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Sample records for cardiac surgery evaluation

  1. Evaluation of a wireless ingestible temperature probe in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Markides, G A; Omorphos, S; Kotoulas, C; Prendergast, B

    2007-10-01

    CorTemp is a wireless intestinal temperature monitoring system in the form of an ingestible pill and an external receiver. The aim of the study was to evaluate the system's accuracy and practicality during cardiac surgery. A repeat measures design using simultaneous temperature readings from the pulmonary artery (T (pa)), a nasopharyngeal thermometer (T (np)), skin thermometers (T (sk)) and the CorTemp system (T (in)), was conducted in 15 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery under hypothermic conditions. Only 67 % of patients' data was analysed and the statistical analysis of a total of 264 sets of readings showed a clinically significant temperature difference of T (in) compared to the other thermometers with limits of agreement between T (in) and T (pa), T (np) and T (sk) (+/- 0.35 to +/- 1.53 degrees C), (+/- 0.72 to +/- 1.63 degrees C) (+/- 0.40 to +/- 1.84 degrees C), respectively. The T (in) bias was significantly different from that of T (pa) ( P = 0.0023), T (np) ( P = 0.018) and T (sk) ( P = 0.0005) during rewarming. The T (in) rate of temperature change was also found to be significantly slower during the rewarming period. The significant temperature differences detected during rewarming urge caution regarding CorTemp use as an accurate estimator of brain temperature in cardiac surgery. Further studies are required to assess its potentially useful role as a body core and intestinal temperature monitoring system and as a useful adjunct in investigating bowel ischaemia aetiology in cardiac surgery.

  2. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  3. Evaluation of autonomic reserves in cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Alain; Denault, André; Rochon, Antoine; Cogan, Jennifer; Pagé, Pierre; D'Antono, Bianca

    2013-06-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is a well-recognized but rarely evaluated risk factor for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. By measuring autonomic reserves in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery, the authors aimed to identify those with autonomic dysfunction and to evaluate their risk of perioperative complications. This was a prospective, observational study. The study was conducted in a single academic center. Sixty-seven patients completed the study. Autonomic reserves were evaluated using analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) after a Valsalva maneuver. The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on their response to the autonomic challenge, a group with autonomic reserves (AR, n = 38) and a group with negligible autonomic reserves (NAR, n = 29). The groups were compared for baseline psychologic distress, demographic and medical profiles, autonomic response to morphine premedication and the induction of anesthesia, hemodynamic instability, the occurrence of decreases in cerebral oxygen saturation, and postoperative complications. Patients in the NAR group had significantly higher psychologic distress scores (p < 0.001), a higher baseline parasympathetic tone (p = 0.003), were unable to increase parasympathetic tone with morphine premedication, had more severe hypotension at the induction of anesthesia (p < 0.001), more episodes of decreases in cerebral saturation (p = 0.0485), and a higher overall complication rate (p = 0.0388) independent of other variables studied. Patients with diminished autonomic reserves can be identified before cardiac surgery using analysis of HRV and BPV of the response to the Valsalva maneuver, and some evidence suggests that they may be at increased risk of perioperative complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Evaluation of the cardiac risks in non-cardiac surgery in patients with heart failure].

    PubMed

    Pinaud, M

    2002-02-01

    Cardiac insufficiency represents a major risk factor in patients about to undergo non-cardiac surgery. The post-operative mortality is linked to the severity of the pre-operative functional impairment: rising from 4% in NYHA class 1 to 67% in class IV. The operative risk is greater when the cardiac insufficiency is more disabling, the patient is older (> 70 years) and if there is a history of acute pulmonary oedema and a gallop bruit on auscultation. The use of metabolic equivalents (Duke Activity Status Index) is recommended: the functional capacity is defined as excellent if > 7 MET, moderate between 4 and 7, or poor if < 4. A non-invasive evaluation of left ventricular function is necessary in each patient with obvious congestive cardiac insufficiency or poor control under the American consensus, but it is rare that the patient has not already been seen by a cardiologist. The degree of per-operative haemodynamic constraint is linked to the surgical technique and is stratified according to the type of surgical intervention and whether or not it is performed as an emergency. An intervention duration > 5 hours is associated with an increased peri-operative risk of congestive cardiac insufficiency and non-cardiac death. Deaths from a cardiac cause are thus twice as frequent after intra-abdominal, non-cardiac thoracic or aortic surgery and the post-operative cardiac complications are six times more frequent. Numerous studies have attempted to document the impact of different anaesthetic techniques on the prognosis for the population at increased risk of post-operative cardiovascular complications. It is advisable to opt for peripheral nerve blocks. The cardiovascular morbidity and overall mortality do not differ between general anaesthetic, epidural anaesthetic or spinal nerve block. The ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) classification is widely used to determine the overall risk. The ASA class and the age are however too coarse as methods of evaluation for

  5. Current Practice and Recommendation for Presurgical Cardiac Evaluation in Patients Undergoing Noncardiac Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, P. Shanmuga

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing major noncardiac surgery justifies guidelines concerning preoperative cardiac evaluation. This is compounded by increasing chances for a volatile perioperative period if the underlying cardiac problems are left uncorrected prior to major noncardiac surgeries. Preoperative cardiac evaluation requires the clinician to assess the patient's probability to have CAD, severity and stability of CAD, placing these in perspective regarding the likelihood of a perioperative cardiac complication based on the planned surgical procedure. Coronary events like new onset ischemia, infarction, or revascularization, induce a high-risk period of 6 weeks, and an intermediate-risk period of 3 months before performing noncardiac surgery. This delay is unwarranted in cases where surgery is the mainstay of treatment. The objective of this review is to offer a comprehensive algorithm in the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery and highlight the importance of myocardial perfusion imaging in risk stratifying these patients. PMID:25191106

  6. Performance of European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation in Veterans General Hospital Kaohsiung cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsin-Hung; Kang, Pei-Luen; Pan, Jun-Yen; Wu, Tung-Ho; Wu, Chieh-Ten; Lin, Chun-Yao; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Chou, Wan-Ting

    2011-03-01

    The European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) model is a widely-used risk prediction algorithm for in-hospital or 30-day mortality in adult cardiac surgery patients. Recent studies indicated that EuroSCORE tends to overpredict mortality. The aim of our study is to evaluate the validity of EuroSCORE in Veterans General Hospital Kaohsiung (VGHKS) cardiac surgery including a number of different surgical and risk subgroups. From January 2006 to December 2009, 1,240 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery in VGHKS were included in this study. The study was followed the guidelines of the Ethics Committee of Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Both additive and logistic score of all patients were calculated depending on the formula in the official EuroSCORE website. The entire cohort, different surgical type and risk stratification subgroups were analyzed. Model discrimination was tested by determining the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Model calibration was tested by the Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square test. Clinical performance of model was assessed by comparing the observed and predicted mortality rates. There were significant differences between the VGHKS and European cardiac surgical populations. The additive score and logistic score for the overall group were 7.16% and 12.88%, respectively. Observed mortality was 10.72% overall, 5.68% for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 4.67% for the mitral valve only and 4.25% for the aortic valve only group. The discriminative ability EuroSCORE was very good in all and various surgical subgroups, with area under the ROC curve from 0.75 to 0.87. The addictive and logistic models of EuroSCORE showed excellent accuracy, 0.839 and 0.845, respectively. Good calibration power was recognized by p value higher than 0.05 for the entire cohort and all subgroups of patients except for isolated CABG. The logistic EuroSCORE model overestimated mortality to different

  7. Evaluation and management of bleeding during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jerrold H; Tanaka, Kenichi A; Steiner, Marie E

    2005-09-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with and potentially without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are at risk for excessive microvascular bleeding. This bleeding often leads to transfusion of allogeneic blood and blood components as well as reexploration. Excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery occurs because of alterations in the hemostatic system pertaining to dilutional thrombocytopenia, excessive hemostatic activation, and exposure to long-acting antiplatelet or antithrombotic agents. Pharmacologic interventions have been extensively reported as means to attenuate the alterations in the hemostatic system during CPB in an attempt to reduce excessive bleeding, transfusion, and reexploration. Prophylactic administration of agents with antifibrinolytic and antiinflammatory properties can decrease blood loss and transfusion. Aprotinin is the most extensively studied and effective blood conservation agent and has the most potent antifibrinolytic and antiinflammatory effects. Other agents, including the lysine analogues with isolated antifibrinolytic properties, may be effective in low-risk patients. The ability to reduce blood product transfusions and to decrease operative times and reexploration rates favorably affects patient outcomes, availability of blood products, and overall health care costs.

  8. Combination of European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) and Cardiac Surgery Score (CASUS) to Improve Outcome Prediction in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Fabian; Heldwein, Matthias B.; Bayer, Ole; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Wahlers, Thorsten; Hekmat, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that the combination of a preoperative and a postoperative scoring system would improve the accuracy of mortality prediction and therefore combined the preoperative ‘additive EuroSCORE‘ (European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation) with the postoperative ‘additive CASUS’ (Cardiac Surgery Score) to form the ‘modified CASUS’. Material/Methods We included all consecutive adult patients after cardiac surgery during January 2007 and December 2010 in our prospective study. Our single-centre study was conducted in a German general referral university hospital. The original additive and the ‘modified CASUS’ were tested using calibration and discrimination statistics. We compared the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver characteristic curves (ROC) by DeLong’s method and calculated overall correct classification (OCC) values. Results The mean age among the total of 5207 patients was 67.2±10.9 years. Whilst the ICU mortality was 5.9% we observed a mean length of ICU stay of 4.6±7.0 days. Both models demonstrated excellent discriminatory power (mean AUC of ‘modified CASUS’: ≥0.929; ‘additive CASUS’: ≥0.920), with no significant differences according to DeLong. Neither model showed a significant p-value (<0.05) in calibration. We detected the best OCC during the 2nd day (modified: 96.5%; original: 96.6%). Conclusions Our ‘additive’ and ‘modified’ CASUS are reasonable overall predictors. We could not detect any improvement in the accuracy of mortality prediction in cardiac surgery by combining a preoperative and a postoperative scoring system. A separate calculation of the two individual elements is therefore recommended. PMID:26279053

  9. Combination of European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) and Cardiac Surgery Score (CASUS) to Improve Outcome Prediction in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Fabian; Heldwein, Matthias B; Bayer, Ole; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Dohmen, Pascal M; Wahlers, Thorsten; Hekmat, Khosro

    2015-08-17

    BACKGROUND We hypothesized that the combination of a preoperative and a postoperative scoring system would improve the accuracy of mortality prediction and therefore combined the preoperative 'additive EuroSCORE' (European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation) with the postoperative 'additive CASUS' (Cardiac Surgery Score) to form the 'modified CASUS'. MATERIAL AND METHODS We included all consecutive adult patients after cardiac surgery during January 2007 and December 2010 in our prospective study. Our single-centre study was conducted in a German general referral university hospital. The original additive and the 'modified CASUS' were tested using calibration and discrimination statistics. We compared the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver characteristic curves (ROC) by DeLong's method and calculated overall correct classification (OCC) values. RESULTS The mean age among the total of 5207 patients was 67.2 ± 10.9 years. Whilst the ICU mortality was 5.9% we observed a mean length of ICU stay of 4.6 ± 7.0 days. Both models demonstrated excellent discriminatory power (mean AUC of 'modified CASUS': ≥ 0.929; 'additive CASUS': ≥ 0.920), with no significant differences according to DeLong. Neither model showed a significant p-value (<0.05) in calibration. We detected the best OCC during the 2nd day (modified: 96.5%; original: 96.6%). CONCLUSIONS Our 'additive' and 'modified' CASUS are reasonable overall predictors. We could not detect any improvement in the accuracy of mortality prediction in cardiac surgery by combining a preoperative and a postoperative scoring system. A separate calculation of the two individual elements is therefore recommended.

  10. Evaluating the obtunded patient after cardiac surgery: the role of continuous electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Marcuse, Lara V; Bronster, David J; Fields, Madeline; Polanco, Antonio; Yu, Tsana; Chikwe, Joanna

    2014-04-01

    This prospective study was designed to evaluate the role of continuous electroencephalography (EEG) in the management of adult patients with neurological dysfunction early after cardiac surgery. Seven hundred twenty-three patients undergoing cardiac surgery between December 2010 and June 2011 were divided into 2 groups based on the presence or absence of post-operative neurological dysfunction. All patients with neurological dysfunction underwent continuous EEG. Neurological dysfunction was diagnosed in 12 patients (1.7%), of whom 5 (42%) did not regain consciousness after surgery, 4 (33%) had a clinical event suspicious for seizure and 3 (25%) had neurological deficits. Continuous EEG showed that 2 of the 5 patients who failed to regain consciousness, without clinical signs of seizures, were in electrographic non-convulsive focal status epilepticus. Periodic discharges were present in the continuous EEGs of 3 patients. Three additional patients (25%) had abnormal movements that continuous EEG demonstrated was not due to seizure activity. Non-convulsive status epilepticus may be an under-recognized cause of obtundation early after cardiac surgery. Continuous EEG monitoring is a non-invasive test that can identify patients that may benefit from anti-epileptic medication. Larger comparative studies are required to establish whether this leads to significant improvements in patient outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mortality prediction in Indian cardiac surgery patients: Validation of European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation II

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Prachi; Geeta, Kanithi; Gopinath, Ramachandran; Durga, Padmaja

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Risk Stratification has an important place in cardiac surgery to identify high-risk cases and optimally allocate resources. Hence various risk scoring systems have been tried to predict mortality. The aim of the present study was to validate the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation II (EuroSCORE II) in Indian cardiac surgical patients. Methods: After obtaining ethics committee clearance, data on EuroSCORE II variables were collected for all patients >18 years undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), valve surgery and mixed (CABG + valve) procedures between January 2011 and December 2012. Mortality prediction was done using the online calculator from the site www.euroscore.org. The calibration of the EuroSCORE II model was analysed using the Hosmer–Lemeshow test and discrimination was analysed by plotting receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) and calculating area under the curve (AUC). The analysis was done in the total sample, CABG, valve surgery and in mixed procedures. Results: The overall observed mortality was 5.7% in the total sample, 6.6% in CABG, 4.2% in valve surgeries and 10.2% in mixed procedures whereas the predicted mortality was 2.9%, 3.1%, 2.4%, 5.1% in total sample, CABG, valve surgery and mixed procedure, respectively. The significance (P value) of Hosmer–Lemeshow test was 0.292, 0.45, 0.56 and 1 for the total sample, CABG, valve surgery and mixed procedure, respectively, indicating good calibration. The AUC of ROC was 0.76, 0.70, 0.83 and 0.78 for total sample, CABG, valve surgery and mixed procedure, respectively. Conclusion: Mortality of the sample was under-predicted by EuroSCORE II. Calibration of the EuroSCORE II model was good for total sample as well as for all surgical subcategories. Discrimination was good in the total sample and in the mixed procedure population, acceptable in CABG patients and excellent in valve surgeries. PMID:28250485

  12. ICF-based approach to evaluating functionality in cardiac rehabilitation patients after heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Racca, V; Di Rienzo, M; Mazzini, P; Ripamonti, V; Gasti, G; Spezzaferri, R; Modica, M; Ferratini, M

    2015-08-01

    Heart surgery is a frequent reason for admission to in-patient cardiac rehabilitation programmes. ICF approach has never been used to evaluate cardiac patients after major heart surgery. The aim was to evaluate and measure functionality in cardiac patients who have undergone heart surgery, using for the first time the ICF-based approach and to assess whether such approach can be feasible and useful in cardiac rehabilitation. Observational study. In-patients cardiac Rehabilitation Unit in Milan. Fifty consecutively admitted patients who had undergone heart surgery (34 males, 16 females; mean age 65.7±12.5 years). We prepared a ICF-core set short enough to be feasible and practical. Patients were individually interviewed by different healthcare professionals (randomly selected from a group of two physicians, two physiotherapists and two psychologists) at the beginning (T1) and end of cardiac rehabilitation (T2) RESULTS: The sum of the scores of each ICF body function, body structure, activity and participation code significantly decreased between T1 and T2 (P<0.001). The environmental code scores significantly decreased in the case of facilitators between T1 and T2 (P=0.0051), but not in the case of barriers. There were significant correlations between the ICF body function scores and Barthel's index (ρ=0.381; P=0.006), NYHA class (ρ=0.404; P=0.004) and plasma Cr-P levels (r=0.31; P=0.03), between the ICF body structure codes and the Conley scale (ρ=0.306; P=0.02), and between the activity/participation codes and SpO2 (ρ=0.319; P=0.04). There were no correlations between the ICF environmental codes and clinical parameters. The ICF-based data provided functional information that was consistent with the patients' clinical course. The core set used allowed to quantify important body functions and activities, including some areas that are generally insufficiently considered by healthcare professionals during cardiac rehabilitation, and document their improvement.

  13. Cardiac surgery patients' evaluation of the quality of theatre nurse postoperative follow-up visit.

    PubMed

    Falk-Brynhildsen, Karin; Nilsson, Ulrica

    2009-06-01

    Theatre nurses at the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery in Orebro, Sweden, have since 2001 routinely conducted a follow-up visit to postoperative cardiac patients. A model with a standardized information part and an individual-caring conversation including both a retrospective and a prospective part designed the visit. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of the postoperative follow-up visit conducted by the theatre nurses and find out if the quality was related to gender or type of admission. The method was prospective and explorative, including 74 cardiac surgery patients who had had a postoperative follow-up visit by a theatre nurse in Sweden. The instrument measuring quality, from the patient's perspective, measured the quality of the visit, and consisted of 16 items modified to suit the study. The results showed an overall high quality rating, with statistically significant higher scores for six items between patients who had undergone emergency surgery, in comparison with elective patients. When comparing gender, women had statistically significant higher scores in two items. In conclusion, this postoperative follow-up visit by the theatre nurse was a valuable and useful tool especially for the patients who had undergone emergency surgery. In the follow-up visit the theatre nurse creates a caring relationship by meeting the patient as an individual with his/her own experience and needs for information about the surgery, intra and postoperative care, and recovery.

  14. Revised ESC/ESA Guidelines on non-cardiac surgery: cardiovascular assessment and management. Implications for preoperative clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guarracino, F; Baldassarri, R; Priebe, H J

    2015-02-01

    Each year, an increasing number of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease undergoing non-cardiac surgery require careful perioperative management to minimize the perioperative risk. Perioperative cardiovascular complications are the strongest predictors of morbidity and mortality after major non-cardiac surgery. A Joint Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) has recently published revised Guidelines on the perioperative cardiovascular management of patients scheduled to undergo non-cardiac surgery, which represent the official position of the ESC and ESA on various aspects of perioperative cardiac care. According to the Guidelines effective perioperative cardiac management includes preoperative risk stratification based on preoperative assessment of functional capacity, type of surgery, cardiac risk factors, and cardiovascular function. The ESC/ESA Guidelines discourage indiscriminate routine preoperative cardiac testing, because it is time- and cost-consuming, resource-limiting, and does not improve perioperative outcome. They rather emphasize the importance of individualized preoperative cardiac evaluation and the cooperation between anesthesiologists and cardiologists. We summarize the relevant changes of the 2014 Guidelines as compared to the previous ones, with particular emphasis on preoperative cardiac testing.

  15. Preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk using dobutamine-thallium imaging in vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Zellner, J.L.; Elliott, B.M.; Robison, J.G.; Hendrix, G.H.; Spicer, K.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Coronary artery disease is frequently present in patients undergoing evaluation for reconstructive peripheral vascular surgery. Dobutamine-thallium imaging has been shown to be a reliable and sensitive noninvasive method for the detection of significant coronary artery disease. Eighty-seven candidates for vascular reconstruction underwent dobutamine-thallium imaging. Forty-eight patients had an abnormal dobutamine-thallium scan. Twenty-two patients had infarct only, while 26 had reversible ischemia demonstrated on dobutamine-thallium imaging. Fourteen of 26 patients with reversible ischemia underwent cardiac catheterization and 11 showed significant coronary artery disease. Seven patients underwent preoperative coronary bypass grafting or angioplasty. There were no postoperative myocardial events in this group. Three patients were denied surgery on the basis of unreconstructible coronary artery disease, and one patient refused further intervention. Ten patients with reversible myocardial ischemia on dobutamine-thallium imaging underwent vascular surgical reconstruction without coronary revascularization and suffered a 40% incidence of postoperative myocardial ischemic events. Five patients were denied surgery because of presumed significant coronary artery disease on the basis of the dobutamine-thallium imaging and clinical evaluation alone. Thirty-nine patients with normal dobutamine-thallium scans underwent vascular reconstructive surgery with a 5% incidence of postoperative myocardial ischemia. Dobutamine-thallium imaging is a sensitive and reliable screening method which identifies those patients with coronary artery disease who are at high risk for perioperative myocardial ischemia following peripheral vascular surgery.

  16. Cardiac surgery 2015 reviewed.

    PubMed

    Doenst, Torsten; Strüning, Constanze; Moschovas, Alexandros; Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Essa, Yasin; Kirov, Hristo; Diab, Mahmoud; Faerber, Gloria

    2016-10-01

    For the year 2015, almost 19,000 published references can be found in PubMed when entering the search term "cardiac surgery". The last year has been again characterized by lively discussions in the fields where classic cardiac surgery and modern interventional techniques overlap. Lacking evidence in the field of coronary revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or bypass surgery has been added. As in the years before, CABG remains the gold standard for the revascularization of complex stable triple-vessel disease. Plenty of new information has been presented comparing the conventional to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) demonstrating similar short- and mid-term outcomes at high and low risk, but even a survival advantage with transfemoral TAVI at intermediate risk. In addition, there were many relevant and interesting other contributions from the purely operative arena. This review article will summarize the most pertinent publications in the fields of coronary revascularization, surgical treatment of valve disease, heart failure (i.e., transplantation and ventricular assist devices), and aortic surgery. While the article does not have the expectation of being complete and cannot be free of individual interpretation, it provides a condensed summary that is intended to give the reader "solid ground" for up-to-date decision-making in cardiac surgery.

  17. Anesthesiologists’ preferences for preoperative cardiac evaluation before vascular surgery: results of a mail survey☆

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, John E.; Tung, Avery; Lee, Helen; Lee, Hubert; Kasza, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective To investigate whether anesthesiologists’ decisions to request preoperative cardiac evaluation (cardiologist consultation, echocardiography, and cardiac stress testing) before vascular surgery were influenced by patient comorbidity and magnitude of surgery; and to explore whether factors unrelated to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines influence these decisions. Design Survey instrument. Setting University medical center. Subjects 2,000 U.S. anesthesiologists who were mailed a survey. Measurements Six factors in a hypothetical patient presenting for vascular surgery [gender, race (white vs. black), age (65 yrs vs. 85 yrs), comorbidities (sick vs. healthy), functional status, and magnitude of surgical stress] were evaluated. Respondents were asked about their demographics, practice patterns, and how they would manage the hypothetical patient. Main Results Of 2,000 mailed surveys, 439 U.S. anesthesiologists responded (22%). Multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that anesthesiologists were more likely to recommend preoperative cardiology consultation for patients with more comorbidities [odds ratio = 5.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.76, 8.15], for those with poorer functional status (odds ratio = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.02, 2.07), for those undergoing a more significant surgery (odds ratio = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.13, 2.30), as the clinicians’ estimated risk of perioperative myocardial infarction increased (P < 0.001), or if they only infrequently anesthetized patients such as the one described in the scenario (P = 0.05). They also would request a preoperative echocardiogram for patients with more comorbidities (odds ratio = 2.58; 95% CI = 1.80, 3.68) and for those undergoing a more significant surgery (odds ratio = 1.59; 95% CI = 1.12, 2.25).Apreoperative stress test was recommended for patients with more comorbidities (odds ratio = 3.01; 95% CI = 2.06, 4.38) and for those with a more

  18. Evaluation of non-surgical causes of cardiac tamponade in children at a cardiac surgery center.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Erkut; Tanidir, Ibrahim Cansaran; Saygi, Murat; Ergul, Yakup; Guzeltas, Alper; Odemis, Ender

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the causes of cardiac tamponade in children undergoing percutaneous pericardiocentesis. Patients who presented with other complaints but were diagnosed with cardiac tamponade based on clinical and echocardiographic findings between January 2010 and January 2013 were retrospectively investigated. Electrocardiography, telecardiography and transthoracic echocardiography were performed. Pericardiocentesis was performed percutaneously under continuous blood pressure and rhythm monitoring with echocardiography and fluoroscopy. Pericardial fluid was analyzed on hemography and biochemistry. Fourteen patients (six boys, eight girls; median age, 7 years) underwent pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade. At presentation, 78% had dyspnea, 56% chest pain, and 49% fever. All had cardiomegaly, and their cardiothoracic index was 0.56-0.72. Also, all patients had sinus tachycardia; 78%, low QRS voltage; 70%, ST-T changes; and 50% QRS alternans. On echocardiography the widest diameter of pericardial effusion was between 12 mm and 36 mm depth around the heart. The pericardial fluid was purulent in one, serohemorrhagic in seven, serofibrinous in two, and serous in four cases. Pericardiocentesis was unsuccessful in two patients, who underwent open surgical drainage, with no complications. Based on pericardial fluid characteristics and additional tests, cardiac tamponade was caused by an infection in five patients, hypothyroidism in two, familial Mediterranean fever in two, malignancy in one, acute rheumatic fever in one, collagen tissue disease (systemic lupus erythematosus) in one, catheter placement-associated damage in one, and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in one patient. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade in children have varied causes, and early treatment is life saving. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Evaluating the Potential Effect of Melatonin on the post-Cardiac Surgery Sleep Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dianatkhah, Mehrnoush; Ghaeli, Padideh; Hajhossein Talasaz, Azita; Karimi, Abbasali; Salehiomran, Abbas; Bina, Peyvand; Jalali, Arash; Ghaffary, Saba; Shahmansouri, Nazila; Vejdani, Shaghayegh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative neurological injuries, including cognitive dysfunction, sleep disorder, delirium, and anxiety, are the important consequences of coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Evidence has shown that postoperative sleep disturbance is partly due to disturbed melatonin secretion in the perioperative period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin on postoperative sleep disorder in patients undergoing CABG. Method: One hundred forty-five elective CABG patients participated in a randomized double-blind study during the preoperative period. The patients were randomized to receive either 3 mg of melatonin or 10 mg of Oxazepam one hour before sleep time. Each group received the medication from 3 days before surgery until the time of discharge. Sleep quality was evaluated using the Groningen Sleep Quality Score (GSQS), and the incidence of delirium was evaluated by nursing records. Sleep quality and anxiety scores were compared before and after surgery through the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and independent t-test were used to compare the sleep and anxiety scores between the groups. P values ≤ 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Totally, 137 patients at a mean age of 60 years completed the study (76% male). The analysis of the data showed that sleep was significantly disturbed after surgery in both groups. The patients in the Oxazepam group demonstrated significantly higher disturbance in their mean postoperative GSQS score than did their counterparts in the melatonin group (p value < 0.001). A smaller proportion of the participants experienced delirium in the melatonin group (0.06%) than in the Oxazepam group (0.12%); however, this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The result of the present study revealed that melatonin improved sleep in post-cardiac surgery patients more than what was observed with Oxazepam. Therefore, melatonin may be

  20. Evaluation of peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Kelli Maria Souza; de Cerqueira Neto, Manoel Luiz; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; de Santana Filho, Valter Joviniano; da Silva Junior, Walderi Monteiro; Araújo Filho, Amaro Afrânio; Cerqueira, Telma Cristina Fontes; Cacau, Lucas de Assis Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral muscle strength has been little explored in the literature in the context of cardiac rehabilitation. Objective To evaluate the peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods This was a longitudinal observational study. The peripheral muscle strength was measured using isometric dynamometry lower limb (knee extensors and flexors) at three different times: preoperatively (M1), the day of discharge (M2) and hospital discharge (M3). Participants received physiotherapy pre and postoperatively during the days of hospitalization during the morning and afternoon. Results Twenty-two patients were evaluated. The values of peripheral muscle strength of knee extensors preoperative found were about 50% lower than those predicted for the healthy population. When comparing muscle strength prior (M1), with the remaining evaluation, found himself in a fall of 29% for the movement of knee extension and 25% for knee flexion in M2 and a decrease of 10% movement for knee extension and 13% for knee flexion in M3 when comparing with M1. Conclusion The values of peripheral muscle strength prior of the study patients were lower than predicted for the healthy population of the same age. After the surgical event this reduction is even more remarkable, being reestablished until the time of discharge, to values close to baseline. PMID:25372909

  1. [Non-cardiac surgery in patients with cardiac disease].

    PubMed

    Sellevold, Olav F Münter; Stenseth, Roar

    2010-03-25

    Patients with cardiac disease have a higher incidence of cardiovascular events after non-cardiac surgery than those without such disease. This paper provides an overview of perioperative examinations and treatment. Own experience and systematic literature search through work with European guidelines constitute the basis for recommendations given in this article. Beta-blockers should not be discontinued before surgery. High-risk patients may benefit from beta-blockers administered before major non-cardiac surgery. Slow dose titration is recommended. Echocardiography should be performed before preoperative beta-blockade to exclude latent heart failure. Statins should be considered before elective surgery and coronary intervention (stenting or surgery) before high-risk surgery. Otherwise, interventions should be evaluated irrespective of planned non-cardiac surgery. Patients with unstable coronary syndrome should only undergo non-cardiac surgery on vital indications. Neuraxial techniques are optimal for postoperative pain relief and thus for postoperative mobilization. Thromboprophylaxis is important, but increases the risk of epidural haematoma and requires systematic follow-up with respect to diagnostics and treatment. Little evidence supports the use of different anaesthetic methods in cardiac patients that undergo non-cardiac surgery than in other patients. Stable circulation, sufficient oxygenation, good pain relief, thromboprophylaxis, enteral nutrition and early mobilization are important factors for improving the perioperative course. Close cooperation between anaesthesiologist, surgeon and cardiologist improves logistics and treatment.

  2. Evaluation of closed-loop anesthesia delivery for propofol anesthesia in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Indranil; Mathew, Preethy J; Singh, Rana S; Puri, Goverdhan D

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the feasibility of closed-loop anesthesia delivery with manual control of propofol in pediatric patients during cardiac surgery. Forty ASA II-III children, undergoing elective cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a tertiary care hospital, were randomized to receive propofol either through a closed-loop anesthesia delivery system (CL group) or through traditional manual control (manual group) to achieve a target BIS of 50. Patients were induced and subsequently maintained with a propofol infusion. The propofol usage and the efficacy of closed-loop system in controlling BIS within ±10 of the target were compared with that of manual control. The maintenance of BIS within ±10 of target and intraoperative hemodynamic stability were similar between the two groups. However, induction dose of propofol was less in the CL group (2.06 ± 0.79 mg·kg(-1) ) than the manual group (2.95 ± 1.03 mg·kg(-1) ) (P = 0.006) with less overshoot of BIS during induction in the closed-loop group (P = 0.007). Total propofol used in the off-CPB period was less in the CL group (6.29 ± 2.48 mg·kg(-1) h(-1) vs 7.82 ± 2.1 mg·kg(-1) h(-1) ) (P = 0.037). Phenylephrine use in the pre-CPB period was more in the manual group (16.92 ± 10.92 μg·kg(-1) vs 5.79 ± 5.98 μg·kg(-1) ) (P = 0.014). Manual group required a median of 18 (range 8-29) dose adjustments per hour, while the CL group required none. This study demonstrated the feasibility of closed-loop controlled propofol anesthesia in children, even in challenging procedures such as cardiac surgery. Closed-loop system needs further and larger evaluation to establish its safety and efficacy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Anaesthesia for cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Rooney, P

    1996-09-01

    Perhaps no form of surgery is as emotive as that on the heart. From ancient times, seen as the seat of the emotions, the heart has been recognised as a vital if, at times, mysterious organ. Its grip on the imagination of primitive peoples is exemplified in the extreme by the climax of the human sacrificial ceremonies carried out by the Aztec and Inca peoples of Mexico and Peru: the holding aloft by the priest of the victim's still-beating heart. Nowadays, although we might congratulate ourselves on the heights of civilization which we have attained, it is salutary to consider that such cultural achievements are but a veneer through which primordial emotions frequently burst. As professional nurses, however, while appreciating the emotions of our patients and relatives with regard to cardiac surgery, we need to exercise sufficient detachment so that effective care may be delivered. This article will discuss cardiac anaesthesia generally, but will not touch on the specialised subjects of transplantation. It also accepts that techniques and drug regimes vary from centre to centre.

  4. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance.

  5. Evaluation of Hemoglobin A1c Criteria to Assess Preoperative Diabetes Risk in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Sima; Zrull, Christina A.; Patil, Preethi V.; Jha, Leena; Kling-Colson, Susan C.; Gandia, Kenia G.; DuBois, Elizabeth C.; Plunkett, Cynthia D.; Bodnar, Tim W.; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) has recently been recommended for diagnosing diabetes mellitus and diabetes risk (prediabetes). Its performance compared with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h post-glucose load (2HPG) is not well delineated. We compared the performance of A1C with that of FPG and 2HPG in preoperative cardiac surgery patients. Methods Data from 92 patients without a history of diabetes were analyzed. Patients were classified with diabetes or prediabetes using established cutoffs for FPG, 2HPG, and A1C. Sensitivity and specificity of the new A1C criteria were evaluated. Results All patients diagnosed with diabetes by A1C also had impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes by other criteria. Using FPG as the reference, sensitivity and specificity of A1C for diagnosing diabetes were 50% and 96%, and using 2HPG as the reference they were 25% and 95%. Sensitivity and specificity for identifying prediabetes with FPG as the reference were 51% and 51%, respectively, and with 2HPG were 53% and 51%, respectively. One-third each of patients with prediabetes was identified using FPG, A1C, or both. When testing A1C and FPG concurrently, the sensitivity of diagnosing dysglycemia increased to 93% stipulating one or both tests are abnormal; specificity increased to 100% if both tests were required to be abnormal. Conclusions In patients before cardiac surgery, A1C criteria identified the largest number of patients with diabetes and prediabetes. For diagnosing prediabetes, A1C and FPG were discordant and characterized different groups of patients, therefore altering the distribution of diabetes risk. Simultaneous measurement of FGP and A1C may be a more sensitive and specific tool for identifying high-risk individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:21854260

  6. Influence of cirrhosis in cardiac surgery outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Esteve, Francisco; Javierre, Casimiro; Ventura, Josep L; Mañez, Rafael; Farrero, Elisabet; Torrado, Herminia; Rodríguez-Castro, David; Carrio, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis has evolved an important risk factor for cardiac surgery due to the higher morbidity and mortality that these patients may suffer compared with general cardiac surgery population. The presence of contributing factors for a poor outcome, such as coagulopathy, a poor nutritional status, an adaptive immune dysfunction, a degree of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and a degree of renal and pulmonary dysfunction, have to be taken into account for surgical evaluation when cardiac surgery is needed, together with the degree of liver disease and its primary complications. The associated pathophysiological characteristics that liver cirrhosis represents have a great influence in the development of complications during cardiac surgery and the postoperative course. Despite the population of cirrhotic patients who are referred for cardiac surgery is small and recommendations come from small series, since liver cirrhotic patients have increased their chance of survival in the last 20 years due to the advances in their medical care, which includes liver transplantation, they have been increasingly considered for cardiac surgery. Indeed, there is an expected rise of cirrhotic patients within the cardiac surgical population due to the increasing rates of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, especially in western countries. In consequence, a more specific approach is needed in the assessment of care of these patients if we want to improve their management. In this article, we review the pathophysiology and outcome prediction of cirrhotic patients who underwent cardiac surgery. PMID:25914775

  7. Robotic cardiac surgery in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Poffo, Robinson; Toschi, Alisson P; Pope, Renato B; Montanhesi, Paola K; Santos, Ricardo S; Teruya, Alexandre; Hatanaka, Dina M; Rusca, Gabriel F; Fischer, Claudio H; Vieira, Marcelo C; Makdisse, Marcia R

    2017-01-01

    Brazil, the largest country and economy in South America, is a major driving force behind the development of new medical technologies in the region. Robotic cardiac surgery (RCS) has been evolving rapidly since 2010, when the first surgery using the DaVinci(®) robotic system was performed in Latin America. The aim of this article is to evaluate short and mid-term results in patients undergoing robotic cardiac surgery in Brazil. From March 2010 to December 2015, 39 consecutive patients underwent robotic cardiac surgery. Twenty-seven patients were male (69.2%), with the mean age of 51.3±17.9 years. Participants had a mean ejection fraction of 62±5%. The procedures included in this study were mitral valve surgery, surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation, atrial septal defect closure, resection of intra-cardiac tumors, totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass and pericardiectomy. The mean time spent on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during RCS was 154.9±94.2 minutes and the mean aortic cross-clamp time was 114.48±75.66 minutes. Thirty-two patients (82%) were extubated in the operating room immediately after surgery. The median intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay was 1 day (ranging from 0 to 25) and the median hospital length of stay was 5 days (ranging from 3 to 25). For each type of procedure, endpoints were individually reported. There were no conversions to sternotomy and no intra-operative complications. Patient follow-up was complete in 100% of the participants, with two early deaths unrelated to the procedures and no re-operations at mid-term. Despite the heterogeneity of this series, RCS appears to be feasible, safe and effective when used for the correction of various intra- and extra-cardiac pathologies. Adopting the robotic system has been a challenge in Brazil, where its limited clinical application may be related to the lack of specific training and the high cost of technology.

  8. Robotic cardiac surgery in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Toschi, Alisson P.; Pope, Renato B.; Montanhesi, Paola K.; Santos, Ricardo S.; Teruya, Alexandre; Hatanaka, Dina M.; Rusca, Gabriel F.; Fischer, Claudio H.; Vieira, Marcelo C.; Makdisse, Marcia R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Brazil, the largest country and economy in South America, is a major driving force behind the development of new medical technologies in the region. Robotic cardiac surgery (RCS) has been evolving rapidly since 2010, when the first surgery using the DaVinci® robotic system was performed in Latin America. The aim of this article is to evaluate short and mid-term results in patients undergoing robotic cardiac surgery in Brazil. Methods From March 2010 to December 2015, 39 consecutive patients underwent robotic cardiac surgery. Twenty-seven patients were male (69.2%), with the mean age of 51.3±17.9 years. Participants had a mean ejection fraction of 62±5%. The procedures included in this study were mitral valve surgery, surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation, atrial septal defect closure, resection of intra-cardiac tumors, totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass and pericardiectomy. Results The mean time spent on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during RCS was 154.9±94.2 minutes and the mean aortic cross-clamp time was 114.48±75.66 minutes. Thirty-two patients (82%) were extubated in the operating room immediately after surgery. The median intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay was 1 day (ranging from 0 to 25) and the median hospital length of stay was 5 days (ranging from 3 to 25). For each type of procedure, endpoints were individually reported. There were no conversions to sternotomy and no intra-operative complications. Patient follow-up was complete in 100% of the participants, with two early deaths unrelated to the procedures and no re-operations at mid-term. Conclusions Despite the heterogeneity of this series, RCS appears to be feasible, safe and effective when used for the correction of various intra- and extra-cardiac pathologies. Adopting the robotic system has been a challenge in Brazil, where its limited clinical application may be related to the lack of specific training and the high cost of technology. PMID:28203537

  9. Hand-held echocardiography in the setting of pre-operative cardiac evaluation of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery: results from a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Ilaria; Mega, Simona; Goffredo, Costanza; Patti, Giuseppe; Chello, Massimo; Di Sciascio, Germano

    2015-06-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is not a routine test in the pre-operative cardiac evaluation of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery but may be considered in those with known heart failure and valvular heart disease or complaining cardiac symptoms. In this setting, hand-held echocardiography (HHE) could find a potential application as an alternative to standard echocardiography in selected patients; however, its utility in this context has not been investigated. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the conclusiveness of HHE compared to standard echocardiography in this subset of patients. 100 patients scheduled for non-cardiac surgery were randomized to receive a standard exam with a Philips Ie33 or a bedside evaluation with a pocket-size imaging device (Opti-Go, Philips Medical System). The primary endpoint was the percentage of satisfactory diagnosis at the end of the examination referred as conclusiveness. Secondary endpoints were the mean duration time and the mean waiting time to perform the exams. No significant difference in terms of conclusiveness between HHE and standard echo was found (86 vs 96%; P = 0.08). Mean duration time of the examinations was 6.1 ± 1.2 min with HHE and 13.1 ± 2.6 min with standard echocardiography (P < 0.001). HHE resulted in a consistent save of waiting time because it was performed the same day of clinical evaluation whereas patients waited 10.1 ± 6.1 days for a standard echocardiography (P < 0.001). This study suggests the potential role of HHE for pre-operative evaluation of selected patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, since it provided similar information but it was faster and earlier performed compared to standard echocardiography.

  10. Evaluation of robotic cardiac surgery simulation training: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Valdis, Matthew; Chu, Michael W A; Schlachta, Christopher; Kiaii, Bob

    2016-06-01

    To compare the currently available simulation training modalities used to teach robotic surgery. Forty surgical trainees completed a standardized robotic 10-cm dissection of the internal thoracic artery and placed 3 sutures of a mitral valve annuloplasty in porcine models and were then randomized to a wet lab, a dry lab, a virtual reality lab, or a control group that received no additional training. All groups trained to a level of proficiency determined by 2 expert robotic cardiac surgeons. All assessments were evaluated using the Global Evaluative Assessment of Robotic Skills in a blinded fashion. Wet lab trainees showed the greatest improvement in time-based scoring and the objective scoring tool compared with the experts (mean, 24.9 ± 1.7 vs 24.9 ± 2.6; P = .704). The virtual reality lab improved their scores and met the level of proficiency set by our experts for all primary outcomes (mean, 24.9 ± 1.7 vs 22.8 ± 3.7; P = .103). Only the control group trainees were not able to meet the expert level of proficiency for both time-based scores and the objective scoring tool (mean, 24.9 ± 1.7 vs 11.0 ± 4.5; P < .001). The average duration of training was shortest for the dry lab and longest for the virtual reality simulation (1.6 hours vs 9.3 hours; P < .001). We have completed the first randomized controlled trial to objectively compare the different training modalities of robotic surgery. Our data demonstrate the significant benefits of wet lab and virtual reality robotic simulation training and highlight key differences in current training methods. This study can help guide training programs in investing resources in cost-effective, high-yield simulation exercises. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. Examining IV Insulin Practice Guidelines in the Cardiac Surgery Patient: Nurses Evaluating Quality Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Amy; Sherry, Daisy; McDermott, Martha; Gobber, Michele; Pabst, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Recent changes in the Surgical Care Improvement Project guideline require blood glucose values be less than 180 mg/dL 18 to 24 hours after anesthesia end time after cardiac surgery. Our study compares the first group of patients transitioned off IV insulin on postoperative day 1, 24 hours after anesthesia end time, whereas the second group was transitioned off IV insulin on the second day, 48 hours after anesthesia end time. Results show no statistical difference in outcomes between groups.

  12. Evaluation of Endotoxemia After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery With the Endotoxin Activity Assay: An Exploratory Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Haiberger, Roberta; Pezzella, Chiara; Favia, Isabella; Cogo, Paola

    2016-02-01

    Children with congenital heart diseases undergoing surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass are exposed to a high risk of perioperative endotoxemia. The aim of our study was to prospectively evaluate endotoxin assay activity reference levels during the postoperative phase of infants undergoing cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease and to assess their association with perioperative variables and postoperative infections. Prospective exploratory single-center cohort study. Tertiary pediatric cardiac ICU. Infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were enrolled. Exclusion criteria were preoperative suspected or confirmed infection, the need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or a ventricular assist device in any perioperative phase, surgery for heart transplantation, and/or urgent surgery. Serial measurements of endotoxin assay activity were performed at baseline, pediatric cardiac ICU arrival, postoperative day 1 and 2. Twenty-five patients were enrolled. Overall, 14 of 25 patients (58%) presented at least one endotoxin assay activity level greater than 0.4 during the study period (normal level is < 0.4). Endotoxin assay activity levels tended to significantly increase from baseline to postoperative day 1 and 2 and from pediatric cardiac ICU arrival to postoperative day 2 (p < 0.0001). Endotoxin assay activity greater than 0.6 predicted Gram-negative infections with a sensitivity of 0.40, a specificity of 0.95, a positive predictive value of 0.66, and a negative predictive value of 0.86. At multivariable regression, endotoxin assay activity on postoperative day 1 resulted independently associated with cardiopulmonary bypass duration, lactate, temperature peak, and vasoactive inotropic score at pediatric cardiac ICU arrival. Children with endotoxin assay activity levels greater than 0.6 (vs all the others) showed a significantly higher median (interquartile) number of ventilation days: 8 (2-39) versus 1.5 (1-3 (p = 0.02). This exploratory

  13. Renal ultrasound provides low utility in evaluating cardiac surgery associated acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Young, Allen; Crawford, Todd; Pierre, Alejandro Suarez; Trent Magruder, J; Fraser, Charles; Conte, John; Whitman, Glenn; Sciortino, Christopher

    2017-09-02

    Renal ultrasonography is part of the algorithm in assessing acute kidney injury (AKI). The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical utility of renal US in postoperative cardiac patients who develop AKI. We conducted a retrospective study of 90 postoperative cardiac surgery patients at a single institution from 1/19/2010 to 3/19/2016 who underwent renal US for AKI. We reviewed provider documentation to determine whether renal US changed management. We defined change as: administration of crystalloid or colloid, addition of inotropic or vasopressor, or procedural interventions on the renal system. Mean age of study patients was 68 ± 13 years. 48/90 patients (53.3%) had pre-existing chronic kidney disease of varying severity. 48 patients (53.3%) had normal renal US with incidental findings and 31 patients (34.4%) had US evidence of medical kidney disease. 10 patients (11.1%) had limited US results due to poor visualization and 1 patient (1.1%) had mild right-sided hydronephrosis. No patients were found to have obstructive uropathy or renal artery stenosis. Clinical management was altered in only 4/90 patients (4.4%), which included 3 patients that received a fluid bolus and 1 patient that received a fluid bolus and inotropes. No vascular or urologic procedures resulted from US findings. Although renal ultrasound is often utilized in the work-up of AKI, our study shows that renal US provides little benefit in managing postoperative cardiac patients. This diagnostic modality should be scrutinized rather than viewed as a universal measure in the cardiac surgery population.

  14. [Evaluation of pain intensity and vital signs in the cardiac surgery postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Miranda, Adriana de Fátima Alencar; da Silva, Lúcia de Fátima; Caetano, Joselany Áfio; de Sousa, Ana Cláudia; Almeida, Paulo César

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the changes in vital signs of postoperative cardiac surgery patients, according to the referred pain intensity. This descriptive-exploratory study was performed using quantitative analysis to investigate 38 patients submitted to a first dressing change. The analysis of the data, measured before and after performing the nursing procedure, indicated that the manifestation of pain occurred at different levels. The main changes in vital signs referred to blood pressure. In conclusion, there is a relationship between pain intensity and vital signs, and the care that is delivered is indispensible to reestablishing the health state of the postoperative patient.

  15. Impact of chest X-ray before discharge in asymptomatic children after cardiac surgery--prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Daniel; Knirsch, Walter; Niesse, Oliver; Schraner, Thomas; Dave, Hitendu; Kretschmar, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    In many paediatric cardiac units chest radiographs are performed routinely before discharge after cardiac surgery. These radiographs contribute to radiation exposure. To evaluate the diagnostic impact of routine chest X-rays before discharge in children undergoing open heart surgery and to analyze certain risk factors predicting pathologic findings. This was a prospective (6 months) single-centre observational clinical study. One hundred twenty-eight consecutive children undergoing heart surgery underwent biplane chest X-ray at a mean of 13 days after surgery. Pathologic findings on chest X-rays were defined as infiltrate, atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, or signs of fluid overload. One hundred nine asymptomatic children were included in the final analysis. Risk factors, such as age, corrective versus palliative surgery, reoperation, sternotomy versus lateral thoracotomy, and relevant pulmonary events during postoperative paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) stay, were analysed. In only 5.5 % (6 of 109) of these asymptomatic patients were pathologic findings on routine chest X-ray before discharge found. In only three of these cases (50 %), subsequent noninvasive medical intervention (increasing diuretics) was needed. All six patients had relevant pulmonary events during their PICU stay. Risk factor analysis showed only pulmonary complications during PICU stay to be significantly associated (p = 0.005) with pathologic X-ray findings. Routine chest radiographs before discharge after cardiac surgery can be omitted in asymptomatic children with an uneventful and straightforward perioperative course. Chest radiographs before discharge are warrantable if pulmonary complications did occur during their PICU stay, as this is a risk factor for pathologic findings in chest X-rays before discharge.

  16. [Cardiac surgery in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Wiegmann, B; Ismail, I; Haverich, A

    2017-02-01

    Due to the increasing demographic changes and the fact that cardiovascular diseases are still the leading cause of death, the mean chronological age of patients undergoing cardiac surgery is steadily increasing. In 2015, 14.8% of these patients were aged 80 years and older. This meta-analysis reviewed if and under what circumstances elderly patients benefit from cardiac surgical procedures without running the risk of limitations in the quality of life and high rates of morbidity and mortality. Generally, the chronological age was not a risk factor for higher perioperative and postoperative morbidity and mortality but the biological age was the critical factor, in particular the associated comorbidities of patients and the timing of the surgical procedure in the course of the disease. The result is that elective operations resulted in a better outcome than operations in a symptomatic or decompensated stage of a disease. Compared to patients receiving conventional medicinal therapy, elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery had an improved life expectancy. A significant increase in the quality of life could also be identified and was ultimately comparable to those of younger patients after cardiac surgery; therefore, elderly patients even those over 80 years old benefit in all aspects of cardiac surgery, as long as individually adapted operative techniques are considered.

  17. Pediatric cardiac surgery in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Asou, T; Rachmat, J

    1998-10-01

    Pediatric cardiac surgery in Indonesia first developed thanks to the cooperation of various cardiac centers abroad. The establishment of the 'Harapan Kita' National Cardiac Center in 1985 was one of the most important initial steps. Thereafter, the discipline advanced remarkably in terms of the number of the operations performed and the variety of the diseases treated and, as a result, the surgical outcome also improved. Numerous problems remain to be solved. Only 1% of the children with congenital heart disease are today properly treated in Indonesia. Some of the underlying problems responsible for this situation include a shortage of pediatric cardiac professionals, the lack of the information and education on the part of the patients, and a shortage of funding, both privately and publicly. It would thus be welcome for pediatric cardiac surgeons, cardiologists and nurses in Indonesia to learn about congenital heart disease from doctors and nurses in advanced countries in order to improve the outlook at home.

