acute pulmonary oedema and a gallop bruit on auscultation. The use of metabolic equivalents (Duke Activity Status Index) is recommended: the functional capacity is defined as excellent if > 7 MET, moderate between 4 and 7, or poor if < 4. A non-invasive evaluation of left ventricular function is necessary in each patient with obvious congestive cardiac insufficiency or poor control under the American consensus, but it is rare that the patient has not already been seen by a cardiologist. The degree of per-operative haemodynamic constraint is linked to the surgical technique and is stratified according to the type of surgical intervention and whether or not it is performed as an emergency. An intervention duration > 5 hours is associated with an increased peri-operative risk of congestive cardiac insufficiency and non-cardiac death. Deaths from a cardiac cause are thus twice as frequent after intra-abdominal, non-cardiac thoracic or aortic surgery and the post-operative cardiac complications are six times more frequent. Numerous studies have attempted to document the impact of different anaesthetic techniques on the prognosis for the population at increased risk of post-operative cardiovascular complications. It is advisable to opt for peripheral nerve blocks. The cardiovascular morbidity and overall mortality do not differ between general anaesthetic, epidural anaesthetic or spinal nerve block. The ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) classification is widely used to determine the overall risk. The ASA class and the age are however too coarse as methods of evaluation for

  15. Lipid-lowering therapy and the patient with multiple risk factors: what have we learned from the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT)?

    PubMed

    Sever, Peter S

    2005-12-01

    The Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT) was the first trial of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) to assess the benefits of lipid lowering in the primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with hypertension who were not deemed to have dyslipidemia by conventional measures. A total of 19,342 patients with hypertension and > or =3 cardiovascular risk factors, but without CHD, were enrolled in ASCOT. Of these, 10,305 patients with a serum cholesterol level of < or =250 mg/dL (< or =6.5 mmol/L) were randomized to either atorvastatin (10 mg/day) or placebo in the ASCOT lipid-lowering arm (ASCOT-LLA). Follow-up was planned for an average of 5 years. The ASCOT-LLA was stopped after 3.3 years owing to the superiority of atorvastatin 10 mg over placebo in reducing the primary end point of nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and fatal CHD. Patients receiving atorvastatin experienced a significant reduction in total cholesterol (50 mg/dL [1.3 mmol/L]) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (46 mg/dL [1.2 mmol/L]) levels after 1 year compared with those who received placebo. Cholesterol lowering with atorvastatin was associated with a highly significant reduction in the primary end point of nonfatal MI and fatal CHD (36%, P = 0.0005). The observed benefit was consistent across the secondary end points and the 18 prespecified subgroups. The ASCOT-LLA findings have influenced lipid-lowering guidelines and support the concept that treatment strategies to reduce cardiovascular disease should be based on the assessment of all cardiovascular risk factors, rather than on numerical thresholds of individual risk factors, to determine treatment strategies.

  16. Prolonged elevated heart rate is a risk factor for adverse cardiac events and poor outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J Michael; Crimmins, Michael; Lantigua, Hector; Fernandez, Andres; Zammit, Chris; Falo, Cristina; Agarwal, Sachin; Claassen, Jan; Mayer, Stephan A

    2014-06-01

    Sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity is common after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We sought to determine whether uncontrolled prolonged heart rate elevation is a risk factor for adverse cardiopulmonary events and poor outcome after SAH. We prospectively studied 447 SAH patients between March 2006 and April 2012. Prior studies define prolonged elevated heart rate (PEHR) as heart rate >95 beats/min for >12 h. Major adverse cardiopulmonary events were documented according to the predefined criteria. Global outcome at 3 months was assessed with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). 175 (39 %) patients experienced PEHR. Nonwhite race/ethnicity, admission Hunt-Hess grade ≥4, elevated APACHE-2 physiological subscore, and modified Fisher score were significant admission predictors of PEHR, whereas documented pre-hospital beta-blocker use was protective. After controlling for admission Hunt-Hess grade, Cox regression using time-lagged covariates revealed that PEHR onset in the previous 48 h was associated with an increased hazard for delayed cerebral ischemia, myocardial injury, and pulmonary edema. PEHR was associated with 3-month poor outcome (mRS 4-6) after controlling for known predictors. PEHR is associated with major adverse cardiopulmonary events and poor outcome after SAH. Further study is warranted to determine if early sympatholytic therapy targeted at sustained heart rate control can improve outcome after SAH.

  17. Rest perfusion abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: correlation with myocardial fibrosis and risk factors for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Chiribiri, A; Leuzzi, S; Conte, M R; Bongioanni, S; Bratis, K; Olivotti, L; De Rosa, C; Lardone, E; Di Donna, P; Villa, A D M; Cesarani, F; Nagel, E; Gaita, F; Bonamini, R

    2015-05-01

    To measure the prevalence of abnormal rest perfusion in a population of consecutive patients with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) referred for cardiovascular MRI (CMR), and to assess any associations between abnormal rest perfusion and the presence, pattern, and severity of myocardial scar and the presence of risk factors for sudden death. Eighty consecutive patients with known HCM referred for CMR underwent functional imaging, rest first-pass perfusion, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Thirty percent of the patients had abnormal rest perfusion, all of them corresponding to areas of mid-myocardial LGE and to a higher degree of segmental hypertrophy. Rest perfusion abnormalities correlated with more extensive and confluent LGE. The subgroup of patients with myocardial fibrosis and rest perfusion abnormalities (fibrosis+/perfusion+) had more than twice the incidence of episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia on Holter monitoring in comparison to patients with myocardial fibrosis and normal rest perfusion (fibrosis+/perfusion-) and patients with no fibrosis and normal rest perfusion (fibrosis-/perfusion-). First-pass perfusion CMR identifies abnormal rest perfusion in a significant proportion of patients with HCM. These abnormalities are associated with the presence and distribution of myocardial scar and the degree of hypertrophy. Rest perfusion abnormalities identify patients with increased incidence of episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia on Holter monitoring, independently from the presence of myocardial fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of circulating factors in cardiac aging

    PubMed Central

    Cannatà, Antonio; Marcon, Gabriella; Cimmino, Giovanni; Camparini, Luca; Ciucci, Giulio; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide increase in life expectancy is a major contributor to the epidemic of chronic degenerative diseases. Aging, indeed, simultaneously affects multiple organ systems, and it has been hypothesized that systemic alterations in regulators of tissue physiology may regulate this process. Cardiac aging itself is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and, because of the intimate relationship with the brain, may contribute to increase the risk of neurodegenerative disorders. Blood-borne factors may play a major role in this complex and still elusive process. A number of studies, mainly based on the revival of parabiosis, a surgical technique very popular during the 70s of the 20th century to study the effect of a shared circulation in two animals, have indeed shown the potential that humoral factors can control the aging process in different tissues. In this article we review the role of circulating factors in cardiovascular aging. A better understanding of these mechanisms may provide new insights in the aging process and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for chronic age-related disorders. PMID:28446965

  19. Depression as a Risk Factor for the Initial Presentation of Twelve Cardiac, Cerebrovascular, and Peripheral Arterial Diseases: Data Linkage Study of 1.9 Million Women and Men.

    PubMed

    Daskalopoulou, Marina; George, Julie; Walters, Kate; Osborn, David P; Batty, G David; Stogiannis, Dimitris; Rapsomaniki, Eleni; Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar; Denaxas, Spiros; Udumyan, Ruzan; Kivimaki, Mika; Hemingway, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Depression is associated with coronary heart disease and stroke, but associations with a range of pathologically diverse cardiovascular diseases are not well understood. We examine the risk of 12 cardiovascular diseases according to depression status (history or new onset). Cohort study of 1,937,360 adult men and women, free from cardiovascular disease at baseline, using linked UK electronic health records between 1997 and 2010. The exposures were new-onset depression (a new GP diagnosis of depression and/or prescription for antidepressants during a one-year baseline), and history of GP-diagnosed depression before baseline. The primary endpoint was initial presentation of 12 cardiovascular diseases after baseline. We used disease-specific Cox proportional hazards models with multiple imputation adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol). Over a median [IQR] 6.9 [2.1-10.5] years of follow-up, 18.9% had a history of depression and 94,432 incident cardiovascular events occurred. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, history of depression was associated with: stable angina (Hazard Ratio = 1.38, 95%CI 1.32-1.45), unstable angina (1.70, 1.60-1.82), myocardial infarction (1.21, 1.16-1.27), unheralded coronary death (1.23, 1.14-1.32), heart failure (1.18, 1.13-1.24), cardiac arrest (1.14, 1.03-1.26), transient ischemic attack (1.31, 1.25-1.38), ischemic stroke (1.26, 1.18-1.34), subarachnoid haemorrhage (1.17, 1.01-1.35), intracerebral haemorrhage (1.30, 1.17-1.45), peripheral arterial disease (1.24, 1.18-1.30), and abdominal aortic aneurysm (1.12,1.01-1.24). New onset depression developed in 2.9% of people, among whom 63,761 cardiovascular events occurred. New onset depression was similarly associated with each of the 12 diseases, with no evidence of stronger associations compared to history of depression. The strength of association between depression and these cardiovascular

  20. Motivational factors of adherence to cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Shahriari, Mohsen; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2012-05-01

    Main suggested theories about patients' adherence to treatment regimens recognize the importance of motivation in positive changes in behaviors. Since cardiac diseases are chronic and common, cardiac rehabilitation as an effective prevention program is crucial in management of these diseases. There is always concern about the patients' adherence to cardiac rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to describe the motivational factors affecting the patients' participation and compliance to cardiac rehabilitation by recognizing and understanding the nature of patients' experiences. The participants were selected among the patients with cardiac diseases who were referred to cardiac rehabilitation in Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Iran. The purposive sampling method was used and data saturation achieved after 8 semi-structured interviews. The three main concepts obtained from this study are "beliefs", "supporters" and "group cohesion". In cardiac rehabilitation programs, emphasis on motivational factors affects the patient's adherence. It is suggested that in cardiac rehabilitation programs more attention should be paid to patients' beliefs, the role of patients' supporters and the role of group-based rehabilitation.

  1. Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been linked to some cancers: Links between air pollution and cancer risk have been found. These include ... between lung cancer and secondhand tobacco smoke , outdoor air pollution, and asbestos . Drinking water that contains a large ...

  2. Risk factors.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Catherine J; Connors, K C; Sheehan, Timothy J; Vaughan, James S

    2005-06-01

    Minimize surprises on your financial statement by adopting a model for integrated risk management that: Examines interrelationships among operations, investments, and financing. Incorporates concepts of the capital asset pricing model to manage unexpected volatility

  3. Usefulness of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T for the Identification of Outlier Patients With Diffuse Coronary Atherosclerosis and Low-Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Magnoni, Marco; Masson, Serge; Andreini, Daniele; Moccetti, Tiziano; Modena, Maria Grazia; Canestrari, Mauro; Berti, Sergio; Casolo, Giancarlo; Gabrielli, Domenico; Marraccini, Paolo; Pontone, Gianluca; Latini, Roberto; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro; Maseri, Attilio

    2016-05-01

    Novel high-sensitivity assay can detect very low levels of circulating cardiac troponin (hs-cTnT) in apparently healthy subjects. Within normal range, higher levels are associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiac abnormalities commonly associated to traditional risk factors (RFs) for CAD. Therefore, we investigated the relation between circulating hs-cTnT and CAD in patients with a spectrum of RF burden aiming to assess the added value of hs-cTnT to identify "outlier" patients with CAD despite a low RF burden. Hs-cTnT was measured in 525 stable patients without previous diagnosis of ischemic heart disease with 0 to 1 RF, excluded diabetes, (low-RF group, n = 263) or ≥2 RFs (multiple-RF group, n = 262) and without CAD (segment involvement score = 0) or diffuse CAD (segment involvement score >5) at coronary computed tomography angiography. Outlier patients with diffuse CAD despite low-RF burden had similar extent, severity, and plaque composition than patients with multiple RFs. Overall, hs-cTnT was measurable in 81% of patients with median value of 6.0 ng/L. In both groups, hs-cTnT concentration was higher in patients with CAD than in patients with normal coronary arteries (p <0.0001). Hs-cTnT was more accurate to detect patients with CAD in the low-RF group than in the multiple-RF group (p = 0.04). In multivariate analysis, higher level of hs-cTnT (>6 ng/L) was independently associated with CAD in low-RF group only. Despite very low circulating concentrations, hs-cTnT may identify with a good accuracy the outlier patients with diffuse CAD despite low-RF burden. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation on functional capacity and cardiovascular risk factors in Brazilians assisted by public health care: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Gabriela S. S.; Ghisi, Gabriela L. M.; Grace, Sherry L.; Oh, Paul; Ribeiro, Antonio L.; Britto, Raquel R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the leading burden of disease worldwide. Moreover, CVD-related death rates are considered an epidemic in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Research shows that cardiac rehabilitation (CR) participation reduces death and improves disability and quality of life. Given the growing epidemic of CVD in LMICs and the insufficient evidence about CR programs in these countries, a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) in Latin America is warranted. Objective To investigate the effects of comprehensive CR on functional capacity and cardiovascular risk factors. Method The design is a single-blinded RCT with three parallel arms: comprehensive CR (exercise + education) versus exercise-based CR versus wait-list control (no CR). The primary outcome will be measured by the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test. Secondary outcomes are risk factors (blood pressure, dyslipidemia, dysglycemia, body mass index and waist circumference); tertiary outcomes are heart health behaviors (exercise, medication adherence, diet, and smoking), knowledge, and depressive symptoms. The CR program is six months in duration. Participants randomized to exercise-based CR will receive 24 weeks of exercise classes. The comprehensive CR group will also receive 24 educational sessions, including a workbook. Every outcome will be assessed at baseline and 6-months later, and mortality will be ascertained at six months and one year. Conclusion This will be the first RCT to establish the effects of CR in Latin America. If positive, results will be used to promote broader implementation of comprehensive CR and patient access in the region and to inform a larger-scale trial powered for mortality. PMID:27849287

  5. Effects of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation on functional capacity and cardiovascular risk factors in Brazilians assisted by public health care: protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Gabriela S S; Ghisi, Gabriela L M; Grace, Sherry L; Oh, Paul; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Britto, Raquel R

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the leading burden of disease worldwide. Moreover, CVD-related death rates are considered an epidemic in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Research shows that cardiac rehabilitation (CR) participation reduces death and improves disability and quality of life. Given the growing epidemic of CVD in LMICs and the insufficient evidence about CR programs in these countries, a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) in Latin America is warranted. To investigate the effects of comprehensive CR on functional capacity and cardiovascular risk factors. The design is a single-blinded RCT with three parallel arms: comprehensive CR (exercise + education) versus exercise-based CR versus wait-list control (no CR). The primary outcome will be measured by the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test. Secondary outcomes are risk factors (blood pressure, dyslipidemia, dysglycemia, body mass index and waist circumference); tertiary outcomes are heart health behaviors (exercise, medication adherence, diet, and smoking), knowledge, and depressive symptoms. The CR program is six months in duration. Participants randomized to exercise-based CR will receive 24 weeks of exercise classes. The comprehensive CR group will also receive 24 educational sessions, including a workbook. Every outcome will be assessed at baseline and 6-months later, and mortality will be ascertained at six months and one year. This will be the first RCT to establish the effects of CR in Latin America. If positive, results will be used to promote broader implementation of comprehensive CR and patient access in the region and to inform a larger-scale trial powered for mortality.

  6. [Prevalence and implicated risk factors associated with the exteriorization of cardiac pacemakers: 5 year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Argüello-Hurtado, Marco; Guevara-Valdivia, Milton Ernesto; Aranda-Ayala, Zulema Lisbeth; Hernández-Lara, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: el objetivo de este estudio es establecer la prevalencia y determinar la frecuencia de factores de riesgo de exteriorización de marcapasos definitivos (MPD), en el departamento de Electrofisiología Cardiaca de la UMAE Hospital de Especialidades "Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret" del Centro Médico Nacional La Raza del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social.Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio transversal, descriptivo del periodo: septiembre del 2005 a septiembre del 2010, para el análisis de los factores se manejó como casos y controles; se eligieron emparejándose por edad, sexo y presencia, o no, de factores de riesgo. Se realizó el cálculo de medidas de tendencia central (media, mediana y moda), así como pruebas de chi cuadrada, test de Fisher y razón de momios.Resultados: se implantaron 3192 MPD, identificando 83 casos de exteriorizaciones, seleccionando 43 casos para casos y controles, la edad promedio fue de 71 años. Ninguno de los factores de riesgo ni el tipo de técnica quirúrgica presentó significancia estadística.Conclusiones: nuestra prevalencia de exteriorizaciones es del 2.6 %, valores muy similares a los reportes publicados. Ninguno de los factores de riesgo descritos se encuentra presente como causa de exteriorización en nuestra población. El análisis de la técnica quirúrgica utilizada puede ser un factor importante, por lo que se necesitan estudios posteriores.

  7. Excess pressure integral predicts cardiovascular events independent of other risk factors in the conduit artery functional evaluation substudy of Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial.

    PubMed

    Davies, Justin E; Lacy, Peter; Tillin, Therese; Collier, David; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Francis, Darrel P; Malaweera, Anura; Mayet, Jamil; Stanton, Alice; Williams, Bryan; Parker, Kim H; McG Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-07-01

    Excess pressure integral (XSPI), a new index of surplus work performed by the left ventricle, can be calculated from blood pressure waveforms and may indicate circulatory dysfunction. We investigated whether XSPI predicted future cardiovascular events and target organ damage in treated hypertensive individuals. Radial blood pressure waveforms were acquired by tonometry in 2069 individuals (aged, 63±8 years) in the Conduit Artery Functional Evaluation (CAFE) substudy of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT). Measurements of left ventricular mass index (n=862) and common carotid artery intima media thickness (n=923) were also performed. XSPI and the integral of reservoir pressure were lower in people treated with amlodipine±perindopril than in those treated with atenolol±bendroflumethiazide, although brachial systolic blood pressure was similar. A total of 134 cardiovascular events accrued during a median 3.4 years of follow-up; XSPI was a significant predictor of cardiovascular events after adjustment for age and sex, and this relationship was unaffected by adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors or Framingham risk score. XSPI, central systolic blood pressure, central augmentation pressure, central pulse pressure, and integral of reservoir pressure were correlated with left ventricular mass index, but only XSPI, augmentation pressure, and central pulse pressure were associated positively with carotid artery intima media thickness. Associations between left ventricular mass index, XSPI, and integral of reservoir pressure and carotid artery intima media thickness and XSPI were unaffected by multivariable adjustment for other covariates. XSPI is a novel indicator of cardiovascular dysfunction and independently predicts cardiovascular events and targets organ damage in a prospective clinical trial.

  8. Risk Factors and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and ... Blood Pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following ...

  9. Aconitine "challenge" test reveals a single whole-body exposure to diesel exhaust increases cardiac arrhythmia risk in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between cardiac electrical dysfunction, arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electri...

  10. Aconitine "challenge" test reveals a single whole-body exposure to diesel exhaust increases cardiac arrhythmia risk in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between cardiac electrical dysfunction, arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electri...

  11. The Metabolic Syndrome and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Hess, Paul L; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R; Friedman, Daniel J; Mulder, Hillary; Kucharska-Newton, Anna; Rosamond, Wayne R; Lopes, Renato D; Gersh, Bernard J; Mark, Daniel B; Curtis, Lesley H; Post, Wendy S; Prineas, Ronald J; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Al-Khatib, Sana M

    2017-08-23

    Prior studies have demonstrated a link between the metabolic syndrome and increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Whether the metabolic syndrome is associated with sudden cardiac death is uncertain. We characterized the relationship between sudden cardiac death and metabolic syndrome status among participants of the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Study (1987-2012) free of prevalent coronary heart disease or heart failure. Among 13 168 participants, 357 (2.7%) sudden cardiac deaths occurred during a median follow-up of 23.6 years. Participants with the metabolic syndrome (n=4444) had a higher cumulative incidence of sudden cardiac death than those without it (n=8724) (4.1% versus 2.3%, P<0.001). After adjustment for participant demographics and clinical factors other than components of the metabolic syndrome, the metabolic syndrome was independently associated with sudden cardiac death (hazard ratio, 1.70, 95% confidence interval, 1.37-2.12, P<0.001). This relationship was not modified by sex (interaction P=0.10) or race (interaction P=0.62) and was mediated by the metabolic syndrome criteria components. The risk of sudden cardiac death varied according to the number of metabolic syndrome components (hazard ratio 1.31 per additional component of the metabolic syndrome, 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.44, P<0.001). Of the 5 components, elevated blood pressure, impaired fasting glucose, and low high-density lipoprotein were independently associated with sudden cardiac death. We observed that the metabolic syndrome was associated with a significantly increased risk of sudden cardiac death irrespective of sex or race. The risk of sudden cardiac death was proportional to the number of metabolic syndrome components. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  12. Treatment patterns, risk factor control and functional capacity in patients with cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease in the cardiac rehabilitation setting.

    PubMed

    Völler, Heinz; Gitt, Anselm; Jannowitz, Christina; Karoff, Marthin; Karmann, Barbara; Pittrow, David; Reibis, Rona; Hildemann, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a frequent comorbidity among elderly patients and those with cardiovascular disease. CKD carries prognostic relevance. We aimed to describe patient characteristics, risk factor management and control status of patients in cardiac rehabilitation (CR), differentiated by presence or absence of CKD. Data from 92,071 inpatients with adequate information to calculate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) based on the Cockcroft-Gault formula were analyzed at the beginning and the end of a 3-week CR stay. CKD was defined as estimated GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Compared with non-CKD patients, CKD patients were significantly older (72.0 versus 58.0 years) and more often had diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, and atherothrombotic manifestations (previous stroke, peripheral arterial disease), but fewer were current or previous smokers had a CHD family history. Exercise capacity was much lower in CKD (59 vs. 92 Watts). Fewer patients with CKD were treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), but more had coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Patients with CKD compared with non-CKD less frequently received statins, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), clopidogrel, beta blockers, and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and more frequently received angiotensin receptor blockers, insulin and oral anticoagulants. In CKD, mean low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were slightly higher at baseline, while triglycerides were substantially lower. This lipid pattern did not change at the discharge visit, but overall control rates for all described parameters (with the exception of HDL-C) were improved substantially. At discharge, systolic blood pressure (BP) was higher in CKD (124 versus 121 mmHg) and diastolic BP was lower (72 versus 74 mmHg). At discharge, 68.7% of CKD versus 71.9% of non-CKD patients had LDL-C <100 mg/dl. Physical fitness on exercise testing

  13. Thromboelastometric analysis of the risk factors for return of spontaneous circulation in adult patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohta, Miho; Imahase, Hisashi; Yahata, Mayuko; Umeka, Mitsuru; Miike, Toru; Nagashima, Futoshi; Iwamura, Takashi; Yamada, Kosuke Chris; Inoue, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that coagulopathy is observed in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Thrombolytic therapy for those patients has been controversial until now. The purpose of this study was to identify a significant predictor for return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) of OHCA patients in the emergency department (ED) using whole blood viscoelastic testing. Adult non-trauma OHCA patients transported to our hospital that underwent thromboelastometry (ROTEM) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation between January 2013 and December 2015 were enrolled in this study. We divided patients into two groups based on the presence or absence of ROSC, and performed statistical analysis utilizing patient characteristics, prehospital data, laboratory data, and ROTEM data. Seventy-five patients were enrolled. The ROSC group and non-ROSC group included 23 and 52 patients, respectively. The logistic regression analysis, utilizing significant parameters by univariate analysis, demonstrated that lactate level [odds ratio (OR) 0.880, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.785-0.986, p = 0.028] and A30 of EXTEM test [OR 1.039, 95% CI 1.010-1.070, p = 0.009] were independent risk factors for ROSC. The cut-off values of lactate and A30 in EXTEM were 12.0 mmol/L and A 48.0 mm, respectively. We defined a positive prediction for ROSC if the patient presented lower lactate level (<12.0 mmol/L) and higher A30 of EXTEM (≥48.0 mm) with high specificity (94.7%) and accuracy (75.0%). The present study showed that lactate level and ROTEM parameter of clot firmness were reliable predictors of ROSC in the ED for adult patients with OHCA.

  14. Predicting the risk of sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Lerma, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the result of a change of cardiac activity from normal (typically sinus) rhythm to a rhythm that does not pump adequate blood to the brain. The most common rhythms leading to SCD are ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). These result from an accelerated ventricular pacemaker or ventricular reentrant waves. Despite significant efforts to develop accurate predictors for the risk of SCD, current methods for risk stratification still need to be improved. In this article we briefly review current approaches to risk stratification. Then we discuss the mathematical basis for dynamical transitions (called bifurcations) that may lead to VT and VF. One mechanism for transition to VT or VF involves a perturbation by a premature ventricular complex (PVC) during sinus rhythm. We describe the main mechanisms of PVCs (reentry, independent pacemakers and abnormal depolarizations). An emerging approach to risk stratification for SCD involves the development of individualized dynamical models of a patient based on measured anatomy and physiology. Careful analysis and modelling of dynamics of ventricular arrhythmia on an individual basis will be essential in order to improve risk stratification for SCD and to lay a foundation for personalized (precision) medicine in cardiology. PMID:26660287

  15. Predicting the risk of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Lerma, Claudia; Glass, Leon

    2016-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the result of a change of cardiac activity from normal (typically sinus) rhythm to a rhythm that does not pump adequate blood to the brain. The most common rhythms leading to SCD are ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). These result from an accelerated ventricular pacemaker or ventricular reentrant waves. Despite significant efforts to develop accurate predictors for the risk of SCD, current methods for risk stratification still need to be improved. In this article we briefly review current approaches to risk stratification. Then we discuss the mathematical basis for dynamical transitions (called bifurcations) that may lead to VT and VF. One mechanism for transition to VT or VF involves a perturbation by a premature ventricular complex (PVC) during sinus rhythm. We describe the main mechanisms of PVCs (reentry, independent pacemakers and abnormal depolarizations). An emerging approach to risk stratification for SCD involves the development of individualized dynamical models of a patient based on measured anatomy and physiology. Careful analysis and modelling of dynamics of ventricular arrhythmia on an individual basis will be essential in order to improve risk stratification for SCD and to lay a foundation for personalized (precision) medicine in cardiology. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  16. Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Laurie, Steven S.; Macias, Brandon R.

    2017-01-01

    NASA has concerns regarding the incidence and clinical significance of cardiac arrhythmias that could occur during long-term exposure to the spaceflight environment, such as on the International Space Station (ISS) or during a prolonged (e.g., up to 3 years) sojourn to Mars or on the Moon. There have been some anecdotal reports and a few documented cases of cardiac arrhythmias in space, including one documented episode of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. The potential catastrophic nature of a sudden cardiac death in the remote space environment has led to concerns from the early days of the space program that spaceflight might be arrhythmogenic. Indeed, there are known and well-defined changes in the cardiovascular system with spaceflight: a) plasma volume is reduced, b) left ventricular mass is decreased, and c) the autonomic nervous system adapts to the weightless environment. Combined, these physiologic adaptations suggest that changes in cardiac structure and neuro-humoral environment during spaceflight could alter electrical conduction, although the evidence supporting this contention consists mostly of minor changes in QT interval (the time between the start of the Q wave and the end of the T wave on an electrocardiogram tracing) in a small number of astronauts after long-duration spaceflight. Concurrent with efforts by NASA Medical Operations to refine and improve screening techniques relevant to arrhythmias and cardiovascular disease, as NASA enters the era of exploration-class missions it will be critical to determine with the highest degree of certainty whether spaceflight by itself alters cardiac structure and function sufficiently to increase the risk of arrhythmias.

  17. Delirium after cardiac surgery: incidence and risk factors†

    PubMed Central

    Smulter, Nina; Lingehall, Helena Claesson; Gustafson, Yngve; Olofsson, Birgitta; Engström, Karl Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Delirium after cardiac surgery is a problem with consequences for patients and healthcare. Preventive strategies from known risk factors may reduce the incidence and severity of delirium. The present aim was to explore risk factors behind delirium in older patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS Patients (≥70 years) scheduled for routine cardiac surgery were included (n = 142). The patients were assessed and monitored pre-/postoperatively, and delirium was diagnosed from repeated assessments with the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Organic Brain Syndrome Scale, using the DSM-IV-TR criteria. Variables were analysed by uni-/multivariable logistic regression, including both preoperative variables (predisposing) and those extracted during surgery and in the early postoperative period (precipitating). RESULTS Delirium was diagnosed in 78 patients (54.9%). Delirium was independently associated with both predisposing and precipitating factors (P-value, odds ratio, upper/lower confidence interval): age (0.036, 1.1, 1.0/1.2), diabetes (0.032, 3.5, 1.1/11.0), gastritis/ulcer problems (0.050, 4.0, 1.0/16.1), volume load during operation (0.001, 2.8, 1.5/5.1), ventilator time in ICU (0.042, 1.2, 1.0/1.4), highest temperature recorded in ICU (0.044, 2.2, 1.0/4.8) and sodium concentration in ICU (0.038, 1.2, 1.0/1.4). CONCLUSIONS Delirium was common among older patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Both predisposing and precipitating factors contributed to delirium. When combined, the predictive strength of the model improved. Preventive strategies may be considered, in particular among the precipitating factors. Of interest, delirium was strongly associated with an increased volume load during surgery. PMID:23887126

  18. Chlorination byproducts and nitrate in drinking water and risk for congenital cardiac defects.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, Marie I; Selbing, Anders J; Löfman, Owe; Källen, Bengt A J

    2002-06-01

    Drinking water disinfection byproducts have been associated with an increased risk for congenital defects including cardiac defects. Using Swedish health registers linked to information on municipal drinking water composition, individual data on drinking water characteristics were obtained for 58,669 women. Among the infants born, 753 had a cardiac defect. The risk for a cardiac defect was determined for ground water versus surface water, for different chlorination procedures, and for trihalomethane and nitrate concentrations. Ground water was associated with an increased risk for cardiac defect when crude rates were analyzed but after suitable adjustments this excess rate was found to be determined by chlorination procedures including chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide appears itself as an independent risk factor for cardiac defects (adjusted odds ratio 1.61 (95%CI 1.00-2.59)). The risk for cardiac defects increased with increasing trihalomethane concentrations (P=0.0005). There was an indicated but statistically nonsignificant excess risk associated with nitrate concentration. The individual risk for congenital cardiac defect caused by chlorine dioxide and trihalomethanes is small but as a large population is exposed to public drinking water, the attributable risk for cardiac defects may not be negligible.

  19. Is High Serum LDL/HDL Cholesterol Ratio an Emerging Risk Factor for Sudden Cardiac Death? Findings from the KIHD Study.

    PubMed

    Kunutsor, Setor K; Zaccardi, Francesco; Karppi, Jouni; Kurl, Sudhir; Laukkanen, Jari A

    2017-06-01

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), which are components of total cholesterol, have each been suggested to be linked to the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, the relationship between LDL-c/HDL-c ratio and the risk of SCD has not been previously investigated. We aimed to assess the associations of LDL-c, HDL-c, and the ratio of LDL-c/HDL-c with the risk of SCD. Serum lipoprotein concentrations were assessed at baseline in the Finnish Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease prospective cohort study of 2,616 men aged 42-61 years at recruitment. Hazard ratios (HRs) (95% confidence intervals [CI]) were assessed. During a median follow-up of 23.0 years, a total of 228 SCDs occurred. There was no significant evidence of an association of LDL-c or HDL-c with the risk of SCD. In analyses adjusted for age, examination year, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, years of education, diabetes, previous myocardial infarction, family history of coronary heart disease, and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein, there was approximately a two-fold increase in the risk of SCD (HR 1.94, 95% CI 1.21-3.11; p=0.006), comparing the top (>4.22) versus bottom (≤2.30) quintile of serum LDL-c/HDL-c ratio. In this middle-aged male population, LDL-c or HDL-c was not associated with the risk of SCD. However, a high serum LDL-c/HDL-c ratio was found to be independently associated with an increased risk of SCD. Further research is warranted to understand the mechanistic pathways underlying this association.

  20. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is still unknown. Scientists ... help find improved therapies and a cure for scleroderma! Your gift today will be matched to have ...

  1. Genetic factors contribute to bleeding after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Welsby, I J; Podgoreanu, M V; Phillips-Bute, B; Mathew, J P; Smith, P K; Newman, M F; Schwinn, D A; Stafford-Smith, M

    2005-06-01

    Postoperative bleeding remains a common, serious problem for cardiac surgery patients, with striking inter-patient variability poorly explained by clinical, procedural, and biological markers. We tested the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms of coagulation proteins and platelet glycoproteins are associated with bleeding after cardiac surgery. Seven hundred and eighty patients undergoing aortocoronary surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were studied. Clinical covariates previously associated with bleeding were recorded and DNA isolated from preoperative blood. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization, Time-Of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy or polymerase chain reaction were used for genotype analysis. Multivariable linear regression modeling, including all genetic main effects and two-way gene-gene interactions, related clinical and genetic predictors to bleeding from the thorax and mediastinum. Nineteen candidate polymorphisms were assessed; seven [GPIaIIa-52C>T and 807C>T, GPIb alpha 524C>T, tissue factor-603A>G, prothrombin 20210G>A, tissue factor pathway inhibitor-399C>T, and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) deletion/insertion] demonstrate significant association with bleeding (P < 0.01). Adding genetic to clinical predictors results improves the model, doubling overall ability to predict bleeding (P < 0.01). We identified seven genetic polymorphisms associated with bleeding after cardiac surgery. Genetic factors appear primarily independent of, and explain at least as much variation in bleeding as clinical covariates; combining genetic and clinical factors double our ability to predict bleeding after cardiac surgery. Accounting for genotype may be necessary when stratifying risk of bleeding after cardiac surgery.

  2. Cardiac risk stratification for postmyocardial infarction dental patients.

    PubMed

    Roberts, H W; Mitnitsky, E F

    2001-06-01

    Traditional dental management guidelines of myocardial infarction survivors mandate a 6-month waiting period before elective treatment can be considered. Technological advances in cardiac disease diagnosis, management, and revascularization treatment may make this older mandatory 6-month waiting period obsolete. The purposes of this literature review are to provide an overview of the historical development of cardiac risk stratification and discuss current developments and guidelines in cardiac risk assessment. We hope that this review and update will stimulate the development of updated dental guidelines for treating the cardiac patient.

  3. Reference values of myocardial structure, function, and tissue composition by cardiac magnetic resonance in healthy African-Americans at 3T and their relations to serologic and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Ying; Bluemke, David A; Gerstenblith, Gary; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Li, Ji; Zhu, Hong; Lai, Shenghan; Lai, Hong

    2014-09-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a standard of reference for cardiac structure and function. Recent advances in T1 mapping and spectroscopy also provide assessment of myocardial tissue composition. However, the reference ranges of left ventricular parameters have rarely been assessed in an African-American (AA) population without known cardiac disease. To estimate the reference values of myocardial structure, function, and tissue composition by CMR and to explore their relationships to serologic factors and cardiovascular risk factors in asymptomatic AAs with low Framingham risk, between November 2010 and June 2012, 92 healthy AAs aged ≥21 years, from Baltimore, MD, were enrolled in an observational study. CMR examination was performed on a 3T scanner. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed to noninvasively quantify myocardial triglyceride content. Native T1 values were obtained from modified Look-Locker inversion recovery sequence. The median age was 37 (interquartile range IQR 27 to 44) years (41% men). The median native T1 time of the myocardium was 1,228 ms (IQR 1,200 to 1,263) with no gender difference. The median myocardial fat content was 0.6% (IQR 0.7% to 4.6%). Native T1 time was not influenced by age, sex, and body mass index. Among the factors investigated, myocardial fat and elevated C-reactive protein (>2.0 mg/dL) were independently associated with T1 relaxation time. Native T1 time was also independently associated with left ventricular end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area. In conclusion, this study of asymptomatic AAs provides reference ranges for cardiovascular structure, function, and tissue composition. Alterations in myocardial fat are associated with native T1 time, a CMR measure of interstitial fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of Roadway Proximity with Fasting Plasma Glucose and Metabolic Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of Cardiac Catheterization Patients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The relationship between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and risk factors for cardiovascular disease needs to be better understood in order to address the adverse impact o.f air pollution on human health.Objective: We examined associations between roadway proximi...

  5. Association of Roadway Proximity with Fasting Plasma Glucose and Metabolic Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of Cardiac Catheterization Patients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The relationship between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and risk factors for cardiovascular disease needs to be better understood in order to address the adverse impact o.f air pollution on human health.Objective: We examined associations between roadway proximi...

  6. Performance of European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation in Veterans General Hospital Kaohsiung cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsin-Hung; Kang, Pei-Luen; Pan, Jun-Yen; Wu, Tung-Ho; Wu, Chieh-Ten; Lin, Chun-Yao; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Chou, Wan-Ting

    2011-03-01

    The European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) model is a widely-used risk prediction algorithm for in-hospital or 30-day mortality in adult cardiac surgery patients. Recent studies indicated that EuroSCORE tends to overpredict mortality. The aim of our study is to evaluate the validity of EuroSCORE in Veterans General Hospital Kaohsiung (VGHKS) cardiac surgery including a number of different surgical and risk subgroups. From January 2006 to December 2009, 1,240 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery in VGHKS were included in this study. The study was followed the guidelines of the Ethics Committee of Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Both additive and logistic score of all patients were calculated depending on the formula in the official EuroSCORE website. The entire cohort, different surgical type and risk stratification subgroups were analyzed. Model discrimination was tested by determining the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Model calibration was tested by the Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square test. Clinical performance of model was assessed by comparing the observed and predicted mortality rates. There were significant differences between the VGHKS and European cardiac surgical populations. The additive score and logistic score for the overall group were 7.16% and 12.88%, respectively. Observed mortality was 10.72% overall, 5.68% for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 4.67% for the mitral valve only and 4.25% for the aortic valve only group. The discriminative ability EuroSCORE was very good in all and various surgical subgroups, with area under the ROC curve from 0.75 to 0.87. The addictive and logistic models of EuroSCORE showed excellent accuracy, 0.839 and 0.845, respectively. Good calibration power was recognized by p value higher than 0.05 for the entire cohort and all subgroups of patients except for isolated CABG. The logistic EuroSCORE model overestimated mortality to different

  7. Stroke Risk Factors, Genetics, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Amelia K; Esenwa, Charles; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-02-03

    Stroke is a heterogeneous syndrome, and determining risk factors and treatment depends on the specific pathogenesis of stroke. Risk factors for stroke can be categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity are nonmodifiable risk factors for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, while hypertension, smoking, diet, and physical inactivity are among some of the more commonly reported modifiable risk factors. More recently described risk factors and triggers of stroke include inflammatory disorders, infection, pollution, and cardiac atrial disorders independent of atrial fibrillation. Single-gene disorders may cause rare, hereditary disorders for which stroke is a primary manifestation. Recent research also suggests that common and rare genetic polymorphisms can influence risk of more common causes of stroke, due to both other risk factors and specific stroke mechanisms, such as atrial fibrillation. Genetic factors, particularly those with environmental interactions, may be more modifiable than previously recognized. Stroke prevention has generally focused on modifiable risk factors. Lifestyle and behavioral modification, such as dietary changes or smoking cessation, not only reduces stroke risk, but also reduces the risk of other cardiovascular diseases. Other prevention strategies include identifying and treating medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, that increase stroke risk. Recent research into risk factors and genetics of stroke has not only identified those at risk for stroke but also identified ways to target at-risk populations for stroke prevention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Dialysis: Hypokalaemia and cardiac risk in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Szeto, Cheuk-Chun

    2012-09-01

    Dialysis, particularly haemodialysis, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study confirms that hypokalaemia confers an excess cardiovascular risk and contributes disproportionately to the high risk of death in patients on peritoneal dialysis, which may partially account for the fact that observed cardiac risk is similar for patients on peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis.