  18. Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery (VACS) offers a minimally invasive platform for most cardiac operations such as coronary and valve procedures. It includes robotic and thoracoscopic approaches and each has strengths and weaknesses. The success depends on appropriate hardware setup, staff training, and troubleshooting efficiency. In our institution, we often use VACS for robotic left-internal-mammary-artery takedown, mitral valve repair, and various intra-cardiac operations such as tricuspid valve repair, combined Maze procedure, atrial septal defect repair, ventricular septal defect repair, etc. Hands-on reminders and updated references are provided for reader’s further understanding of the topic. PMID:24455172

  19. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Following Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiariello, Giovanni Alfonso; Bruno, Piergiorgio; Colizzi, Christian; Crea, Filippo; Massetti, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy syndrome, commonly occurring in postmenopausal women, is characterized by transient apical systolic dysfunction in absence of coronary lesions. The cardiomyopathy is often observed after intense stressful events such as a major surgical procedure. A 72-year-old woman symptomatic for dyspnea at rest, chest pain, and peripheral edema successfully underwent surgery for noncoronary sinus aneurysm-right atrium fistula repair. Two days after surgery the patient developed takotsubo syndrome, diagnosed according to the Mayo Clinic criteria. We reviewed the literature on takotsubo cardiomyopathy as a complication of major cardiac surgery procedures. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is confirmed as a possible early complication of cardiac surgery. Exaggerated sympathetic stimulation may cause massive endogenous catecholamine release. Hypoperfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, inotropic drugs administration, and postoperative anxiety and pain are all factors generating stress, possible coronary artery spasm and transient cardiomyopathy, clinically simulating acute myocardial infarction. Several clinical features have been described such as acute mitral insufficiency, systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral valve leaflet, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, acute cardiac failure, and cardiogenic shock. Intraventricular thrombi and adverse cerebrovascular events may also be possible complications. Rare catastrophic events such as left ventricular free wall rupture and ventricular septal perforation have been also encountered. After cardiac surgery takotsubo cardiomyopathy should be suspected if clinical and instrumental criteria are met, and promptly differentiated from the more frequent acute myocardial infarction. Prognosis may be favorable if appropriate conservative medical treatment is promptly started. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Cardioprotection during cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hausenloy, Derek J.; Boston-Griffiths, Edney; Yellon, Derek M.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. For a large number of patients with CHD, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery remains the preferred strategy for coronary revascularization. Over the last 10 years, the number of high-risk patients undergoing CABG surgery has increased significantly, resulting in worse clinical outcomes in this patient group. This appears to be related to the ageing population, increased co-morbidities (such as diabetes, obesity, hypertension, stroke), concomitant valve disease, and advances in percutaneous coronary intervention which have resulted in patients with more complex coronary artery disease undergoing surgery. These high-risk patients are more susceptible to peri-operative myocardial injury and infarction (PMI), a major cause of which is acute global ischaemia/reperfusion injury arising from inadequate myocardial protection during CABG surgery. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are required to protect the heart in this high-risk patient group. In this article, we review the aetiology of PMI during CABG surgery, its diagnosis and clinical significance, and the endogenous and pharmacological therapeutic strategies available for preventing it. By improving cardioprotection during CABG surgery, we may be able to reduce PMI, preserve left ventricular systolic function, and reduce morbidity and mortality in these high-risk patients with CHD. PMID:22440888

  1. Minimal Incision Congenital Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    del Nido, Pedro J.

    2008-01-01

    Minimally invasive techniques have had limited application in congenital cardiac surgery, primarily due to the complexity of the defects, small working area, and the fact that most defects require exposure to intracardiac structures. Advances in cannula design and instrumentation have allowed application of minimal incision techniques but in most cases, cardiopulmonary bypass is still required. Image guided surgery, which uses non-invasive imaging to guide intracardiac procedures, holds the promise of permitting performance of reconstructive surgery in the beating heart in children. PMID:18395631

  2. Can cardiac surgery cause hypopituitarism?

    PubMed

    Francis, Flverly; Burger, Ines; Poll, Eva Maria; Reineke, Andrea; Strasburger, Christian J; Dohmen, Guido; Gilsbach, Joachim M; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka

    2012-03-01

    Apoplexy of pituitary adenomas with subsequent hypopituitarism is a rare but well recognized complication following cardiac surgery. The nature of cardiac on-pump surgery provides a risk of damage to the pituitary because the vascular supply of the pituitary is not included in the cerebral autoregulation. Thus, pituitary tissue may exhibit an increased susceptibility to hypoperfusion, ischemia or intraoperative embolism. After on-pump procedures, patients often present with physical and psychosocial impairments which resemble symptoms of hypopituitarism. Therefore, we analyzed whether on-pump cardiac surgery may cause pituitary dysfunction also in the absence of pre-existing pituitary disease. Twenty-five patients were examined 3-12 months after on-pump cardiac surgery. Basal hormone levels for all four anterior pituitary hormone axes were measured and a short synacthen test and a growth hormone releasing hormone plus arginine (GHRH-ARG)-test were performed. Quality of life (QoL), depression, subjective distress for a specific life event, sleep quality and fatigue were assessed by means of self-rating questionnaires. Hormonal alterations were only slight and no signs of anterior hypopituitarism were found except for an insufficient growth hormone rise in two overweight patients in the GHRH-ARG-test. Psychosocial impairment was pronounced, including symptoms of moderate to severe depression in 9, reduced mental QoL in 8, dysfunctional coping in 6 and pronounced sleep disturbances in 16 patients. Hormone levels did not correlate with psychosocial impairment. On-pump cardiac surgery did not cause relevant hypopituitarism in our sample of patients and does not serve to explain the psychosocial symptoms of these patients.

  3. Neurological complications of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, David L; Berger, Miles; Mathew, Joseph P; Graffagnino, Carmelo; Milano, Carmelo A; Newman, Mark F

    2014-05-01

    As increasing numbers of elderly people undergo cardiac surgery, neurologists are frequently called upon to assess patients with neurological complications from the procedure. Some complications mandate acute intervention, whereas others need longer term observation and management. A large amount of published literature exists about these complications and guidance on best practice is constantly changing. Similarly, despite technological advances in surgical intervention and modifications in surgical technique to make cardiac procedures safer, these advances often create new avenues for neurological injury. Accordingly, rapid and precise neurological assessment and therapeutic intervention rests on a solid understanding of the evidence base and procedural variables.

  4. Evaluation of kangaroo pericardium as an alternative substitute for reconstructive cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Neethling, W M L; Cooper, S; Van Den Heever, J J; Hough, J; Hodge, A J

    2002-06-01

    Bioprosthetic materials (human, bovine and porcine) are used in various cardio-thoracic repair and replacement procedures because of excellent performance and low thrombogenicity. These bioprosthetic substitutes fail due to degeneration and calcification. This study examines the morphology, tensile properties and calcification potential of kangaroo pericardium in vitro and in vivo. Bovine (control tissue) and kangaroo pericardium, fixed in 0.625% buffered glutaraldehyde, were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. A standard method was used for biaxial testing. Pericardial strips (10 x 5 mm) were implanted subcutaneously into male Wistar rats and retrieved after 4, 6 and 8 weeks and examined by Von Kossa's stain technique and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Histology revealed serosa and fibrosa cell layers in both tissues. Electron microscopy showed a densely arranged collagen matrix in kangaroo pericardium. Kangaroo pericardium calcified significantly less than bovine pericardium at 4 weeks (0.80+/-0.28 versus 21.60+/-4.80 microg/mg) at 6 weeks (0.48+/-0.08 versus 32.80+/-14.4 microg/mg) and at 8 weeks (2.40+/-1.20 versus 30.40+/-17.20 microg/mg), respectively. Kangaroo pericardium has a densely arranged collagen matrix with a higher extensibility and significantly lower calcification potential. Therefore, kangaroo pericardium could be used as an alternative substitute in cardiac surgery because of its low calcification potential.

  5. [Coagulation profiles during cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Bitkova, E E; Zvereva, N Iu; Khvatov, V B; Chumakov, M V; Timerbaev, V Kh; Dublev, A V; Redkoborodyĭ, A V

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate patients' hemostasis after cardiac surgery using thromboelastometric and impedance aggregometry. 66 patients were examined intraoperatively. Comparison group included 45 blood donors. Hemostasis was tested for thromboelastometricRotem Gamma with the assessment of external (exTem) and internal (inTem) pathways of coagulation tests performed detection of heparin (hepTem) and cytochalasin-D-inactivation of platelets (fibTem) to assess the level of fibrinogen. Collagen-induced platelet aggregation was determined in an aggregometer CHRONO-LOG (USA). Significant deviations of the parameters of hemostasis were detected in 52 of the 66 studied patients. In group-1 (23 patients) revealed a residual effect of heparin. The effect manifested prolongation CT (clotting time) inTem to an average of 241 +/- 15 s, compared with CT hepTem--181 +/- 7. Patients in this group were in need of additional administration of protamine sulfate. Postoperative bleeding and resternotomia were observed in 3 patients of group-1. In group-2 (25 patients) CT inTem was 216 +/- 21 with significantly fewer CT hepTem (272 +/- 26). The data indicated excess of protamine sulfate. Platelets aggregation decreased compared to the norm. According to the obtained results, the addition of protamine sulfate is not required, however, in 7 cases the protamine sulfate was administered in a dose of 8.9 +/- 0.8 mg in 6 cases resternotomiya required. In the third group (n = 6) bleeding was observed in 4 patients. The difference in CT-hepCT was significant. Significant variations were revealed in the tests of the activity of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation and cytochalasin-D-induced inactivation of platelets: exMCF- 42 +/- 2 mm (normal 57 +/- 15 mm), fibMCF 5.0 +/- 0.3 mm (norm 12.8 +/- 4.3 mm). The concentration of platelets and their aggregation activity was sharply reduced. Disorders of hemostasis in the third group, designated as dilution coagulopathy. Turning thromboelastometric and impedance

  6. Cerebral Oximetry Use For Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Raza, Syed Shahmeer; Ullah, Farhan; Chandni; Savage, Edward Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown maintaining good cerebral perfusion during Cardiac Surgeries is very important in terms of patient outcomes and reducing the hospital stay, which may have its financial and clinical implications. The aim of this review study was to determine the effectiveness of Cerebral Oximetry (Transcranial Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-NIRS to monitor cerebral oxygenation) for Cardiac Surgery and to propose a possible concluding remark about its potential applications, overall clinical value and whether to keep using it or not. Medical database and archives including Pubmed, Embase, index medicus, index copernicus and Medline were searched. Different papers were looked upon and each had an argument, scientific evidence and background. Fifteen research papers were selected and brought under review after carefully consideration. The papers were carefully reviewed and findings were given in favour of not using NIRS technique for Cerebral Oximetry in Cardiac Surgery. This can rightly be concluded from this study that NIRS Cerebral Oximetry does not carry the clinical significance and relevance which was previously thought. The subject under observation needs further studies and research to evaluate the effectiveness of the Cerebral Oximetry Use for Cardiac Surgery.

  7. Performance of the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation II: a meta-analysis of 22 studies involving 145,592 cardiac surgery procedures.

    PubMed

    Guida, Pietro; Mastro, Florinda; Scrascia, Giuseppe; Whitlock, Richard; Paparella, Domenico

    2014-12-01

    A systematic review of the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (euroSCORE) II performance for prediction of operative mortality after cardiac surgery has not been performed. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies based on the predictive accuracy of the euroSCORE II. We searched the Embase and PubMed databases for all English-only articles reporting performance characteristics of the euroSCORE II. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, the observed/expected mortality ratio, and observed-expected mortality difference with their 95% confidence intervals were analyzed. Twenty-two articles were selected, including 145,592 procedures. Operative mortality occurred in 4293 (2.95%), whereas the expected events according to euroSCORE II were 4802 (3.30%). Meta-analysis of these studies provided an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.792 (95% confidence interval, 0.773-0.811), an estimated observed/expected ratio of 1.019 (95% confidence interval, 0.899-1.139), and observed-expected difference of 0.125 (95% confidence interval, -0.269 to 0.519). Statistical heterogeneity was detected among retrospective studies including less recent procedures. Subgroups analysis confirmed the robustness of combined estimates for isolated valve procedures and those combined with revascularization surgery. A significant overestimation of the euroSCORE II with an observed/expected ratio of 0.829 (95% confidence interval, 0.677-0.982) was observed in isolated coronary artery bypass grafting and a slight underestimation of predictions in high-risk patients (observed/expected ratio 1.253 and observed-expected difference 1.859). Despite the heterogeneity, the results from this meta-analysis show a good overall performance of the euroSCORE II in terms of discrimination and accuracy of model predictions for operative mortality. Validation of the euroSCORE II in prospective populations needs to be further studied for a continuous

  8. Cardiac surgery in Wessex.

    PubMed Central

    Monro, J L; Ross, J K; Manners, J M; Edwards, J C; Lewis, B; Hyde, I; Ogilvie, B C; Keeton, B R; Conway, N; Johnson, A M

    1983-01-01

    The results of 3000 consecutive operations using cardio-pulmonary bypass show that the overall early mortality was 6.1%, dropping from 8.9% in the first 1000 to 4.4% in the third 1000. Operations for valve disease have been the most common, the early mortality for aortic valve replacement being 3.1% and for mitral valve replacement 2.9%. Combined aortic and mitral valve replacement had an early mortality of 4.4%. The number of patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting has increased from 59 in the first 1000 to 292 in the third 1000 operations, with an overall early mortality of 1.3%. Six hundred and ninety seven patients underwent surgery for congenital heart disease with an overall early mortality of 10.9% (7.5% in the last 2000 cases). The patients have been followed up from one to 8.5 years. A high proportion have returned to work and enjoy a normal life. At the time of review, 87% of the 3000 patients were alive. Long waiting times for outpatient and inpatient care indicate underprovision of facilities relative to regional demand. PMID:6402103

  9. Comparative evaluation of blood salvage techniques in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Gunaydin, Serdar; Robertson, Craig; Budak, Ali Baran; Gourlay, Terence

    2017-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test and compare the efficacy of currently available intraoperative blood salvage systems via a demonstration of the level of increase in percentage concentration of red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells 9WBC) and platelets (Plt) in the end product. In a prospective, randomized study, data of 80 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass in a 6-month period was collected, of which the volume aspirated from the surgical field was processed by either the HemoSep Novel Collection Bag (Advancis Surgical, Kirkby-in-Ashfield, Notts, UK) (N=40) (Group 1) or a cell- saver (C.A.T.S Plus Autotransfusion System, Fresenius Kabi, Bad Homburg, Germany) (N=40) (Group 2). Hematocrit levels increased from 23.05%±2.7 to 43.02%±12 in Group 1 and from 24.5±2 up to 55.2±9 in Group 2 (p=0.013). The mean number of platelets rose to 225200±47000 from 116400 ±40000 in the HemoSep and decreased from 125200±25000 to 96500±30000 in the cell-saver group (p=0.00001). The leukocyte count was concentrated significantly better in Group 1 (from 10100±4300 to 18120±7000; p=0.001). IL-6 levels (pg/dL) decreased from 223±47 to 83±21 in Group 1 and from 219±40 to 200±40 in Group 2 (p=0.001). Fibrinogen was protected significantly better in the HemoSep group (from 185±35 to 455±45; p=0.004). Intraoperative blood salvage systems functioned properly and the resultant blood product was superior in terms of red blood cell species. The HemoSep group had significantly better platelet and leukocyte concentrations and fibrinogen content.

  10. Blood conservation in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Blaudszun, G; Butchart, A; Klein, A A

    2017-09-21

    This article aims at reviewing the currently available evidence about blood conservation strategies in cardiac surgery. Pre-operative anaemia and perioperative allogeneic blood transfusions are associated with worse outcomes after surgery. In addition, transfusions are a scarce and costly resource. As cardiac surgery accounts for a significant proportion of all blood products transfused, efforts should be made to decrease the risk of perioperative transfusion. Pre-operative strategies focus on the detection and treatment of anaemia. The management of haematological abnormalities, most frequently functional iron deficiency, is a matter for debate. However, iron supplementation therapy is increasingly commonly administered. Intra-operatively, antifibrinolytics should be routinely used, whereas the cardiopulmonary bypass strategy should be adapted to minimise haemodilution secondary to circuit priming. There is less evidence to recommend minimally invasive surgery. Cell salvage and point-of-care tests should also be a part of the routine care. Post-operatively, any unnecessary iatrogenic blood loss should be avoided. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  11. Evaluation of continuous non-invasive arterial pressure monitoring during induction of general anaesthesia in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Anil; Jagadeesh, A M; Singh, Naveen G; Prasad, S R

    2015-01-01

    Continuous arterial pressure monitoring is essential in cardiac surgical patients during induction of general anaesthesia (GA). Continuous non-invasive arterial pressure (CNAP) monitoring is fast gaining importance due to complications associated with the invasive arterial monitoring. Recently, a new continuous non-invasive arterial pressure device (CNAP™) has been validated perioperatively in non-cardiac surgeries. The aim of our study is to compare and assess the performance of CNAP during GA with invasive arterial pressure (IAP) in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries. Sixty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were included. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) data were recorded every minute for 20 min simultaneously for both IAP and CNAP™. Statistical analysis was performed using mountain plot and Bland Altman plots for assessing limits of agreement and bias (accuracy) calculation. Totally 1200 pairs of data were analysed. The CNAP™ systolic, diastolic and MAP bias was 5.98 mm Hg, -3.72 mm Hg, and - 0.02 mm Hg respectively. Percentage within limits of agreement was 96.0%, 95.2% and 95.7% for systolic, diastolic and MAP. The mountain plot showed similar results as the Bland Altman plots. We conclude CNAP™ provides real-time estimates of arterial pressure comparable to IAP during induction of GA for cardiac surgery. We recommend CNAP can be used as an alternative to IAP in situations such as cardiac patients coming for non-cardiac surgeries, cardiac catheterization procedures, positive Allen's test, inability to cannulate radial artery and vascular diseases, where continuous blood pressure monitoring is required.

  12. Evaluation of paediatric cardiosurgical model in Croatia by using the Aristotle basic complexity score and the risk adjustment for congenital cardiac surgery-1 method.

    PubMed

    Dilber, Daniel; Malcic, Ivan

    2010-08-01

    The Aristotle basic complexity score and the risk adjustment in congenital cardiac surgery-1 method were developed and used to compare outcomes of congenital cardiac surgery. Both methods were used to compare results of procedures performed on our patients in Croatian cardiosurgical centres and results of procedures were taken abroad. The study population consisted of all patients with congenital cardiac disease born to Croatian residents between 1 October, 2002 and 1 October, 2007 undergoing a cardiovascular operation during this period. Of the 556 operations, the Aristotle basic complexity score could be assigned to 553 operations and the risk adjustment in congenital cardiac surgery-1 method to 536 operations. Procedures were performed in two institutions in Croatia and seven institutions abroad. The average complexity for cardiac procedures performed in Croatia was significantly lower. With both systems, along with the increase in complexity, there is also an increase in mortality before discharge and postoperative length of stay. Only after the adjustment for complexity there are marked differences in mortality and occurrence of postoperative complications. Both, the Aristotle basic complexity score and the risk adjustment in congenital cardiac surgery-1 method were predictive of in-hospital mortality as well as prolonged postoperative length to stay, and can be used as a tool in our country to evaluate a cardiosurgical model and recognise potential problems.

  13. Mycobacterium chimaera and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Stewardson, Andrew J; Stuart, Rhonda L; Cheng, Allen C; Johnson, Paul Dr

    2017-02-20

    There is an ongoing investigation into infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria associated with contaminated heater-cooler units used in cardiac surgery. The overall risk is low, but surgical site and disseminated infections have been reported, including one possible case in Australia, mainly with surgery involving implantation of prosthetic material. Mycobacterium chimaera infection should be considered in patients who have previously undergone surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and who present with cardiac or disseminated infection or sternal wound infection unresponsive to standard antibiotic therapy. Where cases are suspected, patients should be investigated and managed in consultation with an infectious diseases physician and/or clinical microbiologist. If cases are confirmed or heater-cooler devices are found to be contaminated, details should be reported to the hospital infection control team, the jurisdictional health department, the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the Australian distributor of the affected heater-cooler unit(s). Measures to manage risk should include communicating with relevant hospital departments, ensuring that the manufacturer's updated instructions for use are followed, regular testing of machines, and reviewing the location of machines when in use.

  14. Hemoglobin Drift after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    George, Timothy J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Kilic, Arman; Haggerty, Kara A.; Frank, Steven M.; Savage, William J.; Whitman, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent literature suggests that a restrictive approach to red blood cell transfusions is associated with improved outcomes in cardiac surgery (CS) patients. Even in the absence of bleeding, intravascular fluid shifts cause hemoglobin levels to drift postoperatively, possibly confounding the decision to transfuse. We undertook this study to define the natural progression of hemoglobin levels in postoperative CS patients. Methods We included all CS patients from 10/10-03/11 who did not receive a postoperative transfusion. Primary stratification was by intraoperative transfusion status. Change in hemoglobin was evaluated relative to the initial postoperative hemoglobin. Maximal drift was defined as the maximum minus the minimum hemoglobin for a given hospitalization. Final drift was defined as the difference between initial and discharge hemoglobin. Results Our final cohort included 199 patients, 71(36%) received an intraoperative transfusion while 128(64%) did not. The average initial and final hemoglobin for all patients were 11.0±1.4g/dL and 9.9±1.3g/dL, respectively, an final drift of 1.1±1.4g/dL. The maximal drift was 1.8±1.1g/dL and was similar regardless of intraoperative transfusion status(p=0.9). Although all patients’ hemoglobin initially dropped, 79% of patients reached a nadir and experienced a mean recovery of 0.7±0.7g/dL by discharge. On multivariable analysis, increasing CPB time was significantly associated with total hemoglobin drift(Coefficient/hour: 0.3[0.1–0.5]g/dL, p=0.02). Conclusions In this first report of hemoglobin drift following CS, although all postoperative patients experienced downward hemoglobin drift, 79% of patients exhibited hemoglobin recovery prior to discharge. Physicians should consider the eventual upward hemoglobin drift prior to administering red cell transfusions. PMID:22609121

  15. Evaluation of the influence of pulmonary hypertension in ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Paulo Sérgio; Cartacho, Márcio Portugal Trindade; de Castro, Casimiro Cardoso; Salgado Filho, Marcello Fonseca; Brandão, Antônio Carlos Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of pulmonary hypertension in the ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult cardiac surgery. Methods A retrospective study. They were included 40 patients divided into two groups: GI (without pulmonary hypertension) and GII (with pulmonary hypertension). Based on data obtained by transthoracic echocardiography. We considered as the absence of pulmonary hypertension: a pulmonary artery systolic pressure (sPAP) <36 mmHg, with tricuspid regurgitation velocity <2.8 m/s and no additional echocardiographic signs of PH, and PH as presence: a sPAP >40 mmHg associated with additional echocardiographic signs of PH. It was established as influence of pulmonary hypertension: the impossibility of extubation in the operating room, the increase in the time interval for extubation and reintubation the first 24 hours postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate analyzes were performed when necessary. Considered significant a P value <0.05. Results The GI was composed of 21 patients and GII for 19. All patients (100%) were extubated in the operating room in a medium time interval of 17.58±8.06 min with a median of 18 min in GII and 17 min in GI. PH did not increase the time interval for extubation (P=0.397). It required reintubation of 2 patients in GII (5% of the total), without statistically significant as compared to GI (P=0.488). Conclusion In this study, pulmonary hypertension did not influence on ultra-fast-track anesthesia in adult cardiac surgery. PMID:27163419

  16. Minimally invasive paediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bacha, Emile; Kalfa, David

    2014-01-01

    The concept of minimally invasive surgery for congenital heart disease in paediatric patients is broad, and has the aim of reducing the trauma of the operation at each stage of management. Firstly, in the operating room using minimally invasive incisions, video-assisted thoracoscopic and robotically assisted surgery, hybrid procedures, image-guided intracardiac surgery, and minimally invasive cardiopulmonary bypass strategies. Secondly, in the intensive-care unit with neuroprotection and 'fast-tracking' strategies that involve early extubation, early hospital discharge, and less exposure to transfused blood products. Thirdly, during postoperative mid-term and long-term follow-up by providing the children and their families with adequate support after hospital discharge. Improvement of these strategies relies on the development of new devices, real-time multimodality imaging, aids to instrument navigation, miniaturized and specialized instrumentation, robotic technology, and computer-assisted modelling of flow dynamics and tissue mechanics. In addition, dedicated multidisciplinary co-ordinated teams involving congenital cardiac surgeons, perfusionists, intensivists, anaesthesiologists, cardiologists, nurses, psychologists, and counsellors are needed before, during, and after surgery to go beyond apparent technological and medical limitations with the goal to 'treat more while hurting less'.

  17. AKI Associated with Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Robert H.; Isbell, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 18% of patients undergoing cardiac surgery experience AKI (on the basis of modern standardized definitions of AKI), and approximately 2%–6% will require hemodialysis. The development of AKI after cardiac surgery portends poor short- and long-term prognoses, with those developing RIFLE failure or AKI Network stage III having an almost 2-fold increase in the risk of death. AKI is caused by a variety of factors, including nephrotoxins, hypoxia, mechanical trauma, inflammation, cardiopulmonary bypass, and hemodynamic instability, and it may be affected by the clinician’s choice of fluids and vasoactive agents as well as the transfusion strategy used. The risk of AKI may be ameliorated by avoidance of nephrotoxins, achievement of adequate glucose control preoperatively, and use of goal-directed therapy hemodynamic strategies. Remote ischemic preconditioning is an exciting future strategy, but more work is needed before widespread implementation. Unfortunately, there are no pharmacologic agents known to reduce the risk of AKI or treat established AKI. PMID:25376763

  18. Menstrual bleeding after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth; Larsen, Signe Holm; Wilkens, Helena; Jakobsen, Anja; Pedersen, Thais Almeida Lins

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether open-heart surgery with the use of extracorporeal circulation has an impact on menstrual bleeding. The menstrual bleeding pattern was registered in fertile women undergoing open-heart surgery in 2010-12. Haematocrit and 24-h postoperative bleeding were compared with those of men undergoing cardiac surgery. Women (n = 22), with mean age of 36 (range 17-60) years, were operated on and hospitalized for 4-5 postoperative days. The mean preoperative haematocrit was 40% (range 32-60%), and mean haematocrit at discharge was 32% (range 26-37%). Mean postoperative bleeding in the first 24 h was 312 (range 50-1442) ml. They underwent surgery for atrial septal defect (n = 5), composite graft/David procedure (n = 4), pulmonary or aortic valve replacement (n = 6), myxoma (n = 2), mitral valvuloplasty (n = 2), ascending aortic aneurysm (n = 1), aortic coarctation (n = 1) and total cavopulmonary connection (n = 1). Unplanned menstrual bleeding (lasting 2-5 days) was detected in 13 (60%) patients. Of them, 4 were 1-7 days early, 4 were 8-14 days early, 3 were 1-7 days late and 2 had menstruation despite having had menstrual bleeding within the last 2 weeks. None had unusually large or long-lasting menstrual bleeding. Ten women took oral contraceptives, 8 of whom had unexpected menstrual bleeding during admission. Men (n = 22), with a mean age of 35 (range 17-54) years, had mean bleeding of 331 (range 160-796) ml postoperatively, which was not statistically significantly different from the women's. The mean preoperative haematocrit was 40% (range 29-49%) among men, while haematocrit at discharge was 32% (28-41), not significantly different from that seen in the female subgroup. Menstrual bleeding patterns are disturbed by open-heart surgery in the majority of fertile women. Nevertheless, the unexpected menstrual bleeding is neither particularly long-lasting nor of large quantity, and the postoperative surgical bleeding is unaffected. We recommend that

  19. Thallium-201 perfusion imaging with atrial pacing or dipyridamole stress testing for evaluation of cardiac risk prior to nonvascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Williams, G.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Preoperative assessment of cardiac risk using thallium-201 scintigraphy and atrial pacing (n = 42) or dipyridamole stress testing (n = 35) was performed in 77 patients (mean age 65 +/- 7 years), who subsequently underwent elective nonvascular surgery. All patients were at low cardiac risk by clinical criteria; none could perform exercise stress testing due to physical limitations. ST depression consistent with ischemia occurred in 11 patients during atrial pacing and in 1 patient during dipyridamole stress testing (p less than 0.01). Nine patients had reversible perfusion defects with atrial pacing, and 10 patients with dipyridamole stress testing; fixed defects were present in 15 and 8 patients, respectively. Only one patient (fixed perfusion defect with atrial pacing, left main disease on coronary angiography) underwent preoperative coronary revascularization. Two patients subsequently had postoperative cardiac events. One patient (reversible perfusion defect with dipyridamole stress testing) experienced sudden death after a nonvascular procedure, while a second patient (normal thallium images with dipyridamole testing) had a nonfatal myocardial infarction. In patients having atrial pacing or dipyridamole stress testing, thallium-201 scans that are normal or show only a fixed perfusion defect confirm a low risk of cardiac complications following nonvascular surgery. The presence of a reversible perfusion defect does not preclude a postoperative course free of cardiac complications in patients at low cardiac risk by clinical criteria.

  20. Malnutrition in cardiac surgery: food for thought.

    PubMed

    Chermesh, Irit; Hajos, Jonathan; Mashiach, Tatiana; Bozhko, Masha; Shani, Liran; Nir, Rony-Reuven; Bolotin, Gil

    2014-04-01

    Undernourished patients treated in general surgery departments suffer from prolonged and complicated hospitalizations, and higher mortality rates compared with well nourished patients. Pivotal information regarding patients' nutritional status and its effect on clinical outcome is lacking for cardiac surgery patients. We investigated the prevalence of malnutrition risk and its association with 30-day hospital mortality and postoperative complications. Four hundred and three patients who underwent cardiac surgery during 2008 and were screened with the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) on admission were enrolled. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses compared the association of high and low risk for malnutrition with length of hospitalization (LOS), in-hospital and 30-day mortality, and postoperative complications. Almost 20% of the patients were found to be at high risk for malnutrition. Univariate analyses revealed higher in-hospital mortality rates (p = 0.03) and greater incidence of LOS and antibiotic treatment longer than 21 days (p = 0.002 and p = 0.04, respectively), vasopressor treatment longer than 11 days (p = 0.02), and positive blood cultures (p = 0.02) in patients belonging to the high-risk MUST group. Incorporation of the MUST in a multivariate model with the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) significantly improved postoperative complications prediction, as well as in-hospital and 30-day mortality, compared with the EuroSCORE alone. Malnutrition is prevalent in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, associated with higher postoperative mortality and morbidity. Preoperative MUST screening has emerged as highly relevant for enabling early diagnosis of patients at malnutrition risk, predicting postoperative mortality and morbidity, thus promoting well timed treatment. Prospective studies are needed to explore whether intervention can decrease malnutrition risk.

  1. Applications of Computational Modeling in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Genet, Martin; Dang, Alan B.; Ge, Liang; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Although computational modeling is common in many areas of science and engineering, only recently have advances in experimental techniques and medical imaging allowed this tool to be applied in cardiac surgery. Despite its infancy in cardiac surgery, computational modeling has been useful in calculating the effects of clinical devices and surgical procedures. In this review, we present several examples that demonstrate the capabilities of computational cardiac modeling in cardiac surgery. Specifically, we demonstrate its ability to simulate surgery, predict myofiber stress and pump function, and quantify changes to regional myocardial material properties. In addition, issues that would need to be resolved in order for computational modeling to play a greater role in cardiac surgery are discussed. PMID:24708036

  2. Cardiac assessment prior to non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mooney, J F; Hillis, G S; Lee, V W; Halliwell, R; Vicaretti, M; Moncrieff, C; Chow, C K

    2016-08-01

    Increasingly, patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery are older and have more comorbidities yet preoperative cardiac assessment appears haphazard and unsystematic. We hypothesised that patients at high cardiac risk were not receiving adequate cardiac assessment, and patients with low-cardiac risk were being over-investigated. To compare in a representative sample of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery the use of cardiac investigations in patients at high and low preoperative cardiac risk. We examined cardiac assessment patterns prior to elective non-cardiac surgery in a representative sample of patients. Cardiac risk was calculated using the Revised Cardiac Risk Index. Of 671 patients, 589 (88%) were low risk and 82 (12%) were high risk. We found that nearly 14% of low-risk and 45% of high-risk patients had investigations for coronary ischaemia prior to surgery. Vascular surgery had the highest rate of investigation (38%) and thoracic patients the lowest rate (14%). Whilst 78% of high-risk patients had coronary disease, only 46% were on beta-blockers, 49% on aspirin and 77% on statins. For current smokers (17.3% of cohort, n = 98), 60% were advised to quit pre-op. Practice patterns varied across surgical sub-types with low-risk patients tending to be over-investigated and high-risk patients under-investigated. A more systemised approach to this large group of patients could improve clinical outcomes, and more judicious use of investigations could lower healthcare costs and increase efficiency in managing this cohort. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  3. Cardiac, renal, and neurological benefits of preoperative levosimendan administration in patients with right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery: evaluation with two biomarkers neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and neuronal enolase

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Orriach, José Luis; Ariza-Villanueva, Daniel; Florez-Vela, Ana; Garrido-Sánchez, Lourdes; Moreno-Cortés, María Isabel; Galán-Ortega, Manuel; Ramírez-Fernández, Alicia; Alcaide Torres, Juan; Fernandez, Concepción Santiago; Navarro Arce, Isabel; Melero-Tejedor, José María; Rubio-Navarro, Manuel; Cruz-Mañas, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate if the preoperative administration of levosimendan in patients with right ventricular (RV) dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, and high perioperative risk would improve cardiac function and would also have a protective effect on renal and neurological functions, assessed using two biomarkers neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (N-GAL) and neuronal enolase. Methods This is an observational study. Twenty-seven high-risk cardiac patients with RV dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension, scheduled for cardiac valve surgery, were prospectively followed after preoperative administration of levosimendan. Levosimendan was administered preoperatively on the day before surgery. All patients were considered high risk of cardiac and perioperative renal complications. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography, renal function by urinary N-GAL levels, and the acute kidney injury scale. Neuronal damage was assessed by neuron-specific enolase levels. Results After surgery, no significant variations were found in mean and SE levels of N-GAL (14.31 [28.34] ng/mL vs 13.41 [38.24] ng/mL), neuron-specific enolase (5.40 [0.41] ng/mL vs 4.32 [0.61] ng/mL), or mean ± SD creatinine (1.06±0.24 mg/dL vs 1.25±0.37 mg/dL at 48 hours). RV dilatation decreased from 4.23±0.7 mm to 3.45±0.6 mm and pulmonary artery pressure from 58±18 mmHg to 42±19 mmHg at 48 hours. Conclusion Preoperative administration of levosimendan has shown a protective role against cardiac, renal, and neurological damage in patients with a high risk of multiple organ dysfunctions undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27143905

  4. Perioperative care in elderly cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Kiecak, Katarzyna; Urbańska, Ewa; Maciejewski, Tomasz; Kaliś, Robert; Pakosiewicz, Waldemar; Kołodziej, Tadeusz; Knapik, Piotr; Przybylski, Roman; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgery is an extreme physiological stress for the elderly. Aging is inevitably associated with irreversible and progressive cellular degeneration. Patients above 75 years of age are characterized by impaired responses to operative stress and a very narrow safety margin. Aim To evaluate perioperative complications in patients aged ≥ 75 years who underwent cardiac surgery in comparison to outcomes in younger patients. Material and methods The study was conducted at the Silesian Centre for Heart Diseases in Zabrze in 2009–2014 after a standard of perioperative care in seniors was implemented to reduce complications, in particular to decrease the duration of mechanical ventilation and reduce postoperative delirium. The study group included 1446 patients. Results The mean duration of mechanical ventilation was 13.8 h in patients aged ≥ 75 years and did not differ significantly compared to younger patients. In-hospital mortality among seniors was 3.8%, a value significantly higher than that observed among patients younger than 75 years of age. Patients aged ≥ 75 years undergoing cardiac surgery have significantly more concomitant conditions involving other organs, which affects treatment outcomes (duration of hospital stay, mortality). Conclusions The implementation of a standard of perioperative care in this age group reduced the duration of mechanical ventilation and lowered the rate of postoperative delirium. PMID:28096832

  5. Preoperative evaluation of the adult patient undergoing non-cardiac surgery: guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology.

    PubMed

    De Hert, Stefan; Imberger, Georgina; Carlisle, John; Diemunsch, Pierre; Fritsch, Gerhard; Moppett, Iain; Solca, Maurizio; Staender, Sven; Wappler, Frank; Smith, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of these guidelines on the preoperative evaluation of the adult non-cardiac surgery patient is to present recommendations based on available relevant clinical evidence. The ultimate aims of preoperative evaluation are two-fold. First, we aim to identify those patients for whom the perioperative period may constitute an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, aside from the risks associated with the underlying disease. Second, this should help us to design perioperative strategies that aim to reduce additional perioperative risks. Very few well performed randomised studies on the topic are available and many recommendations rely heavily on expert opinion and are adapted specifically to the healthcare systems in individual countries. This report aims to provide an overview of current knowledge on the subject with an assessment of the quality of the evidence in order to allow anaesthetists all over Europe to integrate - wherever possible - this knowledge into daily patient care. The Guidelines Committee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) formed a task force with members of subcommittees of scientific subcommittees and individual members of the ESA. Electronic databases were searched from the year 2000 until July 2010 without language restrictions. These searches produced 15 425 abstracts. Relevant systematic reviews with meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional surveys were selected. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network grading system was used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. The final draft guideline was posted on the ESA website for 4 weeks and the link was sent to all ESA members, individual or national (thus including most European national anaesthesia societies). Comments were collated and the guidelines amended as appropriate. When the final draft was complete, the Guidelines Committee and ESA Board ratified the guidelines.

  6. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  7. Investigating interpersonal competencies of cardiac surgery teams.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Mark; Smith, Steven; Slaunwhite, Jason; Sullivan, John

    2006-02-01

    Successful cardiac surgery requires highly skilled individuals to interact effectively in a variety of complex situations. Although cardiac surgery requires individuals to have the requisite medical knowledge and skills, interpersonal competencies are vital to any successful cardiac surgery. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, perfusionists, nurses and residents must communicate effectively in order to ensure a successful patient outcome. Breakdowns in communication, decision-making or leadership could lead to adverse patient outcomes. Realizing that human error is responsible for many adverse patient outcomes, we attempted to understand the team processes involved in cardiac surgery. An adaptation of the Operating Room Management Attitudes Questionnaire was used to gather a variety of responses related to group decision-making and communication. The results indicate inherent group differences based on factors such as seniority and occupational group membership. The implications of the research findings and suggestions for future research are discussed in detail.

  8. Subperiosteal Orbital Hemorrhage Complicating Cardiac Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, Marc C.; Bhatti, M. Tariq

    2004-09-15

    Subperiosteal orbital hemorrhage (SPOH) following cardiac surgery has not been previously reported. We present a patient who developed diplopia and right eye proptosis immediately after cardiac surgery for a mitral valve repair and coronary artery bypass graft. A computed tomography (CT) study demonstrated a right superior SPOH. The diplopia and proptosis resolved spontaneously within 4 weeks. Follow-up CT showed complete resolution of the SPOH.

  9. Pharmacological Risk Factors for Delirium after Cardiac Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Lurdes; Schwarz, Stephan KW; Bowering, John B; Moore, Randell L; Burns, Kyle D; Richford, Carole M; Osborn, Jill A; Barr, Alasdair M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this review is to evaluate the literature on medications associated with delirium after cardiac surgery and potential prophylactic agents for preventing it. Source: Articles were searched in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and EMBASE with the MeSH headings: delirium, cardiac surgical procedures, and risk factors, and the keywords: delirium, cardiac surgery, risk factors, and drugs. Principle inclusion criteria include having patient samples receiving cardiac procedures on cardiopulmonary bypass, and using DSM-IV-TR criteria or a standardized tool for the diagnosis of delirium. Principal Findings: Fifteen studies were reviewed. Two single drugs (intraoperative fentanyl and ketamine), and two classes of drugs (preoperative antipsychotics and postoperative inotropes) were identified in the literature as being independently associated with delirium after cardiac surgery. Another seven classes of drugs (preoperative antihypertensives, anticholinergics, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, opioids, and statins, and postoperative opioids) and three single drugs (intraoperative diazepam, and postoperative dexmedetomidine and rivastigmine) have mixed findings. One drug (risperidone) has been shown to prevent delirium when taken immediately upon awakening from cardiac surgery. None of these findings was replicated in the studies reviewed. Conclusion: These studies have shown that drugs taken perioperatively by cardiac surgery patients need to be considered in delirium risk management strategies. While medications with direct neurological actions are clearly important, this review has shown that specific cardiovascular drugs may also require attention. Future studies that are methodologically consistent are required to further validate these findings and improve their utility. PMID:23449337

  10. Ethical Issues in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kavarana, Minoo N.; Sade, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    While ethical behavior has always been part of cardiac surgical practice, ethical deliberation has only recently become an important component of cardiac surgical practice. Issues such as informed consent, conflict of interest, and professional self-regulation, among many others, have increasingly attracted the attention of cardiac surgeons. This review covers several broad topics of interest to cardiac surgeons and cardiologists, and treats several other topics more briefly. There is much uncertainty about what the future holds for cardiac surgical practice, research, and culture, and we discuss the background of ethical issues to serve as a platform for envisioning what is to come. PMID:22642634

  11. Endoscopic mitral and tricuspid valve surgery after previous cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Casselman, Filip P; La Meir, Mark; Jeanmart, Hughes; Mazzarro, Enzo; Coddens, Jose; Van Praet, Frank; Wellens, Francis; Vermeulen, Yvette; Vanermen, Hugo

    2007-09-11

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a right video-assisted approach for atrioventricular valve disease after previous cardiac surgery. Between December 1st 1997 and May 1st 2006, 80 adults (mean age 65+/-12 years; 56% female) underwent reoperative surgery using a video-assisted approach without rib spreading. Previous cardiac operations included mitral valve (39%), CABG (29%), congenital (10%), and other (23%). For 25% of patients, this was at least their third cardiac operation. Mean time to redo surgery was 15+/-12 years. Femoral vessel cannulation and endoaortic clamping were routinely used. Mean preoperative Euroscore was 9.0+/-2.7 (5 to 20) and predicted mortality was 16.0+/-14.2% (4 to 86). Median preoperative NYHA class was II and mean follow-up was 25+/-22 months. Lung adhesions necessitated sternotomy in 4 cases and cannulation problems in another patient. Total operative mortality was 3.8% (n=3), O/E for mortality being 0.24. Procedures were mitral valve repair (45%; n=36), replacement (50%; n=40) and tricuspid valve replacement (5%; n=4). Additional procedures were performed in 44% (n=35). Mean aortic crossclamp and procedure time were 92+/-37 and 267+/-64 minutes. Mean postoperative blood loss was 815+/-1083 mL. Postoperative morbidity included 2 strokes (2.5%). Mean hospital stay was 10.7+/-6.7 days. Survival at 1 and 4 years was 93.6+/-2.8% and 85.6+/-6.4%. There was 1 late reoperation at 5 years. Median NYHA class at follow-up was II. When comparing, all but 1 patient (98.8%) preferred their minimally invasive approach when considering perioperative pain, postoperative rehabilitation, and final esthetic result. Video-assisted minimal access correction of atrioventricular valve disease after previous cardiac surgery is not only feasible but had lower than predicted mortality and strong patient satisfaction. It should therefore be used more frequently in today's practice.

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Lisa Q.; Di Franco, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a leading cause of postoperative respiratory failure, with a mortality rate approaching 40% in the general population and 80% in the subset of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The increased risk of ARDS in these patients has traditionally been associated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the need for blood product transfusions, large volume shifts, mechanical ventilation and direct surgical insult. Indeed, the impact of ARDS in the cardiac population is substantial, affecting not only survival but also in-hospital length of stay and long-term physical and psychological morbidity. No patient undergoing cardiac surgery can be considered ARDS risk-free. Early identification of those at higher risk is crucial to warrant the adoption of both surgical and non-surgical specific preventative strategies. The present review focuses on epidemiology, risk assessment, pathophysiology, prevention and management of ARDS in the specific setting of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27867583

  13. Cardiac surgery for Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tkebuchava, T; von Segesser, L K; Niederhäuser, U; Bauersfeld, U; Turina, M

    1997-01-01

    Two patients (one girl, one boy) with Kartagener syndrome (situs inversus, bronchiectasis, sinusitis), despite pulmonary problems and associated congenital cardiac anomalies, were operated on at the ages of 4 years and 7 years, respectively. They had had previous palliative treatment at the age of 3 months and 1.3 years, respectively. Both postoperative periods after total correction were without significant complications. Long-term follow-up was available for 9 and 19 years, respectively, with no manifestations of heart insufficiency. Both patients are physically active, and neither requires cardiac medication. Patients with Kartagener syndrome and associated congenital cardiac anomalies can successfully undergo multiple cardiac operations with good long-term outcome.

  14. Concomitant atrial fibrillation surgery for people undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Mark D; Karmali, Kunal N; Berendsen, Mark A; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Kruse, Jane; McCarthy, Patrick M; Malaisrie, S C

    2016-01-01

    Background People with atrial fibrillation (AF) often undergo cardiac surgery for other underlying reasons and are frequently offered concomitant AF surgery to reduce the frequency of short- and long-term AF and improve short- and long-term outcomes. Objectives To assess the effects of concomitant AF surgery among people with AF who are undergoing cardiac surgery on short-term and long-term (12 months or greater) health-related outcomes, health-related quality of life, and costs. Search methods Starting from the year when the first “maze” AF surgery was reported (1987), we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library (March 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (March 2016), Embase Ovid (March 2016), Web of Science (March 2016), the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE, April 2015), and Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA, March 2016). We searched trial registers in April 2016. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of any concomitant AF surgery compared with no AF surgery among adults with preoperative AF, regardless of symptoms, who were undergoing cardiac surgery for another indication. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected studies and extracted data. We evaluated the risk of bias using the Cochrane ‘Risk of bias’ tool. We included outcome data on all-cause and cardiovascular-specific mortality, freedom from atrial fibrillation, flutter, or tachycardia off antiarrhythmic medications, as measured by patient electrocardiographic monitoring greater than three months after the procedure, procedural safety, 30-day rehospitalisation, need for post-discharge direct current cardioversion, health-related quality of life, and direct costs. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using a fixed-effect model when heterogeneity was low (I2 ≤ 50%) and random

  15. Meaningful outcome measures in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Myles, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    The most common cardiac surgical procedures are coronary artery bypass graft surgery and aortic or mitral valve repair or replacement. Underlying conditions include coronary artery disease and heart failure, manifesting as exertional angina, dyspnea, and poor exercise tolerance. The major goals of surgery are to alleviate symptoms and improve patient survival. These, therefore, should inform the choice of primary outcome measures in clinical studies enrolling patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Studies focusing on surrogate outcome measures are relied on all too often. Many are of questionable significance and often have no convincing relationship with patient outcome. Traditional "hard endpoint" outcome measures include serious complications and death with the former including myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Such serious adverse outcomes are commonly collected in registries, but because they occur infrequently, they need to be large to reliably detect true associations and treatment effects. For this reason, some investigators combine several outcomes into a single composite endpoint. Cardiovascular trials commonly use major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) as a composite primary endpoint. However, there is no standard definition for MACE. Most include MI, stroke, and death; others include rehospitalization for heart failure, revascularization, cardiac arrest, or bleeding complications. An influential trial in noncardiac surgery found that perioperative beta-blockers reduced the risk of MI but increased the risk of stroke and death. Such conflicting findings challenge the veracity of such composite endpoints and raise a far more important question: which of these endpoints, or even others that were unmeasured, are most important to a patient recovering from surgery? Given the primary aims of cardiac surgery are to relieve symptoms and improve good quality survival, it is disability-free survival that is the ultimate outcome measure. The question then becomes

  16. Acute kidney injury prediction following elective cardiac surgery: AKICS Score.

    PubMed

    Palomba, H; de Castro, I; Neto, A L C; Lage, S; Yu, L

    2007-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) following cardiac surgery (AKICS) is associated with increased postoperative (post-op) morbidity and mortality. A prognostic score system for AKI would help anticipate patient (pt) treatment. To develop a predictive score (AKICS) for AKI following cardiac surgery, we used a broad definition of AKI, which included perioperative variables. Six hundred three pts undergoing cardiac surgery were prospectively evaluated for AKI defined as serum creatinine above 2.0 mg/dl or an increase of 50% above baseline value. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate pre-, intra-, and post-op parameters associated with AKI. The AKICS scoring system was prospectively validated in a new data set of 215 pts with an incidence of AKI of 14%. Variables included in the AKICS score were age greater than 65, pre-op creatinine above 1.2 mg/dl, pre-op capillary glucose above 140 mg/dl, heart failure, combined surgeries, cardiopulmonary bypass time above 2 h, low cardiac output, and low central venous pressure. The AKICS score presented good calibration and discrimination in both the study group and validation data set. The AKICS system that we developed, which incorporates five risk categories, accurately predicts AKI following cardiac surgery.

  17. Follow-Up After Cardiac Surgery Should be Extended to at Least 120 Days When Benchmarking Cardiac Surgery Centers.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Laura S; Sloth, Erik; Hjortdal, Vibeke E; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan

    2015-08-01

    Short-term (30 days) mortality frequently is used as an outcome measure after cardiac surgery, although it has been proposed that the follow-up period should be extended to 120 days to allow for more accurate benchmarking. The authors aimed to evaluate whether mortality rates 120 days after surgery were comparable to general mortality and to compare causes of death between the cohort and the general population. A multicenter descriptive cohort study using prospectively entered registry data. University hospital. The cohort was obtained from the Western Denmark Heart Registry and matched to the Danish National Hospital Register as well as the Danish Register of Causes of Death. A weighted, age-matched general population consisting of all Danish patients who died within the study period was identified through the central authority on Danish statistics. A total of 11,988 patients (>15 years) who underwent cardiac-surgery at Aarhus, Aalborg and Odense University Hospitals from April 1, 2006 to December 31, 2012 were included. Coronary artery bypass grafting, valve surgery and combinations. Mortality after cardiac surgery matches with mortality in the general population after 140 days. Mortality curves run almost parallel from this point onwards, regardless of The European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) and intervention. The causes of death in the cohort differed statistically significantly from the background population (p<0.0001; one-sample t-test) throughout the first postoperative year. The leading cause of death in the cohort was cardiac (38%); 53% of which was categorized as heart failure. A total of 54% of these patients were assessed preoperatively as having normal or mildly impaired heart function (EuroSCORE). This study supported an extended follow-up period after cardiac surgery when benchmarking cardiac surgery centers. Regardless of preoperative heart function, heart failure was the consistent leading cause of death. Copyright

  18. Delirium in Children After Cardiac Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anita K; Biagas, Katherine V; Clarke, Eunice C; Gerber, Linda M; Mauer, Elizabeth; Silver, Gabrielle; Chai, Paul; Corda, Rozelle; Traube, Chani

    2017-02-01

    To describe the incidence of delirium in pediatric patients after cardiac bypass surgery and explore associated risk factors and effect of delirium on in-hospital outcomes. Prospective observational single-center study. Fourteen-bed pediatric cardiothoracic ICU. One hundred ninety-four consecutive admissions following cardiac bypass surgery, 1 day to 21 years old. Subjects were screened for delirium daily using the Cornell Assessment of Pediatric Delirium. Incidence of delirium in this sample was 49%. Delirium most often lasted 1-2 days and developed within the first 1-3 days after surgery. Age less than 2 years, developmental delay, higher Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery 1 score, cyanotic disease, and albumin less than three were all independently associated with development of delirium in a multivariable model (all p < 0.03). Delirium was an independent predictor of prolonged ICU length of stay, with patients who were ever delirious having a 60% increase in ICU days compared with patients who were never delirious (p < 0.01). In our institution, delirium is a frequent problem in children after cardiac bypass surgery, with identifiable risk factors. Our study suggests that cardiac bypass surgery significantly increases children's susceptibility to delirium. This highlights the need for heightened, targeted delirium screening in all pediatric cardiothoracic ICUs to potentially improve outcomes in this vulnerable patient population.

  19. [Chronic surplus of Japanese cardiac surgeon--ideal nurse practitioner for cardiac surgery, cardiac surgeon's attitude toward the future].

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Hirohisa

    2014-03-01

    It is chronically surplus of doctors in the world of cardiac surgery. There are too many cardiac surgeons because cardiac surgery requires a large amount of manpower resources to provide adequate medical services. Many Japanese cardiac surgeons do not have enough opportunity to perform cardiac surgery operations, and many Japanese cardiac surgery residents do not have enough opportunity to learn cardiac surgery operations. There are physician assistants and nurse practitioners in the US. Because they provide a part of medical care to cardiac surgery patients, American cardiac surgeons can focus more energy on operative procedures. Introduction of cardiac surgery specialized nurse practitioner is essential to deliver a high quality medical service as well as to solve chronic problems that Japanese cardiac surgery has had for a long time.

  20. Blood transfusion and infection after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Keith A; Acker, Michael A; Chang, Helena; Bagiella, Emilia; Smith, Peter K; Iribarne, Alexander; Kron, Irving L; Lackner, Pamela; Argenziano, Michael; Ascheim, Deborah D; Gelijns, Annetine C; Michler, Robert E; Van Patten, Danielle; Puskas, John D; O'Sullivan, Karen; Kliniewski, Dorothy; Jeffries, Neal O; O'Gara, Patrick T; Moskowitz, Alan J; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac surgery is the largest consumer of blood products in medicine; although believed life saving, transfusion carries substantial adverse risks. This study characterizes the relationship between transfusion and risk of major infection after cardiac surgery. In all, 5,158 adults were prospectively enrolled to assess infections after cardiac surgery. The most common procedures were isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (31%) and isolated valve surgery (30%); 19% were reoperations. Infections were adjudicated by independent infectious disease experts. Multivariable Cox modeling was used to assess the independent effect of blood and platelet transfusions on major infections within 60 ± 5 days of surgery. Red blood cells (RBC) and platelets were transfused in 48% and 31% of patients, respectively. Each RBC unit transfused was associated with a 29% increase in crude risk of major infection (p < 0.001). Among RBC recipients, the most common infections were pneumonia (3.6%) and bloodstream infections (2%). Risk factors for infection included postoperative RBC units transfused, longer duration of surgery, and transplant or ventricular assist device implantation, in addition to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and elevated preoperative creatinine. Platelet transfusion decreased the risk of infection (p = 0.02). Greater attention to management practices that limit RBC use, including cell salvage, small priming volumes, vacuum-assisted venous return with rapid autologous priming, and ultrafiltration, and preoperative and intraoperative measures to elevate hematocrit could potentially reduce occurrence of major postoperative infections.

  1. Robotic cardiac surgery: an anaesthetic challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Gao, Changqing

    2014-08-01

    Robotic cardiac surgery with the da Vinci robotic surgical system offers the benefits of a minimally invasive procedure, including a smaller incision and scar, reduced risk of infection, less pain and trauma, less bleeding and blood transfusion requirements, shorter hospital stay and decreased recovery time. Robotic cardiac surgery includes extracardiac and intracardiac procedures. Extracardiac procedures are often performed on a beating heart. Intracardiac procedures require the aid of peripheral cardiopulmonary bypass via a minithoracotomy. Robotic cardiac surgery, however, poses challenges to the anaesthetist, as the obligatory one-lung ventilation (OLV) and CO2 insufflation may reduce cardiac output and increase pulmonary vascular resistance, potentially resulting in hypoxaemia and haemodynamic compromise. In addition, surgery requires appropriate positioning of specialised cannulae such as an endopulmonary vent, endocoronary sinus catheter, and endoaortic clamp catheter under the guidance of transoesophageal echocardiography. Therefore, cardiac anaesthetists should have a working knowledge of these systems, OLV and haemodynamic support. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Standards for resuscitation after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Ley, S Jill

    2015-04-01

    Of the 250 000 patients who undergo major cardiac operations in the United States annually, 0.7% to 2.9% will experience a postoperative cardiac arrest. Although Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) is the standard approach to management of cardiac arrest in the United States, it has significant limitations in these patients. The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) has endorsed a new guideline specific to resuscitation after cardiac surgery that advises important, evidence-based deviations from ACLS and is under consideration in the United States. The ACLS and ERC recommendations for resuscitation of these patients are contrasted on the basis of the essential components of care. Key to this approach is the rapid elimination of reversible causes of arrest, followed by either defibrillation or pacing (as appropriate) before external cardiac compressions that can damage the sternotomy, cautious use of epinephrine owing to potential rebound hypertension, and prompt resternotomy (within 5 minutes) to promote optimal cerebral perfusion with internal massage, if prior interventions are unsuccessful. These techniques are relatively simple, reproducible, and easily mastered in Cardiac Surgical Unit-Advanced Life Support courses. Resuscitation of patients after heart surgery presents a unique opportunity to achieve high survival rates with key modifications to ACLS that warrant adoption in the United States. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  3. An evaluation of underbody forced-air and resistive heating during hypothermic, on-pump cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Engelen, S; Himpe, D; Borms, S; Berghmans, J; Van Cauwelaert, P; Dalton, J E; Sessler, D I

    2011-02-01

    We conducted a randomised controlled trial to compare the efficacy of underbody forced-air warming (Arizant Healthcare Inc, Eden Prairie, MN, USA) with an underbody resistive heating mattress (Inditherm Patient Warming System, Rotherham, UK) and passive insulation in 129 patients having hypothermic cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were separated from cardiopulmonary bypass at a core temperature of 35 °C and external warming continued until the end of surgery. Before cardiopulmonary bypass, the temperature-vs-time slopes were significantly greater in both active warming groups than in the passive insulation group (p < 0.001 for each). However, the slopes of forced-air and resistive warming did not differ (p = 0.55). After cardiopulmonary bypass, the rate of rewarming was significantly greater with forced-air than with resistive warming or passive insulation (p < 0.001 for each), while resistive warming did not differ from passive insulation (p = 0.14). However, absolute temperature differences among the groups were small.

  4. [The third wave of cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Riera-Kinkel, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    A review of the history of cardiac surgery around the world is made divided into three stages, the first since the beginning of humanity until 300 years BC; the second moment shows how comes the platform that would give the anatomical and functional bases of the cardiovascular system. This historic moment includes: 1. the description and analysis of the function of blood and its components; 2. the description of the normal and abnormal Anatomy of the human heart and its vessels; 3. the anatomic and functional correlation: Foundation of the deductive thinking, and 4. the anatomic and functional integration with the clinic. Finally, the third wave, which is living today, is the stage of the technological explosion that begins with procedures as thoracoscopic surgery with the concept of reducing surgical trauma through minimum approach surgery. Also the use of robotics to solve some of the alterations in the CC, another is hybrid procedures and finally the use of fetal cardiac surgery.

  5. Cardiac surgery is successful in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Timothy R; Jansz, Paul C; Spratt, Phillip; Macdonald, Peter S; Dhital, Kumud; Hayward, Christopher; Arndt, Grace T; Keogh, Anne; Hatzistergos, Joanna; Granger, Emily

    2014-08-01

    Improved survival of heart transplant (HTx) recipients and increased acceptance of higher risk donors allows development of late pathology. However, there are few data to guide surgical options. We evaluated short-term outcomes and mortality to guide pre-operative assessment, planning, and post-operative care. Single centre, retrospective review of 912 patients who underwent HTx from February 1984 - June 2012, identified 22 patients who underwent subsequent cardiac surgery. Data are presented as median (IQR). Indications for surgery were coronary allograft vasculopathy (CAV) (n=10), valvular disease (n=6), infection (n=3), ascending aortic aneurysm (n=1), and constrictive pericarditis (n=2). There was one intraoperative death (myocardial infarction). Hospital stay was 10 (8-21) days. Four patients (18%) returned to theatre for complications. After cardiac surgery, survival at one, five and 10 years was 91±6%, 79±10% and 59±15% with a follow-up of 4.6 (1.7-10.2) years. High pre-operative creatinine was a univariate risk factor for mortality, HR=1.028, (95%CI 1.00-1.056; p=0.05). A time dependent Cox proportional hazards model of the risk of cardiac surgery post-HTx showed no significant hazard; HR=0.87 (95%CI 0.37-2.00; p=0.74). Our experience shows cardiac surgery post-HTx is associated with low mortality, and confirms that cardiac surgery is appropriate for selected HTx recipients. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of the preliminary effectiveness of hand massage therapy on postoperative pain of adults in the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Boitor, Mădălina; Martorella, Géraldine; Arbour, Caroline; Michaud, Cécile; Gélinas, Céline

    2015-06-01

    Although many intensive care unit patients experience significant pain, very few studies explored massage to maximize their pain relief. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary effects of hand massage on pain after cardiac surgery in the adult intensive care unit. A pilot randomized controlled trial was used for this study. The study was conducted in a Canadian medical-surgical intensive care unit. Forty adults who were admitted to the intensive care unit after undergoing elective cardiac surgery in the previous 24 hours participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 21) or control (n = 19) group. The experimental group received a 15-minute hand massage, and the control group received a 15-minute hand-holding without massage. In both groups the intervention was followed by a 30-minute rest period. The interventions were offered on 2-3 occasions within 24 hours after surgery. Pain, muscle tension, and vital signs were assessed. Pain intensity and behavioral scores were decreased for the experimental group. Although hand massage decreased muscle tension, fluctuations in vital signs were not significant. This study supports potential benefits of hand massage for intensive care unit postoperative pain management. Although larger randomized controlled trials are necessary, this low-cost nonpharmacologic intervention can be safely administered.

  7. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Mazilu, Dumitru; Horvath, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models. PMID:23125924

  8. Choreoathetotic syndrome following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bisciglia, Michela; London, Frédéric; Hulin, Jonathan; Peeters, André; Ivanoiu, Adrian; Jeanjean, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Movement disorders following heart surgery are very unusual. Post-pump chorea is mainly a pediatric complication of heart surgery, typically manifesting after a latent period of normality and is usually related with long extracorporeal circulation time and deep hypothermia. We report a 73-year-old woman, without risk factors predisposing to paroxysmal movement disorders, presenting acute choreoathetoid movements 5 days after aortic valvular replacement with normal extracorporeal circulation time and perioperative normothermia.

  9. Training general surgery residents to avoid postoperative cardiac events.

    PubMed

    McLean, Thomas R; McGoldrick, Jennifer; Fox, Sheryl; Haller, Chris C; Arevalo, Jane

    2007-11-01

    Expertise in cardiac risk assessment takes years to acquire, but unnecessary cardiology consultation delays treatment and consumes scarce resources. A retrospective review was performed of the cardiac work-up and postoperative events during 1 year on a general surgery service. Postgraduate year 1-3 general surgery residents were instructed to obtain a cardiology consult if a patient had any of the following: (1) had undergone coronary artery intervention more than 2 years in the past; (2) was taking an anti-anginal medication (nitroglycerine, Ca channel, or beta-blocker); or (3) was symptomatic or had an abnormal electrocardiogram. Whether a patient was symptomatic was to be tempered by the nature of the planned procedure. Supervised residents screened 720 unique patients for surgery. Cardiology consultation was obtained in 37. All but 1 (97%) patient referred to cardiology met at least 1 of the earlier-described criteria; with 8 (22%) meeting all 3 criteria. On average, patients referred to the cardiologists were taking 1.4 anti-anginal medications; and 1 patient sustained a fatal myocardial infarction after referral. Cardiac imaging (stress test or catheterization) was performed on 24 (65%) referred patients and was positive in 8 (33%). After minimizing cardiac risk by medication or intervention, the surgery service declined to offer the planned procedure to 11 (30%) of the referred patients and an additional 5 (15%) patients declined surgery. The overall surgical mortality was 2%. None of the patients in this series sustained a postoperative myocardial infarction or cardiac death. Postoperative supraventricular tachycardia was not influenced significantly by cardiology consultation (5% referred patients vs 1% nonreferred). Our criteria for obtaining cardiology consultation in general surgery patients appears to appropriately select patients in need of further work-up. Information obtained from a cardiac consultation frequently leads to a re-evaluation of the

  10. Postoperative Right Ventricular Failure in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Victor H Nieto; Franco, Daniel L Molano; Moreno, Albert A Valencia; Gambasica, Jose A Rojas; Nunez, Cristian C Cortes

    2016-12-01

    Two cases of patients that developed right ventricular failure (RVF) after cardiac valve surgery are presented with a narrative revision of the literature. RVF involves a great challenge due to the severity of this condition; it has a low incidence among non-congenital cardiac surgery patients, is more likely associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary complications related to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and is a cause of acute graft failure and of a higher early mortality in cardiac transplant. The morphologic and hemodynamic characteristics of the right ventricle and some specific factors that breed pulmonary hypertension after cardiac surgery are in favor of the onset of RVF. Due to the possibility of complications after cardiac valve repair or replacement, measures as appropriate hemodynamic monitoring, to manage oxygenation, ventilation, sedation, acid base equilibrium and perfusion goals are a requirement, as well as a normal circulating volume, and the prevention of a disproportionate rise in the afterload, to preserve the free wall of the right ventricle (RV) and the septum's contribution to the right ventricular global function and geometry. If there is no response to these basic measures, the use of advanced therapy with inotropics, intravenous or inhaled pulmonary vasodilation agents is recommended; the use of mechanical ventricular assistance stands as a last resource.

  11. Postoperative Right Ventricular Failure in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Victor H. Nieto; Franco, Daniel L. Molano; Moreno, Albert A. Valencia; Gambasica, Jose A. Rojas; Nunez, Cristian C. Cortes

    2016-01-01

    Two cases of patients that developed right ventricular failure (RVF) after cardiac valve surgery are presented with a narrative revision of the literature. RVF involves a great challenge due to the severity of this condition; it has a low incidence among non-congenital cardiac surgery patients, is more likely associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary complications related to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and is a cause of acute graft failure and of a higher early mortality in cardiac transplant. The morphologic and hemodynamic characteristics of the right ventricle and some specific factors that breed pulmonary hypertension after cardiac surgery are in favor of the onset of RVF. Due to the possibility of complications after cardiac valve repair or replacement, measures as appropriate hemodynamic monitoring, to manage oxygenation, ventilation, sedation, acid base equilibrium and perfusion goals are a requirement, as well as a normal circulating volume, and the prevention of a disproportionate rise in the afterload, to preserve the free wall of the right ventricle (RV) and the septum’s contribution to the right ventricular global function and geometry. If there is no response to these basic measures, the use of advanced therapy with inotropics, intravenous or inhaled pulmonary vasodilation agents is recommended; the use of mechanical ventricular assistance stands as a last resource. PMID:28197291

  12. Cardiac surgery: What the future holds?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac surgery has been scrutinized and challenged as no other specialty has. That has brought new ideas and structural frameworks but has also brought uncertainty and scepticism. This report identifies the challenges that the specialty is facing, and suggests solutions and strategies for the future. PMID:21794111

  13. Cardiac surgery in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Charles R

    2003-10-01

    Retrospective and prospective randomized studies that provide information on the influence of race on the morbidity and mortality of cardiac surgical procedures are reviewed. We intentionally focus our attention on the specific outcomes of these procedures in African Americans because African Americans have a high incidence of all-cause cardiovascular mortality and a high prevalence of a number of risk factors associated with cardiovascular mortality. Furthermore, numerous studies have confirmed that blacks, as a function of race, lack equal access to diagnostic and therapeutic invasive cardiac procedures. Here we use the terms "black" and "African American" interchangeably. In this context we interpret both terms to refer to Americans of African descent. Similarly, we use the term "white" or "Caucasian" interchangeably to refer to Americans of European descent.

  14. Strategies for blood conservation in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery accounts for the majority of blood transfusions in a hospital. Blood transfusion has been associated with complications and major adverse events after cardiac surgery. Compared to adults it is more difficult to avoid blood transfusion in children after cardiac surgery. This article takes into account the challenges and emphasizes on the various strategies that could be implemented, to conserve blood during pediatric cardiac surgery. PMID:27716703

  15. Evaluation of right ventricular function after cardiac surgery: The importance of tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and right ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Garcia Gigorro, Renata; Renes Carreño, Emilio; Mayordomo, Sandra; Marín, Helena; Perez Vela, Jose Luis; Corres Peiretti, María Angélica; Montejo González, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The evaluation of right ventricular systolic function is essential to the hemodynamic management of critically ill cardiac patients. Nevertheless, assessment of right ventricular function remains problematic. We sought to analyze the correlation between tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) in the assessment of global and regional right ventricular function, respectively. This was a prospective study of 61 cardiac surgical patients. TAPSE was measured with transthoracic echocardiography and RVEF was obtained by a thermodilution pulmonary artery catheter. Both measurements were estimated simultaneously during the early postoperative period. Patients with previously identified severe tricuspid insufficiency were excluded from the study to avoid confounding results. The etiologies for cardiac surgery were surgical pulmonary thromboendarterectomy in 19 patients, valve replacement in 17 patients, heart transplant in 13 patients, and coronary artery bypass graft in 9 patients. Mean RVEF and TAPSE were 26.2% ± 9.7% and 11.4 ± 4 mm, respectively. RVEF and TAPSE showed a significant correlation (r = 0.73, P < .001). Weak reverse relationships between TAPSE or RVEF with afterload hemodynamic parameters, mean pulmonary artery pressure, or pulmonary vascular resistance were elucidated. TAPSE is a robust measure of right ventricular function that correlates with RVEF assessed by pulmonary artery catheter. A noninvasive method such as echocardiography can guide and support invasive monitoring of right ventricular function in cardiac surgical patients. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of a novel transfusion algorithm employing point-of-care coagulation assays in cardiac surgery: a retrospective cohort study with interrupted time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Karkouti, Keyvan; McCluskey, Stuart A; Callum, Jeannie; Freedman, John; Selby, Rita; Timoumi, Tarik; Roy, Debashis; Rao, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac surgery requiring the use of cardiopulmonary bypass is frequently complicated by coagulopathic bleeding that, largely due to the shortcomings of conventional coagulation tests, is difficult to manage. This study evaluated a novel transfusion algorithm that uses point-of-care coagulation testing. Consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery with bypass at one hospital before (January 1, 2012 to January 6, 2013) and after (January 7, 2013 to December 13, 2013) institution of an algorithm that used the results of point-of-care testing (ROTEM; Tem International GmBH, Munich, Germany; Plateletworks; Helena Laboratories, Beaumont, TX) during bypass to guide management of coagulopathy were included. Pre- and postalgorithm outcomes were compared using interrupted time-series analysis to control for secular time trends and other confounders. Pre- and postalgorithm groups included 1,311 and 1,170 patients, respectively. Transfusion rates for all blood products (except for cryoprecipitate, which did not change) were decreased after algorithm institution. After controlling for secular pre- and postalgorithm time trends and potential confounders, the posttransfusion odds ratios (95% CIs) for erythrocytes, platelets, and plasma were 0.50 (0.32 to 0.77), 0.22 (0.13 to 0.37), and 0.20 (0.12 to 0.34), respectively. There were no indications that the algorithm worsened any of the measured processes of care or outcomes. Institution of a transfusion algorithm based on point-of-care testing was associated with reduced transfusions. This suggests that the algorithm could improve the management of the many patients who develop coagulopathic bleeding after cardiac surgery. The generalizability of the findings needs to be confirmed.

  17. Opioid analgesia in neonates following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Gregory B; Golianu, Brenda

    2007-03-01

    Pain in the newborn is complex, involving a variety of receptors and mechanisms within the developing nervous system. When pain is generated, a series of sequential neurobiologic changes occur within the central nervous system. If pain is prolonged or repetitive, the developing nervous system could be permanently modified, with altered processing at spinal and supraspinal levels. In addition, pain is associated with a number of adverse physiologic responses that include alterations in circulatory (tachycardia, hypertension, vasoconstriction), metabolic (increased catabolism), immunologic (impaired immune response), and hemostatic (platelet activation) systems. This "stress response" associated with cardiac surgery in neonates could be profound and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Neonates undergoing cardiac operations are exposed to extensive tissue damage related to surgery and additional painful stimulation related to endotracheal and thoracostomy tubes that may remain in place for variable periods of time following surgery. In addition, postoperatively neonates endure repeated procedural pain from suctioning of endotracheal tubes, placement of vascular catheters, and manipulation of wounds (eg, sternal closure) and dressings. The treatment and/or prevention of pain are widely considered necessary for humanitarian and physiologic reasons. Improved clinical and developmental outcomes underscore the importance of providing adequate analgesia for newborns who undergo major surgery, mechanical ventilation, and related procedures in the intensive care unit. This article reviews published information regarding opioid administration and associated issues of tolerance and abstinence syndromes (withdrawal) in neonates with an emphasis on those having undergone cardiac surgery.

  18. Methylprednisolone Does Not Reduce Persistent Pain after Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Turan, Alparslan; Belley-Cote, Emilie P; Vincent, Jessica; Sessler, Daniel I; Devereaux, Philip J; Yusuf, Salim; van Oostveen, Rachel; Cordova, Gustavo; Yared, Jean-Pierre; Yu, Hai; Legare, Jean-Francois; Royse, Alistair; Rochon, Antoine; Nasr, Vivian; Ayad, Sabry; Quantz, Mackenzie; Lamy, Andre; Whitlock, Richard P

    2015-12-01

    Persistent incisional pain is common after cardiac surgery and is believed to be in part related to inflammation and poorly controlled acute pain. Methylprednisolone is a corticosteroid with substantial antiinflammatory and analgesic properties and is thus likely to ameliorate persistent surgical pain. Therefore, the authors tested the primary hypothesis that patients randomized to methylprednisolone have less persistent incisional pain than those given placebo. One thousand forty-three patients having cardiopulmonary bypass for cardiac surgery via a median sternotomy were included in this substudy of Steroids in Cardiac Surgery (SIRS) trial. Patients were randomized to 500 mg intraoperative methylprednisolone or placebo. Incisional pain was assessed at 30 days and 6 months after surgery, and the potential risk factors were also evaluated. Methylprednisolone administration did not reduce pain at 30 days or persistent incisional pain at 6 months, which occurred in 78 of 520 patients (15.7%) in the methylprednisolone group and in 88 of 523 patients (17.8%) in the placebo group. The odds ratio for methylprednisolone was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.79 to 1.09, P = 0.37). Furthermore, there was no difference in worst pain and average pain in the last 24 h, pain interference with daily life, or use of pain medicine at 6 months. Younger age, female sex, and surgical infections were associated with the development of persistent incisional pain. Intraoperative methylprednisolone administration does not reduce persistent incisional pain at 6 months in patients recovering from cardiac surgery.

  19. Loculated cardiac hematoma causing hemodynamic compromise after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Andreia; Cassandra, Miryan; Pinto, Carlos; Oliveira, Catarina; Antunes, Manuel; Gonçalves, Lino

    2015-09-01

    The authors describe a case of a rare complication occurring after cardiac surgery. Three weeks after aortic valve replacement a young male became hemodynamically unstable. The echocardiogram showed a large loculated hematoma compressing the right atrium. The patient was reoperated and the mass was removed. Recovery was complete. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiac Surgery-Associated Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Huijuan; Katz, Nevin; Ariyanon, Wassawon; Blanca-Martos, Lourdes; Adýbelli, Zelal; Giuliani, Anna; Danesi, Tommaso Hinna; Kim, Jeong Chul; Nayak, Akash; Neri, Mauro; Virzi, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; Scalzotto, Elisa; Salvador, Loris; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a common and serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and it is the second most common cause of AKI in the intensive care unit. Although the complication has been associated with the use of CPB, the etiology is likely multifactorial and related to intraoperative and early postoperative management including pharmacologic therapy. To date, very little evidence from randomized trials supporting specific interventions to protect from or prevent AKI in broad cardiac surgery populations has been found. The definition of AKI employed by investigators influences not only the incidence of CSA-AKI, but also the identification of risk variables. The advent of novel biomarkers of kidney injury has the potential to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of CSA-AKI, the assessment of its severity and prognosis, and the early institution of interventions to prevent or reduce kidney damage. Further studies are needed to determine how to optimize cardiac surgical procedures, CPB parameters, and intraoperative and early postoperative blood pressure and renal blood flow to reduce the risk of CSA-AKI. No pharmacologic strategy has demonstrated clear efficacy in the prevention of CSA-AKI; however, some agents, such as the natriuretic peptide nesiritide and the dopamine agonist fenoldopam, have shown promising results in renoprotection. It remains unclear whether CSA-AKI patients can benefit from the early institution of such pharmacologic agents or the early initiation of renal replacement therapy. PMID:24454314

  1. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in immediate postoperative cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Mazullo Filho, João Batista Raposo; Bonfim, Vânia Jandira Gomes; Aquim, Esperidião Elias

    2010-12-01

    Noninvasive ventilation is routine in acute respiratory failure patients; nevertheless, the literature is controversial for its use in cardiac surgery postoperative period. To evaluate the effectiveness of preventive noninvasive ventilation in the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery, monitoring its impact until the sixth day of hospitalization. This was a controlled study, where patients in immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery were randomized into two groups: control (G1) and investigational (G2) which received noninvasive ventilation set on pressure support mode and positive end expiratory pressure, for 2 hours following extubation. Were evaluated ventilatory, hemodynamical and oxygenation variables both immediately after extubation and after noninvasive ventilation in G2. Thirty-two patients completed the study, 18 in G1 and 14 in G2. The mean age was 61±16.23 years for G1 and for G2 61.5 ± 9.4 years. Of the initial twenty-seven patients in G1, nine patients (33.3%) were excluded due to invasive ventilation requirements, and three patients (11.11%) had to go back to invasive mechanical ventilation. None of the 14 G2 patients was reintubated. Patients undergoing early ventilatory support showed better results in the assessments throughout the hospitalization time. Noninvasive post-cardiac surgery ventilation was proven effective, as demonstrated by increased vital capacity, decreased respiratory rate, prevention of post-extubation acute respiratory failure and reduced reintubation rates.

  2. Acute Kidney Injury Subsequent to Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Robert S.; Herron, Crystal R.; Groom, Robert C.; Brown, Jeremiah R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is a common and underappreciated syndrome that is associated with poor short- and long-term outcomes. AKI after cardiac surgery may be epiphenomenon, a signal for adverse outcomes by virtue of other affected organ systems, and a consequence of multiple factors. Subtle increases in serum creatinine (SCr) postoperatively, once considered inconsequential, have been shown to reflect a kidney injury that likely occurred in the operating room during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and more often in susceptible individuals. The postoperative elevation in SCr is a delayed signal reflecting the intraoperative injury. Preoperative checklists and the conduct of CPB represent opportunities for prevention of AKI. Newer definitions of AKI provide us with an opportunity to scrutinize perioperative processes of care and determine strategies to decrease the incidence of AKI subsequent to cardiac surgery. Recognizing and mitigating risk factors preoperatively and optimizing intraoperative practices may, in the aggregate, decrease the incidence of AKI. This review explores the pathophysiology of AKI and addresses the features of patients who are the most vulnerable to AKI. Preoperative strategies are discussed with particular attention to a readiness for surgery checklist. Intraoperative strategies include minimizing hemodilution and maximizing oxygen delivery with specific suggestions regarding fluid management and plasma preservation. PMID:26390675

  3. Development of Models for Regional Cardiac Surgery Centers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Choon Seon; Park, Nam Hee; Sim, Sung Bo; Yun, Sang Cheol; Ahn, Hye Mi; Kim, Myunghwa; Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Myo Jeong; Kim, Hyunsu; Chee, Hyun Keun; Oh, Sanggi; Kang, Shinkwang; Lee, Sok-Goo; Shin, Jun Ho; Kim, Keonyeop; Lee, Kun Sei

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to develop the models for regional cardiac surgery centers, which take regional characteristics into consideration, as a policy measure that could alleviate the concentration of cardiac surgery in the metropolitan area and enhance the accessibility for patients who reside in the regions. Methods To develop the models and set standards for the necessary personnel and facilities for the initial management plan, we held workshops, debates, and conference meetings with various experts. Results After partitioning the plan into two parts (the operational autonomy and the functional comprehensiveness), three models were developed: the ‘independent regional cardiac surgery center’ model, the ‘satellite cardiac surgery center within hospitals’ model, and the ‘extended cardiac surgery department within hospitals’ model. Proposals on personnel and facility management for each of the models were also presented. A regional cardiac surgery center model that could be applied to each treatment area was proposed, which was developed based on the anticipated demand for cardiac surgery. The independent model or the satellite model was proposed for Chungcheong, Jeolla, North Gyeongsang, and South Gyeongsang area, where more than 500 cardiac surgeries are performed annually. The extended model was proposed as most effective for the Gangwon and Jeju area, where more than 200 cardiac surgeries are performed annually. Conclusion The operation of regional cardiac surgery centers with high caliber professionals and quality resources such as optimal equipment and facility size, should enhance regional healthcare accessibility and the quality of cardiac surgery in South Korea. PMID:28035295

  4. Evaluation of the estimated continuous cardiac output monitoring system in adults and children undergoing kidney transplant surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takashi; Maemura, Yumi; Yoshida, Akiko; Muto, Rika; Ochiai, Ryoichi

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of the estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) allows non-invasive and continuous assessment of cardiac output. However, the applicability of this approach in children has not been assessed thus far. We compared the correlation coefficient, bias, standard deviation (SD), and the lower and upper 95 % limits of agreement for esCCO and dye densitography-cardiac output (DDG-CO) measurements by pulse dye densitometry (PDD) in adults and children. On the basis of these assessments, we aimed to examine whether esCCO can be used in pediatric patients. DDG-CO was measured by pulse dye densitometry (PDD) using indocyanine green. Modified-pulse wave transit time, obtained using pulse oximetry and electrocardiography, was used to measure esCCO. Correlations between DDG-CO and esCCO in adults and children were analyzed using regression analysis with the least squares method. Differences between the two correlation coefficients were statistically analyzed using a correlation coefficient test. Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate bias and SD for DDG-CO and esCCO in both adults and children, and 95 % limits of agreement (bias ± 1.96 SD) and percentage error (1.96 SD/mean DDG-CO) were calculated and compared. The average age of the adult patients (n = 10) was 39.3 ± 12.1 years, while the average age of the pediatric patients (n = 7) was 9.4 ± 3.1 years (p < 0.001). For adults, the correlation coefficient was 0.756; bias, -0.258 L/min; SD, 1.583 L/min; lower and upper 95 % limits of agreement for DDG-CO and esCCO, -3.360 and 2.844 L/min, respectively; and percentage error, 42.7 %. For children, the corresponding values were 0.904; -0.270; 0.908; -2.051 and 1.510 L/min, respectively; and 35.7 %. Due to the high percentage error values, we could not establish a correlation between esCCO and DDG-CO. However, the 95 % limits of agreement and percentage error were better in children than in adults. Due to the high percentage error, we could not confirm a correlation

  5. [Fluid therapy in cardiac surgery. An update].

    PubMed

    Boix, E; Vicente, R; Pérez-Artacho, J

    2014-01-01

    The anesthetist has 2 major tools for optimizing haemodynamics in cardiac surgery: Vasoactive drugs and the intravascular volume. It is necessary to identify which patients would benefit from one or the other therapies for a suitable response to treatment. Hemodynamic monitoring with the different existing parameters (pressure, volumetric static, volumetric functional and echocardiography) allows the management of these patients to be optimized. In this article a review is presented on the most recent and relevant publications, and the different tools available to control the management of the fluid therapy in this context, and to suggest a few guidelines for the haemodynamics monitoring of patients submitted to cardiac surgery. A systematic search has been made in PubMed, limiting the results to the publications over the last five years up to February 2012.

  6. Evaluation of the electroencephalographic bispectral index during fentanyl-midazolam anaesthesia for cardiac surgery. Does it predict haemodynamic responses during endotracheal intubation and sternotomy?

    PubMed

    Driessen, J J; Harbers, J B; van Egmond, J; Booij, L H

    1999-09-01

    The bispectral index, a value derived from the electroencephalogram, has been proposed as a measure of anaesthetic effect. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bispectral index during midazolam-fentanyl anaesthesia for cardiac surgery for its possible role as a predictor of increases in systolic blood pressure during endotracheal intubation and sternotomy. After institutional approval 15 consenting patients, scheduled for elective cardiac surgery, were selected for the study. Anaesthesia was induced in all patients with a loading dose of fentanyl 7.5-10 micrograms kg-1, midazolam 0.15 mg kg-1 and pancuronium 0.1 mg kg-1. After a further bolus dose of fentanyl 10-12.5 micrograms kg-1 prior to the start of incision and sternotomy, maintenance infusion rates of fentanyl 4-6 micrograms kg-1 h-1 and midazolam 0.1 mg kg-1 h-1 were started and continued through surgery at the discretion of the anaesthetist and guided by the presenting clinical and haemodynamic responses. The control of anaesthesia was never based on the value of the bispectral index. The mean bispectral index value decreased from 95.7 (3.1) at base-line to 59.5 (12.0) after induction of anaesthesia and then remained below 70 throughout surgery. However, there was an important interindividual variability in bispectral index values despite standardized dosages of fentanyl and midazolam. There was no significant correlation between the bispectral index values in the pre-intubation and pre-incision period and the changes in systolic blood pressure during endotracheal intubation and sternotomy, respectively. In conclusion, the large intersubject variability in the bispectral index values should be investigated further in the light of the great variability in the clinical effects of midazolam and fentanyl. The lack of significant correlation between the bispectral index values and the haemodynamic responses suggest that the bispectral index, which is a helpful monitor of anaesthetic depth, is not a

  7. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research.

  8. Impact of modified ultrafiltration on morbidity after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Raja, Shahzad G; Yousufuddin, Shaik; Rasool, Faisal; Nubi, Ayo; Danton, Mark; Pollock, James

    2006-08-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass is a double-edged sword. Without it, corrective cardiac surgery would not be possible in the majority of children with congenital heart disease. However, much of the perioperative morbidity that occurs after cardiac surgery can be attributed to a large extent to pathophysiologic processes engendered by extracorporeal circulation. One of the challenges that has confronted pediatric cardiac surgeons has been to minimize the consequences of cardiopulmonary bypass. Ultrafiltration is a strategy that has been used for many years in an effort to attenuate the effects of hemodilution that occur when small children undergo surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Over the past several years, a modified technique of ultrafiltration, commonly known as modified ultrafiltration, has been used with increasing enthusiasm. Multiple studies have been undertaken to assess the effects of modified ultrafiltration on organ function and postoperative morbidity following repair of congenital heart defects. This review attempts to evaluate current available scientific evidence on the impact of modified ultrafiltration on organ function and morbidity after pediatric cardiac surgery.

  9. Priority setting and cardiac surgery: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Walton, Nancy A; Martin, Douglas K; Peter, Elizabeth H; Pringle, Dorothy M; Singer, Peter A

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe priority setting in cardiac surgery and evaluate it using an ethical framework, "accountability for reasonableness". Cardiac surgery is an expensive part of hospital budgets. Priority setting decisions are made daily regarding ever increasing volumes of patients. While much attention has been paid to the management of cardiac surgery waiting lists, little empirical research exists into the way actual decision makers deliberate upon and resolve priority setting decisions on a daily basis. A key goal of priority setting, in cardiac surgical areas as well as others, is fairness. "Accountability for reasonableness" is a leading ethical framework for fair priority setting, and can be used to identify opportunities for improvement (i.e. make it fairer) and highlight good practices. A case study was conducted to examine the process of priority setting processes at three University of Toronto affiliated cardiac surgery centres. Relevant documents were examined, weekly triage rounds were observed for 27 months, and interviews were carried out with 23 key participants including cardiac surgeons, cardiologists, and triage nurses. In data analysis, the conditions of "accountability for reasonableness" (relevance, publicity, appeals and enforcement) were used as an analytic lens. While decisions may appear to be based strictly upon clinical criteria (e.g. coronary anatomy); non-clinical criteria also have an impact upon decision-making (e.g. patients' lifestyle choices, type of surgical practice and departmental constraints on resource use). Participants stated that these factors influence their decision-making and can result in unfair and inconsistent decisions. PUBLICITY: Non-clinical reasons are not publicly accessible, nor are they clearly acknowledged in discussions between cardiac clinicians. APPEALS: There are mechanisms for challenging decisions however without access to the non-clinical reasons, this can be problematic

  10. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database: The Driving Force for Improvement in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Winkley Shroyer, Annie Laurie; Bakaeen, Faisal; Shahian, David M; Carr, Brendan M; Prager, Richard L; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Ferraris, Victor; Edwards, Fred; Grover, Frederick L

    2015-01-01

    Initiated in 1989, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Adult Cardiac Surgery Database (ACSD) includes more than 1085 participating centers, representing 90%-95% of current US-based adult cardiac surgery hospitals. Since its inception, the primary goal of the STS ACSD has been to use clinical data to track and improve cardiac surgical outcomes. Patients' preoperative risk characteristics, procedure-related processes of care, and clinical outcomes data have been captured and analyzed, with timely risk-adjusted feedback reports to participating providers. In 2006, STS initiated an external audit process to evaluate STS ACSD completeness and accuracy. Given the extremely high inter-rater reliability and completeness rates of STS ACSD, it is widely regarded as the "gold standard" for benchmarking cardiac surgery risk-adjusted outcomes. Over time, STS ACSD has expanded its quality horizons beyond the traditional focus on isolated, risk-adjusted short-term outcomes such as perioperative morbidity and mortality. New quality indicators have evolved including composite measures of key processes of care and outcomes (risk-adjusted morbidity and risk-adjusted mortality), longer-term outcomes, and readmissions. Resource use and patient-reported outcomes would be added in the future. These additional metrics provide a more comprehensive perspective on quality as well as additional end points. Widespread acceptance and use of STS ACSD has led to a cultural transformation within cardiac surgery by providing nationally benchmarked data for internal quality assessment, aiding data-driven quality improvement activities, serving as the basis for a voluntary public reporting program, advancing cardiac surgery care through STS ACSD-based research, and facilitating data-driven informed consent dialogues and alternative treatment-related discussions.

  11. [Cardiac surgery without transfusion in 2005].

    PubMed

    Vaislic, C; Bical, O; Deleuze, P; Khoury, W; Gaillard, D; Ponzio, O; Ollivier, Y; Robine, B; Dupuys, C; Sportiche, M

    2005-01-01

    Between January 1991 and October 2003, 200 Jehovah Witnesses adult patients underwent elective cardiac surgery. To asses the impact on continuing progress of blood saving protocols and the increasing operative risk of patients proposed to surgery, we have re-assessed our results in this specific population. Files of the first 100 patients operated upon between 1991 and 1998 were reviewed, and compared to the following 100 ones treated between 1998 to today. All patients were scored using the Euroscore model. In the latest series, patients are older (68 vs 51) and 13% underwent an iterative procedure, although there was none in the first series. Three deaths occurred after one month at the beginning of our experience, only one in the latest series. Operative risk factors had distinctly deteriorated, with more redux, and ejection fraction lower than 35%. Major progress to maintain morbi-mortality stability were multifactorial: preoperative erythropoietin in order to reach an haemoglobin minimal value of 14 g/dL, Cornell University protocol, mini-ECC, warm blood cardioplegia, ultra-early extubation. Cardiac surgery without transfusion can be realised with an equivalent risk to that of classical surgery, despite an operative risk aggravation, due to the association of recent conservative techniques.

  12. [PERIOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH DISEASES OF THE CARDIOVASGULAR Yb I am IN NON-CARDIAC SURGERY (Commentary on the new European guidelines "Non-cardiac surgery: evaluation and management of cardiovascular system")].

    PubMed

    Likhvantsev, V

    2015-01-01

    New guidelines for the perioperative management of patients with concomitant diseases of the cardiovascular system (CVS) have been published in the beginning of 2014. The guidelines were the result of joint work of the Board of experts of the European society of cardiology (ESC) and European society of anaesthesiology (ESA). Recommendations ESC/ESA-2014 thoroughly and accurately determine the algorithm of actions of the anaesthesiologist in the process of preparation and conduct of anesthesia and intensive therapy in the early postoperative period in accordance with the modern level of development of our specialty. No doubt they will be useful to all professionals involved in the process of providing medical care to patients in non-cardiac surgery with concomitant diseases of the cardiovascular system. This article, however, does not purport to be a complete summary of the cited document; it only contains, its own commentary on those provisions which are in the author's opinion the most significant and interesting.

  13. Epidemiology and Outcomes After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Punkaj; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Hill, Kevin D.; Gaynor, J. William; O’Brien, Sean M.; He, Max; Sheng, Shubin; Schexnayder, Stephen M.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Imamura, Michiaki; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicenter data regarding cardiac arrest in children undergoing heart operations are limited. We describe epidemiology and outcomes associated with postoperative cardiac arrest in a large multiinstitutional cohort. Methods Patients younger than 18 years in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2007 through 2012) were included. Patient factors, operative characteristics, and outcomes were described for patients with and without postoperative cardiac arrest. Multivariable models were used to evaluate the association of center volume with cardiac arrest rate and mortality after cardiac arrest, adjusting for patient and procedural factors. Results Of 70,270 patients (97 centers), 1,843 (2.6%) had postoperative cardiac arrest. Younger age, lower weight, and presence of preoperative morbidities (all p < 0.0001) were associated with cardiac arrest. Arrest rate increased with procedural complexity across common benchmark operations, ranging from 0.7% (ventricular septal defect repair) to 12.7% (Norwood operation). Cardiac arrest was associated with significant mortality risk across procedures, ranging from 15.4% to 62.3% (all p < 0.0001). In multivariable analysis, arrest rate was not associated with center volume (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 1.57 in low- versus high-volume centers). However, mortality after cardiac arrest was higher in low-volume centers (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.52 to 2.63). This association was present for both high- and low-complexity operations. Conclusions Cardiac arrest carries a significant mortality risk across the stratum of procedural complexity. Although arrest rates are not associated with center volume, lower-volume centers have increased mortality after cardiac arrest. Further study of mechanisms to prevent cardiac arrest and to reduce mortality in those with an arrest is warranted. PMID:25443018

  14. Robotic cardiac surgery at Epworth hospital.

    PubMed

    Skillington, Peter D; Moshinsky, Randall; Goldblatt, John C; Almedia, Aubrey A

    2004-01-01

    Epworth Hospital is the first in the southern hemisphere to acquire the da Vinci Robot to facilitate minimally invasive cardiac surgery. Applications for this new technology include mitral valve repair, atrial septal defect closure, single coronary artery bypass graft to coronary arteries on the front of the heart, ablative surgery for atrial fibrillation and insertion of epicardial pacemaker electrodes. A team of surgeons from the Epworth Hospital have trained at East Carolina University (ECU) Greenville, North Carolina, USA; including surgeons, anesthetists, perfusionist and nurses. Following this, during a week in March, a proctoring surgeon from the USA, Dr. Wiley Nifong, assisted the Epworth team with their initial seven operations, which all proceeded without incident. The initial operative times were longer than the standard surgery, although with additional experience, now totalling 24 patients in all, these times have shortened considerably. The experience to date is summarized as an Addendum to this manuscript.

  15. Postoperative Pain Trajectories in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, C. Richard; Zaslansky, Ruth; Donaldson, Gary W.; Shinfeld, Amihay

    2012-01-01

    Poorly controlled postoperative pain is a longstanding and costly problem in medicine. The purposes of this study were to characterize the acute pain trajectories over the first four postoperative days in 83 cardiac surgery patients with a mixed effects model of linear growth to determine whether statistically significant individual differences exist in these pain trajectories, and to compare the quality of measurement by trajectory with conventional pain measurement practices. The data conformed to a linear model that provided slope (rate of change) as a basis for comparing patients. Slopes varied significantly across patients, indicating that the direction and rate of change in pain during the first four days of recovery from surgery differed systematically across individuals. Of the 83 patients, 24 had decreasing pain after surgery, 24 had increasing pain, and the remaining 35 had approximately constant levels of pain over the four postoperative days. PMID:22448322

  16. [Cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery].