  9. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  10. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  11. Risk of cardiac arrhythmias during hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Chow, Elaine; Bernjak, Alan; Williams, Scott; Fawdry, Robert A; Hibbert, Steve; Freeman, Jenny; Sheridan, Paul J; Heller, Simon R

    2014-05-01

    Recent trials of intensive glycemic control suggest a possible link between hypoglycemia and excess cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia might cause arrhythmias through effects on cardiac repolarization and changes in cardiac autonomic activity. Our aim was to study the risk of arrhythmias during spontaneous hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular risk. Twenty-five insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease or two or more risk factors underwent simultaneous continuous interstitial glucose and ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. Frequency of arrhythmias, heart rate variability, and markers of cardiac repolarization were compared between hypoglycemia and euglycemia and between hyperglycemia and euglycemia matched for time of day. There were 134 h of recording at hypoglycemia, 65 h at hyperglycemia, and 1,258 h at euglycemia. Bradycardia and atrial and ventricular ectopic counts were significantly higher during nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with euglycemia. Arrhythmias were more frequent during nocturnal versus daytime hypoglycemia. Excessive compensatory vagal activation after the counterregulatory phase may account for bradycardia and associated arrhythmias. QT intervals, corrected for heart rate, >500 ms and abnormal T-wave morphology were observed during hypoglycemia in some participants. Hypoglycemia, frequently asymptomatic and prolonged, may increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. This is a plausible mechanism that could contribute to increased cardiovascular mortality during intensive glycemic therapy.

  12. Macrolide Antibiotics and the Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduces the morbidity of patients with cystic fibrosis, non–cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. Lower levels of evidence indicate that chronic macrolides are also effective in treating patients with panbronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and rejection after lung transplant. Macrolides are known to cause torsade des pointes and other ventricular arrhythmias, and a recent observational study prompted the FDA to strengthen the Warnings and Precautions section of azithromycin drug labels. This summary describes the electrophysiological effects of macrolides, reviews literature indicating that the large majority of subjects experiencing cardiac arrhythmias from macrolides have coexisting risk factors and that the incidence of arrhythmias in absence of coexisting risk factors is very low, examines recently published studies describing the relative risk of arrhythmias from macrolides, and concludes that this risk has been overestimated and suggests an approach to patient evaluation that should reduce the relative risk and the incidence of arrhythmias to the point that chronic macrolides can be used safely in the majority of subjects for whom they are recommended. PMID:24707986

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation with a nurse case manager (GoHeart) across local and regional health authorities improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial outcomes. A one-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Vibeke Brogaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark, the local and regional health authorities share responsibility for cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The objective was to assess effectiveness of CR across sectors coordinated by a nurse case manager (NCM). A one-year follow-up study. A CR programme (GoHeart) was evaluated in a cohort at Lillebaelt Hospital Vejle, DK from 2010 to 2011. Consecutive patients admitted to CR were included. The inclusion criteria were the event of acute myocardial infarction or stable angina and invasive revascularization (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥45%). Cardiac risk factors, stratified self-care and self-reported psychosocial factors (SF12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)) were assessed at admission (phase IIa), at three months at discharge (phase IIb) and at one-year follow-up (phase III). Intention-to-treat and predefined subgroup analysis on sex was performed. Of 241 patients, 183 (75.9%) were included (mean age 63.8 years). At discharge improvements were found in total-cholesterol (p < 0.001), low density lipoprotein (LDL; p < 0.001), functional capacities (metabolic equivalent of tasks (METS), p < 0.01), self-care management (p < 0.001), Health status Short Form 12 version (SF12; physical; p < 0.001 and mental; p < 0.01) and in depression symptoms (p < 0.01). At one-year follow-up these outcomes were maintained; additionally there was improvement in body mass index (BMI; p < 0.05), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; p < 0.05). There were no sex differences. CR shared between local and regional health authorities led by a NCM (GoHeart) improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial factors. Further improvements in most variables were at one-year follow-up.

  14. Analysis of agreement between cardiac risk stratification protocols applied to participants of a center for cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana A. S.; Silva, Anne K. F.; Vanderlei, Franciele M.; Christofaro, Diego G. D.; Gonçalves, Aline F. L.; Vanderlei, Luiz C. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Cardiac risk stratification is related to the risk of the occurrence of events induced by exercise. Despite the existence of several protocols to calculate risk stratification, studies indicating that there is similarity between these protocols are still unknown. Objective To evaluate the agreement between the existing protocols on cardiac risk rating in cardiac patients. Method The records of 50 patients from a cardiac rehabilitation program were analyzed, from which the following information was extracted: age, sex, weight, height, clinical diagnosis, medical history, risk factors, associated diseases, and the results from the most recent laboratory and complementary tests performed. This information was used for risk stratification of the patients in the protocols of the American College of Sports Medicine, the Brazilian Society of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the protocol designed by Frederic J. Pashkow, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, the Société Française de Cardiologie, and the Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and the analysis of agreement between the protocols was calculated using the Kappa coefficient. Differences were considered with a significance level of 5%. Results Of the 21 analyses of agreement, 12 were considered significant between the protocols used for risk classification, with nine classified as moderate and three as low. No agreements were classified as excellent. Different proportions were observed in each risk category, with significant differences between the protocols for all risk categories. Conclusion The agreements between the protocols were considered low and moderate and the risk proportions differed between protocols. PMID:27556385

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation after acute coronary syndrome comparing adherence and risk factor modification in a community-based shared care model versus hospital-based care in a randomised controlled trial with 12 months of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, Jannik B; Refsgaard, Jens; Kanstrup, Helle; Johnsen, Søren P; Qvist, Ina; Christensen, Bo; Christensen, Kent L

    2017-04-01

    To investigate whether phase II cardiac rehabilitation (CR) conducted by a community model of shared care CR (SC-CR) including health care centres and general practice was feasible and provided acceptable results and to compare SC-CR to hospital-based CR (H-CR) in a randomised controlled trial. Patients were randomised to H-CR or SC-CR after admission for acute coronary syndrome. In SC-CR, the general practitioner took over the responsibility of the remaining rehabilitation, pharmacological treatment and risk factor management after the initial visit to the hospital outpatient clinic. The Municipal Health Care Centres provided courses on smoking cessation, nutrition, and exercise training and contributed to disease education and psychosocial support. The main endpoint was adherence to the CR programme and compliance with lifestyle modifications. In total, 1364 patients were screened, 327 (24%) were eligible, and 212 (65%) accepted participation. Phase II CR was completed by 192 (91%) of the participants. Full adherence to the CR programme was seen in 53% in SC-CR versus 54% in H-CR (relative risk (RR): 0.98, 95% confidence interval: 0.73-1.32). In H-CR, patients had higher rates of adherence to dietary advice and health education. In SC-CR, 12% of patients did not attend the risk factor evaluation and clinical assessment with their general practitioner. No difference in risk factor improvement was found. Exercise training was declined by 25% in both groups. Adherence to phase II CR was high in both groups. SC-CR did not improve adherence and efficacy, but had comparable effects on medication and risk factors. Thus, SC-CR was safe and effective.

  16. Role of risk stratification and genetics in sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vikrant; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major public health issue due to its increasing incidence in the general population and the difficulty in identifying high-risk individuals. Nearly 300 000 - 350 000 patients in the United States and 4-5 million patients in the world die annually from SCD. Coronary artery disease and advanced heart failure are the main etiology for SCD. Ischemia of any cause precipitates lethal arrhythmias, and ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation are the most common lethal arrhythmias precipitating SCD. Pulseless electrical activity, bradyarrhythmia, and electromechanical dissociation also result in SCD. Most SCDs occur outside of the hospital setting, so it is difficult to estimate the public burden, which results in overestimating the incidence of SCD. The insufficiency and limited predictive value of various indicators and criteria for SCD result in the increasing incidence. As a result, there is a need to develop better risk stratification criteria and find modifiable variables to decrease the incidence. Primary and secondary prevention and treatment of SCD need further research. This critical review is focused on the etiology, risk factors, prognostic factors, and importance of risk stratification of SCD.

  17. Factors affecting survival in pediatric cardiac tamponade caused by central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric central venous catheter (CVC) placement is useful but associated with complications such as cardiac tamponade. We aimed to identify risk factors for death in cardiac tamponade. Published articles on pediatric CVC-associated cardiac tamponade were obtained by searching PubMed and Google and retrospectively reviewed to analyze risk factors for death. Factors examined for their effect on mortality risk included patient age, weight, CVC size, days from CVC insertion to tamponade occurrence, substances administered, insertion site, treatment, CVC material, and initial CVC tip position. Of 110 patients reported in 62 articles, 69 survived and 41 died. Among survivors, 55 of 69 patients were treated; among deaths, only 7 of 38 (OR 537.9, 95% CI 29.3-9,877, p < 0.0001). Multiple regression analysis in 44 cases showed that treatment (p < 0.0001) and initial CVC tip position (p = 0.020) were independent predictive factors related to improved cardiac tamponade survival. Past studies have mainly discussed how to avoid pediatric cardiac tamponade; by contrast, the present study focused on how to avoid deaths. The findings of this review suggest that cardiac tamponade survival is better when tamponade is detected early and treated promptly and might be affected by initial CVC tip position.

  18. BMI is a Better Indicator of Cardiac Risk Factors, as against Elevated Blood Pressure in Apparently Healthy Female Adolescents and Young Adult Students: Results From a Cross-Sectional Study in Tripura

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anthropometric measures are used as indicators of elevated blood pressure, but reported to have variable sensitivity among populations. This study was undertaken to identify the better indicator of Cardiac-risk factors by statistical comparison of BMI, Waist circumference, and Waist to Height (WtHr) ratio in apparently healthy adolescents and young adult female students of Tripura. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a resource limited setup on 210 apparently healthy female adolescents and young adult students in Tripura. Mean (±SD) of all parameters were compared (ANOVA) to recognize significant independent (anthropometric measures) and dependent factors (blood pressure indices and so on). Correlation (r) analysis was used to identify the better (p) indicator of blood pressure indices (dependent variable) and its impact was assessed by Multiple Regression analysis. Results: blood pressure indices are comparatively higher in obese and overweight participants with statistically significant (95.5% confidence) mean differences. Significant correlation with dependent factors is observed with BMI followed by WtHr and Waist Circumference. Impact of anthropometric measures with blood pressure Indices is most significant for BMI (P ≤ 0.020) followed by WtHr (P ≤ 0.500) and waist circumference (P ≤ 0.520). Conclusion: BMI is a superior indicator of blood pressure indices and can identify participants at risk even in apparently healthy adolescent and young adult females. PMID:27890980

  19. Left ventricular mass and the risk of sudden cardiac death: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Jari A; Khan, Hassan; Kurl, Sudhir; Willeit, Peter; Karppi, Jouni; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele

    2014-11-05

    Left ventricular (LV) mass ascertained using echocardiography may enhance risk stratification for sudden cardiac death. The objective of this study was to assess the association between left ventricular mass and the risk of sudden cardiac death in a population-based cohort and determine its incremental value beyond conventional risk predictors. Assessment of LV mass was based on echocardiography in a sample of 905 middle-aged men representative of the general population (aged 42 to 61 years). During the follow-up period of 20 years, there were a total of 63 sudden cardiac deaths. In a comparison of the top versus the bottom quartile of LV mass adjusted by body surface area (>120 versus <89 g/m(2)), the multivariable adjusted hazard ratio was 2.57 (95% CI 1.24 to 5.31, P=0.010). Further adjustment for LV function only modestly attenuated the risk of sudden cardiac death among men with LV mass of >120 g/m(2) (hazard ratio 2.29, 95% CI 1.10 to 4.74, P=0.026). Addition of LV mass adjusted by body surface area to a conventional risk factor model for sudden cardiac death improved the integrated discrimination index by 0.033 (95% CI 0.009 to 0.057, P=0.007) and the category-free net reclassification index by 0.501 (95% CI 0.092 to 0.911, P=0.016). Indexed LV mass by body surface area is an independent predictor of sudden cardiac death and may help improve the risk prediction of sudden cardiac death beyond conventional cardiovascular risk factors. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. [Preoperative cardiac-risk assessment for non-cardiac surgery: The French RICARDO survey].

    PubMed

    Sens, N; Payan, A; Sztark, F; Piriou, V; Bouaziz, H; Bruder, N; Jaber, S; Jouffroy, L; Lebuffe, G; Mantz, J; Piriou, V; Roche, S; Sztark, F; Tauzin-Fin, F

    2013-10-01

    Professional practice evaluation of anaesthesiologist for high cardiac-risk patient cares in non-cardiac surgery, and assess disparities between results and recommendations. Since June to September 2011, a self-questionnaire was sent to 5000 anesthesiologist. They were considered to be representative of national anesthesiology practitioner. Different items investigated concerned: demography, preoperative cardiac-risk assessment, modalities of specialized cardiologic advice, per- and postoperative care, and finally knowledge of current recommendations. We collected 1255 questionnaire, that is to say 25% of answers. Men were 73%, 38% were employed by public hospital; 70% worked in a shared operating theatre with a general activity. With regards to preoperative assessment, 85% of anaesthetists referred high cardiac-risk patient to a cardiologist. In only 16% of answer, Lee's score appeared in anaesthesia file to assess perioperative cardiac-risk. Only 61% considered the six necessary items to optimal estimate of cardiac-risk. On the other hand, 91% measured routinely the exercise capacities by interrogation. The most frequently doing exam (49% of anaesthetist) was an electrocardiogram in elderly patient. In 96% of case, beta-blockers were given in premedication if they were usually thought. Clopidogrel was stopped by 62% of anesthetist before surgery. In this case, 38% used another medication to take over from this one. Only 7% considered revascularization in coronary patient who were effectively treated. POISE study was know by 40% of practitioner, and 18% estimated that they have changed their practice. Preoperatively, 21% organized multidisciplinary approach for high-risk patient. During surgery, 63% monitored the ST-segment. In postoperative period for cardiac-risk patient, only 11% prescribed systematically an ECG, a troponin dosage, a postoperative monitoring of ST-segment, a cardiologic advice. In case of moderate troponin elevation, they were 70% to realize at

  1. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  2. Exercise cardiac power and the risk of sudden cardiac death in a long-term prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kurl, Sudhir; Jae, Sae Young; Kauhanen, Jussi; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Rauramaa, Rainer; Laukkanen, Jari A

    2015-02-15

    Little is known about exercise cardiac power and the risk of sudden cardiac death. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of exercise cardiac power (ECP), defined as a ratio of directly measured maximal oxygen uptake with peak systolic blood pressure during exercise, with the risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD). This prospective study was based on 2358 men who participated in exercise stress test at baseline. During an average follow-up of 20 years 205 SCDs occurred. Men with ECP (<8.2 mL/mmHg, lowest quartile) had a 4.6-fold (95% CI 2.8-7.5, p<0.001) increased risk of SCD as compared to with ECP in the highest quartile (>12.8mL/mmHg) after adjusting for age and examination years. Men with low ECP (<8.2mL/mmHg) had markedly increased risk of SCD (RR 3.9, 95% CI 2.19-7.14, p<0.001) after adjustment for conventional risk factors and left ventricular hypertrophy, whereas for progressive adjustment for resting systolic blood pressure, the respective risk among men with lowest ECP was 2.5 (95% CI 1.46-4.22, p<0.001). After adding ECP in the multivariate model, the Harrell C-index increased from 0.760 to 0.778 showing the significant incremental value of ECP in predicting SCD. The integrated discrimination improvement was 0.014 (p=0.004). Low ECP provides a non-invasive and easily available measure for the prediction of SCD and may help in identifying men with high risk for SCD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Aconitine Challenge Test Reveals a Single Exposure to Air Pollution Causes Increased Cardiac Arrhythmia Risk in Hypertensive Rats - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electrical dysfunction. In this study, ...

  4. Aconitine Challenge Test Reveals a Single Exposure to Air Pollution Causes Increased Cardiac Arrhythmia Risk in Hypertensive Rats - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electrical dysfunction. In this study, ...

  5. [Risk factors for stroke].

    PubMed

    Mandić, Milan; Rancić, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of mortality both in men and in women throughout the world. In Serbia, stroke is the first cause of mortality in women older than 55 years of age and the second cause of death in men of the same age. Both ischemic heart diseases and ischemic stroke correlate with the same predisposing, potentially modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity, diabetes mellitus). Stroke does not usually occur on its own. Patients with stroke have a high prevalence of associated medical problems. These conditions may predict the stroke ("preexisting conditions"), occur for the first time after stroke ("post-stroke complications"), or present as manifestations of preexisting medical conditions after stroke. Risk factors for stroke are divided into the three groups: risk factors which cannot be influenced on such as: age, gender, positive family history of stroke, race: those which are modifiable such as: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking cigarettes, obesity, physical inactivity and the third group consists of potential risk factors for stroke (consumption of alcohol, hormones, changes in fibrinolysis, changes in blood. Stroke remains a leading cause of long-term disability and premature death of both men and women. Consequently, stroke survivors are often handicapped and doomed to sedentary lifestyle which restrains performance of activities of daily living, increases the risk for falls, and may contribute to a higher risk for recurrent stroke and cardiovascular disease. Prevention of stroke is still a great medical and social problem. Further studies are required to investigate potential risk factors for the occurrence of stroke as well as the measures of primary and secondary prevention.

  6. Fibroblast growth factor 21 is induced upon cardiac stress and alters cardiac lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Brahma, Manoja K.; Adam, Rene C.; Pollak, Nina M.; Jaeger, Doris; Zierler, Kathrin A.; Pöcher, Nadja; Schreiber, Renate; Romauch, Matthias; Moustafa, Tarek; Eder, Sandra; Ruelicke, Thomas; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a PPARα-regulated gene elucidated in the liver of PPARα-deficient mice or PPARα agonist-treated mice. Mice globally lacking adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) exhibit a marked defect in TG catabolism associated with impaired PPARα-activated gene expression in the heart and liver, including a drastic reduction in hepatic FGF21 mRNA expression. Here we show that FGF21 mRNA expression is markedly increased in the heart of ATGL-deficient mice accompanied by elevated expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, which can be reversed by reconstitution of ATGL expression in cardiac muscle. In line with this assumption, the induction of ER stress increases FGF21 mRNA expression in H9C2 cardiomyotubes. Cardiac FGF21 expression was also induced upon fasting of healthy mice, implicating a role of FGF21 in cardiac energy metabolism. To address this question, we generated and characterized mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of FGF21 (CM-Fgf21). FGF21 was efficiently secreted from cardiomyocytes of CM-Fgf21 mice, which moderately affected cardiac TG homeostasis, indicating a role for FGF21 in cardiac energy metabolism. Together, our results show that FGF21 expression is activated upon cardiac ER stress linked to defective lipolysis and that a persistent increase in circulating FGF21 levels interferes with cardiac and whole body energy homeostasis. PMID:25176985

  7. Cardiac Disease Increases Risk of Non-amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: Stronger impact in women

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosebud O.; Geda, Yonas E.; Knopman, David S.; Cha, Ruth H.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Boeve, Bradley F.; Tangalos, Eric G.; Ivnik, Robert J.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment (naMCI), a putative precursor of vascular and other non-Alzheimer’s disease dementias, is hypothesized to have a vascular etiology. We investigated the association of cardiac disease with amnestic (aMCI) and non-amnestic (naMCI) MCI. Design A prospective, population-based, cohort study with a median 4.0 years of follow-up. Setting Olmsted County, Minnesota. Participants Participants were evaluated at baseline and every 15 months using the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. A diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia was made by consensus. Cardiac disease at baseline was assessed from the participant’s medical records. Main outcome measures Incident MCI, aMCI, naMCI. Results Among 1,450 subjects free of MCI or dementia at baseline, 366 developed MCI. Cardiac disease was associated with an increased risk of naMCI (hazard ratio [HR] 95% confidence interval; 1.77 [1.16–2.72]). However, the association varied by sex (P for interaction = .02). Cardiac disease was associated with an increased risk of naMCI (HR, 3.07 [1.58–5.99]) in women, but not in men (HR, 1.16 [0.68–1.99]. Cardiac disease was not associated with any MCI or aMCI. Conclusion Cardiac disease is an independent risk factor for naMCI, within sex comparisons showed a stronger association in women. Prevention and management of cardiac disease and vascular risk factors may reduce the risk of naMCI. PMID:23358884

  8. Update in cardiology: vascular risk and cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Galve, Enrique; Cordero, Alberto; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Fácila, Lorenzo; Mazón, Pilar; Alegría, Eduardo; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; García-Porrero, Esteban; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-02-01

    As in other fields, understanding of vascular risk and rehabilitation is constantly improving. The present review of recent epidemiological update shows how far we are from achieving good risk factor control: in diet and nutrition, where unhealthy and excessive societal consumption is clearly increasing the prevalence of obesity; in exercise, where it is difficult to find a balance between benefit and risk, despite systemization efforts; in smoking, where developments center on programs and policies, with the electronic cigarette seeming more like a problem than a solution; in lipids, where the transatlantic debate between guidelines is becoming a paradigm of the divergence of views in this extensively studied area; in hypertension, where a nonpharmacological alternative (renal denervation) has been undermined by the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 setback, forcing a deep reassessment; in diabetes mellitus, where the new dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors and glucagon like peptide 1 analogues have contributed much new information and a glimpse of the future of diabetes treatment, and in cardiac rehabilitation, which continues to benefit from new information and communication technologies and where clinical benefit is not hindered by advanced diseases, such as heart failure. Our summary concludes with the update in elderly patients, whose treatment criteria are extrapolated from those of younger patients, with the present review clearly indicating that should not be the case.

  9. Managing Multiple Risk Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cardiovascular disease among black women can be better controlled through the use of a stress reduction intervention that reduces the sympathetic nervous...All participants will have high normal (130/80) or mild hypertension and at least two additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g

  10. CT and MR imaging findings in patients with acquired heart disease at risk for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Patrick J; Merchant, Naeem; Provost, Yves L; Doyle, Deirdre J; Nguyen, Elsie T; Paul, Narinder S

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is an important screening and diagnostic tool in conditions associated with sudden cardiac death. The most common cause of sudden cardiac death is coronary artery disease, with myocarditis, cardiac sarcoidosis, and dilated and infiltrative cardiomyopathies being less common acquired causes. Common risk factors for sudden cardiac death, regardless of the disease process, include severe ventricular dysfunction and the presence of macroscopic scar seen at delayed contrast material-enhanced imaging. Recent advances in electrocardiographically (ECG) gated cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and multidetector computed tomography (CT) have led to increased referrals for cross-sectional imaging; thus, cardiac radiologists should be familiar with the disease entities associated with sudden cardiac death. Inflammatory processes and cardiomyopathies are best depicted with cardiac MR imaging. Steady-state free precession cine sequences coupled with inversion-recovery prepared gradient-echo T1-weighted sequences performed after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material should form the basis of cardiac MR imaging protocols for cardiomyopathy. A clinical history that is suggestive of myocardial ischemia, specific requests to exclude coronary artery disease, or contraindications for MR imaging may imply that multidetector CT would be more appropriate. Nevertheless, both cardiac MR imaging and ECG-gated multidetector CT offer robust diagnosis and risk stratification for individual disease processes associated with sudden cardiac death.

  11. External validation of the Revised Cardiac Risk Index and update of its renal variable to predict 30-day risk of major cardiac complications after non-cardiac surgery: rationale and plan for analyses of the VISION study.

    PubMed

    Roshanov, Pavel S; Walsh, Michael; Devereaux, P J; MacNeil, S Danielle; Lam, Ngan N; Hildebrand, Ainslie M; Acedillo, Rey R; Mrkobrada, Marko; Chow, Clara K; Lee, Vincent W; Thabane, Lehana; Garg, Amit X

    2017-01-09

    The Revised Cardiac Risk Index (RCRI) is a popular classification system to estimate patients' risk of postoperative cardiac complications based on preoperative risk factors. Renal impairment, defined as serum creatinine >2.0 mg/dL (177 µmol/L), is a component of the RCRI. The estimated glomerular filtration rate has become accepted as a more accurate indicator of renal function. We will externally validate the RCRI in a modern cohort of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery and update its renal component. The Vascular Events in Non-cardiac Surgery Patients Cohort Evaluation (VISION) study is an international prospective cohort study. In this prespecified secondary analysis of VISION, we will test the risk estimation performance of the RCRI in ∼34 000 participants who underwent elective non-cardiac surgery between 2007 and 2013 from 29 hospitals in 15 countries. Using data from the first 20 000 eligible participants (the derivation set), we will derive an optimal threshold for dichotomising preoperative renal function quantified using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-Epi) glomerular filtration rate estimating equation in a manner that preserves the original structure of the RCRI. We will also develop a continuous risk estimating equation integrating age and CKD-Epi with existing RCRI risk factors. In the remaining (approximately) 14 000 participants, we will compare the risk estimation for cardiac complications of the original RCRI to this modified version. Cardiac complications will include 30-day non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal cardiac arrest and death due to cardiac causes. We have examined an early sample to estimate the number of events and the distribution of predictors and missing data, but have not seen the validation data at the time of writing. The research ethics board at each site approved the VISION protocol prior to recruitment. We will publish our results and make our models available online at http

  12. External validation of the Revised Cardiac Risk Index and update of its renal variable to predict 30-day risk of major cardiac complications after non-cardiac surgery: rationale and plan for analyses of the VISION study

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michael; Devereaux, P J; MacNeil, S Danielle; Lam, Ngan N; Hildebrand, Ainslie M; Acedillo, Rey R; Mrkobrada, Marko; Chow, Clara K; Lee, Vincent W; Thabane, Lehana; Garg, Amit X

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The Revised Cardiac Risk Index (RCRI) is a popular classification system to estimate patients' risk of postoperative cardiac complications based on preoperative risk factors. Renal impairment, defined as serum creatinine >2.0 mg/dL (177 µmol/L), is a component of the RCRI. The estimated glomerular filtration rate has become accepted as a more accurate indicator of renal function. We will externally validate the RCRI in a modern cohort of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery and update its renal component. Methods and analysis The Vascular Events in Non-cardiac Surgery Patients Cohort Evaluation (VISION) study is an international prospective cohort study. In this prespecified secondary analysis of VISION, we will test the risk estimation performance of the RCRI in ∼34 000 participants who underwent elective non-cardiac surgery between 2007 and 2013 from 29 hospitals in 15 countries. Using data from the first 20 000 eligible participants (the derivation set), we will derive an optimal threshold for dichotomising preoperative renal function quantified using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-Epi) glomerular filtration rate estimating equation in a manner that preserves the original structure of the RCRI. We will also develop a continuous risk estimating equation integrating age and CKD-Epi with existing RCRI risk factors. In the remaining (approximately) 14 000 participants, we will compare the risk estimation for cardiac complications of the original RCRI to this modified version. Cardiac complications will include 30-day non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal cardiac arrest and death due to cardiac causes. We have examined an early sample to estimate the number of events and the distribution of predictors and missing data, but have not seen the validation data at the time of writing. Ethics and dissemination The research ethics board at each site approved the VISION protocol prior to recruitment. We will

  13. Physician Decision Making and Cardiac Risk: Effects of Knowledge, Risk Perception, Risk Tolerance, and Fuzzy Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Valerie F.; Lloyd, Farrell J.

    2006-01-01

    Despite training, professionals sometimes make serious errors in risky decision making. The authors investigated judgments and decisions for 9 hypothetical patients at 3 levels of cardiac risk, comparing student and physician groups varying in domain-specific knowledge. Decisions were examined regarding whether they deviated from guidelines, how…

  14. Antiplatelet Drugs: Mechanisms and Risks of Bleeding Following Cardiac Operations

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Victor A.; Ferraris, Suellen P.; Saha, Sibu P.

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative antiplatelet drug use is common in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The impact of these drugs on bleeding and blood transfusion varies. We hypothesize that review of available evidence regarding drug-related bleeding risk, underlying mechanisms of platelet dysfunction, and variations in patient response to antiplatelet drugs will aid surgeons as they assess preoperative risk and attempt to limit perioperative bleeding. The purpose of this review is to (1) examine the role that antiplatelet drugs play in excessive postoperative blood transfusion, (2) identify possible mechanisms to explain patient response to antiplatelet drugs, and (3) formulate a strategy to limit excessive blood product usage in these patients. We reviewed available published evidence regarding bleeding risk in patients taking preoperative antiplatelet drugs. In addition, we summarized our previous research into mechanisms of antiplatelet drug-related platelet dysfunction. Aspirin users have a slight but significant increase in blood product usage after CABG (0.5 U of nonautologous blood per treated patient). Platelet adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitors are more potent antiplatelet drugs than aspirin but have a half-life similar to aspirin, around 5 to 10 days. The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons guidelines recommend discontinuation, if possible, of ADP inhibitors 5 to 7 days before operation because of excessive bleeding risk, whereas aspirin should be continued during the entire perioperative period in most patients. Individual variability in response to aspirin and other antiplatelet drugs is common with both hyper- and hyporesponsiveness seen in 5 to 25% of patients. Use of preoperative antiplatelet drugs is a risk factor for increased perioperative bleeding and blood transfusion. Point-of-care tests can identify patients at high risk for perioperative bleeding and blood

  15. EXCESS PRESSURE INTEGRAL PREDICTS CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS INDEPENDENT OF OTHER RISK FACTORS IN THE CONDUIT ARTERY FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION (CAFE) SUB-STUDY OF ANGLO-SCANDINAVIAN CARDIAC OUTCOMES TRIAL (ASCOT)

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Justin E; Lacy, Peter; Tillin, Therese; Collier, David; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Francis, Darrel P; Malaweera, Anura; Mayet, Jamil; Stanton, Alice; Williams, Bryan; Parker, Kim H; McG Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-01-01

    Excess pressure integral (XSPI), a new index of surplus work performed by the left ventricle, can be calculated from blood pressure (BP) waveforms and may indicate circulatory dysfunction. We investigated whether XSPI predicted future cardiovascular (CV) events and target organ damage in treated hypertensive individuals. Radial BP waveforms were acquired by tonometry in 2069 individuals (63±8y) in the Conduit Artery Functional Evaluation sub-study of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes trial. Measurements of left ventricular mass index (LVMI; n = 862) and common carotid artery intima media thickness (cIMT; n = 923) were also performed. XSPI and the integral of reservoir pressure (PRI) were lower in people treated with amlodipine ± perindopril than atenolol ± bendroflumethiazide, although brachial systolic BP was similar. A total of 134 CV events accrued over a median 3.4 years of follow-up; XSPI was a significant predictor of CV events after adjustment for age and sex and this relationship was unaffected by adjustment for conventional CV risk factors or Framingham risk score. XSPI, central systolic BP, central augmentation pressure (AP), central pulse pressure (cPP) and PRI were correlated with LVMI, but only XSPI, AP and cPP were positively associated with cIMT. Associations between LVMI and XSPI and PRI, and cIMT and XSPI were unaffected by multivariable adjustment for other covariates. XSPI is a novel indicator of CV dysfunction and independently predicts CV events and target organ damage in a prospective clinical trial. PMID:24821941

  16. [Pathological gambling: risk factors].

    PubMed

    Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M; Landreat-Guillou, M; Venisse, J-L

    2011-09-01

    In France, consumption of gambling games increased by 148% between 1960 and 2005. In 2004, gamblers lost approximately 0.9% of household income, compared to 0.4% in 1960. This represents approximately 134 Euros per year and per head. In spite of this important increase, the level remains lower than the European average (1%). However, gambling practices may continue to escalate in France in the next few years, particularly with the recent announce of the legalisation of online games and sports betting. With the spread of legalised gambling, pathological gambling rates may increase in France in the next years, in response to more widely available and more attractive gambling opportunities. In this context, there is a need for better understanding of the risk factors that are implicated in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling. This paper briefly describes the major risk factors for pathological gambling by examining the recent published literature available during the first quarter of 2008. This documentary basis was collected by Inserm for the collective expert report procedure on Gambling (contexts and addictions). Seventy-two articles focusing on risk factors for pathological gambling were considered in this review. Only 47 of them were taken into account for analysis. The selection of these 47 publications was based on the guide on literature analysis established by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Assessment in Health (ANAES, 2000). Some publications from more recent literature have also been added, mostly about Internet gambling. We identify three major types of risk factors implicated in gambling problems: some of them are related to the subject (individual factors), others are related to the object of the addiction, here the gambling activity by itself (structural factors), and the last are related to environment (contextual or situational factors). Thus, the development and maintenance of pathological gambling seems to be

  17. Short-Term Complexity of Cardiac Autonomic Control during Sleep: REM as a Potential Risk Factor for Cardiovascular System in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, Sarah L.; Casali, Karina Rabello; Porta, Alberto; Montano, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Sleep is a complex phenomenon characterized by important modifications throughout life and by changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Aging is associated with a reduction of the overall heart rate variability (HRV) and a decrease of complexity of autonomic cardiac regulation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the HRV complexity using two entropy-derived measures, Shannon Entropy (SE) and Corrected Conditional Entropy (CCE), during sleep in young and older subjects. Methods A polysomnographic study was performed in 12 healthy young (21.1±0.8 years) and 12 healthy older subjects (64.9±1.9 years). After the sleep scoring, heart period time series were divided into wake (W), Stage 1–2 (S1-2), Stage 3–4 (S3-4) and REM. Two complexity indexes were assessed: SE(3) measuring the complexity of a distribution of 3-beat patterns (SE(3) is higher when all the patterns are identically distributed and it is lower when some patterns are more likely) and CCEmin measuring the minimum amount of information that cannot be derived from the knowledge of previous values. Results Across the different sleep stages, young subjects had similar RR interval, total variance, SE(3) and CCEmin. In the older group, SE(3) and CCEmin were reduced during REM sleep compared to S1-2, S3-4 and W. Compared to young subjects, during W and sleep the older subjects showed a lower RR interval and reduced total variance as well as a significant reduction of SE(3) and CCEmin. This decrease of entropy measures was more evident during REM sleep. Conclusion Our study indicates that aging is characterized by a reduction of entropy indices of cardiovascular variability during wake/sleep cycle, more evident during REM sleep. We conclude that during aging REM sleep is associated with a simplification of cardiac control mechanisms that could lead to an impaired ability of the cardiovascular system to react to cardiovascular adverse events. PMID:21544202

  18. Use of cardiac glycosides and risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Corinna; Meier, Christoph R; Jick, Susan S; Uhl, Martin; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Hau, Peter; Leitzmann, M F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac glycosides induce apoptotic effects on glioma cells, but whether cardiac glycosides protect against risk for glioma is unknown. We therefore explored the relation between glycoside use and glioma risk using a large and validated database. We performed a case-control analysis using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink involving 2005 glioma cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 that were individually matched to 20,050 controls on age, gender, general practice, and number of years of active history in the database. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between cardiac glycosides and the risk of glioma adjusting for body mass index and smoking. We also examined use of common heart failure and arrhythmia medications to differentiate between a specific glycoside effect and a generic effect of treatment for congestive heart failure or arrhythmia. Cardiac glycoside use was inversely related to glioma incidence. After adjustment for congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, diabetes, and common medications used to treat those conditions, the OR of glioma was 0.47 (95% CI 0.27-0.81, Bonferroni-corrected p value = 0.024) for use versus non-use of cardiac glycosides, based on 17 exposed cases. In contrast, no associations were noted for other medications used to treat congestive heart failure or arrhythmias. The OR of glioma in people with congestive heart failure was 0.65 (95% CI 0.40-1.04), and for arrhythmia it was 1.01 (95% CI 0.78-1.31). These data indicate that cardiac glycoside use is independently associated with reduced glioma risk.

  19. Update in cardiology: vascular risk and cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Galve, Enrique; Alegría, Eduardo; Cordero, Alberto; Fácila, Lorenzo; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Mazón, Pilar; de Pablo Zarzosa, Carmen; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease develops in a slow and subclinical manner over decades, only to manifest suddenly and unexpectedly. The role of prevention is crucial, both before and after clinical appearance, and there is ample evidence of the effectiveness and usefulness of the early detection of at-risk individuals and lifestyle modifications or pharmacological approaches. However, these approaches require time, perseverance, and continuous development. The present article reviews the developments in 2013 in epidemiological aspects related to prevention, includes relevant contributions in areas such as diet, weight control methods (obesity is now considered a disease), and physical activity recommendations (with warnings about the risk of strenuous exercise), deals with habit-related psychosocial factors such as smoking, provides an update on emerging issues such as genetics, addresses the links between cardiovascular disease and other pathologies such as kidney disease, summarizes the contributions of new, updated guidelines (3 of which have recently been released on topics of considerable clinical importance: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease), analyzes the pharmacological advances (largely mediocre except for promising lipid-related results), and finishes by outlining developments in the oft-neglected field of cardiac rehabilitation. This article provides a briefing on controversial issues, presents interesting and somewhat surprising developments, updates established knowledge with undoubted application in clinical practice, and sheds light on potential future contributions. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Identifying Risk for Acute Kidney Injury in Infants and Children Following Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Neumayr, Tara M; Gill, Jeff; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Gazit, Avihu Z; Pineda, Jose A; Berg, Robert A; Dean, J Michael; Moler, Frank W; Doctor, Allan

    2017-10-01

    Our goal was to identify risk factors for acute kidney injury in children surviving cardiac arrest. Retrospective analysis of a public access dataset. Fifteen children's hospitals associated with the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network. Two hundred ninety-six subjects between 1 day and 18 years old who experienced in-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between July 1, 2003, and December 31, 2004. None. Our primary outcome was development of acute kidney injury as defined by the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria. An ordinal probit model was developed. We found six critical explanatory variables, including total number of epinephrine doses, postcardiac arrest blood pressure, arrest location, presence of a chronic lung condition, pH, and presence of an abnormal baseline creatinine. Total number of epinephrine doses received as well as rate of epinephrine dosing impacted acute kidney injury risk and severity of acute kidney injury. This study is the first to identify risk factors for acute kidney injury in children after cardiac arrest. Our findings regarding the impact of epinephrine dosing are of particular interest and suggest potential for epinephrine toxicity with regard to acute kidney injury. The ability to identify and potentially modify risk factors for acute kidney injury after cardiac arrest may lead to improved morbidity and mortality in this population.

  1. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  2. Incidence and Risk Factors for and the Effect of a Program To Reduce the Incidence of Surgical Site Infection after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bevin; Hyman, Sandra; Larson, Elaine; Fowler, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiac surgery (CS) is a serious complication that increases hospital length of stay (LOS), has a substantial financial impact, and increases mortality. The study described here was done to evaluate the effect of a program to reduce SSI after CS. Methods: In January 2007, a multi-disciplinary CS infection-prevention team developed guidelines and implemented bundled tactics for reducing SSI. Data for all patients who underwent CS from 2006–2008 were used to determine whether there was: 1) A difference in the incidence of SSI in white patients and those belonging to minority groups; 2) a reduction in SSI after intervention; and 3) a statistically significant difference in the incidence of SSI in the third quarter of each year as compared with the other quarters of the year. Results: Of 3,418 patients who underwent CS; 1,125 (32.9%) were members of minority groups and 2,293 (67.1%) were white. Eighty (2.3%) patients developed SSI. There was no significant difference in the incidence of SSI in non-Hispanic white patients and all others (2.1% vs. 2.8%, p=0. 42). The incidence of SSI decreased significantly from 2006 (3.0%) to 2007 (2.5%) and 2008 (1.4%), (p=0.03). Surgical site infection occurred more often in the third quarter of each of the years of the study than in other quarters of each year (3.3 vs. 2.0%, p=0.038). Conclusions: Implementation of a program to reduce SSI after CS was associated with a lower incidence of SSI across all racial and ethnic groups and over time, but was not associated with a lower incidence of SSI in the third quarter of each year than in the other quarters. PMID:24800982

  3. PRELIMINARY EXPLORATION OF FACTORS THAT MAY INFLUENCE THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN AIR QUALITY AND THE RISK OF CARDIAC VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTS, TEXAS, 2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to sulfur dioxide (SO2) during weeks three through eight of pregnancy increased risk for ventricular septal defects in a population-based case-control study of air quality and birth defects in seven Texas counties between 1997 and 2000. As a follow-back, a computer-assi...

  4. PRELIMINARY EXPLORATION OF FACTORS THAT MAY INFLUENCE THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN AIR QUALITY AND THE RISK OF CARDIAC VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTS, TEXAS, 2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to sulfur dioxide (SO2) during weeks three through eight of pregnancy increased risk for ventricular septal defects in a population-based case-control study of air quality and birth defects in seven Texas counties between 1997 and 2000. As a follow-back, a computer-assi...

  5. Understand Your Risk for Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Giving for Heart.org Media for Heart.org Arrhythmia About Arrhythmia Why Arrhythmia Matters Understand Your Risk for Arrhythmia Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of Arrhythmia Prevention & Treatment of ...

  6. Exploring the Discussion of Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Kristin Anne; Demo, Erin M; Walker, Peggy; Shuler, C Osborne

    2016-02-01

    Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS), where death is secondary to cardiac arrhythmia, is associated with several cardiac ion channelopathies, including long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome, as well as cardiomyopathies such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. Many of these conditions often present in childhood or adolescence. This study investigates how diagnoses of cardiac diseases associated with SADS are communicated within families. A questionnaire was distributed through cardiac disease-focused support groups and organizations. Data from 114 parents who have a child with a SADS condition were used for analysis. Based on the responses, parents explained the risk of SADS in a straightforward manner and related the risk to the importance of compliance with the prescribed treatment. Participants also found it difficult to determine and enforce lifestyle modifications, manage individuals' emotional reactions, convey the seriousness of the information without scaring their children, and discuss the risk of SADS during these conversations. Concerns regarding disease progression, length and quality of life, and treatment failures were also expressed. Healthcare providers, the Internet, other affected people, visual aids, and personal experience were all reported to be helpful for facilitating these discussions. Services and resources requested by participants included children's support groups, a counselor or psychologist, and child-oriented materials. Increased understanding of how families discuss children's diagnosis of SADS conditions will equip healthcare providers with the information to address parental concerns and help facilitate meaningful and informative discussions within families.

  7. Cardiac risk stratification in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a review of protocols

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anne Kastelianne França; Barbosa, Marianne Penachini da Costa de Rezende; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda Barbosa; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2014-01-01

    Objective Gather and describe general characteristics of different protocols of risk stratification for cardiac patients undergoing exercise. Methods We conducted searches in LILACS, IBECS, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and SciELO electronic databases, using the following descriptors: Cardiovascular Disease, Rehabilitation Centers, Practice Guideline, Exercise and Risk Stratification in the past 20 years. Results Were selected eight studies addressing methods of risk stratification in patients undergoing exercise. Conclusion None of the methods described could cover every situation the patient can be subjected to; however, they are essential to exercise prescription. PMID:25140477

  8. Factors influencing health care utilisation among Aboriginal cardiac patients in central Australia: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians suffer from poorer overall health compared to the general Australian population, particularly in terms of cardiovascular disease and prognosis following a cardiac event. Despite such disparities, Aboriginal Australians utilise health care services at much lower rates than the general population. Improving health care utilisation (HCU) among Aboriginal cardiac patients requires a better understanding of the factors that constrain or facilitate use. The study aimed to identify ecological factors influencing health care utilisation (HCU) for Aboriginal cardiac patients, from the time of their cardiac event to 6–12 months post-event, in central Australia. Methods This qualitative descriptive study was guided by an ecological framework. A culturally-sensitive illness narrative focusing on Aboriginal cardiac patients’ “typical” journey guided focus groups and semi-structured interviews with Aboriginal cardiac patients, non-cardiac community members, health care providers and community researchers. Analysis utilised a thematic conceptual matrix and mixed coding method. Themes were categorised into Predisposing, Enabling, Need and Reinforcing factors and identified at Individual, Interpersonal, Primary Care and Hospital System levels. Results Compelling barriers to HCU identified at the Primary Care and Hospital System levels included communication, organisation and racism. Individual level factors related to HCU included language, knowledge of illness, perceived need and past experiences. Given these individual and health system barriers patients were reliant on utilising alternate family-level supports at the Interpersonal level to enable their journey. Conclusion Aboriginal cardiac patients face significant barriers to HCU, resulting in sub-optimal quality of care, placing them at risk for subsequent cardiovascular events and negative health outcomes. To facilitate HCU amongst Aboriginal people, strategies must be implemented

  9. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  10. Risk Factors for Cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Pak, Mila; Lindseth, Glenda

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone disease is one of the most common public health problems in the United States. Approximately 10%-20% of the national adult populations currently carry gallstones, and gallstone prevalence is rising. In addition, nearly 750,000 cholecystectomies are performed annually in the United States; direct and indirect costs of gallbladder surgery are estimated to be $6.5 billion. Cholelithiasis is also strongly associated with gallbladder, pancreatic, and colorectal cancer occurrence. Moreover, the National Institutes of Health estimates that almost 3,000 deaths (0.12% of all deaths) per year are attributed to complications of cholelithiasis and gallbladder disease. Although extensive research has tried to identify risk factors for cholelithiasis, several studies indicate that definitive findings still remain elusive. In this review, predisposing factors for cholelithiasis are identified, the pathophysiology of gallstone disease is described, and nonsurgical preventive options are discussed. Understanding the risk factors for cholelithiasis may not only be useful in assisting nurses to provide resources and education for patients who are diagnosed with gallstones, but also in developing novel preventive measures for the disease.

  11. Air Pollution and the Risk of Cardiac Defects

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bing-Fang; Lee, Yungling Leo; Jaakkola, Jouni J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous epidemiologic studies have assessed the role of the exposure to ambient air pollution in the development of cardiac birth defects, but they have provided somewhat inconsistent results. To assess the associations between exposure to ambient air pollutants and the risk of cardiac defects, a population-based case-control study was conducted using 1087 cases of cardiac defects and a random sample of 10,870 controls from 1,533,748 Taiwanese newborns in 2001 to 2007. Logistic regression was performed to calculate odds ratios for 10 ppb increases in O3 and 10 μg/m3 increases in PM10. In addition, we compared the risk of cardiac defects in 4 categories-high exposure (>75th percentile); medium exposure (75th to 50th percentile); low exposure (<50th–25th percentile); reference (<25th percentile) based on the distribution of each pollutant. The risks of ventricular septal defects (VSD), atrial septal defects (ASD), and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) were associated with 10 ppb increases in O3 exposure during the first 3 gestational months among term and preterm babies. In comparison between high PM10 exposure and reference category, there were statistically significant elevations in the effect estimates of ASD for all and terms births. In addition, there was a negative or weak association between SO2, NO2, CO, and cardiac defects. The study proved that exposure to outdoor air O3 and PM10 during the first trimester of gestation may increase the risk of VSD, ASD, and PDA. PMID:26554783

  12. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  13. A preoperative risk prediction model for 30-day mortality following cardiac surgery in an Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Billah, Baki; Reid, Christopher Michael; Shardey, Gilbert C; Smith, Julian A

    2010-05-01

    Population-specific risk models are required to build consumer and provider confidence in clinical service delivery, particularly when the risks may be life-threatening. Cardiac surgery carries such risks. Currently, there is no model developed on the Australian cardiac surgery population and this article presents a novel risk prediction model for the Australian cohort with the aim to provide a guide for the surgeons and patients in assessing preoperative risk factors for cardiac surgery. This study aims to identify preoperative risk factors associated with 30-day mortality following cardiac surgery for an Australian population and to develop a preoperative model for risk prediction. All patients (23016) undergoing cardiac surgery between July 2001 and June 2008 recorded in the Australian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ASCTS) database were included in this analysis. The data were divided randomly into model creation (13810, 60%) and model validation (9206, 40%) sets. The model was developed on the creation set and then validated on the validation set. The bootstrap sampling and automated variable selection methods were used to develop several candidate models. The final model was selected from this group of candidate models by using prediction mean square error (MSE) and Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC). Using a multifold validation, the average receiver operating characteristic (ROC), p-value for Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-squared test and MSE were obtained. Risk thresholds for low-, moderate- and high-risk patients were defined. The expected and observed mortality for various risk groups were compared. The multicollinearity and first-order interaction effect between clinically meaningful risk factors were investigated. A total of 23016 patients underwent cardiac surgery and the 30-day mortality rate was 3.2% (728 patients). Independent predictors of mortality in the model were: age, sex, the New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, urgency of procedure

  14. Validity of Type D personality in Iceland: association with disease severity and risk markers in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Svansdottir, Erla; Karlsson, Hrobjartur D; Gudnason, Thorarinn; Olason, Daniel T; Thorgilsson, Hordur; Sigtryggsdottir, Unnur; Sijbrands, Eric J; Pedersen, Susanne S; Denollet, Johan

    2012-04-01

    Type D personality has been associated with poor prognosis in cardiac patients. This study investigated the validity of the Type D construct in Iceland and its association with disease severity and health-related risk markers in cardiac patients. A sample of 1,452 cardiac patients completed the Type D scale (DS14), and a subgroup of 161 patients completed measurements for the five-factor model of personality, emotional control, anxiety, depression, stress and lifestyle factors. The Icelandic DS14 had good psychometric properties and its construct validity was confirmed. Prevalence of Type D was 26-29%, and assessment of Type D personality was not confounded by severity of underlying coronary artery disease. Regarding risk markers, Type D patients reported more psychopharmacological medication use and smoking, but frequency of previous mental problems was similar across groups. Type D is a valid personality construct in Iceland, and is associated with health-related risk markers, but not cardiac disease severity.

  15. A Web-Based Nutrition Program Reduces Health Care Costs in Employees With Cardiac Risk Factors: Before and After Cost Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Howard; Kazis, Lewis E; Jarrett, Kelli M; Vetter, Delia; Richmond, Russell; Moore, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    Background Rising health insurance premiums represent a rapidly increasing burden on employer-sponsors of health insurance and their employees. Some employers have become proactive in managing health care costs by providing tools to encourage employees to directly manage their health and prevent disease. One example of such a tool is DASH for Health, an Internet-based nutrition and exercise behavior modification program. This program was offered as a free, opt-in benefit to US-based employees of the EMC Corporation. Objective The aim was to determine whether an employer-sponsored, Internet-based diet and exercise program has an effect on health care costs. Methods There were 15,237 total employees and spouses who were included in our analyses, of whom 1967 enrolled in the DASH for Health program (DASH participants). Using a retrospective, quasi-experimental design, study year health care costs among DASH participants and non-participants were compared, controlling for baseline year costs, risk, and demographic variables. The relationship between how often a subject visited the DASH website and health care costs also was examined. These relationships were examined among all study subjects and among a subgroup of 735 subjects with cardiovascular conditions (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia). Multiple linear regression analysis examined the relationship of program use to health care costs, comparing study year costs among DASH participants and non-participants and then examining the effects of increased website use on health care costs. Analyses were repeated among the cardiovascular condition subgroups. Results Overall, program use was not associated with changes in health care costs. However, among the cardiovascular risk study subjects, health care costs were US$827 lower, on average, during the study year (P = .05; t 729 = 1.95). Among 1028 program users, increased website use was significantly associated with lower health care costs among those who visited

  16. A web-based nutrition program reduces health care costs in employees with cardiac risk factors: before and after cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Naomi; Cabral, Howard; Kazis, Lewis E; Jarrett, Kelli M; Vetter, Delia; Richmond, Russell; Moore, Thomas J

    2009-10-23

    Rising health insurance premiums represent a rapidly increasing burden on employer-sponsors of health insurance and their employees. Some employers have become proactive in managing health care costs by providing tools to encourage employees to directly manage their health and prevent disease. One example of such a tool is DASH for Health, an Internet-based nutrition and exercise behavior modification program. This program was offered as a free, opt-in benefit to US-based employees of the EMC Corporation. The aim was to determine whether an employer-sponsored, Internet-based diet and exercise program has an effect on health care costs. There were 15,237 total employees and spouses who were included in our analyses, of whom 1967 enrolled in the DASH for Health program (DASH participants). Using a retrospective, quasi-experimental design, study year health care costs among DASH participants and non-participants were compared, controlling for baseline year costs, risk, and demographic variables. The relationship between how often a subject visited the DASH website and health care costs also was examined. These relationships were examined among all study subjects and among a subgroup of 735 subjects with cardiovascular conditions (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia). Multiple linear regression analysis examined the relationship of program use to health care costs, comparing study year costs among DASH participants and non-participants and then examining the effects of increased website use on health care costs. Analyses were repeated among the cardiovascular condition subgroups. Overall, program use was not associated with changes in health care costs. However, among the cardiovascular risk study subjects, health care costs were US$827 lower, on average, during the study year (P= .05; t(729) = 1.95). Among 1028 program users, increased website use was significantly associated with lower health care costs among those who visited the website at least nine times

  17. Trabectedin has a low cardiac risk profile: a comprehensive cardiac safety analysis.

    PubMed

    Lebedinsky, Claudia; Gómez, Javier; Park, Youn C; Nieto, Antonio; Soto-Matos, Arturo; Parekh, Trilok; Alfaro, Vicente; Roy, Elena; Lardelli, Pilar; Kahatt, Carmen

    2011-11-01

    This analysis provides a cross-study evaluation of the cardiac safety of trabectedin. Drug-related cardiac adverse events (CAEs) were retrieved from phase I-III clinical trials, pharmacovigilance databases, and spontaneously reported cases. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was monitored in combination phase I studies with doxorubicin or pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and in a phase III trial (with PLD). CAEs [grade 4 cardiac arrest with severe pancytopenia and sepsis (n = 1 patient), grade 4 atrial fibrillation (n = 2), and grade 1 tachycardia (n = 1)] occurred in 4/283 patients (1.4%) in 6 single-agent phase I trials. CAEs (grade 1 sinus tachycardia in a hypertensive patient and grade 1 ventricular dysfunction) occurred in 2/155 patients (1.3%) in 4 phase I combination trials. Results from 19 single-agent phase II trials showed CAEs in 20/1,132 patients (1.8%): arrhythmias (tachycardia/palpitations; n = 13; 1.1%) were the most common. A rather similar rate of symptomatic CAEs was observed in both arms of a phase III trial in recurrent ovarian cancer: 6/330 patients (1.8%; PLD) and 11/333 patients (3.3%; trabectedin/PLD). No clinically relevant LVEF changes occurred in phase I combination trials. In the phase III trial, LVEF decreases from baseline were similar: 9% of patients (PLD) and 7% (trabectedin/PLD), with no relevant symptoms. During postmarketing experience in soft tissue sarcoma (2,046 patients treated), 4 CAEs (2 cardiac arrest, 2 cardiac failure; ~0.2%) occurred in patients with preexisting conditions. Trabectedin has a low incidence of CAEs, consisting mainly of arrhythmias. This extensive data review indicates a low cardiac risk profile for trabectedin.

  18. Growth Hormone and Risk for Cardiac Tumors in Carney Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bandettini, W. Patricia; Karageorgiadis, Alexander S.; Sinaii, Ninet; Rosing, Douglas R.; Sachdev, Vandana; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Gourgari, Evgenia; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Keil, Meg F.; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Carney, J. Aidan; Arai, Andrew E.; Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Carney Complex (CNC) is a multiple neoplasia syndrome that is caused mostly by PRKAR1A mutations. Cardiac myxomas are the leading cause of mortality in CNC patients who, in addition, often develop growth hormone (GH) excess. We studied patients with CNC who were observed for over a period of 20 years (1995–2015) for the development of both GH excess and cardiac myxomas. GH secretion was evaluated by standard testing; dedicated cardiovascular imaging was used to detect cardiac abnormalities. Four excised cardiac myxomas were tested for expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). A total of 99 CNC patients (97 with a PRKAR1A mutation) were included in the study with a mean age of 25.8 ± 16.6 years at presentation. Over an observed follow-up mean of 25.8 years, 60% of patients with GH excess (n=46) developed a cardiac myxoma compared to only 36% of those without GH excess (n=54) (p=0.016). Patients with GH excess were also overall more likely to have a tumor versus those with normal GH secretion (OR=2.78, 95% CI: 1.23–6.29; p=0.014). IGF-1 mRNA and protein were higher in CNC myxomas than in normal heart tissue. We conclude that the development of cardiac myxomas in CNC may be associated with increased GH secretion, in a manner analogous to the association between fibrous dysplasia and GH excess in McCune Albright syndrome, a condition similar to CNC. We speculate that treatment of GH excess in patients with CNC may reduce the likelihood of cardiac myxoma formation and/or recurrence of this tumor. PMID:27535175

  19. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Request Permissions Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Approved by the Cancer.Net ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Salivary Gland Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Salivary Gland Cancer ...

  20. [Cardiovascular risk factors in women].

    PubMed

    Cengel, Atiye

    2010-03-01

    It is estimated that at least 80% of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) have conventional risk factors and optimization of these risk factors can reduce morbidity and mortality due to this disease considerably. Contemporary women have increased burden of some of these risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and smoking. Turkish women have a worse CV risk profile than Turkish men in some aspects. Risk stratification systems such as Framingham have a tendency of underestimating the risk in women. Coronary artery disease remains in vessel wall for a longer period of time in women; therefore obstructive disease appear later in their lifespan necessitating risk stratification systems for estimating their lifetime risk.

  1. Predicted risks of radiogenic cardiac toxicity in two pediatric patients undergoing photon or proton radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Howell, Rebecca M; Homann, Kenneth; Giebeler, Annelise; Taddei, Phillip J; Mahajan, Anita; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2013-07-23

    Hodgkin disease (HD) and medulloblastoma (MB) are common malignancies found in children and young adults, and radiotherapy is part of the standard treatment. It was reported that these patients who received radiation therapy have an increased risk of cardiovascular late effects. We compared the predicted risk of developing radiogenic cardiac toxicity after photon versus proton radiotherapies for a pediatric patient with HD and a pediatric patient with MB. In the treatment plans, each patient's heart was contoured in fine detail, including substructures of the pericardium and myocardium. Risk calculations took into account both therapeutic and stray radiation doses. We calculated the relative risk (RR) of cardiac toxicity using a linear risk model and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values using relative seriality and Lyman models. Uncertainty analyses were also performed. The RR values of cardiac toxicity for the HD patient were 7.27 (proton) and 8.37 (photon), respectively; the RR values for the MB patient were 1.28 (proton) and 8.39 (photon), respectively. The predicted NTCP values for the HD patient were 2.17% (proton) and 2.67% (photon) for the myocardium, and were 2.11% (proton) and 1.92% (photon) for the whole heart. The predicted ratios of NTCP values (proton/photon) for the MB patient were much less than unity. Uncertainty analyses revealed that the predicted ratio of risk between proton and photon therapies was sensitive to uncertainties in the NTCP model parameters and the mean radiation weighting factor for neutrons, but was not sensitive to heart structure contours. The qualitative findings of the study were not sensitive to uncertainties in these factors. We conclude that proton and photon radiotherapies confer similar predicted risks of cardiac toxicity for the HD patient in this study, and that proton therapy reduced the predicted risk for the MB patient in this study.

  2. Predicted risks of radiogenic cardiac toxicity in two pediatric patients undergoing photon or proton radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hodgkin disease (HD) and medulloblastoma (MB) are common malignancies found in children and young adults, and radiotherapy is part of the standard treatment. It was reported that these patients who received radiation therapy have an increased risk of cardiovascular late effects. We compared the predicted risk of developing radiogenic cardiac toxicity after photon versus proton radiotherapies for a pediatric patient with HD and a pediatric patient with MB. Methods In the treatment plans, each patient’s heart was contoured in fine detail, including substructures of the pericardium and myocardium. Risk calculations took into account both therapeutic and stray radiation doses. We calculated the relative risk (RR) of cardiac toxicity using a linear risk model and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values using relative seriality and Lyman models. Uncertainty analyses were also performed. Results The RR values of cardiac toxicity for the HD patient were 7.27 (proton) and 8.37 (photon), respectively; the RR values for the MB patient were 1.28 (proton) and 8.39 (photon), respectively. The predicted NTCP values for the HD patient were 2.17% (proton) and 2.67% (photon) for the myocardium, and were 2.11% (proton) and 1.92% (photon) for the whole heart. The predicted ratios of NTCP values (proton/photon) for the MB patient were much less than unity. Uncertainty analyses revealed that the predicted ratio of risk between proton and photon therapies was sensitive to uncertainties in the NTCP model parameters and the mean radiation weighting factor for neutrons, but was not sensitive to heart structure contours. The qualitative findings of the study were not sensitive to uncertainties in these factors. Conclusions We conclude that proton and photon radiotherapies confer similar predicted risks of cardiac toxicity for the HD patient in this study, and that proton therapy reduced the predicted risk for the MB patient in this study. PMID:23880421

  3. Factors influencing cardiac auscultation proficiency in physician trainees.

    PubMed

    Lam, M Z C; Lee, T J; Boey, P Y; Ng, W F; Hey, H W; Ho, K Y; Cheong, P Y

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the accuracy of physician trainees in identifying different cardiac sounds and examined the factors influencing their cardiac auscultation proficiency. A total of 106 physicians in the Family Medicine Training Programme were asked to identify 10 cardiac sounds played sequentially on the Littmann electronic stethoscope, which functioned as a surrogate patient. Their auscultation accuracy was scored numerically out of a maximum of 10. Demographical data of the physicians was collected prospectively. The mean (+/-SD) auscultation proficiency score of the study population was 4.0 +/- 1.7. Physicians who graduated in 1994 or earlier fared significantly poorer than those who obtained their Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery degrees between 1995 and 2000 (p-value equals 0.02). Auscultation proficiency was not related to current practice, previous years of primary care, cardiology, internal medicine or paediatric medicine postings, or cumulative years of postings. Normal heart sounds were most accurately identified. Prosthetic cardiac sounds were better identified than other extra-cardiac sounds while systolic murmurs were more accurately identified than diastolic murmurs. Tachycardia had the lowest identification rate. Our data suggest that cardiac auscultation skill declined with time, being significantly impaired eight years after graduation. We suggest that there is a need for retraining in the form of continuing medical education to address not only new knowledge and skills, but also basic skill competency.

  4. The value of cardiac magnetic resonance and distribution of late gadolinium enhancement for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Klopotowski, Mariusz; Kukula, Krzysztof; Malek, Lukasz A; Spiewak, Mateusz; Polanska-Skrzypczyk, Magdalena; Jamiolkowski, Jacek; Dabrowski, Maciej; Baranowski, Rafal; Klisiewicz, Anna; Kusmierczyk, Mariusz; Jasinska, Anna; Jarmus, Ewelina; Kruk, Mariusz; Ruzyllo, Witold; Witkowski, Adam; Chojnowska, Lidia

    2016-07-01

    The presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with worse clinical outcome and the extent of LGE predicts the increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Limited data exist regarding the distribution of LGE. We attempted to verify whether the presence of LGE outside the interventricular insertion points carries additional risk for patients with HCM. In this prospective study, 328 patients with HCM, who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) were enrolled. Five major risk factors for SCD were assessed in all patients. The median follow-up was 37 months. LGE was detected in 226 (68.9%) patients. In 70 (21.3%) patients it was present only at the interventricular insertion points - LGE (+) group, while in 156 (47.6%) it was noted in other locations - LGE (++) group. Primary endpoint defined as SCD or appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator intervention occurred in 14 (4.3%) patients, one in LGE (+) and 13 in LGE (++). In multivariable analysis including five traditional risk factors and left ventricular ejection fraction <50%, only the presence of LGE outside the insertion points was a significant predictor of SCD/aborted SCD (HR 10.01, 95% CI 1.21-83.86, p=0.033). The performance of the multivariable sudden cardiac death risk model was improved by the addition of LGE (++) to the traditional risk factors (likelihood ratio p=0.005). The Kaplan-Meier curves showed better event-free survival in the LGE (-) and LGE (+) patient groups compared to the LGE (++) group. In HCM patients, presence of LGE outside interventricular insertion points is associated with increased risk of sudden cardiac death or its equivalent as well as overall mortality. Cardiac fibrosis as a substrate for SCD in HCM may be identified on CMR and serve as an imaging biomarker of increased risk. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  6. Left atrial size quantification using non-contrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomography - association with cardiovascular risk factors and gender-specific distribution in the general population: the Heinz Nixdorf Recall study.

    PubMed

    Mahabadi, Amir A; Lehmann, Nils; Sonneck, Nina C; Kälsch, Hagen; Bauer, Marcus; Kara, Kaffer; Geisel, Marie H; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund; Möhlenkamp, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Left atrial (LA) size is associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Once cardiac computed tomography (CT) is performed, information on LA size is readily available without additional contrast media or radiation exposure. To determine the association of CT-derived LA area and body surface area-adjusted (BSA) LA index with cardiovascular risk factors and describe age- and gender-specific normative values in a general population cohort. This study included 3945 participants (mean age, 59 ± 8 years; 53% women) from the community-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study. LA area in an axial image at the level of the mitral valve was quantified from non-contrast-enhanced electron-beam CT by manual delineations of the boundaries of the LA with exclusion of subjects with prevalent cardiovascular disease. Definition of normative values was performed in subjects without predictors of LA enlargement. LA quantification was feasible in all subjects. Men had larger LA size (1856 mm(2) vs. 1677 mm(2), P < 0.0001), while after adjustment for BSA, this effect was inverted (910 mm(2)/m(2) vs. 933 mm(2)/m(2) for men and women, P < 0.0001). Determinants of body size were major predictors of LA size (body mass index [BMI]: R(2) = 0.195, BSA: R(2 )= 0.216, both P < 0.0001). Blood pressure was associated with LA size (parameter-estimate [95% confidence interval] = 51.0 (4.9-57.1) mm(2)/10 mmHg for systolic, 31.4 (25.4-37.4) mm(2)/5 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure, 214.6 (186.9-242.3) mm(2) for antihypertensive medication, P < 0.0001 for all). Cholesterol levels, lipid-lowering therapy, and diabetes were associated with LA in univariable analysis, however, correlations were low (r(2 )≤ 0.026). Current smoking was associated with reduced LA size (-115.9 [-149.0 - -82.8] mm(2), P < 0.0001). In multivariable regression, BMI, blood pressure, antihypertensive medication, and smoking remained associated with LA size (P < 0.005). Non-contrast-enhanced cardiac CT enables LA

  7. Reducing cardiovascular risk in spouses of cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yates, Bernice C; Rowland, Sheri; Mancuso, Kerry; Kupzyk, Kevin A; Norman, Joseph F; Shurmur, Scott; Tesina, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined risk-reducing interventions in spouses of coronary artery bypass patients. This study examined the effects of the Partners Together in Health (PaTH) intervention versus usual care on cardiovascular risk factors. Spouses in the experimental group (n = 17/group) attended cardiac rehabilitation with patients and made the same physical activity and healthy eating changes as patients. Spouses in the usual care group attended educational classes with patients. Spouses' 30-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Lifetime Risk Scale before and after cardiac rehabilitation (3 months), and at 6 months. Spouses in both groups significantly reduced 30-year risk scores at 3 and 6 months. Exercise was the key ingredient in lowering risk. There was a trend toward reduction in systolic blood pressure and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in both groups. Although there were no group differences, having spouses participate in cardiac rehabilitation with the patient was effective for reducing spouses' cardiovascular risk. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. The Risks of Inappropriateness in Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged “worried-well” asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks. PMID:19543412

  9. The risks of inappropriateness in cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-05-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged "worried-well" asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks.

  10. Lithium Use in Pregnancy and the Risk of Cardiac Malformations.

    PubMed

    Patorno, Elisabetta; Huybrechts, Krista F; Bateman, Brian T; Cohen, Jacqueline M; Desai, Rishi J; Mogun, Helen; Cohen, Lee S; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia

    2017-06-08

    There has been concern that exposure to lithium early in pregnancy may be associated with a marked increase in the risk of Ebstein's anomaly (a right ventricular outflow tract obstruction defect) in infants and overall congenital cardiac defects, but data are conflicting and limited. We conducted a cohort study involving 1,325,563 pregnancies in women who were enrolled in Medicaid and who delivered a live-born infant between 2000 and 2010. We examined the risk of cardiac malformations among infants exposed to lithium during the first trimester as compared with unexposed infants and, in secondary analyses, with infants exposed to another commonly used mood stabilizer, lamotrigine. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated with control for psychiatric and medical conditions, medications, and other potential confounders. Cardiac malformations were present in 16 of the 663 infants exposed to lithium (2.41%), 15,251 of the 1,322,955 nonexposed infants (1.15%), and 27 of the 1945 infants exposed to lamotrigine (1.39%). The adjusted risk ratio for cardiac malformations among infants exposed to lithium as compared with unexposed infants was 1.65 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 2.68). The risk ratio was 1.11 (95% CI, 0.46 to 2.64) for a daily dose of 600 mg or less, 1.60 (95% CI, 0.67 to 3.80) for 601 to 900 mg, and 3.22 (95% CI, 1.47 to 7.02) for more than 900 mg. The prevalence of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction defects was 0.60% among lithium-exposed infants versus 0.18% among unexposed infants (adjusted risk ratio, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.00 to 7.06). Results were similar when lamotrigine-exposed infants were used as the reference group. Maternal use of lithium during the first trimester was associated with an increased risk of cardiac malformations, including Ebstein's anomaly; the magnitude of this effect was smaller than had been previously postulated. (Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health.).

  11. Cardiac rehabilitation and risk reduction: time to "rebrand and reinvigorate".

    PubMed

    Sandesara, Pratik B; Lambert, Cameron T; Gordon, Neil F; Fletcher, Gerald F; Franklin, Barry A; Wenger, Nanette K; Sperling, Laurence

    2015-02-03

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) continues to increase annually in the United States along with its associated enormous costs. A multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and risk reduction program is an essential component of ASCVD prevention and management. Despite the strong evidence for CR in the secondary prevention of ASCVD, it remains vastly underutilized due to significant barriers. The current model of CR delivery is unsustainable and needs significant improvement to provide cost-effective, patient-centered, comprehensive secondary ASCVD prevention.

  12. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, coronary artery bypass grafting, or percutaneous coronary intervention. Cardiac rehab involves adopting heart-healthy lifestyle changes to address risk factors for cardiovascular disease. To help you adopt lifestyle changes, this program ...

  13. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27698737

  14. Sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients: a comprehensive care approach to reduce risk.

    PubMed

    Pun, Patrick H; Middleton, John P

    2012-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death is a major problem in hemodialysis patients, and our understanding of this disease is underdeveloped. The lack of a precise definition tailored for use in the hemodialysis population limits the reliability of epidemiologic reports. Efforts should be directed toward an accurate classification of all deaths that occur in this vulnerable population. The traditional paradigm of disease pathophysiology based on known cardiac risk factors appears to be inadequate to explain the magnitude of sudden cardiac death risk in chronic kidney disease, and numerous unique cofactors and exposures appear to determine risk in this population. Well-designed cohort studies will be needed for a basic understanding of disease pathophysiology and risk factors, and randomized intervention trials will be needed before best management practices can be implemented. This review examines available data to describe the characteristics of the high-risk patient and suggests a comprehensive common sense approach to prevention using existing cardiovascular medications and reducing and monitoring potential dialysis-related arrhythmic triggers. Other unproven cardiovascular therapies such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators should be used on a case-by-case basis, with recognition of the associated hazards that these devices carry among hemodialysis patients.

  15. Occupational Health Risks in Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Workers.

    PubMed

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Piccaluga, Emanuela; Guagliumi, Giulio; Del Greco, Maurizio; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Picano, Eugenio

    2016-04-01

    Orthopedic strain and radiation exposure are recognized risk factors in personnel staff performing fluoroscopically guided cardiovascular procedures. However, the potential occupational health effects are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of health problems among personnel staff working in interventional cardiology/cardiac electrophysiology and correlate them with the length of occupational radiation exposure. We used a self-administered questionnaire to collect demographic information, work-related information, lifestyle-confounding factors, all current medications, and health status. A total number of 746 questionnaires were properly filled comprising 466 exposed staff (281 males; 44±9 years) and 280 unexposed subjects (179 males; 43±7years). Exposed personnel included 218 interventional cardiologists and electrophysiologists (168 males; 46±9 years); 191 nurses (76 males; 42±7 years), and 57 technicians (37 males; 40±12 years) working for a median of 10 years (quartiles: 5-24 years). Skin lesions (P=0.002), orthopedic illness (P<0.001), cataract (P=0.003), hypertension (P=0.02), and hypercholesterolemia (P<0.001) were all significantly higher in exposed versus nonexposed group, with a clear gradient unfavorable for physicians over technicians and nurses and for longer history of work (>16 years). In highly exposed physicians, adjusted odds ratio ranged from 1.7 for hypertension (95% confidence interval: 1-3; P=0.05), 2.9 for hypercholesterolemia (95% confidence interval: 1-5; P=0.004), 4.5 for cancer (95% confidence interval: 0.9-25; P=0.06), to 9 for cataract (95% confidence interval: 2-41; P=0.004). Health problems are more frequently observed in workers performing fluoroscopically guided cardiovascular procedures than in unexposed controls, raising the need to spread the culture of safety in the cath laboratory. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Imminent Cardiac Risk Assessment via Optical Intravascular Biochemical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.; Wetzel, L; Wetzel, M; Lodder, R

    2009-01-01

    Heart disease is by far the biggest killer in the United States, and type II diabetes, which affects 8% of the U.S. population, is on the rise. In many cases, the acute coronary syndrome and/or sudden cardiac death occurs without warning. Atherosclerosis has known behavioral, genetic and dietary risk factors. However, our laboratory studies with animal models and human post-mortem tissue using FT-IR microspectroscopy reveal the chemical microstructure within arteries and in the arterial walls themselves. These include spectra obtained from the aortas of ApoE-/- knockout mice on sucrose and normal diets showing lipid deposition in the former case. Also pre-aneurysm chemical images of knockout mouse aorta walls, and spectra of plaque excised from a living human patient are shown for comparison. In keeping with the theme of the SPEC 2008 conference Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Disease this paper describes the background and potential value of a new catheter-based system to provide in vivo biochemical analysis of plaque in human coronary arteries. We report the following: (1) results of FT-IR microspectroscopy on animal models of vascular disease to illustrate the localized chemical distinctions between pathological and normal tissue, (2) current diagnostic techniques used for risk assessment of patients with potential unstable coronary syndromes, and (3) the advantages and limitations of each of these techniques illustrated with patent care histories, related in the first person, by the physician coauthors. Note that the physician comments clarify the contribution of each diagnostic technique to imminent cardiac risk assessment in a clinical setting, leading to the appreciation of what localized intravascular chemical analysis can contribute as an add-on diagnostic tool. The quality of medical imaging has improved dramatically since the turn of the century. Among clinical non-invasive diagnostic tools, laboratory tests of body fluids, EKG, and physical examination are

  17. Risk factors in school shootings.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, S; Hersen, M; Thomas, J

    2000-01-01

    Nine incidents of multiple-victim homicide in American secondary schools are examined and common risk factors are identified. The literature dealing with individual, family, social, societal, and situational risk factors for youth violence and aggression is reviewed along with existing risk assessment methods. Checklists of risk factors for serious youth violence and school violence are used in reviewing each school shooting case. Commonalties among the cases and implications for psychologists practicing in clinical and school settings are discussed.

  18. Risk-taking attitudes and their association with process and outcomes of cardiac care: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    King, Kathryn M; Norris, Colleen M; Knudtson, Merril L; Ghali, William A

    2009-08-06

    Prior research reveals that processes and outcomes of cardiac care differ across sociodemographic strata. One potential contributing factor to such differences is the personality traits of individuals within these strata. We examined the association between risk-taking attitudes and cardiac patients' clinical and demographic characteristics, the likelihood of undergoing invasive cardiac procedures and survival. We studied a large inception cohort of patients who underwent cardiac catheterization between July 1998 and December 2001. Detailed clinical and demographic data were collected at time of cardiac catheterization and through a mailed survey one year post-catheterization. The survey included three general risk attitude items from the Jackson Personality Inventory. Patients' (n = 6294) attitudes toward risk were categorized as risk-prone versus non-risk-prone and were assessed for associations with baseline clinical and demographic characteristics, treatment received (i.e., medical therapy, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), and survival (to December 2005). 2827 patients (45%) were categorized as risk-prone. Having risk-prone attitudes was associated with younger age (p < .001), male sex (p < .001), current smoking (p < .001) and higher household income (p < .001). Risk-prone patients were more likely to have CABG surgery in unadjusted (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% CI 1.08-1.36) and adjusted (OR = 1.18; 95% CI 1.02-1.36) models, but were no more likely to have PCI or any revascularization. Having risk-prone attitudes was associated with better survival in an unadjusted survival analysis (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 0.78 (95% CI 0.66-0.93), but not in a risk-adjusted analysis (HR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.77-1.10). These exploratory findings suggest that patient attitudes toward risk taking may contribute to some of the documented differences in use of invasive cardiac procedures. An awareness of these associations could help

  19. 'Browning' the cardiac and peri-vascular adipose tissues to modulate cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Aldiss, Peter; Davies, Graeme; Woods, Rachel; Budge, Helen; Sacks, Harold S; Symonds, Michael E

    2017-02-01

    Excess visceral adiposity, in particular that located adjacent to the heart and coronary arteries is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. In the pathophysiological state, dysfunctional adipose tissue secretes an array of factors modulating vascular function and driving atherogenesis. Conversely, brown and beige adipose tissues utilise glucose and lipids to generate heat and are associated with improved cardiometabolic health. The cardiac and thoracic perivascular adipose tissues are now understood to be composed of brown adipose tissue in the healthy state and undergo a brown-to-white transition i.e. during obesity which may be a driving factor of cardiovascular disease. In this review we discuss the risks of excess cardiac and vascular adiposity and potential mechanisms by which restoring the brown phenotype i.e. "re-browning" could potentially be achieved in clinically relevant populations.