    PubMed

    Dayan, Victor; Ricca, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide with an increase in the incidence in younger populations. Today revascularization strategies are capable of alleviating acute ischemia and/or chronic ischemia. These can be performed percutaneously or through surgery. Even if we improve myocardial perfusion by these methods, the main determinant in maintaining patency of coronary arteries and bypass is a correctly instituted secondary prevention. This is the main focus of cardiac rehabilitation proposals. Although much has been published about the role of cardiac rehabilitation after percutaneous revascularization, there is little work able to synthesize the current state of cardiac rehabilitation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. The aim of this paper is to review the effect of rehabilitation in the return to work, survival, functional capacity, depression and anxiety, as well as compare centralized vs. home rehabilitation in this patient population. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. The rebirth of cardiac surgery in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Elnur, Elamin Elawad

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgery is nowadays an integral part of a complete national health service. Methods In this paper the rebirth of cardiac surgery in Sudan from 1998 till 2007 is given by means of a literature search, personal interviews and searching hospital records. Results A summary of the initial birth of these services in 1959 till its demise in 1993 is first mentioned to set the stage for the subsequent period of sustainable growth. The surgical workforce and the surgical workload in the latter period is documented and showed that in the period from 1998 to 2007 2,868 open heart operations were done in three centers in Sudan. All these centers are based in Khartoum but they cater for all the country. It is estimated that (with the addition of two centers after the study period) the service provided would need to be quadrupled (by doubling the number of centers to 10 and increasing their capacity so as to cater for the whole country). The case mix of operations done is predominantly valvular comprising 63.2% of the total followed by congenital cardiac cases at 22.8% and then ischaemic at 11.9%. Conclusions The results imply that a big effort has to be done in the primary healthcare sector to try and eradicate rheumatic heart disease which is the main cause of the valvular lesions. PMID:27904841

  18. Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Hiroshi; Miyata, Hiroaki; Motomura, Noboru; Ono, Minoru; Takamoto, Shinichi; Harii, Kiyonori; Oura, Norihiko; Hirabayashi, Shinichi; Kyo, Shunei

    2013-05-20

    Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is a serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery. In this study we investigated the incidence of DSWI and effect of re-exploration for bleeding on DSWI mortality. We reviewed 73,700 cases registered in the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JACVSD) during the period from 2004 to 2009 and divided them into five groups: 26,597 of isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) cases, 23,136 valvular surgery cases, 17,441 thoracic aortic surgery cases, 4,726 valvular surgery plus CABG cases, and 1,800 thoracic aortic surgery plus CABG cases. We calculated the overall incidence of postoperative DSWI, incidence of postoperative DSWI according to operative procedure, 30-day mortality and operative mortality of postoperative DSWI cases according to operative procedure, 30-day mortality and operative mortality of postoperative DSWI according to whether re-exploration for bleeding, and the intervals between the operation and deaths according to whether re-exploration for bleeding were investigated. Operative mortality is defined as in-hospital or 30-day mortality. Risk factors for DSWI were also examined. The overall incidence of postoperative DSWI was 1.8%. The incidence of postoperative DSWI was 1.8% after isolated CABG, 1.3% after valve surgery, 2.8% after valve surgery plus CABG, 1.9% after thoracic aortic surgery, and 3.4% after thoracic aortic surgery plus CABG. The 30-day and operative mortality in patients with DSWI was higher after more complicated operative procedures. The incidence of re-exploration for bleeding in DSWI cases was 11.1%. The overall 30-day/operative mortality after DSWI with re-exploration for bleeding was 23.0%/48.0%, and it was significantly higher than in the absence of re-exploration for bleeding (8.1%/22.0%). The difference between the intervals between the operation and death according to whether re-exploration for bleeding had been performed was not significant. Age and cardiogenic shock

  19. Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Loubon, Christian; Fernández-Molina, Manuel; Carrascal-Hinojal, Yolanda; Fulquet-Carreras, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a well-recognized complication resulting with the higher morbid-mortality after cardiac surgery. In its most severe form, it increases the odds ratio of operative mortality 3–8-fold, length of stay in the Intensive Care Unit and hospital, and costs of care. Early diagnosis is critical for an optimal treatment of this complication. Just as the identification and correction of preoperative risk factors, the use of prophylactic measures during and after surgery to optimize renal function is essential to improve postoperative morbidity and mortality of these patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass produces an increased in tubular damage markers. Their measurement may be the most sensitive means of early detection of AKI because serum creatinine changes occur 48 h to 7 days after the original insult. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 are most promising as an early diagnostic tool. However, the ideal noninvasive, specific, sensitive, reproducible biomarker for the detection of AKI within 24 h is still not found. This article provides a review of the different perspectives of the CSA-AKI, including pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, biomarkers, classification, postoperative management, and treatment. We searched the electronic databases, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE using search terms relevant including pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, biomarkers, classification, postoperative management, and treatment, in order to provide an exhaustive review of the different perspectives of the CSA-AKI. PMID:27716701

  20. Analgesia and sedation after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Andrew R; Jackman, Lara

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, the importance of appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and analgesia during cardiac surgery has become recognized as a factor in postoperative recovery. This includes the early perioperative management of the neonate undergoing radical surgery and more recently the care surrounding fast-track and ultra fast-track surgery. However, outside these areas, relatively little attention has focused on postoperative sedation and analgesia within the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). This reflects perceived priorities of the primary disease process over the supporting structure of PICU, with a generic approach to sedation and analgesia that can result in additional morbidities and delayed recovery. Management of the marginal patient requires optimisation of not only cardiac and other attendant pathophysiology, but also every aspect of supportive care. Individualized sedation and analgesia strategies, starting in the operating theater and continuing through to hospital discharge, need to be regarded as an important aspect of perioperative care, to speed the process of recovery. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Liberal or restrictive transfusion after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gavin J; Pike, Katie; Rogers, Chris A; Wordsworth, Sarah; Stokes, Elizabeth A; Angelini, Gianni D; Reeves, Barnaby C

    2015-03-12

    Whether a restrictive threshold for hemoglobin level in red-cell transfusions, as compared with a liberal threshold, reduces postoperative morbidity and health care costs after cardiac surgery is uncertain. We conducted a multicenter, parallel-group trial in which patients older than 16 years of age who were undergoing nonemergency cardiac surgery were recruited from 17 centers in the United Kingdom. Patients with a postoperative hemoglobin level of less than 9 g per deciliter were randomly assigned to a restrictive transfusion threshold (hemoglobin level <7.5 g per deciliter) or a liberal transfusion threshold (hemoglobin level <9 g per deciliter). The primary outcome was a serious infection (sepsis or wound infection) or an ischemic event (permanent stroke [confirmation on brain imaging and deficit in motor, sensory, or coordination functions], myocardial infarction, infarction of the gut, or acute kidney injury) within 3 months after randomization. Health care costs, excluding the index surgery, were estimated from the day of surgery to 3 months after surgery. A total of 2007 patients underwent randomization; 4 participants withdrew, leaving 1000 in the restrictive-threshold group and 1003 in the liberal-threshold group. Transfusion rates after randomization were 53.4% and 92.2% in the two groups, respectively. The primary outcome occurred in 35.1% of the patients in the restrictive-threshold group and 33.0% of the patients in the liberal-threshold group (odds ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91 to 1.34; P=0.30); there was no indication of heterogeneity according to subgroup. There were more deaths in the restrictive-threshold group than in the liberal-threshold group (4.2% vs. 2.6%; hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.00 to 2.67; P=0.045). Serious postoperative complications, excluding primary-outcome events, occurred in 35.7% of participants in the restrictive-threshold group and 34.2% of participants in the liberal-threshold group. Total costs did not

  2. Video-assisted thoracoscopic enucleation after congenital cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hideyuki; Kanzaki, Masato; Isaka, Tamami; Onuki, Takamasa

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old man underwent arterial switch surgery for transposition of the great arteries in infancy. During a routine evaluation, a nodule was detected in the left lower lobe on chest computed tomography. The tumor had enlarged at follow-up and he underwent surgical resection. Because of past cardiac surgery, the pericardium was defective; therefore, the heart was exposed to the pleural cavity and severe adhesions surrounding the left lung. We had to encircle the left main pulmonary artery to perform enucleation safely. The tumor was diagnosed as a pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma using permanent pathology results. PMID:26385193

  3. Perioperative Ventilatory Management in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Courteille, Benoît; Guinot, Pierre-Grégoire; Dupont, Hervé; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Lorne, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Protective ventilation is associated with a lower incidence of pulmonary complications. However, there are few published data on routine pulmonary management in adult cardiac surgery. The present study's primary objective was to survey pulmonary management in this high-risk population, as practiced by anesthesiologists in France. All 460 registered France-based cardiac anesthesiologists were invited (by e-mail) to participate in an online survey in January–February 2015. The survey's questionnaire was designed to assess current practice in pre-, per-, and postoperative pulmonary management. In all, 198 anesthesiologists (43% of those invited) participated in the survey. Other than during the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) per se, 179 anesthesiologists (91% of respondees) [95% confidence interval (CI): 87–95] used a low-tidal-volume approach (6–8 mL/kg), whereas techniques based on positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers vary greatly from 1 anesthesiologist to another. During CPB, 104 (53%) [95% CI: 46–60] anesthesiologists withdrew mechanical ventilation (with disconnection, in some cases) and 97 (49%) [95% CI: 42–56] did not prescribe positive end-expiratory pressure. One hundred sixty-five (83%) [95% CI: 78–88] anesthesiologists stated that a written protocol for peroperative pulmonary management was not available. Twenty (10%) [95% CI: 6–14] and 11 (5%) [95% CI: 2–8] anesthesiologists stated that they did use protocols for ventilator use and recruitment maneuvers, respectively. The preoperative period (pulmonary examinations and prescription of additional assessments) and the postoperative period (extubation, and noninvasive ventilation) periods vary greatly from 1 anesthesiologist to another. The great majority of French cardiac anesthesiologists use a low tidal volume during cardiac surgery (other than during CPB per se). However, pulmonary management procedures varied markedly from 1 anesthesiologist to another

  4. Postoperative atrial fibrillation in non-cardiac and cardiac surgery: an overview.

    PubMed

    Bessissow, A; Khan, J; Devereaux, P J; Alvarez-Garcia, J; Alonso-Coello, P

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is the most common perioperative cardiac arrhythmia. A major risk factor for POAF is advanced age, both in non-cardiac and cardiac surgery. Following non-cardiac surgery, it is important to correct reversible conditions such as electrolytes imbalances to prevent the occurrence of POAF. Management of POAF consists of rate control and therapeutic anticoagulation if POAF persists for > 48 h and CHADS2 score > 2. After cardiac surgery, POAF affects a larger amount of patients. In addition to age, valve surgery carries the greatest risk for new AF. Rate control is the mainstay therapy in these patients. Prediction, prevention, and management of POAF should be further studied.

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Martin K

    2011-10-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for patients who have had heart valve surgery. Analysis of data shows that CR increases exercise capacity and quality of life, and facilitates return to work, with minimal risk of significant adverse effects. In spite of this, CR is vastly underused. Recommendations to improve this include an automatic referral system, liaison assistance to speak with inpatients about CR, and establishment of CR programs in areas that have poor access to the large hospital-based facilities. Components of CR for patients who have had heart valve surgery also are discussed in this review. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Advanced neurologic monitoring for cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Razumovsky, Alexander Y; Gugino, Lavern D; Owen, Jeffrey H

    2006-02-01

    Cardiac surgery (CS) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is currently the most common surgery in the United States. Understanding, avoiding, and preventing postoperative complications, including neurologic deficits following CS, represents a great public and economic benefit for society, especially considering our aging population. There is a critical need to identify new strategies that will prevent harmful events during and after CS. At present, experience with neurophysiologic techniques includes the ability to measure cerebral blood flow velocity/emboli and regional cerebral venous oxygen saturation by transcranial Doppler ultrasound, and by near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Continuous monitoring of these variables along with systemic hemodynamics will provide a better understanding of mechanisms of brain and other organ injury during CPB. Neuroprotective interventions based on multimodality neurologic monitoring would ideally eliminate postoperative complications and improve patient outcomes.

  7. Multimodal brain monitoring reduces major neurologic complications in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Paolo; Messerotti Benvenuti, Simone; Bosco, Enrico; Baldanzi, Fabrizio; Palomba, Daniela; Valfrè, Carlo

    2011-12-01

    Although adverse neurologic outcomes are common complications of cardiac surgery, intraoperative brain monitoring has not received adequate attention. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of multimodal brain monitoring in the prevention of major brain injury and reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit, and postoperative hospital stays after cardiac surgery. A retrospective, observational, controlled study. A single-center regional hospital. One thousand seven hundred twenty-one patients who had undergone cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass from July 2007 to July 2010. One hundred sixty-six patients with multimodal brain monitoring and a control group without brain monitoring (N = 1,555) were compared retrospectively. Multimodal brain monitoring was performed for 166 patients, consisting of intraoperative recordings of somatosensory-evoked potentials, electroencephalography, and transcranial Doppler. The incidence of major neurologic complications and the duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit, and postoperative hospital stays were considered. Patients with brain monitoring had a significantly lower incidence of perioperative major neurologic complications (0%) than those without monitoring (4.06%, p = 0.01) and required significantly shorter periods of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.001) and intensive care unit stays (p = 0.01) than controls. The length of postoperative hospital stays did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (p = 0.57). This preliminary study suggests that multimodal brain monitoring can reduce the incidence of neurologic complications as well as hospital costs associated with post-cardiac surgery patient care. Furthermore, intraoperative brain monitoring provides useful information about brain functioning, blood flow velocity, and metabolism, which may guide the anesthesiologist during surgery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Trainee Perceptions of the Canadian Cardiac Surgery Workforce: A Survey of Canadian Cardiac Surgery Trainees.

    PubMed

    Mewhort, Holly E M; Quantz, Mackenzie A; Hassan, Ansar; Rubens, Fraser D; Pozeg, Zlatko I; Perrault, Louis P; Feindel, Christopher M; Ouzounian, Maral

    2017-04-01

    Management of cardiac surgery health human resources (HHR) has been challenging, with recent graduates struggling to secure employment and a shortage of cardiac surgeons predicted as early as 2020. The length of cardiac surgery training prevents HHR supply from adapting in a timely fashion to changes in demand, resulting in a critical need for active workforce management. This study details the results of the 2015 Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons (CSCS) workforce survey undertaken as part of the CSCS strategy for active workforce management. The 38-question survey was administered electronically to all 96 trainees identified as being registered in a Canadian cardiac surgery residency program for the 2015-2016 academic year. Eighty-four of 96 (88%) trainees responded. The majority of participants were satisfied with their training experience. However, 29% stated that their clinical and operative exposure needed improvement, and 57% of graduating trainees did not believe that they would be competent to practice independently at the conclusion of their training. Although 51% of participants believe the job market is improving, 94% of senior trainees found it competitive or extremely difficult to secure an attending staff position. Participants highlighted a need for improved career counselling and formal mentorship. Although the job market is perceived to be improving, a mismatch in the cardiac surgery workforce supply and demand remains because current trainees continue to experience difficulty securing employment after the completion of residency training. Trainees have identified improved career counselling and mentorship as potential strategies to aid graduates in securing employment. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical evaluation of the Spiral Pump® after improvements to the original project in patients submitted to cardiac surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Dinkhuysen, MD, PhD, Jarbas Jakson; de Andrade, Aron Jose Pazin; Leme, MsC, Juliana; Silva, Cibele; Medina, Claudia Sanches; Pereira, Cristiane Célia; Biscegli, PhD, José Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this paper is to present the results from Spiral Pump clinical trial after design modifications performed at its previous project. This pump applies axial end centrifugal hydraulic effects for blood pumping during cardiopulmonary bypass for patients under cardiac surgery. Methods This study was performed in 52 patients (51% males), between 20 to 80 (67±14.4) years old weighing 53 to 102 (71.7±12.6) kg, mostly under myocardial revascularization surgery (34.6%) and valvular surgery (32.8%). Besides the routine evaluation of the data observed in these cases, we monitored pump rotational speed, blood flow, cardiopulmonary bypass duration, urine free hemoglobin for blood cell trauma analysis (+ to 4+), lactate desidrogenase (UI/L), fibrinogen level (mg/dL) and platelet count (nº/mm3). Results Besides maintaining appropriate blood pressure and metabolic parameters it was also observed that the Free Hemoglobin levels remained normal, with a slight increase after 90 minutes of cardiopulmonary bypass. The Lactate Dehydrogenase showed an increase, with medians varying between 550-770 IU/L, whereas the decrease in Fibrinogen showed medians of 130-100 mg/dl. The number of platelets showed a slight decrease with the medians ranging from 240,000 to 200,000/mm3. No difficulty was observed during perfusion terminations, nor were there any immediate deaths, and all patients except one, were discharged in good condition. CONCLUSION The Spiral Pump, as blood propeller during cardiopulmonary bypass, demonstrated to be reliable and safe, comprising in a good option as original and national product for this kind of application. PMID:25372905

  10. Anesthetic issues for robotic cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Wendy K.; Walker, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    As innovative technology continues to be developed and is implemented into the realm of cardiac surgery, surgical teams, cardiothoracic anesthesiologists, and health centers are constantly looking for methods to improve patient outcomes and satisfaction. One of the more recent developments in cardiac surgical practice is minimally invasive robotic surgery. Its use has been documented in numerous publications, and its use has proliferated significantly over the past 15 years. The anesthesiology team must continue to develop and perfect special techniques to manage these patients perioperatively including lung isolation techniques and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). This review article of recent scientific data and personal experience serves to explain some of the challenges, which the anesthetic team must manage, including patient and procedural factors, complications from one-lung ventilation (OLV) including hypoxia and hypercapnia, capnothorax, percutaneous cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass, TEE guidance, as well as methods of intraoperative monitoring and analgesia. As existing minimally invasive techniques are perfected, and newer innovations are demonstrated, it is imperative that the cardiothoracic anesthesiologist must improve and maintain skills to guide these patients safely through the robotic procedure. PMID:25566713

  11. Comparison of ejection fraction and Goldman risk factor analysis to dipyridamole-thallium 201 studies in the evaluation of cardiac morbidity after aortic aneurysm surgery

    SciTech Connect

    McEnroe, C.S.; O'Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Yeager, A.; Konstam, M.; Mackey, W.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Associated coronary artery disease is the critical factor that influences early and late mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. Dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy, left ventricular ejection fraction, and Goldman risk factor analysis have been suggested as preoperative noninvasive screening methods to detect significant coronary artery disease. In this series of 95 elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy was highly predictive of the absence of perioperative cardiac morbidity (96% specificity, 44/46 normal scans, no cardiac morbidity), whereas ejection fraction (73% specificity, 31/42 normal ejection fraction, no cardiac morbidity) and Goldman risk factor analysis (84% specificity, 44/51 class I, no cardiac morbidity) were less. Furthermore, thallium redistribution on dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy leading to coronary angiography identified a significant number of patients with occult coronary artery disease who required preoperative coronary revascularization (8%, 8/95) and might have remained undetected on the basis of left ventricular ejection fraction or Goldman risk factor analysis. Finally, fixed thallium deficit, which some investigators have interpreted as a low probability finding for cardiac morbidity, was associated with a higher than expected incidence of cardiac complications. Forty-six percent (7/15) of all postoperative cardiac complications (three myocardial infarctions, three ischemic events, one death) occurred in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms with fixed deficits. This suggests that patients with fixed deficits on dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy should be considered for later delayed (4 hours) thallium images or coronary angiography or both.

  12. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac surgery. Joint recommendations of German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, German Society of Surgery and German Society of Internal Medicine].

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e.g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest-x-ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate and publish recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac and non-lung resection surgery. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and updating when new validated evidence becomes available.

  13. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac surgery: joint recommendations of German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, German Society of Surgery and German Society of Internal Medicine].

    PubMed

    2010-11-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e.g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest-x-ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate and publish recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac and non-lung resection surgery. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and updating when new validated evidence becomes available.

  14. [Preoperative cardiac-risk assessment for non-cardiac surgery: The French RICARDO survey].

    PubMed

    Sens, N; Payan, A; Sztark, F; Piriou, V; Bouaziz, H; Bruder, N; Jaber, S; Jouffroy, L; Lebuffe, G; Mantz, J; Piriou, V; Roche, S; Sztark, F; Tauzin-Fin, F

    2013-10-01

    Professional practice evaluation of anaesthesiologist for high cardiac-risk patient cares in non-cardiac surgery, and assess disparities between results and recommendations. Since June to September 2011, a self-questionnaire was sent to 5000 anesthesiologist. They were considered to be representative of national anesthesiology practitioner. Different items investigated concerned: demography, preoperative cardiac-risk assessment, modalities of specialized cardiologic advice, per- and postoperative care, and finally knowledge of current recommendations. We collected 1255 questionnaire, that is to say 25% of answers. Men were 73%, 38% were employed by public hospital; 70% worked in a shared operating theatre with a general activity. With regards to preoperative assessment, 85% of anaesthetists referred high cardiac-risk patient to a cardiologist. In only 16% of answer, Lee's score appeared in anaesthesia file to assess perioperative cardiac-risk. Only 61% considered the six necessary items to optimal estimate of cardiac-risk. On the other hand, 91% measured routinely the exercise capacities by interrogation. The most frequently doing exam (49% of anaesthetist) was an electrocardiogram in elderly patient. In 96% of case, beta-blockers were given in premedication if they were usually thought. Clopidogrel was stopped by 62% of anesthetist before surgery. In this case, 38% used another medication to take over from this one. Only 7% considered revascularization in coronary patient who were effectively treated. POISE study was know by 40% of practitioner, and 18% estimated that they have changed their practice. Preoperatively, 21% organized multidisciplinary approach for high-risk patient. During surgery, 63% monitored the ST-segment. In postoperative period for cardiac-risk patient, only 11% prescribed systematically an ECG, a troponin dosage, a postoperative monitoring of ST-segment, a cardiologic advice. In case of moderate troponin elevation, they were 70% to realize at

  15. Image-Guided Quantification of Cardioplegia Delivery during Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soltesz, Edward G.; Laurence, Rita G.; De Grand, Alec M.; Cohn, Lawrence H.; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Homogenous distribution of cardioplegia delivered to the myocardium has been identified as an important predictor of post-cardiopulmonary bypass ventricular recovery and function. Presently, a method to determine adequate distribution of cardioplegia in patients during cardiac surgery does not exist. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying cardioplegia delivery using a novel, non-invasive optical method. Such a system would permit instantaneous imaging of jeopardized myocardium and allow immediate, intraoperative corrective measures. Methods We have previously developed a portable, intraoperative near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging system for use in large animal cardiac surgery, which simultaneously displays color video and NIR fluorescent images of the surgical field. By introducing exogenous, non-isotopic NIR fluorophores, specific cardiac functions can be visualized in real-time. Results In a cardiopulmonary bypass porcine model, we demonstrate that the FDA-approved intravascular fluorophore indocyanine green (ICG) permits real-time assessment of cardioplegia delivery. ICG was injected into an aortic root and/or transatrial coronary sinus catheter during delivery of cold crystalloid cardioplegia solution. Segmental distribution was immediately noted at the time of injection. In a subset of animals, simulated coronary occlusions resulted in imaging defects consistent with poor cardioplegia delivery and jeopardized myocardium. Videodensitometric analysis was performed on-line to quantify right and left ventricular (RV, LV) distribution. Conclusions We report the development of a novel, non-invasive, intraoperative technique which can easily and safely provide a visual assessment of cardioplegia delivery (antegrade and/or retrograde) and which offers the potential to quantify the relative segmental distribution during cardiac surgical procedures. ULTRAMINI ABSTRACT Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging is a

  16. Application of Mechanical Ventilation Weaning Predictors After Elective Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Mayara Gabrielle Barbosa e; Borges, Daniel Lago; Costa, Marina de Albuquerque Gonçalves; Baldez, Thiago Eduardo Pereira; da Silva, Luan Nascimento; Oliveira, Rafaella Lima; Ferreira, Teresa de Fátima Ramos; Albuquerque, Renato Adams Matos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test several weaning predictors as determinants of successful extubation after elective cardiac surgery. METHODS The study was conducted at a tertiary hospital with 100 adult patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery from September to December 2014. We recorded demographic, clinical and surgical data, plus the following predictive indexes: static compliance (Cstat), tidal volume (Vt), respiratory rate (f), f/ Vt ratio, arterial partial oxygen pressure to fraction of inspired oxygen ratio (PaO2/FiO2), and the integrative weaning index (IWI). Extubation was considered successful when there was no need for reintubation within 48 hours. Sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), positive likelihood ratio (LR+), and negative likelihood ratio (LR-) were used to evaluate each index. RESULTS The majority of the patients were male (60%), with mean age of 55.4±14.9 years and low risk of death (62%), according to InsCor. All of the patients were successfully extubated. Tobin Index presented the highest SE (0.99) and LR+ (0.99), followed by IWI (SE=0.98; LR+ =0.98). Other scores, such as SP, NPV and LR-were nullified due to lack of extubation failure. CONCLUSION All of the weaning predictors tested in this sample of patients submitted to elective cardiac surgery showed high sensitivity, highlighting f/Vt and IWI. PMID:26934398

  17. Levosimendan in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rajendra H; Leimberger, Jeffrey D; van Diepen, Sean; Meza, James; Wang, Alice; Jankowich, Rachael; Harrison, Robert W; Hay, Douglas; Fremes, Stephen; Duncan, Andra; Soltesz, Edward G; Luber, John; Park, Soon; Argenziano, Michael; Murphy, Edward; Marcel, Randy; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Nagpal, Dave; Bozinovski, John; Toller, Wolfgang; Heringlake, Matthias; Goodman, Shaun G; Levy, Jerrold H; Harrington, Robert A; Anstrom, Kevin J; Alexander, John H

    2017-03-19

    Background Levosimendan is an inotropic agent that has been shown in small studies to prevent or treat the low cardiac output syndrome after cardiac surgery. Methods In a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of levosimendan in patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 35% or less who were undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either intravenous levosimendan (at a dose of 0.2 μg per kilogram of body weight per minute for 1 hour, followed by a dose of 0.1 μg per kilogram per minute for 23 hours) or placebo, with the infusion started before surgery. The two primary end points were a four-component composite of death through day 30, renal-replacement therapy through day 30, perioperative myocardial infarction through day 5, or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device through day 5; and a two-component composite of death through day 30 or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device through day 5. Results A total of 882 patients underwent randomization, 849 of whom received levosimendan or placebo and were included in the modified intention-to-treat population. The four-component primary end point occurred in 105 of 428 patients (24.5%) assigned to receive levosimendan and in 103 of 421 (24.5%) assigned to receive placebo (adjusted odds ratio, 1.00; 99% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 1.54; P=0.98). The two-component primary end point occurred in 56 patients (13.1%) assigned to receive levosimendan and in 48 (11.4%) assigned to receive placebo (adjusted odds ratio, 1.18; 96% CI, 0.76 to 1.82; P=0.45). The rate of adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions Prophylactic levosimendan did not result in a rate of the short-term composite end point of death, renal-replacement therapy, perioperative myocardial infarction, or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device that was lower than the rate

  18. Universal definition of perioperative bleeding in adult cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Dyke, Cornelius; Aronson, Solomon; Dietrich, Wulf; Hofmann, Axel; Karkouti, Keyvan; Levi, Marcel; Murphy, Gavin J; Sellke, Frank W; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; von Heymann, Christian; Ranucci, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Perioperative bleeding is common among patients undergoing cardiac surgery; however, the definition of perioperative bleeding is variable and lacks standardization. We propose a universal definition for perioperative bleeding (UDPB) in adult cardiac surgery in an attempt to precisely describe and quantify bleeding and to facilitate future investigation into this difficult clinical problem. The multidisciplinary International Initiative on Haemostasis Management in Cardiac Surgery identified a common definition of perioperative bleeding as an unmet need. The functionality and usefulness of the UDPB for clinical research was then tested using a large single-center, nonselected, cardiac surgical database. A multistaged definition for perioperative bleeding was created based on easily measured clinical end points, including total blood loss from chest tubes within 12 hours, allogeneic blood products transfused, surgical reexploration including cardiac tamponade, delayed sternal closure, and the need for salvage treatment. Depending on these components, bleeding is graded as insignificant, mild, moderate, severe, or massive. When applied to an established cardiac surgery dataset, the UDPB provided insight into the incidence and outcome of bleeding after cardiac surgery. The proposed UDPB in adult cardiac surgery provides a precise classification of bleeding that is useful in everyday practice as well as in clinical research. Once fully validated, the UDPB may be useful as an institutional quality measure and serve as an important end point in future cardiac surgical research. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric cardiac surgery with echocardiographic diagnosis alone.

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sejung; Kim, Hae Soon; Han, Jae Jin

    2002-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of echocardiography alone and the safety of cardiac surgery using this diagnostic approach were retrospectively assessed in 111 children operated for congenital heart defects (CHD) during a 3.5-yr period ending in October 2001. Preoperative diagnosis was compared with the intraoperative findings obtained by surgical inspection. Perioperative death was defined as death within 30 days postoperatively. Of the patients, 70% were operated on in infancy. Seventy-six percent (84 of 111) underwent surgery after echocardiographic diagnosis alone. A high percentage of patients with patent ductus arteriosus (100%), partial atrioventricular canal (100%), coarctation of the aorta (89%), ventricular septal defect (86%), atrial septal defect (85%), and total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (75%) was operated without prior catheterization. Diagnostic errors occurred in 2.4% (2 of 84) of patients with echocardiography only and in 7.4% of patients with catheterization. No error in either group was related to surgical morbidity or mortality. There were five (6.0%) perioperative deaths in the echocardiography group and two (7.4%) in the catheterization group, with no difference in the mortality between the groups. In conclusion, many patients with CHD can be accurately diagnosed by echocardiography alone, and can safely undergo surgery without catheterization, not increasing the overall risk. PMID:12172039

  20. National Adult Cardiac Surgery Registry: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Uva, Miguel Sousa; Mota, João Carlos

    2003-10-01

    A task force commission was created with the support of the Portuguese Society for Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery with the aim of organizing a National Adult Cardiac Surgery Registry, collecting clinical data and types of cardiac surgical procedure performed in Portugal. Selected variables include risk factors, cardiac status, preoperative hemodynamics, surgical procedure, hospital stay and mortality. Information is collected into a database in each institution and sent via the internet to a central database responsible for grouping and data analysis. It is hoped that this National Registry, through standardized data collection, will provide information on cardiac surgery activity in Portugal and its risk adjusted results.

  1. Cardiac surgery-specific screening tool identifies preoperative undernutrition in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    van Venrooij, Lenny M W; Visser, Marlieke; de Vos, Rien; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Peters, Ron J G; de Mol, Bas A J M

    2013-02-01

    Loss of body tissue resulting in undernutrition can be caused by reduced food intake, altered metabolism, ageing, and physical inactivity. The predominant cause of undernutrition before cardiac operations is unknown. First, we explored the association of reduced food intake and inactivity with undernutrition in patients before elective cardiac operations. Second, we assessed if adding these reversible, cause-based items to the nutritional screening process improved diagnostic accuracy. A prospective observational study was performed. Undernutrition was defined by low fat-free mass index (LFFMI) measured by bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy and/or unintended weight loss (UWL). Reduced food intake was defined as the patient having a decreased appetite over the previous month. Patients admitted to hospital preoperatively were assumed to be less physically active than patients awaiting cardiac operations at home. Using these data, we developed a new tool and compared this with an existing cardiac surgery-specific tool (Cardiac Surgery-Specific Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool [CSSM]). A total of 325 patients who underwent open cardiac operations were included. Reduced food intake and inactivity were associated with undernutrition (odds ratio [OR], 4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-8.5 and OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0-4.0). Reduced food intake and inactivity were integrated with body mass index (BMI) and UWL into a new scoring system: the Cardiac Surgery-Specific Undernutrition Screening Tool (CSSUST). Sensitivity in identification of undernourished patients was considerably higher with the CSSUST (90%) than with the CSSM (71%) (receiver operating characteristic [ROC] curve-based area under the curve [AUC], 0.79; 95% CI, 0.73-0.86 and ROC AUC, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.63-0.80). Results suggest that reduced food intake and inactivity partly explain undernutrition before cardiac operations. Our new cause-based CSSUST, which includes reduced food intake and inactivity, is

  2. Robotic cardiac valve surgery: transcending the technologic crevasse!

    PubMed

    Felger, J E; Nifong, L W; Chitwood, W R

    2001-03-01

    "The man with a new idea is a crank until the idea succeeds."--Mark Twain. With the profound public stress for minimally invasive surgery that guided General Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery has progressed with warranted enthusiasm. The explosion of technological advancements in optics, instrumentation and cardiopulmonary bypass has permitted minimally invasive cardiac procedures to be performed with safety, efficiency, and efficacy. In this chapter, we review the evolution of minimally invasive cardiac valve surgery. The articles of leading minimally invasive valve surgeons, both European and American, are reviewed. The indications for minimally invasive surgery are explained. Furthermore, the present day state of "robotic" mitral valve surgery is described.

  3. Cardiac surgery for a patient with Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Mitsugi; Higaki, Takashi; Seike, Yoshimasa; Yokoyama, Yuichiro

    2010-07-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome is an uncommon inherited autosomal disorder characterized by a prolonged QT interval, periodic paralysis, and dysmorphic features. The deleterious effects of cardioplegia on periodic paralysis and cardiac arrhythmia are unknown, and no studies have reported the performance of cardiac surgery in patients with Andersen-Tawil syndrome. We present a case of successful cardiac surgery in a patient with Andersen-Tawil syndrome, without using cardioplegia.

  4. Preoperative Optimization of the Heart Failure Patient Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Maxime; Liszkowski, Mark; Ducharme, Anique

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure patients who undergo cardiac surgery are exposed to significant perioperative complications and high mortality. We herein review the literature concerning preoperative optimization of these patients. Salient findings are that end-organ dysfunction and medication should be optimized before surgery. Specifically: (1) reversible causes of anemia should be treated and a preoperative hemoglobin level of 100 g/L obtained; (2) renal function and volume status should be optimized; (3) liver function must be carefully evaluated; (4) nutritional status should be assessed and cachexia treated to achieve a preoperative albumin level of at least 30 g/L and a body mass index > 20; and (5) medication adjustments performed, such as withholding inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system before surgery and continuing, but not starting, β-blockers. Levels of natriuretic peptides (brain natriuretic peptide [BNP] and N-terminal proBNP) provide additional prognostic value and therefore should be measured. In addition, individual patient's risk should be objectively assessed using standard formulas such as the EuroSCORE-II or Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk scores, which are simple and validated for various cardiac surgeries, including left ventricular assist device implantation. When patients are identified as high risk, preoperative hemodynamic optimization might be achieved with the insertion of a pulmonary artery catheter and hemodynamic-based tailored therapy. Finally, a prophylactic intra-aortic balloon pump might be considered in certain circumstances to decrease morbidity and even mortality, like in some high risk heart failure patients who undergo cardiac surgery, whereas routine preoperative inotropes are not recommended and should be reserved for patients in shock, except maybe for levosimendan.

  5. Weight and patients' decision to undergo cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    King-Shier, Kathryn M; LeBlanc, Pamela; Mather, Charles; Sandham, Sarah; Seneviratne, Cydnee; Maitland, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Obese patients are less likely to have cardiac surgery than normal weight patients. This could be due to physician or patient decision-making. We undertook a qualitative descriptive study to explore the influence of obesity on patients' decision-making to have cardiac surgery. Forty-seven people referred for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were theoretically sampled. Twelve people had declined cardiac surgery. Participants underwent in-depth interviews aimed at exploring their decision-making process. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Though patients' weight did not play a role in their decision, their relationship with their cardiologist/surgeon, the rapidity and orchestration of the diagnosis and treatment, appraisal of risks and benefits, previous experience with other illness or others who had cardiac surgery, and openness to other alternatives had an impact. It is possible that there is a lack of comfort or acknowledgment by all parties in discussing the influence of weight on CABG surgery risks.

  6. [Management of aortic stenosis in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Labbé, Vincent; Ederhy, Stéphane; Szymkiewicz, Olga; Cohen, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis (valve area <1cm(2) or 0.6cm(2)/m(2) body surface area, and maximum jet velocity ≥4m/sec, and mean aortic pressure gradient ≥40mmHg) undergoing non-cardiac surgery, especially in patients with symptoms (dyspnoea, angina, syncope, or heart failure). Before any surgery, clinical assessment should search for signs of aortic stenosis which justifies echocardiographic examination, particularly in the elderly. A systematic rest echocardiography with searching aortic stenosis should be considered in patients undergoing high risk surgery. The key points of pre-operative cardiac risk assessment are: assessment of the severity of aortic stenosis, measurement of the functional capacity, evaluation of the left ventricular systolic function, search of associated coronary artery disease, estimate of the surgical risk of cardiac events, and achievement of risk indices. In symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, only urgent non-cardiac surgery should be performed under careful haemodynamic monitoring. Aortic valve replacement should be considered before elective non-cardiac surgery. In asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, aortic valve replacement should be considered before non-cardiac high risk surgery. Non-cardiac surgery at low/intermediate risk can be performed provided an adapted anaesthetic technique.

  7. Cardiac surgery in nonagenarians: not only feasible, but also reasonable?

    PubMed

    Assmann, Alexander; Minol, Jan-Philipp; Mehdiani, Arash; Akhyari, Payam; Boeken, Udo; Lichtenberg, Artur

    2013-08-01

    Changes in the age profile of the population in the western world and improvement in surgical techniques and postoperative care have contributed to a growing number of cardiosurgical patients aged over 90. In periods when transapical and transfemoral aortic valve replacement were done, we aimed at evaluating the outcome of nonagenarians after conventional aortic valve replacement and cardiac surgery in general, and determining perioperative parameters to predict a complicated postoperative course. Between 1995 and 2011, 49 nonagenarians (aged 91.2±3.1 years) underwent cardiac surgery. A subgroup of 30 patients received aortic valve replacement alone (63%; n=19), in combination with coronary artery bypass grafting (27%; n=8) or other surgical procedures (10%; n=3). Most of the patients suffered from combined aortic valve disease with a mean valve orifice area of 0.6±0.3 cm2 and a mean antegrade pressure gradient of 86±22 mmHg. Cardiac surgery in nonagenarians resulted in remarkable postoperative morbidity and an overall in-hospital mortality of 10% (n=5). In the AVR subgroup, biological valve prostheses were implanted in 29 patients. In this subgroup, the length of stay was 2.9±0.9 days in the intensive care unit and 17.0±5.5 days in the hospital. The in-hospital mortality amounted to 13% (n=4). Although several general preoperative risk factors of postoperative complications such as renal failure, low cardiac output syndrome and New York Heart Association Class IV were remarkably more frequent among the patients who died after the operation, the small cohort of non-surviving nonagenarians did not allow for significant differences. Cardiac surgery in the very elderly, particularly with regard to aortic valve replacement, carries a high risk of early morbidity and mortality. However, in selected nonagenarians, surgery can be performed with an acceptable outcome. The risk may even be reduced by an individual approach to the procedure. With regard to potential

  8. Development of the Post Cardiac Surgery (POCAS) prognostic score

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The risk of mortality in cardiac surgery is generally evaluated using preoperative risk-scale models. However, intraoperative factors may change the risk factors of patients, and the organism functionality parameters determined upon ICU admittance could therefore be more relevant in deciding operative mortality. The goals of this study were to find associations between the general parameters of organism functionality upon ICU admission and the operative mortality following cardiac operations, to develop a Post Cardiac Surgery (POCAS) Scale to define operative risk categories and to validate an operative mortality risk score. Methods We conducted a prospective study, including 920 patients who had undergone cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Several parameters recorded on their ICU admission were explored, looking for a univariate and multivariate association with in-hospital mortality (90 days). In-hospital mortality was 9%. Four independent factors were included in the POCAS mortality risk model: mean arterial pressure, bicarbonate, lactate and the International Normalized Ratio (INR). The POCAS scale was compared with four other risk scores in the validation series. Results In-hospital mortality (90 days) was 9%. Four independent factors were included in the POCAS mortality risk model: mean arterial pressure, bicarbonate ratio, lactate ratio and the INR. The POCAS scale was compared with four other risk scores in the validation series. Discriminatory power (accuracy) was defined with a receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. The best accuracy in predicting in-hospital mortality (90 days) was achieved by POCAS. The areas under the ROC curves of the different systems analyzed were 0.890 (POCAS), followed by 0.847 (Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAP II)), 0.825 (Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)), 0.768 (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II)), 0.754 (logistic EuroSCORE), 0.714 (standard Euro

  9. Impact of preoperative defecation pattern on postoperative constipation for patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Iyigun, Emine; Ayhan, Hatice; Demircapar, Aslı; Tastan, Sevinc

    2017-02-01

    To analyse the impact of preoperative defecation pattern on postoperative defecation pattern for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Constipation is a neglected problem that occurs frequently after cardiac surgery. Descriptive study. The study sample comprised 102 patients who underwent cardiac surgery. A Descriptive Information Form, Rome III Diagnostic Criteria, Constipation Severity Instrument, Postoperative Defecation Pattern Evaluation Form and Bristol Stool Form Scale were used for data collection and analysis. The Constipation Severity Instrument scores of just over one-third (37·2%) of the patients who were constipated prior to surgery were higher compared to those who were not constipated. Following cardiac surgery, 39·2% of patients developed constipation and 80% of these patients were constipated prior to cardiac surgery. The findings indicate a significantly high relationship between preoperative and postoperative defecation pattern (r = 0·71, p < 0·001). Preoperative defecation pattern is a determining factor for the development of postoperative constipation for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. During the preoperative period, clinical nurses may evaluate the patients' defecation patterns using valid and reliable scales and follow the defecation of the patients, especially patients with defecation problems, during the postoperative period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Carotid artery stenting and cardiac surgery in symptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Van der Heyden, Jan; Van Neerven, Danihel; Sonker, Uday; Bal, Egbert T; Kelder, Johannes C; Plokker, Herbert W M; Suttorp, Maarten J

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the combined outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in neurologically symptomatic patients. The risk of perioperative stroke in patients undergoing CABG who report a prior history of transient ischemic attack or stroke has been associated with a 4-fold increased risk as compared to the risk for neurologically asymptomatic patients. It seems appropriate to offer prophylactic carotid endarterectomy to neurologically symptomatic patients who have significant carotid artery disease and are scheduled for CABG. The CAS-CABG outcome for symptomatic patients remains underreported, notwithstanding randomized data supporting CAS for high-risk patients. In a prospective, single-center study, the periprocedural and long-term outcomes of 57 consecutive patients who underwent CAS before cardiac surgery were analyzed. The procedural success rate of CAS was 98%. The combined death, stroke, and myocardial infarction rate was 12.3%. The death and major stroke rate from time of CAS to 30 days after cardiac surgery was 3.5%. The myocardial infarction rate from time of CAS to 30 days after cardiac surgery was 1.5%. This is the first single-center study reporting the combined outcome of CAS-CABG in symptomatic patients. The periprocedural complication rate and long-term results of the CAS-CABG strategy in this high-risk population support the reliability of this approach. In such a high-risk population, this strategy might offer a valuable alternative to the combined surgical approach; however, a large randomized trial is clearly warranted. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychological functioning in parents of children undergoing elective cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Wray, Jo; Sensky, Tom

    2004-04-01

    To assess levels of distress, the marital relationship, and styles of coping of parents of children with congenital heart disease, to evaluate any change in these parameters following elective cardiac surgery for their child, and to compare these parents with parents of children undergoing another form of hospital treatment, and with parents of healthy children. A prospective study in which parents were assessed the day before the surgical procedure being undergone by their child, and 12 months afterwards. We assessed three groups of parents of 75 children, aged from birth to 16.9 years. The first was a group whose children were undergoing surgery because of congenital heart disease, the second was a group whose children were undergoing transplantation of bone marrow, and the third was a group whose children were healthy. Measures used for assessment included the General Health Questionnaire, the Dyadic adjustment scale, and the Utrecht coping list. Parents in both groups of children undergoing surgery had significantly higher rates of distress prior to the surgical procedures than did the parents of the healthy children, but within those whose children were undergoing cardiac surgery, there were no differences between parents of children with cyanotic and acyanotic lesions. Following treatment, there was a significant reduction in the levels of distress in both groups whose children had undergone surgery. There were few differences between any of the groups on the other parameters, and the evaluated indexes showed stability over time. Despite elevated levels of psychological distress prior to surgical procedures, which had fallen after one year, the stability of other parameters of parental functioning over time suggests that the surgical interventions are of less significance than either factors attributable to the presence of chronic illness, or the individual characteristics of the parents.

  12. Pulse contour analysis versus thermodilution in cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Rauch, H; Müller, M; Fleischer, F; Bauer, H; Martin, E; Böttiger, B W

    2002-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that there is a lack of agreement between intermittent cold bolus thermodilution (ICO) and a semicontinuous method with dilution of heat (CCO) in cardiac surgical patients following hypothermic extracorporeal circulation (HCPB). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare both ICO and CCO with continuous pulse contour analysis (PCCO): a method based on a fundamentally different principle of determining cardiac output (CO). A prospective criterion standard study of 25 cardiac surgery patients undergoing HCPB. Cardiac output was determined using the three methods (ICO, CCO, and PCCO) before and after HCPB up to 12 h after arrival on the ICU. Bias and precision were evaluated. A total of 380 triple determinations of CO could be analyzed. During the entire study period bias PCCO-ICO was -0.14 l*/min (precision 1.16 l*/min) and bias CCO-ICO was -0.40 l*/min (precision 1.25 l*/min). Up to 45 min after bypass PCCO agreed with ICO (bias -0.21 l*/min, precision 1.37 l*/min), while bias CCO-ICO was -1.30 l*/min (precision 1.45 l*/min). The agreement between PCCO and ICO in contrast to CCO in the first 45 min after HCPB indicates that CCO underestimates CO during this period.

  13. Brachial Arterial Pressure Monitoring during Cardiac Surgery Rarely Causes Complications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Asha; Bahadorani, Bobby; Wakefield, Brett J; Makarova, Natalya; Kumar, Priya A; Tong, Michael Zhen-Yu; Sessler, Daniel I; Duncan, Andra E

    2017-06-01

    Brachial arterial catheters better estimate aortic pressure than radial arterial catheters but are used infrequently because complications in a major artery without collateral flow are potentially serious. However, the extent to which brachial artery cannulation promotes complications remains unknown. The authors thus evaluated a large cohort of cardiac surgical patients to estimate the incidence of related serious complications. The institutional Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database and Perioperative Health Documentation System Registry of the Cleveland Clinic were used to identify patients who had brachial artery cannulation between 2007 and 2015. Complications within 6 months after surgery were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnostic and procedural codes, Current Procedural Terminology procedure codes, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons variables. The authors reviewed electronic medical records to confirm that putative complications were related plausibly to brachial arterial catheterization. Complications were categorized as (1) vascular, (2) peripheral nerve injury, or (3) infection. The authors evaluated associations between brachial arterial complications and patient comorbidities and between complications and in-hospital mortality and duration of hospitalization. Among 21,597 qualifying patients, 777 had vascular or nerve injuries or local infections, but only 41 (incidence 0.19% [95% CI, 0.14 to 0.26%]) were potentially consequent to brachial arterial cannulation. Vascular complications occurred in 33 patients (0.15% [0.10 to 0.23%]). Definitely or possibly related infection occurred in 8 (0.04% [0.02 to 0.08%]) patients. There were no plausibly related neurologic complications. Peripheral arterial disease was associated with increased risk of complications. Brachial catheter complications were associated with prolonged hospitalization and in-hospital mortality. Brachial artery cannulation for

  14. Evaluation of cardiac emboli source

    PubMed Central

    Michels, M.; Meijboom, F.J.; ten Cate, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Background Evaluating the source of cardiac embolism is one of the most frequent reasons for cardiac consultation. Methods In 2003, 99 patients were referred for the evaluation of the source of cardiac emboli. Evaluation included history, physical examination, ECG, transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) with contrast and 24-hour Holter electrocardiography. Results Altogether, 58 men and 41 women were studied. In 32 patients a possible source of the cardiac emboli was found. Two patients were in atrial fibrillation. Of the patients, 16 had a patent foramen ovale (PFO) and six patients a PFO and atrial septum aneurysm (ASA). Two patients had a thrombus in the left atrial appendage and 14 had severe atherosclerosis in the aortic arch. In eight patients we found two possible cardiac sources of embolism. 24-hour Holter recording did not detect any emboligenic arrhythmias. Conclusion A possible cardiac source of embolism was found in 32% of the patients referred. TOE is the ideal tool to visualise the interatrial septum, left atrial appendage and aortic arch. We advise performing a TOE with contrast in young stroke patients and in older patients with a stroke likely to be caused by an embolism of cardiac origin. 24-hour Holter recording did not detect any emboligenic arrhythmias and should only be done in selected cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:25696441

  15. Excessive bleeding predictors after cardiac surgery in adults: integrative review.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Camila Takao; Dos Santos, Talita Raquel; Brunori, Evelise Helena Fadini Reis; Moorhead, Sue A; Lopes, Juliana de Lima; Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite de

    2015-11-01

    To integrate literature data on the predictors of excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery in adults. Perioperative nursing care requires awareness of the risk factors for excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery to assure vigilance prioritising and early correction of those that are modifiable. Integrative literature review. Articles were searched in seven databases. Seventeen studies investigating predictive factors for excessive bleeding after open-heart surgery from 2004-2014 were included. Predictors of excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery were: Patient-related: male gender, higher preoperative haemoglobin levels, lower body mass index, diabetes mellitus, impaired left ventricular function, lower amount of prebypass thrombin generation, lower preoperative platelet counts, decreased preoperative platelet aggregation, preoperative platelet inhibition level >20%, preoperative thrombocytopenia and lower preoperative fibrinogen concentration. Procedure-related: the operating surgeon, coronary artery bypass surgery with three or more bypasses, use of the internal mammary artery, duration of surgery, increased cross-clamp time, increased cardiopulmonary bypass time, lower intraoperative core body temperature and bypass-induced haemostatic disorders. Postoperative: fibrinogen levels and metabolic acidosis. Patient-related, procedure-related and postoperative predictors of excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery were identified. The predictors summarised in this review can be used for risk stratification of excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery. Assessment, documentation and case reporting can be guided by awareness of these factors, so that postoperative vigilance can be prioritised. Timely identification and correction of the modifiable factors can be facilitated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Outcomes associated with postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mangusan, Ralph Francis; Hooper, Vallire; Denslow, Sheri A; Travis, Lucille

    2015-03-01

    Delirium after surgery is a common condition that leads to poor outcomes. Few studies have examined the effect of postoperative delirium on outcomes after cardiac surgery. To assess the relationship between delirium after cardiac surgery and the following outcomes: length of stay after surgery, prevalence of falls, discharge to a nursing facility, discharge to home with home health services, and use of inpatient physical therapy. Electronic medical records of 656 cardiac surgery patients were reviewed retrospectively. Postoperative delirium occurred in 161 patients (24.5%). Patients with postoperative delirium had significantly longer stays (P < .001) and greater prevalence of falls (P < .001) than did patients without delirium. Patients with delirium also had a significantly greater likelihood for discharge to a nursing facility (P < .001) and need for home health services if discharged to home (P < .001) and a significantly higher need for inpatient physical therapy (P < .001). Compared with patients without postoperative delirium, patients who had this complication were more likely to have received zolpidem and benzodiazepines postoperatively and to have a history of arrhythmias, renal disease, and congestive heart failure. Patients who have delirium after cardiac surgery have poorer outcomes than do similar patients without this complication. Development and implementation of an extensive care plan to address postoperative delirium is necessary for cardiac surgery patients who are at risk for or have delirium after the surgery. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  17. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. Material and Methods: There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position “1” and “2”. We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position “1” lasted 0.5 hours, and position “2” lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. Results: The analysis was done in three positions: “Operating position 1”, “Operating position 2 ‘, and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this

  18. Dexmedetomidine in combination with midazolam after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomomi; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Maruo, Ayako; Matsuhisa, Hironori; Tanaka, Akiko; Noda, Rei; Matsushima, Shunsuke

    2015-09-01

    Although midazolam is one of the most commonly used sedatives for infants in the intensive care unit, it has well-known disadvantages including a dose-dependent potential to induce tolerance, withdrawal, and hemodynamic depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effects of dexmedetomidine combined with midazolam in postoperative intensive care following pediatric cardiac surgery. Forty consecutive infants who underwent cardiac surgery for isolated ventricular septal defects from January 2011 to July 2013 were enrolled in this retrospective study. They were divided into two groups according to postoperative sedation regimen: dexmedetomidine sedation with midazolam (n = 20), or midazolam sedation without dexmedetomidine (control group, n = 20). Perioperative variables were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics between the two groups. During the first 24 h after intensive care unit admission, heart rate and serum lactate levels were significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group compared to the control group (p = 0.0292 and p = 0.0027, respectively). The maximal midazolam dose was also significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group (0.12 ± 0.09 vs. 0.20 ± 0.08 mg kg(-1) h(-1), p = 0.0059). There were no adverse effects of dexmedetomidine such as bradycardia, hypotension, agitation, or seizures. Three (15%) patients in the control group and none in the dexmedetomidine group experienced sudden cardiopulmonary decompensation. Dexmedetomidine can provide favorable sedative properties with a reduced requirement for concomitant midazolam and stable hemodynamics with tachycardia prevention, for postoperative intensive care following pediatric cardiac surgery. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Interposed abdominal compression-cardiopulmonary resuscitation after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-ke; Wang, Jun; Li, Tian-fa

    2014-12-01

    The management of cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery differs from the management of cardiac arrest under other circumstances. In other studies, interposed abdominal compression-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR) resulted in a better outcome compared with conventional CPR. The aim of the present study was to determine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of IAC-CPR compared with conventional CPR in patients with cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery. Data on all cardiac surgical patients who suffered a sudden cardiac arrest during the first 24 h after surgery were collected prospectively. Cardiac arrest was defined as the cessation of cardiac mechanical activity with the absence of a palpable central pulse, apnoea and unresponsiveness, including ventricular fibrillation, asystole and pulseless electrical activity. Forty patients were randomized to either conventional CPR (n = 21) or IAC-CPR (n = 19). IAC-CPR was initially performed by compressing the abdomen midway between the xiphoid and the umbilicus during the relaxation phase of chest compression. If spontaneous circulation was not restored after 10-15 min, the surgical team would immediately proceed to resternotomy. The endpoints of the study were safety, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) >5 min, survival to hospital discharge and survival for 6 months. With IAC-CPR, there were more patients in terms of ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival for 6 months and fewer CPR-related injuries compared with patients who underwent conventional CPR. IAC-CPR is feasible and safe and may be advantageous in cases of cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. The frequency of anesthesia-related cardiac arrests in patients with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Odegard, Kirsten C; DiNardo, James A; Kussman, Barry D; Shukla, Avinash; Harrington, James; Casta, Al; McGowan, Francis X; Hickey, Paul R; Bacha, Emile A; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Laussen, Peter C

    2007-08-01

    The frequency of anesthesia-related cardiac arrests during pediatric anesthesia has been reported between 1.4 and 4.6 per 10,000 anesthetics. ASA physical status >III and younger age are risk factors. Patients with congenital cardiac disease may also be at increased risk. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the frequency of cardiac arrest in patients with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery at a large pediatric tertiary referral center. Using an established data registry, all cardiac arrests from January 2000 through December 2005 occurring in the cardiac operating rooms were reviewed. A cardiac arrest was defined as any event requiring external or internal chest compressions, with or without direct cardioversion. Events determined to be anesthesia-related were classified as likely related or possibly related. There were 41 cardiac arrests in 40 patients (median age, 2.9 mo; range, 2 days to 23 yr) during 5213 anesthetics over the time period, for an overall frequency of 0.79%; 78% were open procedures requiring cardiopulmonary bypass and 22% closed procedures not requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Eleven cardiac arrests (26.8%) were classified as either likely (n = 6) or possibly related (n = 5) to anesthesia, (21.1 per 10,000 anesthetics) but with no mortality; 30 were categorized as procedure-related. The incidence of anesthesia-related and procedure-related cardiac arrests was highest in neonates (P < 0.001). There was no association with year of event or experience of the anesthesiologist. The frequency of anesthesia-related cardiac arrest in patients undergoing cardiac surgery is increased, but is not associated with an increase in mortality. Neonates and infants are at higher risk. Careful preparation and anticipation is important to ensure timely and effective resuscitation.