  20. Cardiac Rehabilitation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercising are other risk factors. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Cardiac Rehabilitation (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Cardiac Rehabilitation (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? (American Heart Association) - ...

  1. Regulation of cardiac microRNAs by serum response factor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Azhar, Gohar; Helms, Scott A; Wei, Jeanne Y

    2011-02-08

    Serum response factor (SRF) regulates certain microRNAs that play a role in cardiac and skeletal muscle development. However, the role of SRF in the regulation of microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis in cardiac hypertrophy has not been well established. In this report, we employed two distinct transgenic mouse models to study the impact of SRF on cardiac microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis. Cardiac-specific overexpression of SRF (SRF-Tg) led to altered expression of a number of microRNAs. Interestingly, downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a and upregulation of miR-21 occurred by 7 days of age in these mice, long before the onset of cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that SRF overexpression impacted the expression of microRNAs which contribute to cardiac hypertrophy. Reducing cardiac SRF level using the antisense-SRF transgenic approach (Anti-SRF-Tg) resulted in the expression of miR-1, miR-133a and miR-21 in the opposite direction. Furthermore, we observed that SRF regulates microRNA biogenesis, specifically the transcription of pri-microRNA, thereby affecting the mature microRNA level. The mir-21 promoter sequence is conserved among mouse, rat and human; one SRF binding site was found to be in the mir-21 proximal promoter region of all three species. The mir-21 gene is regulated by SRF and its cofactors, including myocardin and p49/Strap. Our study demonstrates that the downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a, and upregulation of miR-21 can be reversed by one single upstream regulator, SRF. These results may help to develop novel therapeutic interventions targeting microRNA biogenesis.

  2. Improved Cardiac Risk Assessment with Non-Invasive measures of Coronary flow reserve

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Venkatesh L.; Naya, Masanao; Foster, Courtney R.; Hainer, Jon; Gaber, Mariya; Di Carli, Gilda; Blankstein, Ron; Dorbala, Sharmila; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Pencina, Michael J.; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Impaired vasodilator function is an early manifestation of coronary artery disease and may precede angiographic stenosis. It is unknown whether non-invasive assessment of coronary vasodilator function in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD) carries incremental prognostic significance. Methods and Results 2783 consecutive patients referred for rest/stress PET were followed for a median of 1.4 years (inter-quartile range: 0.7–3.2 years). The extent and severity of perfusion abnormalities were quantified by visual evaluation of myocardial perfusion images (MPI). Rest and stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) were calculated using factor analysis and a 2-compartment kinetic model, and were used to compute coronary flow reserve (CFR=stress/rest MBF). The primary endpoint was cardiac death. Overall 3-year cardiac mortality was 8.0%. The lowest tertile of CFR (<1.5) was associated with a 5.6-fold increase in the risk of cardiac death (95%CI 2.5–12.4, p<0.0001) compared to the highest tertile. Incorporation of CFR into cardiac death risk assessment models resulted in an increase in the c-index from 0.82 (95%CI 0.78–0.86) to 0.84 (95%CI 0.80–0.87, p=0.02) and in a net reclassification improvement (NRI) of 0.098 (95%CI 0.025–0.180). Addition of CFR resulted in correct reclassification of 34.8% of intermediate risk patients (NRI=0.487, 95%CI 0.262–0.731). Corresponding improvements in risk assessment for mortality from any cause were also demonstrated. Conclusions Non-invasive quantitative assessment of coronary vasodilator function using PET is a powerful, independent predictor of cardiac mortality in patients with known or suspected CAD and provides meaningful incremental risk stratification over clinical and gated MPI variables. PMID:22007073

  3. Cardiac Regeneration using Growth Factors: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rebouças, Juliana de Souza; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Formiga, Fabio Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the most significant manifestation of ischemic heart disease and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Novel strategies targeting at regenerating the injured myocardium have been investigated, including gene therapy, cell therapy, and the use of growth factors. Growth factor therapy has aroused interest in cardiovascular medicine because of the regeneration mechanisms induced by these biomolecules, including angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, cardiomyocyte proliferation, stem-cell recruitment, and others. Together, these mechanisms promote myocardial repair and improvement of the cardiac function. This review aims to address the strategic role of growth factor therapy in cardiac regeneration, considering its innovative and multifactorial character in myocardial repair after ischemic injury. Different issues will be discussed, with emphasis on the regeneration mechanisms as a potential therapeutic resource mediated by growth factors, and the challenges to make these proteins therapeutically viable in the field of cardiology and regenerative medicine. PMID:27355588

  4. The transcription factor GATA-6 regulates pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Berlo, Jop H.; Elrod, John W.; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M.G.; York, Allen J.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The transcriptional code that programs maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy involves the zinc finger-containing DNA binding factor GATA-4. The highly related transcription factor GATA-6 is also expressed in the adult heart, although its role in controlling the hypertrophic program is unknown. Objective To determine the role of GATA-6 in cardiac hypertrophy and homeostasis. Methods and Results Here we performed a cardiomyocyte-specific conditional gene targeting approach for Gata6, as well as a transgenic approach to overexpress GATA-6 in the mouse heart. Deletion of Gata6-loxP with Nkx2.5-cre produced late embryonic lethality with heart defects, while deletion with β-myosin heavy chain-cre (βMHC-cre) produced viable adults with greater than 95% loss of GATA-6 protein in the heart. These later mice were subjected to pressure overload induced hypertrophy for 2 and 6 weeks, which showed a significant reduction in cardiac hypertrophy similar to that observed Gata4 heart-specific deleted mice. Gata6-deleted mice subjected to pressure overload also developed heart failure while control mice maintained proper cardiac function. Gata6-deleted mice also developed less cardiac hypertrophy following 2 weeks of angiotensin II/phenylephrine infusion. Controlled GATA-6 overexpression in the heart induced hypertrophy with aging and predisposed to greater hypertrophy with pressure overload stimulation. Combinatorial deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 from the adult heart resulted in dilated cardiomyopathy and lethality by 16 weeks of age. Mechanistically, deletion of Gata6 from the heart resulted in fundamental changes in the levels of key regulatory genes and myocyte differentiation-specific genes. Conclusions These results indicate that GATA-6 is both necessary and sufficient for regulating the cardiac hypertrophic response and differentiated gene expression, both alone and in coordination with GATA-4. PMID:20705924

  5. T-box factors determine cardiac design.

    PubMed

    Hoogaars, W M H; Barnett, P; Moorman, A F M; Christoffels, V M

    2007-03-01

    The heart of higher vertebrates is a structurally complicated multi-chambered pump that contracts synchronously. For its proper function a number of distinct integrated components have to be generated, including force-generating compartments, unidirectional valves, septa and a system in charge of the initiation and coordinated propagation of the depolarizing impulse over the heart. Not surprisingly, a large number of regulating factors are involved in these processes that act in complex and intertwined pathways to regulate the activity of target genes responsible for morphogenesis and function. The finding that mutations in T-box transcription factor-encoding genes in humans lead to congenital heart defects has focused attention on the importance of this family of regulators in heart development. Functional and genetic analyses in a variety of divergent species has demonstrated the critical roles of multiple T-box factor gene family members, including Tbx11, -2, -3, -5, -18 and -20, in the patterning, recruitment, specification, differentiation and growth processes underlying formation and integration of the heart components. Insight into the roles of T-box factors in these processes will enhance our understanding of heart formation and the underlying molecular regulatory pathways.

  6. Heat shock transcription factor 1 protects against pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis via Smad3.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Ye, Yong; Wang, Xingxu; Ma, Ben; Wu, Jian; Li, Lei; Wang, Lin; Wang, Dao Wen; Zou, Yunzeng

    2017-04-01

    Fibrotic cardiac muscle exhibits high stiffness and low compliance which are major risk factors of heart failure. Although heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) was identified as an intrinsic cardioprotective factor, the role that HSF1 plays in cardiac fibrosis remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the role of HSF1 in pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis and the underlying mechanism. HSF1 phosphorylation was significantly downregulated in transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-treated mouse hearts and mechanically stretched cardiac fibroblasts (cFBs). HSF1 transgenic (TG) mice, HSF1 deficient heterozygote (KO) mice, and their wild-type littermates were subjected to sham or TAC surgery for 4 weeks. HSF1 overexpression significantly attenuated pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis and dysfunction. Conversely, HSF1 KO mice showed deteriorated fibrotic response and cardiac dysfunction upon TAC. Moreover, we uncovered that overexpression of HSF1 protected against fibrotic response of cFBs to pressure overload. Mechanistically, we observed that the phosphorylation and the nuclear distribution of the Smad family member 3 (Smad3) were significantly decreased in HSF1-overexpressing mouse hearts, while being greatly increased in HSF1 KO mouse hearts upon TAC, compared to the control hearts, respectively. Similar alteration of Smad3 phosphorylation and nuclear distribution were found in isolated mouse cardiac fibroblasts and mechanically stretched cFBs. Constitutively active Smad3 blocked the anti-fibrotic effect of HSF1 in cFBs. Furthermore, we found a direct binding of phosphorylated HSF1 and Smad3, which can be suppressed by mechanical stress. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that HSF1 acts as a novel negative regulator of cardiac fibrosis by blocking Smad3 activation. HSF1 activity is decreased in fibrotic hearts. HSF1 overexpression attenuates pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis and dysfunction. Deficiency of

  7. Factors influencing attendance at cardiac rehabilitation among coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Farley, Robyn L; Wade, Tracey D; Birchmore, Libby

    2003-09-01

    The current study examined predictors of, and reasons for, non-attendance at cardiac rehabilitation (CR) among coronary heart disease patients. Measures of demographics, surgical procedures, cardiac risk factors, cardiac damage, and psychological variables (depression, trauma, anxiety and alexithymia) were obtained at baseline in 85 coronary heart disease patients, of whom 34 (40%) attended CR. Patients not attending CR reported reasons for their non-attendance. Men who had a sedentary lifestyle or were obese were significantly more likely to attend CR. Women were significantly more likely to attend CR if they had a partner. Patients reported numerous personal reasons for their non-attendance, some of which reflect a dislike of a group format. The results suggest the presence of obstacles to attendance and completion of CR that may differ for men and women. Innovative approaches are needed to encourage participation, including the development and evaluation of alternative formats of CR.

  8. [Cardiac factors predictive of 10-year survival after coronary surgery].

    PubMed

    Fournial, G; Fourcade, J; Roux, D; Garcia, O; Sauer, M; Glock, Y

    1999-07-01

    Although the predictive factors of postoperative mortality after coronary artery surgery are well known, those predictive of long-term survival have received less attention. This study reviews the outcome of a group of 480 patients between 50 and 65 years of age, operated between 1984 and 1986. The patients were classified in two groups according to the presence or absence of internal mammary artery bypass grafts: Group I (304 patients with saphenous vein bypass grafts alone) and group II (176 patients with an internal mammary artery +/- saphenous vein bypass grafts). The long-term results were assessed according to 3 criteria: isolated cardiac mortality: cardiac mortality associated with a repeat revascularisation procedure and cardiac mortality associated with reoperation or recurrence of angina. Cardiac survival at 10 years was significantly better after internal mammary-LAD bypass: 91.4% (CI 87.1-95.1) than after saphenous vein bypass grafting alone: 79.6% (CI 74.8-84.4) (p = 0.012). Univariate analysis identified the following poor predictive factors: three vessel disease (p = 0.03), preoperative left ventricular dysfunction with an ejection fraction inferior to 45% (p = 0.0001), incomplete revascularisation (p = 0.0003), use of venous bypass graft alone (p < 0.014) and perioperative infarction (p = 0.0254). For each criterion of survival (cardiac isolated or associated with a new revascularisation and/or recurrence of angina), multivariate analysis identified three independent predictive factors of long-term extramortality: not using internal mammary artery-LAD bypass graft, incomplete revascularisation and preoperative hypertension. This study confirms the beneficial effects of internal mammary-LAD artery grafting on long-term survival after coronary artery surgery, and also demonstrates the prejudicial effects of hypertension.

  9. A Novel Risk Score to Predict Dysphagia After Cardiac Surgery Procedures.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Joshua C; Magruder, J Trent; Ohkuma, Rika; Dungan, Samuel P; Hayes, Andrea; Vose, Alicia K; Orlando, Megan; Sussman, Marc S; Cameron, Duke E; Whitman, Glenn J R

    2015-08-01

    Although the exact cause of dysphagia after cardiac operations is unknown, timely diagnosis is critical to avoid a devastating aspiration event. Accordingly, we sought to generate the risk of dysphagia in cardiac surgery (RODICS) score to identify patients at risk for its development after heart surgery. All adult heart surgery patients at our institution between January 2011 and March 2012 were analyzed. A videofluoroscopic swallow study stratified patients into two groups based on the presence or absence of dysphagia. Covariates (p < 0.20) were included in a multivariable model to determine the strongest independent predictors of postoperative dysphagia. Based on the relative odds ratios of significant variables, the RODICS score was generated. Risk cohorts were then created based on easily applicable, whole-integer score cutoffs. During the study period, 115 of 1,314 patients (8.8%) undergoing heart surgery were diagnosed with clinically significant dysphagia. The 38-point RODICS score comprises seven patient-specific characteristics and perioperative factors. The low risk (less than 4), intermediate risk (5 to 9), and high risk (more than 9) cohorts had postoperative dysphagia rates of 3.0%, 6.8%, and 21.6%, respectively (p < 0.001). The intermediate-risk cohort (odds ratio 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.33 to 4.27, p = 0.01) and high-risk cohort (odds ratio 8.9, 95% confidence interval: 5.22 to 15.32, p < 0.001) were at significantly higher risk of dysphagia developing. The RODICS score demonstrated excellent discriminatory ability (area under the curve 0.75). The incidence and impact of dysphagia after open cardiac operations is significant. This novel scoring system could lead to prompt identification of patients at high risk for postoperative dysphagia and potentially minimize the complications of aspiration. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, independent of insulin use, is associated with an increased risk of cardiac complications after vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Bakker, E J; Valentijn, T M; van de Luijtgaarden, K M; Hoeks, S E; Voute, M T; Goncalves, F B; Verhagen, H J; Stolker, R J

    2013-09-01

    Previous reports on the prognostic value of diabetes mellitus for cardiac complications after vascular surgery show divergent results, especially in regards to the role of type 2 diabetes as a cardiac risk factor, which remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of type 2 diabetes on 30-day cardiac complications after vascular surgery. Patients undergoing elective vascular surgery between 2002 and 2011 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Previous diagnosis of type 1 and 2 diabetes and use of oral glucose-lowering medications and insulin were recorded. Patients with type 1 diabetes were excluded from the analysis. The main outcome parameter was cardiac complications, a composite of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, severe arrhythmia and asymptomatic troponin release within 30 days of surgery. In multivariate analysis, corrections were made for comorbidities, demographics, medication use and surgical risk. Of 1462 patients, 329 (22.5%) patients had type 2 diabetes. Cardiac complications occurred in 155 (13.7%) patients without diabetes and in 68 (20.7%) with type 2 diabetes. In multivariate analysis, type 2 diabetes was associated with a significantly increased risk of 30-day cardiac complications (odds ratio 1.80; 95% confidence interval 1.25 to 2.60). Results were similar for type 2 diabetes patients managed with (odds ratio 1.84; 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 3.37) and without (odds ratio 1.79; 95% confidence interval 1.19 to 2.70) insulin. Type 2 diabetes is an independent risk factor for cardiac complications after vascular surgery and should be treated as such in preoperative cardiac risk stratification.

  11. Who Is at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Automated External Defibrillator Coronary Heart Disease Heart Failure Long QT Syndrome Send a link ... Factor The major risk factor for SCA is coronary heart disease . Most people who have SCA have some degree ...

  12. Determination of cardiac risk by dipyridamole-thallium imaging before peripheral vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, C.A.; Brewster, D.C.; Darling, R.C.; Okada, R.D.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1985-02-14

    To evaluate the severity of coronary artery disease in patients with severe peripheral vascular disease requiring surgery, preoperative dipyridamole-thallium imaging was performed in 54 stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Of the 54 patients, 48 had peripheral vascular surgery as scheduled without coronary angiography, of whom 8 (17 per cent) had postoperative cardiac ischemic events. The occurrence of these eight cardiac events could not have been predicted preoperatively by any clinical factors but did correlate with the presence of thallium redistribution. Eight of 16 patients with thallium redistribution had cardiac events, whereas there were no such events in 32 patients whose thallium scan either was normal or showed only persistent defects (P less than 0.0001). Six other patients also had thallium redistribution but underwent coronary angiography before vascular surgery. All had severe multivessel coronary artery disease, and four underwent coronary bypass surgery followed by uncomplicated peripheral vascular surgery. These data suggest that patients without thallium redistribution are at a low risk for postoperative ischemic events and may proceed to have vascular surgery. Patients with redistribution have a high incidence of postoperative ischemic events and should be considered for preoperative coronary angiography and myocardial revascularization in an effort to avoid postoperative myocardial ischemia and to improve survival. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging is superior to clinical assessment and is safer and less expensive than coronary angiography for the determination of cardiac risk.

  13. Induction of diverse cardiac cell types by reprogramming fibroblasts with cardiac transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Young-Jae; Lubczyk, Christina; Bhakta, Minoti; Zang, Tong; Fernandez-Perez, Antonio; McAnally, John; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Munshi, Nikhil V.

    2014-01-01

    Various combinations of cardiogenic transcription factors, including Gata4 (G), Hand2 (H), Mef2c (M) and Tbx5 (T), can reprogram fibroblasts into induced cardiac-like myocytes (iCLMs) in vitro and in vivo. Given that optimal cardiac function relies on distinct yet functionally interconnected atrial, ventricular and pacemaker (PM) cardiomyocytes (CMs), it remains to be seen which subtypes are generated by direct reprogramming and whether this process can be harnessed to produce a specific CM of interest. Here, we employ a PM-specific Hcn4-GFP reporter mouse and a spectrum of CM subtype-specific markers to investigate the range of cellular phenotypes generated by reprogramming of primary fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, we find that a combination of four transcription factors (4F) optimized for Hcn4-GFP expression does not generate beating PM cells due to inadequate sarcomeric protein expression and organization. However, applying strict single-cell criteria to GHMT-reprogrammed cells, we observe induction of diverse cellular phenotypes, including those resembling immature forms of all three major cardiac subtypes (i.e. atrial, ventricular and pacemaker). In addition, we demonstrate that cells induced by GHMT are directly reprogrammed and do not arise from an Nxk2.5+ progenitor cell intermediate. Taken together, our results suggest a remarkable degree of plasticity inherent to GHMT reprogramming and provide a starting point for optimization of CM subtype-specific reprogramming protocols. PMID:25344074

  14. Cardiac risks associated with antibiotics: azithromycin and levofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiqiang Kevin; Yuan, Jing; Li, Minghui; Sutton, S Scott; Rao, Gowtham A; Jacob, Sony; Bennett, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Azithromycin and levofloxacin have been shown to be efficacious in treating infections. The adverse drug events associated with azithromycin and levofloxacin were considered rare. However, the US FDA released warnings regarding the possible risk of QT prolongation with azithromycin and levofloxacin. Areas covered Case reports/case series, observational studies and clinical trials assessing cardiovascular risks associated with azithromycin and levofloxacin were critically reviewed, including 15 case reports/series, 5 observational studies and 5 clinical trials that investigated the cardiac risks associated azithromycin and levofloxacin. Expert opinion Results are discordant. Two retrospective studies utilizing large databases demonstrated an increased risk of cardiovascular death with azithromycin, when azithromycin was compared with amoxicillin. Two other retrospective studies found no difference in cardiovascular death associated with azithromycin and other antibiotics. For levofloxacin, the increased risk of cardiovascular death was only found in one retrospective study. Therefore, the risks and benefits of antibacterial therapies should be considered when making prescription decisions. This study should not preclude clinicians from avoiding azithromycin and levofloxacin. If a patient has an indication to receive an antibiotic and if azithromycin or levofloxacin is needed, it may be used, but the potential risks must be understood. PMID:25494485

  15. Obesity related risk of sudden cardiac death in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study

    PubMed Central

    Adabag, Selcuk; Huxley, Rachel R; Lopez, Faye L; Chen, Lin Y; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Siscovick, David; Deo, Rajat; Konety, Suma; Alonso, Alvaro; Folsom, Aaron R

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist hip ratio (WHR) with sudden cardiac death (SCD) in community dwelling individuals. Methods Data from a multicentre, prospective, cohort study of 14 941 men and women (African American, and white), aged 45–64 years, participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study was analysed. Obesity measures were assessed at baseline (1987–1989). SCD was adjudicated by a committee. Results At enrolment mean±SD age of the participants was 54±6 years (55% female; 26% African American). During 12.6±2.5 years of follow-up, 253 SCD occurred (incidence rate 1.34/100 person-years). The association between obesity and SCD differed by smoking status (interaction p≤0.01). In models adjusting for age, sex, race, study centre and education level, SCD risk was positively associated (p<0.001) with BMI, WC and WHR in non-smokers, but not in smokers. WHR was more strongly associated with SCD in non-smokers than was BMI or WC (HR per SD increment (95% CI) 2.00 (1.65 to 2.42); 1.34 (1.15 to 1.56) and 1.49 (1.28 to 1.74), respectively). After adjustment for potential mediators (hypertension, diabetes, lipid profile, prevalent coronary heart disease, heart failure, and LV hypertrophy), non-smokers in the highest WHR category (>0.95 in women; >1.01 in men) had double the risk of SCD (HR 2.03, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.46; incidence rate 1.43/1000 person-years) versus those with normal WHR. Conclusions General obesity is associated with increased risk of SCD in middle-aged, non-smoking individuals, mediated by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Central obesity, however, is independently associated with SCD by pathways that remain to be elucidated. PMID:25410499

  16. Transthyretin Ile 122: Gene frequency and risk of cardiac amyloidosis in African Americans

    SciTech Connect

    Buxbaum, J. |; Pastore, R.; Yaghoubian, R.

    1994-09-01

    Point mutations in the protein transthyretin (TTR) cause familial amyloidosis involving mainly the heart and peripheral nerves. To determine the TTR Ile 122 gene frequency in African Americans, the allele encoding TTR Ile 122 was identified by PCR-Primer Introduced Restriction Analysis of TTR exon 4 and FokI digestion on 1659 control DNA samples from 1659 African Americans: 64 were heterozygous and one homozygous (allele frequency .02). To determine the risk to gene carriers of developing cardiac amyloidosis, immunohistochemical and genetic studies were performed on amyloid-containing samples identified among 52,370 autopsy samples examined over 32 years. In autopsy samples from patients over age 60, isolated cardiac amyloidosis was more common in African Americans (1.6%) than in White Americans (.40%), suggesting a genetic risk factor. All 29 samples from African Americans were immunohistochemically TTR-positive, and 5 were heterozygous for the TTR Ile 122 allele (17%), as compared with 5/108 heterozygotes (4.6%) among age-matched (over age 60) African American controls without amyloidosis from the same autopsy study (one-tailed P value < .03). Among the 29 amyloid-positive samples were 16 with 1+ or 2+ deposition and 13 with 3+ or 4+ deposition. All 5 TTR Ile 122 heterozygotes had 3+ or 4+ deposition. None of 15 samples from White Americans with cardiac amyloidosis was TTR Ile 122-positive. Extrapolating from the 5/29 samples from which we were able to obtain genetic data, we estimate that 9/54 samples containing cardiac amyloid were TTR Ile 122 heterozygotes. We conclude that heterozygosity for TTR Ile 122 is associated with a greater frequency (relative risk 5.8) and greater severity of cardiac amyloid deposition than in non-carriers of the TTR Ile 122 gene. Of over 40 TTR point mutations associated with amyloidosis described to date, TTR Ile 122 appears to be the most common worldwide and to have the lowest penetrance in causing disease.

  17. A single exposure to particulate or gaseous air pollution increases the risk of aconitine-induced cardiac arrythmia in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electrical dysfunction. In this study, ...

  18. A single exposure to particulate or gaseous air pollution increases the risk of aconitine-induced cardiac arrythmia in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electrical dysfunction. In this study, ...

  19. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 is a positive regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi; Deng, Ke-Qiong; Luo, Yuxuan; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Gao, Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Guang-Nian; Zhu, Xueyong; Li, Hongliang

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a common early symptom of heart failure, is regulated by numerous signaling pathways. Here, we identified tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3), an adaptor protein in tumor necrosis factor-related signaling cascades, as a key regulator of cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 expression was upregulated in hypertrophied mice hearts and failing human hearts. Four weeks after aortic banding, cardiac-specific conditional TRAF3-knockout mice exhibited significantly reduced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction. Conversely, transgenic mice overexpressing TRAF3 in the heart developed exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 also promoted an angiotensin II- or phenylephrine-induced hypertrophic response in isolated cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, TRAF3 directly bound to TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), causing increased TBK1 phosphorylation in response to hypertrophic stimuli. This interaction between TRAF3 and TBK1 further activated AKT signaling, which ultimately promoted the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Our findings not only reveal a key role of TRAF3 in regulating the hypertrophic response but also uncover TRAF3-TBK1-AKT as a novel signaling pathway in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This pathway may represent a potential therapeutic target for this pathological process.

  20. Risk factors for surgical infections.

    PubMed

    Dominioni, Lorenzo; Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Rovera, Francesca

    2006-01-01

    Many risk factors for postoperative infections have been identified that can be used individually or in combination as scoring indices. Infection risk scores can be applied in clinical practice to identify high-risk surgical patients, to indicate the need to implement risk-reduction strategies, and to stratify risk for comparison of outcome among different patient series. In the hierarchy of patient-related risk factors, serum albumin concentration and advanced age rank at the top of the list. Among the treatment-related factors, the quality of the surgical technique is a most important determinant, although most surgical site infections are attributable to patient-related risk factors rather than to flawed surgical care. Scoring systems can identify the patients at highest risk, thus prompting the implementation of therapy to improve modifiable conditions, but most clinicians outside the academic and research setting do not use them. Risk assessment also can be performed by expert clinical judgment. Discussion with the patient and informed consent are essential. Carefully collected scores of patient risk factors may be valuable to document the relations between the risk and the outcome of surgery. Ideally, each institution should select a validated scoring system to audit postoperative infectious morbidity and surgical performance in the various specialties.

  1. Effects of regulatory factors on engineered cardiac tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingyu; Park, Hyoungshin; Engelmayr, George C; Moretti, Matteo; Freed, Lisa E

    2007-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that supplemental regulatory factors can improve the contractile properties and viability of cardiac tissue constructs cultured in vitro. Neonatal rat heart cells were cultured on porous collagen sponges for up to 8 days in basal medium or medium supplemented with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF), insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS), platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF), or angiopoietin-1 (ANG). IGF and ITS enhanced contractile properties of the 8-day constructs significantly more than with unsupplemented controls according to contractile amplitude and excitation threshold, and IGF also significantly increased the amount of cardiac troponin-I and enhanced cell viability according to different assays (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL)). PDGF significantly increased the contractile amplitude of 4-day constructs and enhanced cell viability according to MTT, LDH, and TUNEL; ANG enhanced cell viability according to the LDH assay. Our results demonstrate that supplemental regulatory molecules can differentially enhance properties of cardiac tissue constructs and imply that these constructs can provide a platform for systematic in vitro studies of the effects of complex stimuli that occur in vivo to improve our basic understanding of cardiogenesis and identify underlying mechanisms that can potentially be exploited to enhance myocardial regeneration.

  2. Growth Differentiation Factor 11 is a Circulating Factor that Reverses Age-Related Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Loffredo, Francesco S.; Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Jay, Steven M.; Gannon, Joseph; Pancoast, James R.; Yalamanchi, Pratyusha; Sinha, Manisha; Dall’Osso, Claudia; Khong, Danika; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Miller, Christine M.; Singer, Britta S.; Stewart, Alex; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Gerszten, Robert E.; Hartigan, Adam J.; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Serwold, Thomas; Wagers, Amy J.; Lee, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The most common form of heart failure occurs with normal systolic function and often involves cardiac hypertrophy in the elderly. To clarify the biological mechanisms that drive cardiac hypertrophy in aging, we tested the influence of circulating factors using heterochronic parabiosis, a surgical technique in which joining of animals of different ages leads to a shared circulation. After 4 weeks of exposure to the circulation of young mice, cardiac hypertrophy in old mice dramatically regressed, accompanied by reduced cardiomyocyte size and molecular remodeling. Reversal of age-related hypertrophy was not attributable to hemodynamic or behavioral effects of parabiosis, implicating a blood-borne factor. Using modified aptamer-based proteomics, we identified the TGFβ superfamily member GDF11 as a circulating factor in young mice that declines with age. Treatment of old mice to restore GDF11 to youthful levels recapitulated the effects of parabiosis and reversed age-related hypertrophy, revealing a new therapeutic opportunity for cardiac aging. PMID:23663781

  3. Stroke - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... a higher risk. Diseases such as cancer, chronic kidney disease, and some types of arthritis. Weak areas in an artery wall or abnormal arteries and veins . Pregnancy. Both during and in the weeks right after ...

  4. Identification of high-risk communities for unattended out-of-hospital cardiac arrests using GIS.

    PubMed

    Semple, Hugh M; Cudnik, Michael T; Sayre, Michael; Keseg, David; Warden, Craig R; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-04-01

    Improving survival rates for out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as priority in US cities. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is necessary to locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and target these for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes a GIS-based methodology that was used to identify communities with high risk for cardiac arrests in Franklin County, Ohio during the period 2004-2009. Prior work in this area used a single criterion, i.e., the density of OHCA events, to define the high-risk areas, and a single analytical technique, i.e., kernel density analysis, to identify the high-risk communities. In this paper, two criteria are used to identify the high-risk communities, the rate of OHCA incidents and the level of bystander CPR participation. We also used Local Moran's I combined with traditional map overlay techniques to add robustness to the methodology for identifying high-risk communities for OHCA. Based on the criteria established for this study, we successfully identified several communities that were at higher risk for OHCA than neighboring communities. These communities had incidence rates of OHCA that were significantly higher than neighboring communities and bystander rates that were significantly lower than neighboring communities. Other risk factors for OHCA were also high in the selected communities. The methodology employed in this study provides for a measurement conceptualization of OHCA clusters that is much broader than what has been previously offered. It is also statistically reliable and can be easily executed using a GIS.

  5. Environmental risk factors for heart disease.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Conklin, Daniel J; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we discuss current evidence linking environmental pollutants to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Extensive evidence indicates that environmental factors contribute to CVD risk, incidence, and severity. Migrant studies show that changes in the environment could substantially alter CVD risk in a genetically stable population. Additionally, CVD risk is affected by changes in nutritional and lifestyle choices. Recent studies in the field of environmental cardiology suggest that environmental toxins also influence CVD. Exposure to tobacco smoke is paradigmatic of such environmental risk and is strongly and positively associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In animal models of exposure, tobacco smoke induces endothelial dysfunction and prothrombotic responses and exacerbates atherogenesis and myocardial ischemic injury. Similar mechanism may be engaged by other pollutants or food constituents. Several large population-based studies indicate that exposure to fine or ultrafine particulate air pollution increases CVD morbidity and mortality, and the plausibility of this association is supported by data from animal studies. Exposure to other chemicals such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and metals has also been reported to elevate CVD risk by affecting atherogenesis, thrombosis, or blood pressure regulation. Maternal exposure to drugs, toxins, and infection has been linked with cardiac birth defects and premature CVD in later life. Collectively, the data support the notion that chronic environmental stress is an important determinant of CVD risk. Further work is required to assess the magnitude of this risk fully and to delineate specific mechanisms by which environmental toxins affect CVD.

  6. Metabolic syndrome and the risk of sudden cardiac death in middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Kurl, Sudhir; Laaksonen, David E; Jae, Sae Young; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Zaccardi, Francesco; Kauhanen, Jussi; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Laukkanen, Jari A

    2016-01-15

    Little is known about the relationship between metabolic syndrome and sudden cardiac death (SCD). We examined the association of metabolic syndrome, as defined by World Health Organization (WHO), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and American Heart Association (AHA)--IDF interim criteria, with incident SCD. We also assessed the association of a continuous metabolic risk score with SCD. A total of 1466 middle-aged men participating in a prospective population-based cohort study from eastern Finland with no history of coronary heart disease or diabetes at baseline were included. During the average follow-up of 21 years 85 SCDs occurred. Men with the metabolic syndrome as defined by the WHO, NCEP, IDF and interim criteria had a 2.2-2.6 fold, increased risk for SCD, after adjusting for lifestyle and traditional cardiovascular risk factors not included in the metabolic syndrome definition (P<0.001-0.011). A one-standard deviation increase in the metabolic risk score (composed of the sum of Z-scores for waist circumference, insulin, glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure) was associated with a 1.68-fold higher (95% CI 1.33-2.11) risk of SCD. Even when adjusting further for systolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol and body mass index, the association remained significant for the interim criteria and the metabolic risk score, but not for WHO, NCEP, or IDF definitions. Men with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk for SCD. Incident SCD associated with the IDF/AHA interim criteria and metabolic risk clustering estimated by a score is not explained by obesity or traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Men with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk for sudden cardiac death. Incident sudden cardiac death associated with metabolic risk clustering estimated by a score in not explained by obesity or traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Prevention of the metabolic

  7. Cardiac-Specific Conversion Factors to Estimate Radiation Effective Dose From Dose-Length Product in Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Trattner, Sigal; Halliburton, Sandra; Thompson, Carla M; Xu, Yanping; Chelliah, Anjali; Jambawalikar, Sachin R; Peng, Boyu; Peters, M Robert; Jacobs, Jill E; Ghesani, Munir; Jang, James J; Al-Khalidi, Hussein; Einstein, Andrew J

    2017-08-16

    This study sought to determine updated conversion factors (k-factors) that would enable accurate estimation of radiation effective dose (ED) for coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and calcium scoring performed on 12 contemporary scanner models and current clinical cardiac protocols and to compare these methods to the standard chest k-factor of 0.014 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1). Accurate estimation of ED from cardiac CT scans is essential to meaningfully compare the benefits and risks of different cardiac imaging strategies and optimize test and protocol selection. Presently, ED from cardiac CT is generally estimated by multiplying a scanner-reported parameter, the dose-length product, by a k-factor which was determined for noncardiac chest CT, using single-slice scanners and a superseded definition of ED. Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor radiation detectors were positioned in organs of anthropomorphic phantoms, which were scanned using all cardiac protocols, 120 clinical protocols in total, on 12 CT scanners representing the spectrum of scanners from 5 manufacturers (GE, Hitachi, Philips, Siemens, Toshiba). Organ doses were determined for each protocol, and ED was calculated as defined in International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Effective doses and scanner-reported dose-length products were used to determine k-factors for each scanner model and protocol. k-Factors averaged 0.026 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1) (95% confidence interval: 0.0258 to 0.0266) and ranged between 0.020 and 0.035 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1). The standard chest k-factor underestimates ED by an average of 46%, ranging from 30% to 60%, depending on scanner, mode, and tube potential. Factors were higher for prospective axial versus retrospective helical scan modes, calcium scoring versus coronary CTA, and higher (100 to 120 kV) versus lower (80 kV) tube potential and varied among scanner models (range of average k-factors: 0.0229 to 0.0277 mSv·mGy(-1)cm(-1)). Cardiac

  8. Denervated Myocardium Is Preferentially Associated With Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy: A Pilot Competing Risks Analysis of Cause-Specific Mortality.

    PubMed

    Fallavollita, James A; Dare, Jonathan D; Carter, Randolph L; Baldwa, Sunil; Canty, John M

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have identified multiple risk factors that are associated with total cardiac mortality. Nevertheless, identifying specific factors that distinguish patients at risk of arrhythmic death versus heart failure could better target patients likely to benefit from implantable cardiac defibrillators, which have no impact on nonsudden cardiac death. We performed a pilot competing risks analysis of the National Institutes of Health-sponsored PAREPET trial (Prediction of Arrhythmic Events with Positron Emission Tomography). Death from cardiac causes was ascertained in subjects with ischemic cardiomyopathy (n=204) eligible for an implantable cardiac defibrillator for the primary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest after baseline clinical evaluation and imaging at enrollment (positron emission tomography and 2-dimensional echo). Mean age was 67±11 years with an ejection fraction of 27±9%, and 90% were men. During 4.1 years of follow-up, there were 33 sudden cardiac arrests (arrhythmic death or implantable cardiac defibrillator discharge for ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia >240 bpm) and 36 nonsudden cardiac deaths. Sudden cardiac arrest was correlated with a greater volume of denervated myocardium (defect of the positron emission tomography norepinephrine analog (11)C-hydroxyephedrine), lack of angiotensin inhibition therapy, elevated B-type natriuretic peptide, and larger left ventricular end-diastolic volume index. In contrast, nonsudden cardiac death was associated with a higher resting heart rate, older age, elevated creatinine, larger left atrial volume index, and larger left ventricular end-diastolic volume index. Distinct clinical, laboratory, and imaging variables are associated with cause-specific cardiac mortality in primary-prevention candidates with ischemic cardiomyopathy. If prospectively validated, these multivariable associations may help target specific therapies to those at the greatest risk of sudden and nonsudden cardiac

  9. Nasal Methicillin-Resistant S. Aureus is a Major Risk for Mediastinitis in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mediastinitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a serious complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. An outbreak of surgical site infections (SSIs) provided the motivation to implement SSI prevention measures in our institution. Methods: Subjects comprised 174 pediatric patients who underwent open-heart surgery after undergoing preoperative nasal culture screening. The incidence of SSIs and mediastinitis was compared between an early group, who underwent surgery before SSI measures (Group E, n = 73), and a recent group, who underwent surgery after these measures (Group R, n = 101), and factors contributing to the occurrence of mediastinitis were investigated. Results: The incidence of both SSIs and Mediastinitis has significantly decreased after SSI measures. With regard to factors that significantly affected mediastinitis, preoperative factors were “duration of preoperative hospitalization” and “preoperative MRSA colonization,” intraoperative factors were “Aristotle basic complexity score,” “operation time,” “cardiopulmonary bypass circuit volume” and “lowest rectal temperature.” And postoperative factor was “blood transfusion volume.” Patients whose preoperative nasal cultures were MRSA-positive suggested higher risk of MRSA mediastinitis. Conclusions: SSI prevention measures significantly reduced the occurrence of SSIs and mediastinitis. Preoperative MRSA colonization should be a serious risk factor for mediastinitis following pediatric cardiac surgeries. PMID:25641035

  10. Nasal methicillin-resistant S. aureus is a major risk for mediastinitis in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Katayanagi, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mediastinitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a serious complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. An outbreak of surgical site infections (SSIs) provided the motivation to implement SSI prevention measures in our institution. Subjects comprised 174 pediatric patients who underwent open-heart surgery after undergoing preoperative nasal culture screening. The incidence of SSIs and mediastinitis was compared between an early group, who underwent surgery before SSI measures (Group E, n = 73), and a recent group, who underwent surgery after these measures (Group R, n = 101), and factors contributing to the occurrence of mediastinitis were investigated. The incidence of both SSIs and Mediastinitis has significantly decreased after SSI measures. With regard to factors that significantly affected mediastinitis, preoperative factors were "duration of preoperative hospitalization" and "preoperative MRSA colonization," intraoperative factors were "Aristotle basic complexity score," "operation time," "cardiopulmonary bypass circuit volume" and "lowest rectal temperature." And postoperative factor was "blood transfusion volume." Patients whose preoperative nasal cultures were MRSA-positive suggested higher risk of MRSA mediastinitis. SSI prevention measures significantly reduced the occurrence of SSIs and mediastinitis. Preoperative MRSA colonization should be a serious risk factor for mediastinitis following pediatric cardiac surgeries.

  11. Risk factors for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Genco, Robert J; Borgnakke, Wenche S

    2013-06-01

    Risk factors play an important role in an individual's response to periodontal infection. Identification of these risk factors helps to target patients for prevention and treatment, with modification of risk factors critical to the control of periodontal disease. Shifts in our understanding of periodontal disease prevalence, and advances in scientific methodology and statistical analysis in the last few decades, have allowed identification of several major systemic risk factors for periodontal disease. The first change in our thinking was the understanding that periodontal disease is not universal, but that severe forms are found only in a portion of the adult population who show abnormal susceptibility. Analysis of risk factors and the ability to statistically adjust and stratify populations to eliminate the effects of confounding factors have allowed identification of independent risk factors. These independent but modifiable, risk factors for periodontal disease include lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. They also include diseases and unhealthy conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and low dietary calcium and vitamin D. These risk factors are modifiable and their management is a major component of the contemporary care of many periodontal patients. Genetic factors also play a role in periodontal disease and allow one to target individuals for prevention and early detection. The role of genetic factors in aggressive periodontitis is clear. However, although genetic factors (i.e., specific genes) are strongly suspected to have an association with chronic adult periodontitis, there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the general population. It is important to pursue efforts to identify genetic factors associated with chronic periodontitis because such factors have potential in identifying patients who have a high susceptibility for development of this disease. Many of the systemic risk factors

  12. Depression and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death and Arrhythmias: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shaobo; Liu, Tao; Liang, Jinjun; Hu, Dan; Yang, Bo

    Depression is an independent risk factor for cardiac events and mortality in individuals with or without cardiovascular disease (CVD), although the underlying mechanisms involved in sudden cardiac death (SCD) and arrhythmias remain unclear. This meta-analysis aimed to assess the relationship between depression and risk of SCD and arrhythmias. We systematically searched MEDLINE, Elsevier, and PsycINFO databases for articles (January 1990 to June 2015) describing the correlation of depression ("depressive symptoms," "depression," or "depressive disorder") with SCD or arrhythmias (ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation [VT/VF], or atrial fibrillation [AF]). Data were meta-analyzed with random-effects models. A total of 17 studies met the inclusion criteria: 4 of SCD (n = 83,659), 8 of VT/VF (n = 4,048), and 5 of AF (n = 31,247). The total sample consisted of 8,533 individuals with and 110,421 individuals without previous CVD. Depression was associated with increased risk of SCD (hazard risk [HR], 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37-1.92; p < .001), VT/VF (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.23-1.76; p < .001) and AF recurrence (HR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.54-2.30; p < .001). There was no significant association, however, between depression and risk of new-onset AF (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.87-1.04; p = .311). Depression (clinical depression and depressive symptoms) is associated with increased risk of SCD, VT/VF, and AF recurrence. These findings suggest that arrhythmias play an important role in the association between depression and increased mortality in individuals with or without CVD. Systematic evaluation and treatment of depression may contribute to the prevention of lethal cardiac events in the general population and in high-risk individuals with CVD.

  13. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Scar Imaging for Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification in Patients with Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Chattranukulchai, Pairoj

    2015-01-01

    In patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM), risk stratification for sudden cardiac death (SCD) and selection of patients who would benefit from prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillators remains challenging. We aim to discuss the evidence of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial scar for the prediction of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in NICM. From the 15 studies analyzed, with a total of 2747 patients, the average prevalence of myocardial scar was 41%. In patients with myocardial scar, the risk for adverse cardiac events was more than 3-fold higher, and risk for arrhythmic events 5-fold higher, as compared to patients without scar. Based on the available observational, single center studies, CMR scar assessment may be a promising new tool for SCD risk stratification, which merits further investigation. PMID:26175568

  14. Cardiac involvement in primary systemic vasculitis and potential drug therapies to reduce cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Shenoy, Sajjan N

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac involvement is common in primary systemic vasculitides and may be due to direct effect of the disease on the heart or due to therapy. We shall review involvement of the heart in the various forms of primary systemic vasculitis. Among anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV), eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis most commonly involves the heart. Involvement of the heart confers poorer prognosis in AAV, which is also complicated by increased risk of cardiovascular events. Kawasaki's disease (KD) is the most common form of medium-vessel vasculitis to affect the heart, with coronary artery aneurysms being the most common manifestation. These predispose patients with KD to develop premature ischemic heart disease. Takayasu's arteritis is the most common large-vessel vasculitis to involve the heart and can result in aortic incompetence, myocarditis, or coronary heart disease. Involvement of the heart in Behcet's disease is usually in the form of intracardiac mass lesions, thrombosis, or endomyocardial fibrosis. Drugs used in the treatment of systemic vasculitis influence the risk of developing cardiovascular events. Corticosteroid therapy has been shown to increase the risk of myocardial infarction, whereas methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab, and anti-tumor necrosis alpha agents favorably modulate the risk of cardiovascular events, predominantly by dampening systemic inflammation. Awareness of cardiac involvement in vasculitis and accelerated cardiovascular risk in these patients should help clinicians to maximize the modulation of modifiable risk factors for heart disease in these individuals.

  15. Environmental risk factors for autism

    PubMed Central

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Dietert, Janice M.; Dewitt, Jamie C.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a devastating childhood condition that has emerged as an increasing social concern just as it has increased in prevalence in recent decades. Autism and the broader category of autism spectrum disorders are among the increasingly seen examples in which there is a fetal basis for later disease or disorder. Environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors all play a role in determining the risk of autism and some of these effects appear to be transgenerational. Identification of the most critical windows of developmental vulnerability is paramount to understanding when and under what circumstances a child is at elevated risk for autism. No single environmental factor explains the increased prevalence of autism. While a handful of environmental risk factors have been suggested based on data from human studies and animal research, it is clear that many more, and perhaps the most significant risk factors, remain to be identified. The most promising risk factors identified to date fall within the categories of drugs, environmental chemicals, infectious agents, dietary factors, and other physical/psychological stressors. However, the rate at which environmental risk factors for autism have been identified via research and safety testing has not kept pace with the emerging health threat posed by this condition. For the way forward, it seems clear that additional focused research is needed. But more importantly, successful risk reduction strategies for autism will require more extensive and relevant developmental safety testing of drugs and chemicals. PMID:24149029

  16. [Preeclampsia as cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; Bots, Michiel L

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the primary cause of death in women. Guidelines for identifying high-risk individuals have been developed, e.g. the Dutch Guideline on Cardiovascular Risk Management. In the most recent version of this guideline, diabetes mellitus (DM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are cited as cardiovascular risk factors; therefore, individuals with these conditions are identified as being at high risk. As with DM and RA, there is strong evidence that the experience of having a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy is a cardiovascular risk factor. This is particularly the case for early preeclampsia, which constitutes a 7-fold increased risk of ischemic heart disease. However, in the Netherlands, there are no guidelines and there is no consensus on how to screen or treat these women. Trial evidence is therefore urgently needed to substantiate the value of cardiovascular risk management for those women with a history of hypertension during pregnancy.

  17. Children with heart disease: Risk stratification for non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Saettele, Angela K; Christensen, Jacob L; Chilson, Kelly L; Murray, David J

    2016-12-01

    Children with congenital or acquired heart disease have an increased risk of anesthesia related morbidity and mortality. The child's anesthetic risk is related to the severity of their underlying cardiac disease, associated comorbidities, and surgical procedure. The goal of this project was to determine the ease of use of a preoperative risk stratification tool for assigning pediatric cardiac staff and to determine the relative frequency that children with low, moderate, and high risk cardiac disease present for non-cardiac surgery at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A risk-stratification tool was prospectively applied to children with congenital heart disease who presented for non-cardiac surgery. Perioperative. We identified a subset of 100 children with congenital heart disease out of 2200 children who required general anesthesia for surgical or radiological procedures over a 6 week period. A risk stratification tool was utilized to place the patient into low, moderate, or high risk categories to help predict anticipated anesthetic risk. Each grouping specified assignment of staff caring for the patient, clarified preoperative expectations for cardiac assessment, and determined if patient care could be performed at our freestanding ambulatory surgical center. Electronic perioperative records were reviewed to obtain demographic information, the underlying heart disease, prior cardiac surgery, associated conditions, anesthetic management, complications, and provider type. Approximately 4.5% of children presented with cardiac disease over a 6 week period. In 100 consecutive children with cardiac disease, 23 of the children were classified as low risk, 66 patients were classified as moderate risk, and 11 of the patients were classified as high risk. Pediatric cardiac anesthesiologists provided care to all high risk patients. There were no serious adverse events. We found this risk stratification method an effective method to differentiate children into low, moderate

  18. Recombinant factor VIIa in the treatment of postoperative hemorrhage after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Raivio, Peter; Suojaranta-Ylinen, Raili; Kuitunen, Anne H

    2005-07-01

    A generalized coagulation disorder after cardiac surgery that is associated with massive postoperative hemorrhage is not completely understood. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has emerged as a possible "salvage" medication. Limited experience reported in the literature and fears of possible thromboembolic complications make the use of rFVIIa in the treatment of bleeding after cardiac surgery controversial. We analyzed retrospectively all consecutive cardiac surgical patients who have received rFVIIa in the Helsinki University Hospital in order to evaluate the safety and efficacy of rFVIIa after cardiac surgery in our institution. Altogether, 16 patients were identified from operating room and intensive care unit (ICU) databases. Patient records and operating room and ICU databases were reviewed. In this series of high risk patients hospital mortality was high (25%). A definite hemostatic effect was seen after rFVIIa administration in all but three patients (82%). Mean amount of bleeding and amount of platelet and fresh frozen plasma transfusions decreased significantly after rFVIIa administration. Four patients had serious postoperative thromboembolic complications. Recombinant factor VIIa was effective in restoring hemostasis, but thromboembolic complications occurred after rFVIIa use. They may be related to the underlying pathologies and surgery performed. It is possible, however, that rFVIIa treatment contributed to their occurrence.

  19. Predictive factors for bleeding-related re-exploration after cardiac surgery: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Camila T; Brunori, Evelise H Fadini Reis; Santos, Vinicius Batista; Moorhead, Sue A; Lopes, Juliana de Lima; de Barros, Alba L Bottura Leite

    2016-04-01

    Bleeding-related re-exploration is a life-threatening complication after cardiac surgery. Nurses must be aware of important risk factors for this complication so that their assessment, monitoring and evaluation activities can be prioritized, focused and anticipated. To identify the predictive factors for bleeding-related re-exploration after cardiac surgery and to describe the sources of postoperative bleeding. This is a prospective cohort study at a tertiary cardiac school-hospital in São Paulo/SP, Brazil. Adult patients (n=323) submitted to surgical correction of acquired cardiac diseases were included. Potential risk factors for bleeding-related re-exploration within the 24 hours following admission to the intensive care unit were investigated in the patients' charts. A univariate analysis and a multiple analysis through logistic regression were conducted to identify the outcome predictors. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was calculated as a measure of accuracy considering the cut-off points with the highest sensitivity and specificity. The univariate factors significantly associated with bleeding-related re-exploration were a lower preoperative platelet count, a lower number of bypasses in coronary artery bypass surgery and postoperatively, a lower body temperature, infusion of lower intravenous volume, a higher positive end-expiratory pressure during mechanical ventilation and transfusion of blood products. The independent predictors of bleeding-related re-exploration included postoperative red blood cell transfusion, and transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, platelet or cryoprecipitate units. These predictors had a sensitivity of 87.5%, a specificity of 99.28% and an accuracy of 97.93%. Blood product transfusion postoperatively is an independent predictor of bleeding-related re-exploration. Surgical errors prevailed as sources of bleeding. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  20. Hidden Risk Factors for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... previous history of clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and livedo reticularis, a mottled purplish discoloration of the skin. “Risk factors are cumulative,” Dr. Kittner adds. “Reducing even one ...

  1. What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Cancer? Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... those who smoke. Personal or Family History of Lung Cancer If you are a lung cancer survivor, there ...

  2. [Perception of reproductive risk factors].

    PubMed

    Salinas-Martinez, A M; Martínez-Sanchez, C; Pérez-Segura, J

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk perception on several factors related to reproductive health, with the goal of implementing an educational intervention based on detected needs. 405 women between 12 and 44 years were interviewed at home. 62.2% perceived the risk of pregnancy at 17 years and younger; 78.8% the risk of pregnancy at 35 years and older; 76.6% the risk of parity of 5 and higher; and 55.1% the risk of birth interval of 2 years and less. 60.5% recognized family history of birth defects, 80.2% age 35 years and older, and 84.4% rubella during pregnancy, as risk factors for newborns with congenital malformations. 27.7% identified history of a low birth weight and 61.0% birth interval of 1 year and less, as risk factors for low birth weight. The majority perceived the risk of tobacco, alcohol and drugs consumption during pregnancy, diseases with no treatment and deficient nutrition. There was an inconsistent influence of social and obstetric variables on risk perception. No linear correlation was detected. Health educators should recognize differences on knowledge and behavior of future receptors before an educational intervention starts.

  3. [Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tokuhei; Yamada, Masahito

    2010-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly patients. Identification of risk factors for AD would contribute to the understanding of AD pathogenesis and thus, help in the development of preventive methods. Early-onset familial AD is associated with mutations of the genes encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PS-1), or PS-2, resulting in the overproduction of amyloid beta-protein. Epidemiological and case-control studies have led to the identification of several risk factors for sporadic AD. The most concrete genetic risk factor for AD is the epsilon4 allele of apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). In addition, several genes such as CTNNA3, GAB2, PVRL2, TOMM40, and APOC1 are known to be the risk factors that contribute to AD pathogenesis. On the other hand, nongenetic risk factors, such as age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking, depression, head injury, and nutrition have also been reported. Although aging is the strongest risk factor for AD, the mechanisms underlying the development of AD as a result of ageing remain to be elucidated.

  4. Clinical Risk Factors for Portopulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kawut, Steven M.; Krowka, Michael J.; Trotter, James F.; Roberts, Kari E.; Benza, Raymond L.; Badesch, David B.; Taichman, Darren B.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Zacks, Steven; Kaplowitz, Neil; Brown, Robert S.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension affects up to 6% of patients with advanced liver disease, but the predictors and biologic mechanism for the development of this complication are unknown. We sought to determine the clinical risk factors for portopulmonary hypertension in patients with advanced liver disease. We performed a multicenter case-control study nested within a prospective cohort of patients with portal hypertension recruited from tertiary care centers. Cases had a mean pulmonary artery pressure >25 mm Hg, pulmonary vascular resistance >240 dynes · second · cm−5, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mm Hg. Controls had a right ventricular systolic pressure < 40 mm Hg (if estimable) and normal right-sided cardiac morphology by transthoracic echocardiography. The study sample included 34 cases and 141 controls. Female sex was associated with a higher risk of portopulmonary hypertension than male sex (adjusted odds ratio =2.90, 95% confidence interval 1.20-7.01, P = 0.018). Autoimmune hepatitis was associated with an increased risk (adjusted odds ratio = 4.02, 95% confidence interval 1.14-14.23, P = 0.031), and hepatitis C infection was associated with a decreased risk (adjusted odds ratio =0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.09-0.65, P =0.005) of portopulmonary hypertension. The severity of liver disease was not related to the risk of portopulmonary hypertension. Conclusion Female sex and autoimmune hepatitis were associated with an increased risk of portopulmonary hypertension, whereas hepatitis C infection was associated with a decreased risk in patients with advanced liver disease. Hormonal and immunologic factors may therefore be integral to the development of portopulmonary hypertension. PMID:18537192

  5. Hemodynamic and serum cardiac markers and risk of cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    van der Velpen, Isabelle F; Feleus, Stephanie; Bertens, Anne Suzanne; Sabayan, Behnam

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac function is a key player in maintaining energy homeostasis in the brain. Heart failure is closely related to higher risk of neurocognitive disorders. Recent evidence shows that this relationship might not be limited to patients with advanced heart failure, and even suboptimal cardiac functioning is associated with accelerated brain aging. Hence, hemodynamic and serum cardiac markers may provide valuable information about the risk of dementia. We provide an overview on the link between cardiac markers and cognitive function by a systematic search in five databases. Furthermore, we discuss the pathophysiological aspects of this link and highlight the pertinent clinical and public health implications. Increasing evidence supports the associations of hemodynamic and serum cardiac markers with accelerated cognitive decline. Hemodynamic and serum cardiac markers are closely linked with risk of cognitive impairment. This highlights the significance of the heart-brain connection in reducing the burden of dementia. Copyright © 2016 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiac autonomic reactivity and recovery in predicting carotid atherosclerosis: the cardiovascular risk in young Finns study.

    PubMed

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Elovainio, Marko; Pulkki, Laura; Puttonen, Sampsa; Raitakari, Olli; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the association of cardiac autonomic task-induced reactivity and recovery to preclinical atherosclerosis. Thirty-three men and 33 women aged 24-39 years participated in the ongoing epidemiological Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study. The authors measured heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and preejection period (PEP) during the mental arithmetic and speech tasks in 1999. Carotid atherosclerosis was assessed by measuring the thickness of the common carotid artery intima-media complex (IMT) with ultrasound in 2001. Higher HR, RSA, and PEP reactivity were associated with lower IMT values even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors (lipid levels, obesity, and blood pressure). In addition, better HR recovery after the mental arithmetic task was associated with lower IMT values, and this association persisted after all adjustments. Thus, higher task-induced cardiac autonomic reactivity and better HR recovery were related to less preclinical atherosclerosis. The authors concluded that cardiac pattern of reactivity and quick recovery may be associated with better cardiovascular health, and therefore all reactivity occurring in challenging situations should not automatically be considered as potentially pathological.

  7. The Role of Clinical and Geographic Factors in the Use of Hospital versus Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brual, Janette; Gravely, Shannon; Suskin, Neville; Stewart, Donna E.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is most often provided in a hospital setting. Home-based models of care have been developed to overcome geographic, among other, barriers in patients at a lower risk. This study assessed whether clinical and geographic factors were related to the use of either a hospital-based or a home-based program. Secondary analysis…

  8. Cost-effectiveness of In-home Automated External Defibrillators for Individuals at Increased Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Peter; Vijan, Sandeep; Katz, David; Fendrick, A Mark

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE In-home automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are increasingly recommended as a means for improving survival of cardiac arrests that occur at home. The current study was conducted to explore the relationship between individuals' risk of cardiac arrest and cost-effectiveness of in-home AED deployment. DESIGN Markov decision model employing a societal perspective. PATIENTS Four hypothetical cohorts of American adults 60 years of age at progressively greater risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD): 1) all adults (annual probability of SCD 0.4%); 2) adults with multiple SCD risk factors (probability 2%); 3) adults with previous myocardial infarction (probability 4%); and 4) adults with ischemic cardiomyopathy unable to receive an implantable defibrillator (probability 6%). INTERVENTION Strategy 1: individuals suffering an in-home cardiac arrest were treated with emergency medical services equipped with AEDs (EMS-D). Strategy 2: individuals suffering an in-home cardiac arrest received initial treatment with an in-home AED, followed by EMS. RESULTS Assuming cardiac arrest survival rates of 15% with EMS-D and 30% with AEDs, the cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained (QALY) of providing in-home AEDs to all adults 60 years of age is $216,000. Costs of providing in-home AEDs to adults with multiple risk factors (2% probability of SCD), previous myocardial infarction (4% probability), and ischemic cardiomyopathy (6% probability) are $132,000, $104,000, and $88,000, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The cost-effectiveness of in-home AEDs is intimately linked to individuals' risk of SCD. However, providing in-home AEDs to all adults over age 60 appears relatively expensive. PMID:15836529

  9. Predictive factors for red blood cell transfusion in children undergoing noncomplex cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mulaj, Muj; Faraoni, David; Willems, Ariane; Sanchez Torres, Cristel; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequently required in pediatric cardiac surgery and is associated with altered outcome and increased costs. Determining which factors predict transfusion in this context will enable clinicians to adopt strategies that will reduce the risk of RBC transfusion. This study aimed to assess predictive factors associated with RBC transfusion in children undergoing low-risk cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Children undergoing surgery to repair ventricular septal defect or atrioventricular septal defect from 2006 to 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Demography, preoperative laboratory testing, intraoperative data, and RBC transfusion were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to define factors that were able to predict RBC transfusion. Then, we employed receiver operating characteristic analysis to design a predictive score. Among the 334 children included, 261 (78%) were transfused. Age (<18 months), priming volume of the CPB (>43 mL/kg), type of oxygenator used, minimal temperature reached during CPB (<32°C), and preoperative hematocrit (<34%) were independently associated with RBC transfusion in the studied population. A predictive score 2 or greater was the best predictor of RBC transfusion. The present study identified several factors that were significantly associated with perioperative RBC transfusion. Based on these factors, we designed a predictive score that can be used to develop a patient-based blood management program with the aim of reducing the incidence of RBC transfusion. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical pharmacy cardiac risk service for managing patients with coronary artery disease in a health maintenance organization.

    PubMed

    Sandhoff, Brian G; Nies, Leslie K; Olson, Kari L; Nash, James D; Rasmussen, Jon R; Merenich, John A

    2007-01-01

    A clinical pharmacy service for managing the treatment of coronary artery disease in a health maintenance organization is described. Despite the proven benefits of aggressive risk factor modification for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), there remains a treatment gap between consensus- and evidence-based recommendations and their application in patient care. In 1998, Kaiser Permanente of Colorado developed the Clinical Pharmacy Cardiac Risk Service (CPCRS) to focus on the long-term management of patients with CAD to improve clinical outcomes. The primary goals of the CPCRS are to increase the number of CAD patients on lipid-lowering therapy, manage medications shown to decrease the risk of future CAD-related events, assist in the monitoring and control of other diseases that increase cardiovascular risk, provide patient education and recommendations for nonpharmacologic therapy, and act as a CAD information resource for physicians and other health care providers. Using an electronic medical record and tracking database, the service works in close collaboration with primary care physicians, cardiologists, cardiac rehabilitation nurses, and other health care providers to reduce cardiac risk in the CAD population. Particular attention is given to dyslipidemia, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco cessation. Treatment with evidence-based regimens is initiated and adjusted as necessary. Over 11,000 patients are currently being followed by the CPCRS. A clinical pharmacy service in a large health maintenance organization provides cardiac risk reduction for patients with CAD and helps close treatment gaps that may exist for these patients.

  11. Sudden cardiac death and obesity.

    PubMed

    Plourde, Benoit; Sarrazin, Jean-François; Nault, Isabelle; Poirier, Paul

    2014-09-01

    For individuals and the society as a whole, the increased risk of sudden cardiac death in obese patients is becoming a major challenge, especially since obesity prevalence has been increasing steadily around the globe. Traditional risk factors and obesity often coexist. Hypertension, diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome are well-known risk factors for CV disease and are often present in the obese patient. Although the bulk of evidence is circumstantial, sudden cardiac death and obesity share common traditional CV risk factors. Structural, functional and metabolic factors modulate and influence the risk of sudden cardiac death in the obese population. Other risk factors such as left ventricular hypertrophy, increased number of premature ventricular complexes, altered QT interval and reduced heart rate variability are all documented in both obese and sudden cardiac death populations. The present review focuses on out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death and potential mechanisms leading to sudden cardiac death in this population.

  12. Risk score for cardiac surgery in active left-sided infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Carmen; Vilacosta, Isidre; Habib, Gilbert; Maroto, Luis; Fernández, Cristina; López, Javier; Sarriá, Cristina; Salaun, Erwan; Di Stefano, Salvatore; Carnero, Manuel; Hubert, Sandrine; Ferrera, Carlos; Tirado, Gabriela; Freitas-Ferraz, Afonso; Sáez, Carmen; Cobiella, Javier; Bustamante-Munguira, Juan; Sánchez-Enrique, Cristina; García-Granja, Pablo Elpidio; Lavoute, Cecile; Obadia, Benjamin; Vivas, David; Gutiérrez, Ángela; San Román, José Alberto

    2017-09-01

    To develop and validate a calculator to predict the risk of in-hospital mortality in patients with active infective endocarditis (IE) undergoing cardiac surgery. Thousand two hundred and ninety-nine consecutive patients with IE were prospectively recruited (1996-2014) and retrospectively analysed. Left-sided patients who underwent cardiac surgery (n=671) form our study population and were randomised into development (n=424) and validation (n=247) samples. Variables statistically significant to predict in-mortality were integrated in a multivariable prediction model, the Risk-Endocarditis Score (RISK-E). The predictive performance of the score and four existing surgical scores (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) I and II), Prosthesis, Age ≥70, Large Intracardiac Destruction, Staphylococcus, Urgent Surgery, Sex (Female) (PALSUSE), EuroSCORE ≥10) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons's Infective endocarditis score (STS-IE)) were assessed and compared in our cohort. Finally, an external validation of the RISK-E in a separate population was done. Variables included in the final model were age, prosthetic infection, periannular complications, Staphylococcus aureus or fungi infection, acute renal failure, septic shock, cardiogenic shock and thrombocytopaenia. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve in the validation sample was 0.82 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.88). The accuracy of the other surgical scores when compared with the RISK-E was inferior (p=0.010). Our score also obtained a good predictive performance, area under the curve 0.76 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.88), in the external validation. IE-specific factors (microorganisms, periannular complications and sepsis) beside classical variables in heart surgery (age, haemodynamic condition and renal failure) independently predicted perioperative mortality in IE. The RISK-E had better ability to predict surgical mortality in patients with IE when compared with other surgical scores. © Article

  13. Factor analytic reduction of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, David A.

    1989-01-01

    An accepted method for measuring the responsiveness of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex to arterial pressure changes is to artificially stimulate the baroreceptors in the neck. This is accomplished by using a pressurized neck cuff which constricts and distends the carotid artery and subsequently stimulates the baroreceptors. Nine physiological responses to this type of stimulation are quantified and used as indicators of the baroreflex. Thirty male humans between the ages 27 and 46 underwent the carotid-cardiac baroreflex test. The data for the nine response parameters were analyzed by principle component factor analysis. The results of this analysis indicated that 93 percent of the total variance across all nine parameters could be explained in four dimensions. Examination of the factor loadings following an orthogonal rotation of the principle components indicated four well defined dimensions. The first two dimensions reflected location points for R-R interval and carotid distending pressure respectively. The third dimension was composed of measures reflecting the gain of the reflex. The fourth dimension was the ratio of the resting R-R interval to R-R interval during simulated hypertension. The data suggests that the analysis of all nine baroreflex parameters is redundant.

  14. Presepsin (sCD14-ST) Is a Novel Marker for Risk Stratification in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Bomberg, Hagen; Klingele, Matthias; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Spanuth, Eberhard; Volk, Thomas; Sessler, Daniel I; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Groesdonk, Heinrich Volker

    2017-04-01

    Presepsin (soluble cluster-of-differentiation 14 subtype [sCD14-ST]) is a humoral risk stratification marker for systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. It remains unknown whether presepsin can be used to stratify risk in elective cardiac surgery. The authors therefore determined the usefulness of presepsin for risk stratification in patients having elective cardiac surgery. Eight hundred fifty-six cardiac surgical patients were prospectively studied. Preoperative plasma concentrations of presepsin, procalcitonin, N-terminal pro-hormone natriuretic peptide, cystatin C, and the additive European System of Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation 2 were compared to mortality at 30 days (primary outcome), 6 months, and 2 yr. Discrimination was assessed with C statistic. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate univariable and multivariable odds ratios. Thirty-day mortality was 3.2%, 6-month mortality was 6.1%, and 2-yr mortality was 10.4% across the population. Median preoperative presepsin concentrations were significantly greater in 30-day nonsurvivors than in survivors: 842 pg/ml (interquartile range, 306 to 1,246) versus 160 pg/ml (interquartile range, 122 to 234); difference, 167 pg/ml (interquartile range, 92 to 301; P < 0.001). The results were similar for 6-month and 2-yr mortality. Compared to the European System of Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation 2, presepsin concentration provided better discrimination for postoperative mortality at all follow-up periods, including 30 days (C statistic 0.88 vs. 0.74), 6 months (0.87 vs. 0.76), and 2 yr (0.81 vs. 0.74). Presepsin also provided better discrimination than cystatin C, N-terminal pro-hormone natriuretic peptide, or procalcitonin. Elevated presepsin remained an independent risk predictor after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Elevated preoperative plasma presepsin concentration is an independent predictor of postoperative mortality in elective cardiac surgery patients and is a

  15. Plasma Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Maziarz, Marlena; Biggs, Mary L.; Ix, Joachim H.; Zieman, Susan J.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Tracy, Russell P.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Siscovick, David S.; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2013-01-01

    Although fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) may increase risk of diabetes and exert negative cardiac inotropy, it is unknown whether plasma concentrations of FABP4 are associated with incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD). We prospectively analyzed data on 4,560 participants of the Cardiovascular Health Study. FABP4 was measured at baseline using ELISA, and SCD events were adjudicated through review of medical records. We used Cox proportional hazards to estimate effect measures. During a median followup of 11.8 years, 146 SCD cases occurred. In a multivariable model adjusting for demographic, lifestyle, and metabolic factors, relative risk of SCD associated with each higher standard deviation (SD) of plasma FABP4 was 1.15 (95% CI: 0.95–1.38), P = 0.15. In a secondary analysis stratified by prevalent diabetes status, FABP4 was associated with higher risk of SCD in nondiabetic participants, (RR per SD higher FABP4: 1.33 (95% CI: 1.07–1.65), P = 0.009) but not in diabetic participants (RR per SD higher FABP4: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.62–1.27), P = 0.50), P for diabetes-FABP4 interaction 0.049. In summary, a single measure of plasma FABP4 obtained later in life was not associated with the risk of SCD in older adults overall. Confirmation of our post-hoc results in nondiabetic people in other studies is warranted. PMID:24455402

  16. Cardiac risk indices of staff of Federal University Of Technology Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Emerole, C O; Aguwa, E N; Onwasigwe, C N; Nwakoby, B A N

    2007-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases are the major health burden in the industrialized countries and are increasing rapidly in the developing countries owing to demographic transitions and changing lifestyles among the people. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are increasingly becoming a great cause of morbidity and mortality. A total of 100 senior and 141 junior staff in Federal University of Technology, Owerri (FUTO), Imo State, Nigeria was randomly selected for a study on cardiac risk factors. A questionnaire was used to record cardiac risk indices like age, heredity, body mass index (BMI), tobacco smoking, exercise, serum cholesterol estimation, systolic blood pressure and sex. There was no significant difference between the senior and junior staff in sex distribution (P = 0.71), family history of CVD (P = 0.34), smoking habit (P = 0.85) and serum cholesterol (P = 0.89). Senior staff had significantly higher values in age distribution (P < 0.001), presence of systolic hypertension (P<0.001) and overweight (P < 0.001). Senior staff workers, were however, significantly less involved in moderate exercise than junior staff (P < 0.001). The senior staff had a significantly higher total score in CVD risk scoring than junior staff (chi2 = 7.25; P = 0.01). In conclusion, the risk of CVD among staff of FUTO is high especially among the senior staff. Health education campaign targeted at improving life style is strongly recommended.

  17. Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Bungo, Michael W.; Platts, Steven H.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Johnston, Smith L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias (Integrated Cardiovascular) will quantify the extent of long-duration space flightassociated cardiac atrophy (deterioration) on the International Space Station crewmembers.

  18. Cystatin C and Sudden Cardiac Death Risk in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Rajat; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Katz, Ronit; Sarnak, Mark J.; Fried, Linda F.; Chonchol, Michel; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Psaty, Bruce M.; Siscovick, David S.; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated an association between moderate kidney dysfunction and sudden cardiac death in people with cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results The study was a longitudinal analysis among 4465 participants from the Cardiovascular Health Study without prevalent cardiovascular disease at baseline. Cystatin C and creatinine were measured from baseline sera. SCD was defined as a sudden pulseless condition from a cardiac origin in a previously stable individual that occurred out of the hospital or in the emergency room. The association between cystatin C tertiles and SCD was determined with multivariate Cox proportional hazards. A similar analysis compared SCD incidence across creatinine-based eGFR tertiles. Over a median follow-up of 11.2 years, 91 adjudicated SCD events occurred. The annual incidence of SCD events increased across cystatin C tertiles: 10 events per 10,000 person years in tertile 1, 25 events per 10,000 person years in tertile 2 and 32 events per 10,000 person years in the highest cystatin C tertile. These associations persisted after multivariate adjustment: [HR = 2.72, 95% CI (1.44–5.16) in tertile 2 and HR = 2.67, 95% CI (1.33–5.35) in tertile 3]. After multivariate adjustment, the rate of SCD also increased in a linear distribution across creatinine-based eGFR tertiles: 15 events per 10,000 person years in tertile 1, 22 events per 10,000 person years in tertile 2 and 27 events per 10,000 person years in tertile 3. No significant associations, however, remained between creatinine-based eGFR and SCD after multivariable adjustment. Conclusion Impaired kidney function, as measured by cystatin C, has an independent association with SCD risk among elderly persons without clinical cardiovascular disease. PMID:20233980

  19. [Risk factors for arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Madoery, Roberto; Rubin, Graciela; Luquez, Hugo; Luquez, Cecilia; Cravero, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    The risk factors of arterial disease (FREA) predict a future damage over the vascular system of the human body. Its detection are considered a key for the diagnostic as well as for the preventive and even curative strategies. For a long time, scientist considered those factors originated as a consecuence of large studies during the middle of the last century, with current validity up to our days. A simple classification spoke of them as traditionals. Further investigations described the so called new or emergents.factors that where joint together accordingly to their actions: coagulation factors, psicosocial, inflamatories and infectious. A recent classification, taking into account the type of impact, divided them into; causatives, predisposals and conditionals. Also, it was described a mechanism, the oxidative power, with consecuences over the endothelium, in the last part of the process. Before, another mechanism was described: the insulin resistance and the hiperinsulinism, bases for the Metabolic Syndrome, that includes a number of traditional risk factors.

  20. Variants of Folate Metabolism Genes and Risk of Left-Sided Cardiac Defects

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Laura E.; Long, Jin; Garbarini, Jennifer; Paluru, Prasuna; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the most common, serious group of birth defects. Although relatively little is known about the causes of these conditions and there are no established prevention strategies, evidence suggests that the risk of CHD may be related to maternal folate status as well as genetic variants in folate-related genes. Efforts to establish the relationships between these factors and CHD risk have, however, been hampered by a number of factors, including small study sample sizes and phenotypic heterogeneity. Methods The present study examined the relationship between nine genetic variants in eight folate-related genes and a relatively homogeneous group of left-sided cardiac defects in a cohort of 386 case-parent triads. Log-linear analyses were used to assess both maternal and inherited genetic effects. Results Analyses of the study data provided marginal evidence that the maternal MTR A2756G (unadjusted p=0.01) and the inherited BHMT G742A genotypes (unadjusted p=0.06) influence the risk of this subset of CHD. However, neither association achieved significance when the false-discovery rate was controlled at 0.05. Conclusions These results, which are based on the largest study sample and most comprehensive assessment of the relationship between left-sided cardiac defects and folate-related genes reported to date, provide little evidence that this subset of CHD is folate-related. However, even larger studies and more comprehensive evaluations of the folate pathway genes are required to fully explore the relationship between folate and left-sided cardiac defects. PMID:19777601

  1. Risk-taking attitudes and their association with process and outcomes of cardiac care: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    King, Kathryn M; Norris, Colleen M; Knudtson, Merril L; Ghali, William A

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior research reveals that processes and outcomes of cardiac care differ across sociodemographic strata. One potential contributing factor to such differences is the personality traits of individuals within these strata. We examined the association between risk-taking attitudes and cardiac patients' clinical and demographic characteristics, the likelihood of undergoing invasive cardiac procedures and survival. Methods We studied a large inception cohort of patients who underwent cardiac catheterization between July 1998 and December 2001. Detailed clinical and demographic data were collected at time of cardiac catheterization and through a mailed survey one year post-catheterization. The survey included three general risk attitude items from the Jackson Personality Inventory. Patients' (n = 6294) attitudes toward risk were categorized as risk-prone versus non-risk-prone and were assessed for associations with baseline clinical and demographic characteristics, treatment received (i.e., medical therapy, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), and survival (to December 2005). Results 2827 patients (45%) were categorized as risk-prone. Having risk-prone attitudes was associated with younger age (p < .001), male sex (p < .001), current smoking (p < .001) and higher household income (p < .001). Risk-prone patients were more likely to have CABG surgery in unadjusted (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% CI 1.08–1.36) and adjusted (OR = 1.18; 95% CI 1.02–1.36) models, but were no more likely to have PCI or any revascularization. Having risk-prone attitudes was associated with better survival in an unadjusted survival analysis (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 0.78 (95% CI 0.66–0.93), but not in a risk-adjusted analysis (HR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.77–1.10). Conclusion These exploratory findings suggest that patient attitudes toward risk taking may contribute to some of the documented differences in use of invasive cardiac procedures

  2. A cross-sectional multicentre study of cardiac risk score use in the management of unstable angina and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Engel, Josien; van der Wulp, Ineke; de Bruijne, Martine; Wagner, Cordula

    2015-11-24

    Quantitative risk assessment in unstable angina (UA) and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), by using cardiac risk scores, is recommended in international guidelines. However, a gap between recommended care and actual practice exists, as these instruments seem underused in practice. The present study aimed to determine the extent of cardiac risk score use and to study factors associated with lower or higher cardiac risk score use. 13 hospitals throughout the Netherlands. A retrospective chart review of 1788 charts of patients with UA and NSTEMI, discharged in 2012. The extent of cardiac risk score use reflected in a documented risk score outcome in the patient's chart. Factors associated with cardiac risk score use determined by generalised linear mixed models. In 57% (n=1019) of the charts, physicians documented the use of a cardiac risk score. Substantial variation between hospitals was observed (16.7-87%), although this variation could not be explained by the presence of on-site revascularisation facilities or a hospitals' teaching status. Obese patients (OR=1.49; CI 95%1.03 to 2.15) and former smokers (OR=1.56; CI 95%1.15 to 2.11) were more likely to have a cardiac risk score documented. Risk scores were less likely to be used among patients diagnosed with UA (OR=0.60; CI 95% 0.46 to 0.77), in-hospital resuscitation (OR=0.23; CI 95% 0.09 to 0.64), in-hospital heart failure (OR=0.46; CI 95% 0.27 to 0.76) or tachycardia (OR=0.45; CI 95% 0.26 to 0.75). Despite recommendations in cardiac guidelines, the use of cardiac risk scores has not been fully implemented in Dutch practice. A substantial number of patients did not have a cardiac risk score documented in their chart. Strategies to improve cardiac risk score use should pay special attention to patient groups in which risk scores were less often documented, as these patients may currently be undertreated. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  3. Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A.; Korach, K.S. ); Epstein, S. ); Bhattacharyya, M. ); Pounds, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis were reviewed at a conference held at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences 8-9 November 1993. The conference was co-sponsored by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and the NIH Office of Research in Women's Health. The objective of the conference was to review what is known about risk factors for osteoporosis and to identify gaps in the present state of knowledge that might be addressed by future research. The conference was divided into two broad themes. The first session focused on current knowledge regarding etiology, risk factors, and approaches to clinical and laboratory diagnosis. This was followed by three sessions in which various environmental pollutants were discussed. Topics selected for review included environmental agents that interfere with bone and calcium metabolism, such as the toxic metals lead, cadmium, aluminum, and fluoride, natural and antiestrogens, calcium, and vitamin D.