  1. Surgical site infection after cardiac surgery: a simplified surveillance method.

    PubMed

    Lucet, Jean-Christophe

    2006-12-01

    We report the results of a 2-year, 7-center program of surveillance of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) after cardiac surgery. DSWI was defined as the need for reoperation. Stratification data were abstracted from computerized files. The incidence of DSWI was 2.2% (198 of 8,816 cardiac surgery procedures). The risk factors identified were obesity, age, coronary artery bypass grafting, postoperative mechanical ventilation, and early surgical reexploration. The resource efficiency of this simplified surveillance method is discussed.

  2. Management of sickle cell disease in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Todd C; Carter, Michael V; Patel, Rina K; Suarez-Pierre, Alejandro; Lin, Sophie Z; Magruder, Jonathan Trent; Grimm, Joshua C; Cameron, Duke E; Baumgartner, William A; Mandal, Kaushik

    2017-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is a life-limiting inherited hemoglobinopathy that poses inherent risk for surgical complications following cardiac operations. In this review, we discuss preoperative considerations, intraoperative decision-making, and postoperative strategies to optimize the care of a patient with sickle cell disease undergoing cardiac surgery. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A novel software program for detection of potential air emboli during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Secretain, Frank; Pollard, Andrew; Uddin, Mesbah; Ball, Christopher G; Hamilton, Andrew; Tanzola, Robert C; Thorpe, Joelle B; Milne, Brian

    2015-01-12

    Risks associated with air emboli introduced during cardiac surgery have been highlighted by reports of postoperative neuropsychological dysfunction, myocardial dysfunction, and mortality. Presently, there are no standard effective methods for quantifying potential emboli in the bloodstream during cardiac surgery. Our objective was to develop software that can automatically detect and quantify air bubbles within the ascending aorta and/or cardiac chambers during cardiac surgery in real time. We created a software algorithm ("Detection of Emboli using Transesophageal Echocardiography for Counting, Total volume, and Size estimation", or DETECTS™) to identify and measure potential emboli present during cardiac surgery using two-dimensional ultrasound. An in vitro experiment was used to validate the accuracy of DETECTS™ at identifying and measuring air emboli. An experimental rig was built to correlate the ultrasound images to high definition camera images of air bubbles created in water by an automatic bubbler system. There was a correlation between true bubble size and the size reported by DETECTS™ in our in vitro experiment (r = 0.76). We also tested DETECTS™ using TEE images obtained during cardiac surgery, and provide visualization of the software interface. While monitoring the heart during cardiac surgery using existing ultrasound technology and DETECTS™, the operative team can obtain real-time data on the number and volume of potential air emboli. This system will potentially allow de-airing techniques to be evaluated and improved upon. This could lead to reduced air in the cardiac chambers after cardiopulmonary bypass, possibly reducing the risk of neurological dysfunction following cardiac surgery.

  4. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeffi, Michael; Johnson, Kyle; Paciullo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review. PMID:25849690

  5. Cardiac and renal protective effects of dexmedetomidine in cardiac surgeries: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, AS; Mahmoud, KM; Kasemy, ZA; Helwa, MA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac and renal injuries are common insults after cardiac surgeries that contribute to perioperative morbidity and mortality. Dexmedetomidine has been shown to protect several organs against ischemia/reperfusion-(I/R) induced injury. We performed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effect of dexmedetomidine on cardiac and renal I/R injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgeries were randomized to dexmedetomidine group that received a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine initiated 5 min before cardiopulmonary bypass (1 μg/kg over 15 min, followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h) until 6 h after surgery, whereas the control group received an equivalent volume of physiological saline. Primary outcome measures included myocardial-specific proteins (troponin-I, creatine kinase-MB), urinary-specific kidney proteins (N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase, alpha-1-microglobulin, glutathione transferase-pi, glutathione transferase alpha), serum proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta), norepinephrine, and cortisol levels. They were measured within 5 min of starting anesthesia (T0), at the end of surgery (T1), 12 h after surgery (T2), 24 h after surgery (T3), 36 h postoperatively (T4), and 48 h postoperatively (T5). Furthermore, creatinine clearance and serum cystatin C were measured before starting surgery as a baseline, and at days 1, 4, 7 after surgery. Results: Dexmedetomidine reduced cardiac and renal injury as evidenced by lower concentration of myocardial-specific proteins, kidney-specific urinary proteins, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, it caused higher creatinine clearance and lower serum cystatin C. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine provided cardiac and renal protection during cardiac surgery. PMID:27833481

  6. [Oral anticoagulation control in a cardiac surgery ward].

    PubMed

    Melis Tormos, Eloida

    2008-09-01

    In patients who undergo cardiac surgery, particularly valvular surgery it is essential to carry out frequent anticoagulation controls during their hospital stay The author questions if it is viable to carry out these controls by means of a portable coagulation meter which, in principle, can provide advantages in patient care. To determine this viability the author evaluates the concordance between the measurements obtained with this device and measurements taken in a laboratory The author compared the INR (prothrombin time, Normalized International Ratio) in 106 pairs of simultaneous blood samples, from both veins and capillaries, taken from 60 patients receiving anticoagulation medicine hospitalized in the cardiac surgery ward at the La Fe Hospital after each underwent surgery The samples taken from veins were processed in a hemostasia laboratory while the capillary samples were processed with a portable coagulation meter, a Roche CoaguChek"S. The statistical analyses applied were Pearson coefficient, intraclass correlation coefficient (CCI) and the method for mean differences (MMD). Numbers for hemocytes and therapy combined with heparine were taken into account. The results showed, in the overall analysis of data, a very good degree of concordance, CCI = 0.939 (confidence interval, IC=95%, 0.902-0.961) and MMD numbers <10%. For hemocytes <32, the concordance decreases, CCI = 0.876 (IC 95% = 0.787-0.930). The author concludes that this coagulation meter is trustworthy therefore using it would improve care for a patient needing anti-coagulation treatment during his/her stay in the ward since using this meter helps to obtain immediate results and reduces the trauma when extracting blood samples, etc. Nonetheless, when dealing with patients having a low hemocyte level, it is more prudent to make use of laboratory results.

  7. [Postoperative mortality a university Department of General Surgery: incidence of cardiac-related deaths].

    PubMed

    Tavernier, B; Sanchez, R; Pattou, F; Mallat, J; Sperandio, M; Proye, C

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of cardiac deaths following noncardiac nonvascular surgery. Retrospective survey. All patients undergoing mainly endocrinous and digestive surgery in a University department of general surgery between 1991 and 1996. Analysis of all deaths occurring intra- and postoperatively, until discharge of the patients. Demographic and medical data, including patent myocardial ischaemia and risk factors for coronary artery disease, were recorded and compared with a control group including all patients undergoing surgery from January to September 1996. In the 8,700 patients who underwent mainly endocrine neck surgery (66%), or intra-abdominal surgery (31%), the mortality rate (n = 96) was 1.1% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.9-1.3%). Patent myocardial ischaemia or high risk factors for coronary artery disease were existing in 24% of patients with neck surgery, 31% of those with intra-abdominal surgery, and in 60% of the deceased patients (P < 0.01 vs control group). Those who died were older, were in a higher ASA physical class, and had undergone an emergency procedure more often than patients of the control group (P < 0.002 for each parameter). Two cardiac deaths, in patients with a patent cardiopathy, were recorded (cardiac mortality: 0.02%; 95% CI = 0.003-0.08%). The main cause of death was infection (n = 46), followed by haemorrhage (n = 12). Seven deaths remained unexplained. This study suggests that cardiac morbidity is a rare cause of death after noncardiac nonvascular surgery.

  8. The place of research and the role of academic surgeons in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, M J; Schmid, C; Scheld, H H

    2004-04-01

    The development of the discipline of cardiac surgery was, to a large extent, guided by the vision and research of its pioneers. On the basis of their efforts, all the different areas of cardiac surgery were able to evolve including coronary artery bypass grafting, heart valve surgery, surgery of the aorta, congenital heart surgery, surgery for rhythm disorders including the implantation of pacemakers and defibrillators, and surgical treatment of advanced heart failure (for example, heart transplantations and mechanical circulatory support). The continued existence of cardiac surgery and its role in medicine in general will depend, to a significant extent, on the future research activities of its protagonists. Cardiac surgeon-scientists will play a pivotal role since they combine clinical experience with scientific knowledge and intuition which make them able to direct research to topics which will matter in the future. However, research costs money, and state or national funds will be not sufficient to support research as much as is necessary. Funding from third parties such as industry will increasingly be required. Due to this, however, the cardiac surgeon-scientist faces various challenges such as the evaluation of his skill in acquiring funds, conflicts with current ethical standards, conflicts of interest when receiving money from industry, and, as a result of the tough competition in this field, the temptation to commit fraud. The head of a department of cardiac surgery holds an important function as his initiative is decisive for the development of visions for the future and for the employment of surgeon-scientists who pursue visionary research. It will take the combined efforts of surgeon-scientists and departmental heads not only to maintain but to extend the position of cardiac surgery in medicine and society even further.

  9. Importance of pre- and postoperative physiotherapy in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Cavenaghi, Simone; Moura, Silvia Cristina Garcia de; Silva, Thalis Henrique da; Venturinelli, Talita Daniela; Marino, Lais Helena Carvalho; Lamari, Neuseli Marino

    2009-01-01

    Lung complications during postoperative of pediatric heart surgery are frequently highlighting atelectasis and pneumonia. Physiotherapy has an important role in the treatment of these complications. We reviewed and update the physiotherapy performance in the preoperative and in the postoperative lung complication of pediatric cardiac surgery. We noted efficacy of physiotherapy treatment through different specific techniques and the need for development of new studies.

  10. Fluid management in cardiac surgery patients: pitfalls, challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Bignami, Elena; Guarnieri, Marcello; Gemma, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Fluid administration is a powerful tool for hemodynamic stabilization as it increases preload and improves cardiac function in fluid-responsive patients. However, there are various types of fluid to choose from. The use of colloids and crystalloids in non-cardiac Intensive Care Units (ICU) has been reported, showing controversial results. Many trials on sepsis in a non-cardiac ICU setting show that colloids, in particular hydroxyethyl starches and gelatins, might have a detrimental effect on kidney function, and on major outcomes such as mortality. Many small randomized clinical trials focusing on coagulation and bleeding show controversial results regarding fluid safety during the perioperative period in cardiac surgery, and in the cardiac ICU. No definitive data are available on the superiority of one fluid compared with another for fluid replacement after cardiac surgery. Only few data are available regarding the impact of fluids on kidney function in the cardiac ICU. On the other hand, there is much evidence showing that fluid administration requires strict protocols and close monitoring. Improved clinical outcomes are evident in protocols for goal-directed therapy. In conclusion, the application of a close monitoring and a pre-defined goal-directed protocol are far more important than the choice of a single fluid. This review examines the available evidence on fluid management in cardiac surgery and in the ICU, and analyzes the key steps of fluid strategy in these settings.

  11. Ultra-minimally invasive cardiac surgery: robotic surgery and awake CABG.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Go

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of the significant advantages of minimizing surgical trauma has resulted in the development of minimally invasive surgical procedures. Endoscopic surgery confers the benefits of minimally invasive surgery upon patients, and surgical robots have enhanced the ability and precision of surgeons. Consequently, technological advances have facilitated totally endoscopic robotic cardiac surgery, which has allowed surgeons to operate endoscopically, rather than through a median sternotomy, during cardiac surgery. Thus, repairs for structural heart conditions, including mitral valve plasty, atrial septal defect closure, multivessel minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting and totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), can be totally endoscopic. On the other hand, general anesthesia remains a risk in patients who have severe carotid artery stenosis before surgery, as well as in those with a history of severe cerebral infarction or respiratory failure. In this study, the potential of a new awake CABG protocol using only epidural anesthesia was investigated for realizing day surgery and was found to be a promising modality for ultra-minimally invasive cardiac surgery. We herein review robot-assisted cardiac surgery and awake off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting as ultra-minimally invasive cardiac surgeries.

  12. Pain experiences of men and women after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bjørnnes, Ann Kristin; Parry, Monica; Lie, Irene; Fagerland, Morten Wang; Watt-Watson, Judy; Rustøen, Tone; Stubhaug, Audun; Leegaard, Marit

    2016-10-01

    To compare the prevalence and severity of pain in men and women during the first year following cardiac surgery and to examine the predictors of persistent postoperative pain 12 months post surgery. Persistent pain has been documented after cardiac surgery, with limited evidence for differences between men and women. Prospective cohort study of patients in a randomised controlled trial (N = 416, 23% women) following cardiac surgery. Secondary data analysis of data collected prior to surgery, across postoperative days 1-4, at two weeks, and at one, three, six and 12 months post surgery. The main outcome was worst pain intensity (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form). Twenty-nine percent (97/339) of patients reported persistent postoperative pain at rest at 12 months that was worse in intensity and interference for women than for men. For both sexes, a more severe co-morbidity profile, lower education and postoperative pain at rest at one month post surgery were associated with an increased probability for persistent postoperative pain at 12 months. Women with more concerns about communicating pain and a lower intake of analgesics in the hospital had an increased probability of pain at 12 months. Sex differences in pain are present up to one year following cardiac surgery. Strategies for sex-targeted pain education and management pre- and post-surgery may lead to better pain outcomes. These results suggest that informing patients (particularly women) about the benefits of analgesic use following cardiac surgery may result in less pain over the first year post discharge. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Capacity building in cardiac surgery in emerging countries: an overview.

    PubMed

    Velebit, V

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac surgery in the developed world is advancing rapidly towards extremely expensive and time-consuming technologies such as robotic surgery, whereas, at the same time, access to life saving treatment by simple cardiac surgery is denied to many patients in the emerging world. This widening gap of access to technologies in distinct parts of the world has been eloquently described by one of the foremost US cardiac surgeons, Dr James Cox, in his presidential address to the American Association of Thoracic Surgery in San Diego in May 2001. Dr Cox demonstrated the startling figures shown in the table below and pleaded for involvement of surgeons from the developed world in capacity building in the emerging countries.

  14. Myocardial protection during minimally invasive cardiac surgery through right mini-thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    De Palo, Micaela; Guida, Pietro; Mastro, Florinda; Nanna, Daniela; Quagliara, Teresa A P; Rociola, Ruggiero; Lionetti, Giosuè; Paparella, Domenico

    2017-04-01

    Myocardial damage is an independent predictor of adverse outcome following cardiac surgery and myocardial protection is one of the key factors to achieve successful outcomes. Cardioplegia with Custodiol is currently the most used cardioplegia during minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS). Different randomized controlled trials compared blood and Custodiol cardioplegia in the context of traditional cardiac surgery. No data are available for MICS. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of cold blood versus Custodiol cardioplegia during MICS. We retrospectively evaluated 90 patients undergoing MICS through a right mini-thoracotomy in a three-year period. Myocardial protection was performed using cold blood (44 patients, CBC group) or Custodiol (46 patients, Custodiol group) cardioplegia, based on surgeon preference and complexity of surgery. The primary outcomes were post-operative cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and creatine kinase MB (CKMB) serum release and the incidence of Low Cardiac Output Syndrome (LCOS). Aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass times were higher in the Custodiol group. No difference was observed in myocardial injury enzyme release (peak cTnI value was 18±46 ng/ml in CBC and 21±37 ng/ml in Custodiol; p=0.245). No differences were observed for mortality, LCOS, atrial or ventricular arrhythmias onset, transfusions, mechanical ventilation time duration, intensive care unit and total hospital stay. Custodiol and cold blood cardioplegic solutions seem to assure similar myocardial protection in patients undergoing cardiac surgery through a right mini-thoracotomy approach.

  15. Right ventricular dysfunction after cardiac surgery - diagnostic options.

    PubMed

    Grønlykke, Lars; Ravn, Hanne Berg; Gustafsson, Finn; Hassager, Christian; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Nilsson, Jens C

    2017-04-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure after cardiac surgery is associated with an ominous prognosis. The etiology of RV failure is multifaceted and the ability to recognize RV failure early is paramount in order to initiate timely treatment. The present review focuses on different diagnostic modalities for RV function and discusses the normal versus abnormal findings in RV monitoring after cardiac surgery and the limitations of the applicable diagnostic modalities. There are specific challenges in RV assessment after cardiac surgery due to a loss of longitudinal contraction and a concomitant gain of transverse contraction. Additionally, the image quality of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is often reduced after cardiac surgery. RV function can be assessed with 2D and 3D imaging techniques as well as invasive hemodynamic monitoring. Until proper validation studies have determined accuracy, reproducibility and comparability of the next generation of diagnostic modalities we propose to use simple, but obtainable echocardiographic measurements and ultimately the insertion of a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in order to diagnose RV failure after cardiac surgery.

  16. How to evaluate and improve the quality and credibility of an outcomes database: validation and feedback study on the UK Cardiac Surgery Experience.

    PubMed

    Fine, Leon G; Keogh, Bruce E; Cretin, Shan; Orlando, Maria; Gould, Mairi M

    2003-01-04

    To assess the quality and completeness of a database of clinical outcomes after cardiac surgery and to determine whether a process of validation, monitoring, and feedback could improve the quality of the database. Stratified sampling of retrospective data followed by prospective re-sampling of database after intervention of monitoring, validation, and feedback. Ten tertiary care cardiac surgery centres in the United Kingdom. Validation of data derived from a stratified sample of case notes (recording of deaths cross checked with mortuary records), monitoring of completeness and accuracy of data entry, feedback to local data managers and lead surgeons. Average percentage missing data, average kappa coefficient, and reliability score by centre for 17 variables required for assignment of risk scores. Actual minus risk adjusted mortality in each centre. The database was incomplete, with a mean (SE) of 24.96% (0.09%) of essential data elements missing, whereas only 1.18% (0.06%) were missing in the patient records (P<0.0001). Intervention was associated with (a) significantly less missing data (9.33% (0.08%) P<0.0001); (b) marginal improvement in reliability of data and mean (SE) overall centre reliability score (0.53 (0.15) v 0.44 (0.17)); and (c) improved accuracy of assigned Parsonnet risk scores (kappa 0.84 v 0.70). Mortality scores (actual minus risk adjusted mortality) for all participating centres fell within two standard deviations of the mean score. A short period of independent validation, monitoring, and feedback improved the quality of an outcomes database and improved the process of risk adjustment, but with substantial room for further improvement. Wider application of this approach should increase the credibility of similar databases before their public release.

  17. Point-of-Care Testing of Hemostasis in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Prisco, Domenico; Paniccia, Rita

    2003-01-01

    An excessive perioperative blood loss, that requires transfusion of blood products, sometimes occurs in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass for cardiac surgery. Blood loss and transfusion requirements in these patients may be reduced with a better control of heparin treatment and its reversal. Blood component administration in patients with excessive post-cardiopulmonary bypass bleeding has been empiric for a long time due to turnaround times of laboratory coagulation tests. Devices are now available for rapid, point-of-care assessment of hemostasis alterations to allow an appropriate, targeted therapy. In particular, a quick evaluation of platelet and coagulation defects with new point-of-care devices can optimize the administration of pharmacological and transfusion-based therapy in patients with excessive bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:12904262

  18. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database: 2017 Update on Research.

    PubMed

    Thourani, Vinod H; Badhwar, Vinay; Shahian, David M; Edwards, Fred H; O'Brien, Sean; Habib, Robert H; Kelly, John J; Rankin, J Scott; Prager, Richard; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2017-07-01

    Containing more than 6 million cumulative operative records and accounting for 90% to 95% of adult cardiac surgery performed in the United States, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database is an invaluable resource for performance assessment, quality improvement, and clinical research. This article reviews the seven major research efforts published in 2016 that utilized the Adult Cardiac Surgery Database. Two studies evaluated national trends in clinical practice, three assessed the effect of several risk factors on postoperative morbidity and mortality, and two developed new models to evaluate quality of care. The findings of these studies have enhanced clinical practice and delineated areas for future quality improvement research. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Systematic review of near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral oxygenation during non-cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Henning B.

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used to monitor regional cerebral oxygenation (rScO2) during cardiac surgery but is less established during non-cardiac surgery. This systematic review aimed (i) to determine the non-cardiac surgical procedures that provoke a reduction in rScO2 and (ii) to evaluate whether an intraoperative reduction in rScO2 influences postoperative outcome. The PubMed and Embase database were searched from inception until April 30, 2013 and inclusion criteria were intraoperative NIRS determined rScO2 in adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. The type of surgery and number of patients included were recorded. There was included 113 articles and evidence suggests that rScO2 is reduced during thoracic surgery involving single lung ventilation, major abdominal surgery, hip surgery, and laparoscopic surgery with the patient placed in anti-Tredelenburg's position. Shoulder arthroscopy in the beach chair and carotid endarterectomy with clamped internal carotid artery (ICA) also cause pronounced cerebral desaturation. A >20% reduction in rScO2 coincides with indices of regional and global cerebral ischemia during carotid endarterectomy. Following thoracic surgery, major orthopedic, and abdominal surgery the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) might be related to intraoperative cerebral desaturation. In conclusion, certain non-cardiac surgical procedures is associated with an increased risk for the occurrence of rScO2. Evidence for an association between cerebral desaturation and postoperative outcome parameters other than cognitive dysfunction needs to be established. PMID:24672486

  20. Poor preoperative nutritional status is an important predictor of the retardation of rehabilitation after cardiac surgery in elderly cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Masato; Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Satomi-Kobayashi, Seimi; Kitamura, Aki; Ono, Rei; Sakai, Yoshitada; Okita, Yutaka

    2017-04-01

    Preoperative nutritional status and physical function are important predictors of mortality and morbidity after cardiac surgery. However, the influence of nutritional status before cardiac surgery on physical function and the progress of postoperative rehabilitation requires clarification. To determine the effect of preoperative nutritional status on preoperative physical function and progress of rehabilitation after elective cardiac surgery. We enrolled 131 elderly patients with mean age of 73.7 ± 5.8 years undergoing cardiac surgery. We divided them into two groups by nutritional status as measured by the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI): high GNRI group (GNRI ≥ 92, n = 106) and low GNRI group (GNRI < 92, n = 25). Physical function was estimated by handgrip strength, knee extensor muscle strength (KEMS), the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Progress of postoperative rehabilitation was evaluated by the number of days to independent walking after surgery, length of stay in the ICU, and length of hospital stay. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, preoperative handgrip strength (P = 0.034), KEMS (P = 0.009), SPPB (P < 0.0001), and 6MWT (P = 0.012) were all significantly better in the high GNRI group. Multiple regression analysis revealed that a low GNRI was an independent predictor of the retardation of postoperative rehabilitation. Preoperative nutritional status as assessed by the GNRI could reflect perioperative physical function. Preoperative poor nutritional status may be an independent predictor of the retardation of postoperative rehabilitation in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery.

  1. [Pneumoperitoneum after cardiac surgery. A complete anamnesis is the clue].

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; López-Rodríguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorlí, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María E; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Herein we present the case of an 82 year-old patient undergoing cardiac surgery for mitral valve replacement. Fifteen years earlier, the patient had undergone surgery to replace his aortic valve, so that it was now a cardiac reoperation. Through sternotomy, and release of pericardial adherences, there was an accidental opening of a small portion of the peritoneum, proceeding to repair with simple suture. Postoperatively, the presence of pneumoperitoneum alarmed about the possibility of an intra-abdominal complication but it was subsequently discarded with recent surgical process. Through this article we review what the pneumoperitoneum consist, its causes and management, as well as highlighting possible etiologies sometimes not considered as a recent cardiac surgery, simply because the patient in found in different contexts and we do not think about those possibilities.

  2. [Embracement and anxiety symptoms in patients before cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Assis, Cinthia Calsinski; Lopes, Juliana de Lima; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2014-01-01

    This is a randomized clinical trial, aimed to compare the frequency and intensity of symptoms of anxiety in patients of preoperative cardiac surgery who received empathic behavior from nurse or family or those who received no specific type of empathic behavior. The sample consisted of 66 patients in preoperative of cardiac surgery, which were divided in three groups: empathic behavior by nurses, without specific empathic behavior and by family. Anxiety was assessed at two points in time: before and after the intervention. The instrument used was developed and validated by Suriano, comprising 19 defining characteristics of the nursing diagnosis anxiety. It was observed that the reduction of anxiety symptoms was higher in the group receiving empathic behavior of relatives when compared to the other two groups. The results suggested that encouraging the participation of family members can contribute to the reduction of anxiety symptoms in patients in preoperative cardiac surgery.

  3. Women's temporality after cardiac surgery: contributions to nursing care.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Thais Vasconselos; Salimena, Anna Maria de Oliveira; Souza, Ívis Emília de Oliveira; de Melo, Maria Carmen Simões Cardoso; da Silva, Lúcia de Fátima; Cadete, Matilde Meire Miranda

    2015-01-01

    to unveil women's existential movement after cardiac surgery. qualitative phenomenological study. The research setting was a hospital in Minas Gerais, in which ten women were interviewed between December 2011 and January 2012. after hospital discharge, the women experienced physical, social and emotional impairments, and expressed the desire to go back to the time before their diagnosis, because they felt as though they still had heart disease. This vague and average understanding led to three units of meaning that, from a Heideggerian hermeneutic point of view, revealed the phenomenon of cardiac surgery as a present circumstance that limited the participants' daily lives. nurses supporting women patients after cardiac surgery should promote health considering existential facets that are expressed during care. The bases for comprehensive care are revealed in singular and whole meetings of subjectivity.

  4. Quality measures for congenital and pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis; Austin, Erle H; Mavroudis, Constantine; Pasquali, Sara K; Lacour-Gayet, Francois G; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters, Hal; Bacha, Emile A; Nido, Pedro J Del; Fraser, Charles D; Gaynor, J William; Hirsch, Jennifer C; Morales, David L S; Pourmoghadam, Kamal K; Tweddell, James S; Prager, Richard L; Mayer, John E

    2012-01-01

    This article presents 21 "Quality Measures for Congenital and Pediatric Cardiac Surgery" that were developed and approved by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and endorsed by the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society (CHSS). These Quality Measures are organized according to Donabedian's Triad of Structure, Process, and Outcome. It is hoped that these quality measures can aid in congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical quality assessment and quality improvement initiatives.

  5. Therapeutic Interchange of Clevidipine For Sodium Nitroprusside in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Joseph E.; Thomas, Zachariah; Lee, David; Moskowitz, David M.; Nemeth, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background: Generic price inflation has resulted in rising acquisition costs for sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an agent historically described as the drug of choice for the treatment of perioperative hypertension in cardiac surgery. Purpose: To describe the implementation and cost avoidance achieved by utilizing clevidipine as an alternative to SNP in cardiac surgery patients at a 520-bed community teaching hospital that performs more than 300 cardiac surgeries each year. Methods: A multidisciplinary team inclusive of anesthesiologists, intensivists, pharmacists, and surgeons collaborated to develop a therapeutic interchange for SNP in cardiac surgery patients. Consistent with current guidelines for therapeutic interchange, the goal was to encourage a less expensive alternative that was demonstrated to be at least therapeutically equivalent to SNP based on data derived from clinical trials published in peer-reviewed literature. A comprehensive literature review identified clevidipine as an alternative to SNP for perioperative hypertension in cardiac surgery. Nicardipine was considered as well, but was not chosen as a substitute due to lack of strong evidence and comparative data with SNP. Results: Clevidipine was implemented successfully in our cardiac surgery patients and will result in a net cost avoidance of approximately $300,000 in 2016. This is thought to be driven largely by the difference in acquisition cost between clevidipine and SNP. The operating room in our institution no longer keeps SNP stocked in anesthesia trays as a result of the success of our interchange. No requests have been made to return to the SNP standard. Conclusion: Through effective communication and multidisciplinary collaboration, our institution was able to develop an evidence-based and effective therapeutic interchange program for SNP. PMID:27757002

  6. Persistent left superior vena cava in cardiac congenital surgery.

    PubMed

    Giuliani-Poncini, Cristina; Perez, Marie-Hélène; Cotting, Jacques; Hurni, Michel; Sekarski, Nicole; Pfammatter, Jean-Pierre; Di Bernardo, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) is a relatively frequent finding in congenital cardiac malformation. The scope of the study was to analyze the timing of diagnosis of persistent LSVC, the timing of diagnosis of associated anomalies of the coronary sinus, and the global impact on morbidity and mortality of persistent LSVC in children with congenital heart disease after cardiac surgery. Retrospective analysis of a cohort of children after cardiac surgery on bypass for congenital heart disease. Three hundred seventy-one patients were included in the study, and their median age was 2.75 years (IQR 0.65-6.63). Forty-seven children had persistent LSVC (12.7 %), and persistent LSVC was identified on echocardiography before surgery in 39 patients (83 %). In three patients (6.4 %) with persistent LSVC, significant inflow obstruction of the left ventricle developed after surgery leading to low output syndrome or secondary pulmonary hypertension. In eight patients (17 %), persistent LSVC was associated with a partially or completely unroofed coronary sinus and in two cases (4 %) with coronary sinus ostial atresia. Duration of mechanical ventilation was significantly shorter in the control group (1.2 vs. 3.0 days, p = 0.04), whereas length of stay in intensive care did not differ. Mortality was also significantly lower in the control group (2.5 vs. 10.6 %, p = 0.004). The results of study show that persistent LSVC in association with congenital cardiac malformation increases the risk of mortality in children with cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass. Recognition of a persistent LSVC and its associated anomalies is mandatory to avoid complications during or after cardiac surgery.

  7. Renal function changes after elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    de Moraes Lobo, E M; Burdmann, E A; Abdulkader, R C

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac surgery can either induce acute renal failure or improve GFR by improving the cardiac performance. In order to study renal function changes after elective cardiac surgery (CS) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPBP), 21 patients undergoing valvular CS (VCS) or coronary artery bypass (CAB) were prospectively evaluated in three time periods: before, 24 hours after surgery and 48 hours after surgery. Patients were divided in 2 groups according to the GFR percent change in comparison to the baseline value found 24 hours after CS (deltaGFR24): Group 1, deltaGFR24 decrease higher than 20% (n = 11) and Group 2, deltaGFR24 decrease < or = 20% or deltaGFR24 increase (n = 10). In Group 1, 73% of the patients underwent VCS (p = 0.05 vs. Group 2) and all of them had previous VCS in sharp contrast with Group 2, where none of the patients had previous CS (p = 0.006). Patients in Group I required more volume replacement than Group 2 during the first 24 hours after CS: 2,699+/-704 mL versus 217+/-603 mL respectively, p = 0.019. Despite similar baseline GFR, Group 1 presented lower GFR 24 hours after CS when compared to Group 2 (39+/-5 versus 75+/-8 mL/(min x 1.73m2), p = 0.001) and a significantly different deltaGFR 48 hours after CS as compared to Group 2 (-21+/-11 versus +88+/-36%, p<0.01). Baseline sodium fractional excretion (FENa) in Group 1 was lower than in Group 2 (0.27+/-0.04 versus 0.70+/-0.12%, p = 0.01). No changes were observed after CS in urinary osmolality (Uosm) and urinary pH (UpH) in both groups. The deltaGFR24 showed positive correlation with baseline FENa (r = 0.44 p = 0.04) and negative correlation with volume balance during the first 24h after CS (r = -0.63, p = 0.007). More patients in Group 1 required nitroprusside than in Group 2 (66% vs. 14%, p = 0.04). Anesthesia time was shorter in Group 1 as compared to Group 2: 323+/-21 vs. 395+/-26 min, p = 0.04. No significant hemolysis occurred during CS in either group. There were no differences in age, gender

  8. Preoperative physical therapy for elective cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Hulzebos, Erik H J; Smit, Yolba; Helders, Paul P J M; van Meeteren, Nico L U

    2012-11-14

    After cardiac surgery, physical therapy is a routine procedure delivered with the aim of preventing postoperative pulmonary complications. To determine if preoperative physical therapy with an exercise component can prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in cardiac surgery patients, and to evaluate which type of patient benefits and which type of physical therapy is most effective. Searches were run on the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on the Cochrane Library (2011, Issue 12 ); MEDLINE (1966 to 12 December 2011); EMBASE (1980 to week 49, 2011); the Physical Therapy Evidence Database (PEDro) (to 12 December 2011) and CINAHL (1982 to 12 December 2011). Randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised trials comparing preoperative physical therapy with no preoperative physical therapy or sham therapy in adult patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Data were collected on the type of study, participants, treatments used, primary outcomes (postoperative pulmonary complications grade 2 to 4: atelectasis, pneumonia, pneumothorax, mechanical ventilation > 48 hours, all-cause death, adverse events) and secondary outcomes (length of hospital stay, physical function measures, health-related quality of life, respiratory death, costs). Data were extracted by one review author and checked by a second review author. Review Manager 5.1 software was used for the analysis. Eight randomised controlled trials with 856 patients were included. Three studies used a mixed intervention (including either aerobic exercises or breathing exercises); five studies used inspiratory muscle training. Only one study used sham training in the controls. Patients that received preoperative physical therapy had a reduced risk of postoperative atelectasis (four studies including 379 participants, relative risk (RR) 0.52; 95% CI 0.32 to 0.87; P = 0.01) and pneumonia (five studies including 448 participants, RR 0.45; 95% CI 0.24 to 0.83; P = 0.01) but not of

  9. [Anesthesia for non-cardiac surgery in children with congenital heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Frascaroli, G; Fucà, A; Buda, S; Gargiulo, G; Pace, C

    2003-05-01

    The incidence of congenital heart diseases accounts for 8-10 over 1000 liveborn. In Italy about 4000-4500 babies each year are born with congenital heart diseases; 50% of those babies (2000-2200) need cardiac surgery shortly after birth or within the first few months of life. Of the remaining 50%, half undergoes cardiac surgery later on in life and half does not necessitate any surgery; 30% of all cardiac operations consist of palliative procedures and the remaining 70% consist of one-stage corrective procedures. Improvements achieved both in surgical and anesthesiologic techniques, and in cardiopulmonary bypass and myocardial protection, have led to better results in pediatric cardiac surgery, with excellent long term survival rate, even for the more complex variants of congenital heart malformations. Therefore anesthesiologists are now more often required to deal with patients affected by congenital heart defects, for other than cardiac problems. Accurate investigation of patient's clinical history is strongly suggested. Moreover knowledge and familiarity with the modifications of the physiology, occurring in congenital heart disease patients, are mandatory for the choice of the more appropriate anesthesiologic strategy for each patient, in order to optimise the risk-benefits ratio and achieve a less traumatic impact on the cardio-circulatory and respiratory equilibrium. With the aim of achieving better results, interaction between anesthesiologist, cardiologist, pediatrician, surgeon and sometime neonatologist and cardiac surgeon, is strongly recommended in the evaluation of risks, and in decision making of strategies and timing of treatment.

  10. Factors affecting postoperative blood loss in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Faraoni, David; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-02-11

    We hypothesized that the influence of cyanotic disease on postoperative blood loss is closely related to age in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of a cyanotic disease is associated with increased postoperative blood loss in children aged 1 to 6 months. Children with cyanotic disease and aged<1 month who received fresh frozen plasma during cardiopulmonary bypass had less postoperative blood loss and higher maximal clot firmness on FIBTEM than cyanotic children from all other groups. Additional studies are needed to define optimal pathophysiology-based management in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

  11. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Angelini, Gianni D

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was the impact of modified ultrafiltration on adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in terms of inflammatory and metabolic changes, blood loss and early clinical outcomes. A total of 155 papers were identified using the search as described below. Of these, six papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question as they reported data to reach conclusions regarding the issues of interest for this review. The author, date and country of publication, patient group, study type and weaknesses and relevant outcomes were tabulated. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery seems to attenuate the levels of inflammatory molecules associated with surgery, reduces blood loss and blood transfusion and improves cardiac output, index and systemic vascular resistance. However, this was not translated in any reduction in length of stay in intensive care unit or hospital. Most studies were single-centre prospective non-blinded trials that included a small cohort of elective coronary artery bypass grafting patients, which makes it underpowered to provide unbiased evidence regarding clinical outcomes. Properly designed and conducted prospective randomized studies are required to answer whether the beneficial effect of modified ultrafiltration on systemic inflammatory molecules associated with surgery can translate with improvement in clinical outcome.

  12. Role of biomarkers in management of complications after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Liang, J; Zhang, Z

    2015-08-01

    The use of cardiopulmonary bypass distinguishes cardiac surgery from other types of surgery. It introduces some serious postoperative complications, such as acute organ dysfunction of the brain, heart, kidney, lungs and infection, which cause significant morbidity and mortality. Prevention and control of these complications are critical in the evolution of cardiac surgery and in the successful outcomes of most operations. Early detection of these complications are clinically important, because many therapeutic interventions are available to prevent these deadly effects today. Many biomarkers have emerged over the past years, which provided superior diagnostic and prognostic information. Some specific biomarkers that can reflect organ dysfunction, may be useful for early detection, diagnostic assessment, risk stratification of these complications, even monitoring the patient's response to therapy. Our expectation is that a cardiac surgery-associated monitoring system should be constructed with multiple biomarkers, which are specific for different postoperative complications. Such system may help physicians and anesthetist to tailor perioperative management, considering individual pathogenesis and prognosis. In this review, we will summarize the newly identified cardiac surgery-associated biomarkers, and discuss their values in diagnosis and prognosis of some serious complications.

  13. The impact of anaemia and intravenous iron replacement therapy on outcomes in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Maurice; Klein, Andrew A; Richards, Toby

    2015-02-01

    Anaemia is common in patients with cardiac disease and also in those undergoing cardiac surgery. There is increasing evidence that preoperative anaemia is associated with increased patient morbidity and mortality following surgery. We performed a systematic literature review to assess the impact of anaemia and intravenous (IV) iron supplementation on outcomes in cardiac surgery. Sixteen studies examined preoperative anaemia in detail. One study examined the role of preoperative IV iron administration and a further three, the effect of postoperative iron supplementation on haemoglobin (Hb) levels and the need for transfusion. Preoperative anaemia was associated with higher mortality, more postoperative blood transfusions, longer intensive care unit (ICU) and total hospital stay and also a greater incidence of postoperative cardiovascular events. In the single study that examined preoperative IV iron in combination with erythropoietin treatment, there was decreased blood transfusion, shorter hospital stay and an increase in patient survival. However, this was a small retrospective cohort study, with the observation and treatment groups analysed over different time periods. Postoperative administration of IV iron therapy, either alone or in combination with erythropoietin, was not effective in raising Hb levels or reducing red cell concentrate transfusion. On the basis of currently available evidence, the effect of perioperative administration of IV iron to cardiac surgery patients, alone or in combination with erythropoietin, remains unproven. Well-designed and appropriately powered prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate perioperative iron supplementation in the context of cardiac surgery.

  14. Patient Readiness to Exercise After Cardiac Surgery: Development of the Readiness to Change Exercise Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kheawwan, Pataraporn; Chaiyawat, Waraporn; Aungsuroch, Yupin; Wu, Yow-Wu Bill

    2016-01-01

    Readiness to change plays a significant role in patient adherence to an exercise regimen; thus, accurate assessment of readiness to change is necessary to direct interventions. To date, an accurate scale for measuring readiness to exercise after cardiac surgery is not available. The purpose of this study was to develop the Readiness to Change Exercise Questionnaire for use among Thai cardiac surgery patients and to evaluate its psychometric properties. The Readiness to Change Exercise Questionnaire was developed based on the Transtheoretical Model, a comprehensive literature review, and input from experts and cardiac surgery patients. Participants were 533 patients who had undergone cardiac surgery within the previous 3 months. The study was conducted in 7 hospitals in 4 geographical regions of Thailand. Confirmatory factor analysis showed satisfactory goodness of fit for the 13-item scale. The analysis supported a 4-factor structure corresponding to 4 readiness stages: precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, and action. Cronbach's α coefficients were .68 for precontemplation, .75 for contemplation, .72 for preparation, and .75 for action. The scale was found to be a valid and reliable instrument for the determination of patient readiness to exercise after cardiac surgery. However, further testing of the scale is needed to confirm its concurrent and predictive validity.

  15. Cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase-MB release after different cardiac surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mastro, Florinda; Guida, Pietro; Scrascia, Giuseppe; Rotunno, Crescenzia; Amorese, Lillà; Carrozzo, Alessandro; Capone, Giuseppe; Paparella, Domenico

    2015-06-01

    To conduct a comparative study of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and MB isoenzyme of serum creatine kinase (CK-MB) after different cardiac surgeries. Consecutive cardiac operations under cardiopulmonary bypass (200 adults, 144 men, 68 ± 11 years): 67 coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), 27 aortic valve surgery, 21 mitral valve surgery, 11 thoracic aorta surgery, and 74 combined surgery. Postoperative cTnI and CK-MB were measured on admission to the ICU and at fixed time until the fifth postoperative day. Peak values of cTnI (median 5.8 ng/ml; interquartile range 3.6-11.9) and CK-MB (29.0 ng/ml; 15.6-60.4) were reached mainly within 18 h after the end of surgery (85% of cTnI and 95% of CK-MB highest determinations) without differences among groups. Cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp time significantly correlated with markers' peak values. At multivariate analysis, mitral valve surgery showed greater cTnI, CK-MB, and their cumulative area under the curve than other isolated procedures. Thoracic aorta surgery showed lower cumulative area under the curve for both markers than CABG and combined surgery. Mitral valve surgery had significant later reduction of both markers in comparison with other procedures. No patient in mitral valve surgery group reached cTnI values in the normal laboratory range within 5 postoperative days. Release pattern of cTnI and CK-MB after heart surgery depends on the type of procedure. Mitral valve surgery was characterized by highest and longest elevation of postoperative markers' concentration. Determinants of differences in myocardial injury biomarkers and their prognostic value after valve surgery should be accurately assessed.

  16. Nuclear cardiac ejection fraction and cardiac index in abdominal aortic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Fiser, W.P.; Thompson, B.W.; Thompson, A.R.; Eason, C.; Read, R.C.

    1983-11-01

    Since atherosclerotic heart disease results in more than half of the perioperative deaths that follow abdominal aortic surgery, a prospective protocol was designed for preoperative evaluation and intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring. Twenty men who were prepared to undergo elective operation for aortoiliac occlusive disease (12 patients) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (eight patients) were evaluated with a cardiac scan and right heart catheterization. The night prior to operation, each patient received volume loading with crystalloid based upon ventricular performance curves. At the time of the operation, all patients were anesthetized with narcotics and nitrous oxide, and hemodynamic parameters were recorded throughout the operation. Aortic crossclamping resulted in a marked depression in CI in all patients. CI remained depressed after unclamping in the majority of patients. There were two perioperative deaths, both from myocardial infarction or failure. Both patients had ejection fractions less than 30% and initial CIs less than 2 L/M2, while the survivors' mean ejection fraction was 63% +/- 1 and their mean CI was 3.2 L/M2 +/- 0.6. The authors conclude that preoperative evaluation of ejection fraction can select those patients at a high risk of cardiac death from abdominal aortic operation. These patients should receive intensive preoperative monitoring with enhancement of ventricular performance.

  17. The peri-operative management of anti-platelet therapy in elective, non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Alcock, Richard F; Naoum, Chris; Aliprandi-Costa, Bernadette; Hillis, Graham S; Brieger, David B

    2013-07-31

    Cardiovascular complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery, with adverse cardiac outcomes estimated to occur in approximately 4% of all patients. Anti-platelet therapy withdrawal may precede up to 10% of acute cardiovascular syndromes, with withdrawal in the peri-operative setting incompletely appraised. The aims of our study were to determine the proportion of patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery currently prescribed anti-platelet therapy, and identify current practice in peri-operative management. In addition, the relationship between management of anti-platelet therapy and peri-operative cardiac risk was assessed. We evaluated consecutive patients attending elective non-cardiac surgery at a major tertiary referral centre. Clinical and biochemical data were collected and analysed on patients currently prescribed anti-platelet therapy. Peri-operative management of anti-platelet therapy was compared with estimated peri-operative cardiac risk. Included were 2950 consecutive patients, with 516 (17%) prescribed anti-platelet therapy, primarily for ischaemic heart disease. Two hundred and eighty nine (56%) patients had all anti-platelet therapy ceased in the peri-operative period, including 49% of patients with ischaemic heart disease and 46% of patients with previous coronary stenting. Peri-operative cardiac risk score did not influence anti-platelet therapy management. Approximately 17% of patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery are prescribed anti-platelet therapy, the predominant indication being for ischaemic heart disease. Almost half of all patients with previous coronary stenting had no anti-platelet therapy during the peri-operative period. The decision to cease anti-platelet therapy, which occurred commonly, did not appear to be guided by peri-operative cardiac risk stratification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hyperglycemia after pediatric cardiac surgery: impact of age and residual lesions.

    PubMed

    Moga, Michael-Alice; Manlhiot, Cedric; Marwali, Eva M; McCrindle, Brian W; Van Arsdell, Glen S; Schwartz, Steven M

    2011-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of patient age and significant residual cardiac lesions on the association between hyperglycemia and adverse outcomes in children after cardiac surgery. The incidence, severity, and duration of hyperglycemia in this patient population and perioperative factors predisposing to hyperglycemia were also delineated. Retrospective, observational cohort study. Eighteen-bed pediatric cardiac critical care unit. Seven hundred seventy-two children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass during 2006 and 2007. None. Postoperative glucose levels were reviewed in all children who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at our institution during 2006 and 2007 who met all inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria (n = 772). The composite morbidity-mortality outcome included hospital death, cardiac arrest, renal/hepatic failure, lactic acidosis, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use, or infection. Hyperglycemia occurred in 90% of patients and resolved within 72 hrs in most without exogenous insulin. Preoperative factors, including prostaglandins, mechanical ventilation, and cyanosis, were significantly associated with increased odds of significant hyperglycemia (>180 mg/dL for >12 hrs or any level >270 mg/dL) as were increased surgical complexity and perioperative steroid administration. Thirty-one percent of the entire cohort reached the composite outcome and the odds were significantly increased after 54 hrs of mild (elevated, but <180 mg/dL), 12 hrs of moderate (180-270 mg/dL), or any period of severe hyperglycemia (>270 mg/dL). Neonates (<1 month of age) tolerated longer periods of hyperglycemia before showing increased odds of reaching the composite morbidity-mortality end point. In the setting of important residual cardiac lesions, mild or moderate hyperglycemia was not as strongly associated with adverse outcomes. Age and residual cardiac lesions are important modifiers of the association between

  19. Saccadic Palsy following Cardiac Surgery: Possible Role of Perineuronal Nets

    PubMed Central

    Roeber, Sigrun; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nair, Govind; Reich, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Perineuronal nets (PN) form a specialized extracellular matrix around certain highly active neurons within the central nervous system and may help to stabilize synaptic contacts, promote local ion homeostasis, or play a protective role. Within the ocular motor system, excitatory burst neurons and omnipause neurons are highly active cells that generate rapid eye movements – saccades; both groups of neurons contain the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin and are ensheathed by PN. Experimental lesions of excitatory burst neurons and omnipause neurons cause slowing or complete loss of saccades. Selective palsy of saccades in humans is reported following cardiac surgery, but such cases have shown normal brainstem neuroimaging, with only one clinicopathological study that demonstrated paramedian pontine infarction. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that lesions of PN surrounding these brainstem saccade-related neurons may cause saccadic palsy. Methods Together with four controls we studied the brain of a patient who had developed a permanent selective saccadic palsy following cardiac surgery and died several years later. Sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded brainstem blocks were applied to double-immunoperoxidase staining of parvalbumin and three different components of PN. Triple immunofluorescence labeling for all PN components served as internal controls. Combined immunostaining of parvalbumin and synaptophysin revealed the presence of synapses. Results Excitatory burst neurons and omnipause neurons were preserved and still received synaptic input, but their surrounding PN showed severe loss or fragmentation. Interpretation Our findings support current models and experimental studies of the brainstem saccade-generating neurons and indicate that damage to PN may permanently impair the function of these neurons that the PN ensheathe. How a postulated hypoxic mechanism could selectively damage the PN remains unclear. We propose that the well

  20. Trigemino-Cardiac Reflex: A Phenomenon Neglected in Maxillofacial Surgery?

    PubMed

    Joshi, Udupikrishna M; Munnangi, Ashwini; Shah, Kundan; Patil, Satishkumar G; Thakur, Nitin

    2017-06-01

    Trigemino-cardiac reflex is a physiologic response of the body to pressure effects in the region of distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures can induce the development of this reflex, which leads to significant changes in the heart rate and sinus rhythms. This study intends to evaluate the effects of this reflex in patients with facial fractures and its subsequent management. A total of thirty-seven patients with facial fractures who reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Basaveswar Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga during a period from July 2015-March 2016 were considered for the study. A male preponderance is observed with the most susceptible age group being 21-30 years. Twenty-three patients sustained mid-facial fractures alone, nine patients had isolated mandible fractures and five patients had fractures of both the mid-face and mandible. A relative bradycardia was observed in the patients with mid-facial trauma, both at the time of presentation and also during the surgical reduction of midfacial fractures which improved after completion of procedure in most of the patients. However, in two patients, the bradycardia progressed to a cardiac asystole during midface manipulation which required immediate halt of the procedure and intravenous administration of atropine. Trigeminocardiac reflex though physiologic, which usually tends to subside without complications is not to be neglected in the surgeries of the maxillofacial skeleton. A propensity for unforeseen complications due to this reflex has to be avoided by meticulous monitoring of the ECG.