  4. Epileptic Patients are at Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmias: A Novel Approach using QT-nomogram, Tachogram, and Cardiac Restitution Plots

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nimer, Marwan S.; Al-Mahdawi, Sura A.; Abdullah, Namir M.; Al-Mahdawi, Akram

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sudden death is reported in patients who had a history of epilepsy and some authors believed that is due to cardiac arrhythmias. Objectives: This study aimed to predict that the epileptic patients are at risk of serious cardiac arrhythmias by QT-nomogram, tachogram (Lorenz), and cardiac restitution plots. Methods: A total number of 71 healthy subjects (Group I) and 64 newly diagnosed epileptic patients (Group II) were recruited from Al-Yarmouk and Baghdad Teaching hospitals in Baghdad from March 2015 to July 2015 and included in this study. The diagnosis of epilepsy achieved clinically, electroencephalograph record and radio-images including computerized tomography and magnetic image resonance. At the time of entry into the study, an electrocardiography (ECG) was done, and the determinants of each ECG record were calculated. The QT-nomogram, tachogram, and cardiac restitution plots were used to identify the patients at risk of cardiac arrhythmias. Results: Significant prolonged corrected QT corrected (QTc) and JT corrected intervals were observed in female compared with male at age ≥50 years while the TQ interval was significantly prolonged in males of Group II. Eight patients of Group II had a significant pathological prolonged QTc interval compared with undetectable finding in Group I. QT nomogram did not disclose significant findings while the plots of Lorenz and restitution steepness disclose that the patients of Group II were vulnerable to cardiac arrhythmias. Abnormal ECG findings were observed in the age extremities (≤18 years and ≥50 years) in Group II compared with Group I. Conclusion: Utilization of QT-nomogram, restitution steepness, and tachogram plots is useful tools for detection subclinical vulnerable epileptic patient with cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:28149075

  5. Risk factors for eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, H; Nandurkar, S; Royce, S G; Thien, F; Gibson, P R

    2014-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic antigen driven disease, whereby food and/or aeroallergens result in inflammation and luminal narrowing, and the clinical symptoms of dysphagia and food bolus obstruction events (FBOE). Established risk factors are male gender, Caucasian race and atopy. Increased risk amongst family members, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a gene coding thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) on the pseudoautosomal region of the X and Y chromosomes supports a genetic predisposition. Environmental factors including the timing and nature of food and aeroallergen exposure to the developing immune system may be important, whilst esophageal barrier function integrity and the influence of microbiota are worthy of future research.

  6. Exercise cardiac power and the risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular mortality in men.

    PubMed

    Kurl, Sudhir; Mäkikallio, Timo; Jae, Sae Young; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Laukkanen, Jari A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of exercise cardiac power (ECP), defined as a ratio of directly measured maximal oxygen uptake with peak systolic blood pressure during exercise, with the risk of mortality from coronary heart diseases (CHD) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Population-based cohort study with an average follow-up of 25 years from eastern Finland. About 2358 men at baseline participated in exercise stress test and 182 CHD and 302 CVD deaths occurred. Men with low ECP (< 8.7 mL/mmHg, lowest quartile) had a 3.5-fold (95% CI 2.1-5.8, p < 0.0001) risk of CHD mortality as compared with men with high ECP (>16.4 mL/mmHg, highest quartile) after adjusting for age and examination year. Low ECP was associated with a 2.8-fold risk of CHD and 2.4-fold for CVD mortality after additional adjustment for conventional risk factors. After further adjustment for leisure time physical activity, the results hardly changed (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.71-3.67, p < 0.001). ECP provides non-invasive and easily available measure for the prediction of CHD and CVD mortality. One of the most potential explanation for the association between ECP and the risk of CHD and CVD mortality is an elevated afterload and peripheral resistance indicated by hypertension. Key messages Index of exercise cardiac power defined as the ratio of directly measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) with peak systolic blood pressure gives prognostic information in coronary heart disease (CHD) and CVD mortality risk stratification. ECP provides non-invasive and easily available measure for the prediction of CHD and CVD mortality. One of the most potential explanation for the association between ECP and the risk of CHD and CVD mortality is an elevated afterload and peripheral resistance indicated by hypertension.

  7. Cardiac risk factors in descendants of parents with history of coronary artery disease (CAD): an evaluation focusing on small dense low density lipoprotein cholesterol (sdLDLc) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Purohit, Purvi; Gupta, Rashmi

    2013-10-01

    The risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in descendants with positive family history of CAD was evaluated in either one of or both the parents among 71 selected families. Subjects were grouped as parents and descendants without and with CAD and descendants spouses without CAD or family history of CAD. All subjects were examined for anthropometric characteristics, fasting blood sugar, serum lipids, lipoprotein sub-fractions, insulin, insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell function. The results were subjected to statistical analysis by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was prevalent in the 83% descendants with CAD and 54.6% parents with CAD. The traditional risk factors were observed in both parents and descendants with CAD. Metabolic risk factors, including hypertriglyceridemia, low HDLc levels and hyperglycaemia had a higher frequency in the descendants with CAD. ANOVA showed significant 'F' ratio for the anthropometric characteristics, hypertension, serum lipids, small dense (sd) LDLc levels, HDL2c levels and HDL3c levels in the descendants parents with CAD and CAD + diabetes mellitus (DM), as compared to those without CAD. The descendants without CAD, but with a positive family history had central adiposity, hypertension and had lower HDL levels and elevated sdLDLc levels. Multiple analyses of variance showed that sdLDLc and waist circumference were the most potent risk factors for prevalence of CAD. Thus, we conclude that a positive family history of CAD along with central adiposity and elevation of sdLDLc levels appear to be important factors in the assessment of CAD risk in humans.

  8. Update on pharmacological cardiac stress testing: efficacy, risk stratification and patient selection.

    PubMed

    Blankstein, Ron; Cannon, Christopher; Udelson, James

    2014-11-01

    Despite greater control of risk factors and improved treatments, coronary heart disease (CHD) remains a significant cause of mortality with 1 in every 4 deaths in the United States due to this disorder.(1) Cardiac stress tests have long been one of the most often utilized testing modalities used to identify patients suspected of having CHD, specifically coronary artery disease (CAD). These tests allow for noninvasive assessment of the coronary circulation and its ability to augment flow in response to physiologic demand. As with any diagnostic testing however, potential health risks as well as the financial burden of cardiovascular stress testing, must be weighed against the benefits and utility of the data procured. Given the rapidly evolving field of cardiac stress testing with respect to new risk stratification guidelines, new agents, and new assessment methods, it is difficult for physicians to remain up to date on the latest research and the benefits and risks of different testing modalities. A recent survey of primary care physicians and cardiologists conducted by the Elsevier Office of Continuing Medical Education found that approximately one-quarter of the cardiologists and primary care physicians surveyed do not feel confident identifying the factors which should be considered before ordering a cardiac stress test as part of pre-operative screening for a patient. Additionally, this survey also reported that primary care physicians reported a high degree of confidence in ordering the appropriate cardiac screening tests for patients yet, cardiologists reported that they frequently/somewhat frequently felt the need to change the test ordered by the internist. This educational intervention focuses on patient selection, exercise vs. pharmacologic stress testing, pharmacologic agents, and the importance of patient and doctor communication in ensuring the right test is recommended for the right patient. This CME Multimedia Activity is also available through the

  9. Sexual harassment: identifying risk factors.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, E A; O'Donohue, W

    1998-12-01

    A new model of the etiology of sexual harassment, the four-factor model, is presented and compared with several models of sexual harassment including the biological model, the organizational model, the sociocultural model, and the sex role spillover model. A number of risk factors associated with sexually harassing behavior are examined within the framework of the four-factor model of sexual harassment. These include characteristics of the work environment (e.g., sexist attitudes among co-workers, unprofessional work environment, skewed sex ratios in the workplace, knowledge of grievance procedures for sexual harassment incidents) as well as personal characteristics of the subject (e.g., physical attractiveness, job status, sex-role). Subjects were 266 university female faculty, staff, and students who completed the Sexual Experience Questionnaire to assess the experience of sexual harassment and a questionnaire designed to assess the risk factors stated above. Results indicated that the four-factor model is a better predictor of sexual harassment than the alternative models. The risk factors most strongly associated with sexual harassment were an unprofessional environment in the workplace, sexist atmosphere, and lack of knowledge about the organization's formal grievance procedures.

  10. Risk factors for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) originates, in most of the cases (95 %), from a full trisomy of chromosome 21. The remaining cases are due to either mosaicism for chromosome 21 or the inheritance of a structural rearrangement leading to partial trisomy of the majority of its content. Full trisomy 21 and mosaicism are not inherited, but originate from errors in cell divisions during the development of the egg, sperm or embryo. In addition, full trisomy for chromosome 21 should be further divided into cases of maternal origin, the majority, and cases of paternal origin, less than 10 %. Among cases of maternal origin, a further stratification should be performed into errors that have occurred or originated during the first meiotic division in the maternal grandmother's body and errors that occurred later in life during the second maternal meiotic division. This complex scenario suggests that our understanding of the risk factors for trisomy 21 should take into account the above stratification as it reflects different individuals and generations in which the first error has occurred. Unfortunately, most of the available literature is focused on maternal risk factors, and the only certain risk factors for the birth of a child with DS are advanced maternal age at conception and recombination errors, even though the molecular mechanisms leading to chromosome 21 nondisjunction are still a matter of debate. This article critically reviews the hypotheses and the risk factors which have been suggested to contribute to the birth of a child with DS, including folate metabolism, dietary, lifestyle, environmental, occupational, genetic and epigenetic factors, with focus on maternal and paternal risk factors, and taking into account the possible contribution of the maternal grandmother and that of the developing trisomic embryo, in a complex scenario depicting the birth of a child with DS as the result of complex gene-environment interactions and selection processes involving different

  11. Decreased expression of Klotho in cardiac atria biopsy samples from patients at higher risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Corsetti, Giovanni; Pasini, Evasio; Scarabelli, Tiziano M; Romano, Claudia; Agrawal, Pratik R; Chen-Scarabelli, Carol; Knight, Richard; Saravolatz, Louis; Narula, Jagat; Ferrari-Vivaldi, Mario; Flati, Vincenzo; Assanelli, Deodato; Dioguardi, Francesco S

    2016-01-01

    Background Klotho proteins (α- and β) are membrane-based circulating proteins that regulate cell metabolism, as well as the lifespan modulating activity of Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs). Recent data has shown that higher plasma circulating Klotho levels reduce cardiovascular risk, suggesting Klotho has a protective role in cardiovascular diseases. However, although so far it has been identified in various organs, it is unknown whether cardiomyocytes express Klotho and FGFs, and whether high cardiovascular risk could affect cardiac expression of Klotho, FGFs and other molecules. Methods We selected 20 patients with an estimated 10-year high atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and 10 age-matched control subjects with an estimated 10-year low risk undergone cardiac surgery for reasons other than coronary artery by-pass. In myocardial biopsies, we evaluated by immuno-histochemistry whether Klotho and FGFs were expressed in cardiomyocytes, and whether higher cardiovascular risk influenced the expression of other molecules involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Results Only cardiomyocytes of patients with a higher cardiovascular risk showed lower expression of Klotho, but higher expressions of FGFs. Furthermore, higher cardiovascular risk was associated with increased expression of oxidative and endoplasmic reticular stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Conclusions This study showed for the first time that Klotho proteins are expressed in human cardiomyocytes and that cardiac expression of Klotho is down-regulated in higher cardiovascular risk patients, while expression of stress-related molecules were significantly increased. PMID:27781061

  12. Factors Influencing Neurodevelopment after Cardiac Surgery during Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Hövels-Gürich, Hedwig Hubertine

    2016-01-01

    Short- and long-term neurodevelopmental (ND) disabilities with negative impact on psychosocial and academic performance, quality of life, and independence in adulthood are known to be the most common sequelae for surviving children after surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD). This article reviews influences and risk factors for ND impairment. For a long time, the search for independent risk factors was focused on the perioperative period and modalities of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). CPB operations to ensure intraoperative vital organ perfusion and oxygen supply with or without circulatory arrest or regional cerebral perfusion bear specific risks. Examples of such risks are embolization, deep hypothermia, flow rate, hemodilution, blood gas management, postoperative hyperthermia, systemic inflammatory response, and capillary leak syndrome. However, influences of these procedure-specific risk factors on ND outcome have not been found as strong as expected. Furthermore, modifications have not been found to support the effectiveness of the currently used neuroprotective strategies. Postoperative factors, such as need for extracorporal membrane oxygenation or assist device support and duration of hospital stay, significantly influence ND parameters. On the other hand, the so-called “innate,” less modifiable patient-specific risk factors have been found to exert significant influences on ND outcomes. Examples are type and severity of CHD, genetic or syndromic abnormalities, as well as prematurity and low birth weight. Structural and hemodynamic characteristics of different CHDs are assumed to result in impaired brain growth and delayed maturation with respect to the white matter. Beginning in the fetal period, this so-called “encephalopathy of CHD” is suggested a major innate risk factor for pre-, peri-, and postoperative additional hypoxic or ischemic brain injury and subsequent ND impairment. Furthermore, MRI studies on brain volume, structure, and

  13. Prediction of fracture risk. II: Other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ross, P D

    1996-12-01

    Many osteoporotic fractures are probably preventable-by definition, prevention requires identification of those at risk prior to fracture. There is a continuum in fracture risk and a very wide range in risk among individuals. Bone density, previous fractures, and the frequency and types of falls are important risk factors for fractures. There are also many other risk factors for bone loss, falls, and fractures. People with multiple risk factors are at greater risk than those with either a single risk factor or none. Identification of risk factors can help when planning interventions. For example, dietary deficiencies are amenable to dietary modification or supplementation; however, the effects of many risk factors have not been quantified separately, making it difficult to determine the importance. In addition, it is not possible to accurately predict current bone density and fracture risk from risk factors for bone loss; bone density should always be measured directly.

  14. [Risk factors associated to preclampsia].

    PubMed

    López-Carbajal, Mario Joaquín; Manríquez-Moreno, María Esther; Gálvez-Camargo, Daniela; Ramírez-Jiménez, Evelia

    2012-01-01

    preeclampsia constitutes one of the main causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The aim was to identify the risk factors associated to the developmental of preeclampsia mild-moderate and severe, as well as the force of association of these factors in a hospital of second-level medical care. study of cases and controls, a relation 1:1, in women withdrawn of the Service of Gynecology and Obstetrics during 2004 to 2007. Pregnant women with more than 20 weeks gestation were included. In the cases group we included patients with diagnosis of preeclampsia mild-moderate or severe (corroborated clinical and laboratory). In the controls group that had a normal childbirth without pathology during the pregnancy. 42 cases and 42 controls. The average age was of 27 years. The associated risk factors were overweight, obesity, irregular prenatal control, short or long intergenesic period, history of caesarean or preeclampsia in previous pregnancies. the knowledge of the risk factors will allow the accomplishment of preventive measures and decrease the fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality due to preeclampsia.

  15. Cardiac Regeneration using Growth Factors: Advances and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Rebouças, Juliana de Souza; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Formiga, Fabio Rocha

    2016-09-01

    Myocardial infarction is the most significant manifestation of ischemic heart disease and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Novel strategies targeting at regenerating the injured myocardium have been investigated, including gene therapy, cell therapy, and the use of growth factors. Growth factor therapy has aroused interest in cardiovascular medicine because of the regeneration mechanisms induced by these biomolecules, including angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, cardiomyocyte proliferation, stem-cell recruitment, and others. Together, these mechanisms promote myocardial repair and improvement of the cardiac function. This review aims to address the strategic role of growth factor therapy in cardiac regeneration, considering its innovative and multifactorial character in myocardial repair after ischemic injury. Different issues will be discussed, with emphasis on the regeneration mechanisms as a potential therapeutic resource mediated by growth factors, and the challenges to make these proteins therapeutically viable in the field of cardiology and regenerative medicine. Resumo O infarto do miocárdio representa a manifestação mais significativa da cardiopatia isquêmica e está associado a elevada morbimortalidade. Novas estratégias vêm sendo investigadas com o intuito de regenerar o miocárdio lesionado, incluindo a terapia gênica, a terapia celular e a utilização de fatores de crescimento. A terapia com fatores de crescimento despertou interesse em medicina cardiovascular, devido aos mecanismos de regeneração induzidos por essas biomoléculas, incluindo angiogênese, remodelamento da matriz extracelular, proliferação de cardiomiócitos e recrutamento de células-tronco, dentre outros. Em conjunto, tais mecanismos promovem a reparação do miocárdio e a melhora da função cardíaca. Esta revisão pretende abordar o papel estratégico da terapia, com fatores de crescimento, para a regeneração cardíaca, considerando seu car

  16. Activation of Cardiac Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 Causes Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Grabner, Alexander; Amaral, Ansel P.; Schramm, Karla; Singh, Saurav; Sloan, Alexis; Yanucil, Christopher; Li, Jihe; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Hare, Joshua M.; David, Valentin; Martin, Aline; Fornoni, Alessia; Marco, Giovana Seno Di; Kentrup, Dominik; Reuter, Stefan; Mayer, Anna B.; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Stypmann, Jörg; Kuhn, Christian; Hille, Susanne; Frey, Norbert; Leifheit-Nestler, Maren; Richter, Beatrice; Haffner, Dieter; Abraham, Reimar; Bange, Johannes; Sperl, Bianca; Ullrich, Axel; Brand, Marcus; Wolf, Myles; Faul, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health threat that increases risk of death due to cardiovascular complications, including left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Novel therapeutic targets are needed to design treatments to alleviate the cardiovascular burden of CKD. Previously, we demonstrated that circulating concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 23 rise progressively in CKD and induce LVH through an unknown FGF receptor (FGFR)-dependent mechanism. Here, we report that FGF23 exclusively activates FGFR4 on cardiac myocytes to stimulate phospholipase Cγ/calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling. A specific FGFR4 blocking antibody inhibits FGF23-induced hypertrophy of isolated cardiac myocytes and attenuates LVH in rats with CKD. Mice lacking FGFR4 do not develop LVH in response to elevated FGF23, whereas knock-in mice carrying an FGFR4 gain-of-function mutation spontaneously develop LVH. Thus, FGF23 promotes LVH by activating FGFR4, thereby establishing FGFR4 as a pharmacological target for reducing cardiovascular risk in CKD. PMID:26437603

  17. Shared Risk Factors in Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koene, Ryan J.; Prizment, Anna E.; Blaes, Anne; Konety, Suma H.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer are the two leading causes of death worldwide. Although commonly thought of as two separate disease entities, CVD and cancer possess various similarities and possible interactions, including a number of similar risk factors (e.g. obesity, diabetes), suggesting a shared biology for which there is emerging evidence. While chronic inflammation is an indispensible feature of the pathogenesis and progression of both CVD and cancer, additional mechanisms can be found at their intersection. Therapeutic advances, despite improving longevity, have increased the overlap between these diseases, but there are now millions of cancer survivors at risk of developing CVD. Cardiac risk factors have a major impact on subsequent treatment-related cardiotoxicity. In this review, we explore the risk factors common to both CVD and cancer, highlighting the major epidemiologic studies and potential biological mechanisms that account for them. PMID:26976915

  18. Cardiac arrest risk standardization using administrative data compared to registry data

    PubMed Central

    Gaieski, David F.; Donnino, Michael W.; Nelson, Joshua I. M.; Mutter, Eric L.; Carr, Brendan G.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Wiebe, Douglas J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Methods for comparing hospitals regarding cardiac arrest (CA) outcomes, vital for improving resuscitation performance, rely on data collected by cardiac arrest registries. However, most CA patients are treated at hospitals that do not participate in such registries. This study aimed to determine whether CA risk standardization modeling based on administrative data could perform as well as that based on registry data. Methods and results Two risk standardization logistic regression models were developed using 2453 patients treated from 2000–2015 at three hospitals in an academic health system. Registry and administrative data were accessed for all patients. The outcome was death at hospital discharge. The registry model was considered the “gold standard” with which to compare the administrative model, using metrics including comparing areas under the curve, calibration curves, and Bland-Altman plots. The administrative risk standardization model had a c-statistic of 0.891 (95% CI: 0.876–0.905) compared to a registry c-statistic of 0.907 (95% CI: 0.895–0.919). When limited to only non-modifiable factors, the administrative model had a c-statistic of 0.818 (95% CI: 0.799–0.838) compared to a registry c-statistic of 0.810 (95% CI: 0.788–0.831). All models were well-calibrated. There was no significant difference between c-statistics of the models, providing evidence that valid risk standardization can be performed using administrative data. Conclusions Risk standardization using administrative data performs comparably to standardization using registry data. This methodology represents a new tool that can enable opportunities to compare hospital performance in specific hospital systems or across the entire US in terms of survival after CA. PMID:28783754

  19. Neighborhood risk factors for obesity.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Russ P

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this study was to explore neighborhood environmental factors associated with obesity in a sample of adults living in a major U.S. metropolitan area. This was a multi-level study combining data from the U.S. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System with data from the U.S. Census. A total of 15,358 subjects living in 327 zip code tabulation areas were surveyed between 1998 and 2002. The outcome was obesity (BMI >30), and independent variables assessed included individual level variables (age, education, income, smoking status, sex, black race, and Hispanic ethnicity), and zip code level variables (percentage black, percentage Hispanic, percentage with more than a high school education, retail density, establishment density, employment density, population density, the presence of a supermarket, intersection density, median household income, and density of fast food outlets). After controlling for individual level factors, median household income [relative risk (RR) = 0.992; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.990, 0.994], population density (RR = 0.98; 95% CI = 0.972, 0.990), employment density (RR = 1.004; 95% CI = 1.001, 1.009), establishment density (RR = 0.981 95% CI = 0.964, 0.999), and the presence of a supermarket (RR = 0.893; 95% CI = 0.815, 0.978) were associated with obesity risk. Fast food establishment density was poorly associated with obesity risk. Where one lives may affect obesity status. Given the influence of the presence of a supermarket on obesity risk, efforts to address food access might be a priority for reducing obesity.

  20. Device closure of secundum atrial septal defect's and the risk of cardiac erosion.

    PubMed

    Thomson, J D R; Qureshi, S A

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac erosion related to transcatheter atrial septal defect closure devices is of increasing concern. Erosion is reported to have occurred with most of currently available occluder devices. Perhaps due to the very large number of implants worldwide, the Amplatzer (St Jude) occluder is associated with the majority of cardiac erosion events reported in the literature. Best current estimates of the incidence of erosion with the St Jude device are between one and three cases per 1000 implants. Most events occur early after implantation and it is rare, although not unheard of, for events to occur after a year following device insertion. It is important that those involved with closure programmes are vigilant for the problem, because device-related erosion is associated with a significant mortality risk. Despite considerable debate, the risk factors (either patient or device) for erosion remain unclear and require further investigation. Currently available data sets have focussed largely on erosion cohorts and are unable to place these cases in appropriate context with non-erosion closure cases. What is certain is that programmes implanting these devices must take care to implant appropriately sized devices and have in place plans to ensure that patients are both well informed and can access help and advice in the event of developing symptoms.

  1. Noninvasive strategies for the estimation of cardiac risk in stable chest pain patients. The Economics of Noninvasive Diagnosis (END) Study Group.

    PubMed

    Shaw, L J; Hachamovitch, R; Heller, G V; Marwick, T H; Travin, M I; Iskandrian, A E; Kesler, K; Lauer, M S; Hendel, R; Borges-Neto, S; Lewin, H C; Berman, D S; Miller, D

    2000-07-01

    Effective allocation of medical resources in stable chest pain patients requires the accurate diagnosis of coronary artery disease and the stratification of future cardiac risk. We studied the relative predictive value for cardiac death of 3 commonly applied noninvasive strategies, clinical assessment, stress electrocardiography, and myocardial perfusion tomography, in a large, multicenter population of stable angina patients. The multicenter observational series comprised 7 community and academic medical centers and 8,411 stable chest pain patients. All patients underwent pretest clinical screening followed by stress (exercise 84% or pharmacologic 16%) electrocardiography and myocardial perfusion tomography. Risk-adjusted multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed to predict cardiac death. Kaplan-Meier rates of time to cardiac catheterization were also computed. Cardiac mortality was 3% during the 2.5 +/- 1.5 years of follow-up. The number of infarcted vascular territories and pretest clinical risk factors were strong predictors of cardiac mortality, whereas the number of ischemic vascular territories gained increasing importance when determining post-test resource use requirements (i.e., the decision to perform cardiac catheterization). Exertional ST-segment depression in a population with a high frequency of electrocardiographic abnormalities at rest was not a significant differentiator of cardiac death risk. Stable chest pain patients are accurately identified as being at high risk for near-term cardiac events by both physicians' screening clinical evaluation and by the results of stress myocardial perfusion imaging. Disease management strategies for stable chest pain patients aimed at risk reduction should incorporate knowledge of relevant end points in treatment and guideline development.

  2. Risk factors of striae gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Kasielska-Trojan, A; Sobczak, M; Antoszewski, B

    2015-04-01

    Stretch marks are a common skin disorder. Pregnancy-related lesions are defined as striae gravidarum. The root cause of striae formation remains unknown. The aim of this paper was to identify the risk factors associated with striae gravidarum (SG) development. The study was conducted at Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery Clinic and Obstetrics Outpatient Department among 299 Caucasian women maximum 6 months after the delivery, regardless of whether they were primiparas or multiparas. Among the women participating in the study, 71.2% (213 of 299) developed striae gravidarum at least in one site. Logistic regression analysis showed that four of the analysed factors were independent predictors of striae gravidarum occurrence: family history of SG, BMI before pregnancy, the lack of chronic diseases and birthweight (P < 0.0001). It has been found that the presence of striae distensae on the breasts increases the risk of SG development (71.4% vs. 28.6%, P = 0.0008), whereas the presence of these lesions on the thighs decreases the risk (23% vs. 77%, P = 0.0076). In this study, we presented a model that can help to predict the risk of SG formation, including family history of SG, BMI before pregnancy, birthweight and chronic diseases. Moreover, women with stretch marks on their breasts should know that the risk of SG development is significantly higher, whereas lesions on the thighs do not increase such a risk. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  3. Cardiac tissue enriched factors serum response factor and GATA-4 are mutual coregulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belaguli, N. S.; Sepulveda, J. L.; Nigam, V.; Charron, F.; Nemer, M.; Schwartz, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Combinatorial interaction among cardiac tissue-restricted enriched transcription factors may facilitate the expression of cardiac tissue-restricted genes. Here we show that the MADS box factor serum response factor (SRF) cooperates with the zinc finger protein GATA-4 to synergistically activate numerous myogenic and nonmyogenic serum response element (SRE)-dependent promoters in CV1 fibroblasts. In the absence of GATA binding sites, synergistic activation depends on binding of SRF to the proximal CArG box sequence in the cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoter. GATA-4's C-terminal activation domain is obligatory for synergistic coactivation with SRF, and its N-terminal domain and first zinc finger are inhibitory. SRF and GATA-4 physically associate both in vivo and in vitro through their MADS box and the second zinc finger domains as determined by protein A pullout assays and by in vivo one-hybrid transfection assays using Gal4 fusion proteins. Other cardiovascular tissue-restricted GATA factors, such as GATA-5 and GATA-6, were equivalent to GATA-4 in coactivating SRE-dependent targets. Thus, interaction between the MADS box and C4 zinc finger proteins, a novel regulatory paradigm, mediates activation of SRF-dependent gene expression.

  4. Cardiac tissue enriched factors serum response factor and GATA-4 are mutual coregulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belaguli, N. S.; Sepulveda, J. L.; Nigam, V.; Charron, F.; Nemer, M.; Schwartz, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Combinatorial interaction among cardiac tissue-restricted enriched transcription factors may facilitate the expression of cardiac tissue-restricted genes. Here we show that the MADS box factor serum response factor (SRF) cooperates with the zinc finger protein GATA-4 to synergistically activate numerous myogenic and nonmyogenic serum response element (SRE)-dependent promoters in CV1 fibroblasts. In the absence of GATA binding sites, synergistic activation depends on binding of SRF to the proximal CArG box sequence in the cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoter. GATA-4's C-terminal activation domain is obligatory for synergistic coactivation with SRF, and its N-terminal domain and first zinc finger are inhibitory. SRF and GATA-4 physically associate both in vivo and in vitro through their MADS box and the second zinc finger domains as determined by protein A pullout assays and by in vivo one-hybrid transfection assays using Gal4 fusion proteins. Other cardiovascular tissue-restricted GATA factors, such as GATA-5 and GATA-6, were equivalent to GATA-4 in coactivating SRE-dependent targets. Thus, interaction between the MADS box and C4 zinc finger proteins, a novel regulatory paradigm, mediates activation of SRF-dependent gene expression.

  5. Cardiac Arrest in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Incidence, Predisposing Factors, and Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Joundi, Raed A; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Nikneshan, Davar; Tu, Jack V; Fang, Jiming; Holloway, Robert; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest is a devastating complication of acute ischemic stroke, but little is known about its incidence and characteristics. We studied a large ischemic stroke inpatient population and compared patients with and without cardiac arrest. We studied consecutive patients from the Ontario Stroke Registry who had an ischemic stroke between July 2003 and June 2008 at 11 tertiary care stroke centers in Ontario. Multivariable analyses were used to determine independent predictors of cardiac arrest and associated outcomes. Adjusted survival curves were computed, and hazard ratios for mortality at 30 days and 1 year were determined for cardiac arrest and other major outcomes. Among the 9019 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 352 had cardiac arrest, for an overall incidence of 3.9%. In a sensitivity analysis with palliative patients removed, the incidence of cardiac arrest was 2.5%. Independent predictors of cardiac arrest were as follows: older age, greater stroke severity, preadmission dependence, and a history of diabetes, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Systemic complications associated with cardiac arrest were as follows: myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and pneumonia. Patients with cardiac arrest had higher disability at discharge, and a markedly increased 30-day mortality of 82.1% compared with 9.3% without cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest had a high incidence and was associated with poor outcomes after ischemic stroke, including multiple medical complications and very high mortality. Predictors of cardiac arrest identified in this study could help risk stratify ischemic stroke patients for cardiac investigations and prolonged cardiac monitoring. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Frequency of cardiac arrhythmia in patients with liver cirrhoses and evaluation of associated factors].

    PubMed

    Gundling, F; Schmidtler, F; Zelihic, E; Seidl, H; Haller, B; Ronel, J; Löffler, N; Schepp, W

    2012-11-01

    Studies analysing the frequency of rhythm disorders in patients with cirrhosis are rare. Nevertheless, factors triggering rhythm disorders occur frequently in cirrhosis. Therefore, a retrospective case control study was performed investigating the frequency of cardiac arrhythmia in a population of patients with cirrhosis while evaluating several associated factors. The files of patients with cirrhosis (n  =  293) in the period 2004 - 2008 were analysed retrospectively regarding cardiac arrhythmia. The frequency of cardiac arrhythmia in the presence of relevant risk factors was analysed using χ ²tests and logistic regression models. 61.1  % of all patients were male (mean age 61.7 years) and 38.9  % female (mean age 62.8 years). The severity of cirrhosis according to the Child-Pugh score (CP) was as follows: CP A 43.3  %, CP B 32.8  % and CP C 23.9  %. Altogether, rhythm disorders were diagnosed in 16.4  % (48/293) of the study population, most frequently atrial fibrillation (68.8  %) and atrial flutter (6.7  %). An advanced age and comorbidities such as arteriosclerotic diseases, hypercholesterinemia (p  <  0.001, each) and diabetes mellitus (p  =  0.013) correlated significantly with the frequency of rhythm disorders which occurred more often in males than in females (p  = 0.066). Ongoing alcohol abuse, the severity of cirrhosis and arterial hypertension were not associated significantly with the onset of rhythm disorders. 84.4  % of all patients with cardiac arrhythmia were treated by diuretics. Decreased (<  3.5 mmol/L) and elevated (>  5 mmol/L) potassium values were observed in 60.6  % of the study collective. Rhythm disorders were more often observed in patients with hyperkalemia (especially atrioventricular block, p  < 0.01). Compared to the average population, the prevalence of atrial fibrillation was increased in our cirrhotic cohort. The occurrence of rhythm disorders was significantly associated with

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation in the Navy.

    PubMed

    Bruzek-Kohler, C M; Love, V; Hendrickson, R; Branford, M; Gates, A; Telvick, C

    1994-10-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation has been effective in the management and recovery of the post-myocardial infarction population for almost 40 years. During that time, the fundamental components of rehabilitation have changed to reflect a growing complexity and number of cardiac patients. Great Lakes Naval Hospital has instituted a structured outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program. It is based on the needs of a large cardiac population with modifiable risk factors identified through quality improvement studies. Future implications and research in the area of cardiac rehabilitation include measurements of self-efficacy, long-term risk factor modification, cost effectiveness, gender-related differences, or morbidity and mortality.

  8. Factors associated with initiation of medical advanced cardiac life support after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Giolito, Didier; Tosi, Jordan; Le Duff, Franck; Boissier, Nicolas; Mamino, Christophe; Molinatti, Emmanuelle; Ung, Thai Se; Kabsy, Yassine; Fraimout, Nicolas; Contenti, Julie; Levraut, Jacques

    2016-12-01

    Termination of resuscitation rule permits to stop futile resuscitative efforts by paramedics. In a different setting, the decision to withhold resuscitation by emergency physician could be based on different factors. We aimed to identify the factors associated with the initiation of a medical ACLS in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. We prospectively collected the characteristics of all out-of hospital cardiac arrest patients occurring in a French district between March 2010 and December 2013 and managed by the emergency medical system. We analyzed the factors associated with the initiation of medical ACLS. Medical ACLS was initiated in 69 % of the 2690 patients included in the register. ACLS patients were younger (69 years [55-80] vs. 84 years [77-90]) and more frequently men. A higher percentage of witnessed cardiac arrest and BLS were observed. Duration of no-flow was shorter in the ACLS patients, whereas BLS duration was longer. A higher proportion of shockable rhythm and application of AED were found in this group. Mains factors associated with the initiation of medical ACLS were a suspected cardiac cause (1.73 [1.30-2.30]) and use of an automated external defibrillator (1.59 [1.18-2.16]), whereas factors associated with no medical ACLS were higher age (0.93 [0.92-0.94]), absence of BLS (0.62 [0.52-0.73]), asystole (0.31 [0.18-0.51]) and location in nursing home (0.23 [0.11-0.51]). The medical decision to not initiate ACLS in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients seems to rely on a complex combination of validated criteria used for termination of resuscitation and factors resulting from an intuitive perception of the outcome.

  9. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Shahid, N S; Sack, D A; Rahman, M; Alam, A N; Rahman, N

    1988-10-22

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks.

  10. Obesity and related risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, H; Nabaei, B

    2007-03-01

    To study the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Iranian schoolgirls and to identify risk factors which lead to obesity. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2002 and a sample of 1800 female students between 7-12 years old was obtained using a multistage cluster sampling method from Tehran. Height and weight were measured and related socio-economic information was collected. The overall percent of overweight and obesity was 13.3% and 7.7% respectively. BMI (Body Mass Index) was directly and significantly(r=+0.28, P< 0.001) correlated with increasing age. Physical activity was significantly different between obese and non-obese children. (P=0.03) Also, economical factors such as the type of school (private&public) were different in these children. (P=0.03) The statistical analysis of the data revealed a significant and inverse correlation(r=-0.03, P=0.04) between maternal education and occurrence of overweight and obesity in children. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in young Iranian girls was high. Advanced age, lack of physical inactivity, low economical factors and maternal educational status could be risk factors for obesity in children.

  11. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, N. S.; Sack, D. A.; Rahman, M.; Alam, A. N.; Rahman, N.