  1. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs’ exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-01-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period. PMID:28349037

  2. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs' exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-02-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period.

  3. Determination of cardiac risk by dipyridamole-thallium imaging before peripheral vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, C.A.; Brewster, D.C.; Darling, R.C.; Okada, R.D.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1985-02-14

    To evaluate the severity of coronary artery disease in patients with severe peripheral vascular disease requiring surgery, preoperative dipyridamole-thallium imaging was performed in 54 stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Of the 54 patients, 48 had peripheral vascular surgery as scheduled without coronary angiography, of whom 8 (17 per cent) had postoperative cardiac ischemic events. The occurrence of these eight cardiac events could not have been predicted preoperatively by any clinical factors but did correlate with the presence of thallium redistribution. Eight of 16 patients with thallium redistribution had cardiac events, whereas there were no such events in 32 patients whose thallium scan either was normal or showed only persistent defects (P less than 0.0001). Six other patients also had thallium redistribution but underwent coronary angiography before vascular surgery. All had severe multivessel coronary artery disease, and four underwent coronary bypass surgery followed by uncomplicated peripheral vascular surgery. These data suggest that patients without thallium redistribution are at a low risk for postoperative ischemic events and may proceed to have vascular surgery. Patients with redistribution have a high incidence of postoperative ischemic events and should be considered for preoperative coronary angiography and myocardial revascularization in an effort to avoid postoperative myocardial ischemia and to improve survival. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging is superior to clinical assessment and is safer and less expensive than coronary angiography for the determination of cardiac risk.

  4. Genetic factors contribute to bleeding after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Welsby, I J; Podgoreanu, M V; Phillips-Bute, B; Mathew, J P; Smith, P K; Newman, M F; Schwinn, D A; Stafford-Smith, M

    2005-06-01

    Postoperative bleeding remains a common, serious problem for cardiac surgery patients, with striking inter-patient variability poorly explained by clinical, procedural, and biological markers. We tested the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms of coagulation proteins and platelet glycoproteins are associated with bleeding after cardiac surgery. Seven hundred and eighty patients undergoing aortocoronary surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were studied. Clinical covariates previously associated with bleeding were recorded and DNA isolated from preoperative blood. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization, Time-Of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy or polymerase chain reaction were used for genotype analysis. Multivariable linear regression modeling, including all genetic main effects and two-way gene-gene interactions, related clinical and genetic predictors to bleeding from the thorax and mediastinum. Nineteen candidate polymorphisms were assessed; seven [GPIaIIa-52C>T and 807C>T, GPIb alpha 524C>T, tissue factor-603A>G, prothrombin 20210G>A, tissue factor pathway inhibitor-399C>T, and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) deletion/insertion] demonstrate significant association with bleeding (P < 0.01). Adding genetic to clinical predictors results improves the model, doubling overall ability to predict bleeding (P < 0.01). We identified seven genetic polymorphisms associated with bleeding after cardiac surgery. Genetic factors appear primarily independent of, and explain at least as much variation in bleeding as clinical covariates; combining genetic and clinical factors double our ability to predict bleeding after cardiac surgery. Accounting for genotype may be necessary when stratifying risk of bleeding after cardiac surgery.

  5. Cutaneous microangiopathic thrombosis complicated by pyoderma gangrenosum in post-cardiac surgery heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Suvitesh; Theodore, Sanjay; Liava'a, Matthew; Atkinson, Victoria; Tatoulis, James

    2009-08-01

    Thrombotic cutaneous gangrene is a rare complication of heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia after cardiac surgery. We report a case and discuss management issues with cardiopulmonary bypass for cardiac surgery in this condition.

  6. Definition of important early morbidities related to paediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Brown, Katherine L; Pagel, Christina; Brimmell, Rhian; Bull, Kate; Davis, Peter; Franklin, Rodney C; Hoskote, Aparna; Khan, Natasha; Rodrigues, Warren; Thorne, Sara; Smith, Liz; Chigaru, Linda; Utley, Martin; Wray, Jo; Tsang, Victor; Mclean, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Morbidity is defined as a state of being unhealthy or of experiencing an aspect of health that is "generally bad for you", and postoperative morbidity linked to paediatric cardiac surgery encompasses a range of conditions that may impact the patient and are potential targets for quality assurance. As part of a wider study, a multi-disciplinary group of professionals aimed to define a list of morbidities linked to paediatric cardiac surgery that was prioritised by a panel reflecting the views of both professionals from a range of disciplines and settings as well as parents and patients. We present a set of definitions of morbidity for use in routine audit after paediatric cardiac surgery. These morbidities are ranked in priority order as acute neurological event, unplanned re-operation, feeding problems, the need for renal support, major adverse cardiac events or never events, extracorporeal life support, necrotising enterocolitis, surgical site of blood stream infection, and prolonged pleural effusion or chylothorax. It is recognised that more than one such morbidity may arise in the same patient and these are referred to as multiple morbidities, except in the case of extracorporeal life support, which is a stand-alone constellation of morbidity. It is feasible to define a range of paediatric cardiac surgical morbidities for use in routine audit that reflects the priorities of both professionals and parents. The impact of these morbidities on the patient and family will be explored prospectively as part of a wider ongoing, multi-centre study.

  7. Prophylactic use of vancomycin in adult cardiology and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Movahed, Mohammad-Reza; Kasravi, Babak; Bryan, Charles S

    2004-03-01

    The recent appearance of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains that have reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, and the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci, raise the specter of endovascular infections that will be difficult or impossible to cure with available drugs. We review issues concerning the prophylactic use of vancomycin in adult cardiology and cardiac surgery with special attention to dosing and indications. There is no indication for the routine use of prophylactic vancomycin in pacemaker implantations, cardiac catheterization, and transesophageal echocardiography. In institutions with a high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. epidermidis, vancomycin may be used for antibiotic prophylaxis in place of cephalosporins for pacemaker or defibrillator implantation. The strongest evidence in support of the prophylactic use of vancomycin is during cardiac surgeries, particularly valvular surgeries in institutions with a high prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. epidermidis. When vancomycin is used prior to open heart surgery, the dose should be 15 mg/kg rather than the standard 1 g dose that is often recommended in the literature and used by 85% of institutional pharmacists who responded to our survey. Cardiologists and cardiac surgeons should assume leadership roles in promoting its responsible use.

  8. [Clinical analysis of gastrointestinal bleeding after cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-ming; Wu, Ruo-bin; Yang, Hong-wei; Zheng, Shao-yi; Fan, Rui-xin; Lu, Cong; Zhang, Jing-fang

    2005-05-15

    To explore early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after cardiac surgery. In the last 13 years, cases complicated with GI bleeding after cardiac surgeries were analyzed retrospectively. Fourty-four GI bleeding occurred post-operatively in (6 +/- 3) d. The mortality was 23% (10/44). Thirty-eight were located in upper GI tract, of them 26 underwent conservative therapy while 4 died of other than GI bleeding cause; six underwent laparotomy while 1 and 3 died of septicemia and multi-organ failure respectively; six underwent gastric endoscopic hemostasis by electrocautery or clipping the bleeding vessel while all survived. Six were located in lower GI tract, and 2 of them underwent laparotomy without finding bleeding section and died of multi-organ failure. By multivariable logistic regression analysis, deaths were highly related to the post-operative ventilator-dependence, acute renal insufficiency, intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) assisting and laparotomy. The mortality of GI bleeding after cardiac surgeries is very high, early gastrointestinal endoscopic examination and minimally invasive intervention can treat this complication more effectively. GI bleeding must be prevented whenever complicating post-operative ventilator-dependence, acute renal insufficiency, and IABP assisting after cardiac surgery.

  9. Early detection of acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, John Lynn; Devarajan, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a common problem in children undergoing cardiac surgery, with well documented increases in morbidity and mortality in both the short and the long term. Traditional approaches to the identification of AKI such as changes in serum creatinine have revealed a large incidence in this population with significant negative impact on clinical outcomes. However, the traditional diagnostic approaches to AKI diagnosis have inherent limitations that may lead to under-diagnosis of this pathologic process. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials for the prevention and treatment of AKI associated with cardiac surgery, at least in part due to the paucity of early predictive biomarkers. Novel non-invasive biomarkers have ushered in a new era that allows for earlier detection of AKI. With these new diagnostic tools, a more consistent approach can be employed across centers that may facilitate a more accurate representation of the actual prevalence of AKI and more importantly, clinical investigation that may minimize the occurrence of AKI following pediatric cardiac surgery. A thoughtful management approach is necessary to mitigate the effects of AKI after cardiac surgery, which is best accomplished in close collaboration with pediatric nephrologists. Long-term surveillance for improvement in kidney function and potential development of chronic kidney disease should also be a part of the comprehensive management strategy. PMID:27429538

  10. Cardiac surgery in patients on antiplatelet and antithrombotic agents.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The widespread application of antithrombotic agents carries significant potential for inducing excessive peri-operative hemorrhage during cardiac surgery. Specific surgical and medical strategies can be employed to attenuate this bleeding. These antithrombotic agents and anti-hemorrhagic measures will be reviewed in depth.

  11. Great Expectations: Perceived Social Support in Couples Experiencing Cardiac Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankin, Sally H.; Monahan, Patricia

    1991-01-01

    Compared patient and spousal perceived support during the cardiac surgery recovery period and explored effects of social support on patient/spouse subjective mood states for 117 couples. Social support buffered the impact of caregiving burden on mood disturbance for caregiving spouses but did not significantly impact physical or mental health…

  12. Great Expectations: Perceived Social Support in Couples Experiencing Cardiac Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankin, Sally H.; Monahan, Patricia

    1991-01-01

    Compared patient and spousal perceived support during the cardiac surgery recovery period and explored effects of social support on patient/spouse subjective mood states for 117 couples. Social support buffered the impact of caregiving burden on mood disturbance for caregiving spouses but did not significantly impact physical or mental health…

  13. Tissue oxygen saturation and outcome after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Julie; Toor, Iqbal Singh; Yurik, Teresa M; Keogh, Bruce E; Mythen, Michael; Montgomery, Hugh E

    2011-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass during cardiac surgery can result in a shortfall in oxygen delivery relative to demand, marked by a decrease in muscle tissue oxygen saturation as blood flow is redistributed to vital organs. Such "tissue shock" might impair postoperative recovery. To determine the association of changes in tissue oxygen saturation with postoperative outcome in cardiac surgery patients. In 74 adults undergoing cardiac surgery, tissue oxygen saturation in the thenar eminence was recorded using near-infrared spectroscopy before and during induction of anesthesia, throughout surgery, and in the intensive care unit until extubation or for a maximum monitoring time of 24 hours. The measurements were related to postoperative outcome. Mean tissue oxygen saturation increased from 81.7% to 88.5% with induction of anesthesia and decreased to 78.9% and 69.9% during surgery and on arrival in the intensive care unit, respectively. Saturation increased to 77.8% by 6 hours after surgery and remained stable. Mean saturation during the first minutes of anesthesia and 20 minutes in the intensive care unit was lower in patients with a postoperative morbidity than in patients without such morbidity on day 15 (81.1% vs 87.6%; P = .04) and on day 3 (72.9% vs 85.5%; P = .009). No associations with other outcome measures were observed. In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, reduced tissue oxygen saturation in the thenar eminence may be associated with poor postoperative outcome. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine whether measures to improve the balance between oxygen delivery and consumption might improve both tissue oxygen saturation and outcome.

  14. Prediction of cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Morise, A.P.; McDowell, D.E.; Savrin, R.A.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabrielle, O.F.; Oliver, F.N.; Nullet, F.R.; Bekheit, S.; Jain, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to determine whether noninvasive cardiac testing could be used to assess cardiac risk in patients undergoing surgery for vascular disease, the authors studied 96 patients. Seventy-seven patients eventually underwent major vascular surgery with 11 (14%) experiencing a significant cardiac complication. Thallium imaging was much more likely to be positive (p less than 0.01) in patients with a cardiac complication; however, there was a significant number of patients with cardiac complications who had a positive history or electrocardiogram for myocardial infarction. When grouped by complication and history of infarction, thallium imaging, if negative, correctly predicted low cardiac risk in the group with a history of infarction. Thallium imaging, however, did not provide a clear separation of risk in those without a history of infarction. Age and coronary angiography, on the other hand, did reveal significant differences within the group without a history of infarction. The resting radionuclide ejection fraction followed a similar pattern to thallium imaging. It is concluded that a positive history of myocardial infarction at any time in the past is the strongest risk predictor in this population and that the predictive value of noninvasive testing is dependent on this factor. Considering these findings, a proposed scheme for assessing risk that will require further validation is presented.

  15. Cardiac ECMO for biventricular hearts after paediatric open heart surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, R R; Macrae, D; Brown, K L; Schindler, M; Smith, E C; Davis, K B; Cohen, G; Tsang, V; Elliott, M; de Leval, M; Gallivan, S; Goldman, A P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To delineate predictors of hospital survival in a large series of children with biventricular physiology supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) after open heart surgery. Results: 81 children were placed on ECMO after open heart surgery. 58% (47 of 81) were transferred directly from cardiopulmonary bypass to ECMO. Hospital survival was 49% (40 of 81) but there were seven late deaths among these survivors (18%). Factors that improved the odds of survival were initiation of ECMO in theatre (64% survival (30 of 47)) rather than the cardiac intensive care unit (29% survival (10 of 34)) and initiation of ECMO for reactive pulmonary hypertension. Important adverse factors for hospital survival were serious mechanical ECMO circuit problems, renal support, residual lesions, and duration of ECMO. Conclusions: Hospital survival of children with biventricular physiology who require cardiac ECMO is similar to that found in series that include univentricular hearts, suggesting that successful cardiac ECMO is critically dependent on the identification of hearts with reversible ventricular dysfunction. In our experience of postoperative cardiac ECMO, the higher survival of patients cannulated in the operating room than in the cardiac intensive care unit is due to early effective support preventing prolonged hypoperfusion and the avoidance of a catastrophic cardiac arrest. PMID:15084554

  16. Outcome of cardiac surgery in patients with congenital heart disease in England between 1997 and 2015

    PubMed Central

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Uebing, Anselm; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Belitsis, George

    2017-01-01

    Background The number of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) is increasing worldwide and most of them will require cardiac surgery, once or more, during their lifetime. The total volume of cardiac surgery in CHD patients at a national level and the associated mortality and predictors of death associated with surgery are not known. We aimed to investigate the surgical volume and associated mortality in CHD patients in England. Methods Using a national hospital episode statistics database, we identified all CHD patients undergoing cardiac surgery in England between 1997 and 2015. Results We evaluated 57,293 patients (median age 11.9years, 46.7% being adult, 56.7% female). There was a linear increase in the number of operations performed per year from 1,717 in 1997 to 5,299 performed in 2014. The most common intervention at the last surgical event was an aortic valve procedure (9,276; 16.2%), followed by repair of atrial septal defect (9,154; 16.0%), ventricular septal defect (7,746; 13.5%), tetralogy of Fallot (3,523; 6.1%) and atrioventricular septal defect (3,330; 5.8%) repair. Associated mortality remained raised up to six months following cardiac surgery. Several parameters were predictive of post-operative mortality, including age, complexity of surgery, need for emergency surgery and socioeconomic status. The relationship of age with mortality was “U”-shaped, and mortality was highest amongst youngest children and adults above 60 years of age. Conclusions The number of cardiac operations performed in CHD patients in England has been increasing, particularly in adults. Mortality remains raised up to 6-months after surgery and was highest amongst young children and seniors. PMID:28628610

  17. [Use of the Zeus robotic surgical system for cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Sawa, Yoshiki; Monta, Osamu; Matsuda, Hikaru

    2004-11-01

    The development of closed chest cardiopulmonary bypass systems has opened the door for totally endoscopic cardiac surgery. We used the robotic surgical system ZEUS for closure of the atrial septal defect (ASD) in three patients. Under one-lung ventilation, Port-Access cardiopulmonary bypass system of the drainage from the right internal jugular vein and the the right femoral vein and the return to the right femoral artery was started after port placement at the forth intercostal space of the right thoracic wall. ASD direct closure was achieved by using robotic surgical system ZEUS under cardiac arrest. The three patients were discharged in 7 days after the operation uneventfully. The robotic surgical system ZEUS can make cardiac surgeries less invasive than ever.

  18. Tapia's syndrome — a rare complication following cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nalladaru, Zubin; Wessels, Andre; DuPreez, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Tapia's syndrome is a rare complication following cardiac surgery. It includes the extracranial involvement of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the hypoglossal nerve and results in ipsilateral paralysis of the vocal cord and the tongue. It is usually a complication related to anaesthesia and positioning of the head of the patient during surgery. We describe this rare complication which occurred at our institute. A 49-year old man developed Tapia's syndrome after an uneventful coronary artery bypass surgery. He complained of dysphonia, hoarseness of voice and an inability to swallow soon after extubation. The syndrome resolved completely over the following weeks with no neurological deficit. PMID:22108947

  19. Bone cement implantation syndrome during spinal surgery requiring cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Sastre, José A; López, Teresa; Dalmau, María J; Cuello, Rafael E

    2013-12-15

    During a posterior segmental spinal fusion procedure, a 71-year-old woman developed cardiac and pulmonary embolism characterized by nonsustained ventricular tachycardia during cement injection, rapid and severe hypoxemia, and hemodynamic instability. Management included exploratory cardiotomy under cardiopulmonary bypass and removal of the emboli from the pulmonary vessels. Postoperative recovery was successful, and the patient was discharged without sequelae. We discuss the pathophysiology of bone cement implantation syndrome during spinal fusion, possible causative factors, and treatment alternatives.

  20. Predictors of operating room extubation in adult cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Kathirvel; DeAndrade, Diana S; Mandell, Daniel R; Althouse, Andrew D; Manmohan, Rajan; Esper, Stephen A; Varga, Jeffrey M; Badhwar, Vinay

    2017-06-13

    The primary objective of the study was to identify perioperative factors associated with successful immediate extubation in the operating room after adult cardiac surgery. The secondary objective was to derive a simplified predictive scoring system to guide clinicians in operating room extubation. All 1518 patients in this retrospective cohort study underwent standardized fast-track cardiac anesthetic protocol during adult cardiac surgery. Perioperative variables between patients who had successful extubation in the operating room versus in the intensive care unit were retrospectively analyzed using both univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. A predictive score of successful operating room extubation was constructed from the multivariable results of 800 patients (derivation set), and the scoring system was further tested using a validation set of 398 patients. Younger age, lower body mass index, higher preoperative serum albumin, absence of chronic lung disease and diabetes, less-invasive surgical approach, isolated coronary bypass surgery, elective surgery, and lower doses of intraoperative intravenous fentanyl were independently associated with higher probability of operating room extubation. The extubation prediction score created in a derivation set of patients performed well in the validation set. Patient scores less than 0 had a minimal probability of successful operating room extubation. Operating room extubation was highly predicted with scores of 5 or greater. Perioperative factors that are independently associated with successful operating room extubation after adult cardiac operations were identified, and an operating room extubation prediction scoring system was validated. This scoring system may be used to guide safe operating room extubation after cardiac operations. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nurse practitioners in postoperative cardiac surgery: are they effective?

    PubMed

    Goldie, Catherine L; Prodan-Bhalla, Natasha; Mackay, Martha

    2012-01-01

    High demand for acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) in Canadian postoperative cardiac surgery settings has outpaced methodologically rigorous research to support the role. To compare the effectiveness of ACNP-led care to hospitalist-led care in a postoperative cardiac surgery unit in a Canadian, university-affiliated, tertiary care hospital. Patients scheduled for urgent or elective coronary artery bypass and/or valvular surgery were randomly assigned to either ACNP-led (n=22) or hospitalist-led (n=81) postoperative care. Both ACNPs and hospitalists worked in collaboration with a cardiac surgeon. Outcome variables included length of hospital stay, hospital readmission rate, postoperative complications, adherence to follow-up appointments, attendance at cardiac rehabilitation and both patient and health care team satisfaction. Baseline demographic characteristics were similar between groups except more patients in the ACNP-led group had had surgery on an urgent basis (p < or = 0.01), and had undergone more complicated surgical procedures (p < or =0.01). After discharge, more patients in the hospitalist-led group had visited their family doctor within a week (p < or =0.02) and measures of satisfaction relating to teaching, answering questions, listening and pain management were higher in the ACNP-led group. Although challenges in recruitment yielded a lower than anticipated sample size, this study contributes to our knowledge of the ACNP role in postoperative cardiac surgery. Our findings provide support for the ACNP role in this setting as patients who received care from an ACNP had similar outcomes to hospitalist-led care and reported greater satisfaction in some measures of care.

  2. The state of robotic cardiac surgery in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Navarra, Emiliano; Noirhomme, Philippe; Gutermann, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    Background In the past two decades, the introduction of robotic technology has facilitated minimally invasive cardiac surgery, allowing surgeons to operate endoscopically rather than through a median sternotomy. This approach has facilitated procedures for several structural heart conditions, including mitral valve repair, atrial septal defect closure and multivessel minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting. In this rapidly evolving field, we review the status of robotic cardiac surgery in Europe with a focus on mitral valve surgery and coronary revascularization. Methods Structured searches of MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were performed from their dates of inception to June 2016. All original studies, except case-reports, were included in this qualitative review. Studies performed in Europe were presented quantitatively. Data provided from Intuitive Surgical Inc. are also presented. Results Fourteen papers on coronary surgery were included in the analysis and reported a mortality rate ranging between 0–1%, revision for bleeding between 2–7%, conversion to a larger incision between 2–15%, and patency rate between 92–98%. The number of procedures ranged between 23 and 170 per year. There were only a small number of published reports for robotic mitral valve surgery from European centers. Conclusions Coronary robotic surgery in Europe has been performed safely and effectively with very few perioperative complications in the last 15 years. On the other hand, mitral surgery has been developed later with increasing applications of this technology only in the last 5–6 years. PMID:28203535

  3. Adhesion barrier reduces postoperative adhesions after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Hirata, Yasutaka; Achiwa, Ikuya; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Soto, Hajime; Kobayahsi, Jotaro

    2012-06-01

    Reoperation in cardiac surgery is associated with increased risk due to surgical adhesions. Application of a bioresorbable material could theoretically reduce adhesions and allow later development of a free dissection plane for cardiac reoperation. Twenty-one patients in whom a bioresorbable hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose adhesion barrier had been applied in a preceding surgery underwent reoperations, while 23 patients underwent reoperations during the same period without a prior adhesion barrier. Blinded observers graded the tenacity of the adhesions from surgical video recordings of the reoperations. No excessive bleeding requiring wound reexploration, mediastinal infection, or other complication attributable to the adhesion barrier occurred. Multiple regression analysis showed that shorter duration of the preceding surgery, non-use of cardiopulmonary bypass in the preceding surgery, and use of the adhesion barrier were significantly associated with less tenacious surgical adhesions. The use of a bioresorbable material in cardiac surgery reduced postoperative adhesions, facilitated reoperation, and did not promote complications. The use of adhesion barrier is recommended in planned staged procedures and those in which future reoperation is likely.

  4. Harmonic scalpel reduces bleeding and postoperative complications in redo cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Nicola; Anselmi, Amedeo; Gaudino, Mario; Nasso, Giuseppe; Glieca, Franco; Martinelli, Lorenzo; Santarelli, Filippo; Perisano, Mario; Possati, Gianfederico

    2005-09-01

    Intraoperative and postoperative bleeding and injuries to cardiac structures are among the main determinants of complications and hospital and intensive care unit stay after cardiac reinterventions. The harmonic scalpel has been reported to achieve optimal tissue dissection with little blood loss. The present retrospective work was performed to evaluate the safety and usefulness of this device in redo cardiac surgery. Ninety-six redo cardiac surgery patients were operated on with the use of harmonic scalpel, and 105 redo patients operated on by traditional electrocautery and scissors were selected from our database and served as controls. Intraoperative and postoperative data of the two groups were collected and compared. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed for identification of factors associated with death and with major and minor complications in the overall study population and in both groups, separately. Although mortality and major postoperative morbidity were comparable in the two groups, harmonic scalpel patients presented markedly reduced postoperative bleeding, lower incidence of minor complications, cardiac injuries, major arrhythmias, and need for transfusions. Operative time and mean intensive care unit stay were shorter. Use of ultrascissor was found to be a protective factor against minor morbidity at multivariate analysis. Our data suggest that harmonic scalpel is safe and is associated with better in-hospital outcome and lower postoperative blood loss in redo cardiac surgery.

  5. Predictors of in-hospital mortality following redo cardiac surgery: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Isa; Cayli, Murat; Gulcan, Oner

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Redo cardiac operations represent one of the main challenges in heart surgery. The purpose of the study was to analyze the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing reoperative cardiac surgery by a single surgical team. Methods A total of 1367 patients underwent cardiac surgical procedures and prospectively entered into a computerized database. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the reoperative cardiac surgery (n = 109) and control group (n = 1258). Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the possible predictors of hospital mortality. Results Mean age was 56 ± 13, and 46% were female in redo group. In-hospital mortality was 4.6 vs. 2.2%, p = 0.11. EuroSCORE (6 vs. 3; p < 0.01), cardiopulmonary bypass time (90 vs. 71 min; p < 0.01), postoperative bleeding (450 vs. 350 ml; p < 0.01), postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) (29 vs. 16%; p < 0.01), and inotropic support (58 vs. 31%; p = 0.001) were significantly different. These variables were entered into uni- and multivariate regression analysis. Postoperative AF (OR1.76, p = 0.007) and EuroSCORE (OR 1.42, p < 0.01) were significant risk factors predicting hospital mortality. Conclusions Reoperative cardiac surgery can be performed under similar risks as primary operations. Postoperative AF and EuroSCORE are predictors of in-hospital mortality for redo cases. PMID:26527452

  6. Neuroprotective Strategies during Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Aida; Dhein, Stefan; Dähnert, Ingo; Klein, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Aortocoronary bypass or valve surgery usually require cardiac arrest using cardioplegic solutions. Although, in principle, in a number of cases beating heart surgery (so-called off-pump technique) is possible, aortic or valve surgery or correction of congenital heart diseases mostly require cardiopulmonary arrest. During this condition, the heart-lung machine also named cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has to take over the circulation. It is noteworthy that the invention of a machine bypassing the heart and lungs enabled complex cardiac operations, but possible negative effects of the CPB on other organs, especially the brain, cannot be neglected. Thus, neuroprotection during CPB is still a matter of great interest. In this review, we will describe the impact of CPB on the brain and focus on pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies to protect the brain. PMID:27879647

  7. Pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking mediastinitis after cardiac surgery: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hysi, I; Vincentelli, A

    2016-06-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a dermatosis which associates both, necrosis and polynuclear infiltration of the skin. While the aetiology is not well understood, the disease is thought to be due to immune system dysfunction and it can occur after minor trauma or surgery. Although it has seldom been reported after cardiac surgery in the literature, it is not exceptional. Here we report a case of pyoderma gangrenosum after coronary artery bypass grafting in a 76-year-old patient with chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis. Diagnosis was clinically made and the patient was treated with systemic steroids. The lesions showed a remarkable improvement with this therapy. In the field of cardiac surgery, physicians of the surgical team and nurses should think about this diagnosis in all rapidly expanding postoperative lesions without improvement after debridement or antibiotics. The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

  8. Preoperative risk factors of malnutrition for cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Donata, Ringaitienė; Dalia, Gineitytė; Vaidas, Vicka; Tadas, Žvirblis; Jūratė, Šipylaitė; Algimantas, Irnius; Juozas, Ivaškevičius

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malnutrition (MN) is prevalent in cardiac surgery, but there are no specific preoperative risk factors of MN. The aim of this study is to assess the clinically relevant risk factors of MN for cardiac surgery patients. Materials and methods. The nutritional state of the patients was evaluated one day prior to surgery using a bioelectrical impedance analysis phase angle (PA). Two groups of patients were generated according to low PA: malnourished and well nourished. Risk factors of MN were divided into three clinically relevant groups: psychosocial and lifestyle factors, laboratory findings and disease-associated factors. Variables in each different group were entered into separate multivariate logistic regression models. Results. A total of 712 patients were included in the study. The majority of them were 65-year old men after a CABG procedure. Low PA was present in 22.9% (163) of patients. The analysis of disease-related factors of MN revealed the importance of heart functions (NYHA IV class OR: 3.073, CI95%: 1.416–6.668, p = 0.007), valve pathology (OR: 1.825, CI95%: 1.182–2.819, p = 0.007), renal insufficiency (OR: 4.091, CI95%: 1.995–8.389, p < 0.001) and body mass index (OR: 0.928, CI95%: 0.890–0.968, p < 0.001). Laboratory values related to MN were levels of haemoglobin (OR: 0.967, CI95%: 0.951–0.983, p < 0.001) and C-reactive protein (OR: 1.015, CI95%: 1.002–1.028, p = 0.0279). The lifestyle variables that qualified as risk factors concerned the intake of food (OR: 3.030, CI95%: 1.353–6.757, p = 0.007) and mobility (OR: 2.770, CI95%: 1.067–7.194, p = 0.036). Conclusions. MN risk factors comprise three different clinical groups: psychosocial and lifestyle factors, laboratory findings and disease-associated factors. The patients who are most likely to be malnourished are those with valve pathology, severe imparted heart function, insufficient renal function and high inflammatory markers. Also these patients have decreased mobility

  9. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning and Outcomes of Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hausenloy, Derek J; Candilio, Luciano; Evans, Richard; Ariti, Cono; Jenkins, David P; Kolvekar, Shyam; Knight, Rosemary; Kunst, Gudrun; Laing, Christopher; Nicholas, Jennifer; Pepper, John; Robertson, Steven; Xenou, Maria; Clayton, Tim; Yellon, Derek M

    2015-10-08

    Whether remote ischemic preconditioning (transient ischemia and reperfusion of the arm) can improve clinical outcomes in patients undergoing coronary-artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is not known. We investigated this question in a randomized trial. We conducted a multicenter, sham-controlled trial involving adults at increased surgical risk who were undergoing on-pump CABG (with or without valve surgery) with blood cardioplegia. After anesthesia induction and before surgical incision, patients were randomly assigned to remote ischemic preconditioning (four 5-minute inflations and deflations of a standard blood-pressure cuff on the upper arm) or sham conditioning (control group). Anesthetic management and perioperative care were not standardized. The combined primary end point was death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, or stroke, assessed 12 months after randomization. We enrolled a total of 1612 patients (811 in the control group and 801 in the ischemic-preconditioning group) at 30 cardiac surgery centers in the United Kingdom. There was no significant difference in the cumulative incidence of the primary end point at 12 months between the patients in the remote ischemic preconditioning group and those in the control group (212 patients [26.5%] and 225 patients [27.7%], respectively; hazard ratio with ischemic preconditioning, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.79 to 1.15; P=0.58). Furthermore, there were no significant between-group differences in either adverse events or the secondary end points of perioperative myocardial injury (assessed on the basis of the area under the curve for the high-sensitivity assay of serum troponin T at 72 hours), inotrope score (calculated from the maximum dose of the individual inotropic agents administered in the first 3 days after surgery), acute kidney injury, duration of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital, distance on the 6-minute walk test, and quality of life

  10. Delirium after cardiac surgery: incidence and risk factors†

    PubMed Central

    Smulter, Nina; Lingehall, Helena Claesson; Gustafson, Yngve; Olofsson, Birgitta; Engström, Karl Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Delirium after cardiac surgery is a problem with consequences for patients and healthcare. Preventive strategies from known risk factors may reduce the incidence and severity of delirium. The present aim was to explore risk factors behind delirium in older patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS Patients (≥70 years) scheduled for routine cardiac surgery were included (n = 142). The patients were assessed and monitored pre-/postoperatively, and delirium was diagnosed from repeated assessments with the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Organic Brain Syndrome Scale, using the DSM-IV-TR criteria. Variables were analysed by uni-/multivariable logistic regression, including both preoperative variables (predisposing) and those extracted during surgery and in the early postoperative period (precipitating). RESULTS Delirium was diagnosed in 78 patients (54.9%). Delirium was independently associated with both predisposing and precipitating factors (P-value, odds ratio, upper/lower confidence interval): age (0.036, 1.1, 1.0/1.2), diabetes (0.032, 3.5, 1.1/11.0), gastritis/ulcer problems (0.050, 4.0, 1.0/16.1), volume load during operation (0.001, 2.8, 1.5/5.1), ventilator time in ICU (0.042, 1.2, 1.0/1.4), highest temperature recorded in ICU (0.044, 2.2, 1.0/4.8) and sodium concentration in ICU (0.038, 1.2, 1.0/1.4). CONCLUSIONS Delirium was common among older patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Both predisposing and precipitating factors contributed to delirium. When combined, the predictive strength of the model improved. Preventive strategies may be considered, in particular among the precipitating factors. Of interest, delirium was strongly associated with an increased volume load during surgery. PMID:23887126

  11. Contemporary cardiac surgery for adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Beurtheret, Sylvain; Tutarel, Oktay; Diller, Gerhard Paul; West, Cathy; Ntalarizou, Evangelia; Resseguier, Noémie; Papaioannou, Vasileios; Jabbour, Richard; Simpkin, Victoria; Bastin, Anthony J; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Bonello, Beatrice; Li, Wei; Sethia, Babulal; Uemura, Hideki; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Shore, Darryl

    2017-08-01

    Advances in early management of congenital heart disease (CHD) have led to an exponential growth in adults with CHD (ACHD). Many of these patients require cardiac surgery. This study sought to examine outcome and its predictors for ACHD cardiac surgery. This is an observational cohort study of prospectively collected data on 1090 consecutive adult patients with CHD, undergoing 1130 cardiac operations for CHD at the Royal Brompton Hospital between 2002 and 2011. Early mortality was the primary outcome measure. Midterm to longer-term survival, cumulative incidence of reoperation, other interventions and/or new-onset arrhythmia were secondary outcome measures. Predictors of early/total mortality were identified. Age at surgery was 35±15 years, 53% male, 52.3% were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I, 37.2% in class II and 10.4% in class III/IV. Early mortality was 1.77% with independent predictors NYHA class ≥ III, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) <15 mm and female gender. Over a mean follow-up of 2.8±2.6 years, 46 patients died. Baseline predictors of total mortality were NYHA class ≥ III, TAPSE <15 mm and non-elective surgery. The number of sternotomies was not independently associated with neither early nor total mortality. At 10 years, probability of survival was 94%. NYHA class among survivors was significantly improved, compared with baseline. Contemporary cardiac surgery for ACHD performed at a single, tertiary reference centre with a multidisciplinary approach is associated with low mortality and improved functional status. Also, our findings emphasise the point that surgery should not be delayed because of reluctance to reoperate only. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Plasma troponins as markers of myocardial damage during cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Salvatore; Casquero, Elena; Bustamante, Rosa; Gualis, Javier; Carrascal, Yolanda; Bustamante, Juan; Fulquet, Enrique; Florez, Santiago; Echevarria, Jose Ramon; Fiz, Luis

    2007-09-01

    All types of cardiac surgery involve considerable injury to the myocardium. However, it is difficult to differentiate, in the immediate post-operative state, between ischemic alterations associated with the cardiac surgery itself and the pathological alterations of a peri-operative myocardial infarction. The diagnosis of damaged myocardium, classically performed with the enzymatic markers creatine kinase (CK) and its muscle fraction (CK-MB), has become more precise with the option of measuring cardiac troponins T and I. We measured these markers in 58 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery with extra-corporeal circulation (ECC). The patients included 37 cases undergoing valve surgery, 14 for coronary revascularization, 6 for mixed procedures, and 1 for closure of an inter-atrial communication. The markers were measured in plasma at baseline (at anesthesia initiation), 5 min post-ECC commencement, following aorta de-clamping, during the surgical closure, and 6, 18 and 42 hrs after surgery. All the markers were increased significantly relative to the baseline values. Troponin I, CK and CK-MB values peaked between 6 and 18 hrs after surgery, troponin T between 18 and 42 hrs, and myoglobin at the surgical closure. The values of all markers were higher in patients undergoing coronary surgery compared to those in patients undergoing valve surgery. In the evaluation of myocardial damage after surgery, the measurement of classical markers such as CK and myoglobin remain valid, but other markers such as troponins provide significant additional diagnostic benefit and, thus, need to be included in the routine biochemical measurements for monitoring myocardial damage associated with the surgical procedure.

  13. Outcome of cardiac surgery in patients with low preoperative ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Marina; Belletti, Alessandro; Monaco, Fabrizio; Pisano, Antonio; Musu, Mario; Dalessandro, Veronica; Monti, Giacomo; Finco, Gabriele; Zangrillo, Alberto; Landoni, Giovanni

    2016-10-18

    In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, a reduced preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is common and is associated with a worse outcome. Available outcome data for these patients address specific surgical procedures, mainly coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Aim of our study was to investigate perioperative outcome of surgery on patients with low pre-operative LVEF undergoing a broad range of cardiac surgical procedures. Data from patients with pre-operative LVEF ≤40 % undergoing cardiac surgery at a university hospital were reviewed and analyzed. A subgroup analysis on patients with pre-operative LVEF ≤30 % was also performed. A total of 7313 patients underwent cardiac surgery during the study period. Out of these, 781 patients (11 %) had a pre-operative LVEF ≤40 % and were included in the analysis. Mean pre-operative LVEF was 33.9 ± 6.1 % and in 290 patients (37 %) LVEF was ≤30 %. The most frequently performed operation was CABG (31 % of procedures), followed by mitral valve surgery (22 %) and aortic valve surgery (19 %). Overall perioperative mortality was 5.6 %. Mitral valve surgery was more frequent among patients who did not survive, while survivors underwent more frequently CABG. Post-operative myocardial infarction occurred in 19 (2.4 %) of patients, low cardiac output syndrome in 271 (35 %). Acute kidney injury occurred in 195 (25 %) of patients. Duration of mechanical ventilation was 18 (12-48) hours. Incidence of complications was higher in patients with LVEF ≤30 %. Stepwise multivariate analysis identified chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pre-operative insertion of intra-aortic balloon pump, and pre-operative need for inotropes as independent predictors of mortality among patients with LVEF ≤40 %. We confirmed that patients with low pre-operative LVEF undergoing cardiac surgery are at higher risk of post-operative complications. Cardiac surgery can be performed with acceptable mortality rates

  14. Incentive spirometry: its value after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gale, G D; Sanders, D E

    1980-09-01

    Treatment with intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB) and incentive spirometry (I.S.) was compared in 109 patients after heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Assessment was done by measurement of vital capacity, arterial oxygen tension and identification of the radiological signs of atelectasis. All patients were instructed pre-operatively in the treatment which was to be used. Vital capacity, arterial oxygen tension while breathing air for the first three postoperative days and the incidence of atelectasis showed no significant difference between groups. Ten minutes after treatment the arterial oxygen tension fell, but this was only statistically significant after I.P.P.B. At 60 minutes the arterial oxygen tension had returned to pretreatment level in both groups. The use of the incentive spirometer four times daily is no better than I.P.P.B., in preventing atelectasis after open-heart surgery. Possibly incentive spirometer treatment given more frequently may be more effective.

  15. Preoperative thromboelastometry for the prediction of increased chest tube output in cardiac surgery: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gozdzik, Waldemar; Adamik, Barbara; Wysoczanski, Grzegorz; Gozdzik, Anna; Rachwalik, Maciej; Skalec, Tomasz; Kübler, Andrzej

    2017-07-01

    Bleeding following cardiac surgery is a serious event with potentially life-threatening consequences. Preoperative recognition of coagulation abnormalities and detection of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) related coagulopathy could aid in the start of preventive treatment strategies that minimize perioperative blood loss. Most algorithms that analyze thromboelastometry coagulation tests in elective cardiac surgery do not include test results performed before surgery. We evaluated preoperative rotational thromboelastometry test results for their ability to predict blood loss during and after cardiac surgery.A total of 114 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB were included in this retrospective analysis. Each patient had thromboelastometry tests done twice: preoperatively, before the induction of anesthesia and postoperatively, 10 minutes after heparin reversal with protamine after decannulation.Patients were placed into 1 of 2 groups depending on whether preoperative thromboelastometry parameters deviated from reference ranges: Group 1 [N = 29; extrinsically activated test (EXTEM) or INTEM results out of normal range] or Group 2 (N = 85; EXTEM and INTEM results within the normal range). We observed that the total amount of chest tube output was significantly greater in Group 1 than in Group 2 (700 mL vs 570 mL, P = .03). At the same time, the preoperative values of standard coagulation tests such as platelet count, aPTT, and INR did not indicate any abnormalities of coagulation.Preoperative coagulation abnormalities diagnosed with thromboelastometry can predict increased chest tube output in the early postoperative period in elective adult cardiac surgery. Monitoring of the coagulation system with thromboelastometry allows rapid diagnosis of coagulation abnormalities even before the start of the surgery. These abnormalities could not always be detected with routine coagulation tests.

  16. Risk index proposal to predict atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rogério Gomes da; Lima, Gustavo Glotz de; Guerra, Nelma; Bigolin, André Vicente; Petersen, Lucas Celia

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication following cardiac surgery and is associated with an increased patient morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to develop a risk index proposal to predict AF after cardiac surgery. A prospective observational study in that 452 patients were selected to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with postoperative AF. Only patients following cardiac surgery were selected. Continuous cardiac monitor and daily electrocardiogram were assessed. The most associated in a multivariable logistic model were selected for the risk index. The average incidence of AF was 22.1%. The most associated factors with AF were: patients older than 75 years of age, mitral valve disease, no use of a beta blocker, withdrawal of a beta-blocker and a positive fluid balance. The absence risk factor determined 4.6% chance to postoperative AF, and for one, two and three or more risk factors, the chance was 16.6%, 25.9% and 46.3%, respectively. In a multivariable logistic model was possible to develop a risk index proposal to predict postoperative AF with a major risk of 46.3% in the presence of three or more risk factors.

  17. Microcirculatory changes during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Prestes, I; Riva, J; Bouchacourt, J P; Kohn, E; López, A; Hurtado, F J

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate microcirculation in intermediate and high mortality risk patients undergoing cardiac surgery (CS) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The study included 22 patients with a Euroscore >3. Using the Videomicroscopy Side Stream Dark Field system, and evaluation was made of, capillary density, proportion of perfused capillaries, density of perfused capillaries, microcirculatory flow index (MFI), and heterogeneity flow index. Three to five video sequences were recorded: after induction of anaesthesia (T1), at the beginning of the CPB (T2), before finalising CPB (T3), at the end of the surgery, and before the patient was transferred to Intensive Care Unit (T4). Mean arterial pressure decreased, while the blood lactate increased significantly, when comparing the initial and final values (P<.05). MFI increased significantly in T3 and T4 (P<.05) with regards to the initial values. When the patients with and without postoperative complications were compared, significant differences were found in, Euroscore, left ventricular ejection fraction, and MFI in T3. in patients with intermediate/high preoperative risk, CS and CBP can involve an increase in MFI and blood lactate at the end of the study. These alterations suggest the possibility of a functional microcirculatory shunt at tissue perfusion level, secondary to the surgical injury and the CPB. Further investigation is needed to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. The efficacy and safety of clopidogrel in vascular surgery patients with immediate postoperative asymptomatic troponin T release for the prevention of late cardiac events: Rationale and design of the Dutch Echocardiographic Cardiac Risk Evaluation Applying Stress Echo-VII (DECREASE-VII) trial.

    PubMed

    van Kuijk, Jan-Peter; Voute, Michiel T; Flu, Willem-Jan; Schouten, Olaf; Chonchol, Michel; Hoeks, Sanne E; Boersma, Eric E; Verhagen, Hence J M; Bax, Jeroen J; Poldermans, Don

    2010-09-01

    Major vascular surgery patients are at high risk for developing asymptomatic perioperative myocardial ischemia reflected by a postoperative troponin release without the presence of chest pain or electrocardiographic abnormalities. Long-term prognosis is severely compromised and characterized by an increased risk of long-term mortality and cardiovascular events. Current guidelines on perioperative care recommend single antiplatelet therapy with aspirin as prophylaxis for cardiovascular events. However, as perioperative surgical stress results in a prolonged hypercoagulable state, the postoperative addition of clopidogrel to aspirin within 7 days after perioperative asymptomatic cardiac ischemia could provide improved effective prevention for cardiovascular events. DECREASE-VII is a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of early postoperative dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin and clopidogrel) for the prevention of cardiovascular events after major vascular surgery. Eligible patients undergoing a major vascular surgery (abdominal aorta or lower extremity vascular surgery) who developed perioperative asymptomatic troponin release are randomized 1:1 to clopidogrel or placebo (300-mg loading dose, followed by 75 mg daily) in addition to standard medical treatment with aspirin. The primary efficacy end point is the composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or severe ischemia of the coronary or peripheral arterial circulation leading to an intervention. The evaluation of long-term safety includes bleeding defined by TIMI criteria. Recruitment began early 2010. The trial will continue until 750 patients are included and followed for at least 12 months. DECREASE-VII is evaluating whether early postoperative dual antiplatelet therapy for patients developing asymptomatic cardiac ischemia after vascular surgery reduces cardiovascular events with a favorable safety profile. 2010 Mosby

  19. Changes in quality of life associated with surgical risk in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Paola Severo; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Rodrigues, Juliane; Moraes, Maria Antonieta

    2015-10-01

    The study aims to verify quality of life of elderly patients submitted to cardiac surgery, and correlating surgical risk to health-related quality of life instrument domains. Prospective cohort study, performed at a cardiology hospital. It included elderly patients who had undergone elective cardiac surgery. Pre- and postoperative quality of life was evaluated by applying the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Old (WHOQOL-OLD) scale and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. Surgical risk was stratified using the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE). Fifty-four patients, mostly men (64.8%), were included, with a mean age of 69.3 ± 5.7 years. The eight domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, and the four facets presented for the WHOQOL-OLD scale showed improved quality of life 6 months after surgery (P < 0.001). No difference was found in the association of EuroSCORE with the domains of the health-related quality of life instruments. The data showed improved quality of life of elderly people submitted to cardiac surgery, unrelated to surgical risk. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Regional anesthesia in cardiac surgery: a friend or a foe?

    PubMed

    Djaiani, George; Fedorko, Ludwik; Beattie, W Scott

    2005-03-01

    Escalating costs and change in the profile of patients presenting for cardiac surgery requires modification of perioperative management strategies. Regional anesthesia has played an integral part of many fast-track anesthesia protocols across North America and Europe. This review suggests that for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, the risk-to-benefit ratio is in favor of epidural and spinal anesthesia, provided there are no specific contraindications and the guidelines for the use of regional techniques in cardiac surgery are followed. Patients managed with regional techniques seem to benefit from superior postoperative analgesia, shorter postoperative ventilation, reduced incidence of supraventricular arrhythmia, and lower rates of perioperative myocardial infarction. The results of this analysis suggest that for each episode of neurologic complication, 20 myocardial infarctions and 76 episodes of atrial fibrillation would be prevented, thus, we would consider the regional anesthesia and analgesia to be an effective strategy that improves perioperative morbidity. However, other treatment modalities such as the addition of calcium channel blockers, aspirin, and beating heart surgery, are also suggested to be beneficial in cardiac surgical patients and may impose less risk than the use of regional techniques. We believe that the results presented in this review are encouraging enough to permit continued investigation. A prospective, randomized, controlled multicenter trial needs to be adequately powered to answer important clinical questions and allow for a long-term follow-up.

  1. [Recent trends in cardiac surgery for acquired heart disease].

    PubMed

    Hirose, H; Taniguchi, K; Nakano, S; Kawashima, Y

    1985-09-01

    Some recently developed problems in cardiac surgery for acquired heart diseases, in our department, have been discussed in this paper. Ischemic heart disease (IHD): Indication for aortocoronary bypass grafting (ACBG) has been extended for the patients with poor left ventricular function. The number of the patients, who are found to have IHD before general surgery have been increased. Surgical treatments for these patients, five with malignant tumor, and two with aneurysm of the descending aorta, were performed 16 days to 4 months after ACBG without any operative death. In three patients with lesions of carotid arteries, blood flow of the carotid arteries was monitored with doppler echography, which was found useful for this purpose, during extracorporeal circulation. One hundred and four patients, over 40 years old, for valvular surgery, had coronary angiography at the cardiac catheterization between 1982-1983. Nine patients (8%) had significant IHD. They had ACBG and valvular surgery simultaneously. Valvular heart disease (VHD): Long-term results following aortic valve replacement have showed that 6 deaths were of cardiac origin. Five of them were with poor preoperative left ventricular function (ejection fraction: 0.35 or less, left ventricular endsystolic volume index: 200 ml/m2 or more) which might be indices for indication of surgical treatment for aortic regurgitation.

  2. Fluid management in cardiac surgery: colloid or crystalloid?

    PubMed

    Shaw, Andrew; Raghunathan, Karthik

    2013-06-01

    The crystalloid-colloid debate has raged for decades, with the publication of many meta-analyses, yet no consensus. There are important differences between colloids and crystalloids, and these differences have direct relevance for cardiac surgical patients. Rather than asking crystalloid or colloid, we believe better questions to ask are (1) High or low chloride content? and (2) Synthetic or natural colloid? In this paper we review the published literature regarding fluid therapy in cardiac surgery and explain the background to these two important and unanswered questions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Outcome and quality of life after cardiac surgery in octogenarians.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shiromani; Henry, Margaret; Mohajeri, Morteza

    2005-06-01

    Cardiac surgery is being performed with increasing frequency in octogenarians. The purpose of the present study was to determine the outcome and quality of life of octogenarians after cardiac surgery in a single surgeon series and in a newly established cardiac surgery unit. Prospective data collection and analysis were undertaken of octogenarians having cardiac surgery from 1997 to 2003 by a single surgeon in a single institution. The outcome was compared to septuagenarians operated on by the same surgeon in the same time frame, specifically to see if there were any significant differences in outcomes between these two close age groups. Follow up was conducted by sending a questionnaire, interviewing patients or their general practitioner. There were significantly less octogenarians with airway disease but more with class III and IV New York Heart Association heart failure. There were no significant differences in the incidence of left main disease, urgent operations, renal impairment and cerebrovascular disease between the two groups. There was a trend towards increased operative mortality in octogenarians when the group was taken as a whole (8%vs 2%, P = 0.052). They also had a significantly higher incidence of respiratory failure (6%vs 2%, P = 0.029). The incidence of stroke, renal failure and low cardiac output was not significantly different between the two groups. Blood product usage was significantly higher in octogenarians (19%vs 9%, P = 0.042), but re-operation for bleeding was not significantly different (3%vs 4%). Intensive care unit median length of stay was significantly longer in the case of Octogenarians (1.0 vs 0.9 days, P = 0.039), but the duration of hospital stay was similar (6.5 vs 6.4 days, P = 0.165). Follow up was 94.5% complete, 85% of the octogenarians responded to the questionnaire sent to them. All patients were free of angina, 98% of them had improved by at least one New York Heart Association heart failure class and 86.7% felt that

  4. [Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography for the monitoring of cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Pepi, M; Barbier, P; Doria, E; Tamborini, G; Berti, M; Muratori, M; Guazzi, M; Maltagliati, A; Alimento, M; Celeste, F

    1994-08-01

    Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) allows visualization of the heart and great vessels through an infinite number of imaging planes and improves the diagnostic capabilities of mono and biplane TEE. This study was undertaken to test whether MTEE is a useful intraoperative monitoring method during cardiac surgery. Intraoperative multiplane TEE was performed in 200 patients (mean age 56 +/- 19 years) as a part of the routine clinical care. We systematically acquired cardiac images from the gastric fundus (short and long axes of the ventricles), lower esophagus (four-chamber, two-chamber, and long axis), upper esophagus (13 views concerning the aorta, pulmonary artery, left and right atrium, systemic and pulmonary veins, coronary arteries, right ventricular outflow tract), and searched for complete views of the thoracic descending aorta. All views analyzed in the preoperative (immediately before cardiopulmonary bypass), intraoperative and postoperative phases evaluating: the angle between current and 0 degree at which each view was obtained; the success rate of each view; the usefulness of the different views in providing essential additional clinical information compared to 0 degrees and 90 degrees of the traditional biplane TEE. Most views of the heart and great vessels were visualized in oblique planes, and other views were significantly improved thanks to slight angle corrections. Multiplane TEE was particularly useful in the preoperative and postoperative phases of aortic dissection (11 cases), mitral valve repair (13 cases), left ventricular aneurysmectomy (9 cases), right atrial thrombosis (1 case), positioning of left ventricular hemopump (2 cases), mitral-aortic endocarditis (3 cases), bleeding from proximal suture of an aortic heterograft (1 case).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Nitrates for the prevention of cardiac morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Xu, Jin; Singh, Balwinder; Yu, Xuerong; Wu, Taixiang; Huang, Yuguang

    2016-08-04

    Cardiac complications are not uncommon in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, especially in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) or at high risk of CAD. Perioperative cardiac complications can lead to mortality and morbidity, as well as higher costs for patient care. Nitrates, which are among the most commonly used cardiovascular drugs, perform the function of decreasing cardiac preload while improving cardiac blood perfusion. Sometimes, nitrates are administered to patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery to reduce the incidence of cardiac complications, especially for patients with CAD. However, their effects on patients' relevant outcomes remain controversial. • To assess effects of nitrates as compared with other interventions or placebo in reducing cardiac risk (such as death caused by cardiac factors, angina pectoris, acute myocardial infarction, acute heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia) in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.• To identify the influence of different routes and dosages of nitrates on patient outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Chinese BioMedical Database until June 2014. We also searched relevant conference abstracts of important anaesthesiology or cardiology scientific meetings, the database of ongoing trials and Google Scholar.We reran the search in January 2016. We added three potential new studies of interest to the list of 'Studies awaiting classification' and will incorporate them into our formal review findings for the review update. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing nitrates versus no treatment, placebo or other pharmacological interventions in participants (15 years of age and older) undergoing non-cardiac surgery under any type of anaesthesia. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by Cochrane. Two review authors selected trials, extracted data from included studies and assessed risk of bias. We

  6. Incidence and predictors of major perioperative adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events in non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Sabaté, S; Mases, A; Guilera, N; Canet, J; Castillo, J; Orrego, C; Sabaté, A; Fita, G; Parramón, F; Paniagua, P; Rodríguez, A; Sabaté, M

    2011-12-01

    Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) represent the most common cause of serious perioperative morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify risk factors for MACCE in a broad surgical population with intermediate-to-high surgery-specific risk and to build and validate a model to predict the risk of MACCE. A prospective, multicentre study of patients undergoing surgical procedures under general or regional anaesthesia in 23 hospitals. The main outcome was the occurrence of at least one perioperative MACCE, defined as any of the following complications from admittance to discharge: cardiac death, cerebrovascular death, non-fatal cardiac arrest, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, new cardiac arrhythmia, angina, or stroke. The MACCE predictive index was based on β-coefficients and validated in an external data set. Of 3387 patients recruited, 146 (4.3%) developed at least one MACCE. The regression model identified seven independent risk factors for MACCE: history of coronary artery disease, history of chronic congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, history of cerebrovascular disease, preoperative abnormal ECG, intraoperative hypotension, and blood transfusion. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was 75.9% (95% confidence interval, 71.2-80.6%). The risk score based on seven objective and easily assessed factors can accurately predict MACCE occurrence after non-cardiac surgery in a population at intermediate-to-high surgery-specific risk.

  7. Acute gastrointestinal complications after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Halm, M A

    1996-03-01

    Gastrointestinal problems, with an incidence of about 1%, may complicate the postoperative period after cardiovascular surgery, increasing morbidity, length of stay, and mortality. Several risk factors for the development of these complications, including preexisting conditions; advancing age; surgical procedure, especially valve, combined bypass/valve, emergency, reoperative, and aortic dissection repair; iatrogenic conditions; stress; ischemia; and postpump complications, have been identified in multiple research studies. Ischemia is the most significant of these risk factors after cardiovascular surgery. Mechanisms that have been implicated include longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and hypoperfusion states, especially if inotropic or intra-aortic balloon pump support is required. These risk factors have been linked to upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding, paralytic ileus, intestinal ischemia, acute diverticulitis, acute cholecystitis, hepatic dysfunction, hyperamylasemia, and acute pancreatitis. Gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for almost half of all complications, followed by hepatic dysfunction, intestinal ischemia, and acute cholecystitis. Identification of these gastrointestinal complications may be difficult because manifestations may be masked by postoperative analgesia or not reported by patients because they are sedated or require prolonged mechanical ventilation. Furthermore, clinical manifestations may be nonspecific and not follow the "classic" clinical picture. Therefore, astute assessment skills are needed to recognize these problems in high-risk patients early in their clinical course. Such early recognition will prompt aggressive medical and/or surgical management and therefore improve patient outcomes for the cardiovascular surgical population.

  8. Pulmonary function and health-related quality of life 1-year follow up after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Westerdahl, Elisabeth; Jonsson, Marcus; Emtner, Margareta

    2016-07-08

    Pulmonary function is severely reduced in the early period after cardiac surgery, and impairments have been described up to 4-6 months after surgery. Evaluation of pulmonary function in a longer perspective is lacking. In this prospective study pulmonary function and health-related quality of life were investigated 1 year after cardiac surgery. Pulmonary function measurements, health-related quality of life (SF-36), dyspnoea, subjective breathing and coughing ability and pain were evaluated before and 1 year after surgery in 150 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, valve surgery or combined surgery. One year after surgery the forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s were significantly decreased (by 4-5 %) compared to preoperative values (p < 0.05). Saturation of peripheral oxygen was unchanged 1 year postoperatively compared to baseline. A significantly improved health-related quality of life was found 1 year after surgery, with improvements in all eight aspects of SF-36 (p < 0.001). Sternotomy-related pain was low 1 year postoperatively at rest (median 0 [min-max; 0-7]), while taking a deep breath (0 [0-4]) and while coughing (0 [0-8]). A more pronounced decrease in pulmonary function was associated with dyspnoea limitations and impaired subjective breathing and coughing ability. One year after cardiac surgery static and dynamic lung function measurements were slightly decreased, while health-related quality of life was improved in comparison to preoperative values. Measured levels of pain were low and saturation of peripheral oxygen was same as preoperatively.

  9. Myocardial Ischemia Induces SDF-1α Release in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Sung; Jacobs, Denise; Emontzpohl, Christoph; Goetzenich, Andreas; Soppert, Josefin; Jarchow, Mareike; Schindler, Lisa; Averdunk, Luisa; Kraemer, Sandra; Marx, Gernot; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Pallua, Norbert; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Simons, David; Stoppe, Christian

    2016-06-01

    In the present observational study, we measured serum levels of the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) in 100 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at seven distinct time points including preoperative values, myocardial ischemia, reperfusion, and the postoperative course. Myocardial ischemia triggered a marked increase of SDF-1α serum levels whereas cardiac reperfusion had no significant influence. Perioperative SDF-1α serum levels were influenced by patients' characteristics (e.g., age, gender, aspirin intake). In an explorative analysis, we observed an inverse association between SDF-1α serum levels and the incidence of organ dysfunction. In conclusion, time of myocardial ischemia was identified as the key stimulus for a significant upregulation of SDF-1α, indicating its role as a marker of myocardial injury. The inverse association between SDF-1α levels and organ dysfunction association encourages further studies to evaluate its organoprotective properties in cardiac surgery patients.

  10. Hypothermia: its possible role in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Sealy, W C

    1989-05-01

    The current safety of operations on the heart requiring cardiopulmonary bypass occurred because of a series of step-by-step laboratory and clinical investigations that were compromises between the time needed for heart repair and the brain's requirement for oxygen. The first step, so clearly shown in a paper by Bigelow and associates in 1950, was the reduction of the brain's need for oxygen by surface cooling to 28 degrees to 32 degrees C, limited to this level by cardiac and pulmonary failure at levels lower than this. The six to eight minutes of circulatory arrest permitted time for repair of simple defects. This method was rapidly adopted by many surgeons. As low-flow pump oxygenators became available, blood cooling to 10 degrees to 20 degrees C was introduced. This increased the periods of circulatory arrest to 30 to 60 minutes, and also made still longer periods of bypass with the pump oxygenator possible. Hypothermia to reduce oxygen and metabolic requirements is still an important adjunct to bypass, even with the currently used efficient pump oxygenators. It remains the most important component of myocardial preservation, and has made possible the delay needed for transportation between the harvesting and the transplantation of organs.

  11. "Just-In-Time" Simulation Training Using 3-D Printed Cardiac Models After Congenital Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Laura J; Su, Lillian; Hynes, Conor F; Krieger, Axel; Alfares, Fahad A; Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Zurakowski, David; Marshall, M Blair; Kim, Peter C W; Jonas, Richard A; Nath, Dilip S

    2016-03-01

    High-fidelity simulation using patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) models may be effective in facilitating pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) provider training for clinical management of congenital cardiac surgery patients. The 3D-printed heart models were rendered from preoperative cross-sectional cardiac imaging for 10 patients undergoing congenital cardiac surgery. Immediately following surgical repair, a congenital cardiac surgeon and an intensive care physician conducted a simulation training session regarding postoperative care utilizing the patient-specific 3D model for the PCICU team. After the simulation, Likert-type 0 to 10 scale questionnaire assessed participant perception of impact of the training session. Seventy clinicians participated in training sessions, including 22 physicians, 38 nurses, and 10 ancillary care providers. Average response to whether 3D models were more helpful than standard hand off was 8.4 of 10. Questions regarding enhancement of understanding and clinical ability received average responses of 9.0 or greater, and 90% of participants scored 8 of 10 or higher. Nurses scored significantly higher than other clinicians on self-reported familiarity with the surgery (7.1 vs. 5.8; P = .04), clinical management ability (8.6 vs. 7.7; P = .02), and ability enhancement (9.5 vs. 8.7; P = .02). Compared to physicians, nurses and ancillary providers were more likely to consider 3D models more helpful than standard hand off (8.7 vs. 7.7; P = .05). Higher case complexity predicted greater enhancement of understanding of surgery (P = .04). The 3D heart models can be used to enhance congenital cardiac critical care via simulation training of multidisciplinary intensive care teams. Benefit may be dependent on provider type and case complexity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Same day admission for elective cardiac surgery: how to improve outcome with satisfaction and decrease expenses.

    PubMed

    Silvay, George; Goldberg, Andrew; Gutsche, Jacob T; T Augoustides, John G

    2016-06-01

    Admission on the day of surgery for elective cardiac and non-cardiac surgery has been established as a prevalent, critical practice. This approach realizes medical, logistical, psychological and fiscal benefits, and its success is predicated on an effective outpatient pre-operative evaluation. The establishment of a highly functional pre-operative clinic with a comprehensive set-up and efficient logistical pathways is invaluable. This notion has been expanded in recent years to include the entire peri-operative period and the concept of a 'peri-operative anesthesia/surgical home' is gaining popularity and support. Evaluating patients prior to admission for surgery, anesthesiologists can place themselves at the forefront of reducing unnecessary pre-operative hospital admissions, excess lab tests, unneeded consultations, and ultimately decrease the cancellations on the day of surgery. Furthermore, by taking a leadership role in the pre-operative clinic, anesthesiologists place themselves squarely at the forefront of the burgeoning movement for the peri-operative surgical home and continue to cement the indispensability of the anesthesiologist during the entire peri-operative course. The authors present this review as a follow-up describing the successful implementation of a pre-operative same-day cardiac surgery clinic and offer these experiences over the last 8 years as a guide to helping other anesthesiologists do the same.

  13. Circulating microparticles from patients with valvular heart disease and cardiac surgery inhibit endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Hu, Xiao-Xia; Lin, Ze-Bang; Chang, Feng-Jun; Ou, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Ou, Jing-Song

    2015-09-01

    Vascular function is very important for maintaining circulation after cardiac surgery. Circulating microparticles (MPs) generated in various diseases play important roles in causing inflammation, coagulation, and vascular injury. However, the impact of MPs generated from patients who have valvular heart disease (VHD), before and after cardiac surgery, on vascular function remains unknown. This study is designed to investigate the impact of such MPs on vasodilation. Microparticles were isolated from age-matched healthy subjects and patients who had VHD, before cardiac surgery, and at 12 hours and 72 hours afterward. The number of MPs was measured and compared. Effects evaluated were of the impact of MPs on: vasodilation of mice aorta; the phosphorylation and expression of Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), protein kinase C-βII (PKC-βII), and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K); expression of caveolin-1; the association of eNOS with heat shock protein 90 (HSP90); and generation of nitric oxide and superoxide anion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Compared with the healthy subjects, VHD patients had significantly higher levels of circulating MPs and those MPs before cardiac surgery can: impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation; inhibit phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS; increase activation of PKC-βII and p70S6K; enhance expression of caveolin-1; reduce the association of HSP90 with eNOS; decrease nitric oxide production, and increase superoxide anion generation. These deleterious effects were even stronger in postoperative MPs. Our data demonstrate that MPs generated from VHD patients before and after cardiac surgery contributed to endothelial dysfunction, by uncoupling and inhibiting eNOS. Circulating MPs are potential therapeutic targets for the maintenance of vascular function postoperatively. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Severe antiphospholipid syndrome and cardiac surgery: Perioperative management.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Khazi, Fayaz Mohammed; Yiu, Patrick; Billing, John Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an antiphospholipid antibody-mediated prothrombotic state leading to arterial and venous thrombosis. This condition alters routine in-vitro coagulation tests, making results unreliable. Antiphospholipid syndrome patients requiring cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass present a unique challenge in perioperative anticoagulation management. We describe 3 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome who had successful heart valve surgery at our institution. We have devised an institutional protocol for antiphospholipid syndrome patients, and all 3 patients were managed according to this protocol. An algorithm-based approach is recommended because it improves team work, optimizes treatment, and improves patient outcome.

  15. Epidemiology and prevention of surgical site infections after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Lepelletier, D; Bourigault, C; Roussel, J C; Lasserre, C; Leclère, B; Corvec, S; Pattier, S; Lepoivre, T; Baron, O; Despins, P

    2013-10-01

    Deep sternal wound infection is the major infectious complication in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate, and a longer hospital stay. The most common causative pathogen involved is Staphylococcus spp. The management of post sternotomy mediastinitis associates surgical revision and antimicrobial therapy with bactericidal activity in blood, soft tissues, and the sternum. The pre-, per-, and postoperative prevention strategies associate controlling the patient's risk factors (diabetes, obesity, respiratory insufficiency), preparing the patient's skin (body hair, preoperative showering, operating site antiseptic treatment), antimicrobial prophylaxis, environmental control of the operating room and medical devices, indications and adequacy of surgical techniques. Recently published scientific data prove the significant impact of decolonization in patients carrying nasal Staphylococcus aureus, on surgical site infection rate, after cardiac surgery.

  16. Cardiovascular assessment for non-cardiac surgery: European guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Montgomery, Hugh

    2017-06-02

    In 2014, a joint task force involving the European Society of Cardiology and European Society of Anaesthesiology assembled 'Guidelines on non-cardiac surgery: cardiovascular assessment and management'. The guidelines, subsequently published in the European Heart Journal, are intended for physicians and collaborators involved in the perioperative care of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, in whom heart disease is a potential source of complications. While the guidelines are an extremely relevant and useful aid for most, if not all, medics within the hospital environment, the sheer size of the document (49 pages) renders it a feat to read and digest. Given the importance of the document for optimizing patient care, this article condenses the guidelines down to help highlight the important details.

  17. Prevention of lung injury in cardiac surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert W

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory lung injury is an inevitable consequence of cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The lungs are particularly susceptible to the effects of the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass. This insult is further exacerbated by a pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury after termination of bypass. Older patients and those with pre-existing lung disease will clearly be less tolerant of any lung injury and more likely to develop respiratory failure in the postoperative period. A requirement for prolonged ventilation has implications for morbidity, mortality, and cost of treatment. This review contains a summary of recent interventions and changes of practice that may reduce inflammatory lung injury after cardiac surgery. The review also focuses on a number of general aspects of perioperative management, which may exacerbate such injury, if performed poorly.

  18. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Surgery: Clinical Trials, Challenges, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael G; Fargnoli, Anthony S; Kendle, Andrew P; Hajjar, Roger J; Bridges, Charles R

    2016-06-01

    The concept of gene therapy was introduced in the 1970s after the development of recombinant DNA technology. Despite the initial great expectations, this field experienced early setbacks. Recent years have seen a revival of clinical programs of gene therapy in different fields of medicine. There are many promising targets for genetic therapy as an adjunct to cardiac surgery. The first positive long-term results were published for adenoviral administration of vascular endothelial growth factor with coronary artery bypass grafting. In this review we analyze the past, present, and future of gene therapy in cardiac surgery. The articles discussed were collected through PubMed and from author experience. The clinical trials referenced were found through the Wiley clinical trial database (http://www.wiley.com/legacy/wileychi/genmed/clinical/) as well as the National Institutes of Health clinical trial database (Clinicaltrials.gov). Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Surgery: Clinical Trials, Challenges, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Fargnoli, Anthony S.; Kendle, Andrew P.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Bridges, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of gene therapy was introduced in the 1970s after the development of recombinant DNA technology. Despite the initial great expectations, this field experienced early setbacks. Recent years have seen a revival of clinical programs of gene therapy in different fields of medicine. There are many promising targets for genetic therapy as an adjunct to cardiac surgery. The first positive long-term results were published for adenoviral administration of vascular endothelial growth factor with coronary artery bypass grafting. In this review we analyze the past, present, and future of gene therapy in cardiac surgery. The articles discussed were collected through PubMed and from author experience. The clinical trials referenced were found through the Wiley clinical trial database (http://www.wiley.com/legacy/wileychi/genmed/clinical/) as well as the National Institutes of Health clinical trial database (Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:26801060

  20. Cardiac surgery in patients age 80 years or older.

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, W H; Stewart, J R; Frist, W H; Hammon, J W; Bender, H W

    1990-01-01

    Between February 1978 and August 1989, forty patients aged 80 years or older underwent cardiac surgery at this institution. Patient age varied from 80 to 87 years (mean, 82.4 years). Operative indications were angina pectoris or congestive heart failure. Twenty-eight patients underwent coronary artery bypass (CAB) alone and 12 underwent valve replacement(s) with or without CAB. The operative mortality rate was 10%. Postoperative hospitalization averaged 14 days. There were three late cardiac deaths at 13, 36, and 48 months after operation and one late noncardiac death. Thirty-two survivors have been followed from 1 to 86 months (mean, 20 months). All experienced sustained improvement in functional status and minimal late morbidity. All survivors remained in NYHA class 1 or 2. Cardiac surgical procedures in patients older than 80 years can be performed with increased but acceptable mortality and morbidity rates. Most patients achieve sustained symptomatic improvement and excellent long-term survival. PMID:2357139

  1. Acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Coppolino, Giuseppe; Presta, Piera; Saturno, Laura; Fuiano, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery ranges from 7.7% to 28.1% in different studies, probably in relation to the criteria adopted to define AKI. AKI markedly increases mortality risk. However, despite the development of less invasive techniques, cardiac surgery remains the first option in many conditions such as severe coronary artery disease, valve diseases and complex interventions. The risk of postsurgery AKI can be reduced by adopting less invasive approaches, such as off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting or transcatheter aortic valve implantation, but these options cannot be employed in all cases. Thus, since traditional cardiac surgery remains the only option in many cases, it is important to adopt strategies helping the clinician to prevent AKI or diagnose it early. Old age, preprocedural chronic kidney disease, obesity, some comorbidities, wide pulse pressure and some pharmacological regimens represent risk factors for postsurgery AKI and mortality. Important intraoperative factor are use and duration of cardiopulmonary bypass. Postoperative efforts should be aimed toward maximizing cardiac output, avoiding drugs vasoconstricting the renal artery, providing adequate crystalloid infusion and alkalinizing urine. Fluid management should not be based on the measurements for cardiac filling pressures, which are mostly unreliable in these patients. Novel biomarkers such as cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 and human neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin have been found to change earlier than creatinine, particularly when measured in combination, so their use in clinical practice can facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of AKI. The occurrence of oliguria despite adequate cardiovascular therapy can be managed with furosemide, possibly using continuous infusion, or renal replacement therapy.

  2. The peripheral cannulation technique in minimally invasive congenital cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Tessari, Chiara; Putzu, Alessandro; Tiberio, Ivo; Guariento, Alvise; Gallo, Michele; Stellin, Giovanni

    2016-08-19

    Congenital minimally invasive cardiac surgery has gained wide acceptance thanks to its favorable outcomes. The introduction of peripheral cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass further reduces surgical trauma by decreasing surgical access and allowing the spectrum of surgical access for the correction of simple congenital heart defects to be widened. Right internal jugular vein percutaneous cannulation, together with the direct surgical cannulation of femoral vessels, proves to be a safe and effective tool in patients with body weight above 15 kg.

  3. Cardiac surgery in low birth weight infants: current outcomes.

    PubMed

    Azakie, Anthony; Johnson, Natalie C; Anagnostopoulos, Petros V; Egrie, Glenn D; Lavrsen, Michael J; Sapru, Anil

    2011-03-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) is a risk factor for mortality in neonatal and infant heart surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the contemporary outcomes and risk factors of cardiac surgery in low weight babies. The records of 75 consecutive infants weighing <2.5 kg having heart surgery were reviewed. The median weight was 2100 g (range 800-2500 g) and median age was 11 days (range 2-86 days). Half (n=38) of the infants were premature. Diagnoses included: arch obstruction (n=14), hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) (n=12), tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) or pulmonary atresia (PA)/ventricular septal defect (VSD) (n=11), transposition of the great arteries (TGA) (n=7), total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) (n=5), and other (n=20). There were two early deaths. Follow-up was available on all infants with a median duration of 1320 days (range 6-3055 days). Cumulative Kaplan-Meier survival at one year was 90% [95% confidence interval (CI), 80-95%] and at five years was 88% (95% CI, 77-94%). Overall mortality amongst patients with genetic/chromosomal abnormalities was higher, 28% vs. 5.4% amongst patients without such abnormalities (P=0.008). Age, prematurity, preoperative mechanical ventilation, prostaglandins, non-cardiac organ dysfunction, extra-cardiac malformations, perioperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and type of procedure were not associated with significant differences in mortality. Cardiac surgery in LBW infants can be performed with low early and mid-term mortality. LBW infants with chromosomal/genetic anomalies have a higher risk.

  4. Kidney Outcomes 5 Years After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jason H.; Zappitelli, Michael; Devarajan, Prasad; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather R.; Krawczeski, Catherine; Li, Simon; Garg, Amit X.; Coca, Steve; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Acute kidney injury (AKI) after pediatric cardiac surgery is associated with high short-term morbidity and mortality; however, the long-term kidney outcomes are unclear. OBJECTIVE To assess long-term kidney outcomes after pediatric cardiac surgery and to determine if perioperative AKI is associated with worse long-term kidney outcomes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This prospective multicenter cohort study recruited children between ages 1 month to 18 years who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass for cardiac surgery and survived hospitalization from 3 North American pediatric centers between July 2007 and December 2009. Children were followed up with telephone calls and an in-person visit at 5 years after their surgery. EXPOSURES Acute kidney injury defined as a postoperative serum creatinine rise from preoperative baseline by 50% or 0.3 mg/dL or more during hospitalization for cardiac surgery. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Hypertension (blood pressure ≥95th percentile for height, age, sex, or self-reported hypertension), microalbuminuria (urine albumin to creatinine ratio >30 mg/g), and chronic kidney disease (serum creatinine estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] <90 mL/min/1.73 m2 or microalbuminuria). RESULTS Overall, 131 children (median [interquartile range] age, 7.7 [5.9–9.9] years) participated in the 5-year in-person follow-up visit; 68 children (52%) were male. Fifty-seven of 131 children (44%) had postoperative AKI. At follow-up, 22 children (17%) had hypertension (10 times higher than the published general pediatric population prevalence), while 9 (8%), 13 (13%), and 1 (1%) had microalbuminuria, an eGFR less than 90 mL/min/1.73 m2, and an eGFR less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively. Twenty-one children (18%) had chronic kidney disease. Only 5 children (4%) had been seen by a nephrologist during follow-up. There was no significant difference in renal outcomes between children with and without postoperative AKI. CONCLUSIONS AND

  5. Recombinant factor VIIa in the treatment of postoperative hemorrhage after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Raivio, Peter; Suojaranta-Ylinen, Raili; Kuitunen, Anne H

    2005-07-01

    A generalized coagulation disorder after cardiac surgery that is associated with massive postoperative hemorrhage is not completely understood. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has emerged as a possible "salvage" medication. Limited experience reported in the literature and fears of possible thromboembolic complications make the use of rFVIIa in the treatment of bleeding after cardiac surgery controversial. We analyzed retrospectively all consecutive cardiac surgical patients who have received rFVIIa in the Helsinki University Hospital in order to evaluate the safety and efficacy of rFVIIa after cardiac surgery in our institution. Altogether, 16 patients were identified from operating room and intensive care unit (ICU) databases. Patient records and operating room and ICU databases were reviewed. In this series of high risk patients hospital mortality was high (25%). A definite hemostatic effect was seen after rFVIIa administration in all but three patients (82%). Mean amount of bleeding and amount of platelet and fresh frozen plasma transfusions decreased significantly after rFVIIa administration. Four patients had serious postoperative thromboembolic complications. Recombinant factor VIIa was effective in restoring hemostasis, but thromboembolic complications occurred after rFVIIa use. They may be related to the underlying pathologies and surgery performed. It is possible, however, that rFVIIa treatment contributed to their occurrence.

  6. Vitamin C for the Prevention of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation after Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Polymeropoulos, Evangelos; Bagos, Pantelis; Papadimitriou, Maria; Rizos, Ioannis; Patsouris, Efstratios; Τoumpoulis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have investigated the administration of vitamin C (vitC) for the prevention of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) after cardiac surgery. However, their findings were inconsistent. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of vitC as prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative AF in cardiac surgery. Methods: A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, the Cochrane Library, and clinical trial registries, was performed. 9 studies, published from August 2001 to May 2015, were included, with a total of 1,037 patients. Patients were randomized to receive vitC, or placebo. Results: Cardiac surgery patients who received vitC as prophylaxis, had a significantly lower incidence of postoperative AF (random effects OR=0.478, 95% CI 0.340 – 0.673, P < 10-4). No significant heterogeneity was detected across the analyzed studies (I2=21.7%), and no publication bias or other small study-related bias was found. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that VitC is effective as prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative AF. The administration of vitC may be considered in all patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27478787

  7. New Technologies for Surgery of the Congenital Cardiac Defect

    PubMed Central

    Kalfa, David; Bacha, Emile

    2013-01-01

    The surgical repair of complex congenital heart defects frequently requires additional tissue in various forms, such as patches, conduits, and valves. These devices often require replacement over a patient’s lifetime because of degeneration, calcification, or lack of growth. The main new technologies in congenital cardiac surgery aim at, on the one hand, avoiding such reoperations and, on the other hand, improving long-term outcomes of devices used to repair or replace diseased structural malformations. These technologies are: 1) new patches: CorMatrix® patches made of decellularized porcine small intestinal submucosa extracellular matrix; 2) new devices: the Melody® valve (for percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation) and tissue-engineered valved conduits (either decellularized scaffolds or polymeric scaffolds); and 3) new emerging fields, such as antenatal corrective cardiac surgery or robotically assisted congenital cardiac surgical procedures. These new technologies for structural malformation surgery are still in their infancy but certainly present great promise for the future. But the translation of these emerging technologies to routine health care and public health policy will also largely depend on economic considerations, value judgments, and political factors. PMID:23908869

  8. Medical robots in cardiac surgery - application and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kroczek, Karolina; Kroczek, Piotr; Nawrat, Zbigniew

    2017-03-01

    Medical robots offer new standards and opportunities for treatment. This paper presents a review of the literature and market information on the current situation and future perspectives for the applications of robots in cardiac surgery. Currently in the United States, only 10% of thoracic surgical procedures are conducted using robots, while globally this value remains below 1%. Cardiac and thoracic surgeons use robotic surgical systems increasingly often. The goal is to perform more than one hundred thousand minimally invasive robotic surgical procedures every year. A surgical robot can be used by surgical teams on a rotational basis. The market of surgical robots used for cardiovascular and lung surgery was worth 72.2 million dollars in 2014 and is anticipated to reach 2.2 billion dollars by 2021. The analysis shows that Poland should have more than 30 surgical robots. Moreover, Polish medical teams are ready for the introduction of several robots into the field of cardiac surgery. We hope that this market will accommodate the Polish Robin Heart robots as well.

  9. Outcomes following cardiac surgery in patients with preoperative renal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Hunaid A; Armstrong, Lesley A; Modi, Amit; Barlow, Clifford W

    2014-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was that whether patients who are dependent on chronic dialysis have higher morbidity and mortality rates than the general population when undergoing cardiac surgery. These patients often require surgery in view of their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 278 relevant papers were identified using the below mentioned search, 16 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Dialysis-dependent (DD) patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or valve replacement have higher morbidity but acceptable outcomes. There is some evidence to show that outcomes after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) are better than after on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (ONCAB) and that results are worse in DD patients with diabetic nephropathy. Patients undergoing combined procedures have a higher mortality.

  10. Video-assisted pericardial fenestration for effusions after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Georghiou, Georgios P; Porat, Eyal; Fuks, Avi; Vidne, Bernardo A; Saute, Milton

    2009-10-01

    Delayed-onset pericardial effusion following cardiac surgery can give rise to significant morbidity due to its presentation as well as management by traditional surgical techniques. An institutional experience of a video-assisted thoracoscopic technique to create a pericardial window, with the advantages of a minimally invasive approach combined with excellent visualization in such patients, was reviewed. A retrospective analysis was conducted on all patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic for delayed pericardial effusion after cardiac surgery from January 2001 to January 2006 at our center. Seven patients with echocardiographically diagnosed delayed tamponade underwent video-assisted thoracoscopy; 5 were receiving anticoagulants after valve replacement, and 2 had undergone heart transplantation. Pericardial windows were created under general anesthesia and single-lung ventilation using 2 to 3 trocars. Mean operative time was 45 min. There were no complications of the thoracoscopic technique. Video-assisted thoracoscopic creation of a pericardial window is safe and effective treatment for loculated pericardial effusions secondary to cardiac surgery.

  11. Optimal technique for deep breathing exercises after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Westerdahl, E

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac surgery patients often develop a restrictive pulmonary impairment and gas exchange abnormalities in the early postoperative period. Chest physiotherapy is routinely prescribed in order to reduce or prevent these complications. Besides early mobilization, positioning and shoulder girdle exercises, various breathing exercises have been implemented as a major component of postoperative care. A variety of deep breathing maneuvres are recommended to the spontaneously breathing patient to reduce atelectasis and to improve lung function in the early postoperative period. Different breathing exercises are recommended in different parts of the world, and there is no consensus about the most effective breathing technique after cardiac surgery. Arbitrary instructions are given, and recommendations on performance and duration vary between hospitals. Deep breathing exercises are a major part of this therapy, but scientific evidence for the efficacy has been lacking until recently, and there is a lack of trials describing how postoperative breathing exercises actually should be performed. The purpose of this review is to provide a brief overview of postoperative breathing exercises for patients undergoing cardiac surgery via sternotomy, and to discuss and suggest an optimal technique for the performance of deep breathing exercises.

  12. Medical robots in cardiac surgery – application and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kroczek, Karolina; Kroczek, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Medical robots offer new standards and opportunities for treatment. This paper presents a review of the literature and market information on the current situation and future perspectives for the applications of robots in cardiac surgery. Currently in the United States, only 10% of thoracic surgical procedures are conducted using robots, while globally this value remains below 1%. Cardiac and thoracic surgeons use robotic surgical systems increasingly often. The goal is to perform more than one hundred thousand minimally invasive robotic surgical procedures every year. A surgical robot can be used by surgical teams on a rotational basis. The market of surgical robots used for cardiovascular and lung surgery was worth 72.2 million dollars in 2014 and is anticipated to reach 2.2 billion dollars by 2021. The analysis shows that Poland should have more than 30 surgical robots. Moreover, Polish medical teams are ready for the introduction of several robots into the field of cardiac surgery. We hope that this market will accommodate the Polish Robin Heart robots as well. PMID:28515758

  13. Novel approaches in pain management in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bigeleisen, Paul E; Goehner, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    Open cardiac surgery may cause severe postoperative pain and the activation of a perioperative stress response. If not treated adequately, the patient may suffer increased morbidity, a longer hospital stay, and higher overall costs. This article reviews the literature regarding various modalities for management of postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Paravertebral block of the spinal nerve roots provides similar analgesia to thoracic epidural without the risk of hypotension or epidural hematoma. Continuous α-2 agonist infusion reduces opioid requirements in the immediate postoperative period and may convey a morbidity and mortality benefit in cardiac surgery patients that persists for 12 months. Antiepileptics may significantly decrease opioid requirements and improve pain scores. Finally, complementary and alternative practices such as acupuncture, music, and behavioral exercises both pre and postoperatively may improve acute pain and lessen conversion to chronic pain. Although published data remain limited, recent evidence indicates that patients may benefit from the addition of a variety of novel pain-management strategies currently under investigation. Selection of a multimodal approach to perioperative pain management is advocated, including selective application of regional analgesia, non-narcotic medications, and complimentary alternative options to improve patient comfort and overall outcome.

  14. Transcardiac migration of ventriculoperitoneal shunt requiring open cardiac surgery: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Ashley; Johnson, Amanda; Ziemer, Gerhard; Frim, David M

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac migration of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts has been reported, with most easily removed or shortened via a cervical incision. We present a review of the literature, highlighting our unique case with significant scarring requiring open, on-pump, cardiac surgery for removal of migrated distal tubing. A 7-year-old boy underwent VP shunt insertion for hydrocephalus secondary to intracranial astrocytoma. He presented at age 17 with evidence of right heart strain, associated with the distal shunt catheter proximally migrated into his heart and pulmonary arteries. Due to his delayed presentation, the catheter was knotted and partially immobilized by scar formation, finally requiring open-heart surgery to remove the catheter. A multi-disciplinary evaluation with endovascular, neurosurgery, and cardiothoracic surgery may be the safest approach, especially in those patients with knotting on preoperative imaging.

  15. Rationale for Implementation of Warm Cardiac Surgery in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Durandy, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery was developed thanks to the introduction of hypothermia and cardiopulmonary bypass in the early 1950s. The deep hypothermia protective effect has been essential to circulatory arrest complex cases repair. During the early times of open-heart surgery, a major concern was to decrease mortality and to improve short-term outcomes. Both mortality and morbidity dramatically decreased over a few decades. As a consequence, the drawbacks of deep hypothermia, with or without circulatory arrest, became more and more apparent. The limitation of hypothermia was particularly evident for the brain and regional perfusion was introduced as a response to this problem. Despite a gain in popularity, the results of regional perfusion were not fully convincing. In the 1990s, warm surgery was introduced in adults and proved to be safe and reliable. This option eliminates the deleterious effect of ischemia–reperfusion injuries through a continuous, systemic coronary perfusion with warm oxygenated blood. Intermittent warm blood cardioplegia was introduced later, with impressive results. We were convinced by the easiness, safety, and efficiency of warm surgery and shifted to warm pediatric surgery in a two-step program. This article outlines the limitations of hypothermic protection and the basic reasons that led us to implement pediatric warm surgery. After tens of thousands of cases performed across several centers, this reproducible technique proved a valuable alternative to hypothermic surgery. PMID:27200324

  16. Predictors of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Handerson Nunes; Magedanz, Ellen Hettwer; Guaragna, João Carlos Vieira da Costa; dos Santos, Natalia Nunes; Albuquerque, Luciano Cabral; Goldani, Marco Antonio; Petracco, João Batista; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk factors related to the development of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods A historical cohort study. We included 4626 patients aged > 18 years who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, heart valve replacement surgery alone or heart valve surgery combined with coronary artery bypass grafting between January 1996 and December 2011. The relationship between risk predictors and stroke was assessed by logistic regression model with a significance level of 0.05. Results The incidence of stroke was 3% in the overall sample. After logistic regression, the following risk predictors for stroke were found: age 50-65 years (OR=2.11 - 95% CI 1.05-4.23 - P=0.036) and age >66 years (OR=3.22 - 95% CI 1.6-6.47 - P=0.001), urgent and emergency surgery (OR=2.03 - 95% CI 1.20-3.45 - P=0.008), aortic valve disease (OR=2.32 - 95% CI 1.18-4.56 - P=0.014), history of atrial fibrillation (OR=1.88 - 95% CI 1.05-3.34 - P=0.032), peripheral artery disease (OR=1.81 - 95% CI 1.13-2.92 - P=0.014), history of cerebrovascular disease (OR=3.42 - 95% CI 2.19-5.35 - P<0.001) and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes (OR=1.71 - 95% CI 1.16-2.53 - P=0.007). Mortality was 31.9% in the stroke group and 8.5% in the control group (OR=5.06 - 95% CI 3.5-7.33 - P<0.001). Conclusion The study identified the following risk predictors for stroke after cardiac surgery: age, urgent and emergency surgery, aortic valve disease, history of atrial fibrillation, peripheral artery disease, history of cerebrovascular disease and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes. PMID:25140462

  17. Activation of the Homeostatic Intracellular Repair Response during Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jahania, Salik M.; Sengstock, David; Vaitkevicius, Peter; Andres, Allen; Ito, Bruce R.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Mentzer, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The homeostatic intracellular repair response (HIR2) is an endogenous beneficial pathway that eliminates damaged mitochondria and dysfunctional proteins in response to stress. The underlying mechanism is adaptive autophagy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the HIR2 response is activated in the heart in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and to assess whether it is associated with the duration of ischemic arrest and predicted surgical outcome. Methods Autophagy was assessed in 19 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass or valve surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Biopsies of the right atrial appendage obtained before initiation of CPB and after weaning from CPB were analyzed for autophagy by immunoblotting for LC3, Beclin-1, Atg5-12, and p62. Changes in p62, a marker of autophagic flux, were correlated with duration of ischemia and with the mortality/morbidity risk scores obtained from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database (v2.73). Results Heart surgery was associated with a robust increase in autophagic flux indicated by depletion of LC3-I, LC3-II, Beclin-1, and Atg5-12; the magnitude of change for each of these factors correlated significantly with changes in the flux marker p62. Moreover, changes in p62 correlated directly with cross clamp time and inversely with the mortality/morbidity risk scores. Conclusion These findings are consistent with preclinical studies indicating that HIR2 is cardioprotective, and reveal that it is activated in patients in response to myocardial ischemic stress. Strategies designed to amplify HIR2 during conditions of cardiac stress may have therapeutic utility and represent an entirely new approach to myocardial protection in patients undergoing heart surgery. PMID:23415552

  18. Cardiac surgery in nonagenarians: pushing the boundary one further decade.

    PubMed

    Easo, Jerry; Hölzl, Philipp P F; Horst, Michael; Dikov, Valentin; Litmathe, Jens; Dapunt, Otto

    2011-01-01

    With increasing age of the general population, the necessity for cardiac surgery in the collective of patients aged 90 and older has been increasing. To aid in the choice of adequate therapy we investigated our experience for the group of nonagenarians undergoing surgical interventions. From 6/2000 to 9/2007, 17 patients aged 90 and older underwent open-heart surgery at our institution. We performed a retrospective data analysis including baseline preoperative clinical status, intra- and postoperative results and the long-term survival in the further postoperative course. We performed cardiac surgical procedures in 17 patients (male/female ratio 6/11), including isolated aortic valve replacement (n = 7), aortic root replacement (n = 2), isolated coronary bypass surgery (n = 4), combined coronary and valve surgery (n = 5), re-operative valve replacement (n = 1) and root replacement with arch repair (n = 1). Emergency procedures were performed in 11.8% (2/17). Mean age was 91.9 ± 1.2 years, ranging 90.1-94.2. Mean follow-up was 3.2 ± 2.2 years. The 30-day mortality was 17.6% (3/17), overall mortality at 42.9 follow-up patient years was 58.8% (10/17). We conclude that cardiac surgery procedures can be performed with therapeutic benefit for selected nonagenarians safely and with acceptable operative risk. After analysis our clinical experience we believe age alone not to be a contraindication for surgical intervention, consideration of the physiologic status of the patient reflects on the postoperative outcome. Survival of the patients investigated that survived the initial 30-day postoperative period was similar to the estimated survival of the equally aged general population in Germany. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Complications Associated With Femoral Cannulation During Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lamelas, Joseph; Williams, Roy F; Mawad, Maurice; LaPietra, Angelo

    2017-06-01

    Different types of cannulation techniques are available for minimally invasive cardiac surgery. At our institution, we favor a femoral platform for most minimally invasive cardiac procedures. Here, we review our results utilizing this cannulation approach. We retrospectively reviewed all minimally invasive valve surgeries that were performed at our institution between January 2009 and January 2015. Operative times, lengths of stay, postoperative complications, and mortality were analyzed. We identified 2,645 consecutive patients. The mean age was 69.7 ± 12.77 years, and 1,412 patients (53.4%) were male. Three hundred fifty-eight patients (13.5%) had a history of cerebrovascular accident, 422 (16%) had previous heart surgery, and 276 (10.4%) had a history of peripheral vascular disease. The procedures performed were isolated aortic valve replacements (42.1%), isolated mitral valve operations (40.6%), tricuspid valve repairs (0.57%), double valve surgery (15%), triple valve surgery (0.3%), and ascending aortic aneurysm resection with and without circulatory arrest (5%). Femoral cannulation and central cannulation were utilized in 2,400 patients (90.7%) and 244 patients (9.3%), respectively. The median aortic cross-clamp time and cardiopulmonary bypass time were 81 minutes (interquartile range, 65 to 105) and 113 minutes (interquartile range, 92 to 142), respectively. The median postoperative hospital length of stay was 6 days (interquartile range, 5 to 9). There were 31 cerebrovascular accidents (1.17%), no aortic dissections, two compartment syndromes, two femoral arterial pseudoaneurysms, and 174 (6.65%) groin wound seromas. The overall 30-day mortality was 57 patients (2.15%). Minimally invasive cardiac surgical procedures utilizing femoral cannulation techniques have a low risk of complications. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Congenital cardiac surgery fellowship training: A status update.

    PubMed

    Kogon, Brian; Karamlou, Tara; Baumgartner, William; Merrill, Walter; Backer, Carl

    2016-06-01

    In 2007, congenital cardiac surgery became a recognized fellowship by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and leads to board certification through the American Board of Thoracic Surgery (ABTS). We highlight the strengths and weaknesses in the current system of accredited training. Data were collected from program directors, the ACGME, and the ABTS. In addition, surveys were sent to training program graduates. Topics included program accreditation status, number of fellows trained per year and per program, match results, fellow operative experience, fellow satisfaction, and post-fellowship employment status. There are twelve active accredited fellowship programs, and 44 trainees have completed accredited training. Each active program has trained a median of 3 fellows (range: 0-7). Operative logs were obtained from 38 of 44 (86%) graduates. The median number of total cases (minimum 75) was 136 (range: 75-236). For complex neonates (minimum 5), the median number of cases was 6 (range: 2-17). Some fellows failed to meet the minimum requirements. Thirty-six (82%) graduates responded to the survey; most were satisfied with their overall operative experience, but less with their neonatal operative experience. Of this total, 84% are currently practicing congenital cardiac surgery, and 74% secured jobs prior to completing their residency. Since 2007, congenital cardiac surgery training has been accredited by the ACGME. In general, the training is uniform, the operative experience is robust, and the fellows are satisfied. Although shortcomings remain, this study highlights the many strengths of the current system. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Associations of Early Dysnatremias in Critically Ill Neonates and Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Jon; Phadke, Daniel; Tong, Suhong; Eshelman, Jennifer; Newman, Sarah; Ruzas, Christopher; da Cruz, Eduardo M; Osorio, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    Dysnatremias (DN) are common electrolyte disturbances in cardiac critical illness and are known risk factors for adverse outcomes in certain populations. Little information exists on DN in children with cardiac disease admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) after undergoing cardiac surgery, either corrective or palliative. The aim was to determine the incidence and adverse outcomes associated with DN in neonates and infants undergoing cardiac surgery. Retrospective cohort and single center study performed at Children's Hospital Colorado from May 2013 to May 2014, in children under 1 year old admitted to the CICU after undergoing surgery for congenital or acquired cardiac disease. 183 subjects were analyzed.

  2. Preoperative education interventions to reduce anxiety and improve recovery among cardiac surgery patients: a review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping

    2015-01-01

    To update evidence of the effectiveness of preoperative education among cardiac surgery patients. Patients awaiting cardiac surgery may experience high levels of anxiety and depression, which can adversely affect their existing disease and surgery and result in prolonged recovery. There is evidence that preoperative education interventions can lead to improved patient experiences and positive postoperative outcomes among a mix of general surgical patients. However, a previous review suggested limited evidence to support the positive impact of preoperative education on patients' recovery from cardiac surgery. Comprehensive review of the literature. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for English-language articles published between 2000-2011. Original articles were included reporting randomised controlled trials of cardiac preoperative education interventions. Six trials were identified and have produced conflicting findings. Some trials have demonstrated the effects of preoperative education on improving physical and psychosocial recovery of cardiac patients, while others found no evidence that patients' anxiety is reduced or of any effect on pain or hospital stay. Evidence of the effectiveness of preoperative education interventions among cardiac surgery patients remains inconclusive. Further research is needed to evaluate cardiac preoperative education interventions for sustained effect and in non-Western countries. A nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary preoperative education approach may offer a way forward to provide a more effective and efficient service. Staff training in developing and delivering such interventions is a priority. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Prospective clinical evaluation and follow-up of a cohort of consecutive VT/VF patients, using a staged-care protocol, including coronary arteriography, programmed electrical stimulation and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Naccarella, F; Rolli, A; Carboni, A; Finardi, A; Aurier, E; Favaro, L; Contini, S; Gherli, T; Caponi, D; Maranga, S S; Lepera, G; Bartoletti, A

    1999-10-01

    The prospective evaluation and follow-up of 39 consecutive subjects with VT/VF, 6 of whom, with cardiac arrest (CA), are reported. Patients were enrolled in a specific staged-care approach protocol, which included coronary arteriography (CAR) and ventriculography (VC), in order to exclude the need of cardiac surgery, including coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), with and without left ventricular aneurysmectomy (LVA). The protocol included inducibility of VT/VF, which was verified by programmed electrical stimulation (PES) in control conditions and after antiarrhythmic therapy (ADT), to assess persistent inducibility and mainly to verify the hemodynamic sequelae of VT. VT that showed poor hemodynamic tolerance was treated with ICD, while well-tolerated VT was treated by ADT or ablation when indicated. Furthermore, PES was obtained after surgical procedures. As a first step, the patients were assigned to receive amiodarone (AMIO) (200-400 mg/daily) in the presence of EF% < 30% or contraindication to sotalol, (Group A), or sotalol (SOT) (80-140 mg/daily) in the presence of EF > or = 31%. (Group C). Conversely, in case of recurrences, patients were assigned to receive AMIO (200-300 mg/daily) plus metoprolol (MET) (20-100 mg/daily), (Group B) or, in case of intolerance to beta-blockers, to AMIO plus mexiletine (MEX) (200 mg/daily) (Group D). The four groups were similar for the type of VA, with recurrent ventricular tachycardia (RVT) being the most frequent one. The most frequent underlying cardiac disease of VA in this study was post-AMI CAD, with a rate of over 60% in all four groups. Single- and two-vessel lesions were found at CAR in various patients in all four groups, in 5/13 (38%) in Group A, in 8/14 (57%) in Group B, in 5/7 (71%) in Group C, and in 3/5 (60%) in Group D. Cardiac surgery was performed in a similar and limited number of patients in all four groups, in 4/13 (30%) in Group A, in 4/14 (35%) in Group B, in 2/7 (28%) in Group C, and in 2/5 (40%) in

  4. Cardiac Variables as Main Predictors of Endotracheal Reintubation Rate after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanian, Forouzan; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Aghdaii, Nahid; Faritous, Seyedeh Zahra; Motlagh, Soudabeh Djalali; Panahipour, Abdollah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reintubation in patients after cardiac surgery is associated with undesirable consequences. The purpose of the present study was to identify variables that could predict reintubation necessity in this group of patients. Methods: We performed a prospective study in 1000 consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The patients who required reintubation after extubation were compared with patients not requiring reintubation regarding demographic and preoperative clinical variables, including postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality. Results: Postoperatively, 26 (2.6%) of the 1000 patients studied required reintubation due to respiratory, cardiac, or neurological reasons. Advanced age and mainly cardiac variables were determined as univariate intra- and postoperative predictors of reintubation (all p values < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed lower preoperative (p = 0.014; OR = 3.00, 95%CI: 1.25 – 7.21), and postoperative ejection fraction (p = 0.001; OR = 11.10, 95%CI: 3.88 – 31.79), valvular disease (p = 0.043; OR = 1.84, 95%CI: 1.05 – 3.96), arrhythmia (p = 0.006; OR = 3.84, 95%CI: 1.47 – 10.03), and postoperative intra-aortic balloon pump requirement (p = 0.019; OR = 4.20, 95%CI: 1.26 – 14.00) as the independent predictors of reintubation. Conclusions: These findings reveal that cardiac variables are more common and significant predictors of reintubation after cardiac surgery in adult patients than are respiratory variables. The incidence of this complication, reintubation, is low, although it could result in significant postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:23646047

  5. Cardiac variables as main predictors of endotracheal reintubation rate after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Yazdanian, Forouzan; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Aghdaii, Nahid; Faritous, Seyedeh Zahra; Motlagh, Soudabeh Djalali; Panahipour, Abdollah

    2013-01-01

    Reintubation in patients after cardiac surgery is associated with undesirable consequences. The purpose of the present study was to identify variables that could predict reintubation necessity in this group of patients. We performed a prospective study in 1000 consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The patients who required reintubation after extubation were compared with patients not requiring reintubation regarding demographic and preoperative clinical variables, including postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality. Postoperatively, 26 (2.6%) of the 1000 patients studied required reintubation due to respiratory, cardiac, or neurological reasons. Advanced age and mainly cardiac variables were determined as univariate intra- and postoperative predictors of reintubation (all p values < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed lower preoperative (p = 0.014; OR = 3.00, 95%CI: 1.25 - 7.21), and postoperative ejection fraction (p = 0.001; OR = 11.10, 95%CI: 3.88 - 31.79), valvular disease (p = 0.043; OR = 1.84, 95%CI: 1.05 - 3.96), arrhythmia (p = 0.006; OR = 3.84, 95%CI: 1.47 - 10.03), and postoperative intra-aortic balloon pump requirement (p = 0.019; OR = 4.20, 95%CI: 1.26 - 14.00) as the independent predictors of reintubation. These findings reveal that cardiac variables are more common and significant predictors of reintubation after cardiac surgery in adult patients than are respiratory variables. The incidence of this complication, reintubation, is low, although it could result in significant postoperative morbidity and mortality.