    1988-01-01

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks. PMID:3142603

  12. Comparison of factor structure models for the Beck Anxiety Inventory among cardiac rehabilitation patients.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jillian M R; Marszalek, Jacob M; Bennett, Kymberley K; Harry, Kadie M; Howarter, Alisha D; Eways, Kalon R; Reed, Karla S

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with cardiovascular disease (CVD) experience greater rates of distress symptoms, such as anxiety and depressive symptoms, than the general population. These psychological outcomes have been linked to greater risk for negative outcomes following a cardiac event; however, research examining the relationship between specific components of anxiety and outcomes in CVD is limited. Further, prior research has not investigated the structure of anxiety symptoms in CVD. This study sought to compare previously established one, two, and four-factor models of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) in individuals enrolled in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Our sample included 208 individuals with CVD recruited during enrollment in a phase II CR program. Participants completed the BAI at enrollment in CR (Time 1) and again 12weeks later at CR completion (Time 2, n=151). Consistent with prior literature, 41% of our sample reported at least mild symptoms of anxiety (BAI>8), and the BAI proved to be a reliable measure within this sample (α=0.89). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) results indicated that a second-order model with four first order factors, consisting of cognitive, autonomic, neuromotor, and panic components, fit our data well. A multi-group CFA approach supported measurement invariance across time. These results suggest that anxiety following CVD can be evaluated based on cognitive, autonomic, neuromotor, and panic components as well as the encompassing anxiety construct. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer? A risk factor is ... may have few or no known risk factors. Risk factors for eye melanoma Race/ethnicity The risk ...

  14. Phobic anxiety and risk of coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac death among women.

    PubMed

    Albert, Christine M; Chae, Claudia U; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Manson, JoAnn E; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2005-02-01

    High levels of phobic anxiety have been associated with elevated risks of coronary heart disease (CHD) death and sudden cardiac death (SCD) among men. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have looked at this association among women. Anxiety may influence CHD mortality by increasing the risk of ventricular arrhythmia and SCD. We prospectively examined the relationship between phobic anxiety, as measured by the Crown-Crisp index (CCI), and CHD among women participating in the Nurses' Health Study. Among 72,359 women with no history of cardiovascular disease or cancer in 1988, 97 SCDs, 267 CHD deaths, and 930 nonfatal myocardial infarctions (MI) were documented over 12 years of follow-up. A higher score on the CCI was associated with an increased risk of SCD and fatal CHD but not of nonfatal MI in age-adjusted (P, trend < or =0.008) and in multivariable models excluding possible biological intermediaries (P, trend < or =0.03). Multivariable adjustment appeared to attenuate the relations; women who scored 4 or greater on the CCI were at a 1.59-fold (95% CI, 0.97 to 2.60) marginally increased risk of SCD and a 1.31-fold (95% CI, 0.97 to 1.75) marginally increased risk of fatal CHD compared with those who scored 0 or 1. After control for possible intermediaries (hypertension, diabetes, and elevated cholesterol), a trend toward an increased risk persisted for SCD (P=0.06). These prospective data suggest that high levels of phobic anxiety are associated with an increased risk of fatal CHD, particularly from SCD. Some but not all of this risk can be accounted for by CHD risk factors associated with phobic anxiety.

  15. Preventing tomorrow's sudden cardiac death today: part II: Translating sudden cardiac death risk assessment strategies into practice and policy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Gillian D; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Berliner, Elise; Bigger, J Thomas; Buxton, Alfred E; Califf, Robert M; Carlson, Mark; Curtis, Anne B; Curtis, Jeptha P; Domanski, Michael; Fain, Eric; Gersh, Bernard J; Gold, Michael R; Goldberger, Jeffrey; Haghighi-Mood, Ali; Hammill, Stephen C; Harder, Joel; Healey, Jeffrey; Hlatky, Mark A; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Lee, Kerry L; Mark, Daniel B; Mitchell, Brent; Phurrough, Steve; Prystowsky, Eric; Smith, Joseph M; Stockbridge, Norman; Temple, Robert

    2007-06-01

    Although current evidence supporting a more precise strategy for identifying patients at highest risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) is sparse, strategies for translating existing and future evidence into clinical practice and policy are needed today. A great many unanswered questions exist. Examples include the following: At what level of risk for SCD should we pursue further testing or therapy? How should clinical strategies ethically and economically balance alternative outcomes? How can we best translate optimal strategies into clinical practice so as to prevent tomorrow's SCDs? On July 20 and 21, 2006, a group of individuals with expertise in clinical cardiovascular medicine, biostatistics, economics, and health policy was joined by government (Food and Drug Administration; Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality), professional societies (Heart Rhythm Society), and industry to discuss strategies for risk assessment and prevention of SCD. The meeting was organized by the Duke Center for the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death and the Duke Clinical Research Institute. This article, the second of 2 documents, summarizes the policy discussions of that meeting, discusses an analytic framework for evaluating the risks and benefits associated with SCD prevention and risk stratification, and addresses the translation of SCD risk assessment strategies into practice and policy.

  16. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Cardiac Arrest in Pediatric Cardiac ICUs.

    PubMed

    Alten, Jeffrey A; Klugman, Darren; Raymond, Tia T; Cooper, David S; Donohue, Janet E; Zhang, Wenying; Pasquali, Sara K; Gaies, Michael G

    2017-10-01

    In-hospital cardiac arrest occurs in 2.6-6% of children with cardiac disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Much remains unknown about cardiac arrest in pediatric cardiac ICUs; therefore, we aimed to describe cardiac arrest epidemiology in a contemporary multicenter cardiac ICU cohort. Retrospective analysis within the Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care Consortium clinical registry. Cardiac ICUs within 23 North American hospitals. All cardiac medical and surgical patients admitted from August 2014 to July 2016. None. There were 15,908 cardiac ICU encounters (6,498 medical, 9,410 surgical). 3.1% had cardiac arrest; rate was 4.8 cardiac arrest per 1,000 cardiac ICU days. Medical encounters had 50% higher rate of cardiac arrest compared with surgical encounters. Observed (unadjusted) cardiac ICU cardiac arrest prevalence varied from 1% to 5.5% among the 23 centers; cardiac arrest per 1,000 cardiac ICU days varied from 1.1 to 10.4. Over half cardiac arrest occur within 48 hours of admission. On multivariable analysis, prematurity, neonatal age, any Society of Thoracic Surgeons preoperative risk factor, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery mortality category 4, 5 had strongest association with surgical encounter cardiac arrest. In medical encounters, independent cardiac arrest risk factors were acute heart failure, prematurity, lactic acidosis greater than 3 mmol/dL, and invasive ventilation 1 hour after admission. Median cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration was 10 minutes, return of spontaneous circulation occurred in 64.5%, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in 27.2%. Unadjusted survival was 53.2% in encounters with cardiac arrest versus 98.2% without. Medical encounters had lower survival after cardiac arrest (37.7%) versus surgical encounters (62.5%); Norwood patients had less than half the survival after cardiac arrest (35.6%) compared with all others. Unadjusted survival after

  17. High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T and the Risk of Incident Atrial Fibrillation: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Filion, Kristian B.; Agarwal, Sunil K.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Eberg, Maria; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Huxley, Rachel R.; Loehr, Laura R.; Nambi, Vijay; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Structural changes in the heart are known risk factors for atrial fibrillation (AF). An association between cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT), a marker of myocardial cell damage measured with a high sensitivity assay, and the risk of AF could have implications for AF risk stratification. Objective To estimate the association between hs-cTnT and the risk of incident AF in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, a prospective cohort of middle-aged adults from 4 U.S. communities. Methods Study included 10,584 participants (mean age 62.7 years) free of AF in 1996-98 and followed through 2008. AF was defined using ICD codes from hospitalizations and death certificates. Participants with undetectable hs-cTnT levels (58%) were assigned the lower limit of measurement (5 ng/L). Net reclassification improvement (NRI) was used to examine the discriminative ability of hs-cTnT for 10-year AF risk prediction (categories: <5%, 5-15%, and >15%). Results A total of 920 incident AF cases were observed over 109,227 person-years. After adjustment, a 1-standard deviation difference in ln(hs-cTnT) was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.16 (95% CI=1.10-1.23). Compared with those with undetectable levels, participants with hs-cTnT ≥14 ng/L had a HR of 1.78 (95% CI=1.43-2.24). Addition of hs-cTnT to known AF predictors did not increase the c-statistic appreciably (0.756 vs 0.758) or improve risk stratification (NRI=0.4%, 95% CI=−1.4%-2.3%). Conclusions Hs-cTnT level is associated with an increased incidence rate of AF but did not improve risk stratification. PMID:25497245

  18. [Factors involved in the development of vasoplegia after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation. A prospective observational study].

    PubMed

    Durán Bruce, M; Gomar Sancho, C; Holguera, J C; Muliterno Español, E

    2014-05-01

    The incidence and risk factors for vasoplegia in the early postoperative period and at 24h are investigated in patients subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Vasoplegia following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with a high morbimortality. The risk factors described emerged from retrospective, non-controlled studies. Observational prospective study of 188 consecutive patients subjected to cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass in a single hospital between November 2011 and May 2012. Emergency surgery or complex procedures were excluded. Vasoplegia was assessed during the immediate postoperative period, and at 24h after surgery, and was defined as a mean arterial pressure below 50mmHg, and the need for a noradrenaline perfusion of more than 0.08μg/kg/min, monitored by cardiac output and systemic vascular resistances. The anaesthetic and cardiopulmonary bypass protocols, as well as haemodynamic management, were the same in all patients. Almost half (48%) of patients had vasoplegia in the immediate postoperative period, and 34% at 24h. Risk factors for immediate vasoplegia development were preoperative use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor drugs, a mean arterial pressure<50mmHg immediately after beginning cardiopulmonary bypass, duration of aortic clamping as well as the cardiopulmonary bypass, and minimum temperature in cardiopulmonary bypass. Vasoplegia at 24h after surgery was correlated to preoperative angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor drug treatment and cardiopulmonary bypass duration. The incidence of vasoplegia after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is high during the first 24 postoperative hours. Preoperative treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and the mean arterial pressure at the beginning of cardiopulmonary bypass are the more easily controllable risk factors. In patients arriving to surgery with those drugs, treatment or prevention of vasoplejia should be planned. Copyright

  19. [Risk factors for birth injuries].

    PubMed

    García, Heladia; Rubio-Espíritu, Jorge; Islas-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa

    2006-01-01

    To identify risk factors associated with birth trauma. Servicio de Neonatología, Hospital General "Dr. Manuel Gea González", Secretaría de Salud. Case-control, prolective study. There were 129 cases and 134 controls. We recorded the following variables: a) maternal and delivery: age, weight, height, prenatal care, pre-existing disease or gestational disease, mode of delivery, anesthetic management during labor, use of external maneuvers or forceps; b) newborn: birth weight, gestational age, academic degree of attendant physician at delivery, and type of birth injury. The independent risk factors associated to birth injury were: for ecchymoses; general anesthesia (OR 13.7, 95% CI = 3 - 62.6), breech presentation (OR 6.4, 95% IC 95% = 1.4 - 27.9) and gestational age < or = 32 weeks (OR 6.4, 95% CI = 1.3 - 31.1); for lacerations, vaginal dystocic delivery or cesarean section (OR 19, 95% CI = 4.4 - 81.1) and use of external maneuvers (OR 5.6, 95% CI = 1.5 - 21.6); for cephalhematoma maternal height < or = 1.54 m (OR 7.4, 95% CI = 2.3 - 23.7) and external maneuvers (OR 7.2, 95% CI = 2.3 - 23.7); for caput succedaneum, external maneuvers (OR 3.4, 95% CI = 1.5-7.7) and maternal age < or = 19 or > or = 36 years (OR 3.0, 95% CI = 1.4 - 6.4). Risk factors associated with birth injuries identified in this study involved maternal conditions, neonatal conditions and mechanism of delivery.

  20. Modifications of Coronary Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Jeanine; Gottlieb, Sheldon H.; August, Phyllis; Nesto, Richard W.; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the revascularization and glycemic management interventions assigned at random, the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) design includes the uniform control of major coronary artery disease risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, smoking, central obesity, and sedentary lifestyle. Target levels for risk factors were adjusted throughout the trial to comply with changes in recommended clinical practice guidelines. At present, the goals are low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <2.59 mmol/L (<100 mg/dL) with an optional goal of <1.81 mmol/L (<70 mg/dL); plasma triglyceride level <1.70 mmol/L (<150 mg/dL); blood pressure level <130 mm Hg systolic and <80 mm Hg diastolic; and smoking cessation treatment for all active smokers. Algorithms were developed for the pharmacologic management of dyslipidemia and hypertension. Dietary prescriptions for the management of glycemia, plasma lipid profiles, and blood pressure levels were adapted from existing clinical practice guidelines. Patients with a body mass index >25 were prescribed moderate caloric restriction; after the trial was under way, a lifestyle weight-management program was instituted. All patients were formally prescribed both endurance and resistance/flexibility exercises, individually adapted to their level of disability and fitness. Pedometers were distributed as a biofeedback strategy. Strategies to achieve the goals for risk factors were designed by BARI 2D working groups (lipid, cardiovascular and hypertension, and nonpharmacologic intervention) and the ongoing implementation of the strategies is monitored by lipid, hypertension, and lifestyle intervention management centers. PMID:16813737

  1. Plasma and dietary magnesium and risk of sudden cardiac death in women123

    PubMed Central

    Chiuve, Stephanie E; Korngold, Ethan C; Januzzi, James L; Gantzer, Mary Lou; Albert, Christine M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Magnesium has antiarrhythmic properties in cellular and experimental models; however, its relation to sudden cardiac death (SCD) risk is unclear. Objective: We prospectively examined the association between magnesium, as measured in diet and plasma, and risk of SCD. Design: The analysis was conducted within the Nurses’ Health Study. The association for magnesium intake was examined prospectively in 88,375 women who were free of disease in 1980. Information on magnesium intake, other nutrients, and lifestyle factors was updated every 2–4 y through questionnaires, and 505 cases of sudden or arrhythmic death were documented over 26 y of follow-up. For plasma magnesium, a nested case-control analysis including 99 SCD cases and 291 controls matched for age, ethnicity, smoking, and presence of cardiovascular disease was performed. Results: After multivariable adjustment for confounders and potential intermediaries, the relative risk of SCD was significantly lower in women in the highest quartile compared with those in the lowest quartile of dietary (relative risk: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.91) and plasma (relative risk: 0.23; 95% CI: 0.09, 0.60) magnesium. The linear inverse relation with SCD was strongest for plasma magnesium (P for trend = 0.003), in which each 0.25-mg/dL (1 SD) increment in plasma magnesium was associated with a 41% (95% CI: 15%, 58%) lower risk of SCD. Conclusions: In this prospective cohort of women, higher plasma concentrations and dietary magnesium intakes were associated with lower risks of SCD. If the observed association is causal, interventions directed at increasing dietary or plasma magnesium might lower the risk of SCD. PMID:21106914

  2. Environmental Risk Factors for ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, Farzad; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Over the past several decades, alcohol abuse and cigarette smoke exposure have been identified as risk factors for the development of ARDS. The mechanisms underlying these relationships are complex and remain under investigation but are thought to involve pulmonary immune impairment as well as alveolar epithelial and endothelial dysfunction. This review summarizes the epidemiologic data supporting links between these exposures and ARDS susceptibility and outcomes and highlights key mechanistic investigations that provide insight into the pathways by which each exposure is linked to ARDS. PMID:25453414

  3. Cardiac glycosides and breast cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Karasneh, Reema A; Murray, Liam J; Cardwell, Chris R

    2017-03-01

    Cardiac glycosides are phytoestrogens and have been linked to the risk of estrogen sensitive cancers such as uterus cancer. However, the association between use of cardiac glycosides and risk of breast cancer remains unclear. We investigated the association between cardiac glycosides use and the risk of breast cancer by systematically reviewing the published literature and performing meta-analyses. A comprehensive literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and SCOPUS to identify all relevant articles published up to November 2015. Risk estimates, and accompanying standard errors, for the association between cardiac glycoside use and breast cancer were extracted from identified studies. Meta-analysis models were used to calculate a combined hazard ratio (HR), and 95% confidence interval (CI), and to investigate heterogeneity between studies. In total, nine studies were identified investigating cardiac glycosides use and risk of developing breast cancer. Overall, there was evidence to suggest an association between cardiac glycosides use and breast cancer risk (HR = 1.34; 95% CI 1.25, 1.44; p < 0.001) with little variation in the association between studies (I(2)  = 16%, p for heterogeneity = 0.30). Results were little altered when analysis was restricted to studies with high quality scores or cohort studies. Overall, there was a 34% increase in breast risk with use of cardiac glycosides but it is unclear whether this association reflects confounding or is causal. Further observational studies are required to examine this association particularly for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer and to explore the role of potential confounding variables. © 2016 UICC.

  4. Comprehensive Cardiovascular Risk Reduction and Cardiac Rehabilitation in Diabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heinl, Robert E.; Dhindsa, Devinder S.; Mahlof, Elliot N.; Schultz, William M.; Ricketts, Johnathan C.; Varghese, Tina; Esmaeeli, Amirhossein; Allard-Ratick, Marc P.; Millard, Anthony J.; Kelli, Heval M.; Sandesara, Pratik B.; Eapen, Danny J.; Sperling, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    The epidemic of obesity has contributed to a growing burden of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and diabetes mellitus (DM) worldwide. MetS is defined as central obesity along with associated factors such as hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. MetS and DM are associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Healthy behavioural modification is the cornerstone for reducing the atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease burden in this population. Comprehensive, multi-disciplinary cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs reduce mortality and hospitalizations in patients with MetS and DM. Despite this benefit, patients with MetS and DM are less likely to attend and complete CR because of numerous barriers. Implementation of innovative CR delivery models might improve utilization of CR and cardiovascular outcomes in this high-risk population. PMID:27692115

  5. Prevalence of factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency among 426 patients with coronary heart disease awaiting cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Halbmayer, W M; Haushofer, A; Radek, J; Schön, R; Deutsch, M; Fischer, M

    1994-05-01

    Several case reports of myocardial infarction in patients with factor XII deficiency have been published. In the present study we investigated the prevalence of this condition. Factor XII activity (one-stage clotting assay), fibrinogen (derived method), and lipoprotein (a) (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were measured in the plasma of 426 consecutive patients with coronary heart disease awaiting cardiac surgery. Among the 426 patients, 44 (10.3%) were found to be moderately deficient in factor XII (factor XII activity 17-50%, antigen 15-57%). The prevalence of factor XII deficiency was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) among patients with coronary heart disease than among 300 healthy blood donors (2.3%). Among coronary heart disease patients with this deficiency, elevated levels of fibrinogen, lipoprotein (a), and blood pressure were no more prevalent than in those without the deficiency; nor were cigarette smoking or a positive family history of thromboembolism more prevalent. Coronary heart disease patients showed a 10% prevalence of factor XII deficiency. However, the pattern of atherosclerotic risk factors did not differ between patients with or without the deficiency.

  6. A risk score for predicting 30-day mortality in heart failure patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Charlotte; Gislason, Gunnar H; Hlatky, Mark A; Søndergaard, Kathrine Bach; Pallisgaard, Jannik; Smith, J Gustav; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Larson, Martin G; Jensen, Per Føge; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Heart failure is an established risk factor for poor outcomes in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, yet risk stratification remains a clinical challenge. We developed an index for 30-day mortality risk prediction in this particular group. All individuals with heart failure undergoing non-cardiac surgery between October 23 2004 and October 31 2011 were included from Danish administrative registers (n = 16 827). In total, 1787 (10.6%) died within 30 days. In a simple risk score based on the variables from the revised cardiac risk index, plus age, gender, acute surgery, and body mass index category the following variables predicted mortality (points): male gender (1), age 56-65 years (2), age 66-75 years (4), age 76-85 years (5), or age >85 years (7), being underweight (4), normal weight (3), or overweight (1), undergoing acute surgery (5), undergoing high-risk procedures (intra-thoracic, intra-abdominal, or suprainguinal aortic) (3), having renal disease (1), cerebrovascular disease (1), and use of insulin (1). The c-statistic was 0.79 and calibration was good. Mortality risk ranged from <2% for a score <5 to >50% for a score ≥20. Internal validation by bootstrapping (1000 re-samples) provided c-statistic of 0.79. A more complex risk score based on stepwise logistic regression including 24 variables at P < 0.05 performed only slightly better, c-statistic = 0.81, but was limited in use by its complexity. For patients with heart failure, this simple index can accurately identify those at low risk for perioperative mortality. © 2014 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  7. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  8. Health status of cardiac genetic disease patients and their at-risk relatives.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Yeates, Laura; Hunt, Lauren; McGaughran, Julie; Scuffham, Paul A; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2013-05-25

    Health status is an important outcome measure that incorporates multiple dimensions of health, including symptoms, functional status, and psychosocial factors. While health status has been shown to be a predictor for hospital readmission, morbidity and mortality in the heart failure setting, there are limited data in cardiac genetic disease. We examined health status in a number of cardiac genetic disease groups compared to the general Australian population. A total of 409 individuals were assessed. Individuals with inherited cardiomyopathies [hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), familial dilated cardiomyopathy (FDC), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)] and primary arrhythmogenic disorders [long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT)], as well as their first-degree relatives, completed the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36). The physical and mental component scores (PCS and MCS) and SF-6D utility score were assessed. Patients with HCM (p<0.001), FDC (p<0.05), and CPVT (p<0.05) were found to have a significantly lower PCS, while patients with LQTS (p<0.01) had a lower MCS. Individuals at risk of HCM (p<0.0001) and genotype positive-phenotype negative HCM patients (p<0.01) both had a higher PCS and utility scores compared to the clinically affected HCM population. Individuals at risk of LQTS had significantly higher PCS than those with a clinical diagnosis of LQTS (p<0.05) and similarly individuals at risk of FDC had significantly higher PCS than FDC patients (p<0.05). In HCM, female gender (p=0.002), presence of co-morbidities (p<0.0001) and higher NYHA functional class (p<0.0001) were predictors of a lower PCS. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of a genetic heart disease have an impaired health status, related to both physical and mental function. Clinical management strategies in such patient groups need to consider health status as an important outcome measure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier

  9. Association between sleep duration and cardiac structure in youths at risk for metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Dan; Zhang, Jihui; Fu, Junling; Wu, Heng; Wang, Yonghui; Li, Lujiao; Zhao, Yanglu; Li, Ming; Gao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for a link between sleep duration and cardiovascular risk is accumulating in youths, but no study has yet investigated the relationship between sleep duration and change of cardiac structure. In this study, we recruited 559 youths aged 14–28 years from the cohort of Beijing Child and Adolescent Metabolic Syndrome Study. Questionnaire, color Doppler echocardiography, oral glucose tolerance test and blood biomarkers analyses were performed. We found that sleep duration was negatively correlated with body mass index, waist circumstance, and HbA1c (all P < 0.05), but not with adiponectin and leptin. Meanwhile, participants with shorter sleep duration (≤7 h) had larger interventricular septal diastolic thickness, left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic diameter, LV posterior wall thickness, LV mass (LVM), and LV mass index (LVMI), compared to participants in 7–9 h/night or >9 h/night group. Findings remained significant after adjustment for the major confounding factors (P < 0.05). Multivariate regression modeling revealed that each additional hour of sleep was associated with smaller LVM (β: −3.483, P < 0.0001) and LVMI (β: −0.815, P < 0.0001). Our findings suggest that short sleep has a possible direct effect on cardiac remodeling, occurring already at young ages. PMID:27966597

  10. Early origins of heart disease: low birth weight and the role of the insulin-like growth factor system in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Botting, Kimberley J; Padhee, Monalisa; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I Caroline; Suter, Catherine M; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2012-11-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that poor growth before birth is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and an increased risk of death from heart disease later in life. In fetal life, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system has been implicated in physiological growth of the heart, whereas in postnatal life IGFs can be involved in both physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy. A reduction in substrate supply in fetal life, resulting in chronic hypoxaemia and intrauterine growth restriction, results in increased cardiac IGF-1R, IGF-2 and IGF-2R gene expression; and there is also evidence for a role of the IGF-2 receptor in the ensuing cardiac hypertrophy. The persistent high level of cardiac IGF-2R gene expression from fetal to postnatal life may be due to epigenetic changes in key cardiac hypertrophy regulatory pathways. © 2012 The Authors Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  12. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? In women, high triglycerides combined ... information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart Disease Fact ...

  13. Risk Factors and Causes of Syncope

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes of Sy... Back to Fainting Risk Factors & Causes of Syncope Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Syncope The ... heart. LQTS is believed to be a common cause of sudden and unexplained death in children and ...

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of critical congenital heart disease reduces risk of death from cardiovascular compromise prior to planned neonatal cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Holland, B J; Myers, J A; Woods, C R

    2015-06-01

    To determine if prenatal diagnosis improves the chance that a newborn with critical congenital heart disease will survive to undergo planned cardiac surgery. A systematic review of the medical literature identified eight studies which met the following criteria: compared outcomes between newborns with prenatal and those with postnatal diagnosis of critical congenital heart disease; compared groups of patients with the same anatomical diagnosis; provided detailed information on cardiac anatomy; included detailed information on preoperative cause of death. A meta-analysis was performed to assess differences in preoperative mortality rates between newborns with prenatal diagnosis and those with postnatal diagnosis. Patients with established risk factors for increased mortality (high risk) and those whose families chose comfort care rather than cardiac surgery were excluded. In patients with comparable anatomy, standard risk, a parental desire to treat and optimal care, newborns with a prenatal diagnosis of critical congenital heart disease were significantly less likely to die prior to planned cardiac surgery than were those with a comparable postnatal diagnosis (pooled odds ratio, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.84). For newborns most likely to benefit from treatment for their critical congenital heart disease, because they did not have additional risk factors and their families pursued treatment, prenatal diagnosis reduced the risk of death prior to planned cardiac surgery relative to patients with a comparable postnatal diagnosis. Further study and efforts to improve prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease should therefore be considered. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Transcription factor-induced activation of cardiac gene expression in human c-kit+ cardiac progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vajravelu, Bathri N.; Moktar, Afsoon; Cao, Pengxiao; Moore, Joseph B.; Bolli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Although transplantation of c-kit+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) significantly alleviates post-myocardial infarction left ventricular dysfunction, generation of cardiomyocytes by exogenous CPCs in the recipient heart has often been limited. Inducing robust differentiation would be necessary for improving the efficacy of the regenerative cardiac cell therapy. We assessed the hypothesis that differentiation of human c-kit+ CPCs can be enhanced by priming them with cardiac transcription factors (TFs). We introduced five different TFs (Gata4, MEF2C, NKX2.5, TBX5, and BAF60C) into CPCs, either alone or in combination, and then examined the expression of marker genes associated with the major cardiac cell types using quantitative RT-PCR. When introduced individually, Gata4 and TBX5 induced a subset of myocyte markers. Moreover, Gata4 alone significantly induced smooth muscle cell and fibroblast markers. Interestingly, these gene expression changes brought by Gata4 were also accompanied by morphological changes. In contrast, MEF2C and NKX2.5 were largely ineffective in initiating cardiac gene expression in CPCs. Surprisingly, introduction of multiple TFs in different combinations mostly failed to act synergistically. Likewise, addition of BAF60C to Gata4 and/or TBX5 did not further potentiate their effects on cardiac gene expression. Based on our results, it appears that GATA4 is able to potentiate gene expression programs associated with multiple cardiovascular lineages in CPCs, suggesting that GATA4 may be effective in priming CPCs for enhanced differentiation in the setting of stem cell therapy. PMID:28355297

  16. Transcription factor-induced activation of cardiac gene expression in human c-kit+ cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Maqtari, Tareq; Hong, Kyung U; Vajravelu, Bathri N; Moktar, Afsoon; Cao, Pengxiao; Moore, Joseph B; Bolli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Although transplantation of c-kit+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) significantly alleviates post-myocardial infarction left ventricular dysfunction, generation of cardiomyocytes by exogenous CPCs in the recipient heart has often been limited. Inducing robust differentiation would be necessary for improving the efficacy of the regenerative cardiac cell therapy. We assessed the hypothesis that differentiation of human c-kit+ CPCs can be enhanced by priming them with cardiac transcription factors (TFs). We introduced five different TFs (Gata4, MEF2C, NKX2.5, TBX5, and BAF60C) into CPCs, either alone or in combination, and then examined the expression of marker genes associated with the major cardiac cell types using quantitative RT-PCR. When introduced individually, Gata4 and TBX5 induced a subset of myocyte markers. Moreover, Gata4 alone significantly induced smooth muscle cell and fibroblast markers. Interestingly, these gene expression changes brought by Gata4 were also accompanied by morphological changes. In contrast, MEF2C and NKX2.5 were largely ineffective in initiating cardiac gene expression in CPCs. Surprisingly, introduction of multiple TFs in different combinations mostly failed to act synergistically. Likewise, addition of BAF60C to Gata4 and/or TBX5 did not further potentiate their effects on cardiac gene expression. Based on our results, it appears that GATA4 is able to potentiate gene expression programs associated with multiple cardiovascular lineages in CPCs, suggesting that GATA4 may be effective in priming CPCs for enhanced differentiation in the setting of stem cell therapy.

  17. Pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy is associated with distinct alternative splicing due to altered expression of splicing factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyong; Kim, Jin Ock; Oh, Jae Gyun; Hong, Seong-Eui; Kim, Do Han

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy is associated with an increased risk of morbidity/mortality, largely due to maladaptive remodeling and dilatation that progresses to dilated cardiomyopathy. Alternative splicing is an important biological mechanism that generates proteomic complexity and diversity. The recent development of next-generation RNA sequencing has improved our understanding of the qualitative signatures associated with alternative splicing in various biological conditions. However, the role of alternative splicing in cardiac hypertrophy is yet unknown. The present study employed RNA-Seq and a bioinformatic approach to detect the RNA splicing regulatory elements involved in alternative splicing during pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy. We found GC-rich exonic motifs that regulate intron retention in 5' UTRs and AT-rich exonic motifs that are involved in exclusion of the AT-rich elements that cause mRNA instability in 3' UTRs. We also identified motifs in the intronic regions involved in exon exclusion and inclusion, which predicted splicing factors that bind to these motifs. We found, through Western blotting, that the expression levels of three splicing factors, ESRP1, PTB and SF2/ASF, were significantly altered during cardiac hypertrophy. Collectively, the present results suggest that chronic pressure-overload hypertrophy is closely associated with distinct alternative splicing due to altered expression of splicing factors.

  18. Incidence of and factors associated with perioperative cardiac arrest within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery.

    PubMed

    Siriphuwanun, Visith; Punjasawadwong, Yodying; Lapisatepun, Worawut; Charuluxananan, Somrat; Uerpairojkit, Ketchada

    2014-01-01

    To determine the incidence of and factors associated with perioperative cardiac arrest within 24 hours of receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery. This retrospective cohort study was approved by the ethical committee of Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Thailand. We reviewed the data of 44,339 patients receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery during the period from January 1, 2003 to March 31, 2011. The data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, anesthesia information, location of anesthesia performed, and outcomes. Data of patients who had received topical anesthesia or monitoring anesthesia care were excluded. Factors associated with cardiac arrest were identified by univariate analyses. Multiple regressions for the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to determine the strength of factors associated with cardiac arrest. A forward stepwise algorithm was chosen at a P-value <0.05. The incidence (within 24 hours) of perioperative cardiac arrest in patients receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery was 163 per 10,000. Factors associated with 24-hour perioperative cardiac arrest in emergency surgery were age of 2 years or younger (RR =1.46, CI =1.03-2.08, P=0.036), ASA physical status classification of 3-4 (RR =5.84, CI =4.20-8.12, P<0.001) and 5-6 (RR =33.98, CI =23.09-49.98, P<0.001), the anatomic site of surgery (upper intra-abdominal, RR =2.67, CI =2.14-3.33, P<0.001; intracranial, RR =1.74, CI =1.35-2.25, P<0.001; intrathoracic, RR =2.35, CI =1.70-3.24, P<0.001; cardiac, RR =3.61, CI =2.60-4.99, P<0.001; and major vascular; RR =3.05, CI =2.22-4.18, P<0.001), respiratory or cardiovascular comorbidities (RR =1.95, CI =1.60-2.38, P<0.001 and RR =1.38, CI =1.11-1.72, P=0.004, respectively), and patients in shock prior to receiving anesthesia (RR =2.62, CI =2.07-3.33, P<0.001). The perioperative incidence of cardiac arrest within 24 hours of

  19. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Body mass index. (iv) Systolic blood pressure. (v) Diastolic blood pressure. (vi) The need for cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes medications. (3) A list of approved intensive cardiac rehabilitation... prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, psychosocial assessment, and outcomes...

  20. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Body mass index. (iv) Systolic blood pressure. (v) Diastolic blood pressure. (vi) The need for cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes medications. (3) A list of approved intensive cardiac rehabilitation... prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, psychosocial assessment, and outcomes...

  1. Dissonance-based eating disorder program reduces cardiac risk: A preliminary trial.

    PubMed

    Green, Melinda A; Willis, Mary; Fernandez-Kong, Kristen; Reyes, Shuhan; Linkhart, Ruby; Johnson, Molly; Thorne, Tyler; Kroska, Emily; Woodward, Halley; Lindberg, Jessica

    2017-04-01

    We conducted a randomized, controlled preliminary trial to examine the effect of a dissonance-based eating disorder program on eating disorder symptoms and cardiac risk indices in a community sample of women with subclinical and clinical symptoms (N = 47), examining the efficacy of the program in both the indicated prevention and treatment realms. Eating disorder symptoms, body mass index, and biomarkers of cardiac risk were examined in dissonance and assessment-only control conditions at baseline, postintervention, and 2-month follow-up. Specifically, we assessed mean R wave amplitude, QT interval length, vagal tone (high frequency spectral power of heart rate variability), and sympathetic tone (low/high frequency spectral power ratio) via electocardiography (ECG) at each assessment period. We predicted a statistically significant 2 (condition: control, dissonance) × 3 (time: baseline, postintervention, 2-month follow-up) interaction in the mixed factorial MANOVA results. Results confirmed this hypothesis. Eating disorder symptoms and cardiac risk indices decreased significantly among participants in the dissonance condition at postintervention and 2-month follow-up compared with baseline. Results provide support for the efficacy of a dissonance-based program in the reduction of eating disorder symptoms and cardiac risk indices among women with subclinical and clinical eating disorder symptoms. Findings establish the efficaciousness of this dissonance-based approach in the indicated prevention and treatment realms and establish its efficacy in reducing cardiac risk indicators. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  3. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  4. Nurse-led risk assessment/management clinics reduce predicted cardiac morbidity and mortality in claudicants.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Josephine; Gulati, Sumit; Abdul Rahman, Morhisham N A; Coughlin, Patrick A; Chetter, Ian C

    2008-12-01

    Nurse-led assessment/management of risk factors is effective in many chronic medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate whether this finding was true for patients with intermittent claudication and to analyze its impact on patient-reported quality of life and predicted mortality due to coronary heart disease. We prospectively studied a series of 78 patients (51 men; median age, 65 years [IQR: 56-74 years]), diagnosed with intermittent claudication and referred to a nurse-led risk assessment/management clinic (NLC) from a consultant-led vascular surgical clinic. The NLC used clinical care pathways to manage antiplatelet medication, smoking cessation, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes and to provide exercise advice. All patients were reassessed at a 3 months. Medication compliance, smoking status, fasting lipid profiles, blood pressure, and HbA1c were recorded. Disease-specific quality of life was assessed using King's College VascuQoL and predicted cardiac morbidity and mortality were calculated using the PROCAM and Framingham risk scores. We found that NLC enrollment produced an antiplatelet and a statin compliance of 100%, a smoking cessation rate of 17% (9 patients) and significant improvements in total cholesterol (median, 5.2-4.5 mmol/l), LDL (median, 3.1-2.5 mmol/l) and triglyceride (median, 1.7-1.4 mmol/l) levels. Significant disease-specific quality of life improvements and significant reduction in both the PROCAM (14% to 10%) and Framingham (14% to 11%) coronary risk scores were observed. Providing care at NLCs for claudicants is effective in assessing and managing risk factors, improves disease-specific quality of life and reduces predicted morbidity and mortality due to coronary heart disease.

  5. Placental growth factor regulates cardiac adaptation and hypertrophy through a paracrine mechanism.

    PubMed

    Accornero, Federica; van Berlo, Jop H; Benard, Matthew J; Lorenz, John N; Carmeliet, Peter; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2011-07-22

    Paracrine growth factor-mediated crosstalk between cardiac myocytes and nonmyocytes in the heart is critical for programming adaptive cardiac hypertrophy in which myocyte size, capillary density, and the extracellular matrix function coordinately. To examine the role that placental growth factor (PGF) plays in the heart as a paracrine regulator of cardiac adaptation to stress stimulation. PGF is induced in the heart after pressure-overload stimulation, where it is expressed in both myocytes and nonmyocytes. We generated cardiac-specific and adult inducible PGF-overexpressing transgenic mice and analyzed Pgf(-/-) mice to examine the role that this factor plays in cardiac disease and paracrine signaling. Although PGF transgenic mice did not have a baseline phenotype or a change in capillary density, they did exhibit a greater cardiac hypertrophic response, a greater increase in capillary density, and increased fibroblast content in the heart in response to pressure-overload stimulation. PGF transgenic mice showed a more adaptive type of cardiac growth that was protective against signs of failure with pressure overload and neuroendocrine stimulation. Antithetically, Pgf(-/-) mice rapidly died of heart failure within 1 week of pressure overload, they showed an inability to upregulate angiogenesis, and they showed significantly less fibroblast activity in the heart. Mechanistically, we show that PGF does not have a direct effect on cardiomyocytes but works through endothelial cells and fibroblasts by inducing capillary growth and fibroblast proliferation, which secondarily support greater cardiac hypertrophy through intermediate paracrine growth factors such as interleukin-6. PGF is a secreted factor that supports hypertrophy and cardiac function during pressure overload by affecting endothelial cells and fibroblasts that in turn stimulate and support the myocytes through additional paracrine factors.

  6. Placental growth factor regulates cardiac adaptation and hypertrophy through a paracrine mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Accornero, Federica; van Berlo, Jop H.; Benard, Matthew J.; Lorenz, John N.; Carmeliet, Peter; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Paracrine growth factor-mediated crosstalk between cardiac myocytes and non-myocytes in the heart is critical for programming adaptive cardiac hypertrophy in which myocyte size, capillary density, and the extracellular matrix function coordinately. Objective To examine the role that placental growth factor (PGF) plays in the heart as a paracrine regulator of cardiac adaptation to stress stimulation. Methods and Results PGF is induced in the heart following pressure overload stimulation where it is expressed in both myocytes and non-myocytes. Here we generated cardiac-specific and adult inducible PGF overexpressing transgenic mice, as well as analyzed Pgf−/− mice to examine the role that this factor plays in cardiac disease and paracrine signaling. While PGF transgenic mice did not have a baseline phenotype or a change in capillary density, they did exhibit a greater cardiac hypertrophic response, a greater increase in capillary density, and increased fibroblast content in the heart in response to pressure overload stimulation. PGF transgenic mice showed a more adaptive type of cardiac growth that was protective against signs of failure with pressure overload and neuroendocrine stimulation. Antithetically, Pgf−/− mice rapidly succumbed to heart failure within a week of pressure overload, they showed an inability to upregulate angiogenesis, and they showed significantly less fibroblast activity in the heart. Mechanistically, we show that PGF does not have a direct effect on the cardiomyocytes but works through endothelial cells and fibroblasts by inducing capillary growth and fibroblasts proliferation, which secondarily support greater cardiac hypertrophy through intermediate paracrine growth factors such as interleukin-6. Conclusions PGF is a secreted factor that supports hypertrophy and cardiac function during pressure overload by affecting endothelial cells and fibroblasts that in turn stimulate and support the myocytes through additional

  7. The fibroblast growth factor-23 and Vitamin D emerge as nontraditional risk factors and may affect cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Masson, S; Agabiti, N; Vago, T; Miceli, M; Mayer, F; Letizia, T; Wienhues-Thelen, U; Mureddu, G F; Davoli, M; Boccanelli, A; Latini, R

    2015-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and vitamin D are hormones involved in phosphate homoeostasis. They also directly influence cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We examined whether the relationships between levels of vitamin D or FGF-23, cardiac phenotype and outcome were independent of established cardiac biomarkers in a large cohort of community-dwelling elderly subjects. Plasma levels of FGF-23 and vitamin D were measured in 1851 men and women (65-84 years) resident in the Lazio region of Italy. Participants were referred to eight cardiology centres for clinical examination, electrocardiography, comprehensive Doppler echocardiography and blood sampling. All-cause mortality or hospitalizations were available after a median follow-up of 47 months with record linkage of administrative data. Vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng mL(-1) ) was found in 72.3% of subjects, but FGF-23 levels were normal [74 (58-97) RU per mL]. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and morbidities, low concentrations of vitamin D and high levels of FGF-23 were associated with a higher left ventricular (LV) mass index. Levels of FGF-23 [hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) 1.71 (1.28-2.28), P < 0.0001] but not vitamin D [0.76 (0.57-1.01), P = 0.08] were independently associated with mortality after adjustment for clinical risk factors and two cardiac markers together (N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T), but did not predict hospital admission. People with above median values of FGF-23 and below median values of vitamin D had greater LV hypertrophy and higher mortality. In community-dwelling elderly individuals with highly prevalent vitamin D deficiency, FGF-23 levels were associated with LV hypertrophy and predicted mortality independently of two robust cardiac biomarkers. A causal relationship was not demonstrated, but the hormones involved in mineral metabolism emerged as nontraditional risk factors and may affect cardiovascular risk

  8. Clinical factors influencing mortality risk in hospital acquired sepsis.

    PubMed

    López-Mestanza, Cristina; Andaluz-Ojeda, David; Gómez-López, Juan Ramón; Bermejo Martín, Jesús F

    2017-09-04

    Identification of factors that confer an increased risk of mortality in hospital acquired sepsis (HAS) is necessary to help prevent, and improve the outcome of, this condition. To evaluate the clinical characteristics and factors associated with mortality in patients with HAS. Retrospective study of patients with HAS in a major Spanish Hospital from 2011 to 2015. Data from adults receiving any of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes associated with sepsis were collected. Those fulfilling the SEPSIS-2 definition with no evidence of infection during the first 48 hours following hospitalization were included (n=196). A multivariate analysis was employed to identify the risk factors of mortality. HAS patients were found to have many of the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease (male sex, ageing, antecedent of cardiac disease, arterial hypertension, dyslipemia, smoking habit) and cancer. Vascular disease or chronic kidney disease were associated with 28 day mortality. Time from hospital admission to sepsis diagnosis, and the presence of organ failure were risk factors for 28-day and hospital mortality. Experiencing more than one episode of sepsis increased the risk of hospital mortality. "Sepsis Code" for the early identification of sepsis was protective against hospital mortality. We have identified a number of major factors associated to mortality in patients suffering from HAS. Implementation of surveillance programmes for the early identification and treatment of sepsis translate into a clear benefit. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Depression and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death and Coronary Heart Disease in Women: Results from the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Whang, William; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Kroenke, Candyce H.; Glynn, Robert J.; Garan, Hasan; Albert, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We assessed the association between depression and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and cardiac events among individuals without baseline coronary heart disease (CHD). Background Depression is a risk factor for cardiac events and mortality among those with CHD, possibly from arrhythmia. Methods We studied depressive symptoms, and a proxy variable for clinical depression consisting of severe symptoms and/or antidepressant medication use, and their relationship to cardiac events in the Nurses’ Health Study. Questionnaires in 1992, 1996, and 2000 assessed symptoms with the Mental Health Index (MHI-5), and antidepressant use was assessed in 1996 and 2000. Primary endpoints included SCD, fatal CHD, and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI). Results Among 63,469 women without prior CHD/stroke in 1992, 7.9% had MHI-5 scores (<53) previously found to predict clinical depression. Depressive symptoms were associated with CHD events, and the relationship was strongest for fatal CHD, where the association remained significant even after controlling for CHD risk factors (HR=1.49; 95% CI 1.11–2.00 for MHI-5 score<53). In models from 1996 onward, our proxy variable for clinical depression was most associated with SCD in multivariable models (HR=2.33, 95% CI 1.47–3.70), and this risk was primarily due to a specific relationship between antidepressant use and SCD (HR=3.34, 95% CI 2.03–5.50). Conclusions In this cohort of women without baseline CHD, depressive symptoms were associated with fatal CHD, and a measure of clinical depression including antidepressant use was specifically associated with SCD. Although antidepressant use may be a marker of worse depression, its specific association with SCD merits further study. CONDENSED ABSTRACT We prospectively analyzed the association between depression and cardiac events in the Nurses’ Health Study. Symptoms of depression as measured by Mental Health Index (MHI-5) score were directly associated with risk of CHD events

  10. Panic disorder: coronary spasm as a basis for cardiac risk?

    PubMed

    Mansour, V M; Wilkinson, D J; Jennings, G L; Schwarz, R G; Thompson, J M; Esler, M D

    1998-04-20

    Patients with panic disorder often complain of angina-like chest pain during panic attacks, but this is not usually considered life-threatening. We describe three patients with panic disorder and documented cardiac ischaemia during episodes of chest pain. In two, it progressed to myocardial infarction. As none had atherosclerosis evident at coronary angiography, the mechanism was presumed to be coronary artery spasm. These cases illustrate that pain typical of angina during panic attacks may have an organic cause.

  11. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death in North America - current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Buxton, Alfred E; Waks, Jonathan W; Shen, Changyu; Chen, Peng-Sheng

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) accounts for approximately 360,000 deaths annually in the United States, and is the cause of half of all cardiovascular deaths. In patients with severely depressed left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) have been shown to significantly reduce total mortality, but many factors beyond LVEF influence the relative benefit afforded by ICD implantation. In fact, among patients with prior myocardial infarction, approximately half of all SCDs occur in patients without severe LV dysfunction, and in analyses of large ICD trials, certain patient subgroups derive no benefit to ICD implantation despite having low LVEF, often due to competing non-arrhythmic mortality. Improved risk stratification tools to help select patients who are likely to derive the most benefit from ICD implantation are therefore needed. This manuscript will review studies evaluating use of ICDs in patients with mild LV systolic dysfunction and LVEF >35%, currently available ICD risk stratification models, and the rationale for designing a cohort study to prospectively validate use of an ICD risk stratification score.

  12. Analytical and assay issues for use of cardiac troponin testing for risk stratification in primary care.

    PubMed

    Wu, Alan H B; Christenson, Robert H

    2013-08-01

    Cardiac troponin is the standard marker for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction and risk stratification of patients who present to an emergency department with signs and symptoms of acute cardiac ischemia. Over the past few years, the analytical sensitivity of assays for cardiac troponin has improved significantly to the point where a detectable amount of troponin can be measured in essentially all healthy subjects. Recent studies have shown that use of a highly sensitive troponin assays may provide value to traditional markers of primary disease risk for patients, i.e., for those who have no history of heart disease. There are barriers to the adoption of cardiac troponin for screening high risk cohorts such as the elderly, diabetics and perhaps even the asymptomatic population. Strategies used for the assignment of cutoff concentrations in acute care, i.e., the 99 th percentile, may not be appropriate for primary care as changes over baseline levels may provide more accurate information of risk than cross-sectional results. A review of biological variation has shown that cardiac troponin as a biomarker has low index of individuality, indicating that reference values are of little utility. Whether or not cardiac troponin can be released in reversible injury is a debate that could have significance for detecting minor myocardial injury. A major hurdle for use of troponin in primary care is the lack of assay standardization and nomenclature for the different generations of troponin assays. Standardization requires knowledge of what is released after cardiac injury and what the various cardiac troponin assays are measuring. Currently it is not clear if the cardiac troponin release after ischemic injury is identical to that in circulation of healthy individuals. This may affect the design of future assays and standardization approaches. There is potential that a marker of myocardial injury such as troponin can add to the value of existing indicators and biomarkers

  13. Factors affecting postoperative blood loss in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Faraoni, David; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-02-11

    We hypothesized that the influence of cyanotic disease on postoperative blood loss is closely related to age in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of a cyanotic disease is associated with increased postoperative blood loss in children aged 1 to 6 months. Children with cyanotic disease and aged<1 month who received fresh frozen plasma during cardiopulmonary bypass had less postoperative blood loss and higher maximal clot firmness on FIBTEM than cyanotic children from all other groups. Additional studies are needed to define optimal pathophysiology-based management in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

  14. A multicenter risk index for atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Joseph P; Fontes, Manuel L; Tudor, Iulia C; Ramsay, James; Duke, Peter; Mazer, C David; Barash, Paul G; Hsu, Ping H; Mangano, Dennis T

    2004-04-14

    Atrial fibrillation is a common, but potentially preventable, complication following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. To assess the nature and consequences of atrial fibrillation after CABG surgery and to develop a comprehensive risk index that can better identify patients at risk for atrial fibrillation. Prospective observational study of 4657 patients undergoing CABG surgery between November 1996 and June 2000 at 70 centers located within 17 countries, selected using a systematic sampling technique. From a derivation cohort of 3093 patients, associations between predictor variables and postoperative atrial fibrillation were identified to develop a risk model, which was assessed in a validation cohort of 1564 patients. New-onset atrial fibrillation after CABG surgery. A total of 1503 patients (32.3%) developed atrial fibrillation after CABG surgery. Postoperative atrial fibrillation was associated with subsequent greater resource use as well as with cognitive changes, renal dysfunction, and infection. Among patients in the derivation cohort, risk factors associated with atrial fibrillation were advanced age (odds ratio [OR] for 10-year increase, 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.59-1.93); history of atrial fibrillation (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.57-2.85) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09-1.87); valve surgery (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.31-2.32); and postoperative withdrawal of a beta-blocker (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.52-2.40) or an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (OR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.38-2.08). Conversely, reduced risk was associated with postoperative administration of beta-blockers (OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.22-0.46), ACE inhibitors (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.48-0.79), potassium supplementation (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.42-0.68), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.40-0.60). The resulting multivariable risk index had adequate discriminative power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC

  15. Management of cardiac toxicity in patients receiving vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steingart, Richard M; Bakris, George L; Chen, Helen X; Chen, Ming-Hui; Force, Thomas; Ivy, S Percy; Leier, Carl V; Liu, Glenn; Lenihan, Daniel; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Maitland, Michael L; Remick, Scot C; Tang, W H Wilson

    2012-02-01

    Interfering with angiogenesis is an effective, widely used approach to cancer therapy, but antiangiogenic therapies have been associated with important systemic cardiovascular toxicities such as hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, and myocardial ischemia and infarction. As the use of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway (VSP) inhibitors broadens to include older patients and those with existing cardiovascular disease, the adverse effects are likely to be more frequent, and cardiologists will increasingly be enlisted to help oncologists manage patients who develop adverse cardiovascular effects. The Cardiovascular Toxicities Panel of the National Cancer Institute reviewed the published literature and abstracts from major meetings, shared experience gained during clinical development of VSP inhibitors, and contributed extensive clinical experience in evaluating and treating patients with cancer with cardiovascular disease. This report was edited and approved by the National Cancer Institute Investigational Drug Steering Committee. It presents the panel's expert opinion on the current clinical use and future investigation for safer, more expansive use of these drugs. The panel recommends that physicians (1) conduct and document a formal risk assessment for existing cardiovascular disease and potential cardiovascular complications before VSP inhibitor treatment recognizing that preexisting hypertension and cardiovascular disease are common in patients with cancer, (2) actively monitor for blood pressure elevations and cardiac toxicity with more frequent assessments during the first treatment cycle, and (3) aggressively manage blood pressure elevations and early symptoms and signs of cardiac toxicity to prevent clinically limiting complications of VSP inhibitor therapy. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [The colorectal carcinoma risk factors].

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Andrzej; Wawrzyn-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria

    2005-12-01

    Colorectal carcinoma constitutes the second, as for the rate, death cause due to a malignant disease both in the western countries and in Poland. Despite deep knowledge concerning morphogenesis and spread of colorectal carcinoma as well as vast achievements in surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy, the percentage of 5-year-survivals still reaches 40%. According to most authors there are 4 risk factor categories: epidemiological, intestinal, dietetic, and mixed. It is well-known that colorectal carcinoma, like neoplasms localized in other organs and systems, is a disease, in which genetic mutations of somatic cells are the molecular base/source of the disease. The inner innervation of the colon seems to play an important role in carcinoma pathogenesis and spread. At present, 80% of colorectal carcinomas are diagnosed in the advanced stage, with infiltration exceeding the intestinal wall or spreading to neighboring organs, which gives full clinical symptoms. The prognosis as to survival and disease progression is usually poor. Therefore, the ways of early diagnosis, monitoring, and the knowledge of etiological factors are so important in medical practice.

  17. Cardiac sympathetic nerve abnormality predicts ventricular tachyarrhythmic events in patients without conventional risk of sudden death.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Yasushi; Kaneko, Kyouichi; Kodama, Yusuke; Li, Hui-Ling; Kawamura, Mitsuharu; Asano, Taku; Tanno, Kaoru; Shinozuka, Akira; Gokan, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Youichi

    2008-11-01

    Patients with structural heart disease, severe left ventricular dysfunction, or history of cardiac arrest are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, a useful marker for predicting sudden cardiac death is not clarified in low-risk patients without those conventional risks. We hypothesized that cardiac sympathetic nerve system (SNS) abnormality would be associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmic events in low-risk patients with ventricular tachycardia (VT). Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) scintigraphy was performed in 50 patients (mean+/-standard deviation, age 54 +/- 16 years, 52% males) with VT who did not have structural heart disease, severe left ventricular dysfunction, or history of cardiac arrest, and SNS activity was assessed from heart/mediastinal (H/M) ratio on delayed images. Over 11 years of follow-up, three patients had sudden deaths (6%) and nine patients had sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmic events (18%). SNS abnormality, defined as H/M ratio <2.8, was predictive of sudden death or ventricular tachyarrhythmic events (45% in nine of 20 patients with SNS abnormality vs 16.7% in three of 30 patients without SNS abnormality, p = 0.005). After adjustment for potential confounding variables including slight left ventricular dysfunction, SNS abnormality remained independently predictive of ventricular tachyarrhythmic events with a hazard ratio of 5.3 (95% confidence interval = 1.4 to 20.8, p = 0.016). SNS abnormality is a readily available and powerful predictor of recurrent ventricular tachyarrhythmic events in patients with VT who did not have conventional risk of sudden cardiac death. (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy can provide prognostic information of VT patients without conventional risk.

  18. Myocardin-related transcription factors are required for cardiac development and function.

    PubMed

    Mokalled, Mayssa H; Carroll, Kelli J; Cenik, Bercin K; Chen, Beibei; Liu, Ning; Olson, Eric N; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2015-10-15

    Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors A and B (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) are highly homologous proteins that function as powerful coactivators of serum response factor (SRF), a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor essential for cardiac development. The SRF/MRTF complex binds to CArG boxes found in the control regions of genes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and muscle contraction, among other processes. While SRF is required for heart development and function, the role of MRTFs in the developing or adult heart has not been explored. Through cardiac-specific deletion of MRTF alleles in mice, we show that either MRTF-A or MRTF-B is dispensable for cardiac development and function, whereas deletion of both MRTF-A and MRTF-B causes a spectrum of structural and functional cardiac abnormalities. Defects observed in MRTF-A/B null mice ranged from reduced cardiac contractility and adult onset heart failure to neonatal lethality accompanied by sarcomere disarray. RNA-seq analysis on neonatal hearts identified the most altered pathways in MRTF double knockout hearts as being involved in cytoskeletal organization. Together, these findings demonstrate redundant but essential roles of the MRTFs in maintenance of cardiac structure and function and as indispensible links in cardiac cytoskeletal gene regulatory networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of Denervated Myocardium on Improving Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Between 184,000 and 462,000 Americans die suddenly each year. Fifty percent to 70% of these deaths are due to ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF). We tested whether hibernating myocardium or myocardial sympathetic denervation identifies patients at high-risk for developing VT/VF independently of ejection fraction (EF). Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify myocardial sympathetic denervation (11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine [11C-HED]), perfusion (13N-ammonia), and viability (insulin-stimulated 18F-2-deoxyglucose [18FDG]) in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (EF < 35%) eligible for a primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). The primary end-point was sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) defined as arrhythmic death or ICD discharge for VT/VF > 240 bpm. Volumes of total denervated (P = .001) and viable denervated myocardium (11C-HED-18FDG mismatch, P = .03) predicted SCA, whereas hibernating and infarcted myocardium did not. Multivariate analysis identified four independent predictors of SCA: denervated myocardium > 37.6% of left ventricule (LV), LV end-diastolic volume > 98 mL/m2, creatinine level > 1.49 mg/dL, and no angiotensin- inhibition therapy. Denervated myocardium had a hazard ratio of 3.5 for SCA (10.3%/year vs. 3.0%/year, p=0.001). Absence of all four factors predicted low risk (44% of cohort; SCA <1%/y) whereas two or more factors identified subjects at high-risk (20% of cohort; SCA 12%/y). Denervated myocardium quantified using PET strongly predicts risk of SCA, and is independent of EF, infarct volume, and other clinical variables. PMID:25125727

  20. Impact of denervated myocardium on improving risk stratification for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Cain, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Between 184,000 and 462,000 Americans die suddenly each year. Fifty percent to 70% of these deaths are due to ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF). We tested whether hibernating myocardium or myocardial sympathetic denervation identifies patients at high-risk for developing VT/VF independently of ejection fraction (EF). Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify myocardial sympathetic denervation ((11)C-meta-hydroxyephedrine [(11)C-HED]), perfusion ((13)N-ammonia), and viability (insulin-stimulated (18)F-2-deoxyglucose [(18)FDG]) in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (EF < 35%) eligible for a primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). The primary end-point was sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) defined as arrhythmic death or ICD discharge for VT/VF > 240 bpm. Volumes of total denervated (P = .001) and viable denervated myocardium ((11)C-HED-(18)FDG mismatch, P = .03) predicted SCA, whereas hibernating and infarcted myocardium did not. Multivariate analysis identified four independent predictors of SCA: denervated myocardium > 37.6% of left ventricule (LV), LV end-diastolic volume > 98 mL/m(2), creatinine level > 1.49 mg/dL, and no angiotensin- inhibition therapy. Denervated myocardium had a hazard ratio of 3.5 for SCA (10.3%/year vs. 3.0%/year, p=0.001). Absence of all four factors predicted low risk (44% of cohort; SCA <1%/y) whereas two or more factors identified subjects at high-risk (20% of cohort; SCA 12%/y). Denervated myocardium quantified using PET strongly predicts risk of SCA, and is independent of EF, infarct volume, and other clinical variables.

  1. Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease Risk by Cardiac Biomarkers in 2 United Kingdom Cohort Studies: Does Utility Depend on Risk Thresholds For Treatment?

    PubMed

    Welsh, Paul; Hart, Carole; Papacosta, Olia; Preiss, David; McConnachie, Alex; Murray, Heather; Ramsay, Sheena; Upton, Mark; Watt, Graham; Whincup, Peter; Wannamethee, Goya; Sattar, Naveed

    2016-02-01

    We tested the predictive ability of cardiac biomarkers N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high-sensitivity troponin T, and midregional pro adrenomedullin for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events using the British Regional Heart Study (BRHS) of men aged 60 to 79 years, and the MIDSPAN Family Study (MFS) of men and women aged 30 to 59 years. They included 3757 and 2226 participants, respectively, and during median 13.0 and 17.3 years follow-up the primary CVD event rates were 16.6 and 5.3 per 1000 patient-years, respectively. In Cox models adjusted for basic classical risk factors, 1 SD increases in log-transformed NT-proBNP, high-sensitivity troponin T, and midregional pro adrenomedullin were generally associated with increased primary CVD risk in both the studies (P<0.006) except midregional pro adrenomedullin in MFS (P=0.10). In BRHS, QRISK2 risk factors yielded a C-index of 0.657, which was improved by 0.017 (P=0.005) by NT-proBNP, but not by other biomarkers. Using 28% 14-year risk as a proxy for 20% 10-year risk, NT-proBNP improved risk classification for primary CVD cases (case net reclassification index, 5.9%; 95% confidence interval, 2.8%-9.2%), but only improved classification of noncases at a 14% 14-year risk threshold (4.6%; 2.9%-6.3%). In MFS, ASSIGN risk factors yielded a C-index of 0.752 for primary CVD; none of the cardiac biomarkers improved the C-index. Improvements in risk classification were only seen using NT-proBNP and high-sensitivity troponin T among cases using the 28% 14-year risk threshold (4.7%; 1.0%-9.2% and 2.6%; 0.0%-5.8%, respectively). In conclusion, the improvement in treatment allocation gained by adding cardiac biomarkers to risk scores seems to depend on the risk threshold chosen for commencing preventative treatments. © 2015 The Authors.

  2. Combination of European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) and Cardiac Surgery Score (CASUS) to Improve Outcome Prediction in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Fabian; Heldwein, Matthias B.; Bayer, Ole; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Wahlers, Thorsten; Hekmat, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that the combination of a preoperative and a postoperative scoring system would improve the accuracy of mortality prediction and therefore combined the preoperative ‘additive EuroSCORE‘ (European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation) with the postoperative ‘additive CASUS’ (Cardiac Surgery Score) to form the ‘modified CASUS’. Material/Methods We included all consecutive adult patients after cardiac surgery during January 2007 and December 2010 in our prospective study. Our single-centre study was conducted in a German general referral university hospital. The original additive and the ‘modified CASUS’ were tested using calibration and discrimination statistics. We compared the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver characteristic curves (ROC) by DeLong’s method and calculated overall correct classification (OCC) values. Results The mean age among the total of 5207 patients was 67.2±10.9 years. Whilst the ICU mortality was 5.9% we observed a mean length of ICU stay of 4.6±7.0 days. Both models demonstrated excellent discriminatory power (mean AUC of ‘modified CASUS’: ≥0.929; ‘additive CASUS’: ≥0.920), with no significant differences according to DeLong. Neither model showed a significant p-value (<0.05) in calibration. We detected the best OCC during the 2nd day (modified: 96.5%; original: 96.6%). Conclusions Our ‘additive’ and ‘modified’ CASUS are reasonable overall predictors. We could not detect any improvement in the accuracy of mortality prediction in cardiac surgery by combining a preoperative and a postoperative scoring system. A separate calculation of the two individual elements is therefore recommended. PMID:26279053

  3. Combination of European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) and Cardiac Surgery Score (CASUS) to Improve Outcome Prediction in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Fabian; Heldwein, Matthias B; Bayer, Ole; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Dohmen, Pascal M; Wahlers, Thorsten; Hekmat, Khosro

    2015-08-17

    BACKGROUND We hypothesized that the combination of a preoperative and a postoperative scoring system would improve the accuracy of mortality prediction and therefore combined the preoperative 'additive EuroSCORE' (European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation) with the postoperative 'additive CASUS' (Cardiac Surgery Score) to form the 'modified CASUS'. MATERIAL AND METHODS We included all consecutive adult patients after cardiac surgery during January 2007 and December 2010 in our prospective study. Our single-centre study was conducted in a German general referral university hospital. The original additive and the 'modified CASUS' were tested using calibration and discrimination statistics. We compared the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver characteristic curves (ROC) by DeLong's method and calculated overall correct classification (OCC) values. RESULTS The mean age among the total of 5207 patients was 67.2 ± 10.9 years. Whilst the ICU mortality was 5.9% we observed a mean length of ICU stay of 4.6 ± 7.0 days. Both models demonstrated excellent discriminatory power (mean AUC of 'modified CASUS': ≥ 0.929; 'additive CASUS': ≥ 0.920), with no significant differences according to DeLong. Neither model showed a significant p-value (<0.05) in calibration. We detected the best OCC during the 2nd day (modified: 96.5%; original: 96.6%). CONCLUSIONS Our 'additive' and 'modified' CASUS are reasonable overall predictors. We could not detect any improvement in the accuracy of mortality prediction in cardiac surgery by combining a preoperative and a postoperative scoring system. A separate calculation of the two individual elements is therefore recommended.

  4. Interferon regulatory factor 7 functions as a novel negative regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Heng; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Ke; Gao, Lu; Peng, Juan; Gong, Hui; Chen, Yingjie; Yang, Qinglin; Liu, Peter P; Fan, Guo-Chang; Zou, Yunzeng; Li, Hongliang

    2014-04-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a complex pathological process that involves multiple factors including inflammation and apoptosis. Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is a multifunctional regulator that participates in immune regulation, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. However, the role of IRF7 in cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. We performed aortic banding in cardiac-specific IRF7 transgenic mice, IRF7 knockout mice, and the wild-type littermates of these mice. Our results demonstrated that IRF7 was downregulated in aortic banding-induced animal hearts and cardiomyocytes that had been treated with angiotensin II or phenylephrine for 48 hours. Accordingly, heart-specific overexpression of IRF7 significantly attenuated pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction, whereas loss of IRF7 led to opposite effects. Moreover, IRF7 protected against angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Mechanistically, we identified that IRF7-dependent cardioprotection was mediated through IRF7 binding to inhibitor of κB kinase-β, and subsequent nuclear factor-κB inactivation. In fact, blocking nuclear factor-κB signaling with cardiac-specific inhibitors of κBα(S32A/S36A) super-repressor transgene counteracted the adverse effect of IRF7 deficiency. Conversely, activation of nuclear factor-κB signaling via a cardiac-specific conditional inhibitor of κB kinase-β(S177E/S181E) (constitutively active) transgene negated the antihypertrophic effect of IRF7 overexpression. Our data demonstrate that IRF7 acts as a novel negative regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signaling and may constitute a potential therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

  5. Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Functions as a Novel Negative Regulator of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Heng; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Ke; Gao, Lu; Peng, Juan; Gong, Hui; Chen, Yingjie; Yang, Qinglin; Liu, Peter P.; Fan, Guo-Chang; Zou, Yunzeng; Li, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a complex pathological process that involves multiple factors including inflammation and apoptosis. Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is a multifunctional regulator that participates in immune regulation, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. However, the role of IRF7 in cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. We performed aortic banding in cardiac-specific IRF7 transgenic mice, IRF7 knockout mice, and the wild-type littermates of these mice. Our results demonstrated that IRF7 was downregulated in aortic banding–induced animal hearts and cardiomyocytes that had been treated with angiotensin II or phenylephrine for 48 hours. Accordingly, heart-specific overexpression of IRF7 significantly attenuated pressure overload–induced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction, whereas loss of IRF7 led to opposite effects. Moreover, IRF7 protected against angiotensin II–induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Mechanistically, we identified that IRF7-dependent cardioprotection was mediated through IRF7 binding to inhibitor of κB kinase-β, and subsequent nuclear factor-κB inactivation. In fact, blocking nuclear factor-κB signaling with cardiac-specific inhibitors of κBαS32A/S36A super-repressor transgene counteracted the adverse effect of IRF7 deficiency. Conversely, activation of nuclear factor-κB signaling via a cardiac-specific conditional inhibitor of κB kinase-βS177E/S181E (constitutively active) transgene negated the antihypertrophic effect of IRF7 overexpression. Our data demonstrate that IRF7 acts as a novel negative regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signaling and may constitute a potential therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24396025

  6. Evaluation of Resting Cardiac Power Output as a Prognostic Factor in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Omer; Aslan, Gamze; Demirozu, Zumrut T; Yenigun, Cemal Deniz; Yazicioglu, Nuran

    2017-09-15

    If the heart is represented by a hydraulic pump, cardiac power represents the hydraulic function of the heart. Cardiac pump function is frequently determined through left ventricular ejection fraction using imaging. This study aims to validate resting cardiac power output (CPO) as a predictive biomarker in patients with advanced heart failure (HF). One hundred and seventy-two patients with HF severe enough to warrant cardiac transplantation were retrospectively reviewed at a single tertiary care institution between September 2010 and July 2013. Patients were initially evaluated with simultaneous right-sided and left-sided cardiac catheter-based hemodynamic measurements, followed by longitudinal follow-up (median of 52 months) for adverse events (cardiac mortality, cardiac transplantation, or ventricular assist device placement). Median resting CPO was 0.54 W (long rank chi-square = 33.6; p < 0.0001). Decreased resting CPO (<0.54 W) predicted increased risk for adverse outcomes. Fifty cardiac deaths, 10 cardiac transplants, and 12 ventricular assist device placements were documented. The prognostic relevance of resting CPO remained significant after adjustment for age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, right atrial pressure, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (HR, 3.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.66 to 6.77; p = 0.0007). In conclusion, lower resting CPO supplies independent prediction of adverse outcomes. Thus, it could be effectively used for risk stratification in patients with advanced HF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The cardiac safety of aripiprazole treatment in patients at high risk for torsade: a systematic review with a meta-analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Polcwiartek, Christoffer; Sneider, Benjamin; Graff, Claus; Taylor, David; Meyer, Jonathan; Kanters, Jørgen K; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2015-09-01

    Certain antipsychotics increase the risk of heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) prolongation and consequently Torsades de Pointes (TdP) and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Drug-induced Brugada syndrome (BrS) is also associated with SCD. Most SCDs occur in patients with additional cardiac risk factors. Aripiprazole's cardiac safety has not been assessed in patients at high risk for torsade, where QTc prolongation risk is highly increased. MEDLINE, Embase, and The Cochrane Library were searched for preclinical, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Eligible studies were reviewed and cardiac safety data were extracted. Continuous and dichotomous QTc data were used in the meta-analysis. Preclinical studies suggested that aripiprazole has limited affinity for the delayed rectifier potassium current. TdP was reported in two case reports and SCD was reported in one case report and one case series. No clinical studies assessing aripiprazole's cardiac safety in patients at high risk for torsade were found. No thorough QT (TQT) study with aripiprazole was found. The meta-analysis revealed that the mean ΔQTc interval was decreased with aripiprazole and QTc prolongation risk was lower compared with placebo and active controls. Epidemiological studies linked aripiprazole to weak/moderate torsadogenicity. No studies were found associating aripiprazole with BrS suggesting low affinity for the fast sodium current. Aripiprazole is a low-risk antipsychotic regarding cardiac safety in healthy patients. However, baseline and steady state electrocardiogram is recommended in patients at high risk for torsade due to marked QTc prolongation, absence of a TQT study, and lack of data in this group.

  8. Transforming growth factor-beta and Forkhead box O transcription factors as cardiac fibroblast regulators.

    PubMed

    Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Núñez-Soto, Constanza; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; Cancino-Arenas, Nicole; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Vivar, Raul; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo; Mellado, Rosemarie; Chiong, Mario

    2017-05-23

    Fibroblasts play several homeostatic roles, including electrical coupling, paracrine signaling and tissue repair after injury. Fibroblasts have low secretory activity. However, in response to injury, they differentiate to myofibroblasts. These cells have an increased extracellular matrix synthesis and secretion, including collagen fibers, providing stiffness to the tissue. In pathological conditions myofibroblasts became resistant to apoptosis, remaining in the tissue, causing excessive extracellular matrix secretion and deposition, which contributes to the progressive tissue remodeling. Therefore, increased myofibroblast content within damaged tissue is a characteristic hallmark of heart, lung, kidney and liver fibrosis. Recently, it was described that cardiac fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation is triggered by the transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) through a Smad-independent activation of Forkhead box O (FoxO). FoxO proteins are a transcription factor family that includes FoxO1, FoxO3, FoxO4 and FoxO6. In several cells types, they play an important role in cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress resistance, cell survival, energy metabolism, and cell death. Here, we review the role of FoxO family members on the regulation of cardiac fibroblast proliferation and differentiation.

  9. Family Factors Predicting Categories of Suicide Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Brooke P.; Wang, Wen-Ling; Herting, Jerald R.; Eggert, Leona L.

    2006-01-01

    We compared family risk and protective factors among potential high school dropouts with and without suicide-risk behaviors (SRB) and examined the extent to which these factors predict categories of SRB. Subjects were randomly selected from among potential dropouts in 14 high schools. Based upon suicide-risk status, 1,083 potential high school…

  10. Suicide Risk Factors in Alcohol Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motto, Jerome A.

    1980-01-01

    A current focus in evaluating suicide risk is the "clinical model" approach, which determines those factors associated with high risk for suicide. The sociological factors identified as estimators of suicide risk included impaired health, job instability, multiple unit residence, no change in living setting, and modest financial resources. (JAC)

  11. [Suicide risk factors among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Pérez Barrero, Sergio Andrés

    2012-08-01

    The author offers a brief overview of suicide risk factors among the elderly such as depression, all manner of abuse of the elderly, as well as medical, psychological and social risk factors, etc. By way of conclusion, a practical guide to evaluate suicide risk among the elderly is provided.

  12. Common Variation in Fatty Acid Metabolic Genes and Risk of Incident Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Johnson, Catherine O.; Hesselson, Stephanie; Sotoodhenia, Nona; McKnight, Barbara; Sitlani, Colleen M.; Rea, Thomas D.; King, Irena B.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Mak, Angel; Li, Guo; Brody, Jennifer; Larson, Eric; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Psaty, Bruce M.; Huertas-Vazquez, Adriana; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Albert, Christine M.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Arking, Dan E.; Kääb, Stefan; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Wang, Ying A.; Reinier, Kyndaron; Lehtimäki, Terho; Pulit, Sara L.; Brugada, Ramon; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Newton-Cheh, Chris H.; Karhunen, Pekka J.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Goyette, Philippe; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chugh, Sumeet S.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Jouven, Xavier; Siscovick, David S

    2014-01-01

    Background There is limited information on genetic factors associated with sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Objective To assess the association of common variation in genes in fatty acid pathways with SCA risk. Methods We selected 85 candidate genes and 1155 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging common variation in each gene. We investigated the SNP associations with SCA in a population-based case-control study. Cases (n=2160) were from a repository of SCA in the greater Seattle area. Controls (n=2615), frequency-matched on age and sex, were from the same area. We used linear logistic regression to examine SNP associations with SCA. We performed p-min permutation tests to account for multiple comparisons within each gene. The SNP associations with corrected p-value < 0.05 were then examined in a meta-analysis of these SNP associations in nine replication studies totaling 2129 SCA cases and 23833 non-cases. Results Eight SNPs in or near 8 genes were associated with SCA risk in the discovery study, one of which was nominally significant in the replication phase (rs7737692, minor allele frequency 36%, near the LPCAT1 gene). For each copy of the minor allele, rs7737692 was associated with 13% lower SCA risk (−21% to −5%) in the discovery phase and 9% lower risk (95% CI −16% to - 1%) in the replication phase. Conclusions While none of the associations reached significance with Bonferroni correction, a common genetic variant near LPCAT1, a gene involved in the remodeling of phospholipids, was nominally associated with incident SCA risk. Further study is needed to validate this observation. PMID:24418166

  13. [Genetic risk factors in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fabisch, H; Kroisel, P M; Fabisch, Karin

    2005-11-01

    The high pathogenetic relevance of genetic factors in schizophrenia is beyond doubt based on the findings of epidemiological studies. By means of a complex mode of transmission, it is likely that several genes with weak to moderate effect jointly constitute a genetic basis for a vulnerability to schizophrenia that may well vary for different individuals. Other organic and psychosocial factors also play an individually different -- in some cases significant -- role in terms of pathogenesis, as a result of which an oligogenic/polygenic multifactor model is assumed from the standpoint of aetiopathogenetics. Molecular genetic methods consist in linkage analyses and association analyses. Positive linkage findings accumulate particularly for the chromosomes 1q, 6p, 8p, 13q and 22q. By themselves, individual mutations contribute little to the range of schizophrenic feature characteristics, it was not possible -- irrespective of some subtypes -- to replicate genes of major effect. From the large number of possible candidate genes, although studies on DRD3, DRD2 and HTR2A produced positive results, the magnitudes of effect were low. The findings for alleles of dysbindin, neuregulin 1, DAO, COMT, PRODH, ZDHHC and DISC are less clear. The search for schizophrenia-relevant mutations is hampered by the possibility of a heterogeneous phenotype of schizophrenia in case of a homogeneous genotype as much as by the possibility of inter-individually homogeneous phenotypical characteristics in case of schizophrenia-relevant heterotype in the genome. With the aid of the concept of endo-phenotypes, based on neurobiological phenomena, it might be possible to take a more direct approach that leads from relevant mutations to the risk of schizophrenias. However, replacing schizophrenic alienation with neurobiological aspects leads to difficulties in explaining these complex disorder profiles. Schizophrenic diseases require an explanatory approach that also incorporates personality and

  14. [Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer disease risk: epidemiological studies review].

    PubMed

    Cowppli-Bony, Pascale; Dartigues, Jean-François; Orgogozo, Jean-Marc

    2006-03-01

    Etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still undefined in its most frequent sporadic type, but a role of vascular risk factor is more and more evocated in its pathophysiology. This role enables to hope that preventive or curative care of vascular risk factors could decrease AD incidence. Among these factors, high blood pressure, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and tobacco consumption were the most studied. We review the risk for AD, which had been associated with each of these factors in epidemiological studies. High blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of AD in most studies while the results are more controversial for the others factors. All these four vascular risk factors have variable interaction with the presence of cerebrovascular diseases and of the epsilon 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene which is a predisposition factor for sporadic AD.

  15. Coronary artery calcium scoring is a better predictor of cardiac risk in subclinical hypothyroidism patients with low-risk Framingham score

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Verma, Ashish; Gupta, Piyush; Agrawal, N. K.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Overt hypothyroidism accelerates the cardiovascular disease. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), being considered as a preclinical state, impacts on cardiovascular status is not clear. Aims: This study was aimed at assessing cardiac risk stratification by Framingham risk scoring (FRS) and coronary coronary artery calcium score (CACS) by noncontrast cardiac computed tomography in SCH. Study Design: Observational study. Subjects and Methods: We enrolled thirty treatment-naive SCH patients (aged 30–60 years with no serious concurrent medical conditions), thirty euthyroid (age, sex, and body mass index-matched) controls, and ten