  6. Effectiveness of non-cardiac preoperative testing in non-cardiac elective surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Johansson, T; Fritsch, G; Flamm, M; Hansbauer, B; Bachofner, N; Mann, E; Bock, M; Sönnichsen, A C

    2013-06-01

    Elective surgery is usually preceded by preoperative diagnostics to minimize risk. The results are assumed to elicit preventive measures or even cancellation of surgery. Moreover, physicians perform preoperative tests as a baseline to detect subsequent changes. This systematic review aims to explore whether preoperative testing leads to changes in management or reduces perioperative mortality or morbidity in unselected patients undergoing elective, non-cardiac surgery. We systematically searched all relevant databases from January 2001 to February 2011 for studies investigating the relationship between preoperative diagnostics and perioperative outcome. Our methodology was based on the manual of the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Health Technology Assessment, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) handbook, and the PRISMA statement for reporting systematic reviews. One hundred and one of the 25 281 publications retrieved met our inclusion criteria. Three test grid studies used a randomized controlled design and 98 studies used an observational design. The test grid studies show that in cataract surgery and ambulatory surgery, there are no significant differences between patients with indicated preoperative testing and no testing regarding perioperative outcome. The observational studies do not provide valid evidence that preoperative testing is beneficial in healthy adults undergoing non-cardiac surgery. There is no evidence derived from high-quality studies that supports routine preoperative testing in healthy adults undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Testing according to pathological findings in a patient's medical history or physical examination seems justified, although the evidence is scarce. High-quality studies, especially large randomized controlled trials, are needed to explore the effectiveness of indicated preoperative testing.

  7. Infant cardiac surgery: mothers tell their story: a therapeutic experience.

    PubMed

    Re, Jennifer; Dean, Suzanne; Menahem, Samuel

    2013-07-01

    Serious congenital heart disease frequently requires major congenital heart surgery. It causes much distress for parents, which may not always be recognized and treated appropriately. As part of a larger study, 26 mothers of two-month-old infants subjected to recent cardiac surgery were interviewed in depth. Each mother was invited to describe her own and what she perceived were her infant's experiences and to comment on the interview process. A systematic content analysis of the interviews was performed using qualitative research methodology. Almost all participants described acute stress symptoms relating to the diagnosis and the infant's surgery. In addition, most mothers reported that the interview helped them to think about and integrate what had happened to them and their infant, suggesting a probable therapeutic value to the interview. A suitably qualified and experienced mental health professional, assisting the mother to tell her story about the diagnosis and her infant's cardiac surgery, may provide a valuable, brief, and very cost-effective therapeutic intervention for these mothers and infants. It has the potential to alleviate maternal distress, with associated gains for the developing mother-infant relationship, reducing infant morbidity, and enhancing the quality of life for both infant and mother.

  8. Physical therapy in postoperative cardiac surgery: patient's perception.

    PubMed

    Lima, Paula Monique Barbosa; Cavalcante, Hermanny Evanio Freitas; Rocha, Angelo Roncalli Miranda; Brito, Rebeca Taciana Fernandes de

    2011-01-01

    Many strategies to improve services provided by for physiotherapy are based on patients satisfaction. Listen and observe the behavior of patients in a hospital is crucial to understanding and improvement of service and the hospital. This study aimed to identify the patient's perception undergoing cardiac surgery on the physiotherapy service provided to wards of hospitals for heart surgery reference in the city of Maceió, AL, Brazil, and from that information detect what actions are perceived as priorities for which are noteworthy plans for improvements in quality of care. Cross-sectional study, conducted in quality and quantity of reference hospitals in cardiac surgery in the city of Maceio, AL, Brazil, in the period from September to November 2008. The study included 30 users of the Sistema Único de Saúde, of which 12 (40%) female and 18 (60%) males. The average age of this sample was 49.2 ± 11.9 years and most belonged to socioeconomic class D (36.7%). It was found that only 16.7% had contact with the physiotherapist before surgery. Regarding educational guidelines about postoperative period, only 2.9% patients reported having received them. However, 56.8% rated the care as good and 100% of patients reported believing that physiotherapy could improve their health status. We suggest the implementation of preoperative physical therapy protocols with preventive measures and educational as well as new researchs that may characterize the population of users of health plans/private.

  9. Relationship of Kidney Injury Biomarkers with Long-Term Cardiovascular Outcomes after Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Chirag R; Puthumana, Jeremy; Shlipak, Michael G; Koyner, Jay L; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; McArthur, Eric; Kerr, Kathleen; Kavsak, Peter; Whitlock, Richard P; Garg, Amit X; Coca, Steven G

    2017-08-14

    Clinical AKI, measured by serum creatinine elevation, is associated with long-term risks of adverse cardiovascular (CV) events and mortality in patients after cardiac surgery. To evaluate the relative contributions of urine kidney injury biomarkers and plasma cardiac injury biomarkers in adverse events, we conducted a multicenter prospective cohort study of 968 adults undergoing cardiac surgery. On postoperative days 1-3, we measured five urine biomarkers of kidney injury (IL-18, NGAL, KIM-1, L-FABP, and albumin) and five plasma biomarkers of cardiac injury (NT-proBNP, H-FABP, hs-cTnT, cTnI, and CK-MB). The primary outcome was a composite of long-term CV events or death, which was assessed via national health care databases. During a median 3.8 years of follow-up, 219 (22.6%) patients experienced the primary outcome (136 CV events and 83 additional deaths). Compared with patients without postsurgical AKI, patients who experienced AKI Network stage 2 or 3 had an adjusted hazard ratio for the primary composite outcome of 3.52 (95% confidence interval, 2.17 to 5.71). However, none of the five urinary kidney injury biomarkers were significantly associated with the primary outcome. In contrast, four out of five postoperative cardiac injury biomarkers (NT-proBNP, H-FABP, hs-cTnT, and cTnI) strongly associated with the primary outcome. Mediation analyses demonstrated that cardiac biomarkers explained 49% (95% confidence interval, 1% to 97%) of the association between AKI and the primary outcome. These results suggest that clinical AKI at the time of cardiac surgery is indicative of concurrent CV stress rather than an independent renal pathway for long-term adverse CV outcomes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. Cardiac surgery in special populations, Part 2: Women, pregnant patients, and Jehovah's Witnesses.

    PubMed

    Vaska, P L

    1997-02-01

    This is the second in a series of articles that discusses cardiac surgery in patients who belong to special populations. Women are often the victims of sex bias regarding their referral to cardiac testing, and are consequently sicker when they present for heart surgery. Pregnant women undergoing cardiac surgery require vigilant care while undergoing surgery, with anticoagulant administration and valve selection to achieve positive maternal and fetal outcomes. Progressive improvements in technology, perioperative care, and pharmaceutical development has made cardiac surgery in Jehovah's Witnesses safer than in the past.

  11. Unusual combination of bilateral ischaemic optic neuropathy following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Harky, Amer; Balmforth, Damian; Goli, Giridhara; Wong, Kit

    2017-09-27

    Ischaemic optic neuropathy is a rare but serious complication post cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery patients. It presents with visual loss either unilaterally or bilaterally, and it can be anterior or posterior in type depending on the segment of the optic nerve involved. In non-ocular surgery patients, the most common type is called non-arteritic ischaemic optic neuropathy. We report a case of bilateral non-arteritic ischaemic optic neuropathy following coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve surgeries and review the published literature for the aetiology, management and prognosis of this rare complication. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. [Kidney failure after ectracorporeal circulation in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Reginier, B; Ledouarin, B; Loisance, D

    1977-01-01

    The renal function of 113 patients undergoing cardiac surgery under ECC was studied. In 32 p. 100 of the cases renal involvement was noted which was moderate in 18 p. 100 of the cases, severe in 10 p. 100 of the cases and anuric in 4 p. 100 of the cases. Valvular surgery was complicated once in every three cases by renal involvement, the repair of congenital malformations once out of every two cases, and coronary surgery in 17 p. 100 of the cases. The fall in renal perfusion represents the essential factor in this renal involvement, which should be avoided by the maintenace during ECC of a high output level and a satisfactory perfusion pressure and by the recovery of correct hemodynamics after the intervention.

  13. Carotid Stenosis in Cardiac Surgery-No Difference in Postoperative Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Molly; Saadat, Siavash; Dombrovskiy, Victor; Frenchu, Kiersten; Kanduri, Jaya; Romero, Joseph; Lemaire, Anthony; Ghaly, Aziz; Bastides, George; Rahimi, Saum; Lee, Leonard

    2016-02-23

    Background Debate over revascularization of asymptomatic carotid stenosis before cardiac surgery is ongoing. In this study, we analyze cardiac surgery outcomes in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis at a single hospital. Methods In this study, 1,781 patients underwent cardiac surgery from January 2012 to June 2013; 1,357 with preoperative screening carotid duplex were included. Patient demographics, comorbidities, degree of stenosis, postoperative complications, and mortality were evaluated. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed. Results Asymptomatic stenosis was found in 403/1,357 patients (29.7%; 355 moderate and 48 severe). Patients with stenosis, compared with those without, were older (71.7 ± 11 vs. 66.3 ± 12 years; p < 0.01). Females were more likely to have stenosis (odd ratio, = 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-2.2); however, patients were predominantly male in both groups. There were no significant differences in the rates of mortality and postoperative complications, including stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). Postoperative TIA occurred in 3/1,357(0.2%); only one had moderate stenosis. Inhospital stroke occurred in 21/1,357 (1.5%) patients; stroke rates were 2.3% (8/355) with moderate stenosis and 2.1% (1/48) severe stenosis. There were 59/1,357 (4.3%) deaths; patients with stenosis had a mortality rate of 4.2% (17/403); however, no postoperative stroke lead to death. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, gender, race, comorbidities, and postoperative complications did not show an impact of carotid stenosis on postoperative mortality and development of stroke after cardiac surgery. Conclusion This study suggests that patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis undergoing cardiac surgery are not at increased risk of postoperative complications and mortality; thus, prophylactic carotid revascularization may not be indicated.

  14. Determinants of Acute Kidney Injury Duration After Cardiac Surgery: An Externally Validated Tool

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jeremiah R.; Kramer, Robert S.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Coca, Steven G.; Sint, Kyaw; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) duration following cardiac surgery is associated with poor survival in a dose-dependent manner. However, it is not known what peri-operative risk factors contribute to prolonged AKI and delayed recovery. We sought to identify peri-operative risk factors that predict duration of AKI, a complication that effects short and long term survival. Methods We studied 4,987 consecutive cardiac surgery patients from 2002 through 2007. AKI was defined as a ≥0.3 (mg/dL) or ≥50% increase in SCr from baseline. Duration of AKI was defined by the number of days AKI was present. Step-wise multivariable negative binomial regression analysis was conducted using peri-operative risk factors for AKI duration. C-index was estimated by Kendall’s tau. Results AKI developed in 39% of patients with a median duration of AKI at 3 days and ranged from 1 to 108 days. Patients without AKI had duration of zero days. Independent predictors of AKI duration included baseline patient and disease characteristics, operative and post-operative factors. Prediction for mean duration of AKI was developed using coefficients from the regression model and externally validated the model on 1,219 cardiac surgery patients in a separate cardiac surgery cohort (TRIBE-AKI). The C-index was 0.65 (p<0.001) for the derivation cohort and 0.62 (p<0.001) for the validation cohort. Conclusion We identified and externally validated peri-operative predictors of AKI duration. These risk-factors will be useful to evaluate a patient’s risk for the tempo of recovery from AKI after cardiac surgery and subsequent short and long term survival. The level of awareness created by working with these risk factors have implications regarding positive changes in processes of care that have the potential to decrease the incidence and mitigate AKI. PMID:22206952

  15. Video-assisted Port-Access mitral valve surgery: from debut to routine surgery. Will Trocar-Port-Access cardiac surgery ultimately lead to robotic cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Vanermen, H; Wellens, F; De Geest, R; Degrieck, I; Van Praet, F

    1999-07-01

    A right thoracotomy is a well-known alternative for midsternotomy to have access to the left atrium. The Port-Access (Heartport, Inc, Redwood City, CA) approach is an invaluable option to avoid cracking of ribs and cartilage. EndoCPB (Heartport, Inc) and Endo-Aortic Clamp (Heartport, Inc) allows installation of the extracorporeal circulation and cardiac arrest from the groin. Videoassistance and shafted instruments help the surgeon to perform the surgery through a 5 x 2-cm port and fulfill the main goals of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, comfort, cosmesis, and fast rehabilitation. From February 1997 to November 1998, 75 patients (40 men/35 women) had either Port-Access mitral valve repair (n = 41) or replacement (n = 33) for a variety of reasons: myxoid degeneration (n = 45), rheumatic disease (n = 21), chronic endocarditis (n = 4), annular dilatation (n = 2), and sclerotic disease (n = 2). One valve was replaced because of an ingrowing myxoma. There was one closure of a paravalvular leak. The mean age was 59.3 years of age (range, 32 to 83 years). Most patients had normal ejection fractions but different grades of mitral valve insufficiency and were in NYHA class II. One 71-year-old patient died after reoperation on postoperative day 1 for failed repair. Two patients had conversion to sternotomy and conventional ECC for repair of a dissected aorta. One patient died, one patient suffered a minor cerebrovascular deficit. Three patients had prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stays for respiratory insufficiency, 5 patients underwent revision for bleeding. Mean ICU stay was 2.5 days; and mean hospital stay, 9 days (range, 4 to 36). A significant difference between the first 30 and last 38 patients in terms of length of stay in the ICU and the hospital was noticed. Two late mitral valve replacements for chronic endocarditis after repair occurred. One patient had medical therapy for endocarditis after mitral valve replacement. The debut of Port-Access mitral valve

  16. [Cardiac factors predictive of 10-year survival after coronary surgery].

    PubMed

    Fournial, G; Fourcade, J; Roux, D; Garcia, O; Sauer, M; Glock, Y

    1999-07-01

    Although the predictive factors of postoperative mortality after coronary artery surgery are well known, those predictive of long-term survival have received less attention. This study reviews the outcome of a group of 480 patients between 50 and 65 years of age, operated between 1984 and 1986. The patients were classified in two groups according to the presence or absence of internal mammary artery bypass grafts: Group I (304 patients with saphenous vein bypass grafts alone) and group II (176 patients with an internal mammary artery +/- saphenous vein bypass grafts). The long-term results were assessed according to 3 criteria: isolated cardiac mortality: cardiac mortality associated with a repeat revascularisation procedure and cardiac mortality associated with reoperation or recurrence of angina. Cardiac survival at 10 years was significantly better after internal mammary-LAD bypass: 91.4% (CI 87.1-95.1) than after saphenous vein bypass grafting alone: 79.6% (CI 74.8-84.4) (p = 0.012). Univariate analysis identified the following poor predictive factors: three vessel disease (p = 0.03), preoperative left ventricular dysfunction with an ejection fraction inferior to 45% (p = 0.0001), incomplete revascularisation (p = 0.0003), use of venous bypass graft alone (p < 0.014) and perioperative infarction (p = 0.0254). For each criterion of survival (cardiac isolated or associated with a new revascularisation and/or recurrence of angina), multivariate analysis identified three independent predictive factors of long-term extramortality: not using internal mammary artery-LAD bypass graft, incomplete revascularisation and preoperative hypertension. This study confirms the beneficial effects of internal mammary-LAD artery grafting on long-term survival after coronary artery surgery, and also demonstrates the prejudicial effects of hypertension.

  17. A composite outcome for neonatal cardiac surgery research

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Ryan J.; Scheurer, Mark A.; Zyblewski, Sinai C.; Wahlquist, Amy E.; Nietert, Paul J.; Bradley, Scott M.; Atz, Andrew M.; Graham, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether a composite outcome, derived of objective signs of inadequate cardiac output, would be associated with other important measures of outcomes and therefore be an appropriate end point for clinical trials in neonatal cardiac surgery. Methods Neonates (n = 76) undergoing cardiac operations requiring cardiopulmonary bypass were prospectively enrolled. Patients were defined to have met the composite outcome if they had any of the following events before hospital discharge: death, the use of mechanical circulatory support, cardiac arrest requiring chest compressions, hepatic injury (2 times the upper limit of normal for aspartate aminotransferase or alanine aminotransferase), renal injury (creatinine >1.5 mg/dL), or lactic acidosis (an increasing lactate >5 mmol/L in the postoperative period). Associations between the composite outcome and the duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay, hospital stay, and total hospital charges were determined. Results The median age at the time of surgery was 7 days, and the median weight was 3.2 kg. The composite outcome was met in 39% of patients (30/76). Patients who met the composite outcome compared with those who did not had a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (4.9 vs 2.9 days, P<.01), intensive care unit stay (8.8 vs 5.7 days, P<.01), hospital stay (23 vs 12 days, P<.01), and increased hospital charges ($258,000 vs $170,000, P<.01). In linear regression analysis, controlling for surgical complexity, these differences remained significant (R2 = 0.29–0.42, P<.01). Conclusions The composite outcome is highly associated with important early operative outcomes and may serve as a useful end point for future clinical research in neonates undergoing cardiac operations. PMID:23587468

  18. A composite outcome for neonatal cardiac surgery research.

    PubMed

    Butts, Ryan J; Scheurer, Mark A; Zyblewski, Sinai C; Wahlquist, Amy E; Nietert, Paul J; Bradley, Scott M; Atz, Andrew M; Graham, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a composite outcome, derived of objective signs of inadequate cardiac output, would be associated with other important measures of outcomes and therefore be an appropriate end point for clinical trials in neonatal cardiac surgery. Neonates (n = 76) undergoing cardiac operations requiring cardiopulmonary bypass were prospectively enrolled. Patients were defined to have met the composite outcome if they had any of the following events before hospital discharge: death, the use of mechanical circulatory support, cardiac arrest requiring chest compressions, hepatic injury (2 times the upper limit of normal for aspartate aminotransferase or alanine aminotransferase), renal injury (creatinine >1.5 mg/dL), or lactic acidosis (an increasing lactate >5 mmol/L in the postoperative period). Associations between the composite outcome and the duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay, hospital stay, and total hospital charges were determined. The median age at the time of surgery was 7 days, and the median weight was 3.2 kg. The composite outcome was met in 39% of patients (30/76). Patients who met the composite outcome compared with those who did not had a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (4.9 vs 2.9 days, P < .01), intensive care unit stay (8.8 vs 5.7 days, P < .01), hospital stay (23 vs 12 days, P < .01), and increased hospital charges ($258,000 vs $170,000, P < .01). In linear regression analysis, controlling for surgical complexity, these differences remained significant (R(2) = 0.29-0.42, P < .01). The composite outcome is highly associated with important early operative outcomes and may serve as a useful end point for future clinical research in neonates undergoing cardiac operations. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Ventilator-associated pneumonia in children after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Shaath, Ghassan A; Jijeh, Abdulraouf; Faruqui, Fawaz; Bullard, Lily; Mehmood, Akhter; Kabbani, Mohamed S

    2014-04-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a nosocomially acquired infection that has a significant burden on intensive care units (ICUs). We investigated the incidence of VAP in children after cardiac surgery and its impact on morbidity and mortality. A prospective cross-sectional review was performed in the postoperative cardiac patients in pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) patients from March 2010 until the end of September 2010. The patients were divided into two groups: the VAP group and the non-VAP group, Demographic data and perioperative risk variables were collected for all patients. One hundred thirty-seven patients were recruited, 65 (48%) female and 72 (52%) male. VAP occurred in 9 patients (6.6%). Average body weights in the VAP and non-VAP groups were 5.9 ± 1.24 and 7.3 ± 0.52 kg, respectively. In our PCICU, the mechanical ventilation (MV) use ratio was 26% with a VAP-density rate of 29/1000 ventilator days. Univariate analyses showed that the risk variables to develop VAP are as follows: prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time, use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN), and prolonged ICU stay (p < 0.002 for all). Thirty-three percent of VAP patients had Gram-negative bacilli (GNB). VAP Patients require more MV hours, longer stay, and more inhaled nitric oxide. Mortality in the VAP group was 11% and in the non-VAP group was 0.7 % (p = 0.28). VAP incidence is high in children after cardiac surgery mainly by GNB. VAP increases with longer CPB time, administration of TPN, and longer PCICU stay. VAP increases morbidity in postoperative cardiac patients.

  20. Tolerance of intraoperative hemoglobin decrease during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, Esther; Rosseel, Peter; van der Bom, Johanna; Bentala, Mohamed; Brand, Anneke; van der Meer, Nardo; van de Watering, Leo

    2014-10-01

    It has been suggested that a decrease of at least 50% from the preoperative hemoglobin (Hb) level during cardiac surgery is associated with adverse outcomes even if the absolute Hb level remains above the commonly used transfusion threshold of 7.0 g/dL. In this study the relation between intraoperative Hb decline of at least 50% and a composite endpoint was analyzed. This single-center study comprised 11,508 patients who underwent cardiac surgery and had normal preoperative Hb levels (12.0-16.0 g/dL in women, 13.0-18.0 g/dL in men) between January 2001 and December 2011. Logistic regression modeling was used. The composite endpoint comprised in-hospital mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, and renal failure. Patients whose Hb did not decrease at least 50% and remained above 7 g/dL were used as reference (n = 9672). A total of 363 (3.2%) patients had an intraoperative Hb of less than 7 g/dL during surgery but a Hb decrease of less than 50%; 876 patients (7.4%) showed both a nadir Hb less than 7 g/dL and a Hb decrease of at least 50%, while 597 (5.2%) had a Hb decrease of at least 50% and a nadir Hb of at least 7 g/dL. In this last group the incidence of the composite endpoint was higher than in patients in the reference group (adjusted odds ratio, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.41). Our findings show that a decrease of at least 50% from baseline Hb during cardiac surgery is associated with adverse outcomes, even if the absolute Hb level remains higher than the commonly used transfusion threshold of 7.0 g/dL. © 2014 AABB.

  1. Active Bleeding after Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Observational Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Bertet, Héléna; Faucanie, Marie; Amour, Julien; Blanloeil, Yvonnick; Lanquetot, Hervé; Ouattara, Alexandre; Picot, Marie Christine

    2016-01-01

    Main Objectives To estimate the incidence of active bleeding after cardiac surgery (AB) based on a definition directly related on blood flow from chest drainage; to describe the AB characteristics and its management; to identify factors of postoperative complications. Methods AB was defined as a blood loss > 1.5 ml/kg/h for 6 consecutive hours within the first 24 hours or in case of reoperation for hemostasis during the first 12 postoperative hours. The definition was applied in a prospective longitudinal observational study involving 29 French centers; all adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were included over a 3-month period. Perioperative data (including blood product administration) were collected. To study possible variation in clinical practice among centers, patients were classified into two groups according to the AB incidence of the center compared to the overall incidence: “Low incidence” if incidence is lower and “High incidence” if incidence is equal or greater than overall incidence. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors of postoperative complications. Results Among 4,904 patients, 129 experienced AB (2.6%), among them 52 reoperation. Postoperative bleeding loss was 1,000 [820;1,375] ml and 1,680 [1,280;2,300] ml at 6 and 24 hours respectively. Incidence of AB varied between centers (0 to 16%) but was independent of in-centre cardiac surgical experience. Comparisons between groups according to AB incidence showed differences in postoperative management. Body surface area, preoperative creatinine, emergency surgery, postoperative acidosis and red blood cell transfusion were risk factors of postoperative complication. Conclusions A blood loss > 1.5 ml/kg/h for 6 consecutive hours within the first 24 hours or early reoperation for hemostasis seems a relevant definition of AB. This definition, independent of transfusion, adjusted to body weight, may assess real time bleeding occurring

  2. Massage therapy for cardiac surgery patients--a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Braun, Lesley A; Stanguts, Catherine; Casanelia, Lisa; Spitzer, Ondine; Paul, Eldho; Vardaxis, Nicholas J; Rosenfeldt, Franklin

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether massage significantly reduces anxiety, pain, and muscular tension and enhances relaxation compared with an equivalent period of rest time after cardiac surgery. The feasibility of delivering the treatment, effects on heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate, and patient satisfaction were also assessed. Elective cardiac surgery patients were randomized to receive massage or rest time at 2 points after surgery. Visual analog scales were used to measure pain, anxiety, relaxation, muscular tension, and satisfaction. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure were measured before and after treatment. Focus groups and feedback were used to collect qualitative data about clinical significance and feasibility. A total of 152 patients (99% response rate) participated. Massage therapy produced a significantly greater reduction in pain (P = .001), anxiety (P < .0001), and muscular tension (P = .002) and increases in relaxation (P < .0001) and satisfaction (P = .016) compared to the rest time. No significant differences were seen for heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure. Pain was significantly reduced after massage on day 3 or 4 (P < .0001) and day 5 or 6 (P = .003). The control group experienced no significant change at either time. Anxiety (P < .0001) and muscular tension (P < .0001) were also significantly reduced in the massage group at both points. Relaxation was significantly improved on day 3 or 4 for both groups (massage, P < .0001; rest time, P = .006), but only massage was effective on day 5 or 6 (P < .0001). Nurses and physiotherapists observed patient improvements and helped facilitate delivery of the treatment by the massage therapists on the ward. Massage therapy significantly reduced the pain, anxiety, and muscular tension and improves relaxation and satisfaction after cardiac surgery. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. High-sensitive cardiac troponin T measurements in prediction of non-cardiac complications after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, P G; van Geffen, O; Dijkstra, I M; Boerma, D; Meinders, A J; Rettig, T C D; Eefting, F D; van Loon, D; van de Garde, E M W; van Dongen, E P A

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative non-cardiac complication rates are as high as 11-28% after high-risk abdominal procedures. Emerging evidence indicates that postoperative cardiac troponin T elevations are associated with adverse outcome in non-cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between postoperative high-sensitive cardiac troponin T elevations and non-cardiac complications in patients after major abdominal surgery. This prospective observational single-centre cohort study included patients at risk for coronary artery disease undergoing elective major abdominal surgery. Cardiac troponin was measured before surgery and at day 1, 3, and 7. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the adjusted association for different cut-off concentrations of postoperative myocardial injury and non-cardiac outcome. In 203 patients, 690 high-sensitive cardiac troponin T measurements were performed. Fifty-three patients (26%) had a non-cardiac complication within 30 days after surgery. Hospital mortality was 4% (8/203). An increase in cardiac troponin T concentration ≥100% compared with baseline was a superior independent predictor of non-cardiac postoperative clinical complications (adjusted odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence interval 1.8-10.1, P<0.001) and was associated with increased length of stay (9 days, 95% confidence interval 7-11 vs 7 days, 95% confidence interval 6-8, P=0.004) and increased hospital mortality (12 vs 2%, P=0.028). A postoperative high-sensitive cardiac troponin T increase ≥100% is a strong predictor of non-cardiac 30 day complications, increased hospital stay and hospital mortality in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. NCT02150486. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. [Metabolic support of the ischemic heart during cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Luna Ortiz, Pastor; Serrano Valdés, Xenia; Rojas Pérez, Eduardo; de Micheli, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    We examine [IBM1] the basic principles and clinical results of the metabolic intervention with glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) solutions in the field of cardiovascular surgery. On the basis of many international publications concerning this subject, and the experience obtained in the operating room of the Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia "Ignacio Chávez", we conclude that the metabolic support wit GIK is a powerful system that provides very useful energy to protect the myocardium during cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. The most recent publications indicate their effects in reducing low output syndromes, due to interventions on the coronary arteries, as well as producing a significant reduction of circulating fatty acids. These effects are produced also in the field of interventional cardiology, where GIK solutions protect the myocardium against damage due to impaired microcirculation. It is evident that these solutions must be utilized in higher concentrations that the initial ones, equal to those employed in laboratory animals. On the other side, it is worthy to remember that it has been always underlined that this treatment represents only a protection for the myocardium. Therefore, its association with other drugs or treatments favoring a good myocardial performance is not contraindicated--on the contrary, it yields better results. The present review presents pharmacological approaches, such as the use of glutamato, aspartate, piruvato, trimetazidina ranolazine and taurine to optimize cardiac energy metabolism, for the management of ischemic heart disease.

  5. Influence of the timing of cardiac catheterization and amount of contrast media on acute renal failure after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mohsen Mirmohammad; Gharipour, Mojgan; Nilforoush, Peiman; Shamsolkotabi, Hamid; Sadeghi, Hamid Mirmohammad; Kiani, Amjad; Sadeghi, Pouya Mirmohammad; Farahmand, Niloufar

    2011-04-01

    There is limited data about the influence of timing of cardiac surgery in relation to diagnostic angiography and/or the impact of the amount of contrast media used during angiography on the occurance of acute renal failure (ARF). Therefore, in the present study the effect of the time interval between diagnostic angiography and cardiac surgery and also the amount of contrast media used during the diagnostic procedure on the incidence of ARF after cardiac surgery was investigated. Data of 1177 patients who underwent different types of cardiac surgeries after cardiac catheterization were prospectively examined. The influence of time interval between cardiac catheterization and surgery as well as the amount of contrast agent on postoperative ARF were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. The patients who progressed to ARF were more likely to have received a higher dose of contrast agent compared to the mean dose. However, the time interval between cardiac surgery and last catheterization was not significantly different between the patients with and without ARF (p = 0.05). Overall, postoperative peak creatinine was highest on day 0, then decreased and remained significantly unchanged after this period. Overall prevalence of acute renal failure during follow-up period had a changeable trend and had the highest rates in days 1 (53.57%) and 6 (52.17%) after surgery. Combined coronary bypass and valve surgery were the strongest predictor of postoperative ARF (OR: 4.976, CI = 1.613-15.355 and p = 0.002), followed by intra-aortic balloon pump insertion (OR: 6.890, CI = 1.482-32.032 and p = 0.009) and usage of higher doses of contrast media agent (OR: 1.446, CI = 1.033-2.025 and p = 0.031). Minimizing the amount of contrast agent has a potential role in reducing the incidence of postoperative ARF in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, but delaying cardiac surgery after exposure to these agents might not have this protective effect.

  6. Fatigue of survivors following cardiac surgery: positive influences of preoperative prayer coping.

    PubMed

    Ai, Amy L; Wink, Paul; Shearer, Marshall

    2012-11-01

    Fatigue symptoms are common among individuals suffering from cardiac diseases, but few studies have explored longitudinally protective factors in this population. This study examined the effect of preoperative factors, especially the use of prayer for coping, on long-term postoperative fatigue symptoms as one aspect of lack of vitality in middle-aged and older patients who survived cardiac surgery. The analyses capitalized on demographics, faith factors, mental health, and on medical comorbidities previously collected via two-wave preoperative interviews and standardized information from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons' national database. The current participants completed a mailed survey 30 months after surgery. Two hierarchical regressions were performed to evaluate the extent to which religious factors predicted mental and physical fatigue, respectively, after controlling for key demographics, medical indices, and mental health. Preoperative prayer coping, but not other religious factors, predicted less mental fatigue at the 30-month follow-up, after controlling for key demographics, medical comorbidities, cardiac function (previous cardiovascular intervention, congestive heart failure, left ventricular ejection fraction, New York Heart Association Classification), mental health (depression, anxiety), and protectors (optimism, hope, social support). Male gender, preoperative anxiety, and reverence in secular context predicted more mental fatigue. Physical fatigue increased with age, medical comorbidities, and preoperative anxiety. Including health control beliefs in the model did not eliminate this effect. Prayer coping may have independent and positive influences on less fatigue in individuals who survived cardiac surgery. However, future research should investigate mechanisms of this association. ©2012 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Incidence of Postoperative Deep Venous Thrombosis Is Higher among Cardiac and Vascular Surgery Patients as Compared with General Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Faisal; Patel, Mayank; Ortenzi, Gail; Reed, Amy B

    2015-01-01

    Unlike general surgery patients, most of vascular and cardiac surgery patients receive therapeutic anticoagulation during operations. The purpose of this study was to report the incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) among cardiac and vascular surgery patients, compared with general surgery. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried for all patients who underwent surgical procedures from 2005 to 2010. Patients who developed DVT within 30 days of an operation were identified. The incidence of DVT was compared among vascular, general, and cardiac surgery patients. Risk factors for developing postoperative DVT were identified and compared among these patients. Of total 2,669,772 patients underwent surgical operations in the period between 2005 and 2010. Of all the patients, 18,670 patients (0.69%) developed DVT. The incidence of DVT among different surgical specialties was cardiac surgery (2%), vascular surgery (0.99%), and general surgery (0.66%). The odds ratio for developing DVT was 1.5 for vascular surgery patients and 3 for cardiac surgery patients, when compared with general surgery patients (P < 0.001). The odds ratio for developing DVT after cardiac surgery was 2, when compared with vascular surgery (P < 0.001). The incidence of DVT is higher among vascular and cardiac surgery patients as compared with that of general surgery patients. Intraoperative anticoagulation does not prevent the occurrence of DVT in the postoperative period. These patients should receive DVT prophylaxis in the perioperative period, similar to other surgical patients according to evidence-based guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. How should we manage arrest following cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Ley, S Jill

    2015-06-01

    Perioperative arrest occurs in thousands of cardiac surgical patients annually, yet standard resuscitation methods are ineffective or potentially harmful. These "high risk, low volume" events typically occur in well-monitored patients in the highly specialized environment of the operating room or intensive care unit, with a short list of likely causes of arrest, making a protocolized approach to management feasible and desirable. An evidence-based guideline for resuscitation specific to the cardiac surgical patient was first published by Dunning et al in 2009 and adopted by the European Resuscitation Council the following year. It emphasizes important deviations from advanced cardiac life support, including immediate defibrillation or pacing of arrhythmias before external compressions, if feasible within 1 minute, and avoidance of epinephrine due to potential rebound hypertension. In standard fashion, the rapid exclusion of reversible causes of arrest is followed by chest reopening within 5 minutes. This approach is now standard of care in most European countries and is under review for use in the United States by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. The anesthesiologist, as either team leader or participant, plays a critical role in optimally managing arrests after cardiac surgery. Their familiarity with this new standard is essential to optimal patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Additive Effect on Survival of Anaesthetic Cardiac Protection and Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Cardiac Surgery: A Bayesian Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zangrillo, Alberto; Musu, Mario; Greco, Teresa; Di Prima, Ambra Licia; Matteazzi, Andrea; Testa, Valentina; Nardelli, Pasquale; Febres, Daniela; Monaco, Fabrizio; Calabrò, Maria Grazia; Ma, Jun; Finco, Gabriele; Landoni, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cardioprotective properties of volatile agents and of remote ischemic preconditioning have survival effects in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. We performed a Bayesian network meta-analysis to confirm the beneficial effects of these strategies on survival in cardiac surgery, to evaluate which is the best strategy and if these strategies have additive or competitive effects. Methods Pertinent studies were independently searched in BioMedCentral, MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register (updated November 2013). A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed. Four groups of patients were compared: total intravenous anesthesia (with or without remote ischemic preconditioning) and an anesthesia plan including volatile agents (with or without remote ischemic preconditioning). Mortality was the main investigated outcome. Results We identified 55 randomized trials published between 1991 and 2013 and including 6,921 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The use of volatile agents (posterior mean of odds ratio = 0.50, 95% CrI 0.28–0.91) and the combination of volatile agents with remote preconditioning (posterior mean of odds ratio = 0.15, 95% CrI 0.04–0.55) were associated with a reduction in mortality when compared to total intravenous anesthesia. Posterior distribution of the probability of each treatment to be the best one, showed that the association of volatile anesthetic and remote ischemic preconditioning is the best treatment to improve short- and long-term survival after cardiac surgery, suggesting an additive effect of these two strategies. Conclusions In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, the use of volatile anesthetics and the combination of volatile agents with remote preconditioning reduce mortality when compared to TIVA and have additive effects. It is necessary to confirm these results with large, multicenter, randomized, double-blinded trials comparing these different strategies in cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, to

  10. Pulmonary complications in pediatric cardiac surgery at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Borges, Daniel Lago; Sousa, Lícia Raquel Teles; Silva, Raquel Teixeira; Gomes, Holga Cristina da Rocha; Ferreira, Fernando Mauro Muniz; Lima, Willy Leite; Borges, Lívia Christina do Prado Lui

    2010-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of pulmonary complications in children undergone cardiac surgery, as well as demographic and clinical characteristics of this population. The sample comprised 37 children of both genders, underwent cardiac surgery at the Hospital Universitário Presidente Dutra, São Luis (MA) during the year of 2007. There were not included patients who had lung disease in pre-operative period, patients with neurological disorders, intra-operative death besides lack of data in medical records. The data were obtained from general medical and nursing staff of their medical records. The population of the study was predominantly composed by female children, from the countryside and at school age. Pathologies considered low risk were the majority, especially the patent ductus arteriosus, interventricular communication and interatrial communication. It was observed that the largest share of children made use of cardiopulmonary bypass for more than 30 minutes, with a median of 80 minutes, suffered a median sternotomy, using only the mediastinal drain and made use of mechanical ventilation after surgery, with the median about 6.6 hours. Only three (8.1%) patients developed pulmonary complications, and of these, two died. Most of the sample was female, school aged and from the countryside. The low time of cardiopulmonary bypass and mechanical ventilation, and congenital heart disease with low risk, may have been factors that contributed to the low rate of pulmonary complications postoperative.

  11. Cardiac Surgery in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Cipriano; Cárdenes, Miguel Angel; Jiménez, Pedro Conrado; Armas, Mario-Vicente; Betancor, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    From January 1991 through December 1999, 5 consecutive patients who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus presented in need of cardiac surgery. All were men; the median age was 44 years. Two of them presented with mitral and aortic infectious valve endocarditis, 1 with tricuspid endocarditis, 1 with prosthetic valve endocarditis, and 1 with pericarditis and pericardial tamponade. Under cardiopulmonary bypass, the 4 patients with endocarditis underwent these procedures: mitral and aortic valve replacement (2), tricuspid valve replacement (1), and aortic valve replacement (reoperation) and concomitant repair of a mycotic ascending aortic aneurysm (1). In the patient who had pericardial effusion, subxifoid pericardiostomy and drainage were performed, and a pericardial window was created. There was no intraoperative mortality. The patient with pericardial effusion died 8 days after surgery; he was in septic shock and had multiple organ failure. Two deaths occurred at 2 and 63 months, due to hemoptysis and sudden death, respectively. The 2 patients who underwent double valve replacement are alive and in good condition after a median follow-up of 71 months. Cardiac surgery is indicated in selected patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus. These patients are frequently drug abusers or homosexual. Valvular endocarditis is the most common finding. Hospital morbidity and mortality rates are higher than usual in this group of patients. PMID:11198308

  12. Respiratory physiotherapy in the pulmonary dysfunction after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Renault, Julia Alencar; Costa-Val, Ricardo; Rossetti, Márcia Braz

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to make a critical review about the different techniques of respiratory physiotherapy used following cardiac surgery and this effectiveness in reverting pulmonary dysfunction. It has been used as reference publications in English and Portuguese using as key words thoracic surgery, respiratory exercises, physical therapy modalities, postoperative complications and myocardial revascularization, contained in the following databases BIREME, SciELO Brazil, LILACS, PUBMED, from 1997 to 2007. A secondary search of the reference list of identified articles also was made. It has been selected eleven randomized trials (997 patients). For the articles included incentive spirometry was used in three; deep breathing exercises in six; deep breathing exercises added to positive expiratory pressure in four and positive airway pressure added to inspiratory resistance in two. Three trials used intermittent positive pressure breathing. Continuous positive airway pressure and bi-level positive airway pressure has been used in three and two trials. The protocols used in the studies were varied and the co interventions were present in a big part of these. The different analyzed varieties and the time of postoperatory follow up make a comparative analysis difficult. Pulmonary dysfunction is evident in the postoperatory period of cardiac surgery. The use of noninvasive ventilation has been associated with good results in the first postoperatory days. Despite the known importance of postoperatory respiratory physiotherapy, until now, there is no literary consensus about the superiority of one technique over the others.

  13. Epidemiology and outcome of major postoperative infections following cardiac surgery: Risk factors and impact of pathogen type

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luke F.; Arduino, Jean Marie; Sheng, Shubin; Muhlbaier, Lawrence H.; Kanafani, Zeina A.; Harris, Anthony D.; Fraser, Thomas G.; Allen, Keith; Corey, G. Ralph; Fowler, Vance G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Major postoperative infections (MPIs) are poorly understood complications of cardiac surgery. We examined the epidemiology, microbiology, and outcome of MPIs occurring after cardiac surgery. Methods The study cohort was drawn from the Society of Thoracic Surgeon National Cardiac Database and comprised adults who underwent cardiac surgery at 5 tertiary hospitals between 2000 and 2004. We studied the incidence, microbiology, and risk factors of MPI (bloodstream or chest wound infections within 30 days after surgery), as well as 30-day mortality. We used multivariate regression analyses to evaluate the risk of MPI and mortality. Results MPI was identified in 341 of 10,522 patients (3.2%). Staphylococci were found in 52.5% of these patients, gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in 24.3%, and other pathogens in 23.2%. High body mass index, previous coronary bypass surgery, emergency surgery, renal impairment, immunosuppression, cardiac failure, and peripheral/cerebrovascular disease were associated with the development of MPI. Median postoperative duration of hospitalization (15 days vs 6 days) and mortality (8.5% vs 2.2%) were higher in patients with MPIs. Compared with uninfected individuals, odds of mortality were higher in patients with S aureus MPIs (adjusted odds ratio, 3.7) and GNB MPIs (adjusted odds ratio, 3.0). Conclusions Staphylococci accounted for the majority of MPIs after cardiac surgery. Mortality was higher in patients with Staphylococcus aureus- and GNB-related MPIs than in patients with MPIs caused by other pathogens and uninfected patients. Preventive strategies should target likely pathogens and high-risk patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:22609237

  14. Intensive insulin therapy to maintain normoglycemia after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Van den Berghe, G

    2011-01-01

    Drugs used in the perioperative period could have an effect on survival as recently pointed out by an international consensus conference on the reduction in mortality in cardiac anesthesia and intensive care. Insulin infusion to achieve a strict glycemic control is the best example of how an ancillary (i.e. non-surgical) drug/technique/strategy might influence survival rates in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The author of this "expert opinion" presents her insights into the use of insulin in this setting and suggest that based on available evidence based medicine, insulin infusion, titrated to "normoglycemia" is a complex intervention, that not only requires the simple administration of a "drug", the hormone insulin, but also needs tools and skills to accurately measure and control blood glucose to achieve normoglycemia while avoiding hypoglycemia and large glucose fluctuations.

  15. Robotics in Cardiac Surgery: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Bryan; Nifong, L. Wiley; Chitwood, W. Randolph

    2013-01-01

    Robotic cardiac operations evolved from minimally invasive operations and offer similar theoretical benefits, including less pain, shorter length of stay, improved cosmesis, and quicker return to preoperative level of functional activity. The additional benefits offered by robotic surgical systems include improved dexterity and degrees of freedom, tremor-free movements, ambidexterity, and the avoidance of the fulcrum effect that is intrinsic when using long-shaft endoscopic instruments. Also, optics and operative visualization are vastly improved compared with direct vision and traditional videoscopes. Robotic systems have been utilized successfully to perform complex mitral valve repairs, coronary revascularization, atrial fibrillation ablation, intracardiac tumor resections, atrial septal defect closures, and left ventricular lead implantation. The history and evolution of these procedures, as well as the present status and future directions of robotic cardiac surgery, are presented in this review. PMID:23908867

  16. Robotics in cardiac surgery: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Bush, Bryan; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2013-07-01

    Robotic cardiac operations evolved from minimally invasive operations and offer similar theoretical benefits, including less pain, shorter length of stay, improved cosmesis, and quicker return to preoperative level of functional activity. The additional benefits offered by robotic surgical systems include improved dexterity and degrees of freedom, tremor-free movements, ambidexterity, and the avoidance of the fulcrum effect that is intrinsic when using long-shaft endoscopic instruments. Also, optics and operative visualization are vastly improved compared with direct vision and traditional videoscopes. Robotic systems have been utilized successfully to perform complex mitral valve repairs, coronary revascularization, atrial fibrillation ablation, intracardiac tumor resections, atrial septal defect closures, and left ventricular lead implantation. The history and evolution of these procedures, as well as the present status and future directions of robotic cardiac surgery, are presented in this review.

  17. An audit of post-operative nausea and vomiting, following cardiac surgery: scope of the problem.

    PubMed

    Mace, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Post-operative nausea and vomiting is a major problem for patients following cardiac surgery. The literature in this area identifies that there are a number of individual patient and post-operative factors which increase the risk of post-operative nausea and vomiting, including female gender, non-smoker, age, use of opioids, pain and anxiety. An audit involving 200 patients, who had undergone cardiac surgery was implemented to assess/evaluate the incidence of nausea and vomiting for this patient group. Data collected included information relating to nausea and vomiting, pain, consumption of morphine and other individual patient variables. The results suggest that nausea and vomiting, is experienced by a large number of patients after cardiac surgery (67%), with the majority suffering on the first day after surgery. The duration of nausea and vomiting for most is short, but for a significant number (7%) it can last up to one-quarter of their initial post-operative course. The paper discusses key implications for practice arising from this project.

  18. Simultaneous surgery in patients with both cardiac and noncardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Xiao, Feng; Wang, Jin; Song, Bo; Li, Xi-Hui; Li, Jian; He, Zhi-Song; Zhang, Huan; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the possibility and feasibility of simultaneous cardiac and noncardiac surgery. Methods From August 2000 to March 2015, 64 patients suffering from cardiac and noncardiac diseases have been treated by simultaneous surgeries. Results Two patients died after operations in hospital; thus, the hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. One patient with coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, and a recurrence of bladder cancer accepted emergency simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), bladder cystectomy, and ureterostomy. He died of acute cerebral infarction complicated with multiple organ failure on the 153rd day after operation. The other patient with chronic constrictive pericarditis and right lung cancer underwent pericardial stripping and right lung lower lobectomy, which resulted in multiple organ failure, and the patient died on the tenth day postoperatively. The remaining 62 patients recovered and were discharged. The total operative morbidity was 17.2%: postoperative hemorrhage (n, % [1, 1.6%]), pulmonary infection and hypoxemia (2, 3.1%), hemorrhage of upper digestive tract (1, 1.6%), incisional infection (3, 4.7%), subphrenic abscess (1, 1.6%), and postoperative acute renal failure and hemofiltration (3, 4.7%). Of the 62 patients discharged, 61 patients were followed up. Eleven patients died with 10 months to 10 years during the follow-up. The mean survival time is 116.2±12.4 months. The cumulative survival rate is 50.8%. Conclusion Simultaneous surgeries in patients suffering from both cardiac and noncardiac benign or malignant diseases are safe and possible with satisfactory short-term and long-term survival. PMID:27486311

  19. Femoral cannulation: a safe vascular access option for cardiopulmonary bypass in minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Siavash; Schultheis, Molly; Azzolini, Anthony; Romero, Joseph; Dombrovskiy, Victor; Odroniec, Karen; Scholz, Peter; Lemaire, Anthony; Batsides, George; Lee, Leonard

    2016-03-01

    Femoral cannulation during cardiopulmonary bypass has become a common approach for many cardiac procedures and serves as an important access option, especially during minimally invasive cardiac surgery. Opponents, however, argue that there is significant risk, including site-specific and overall morbidity, which makes the use of this modality dangerous compared to conventional aortoatrial cannulation techniques. We analyzed our institutional experience to elucidate the safety and efficacy of femoral cannulation. All data were collected from a single hospital's cardiac surgery database. A total of 346 cardiac surgeries were evaluated from September 2012 to September 2013, of which 85/346 (24.6%) utilized a minimally invasive approach. Of the 346 operations performed, 72/346 (20.8%) utilized femoral cannulation while 274/346 (79.2%) used aortoatrial cannulation. Stroke occurred in 1/72 (1.39%) after femoral cannulation, specifically, in a conventional sternotomy patient, while it occurred in 6/274 (2.19%) [p=0.67] after aortoatrial cannulation. When comparing postoperative complications between the femoral cannulation and aortoatrial cannulation groups, the rates of atrial fibrillation [10/72 (13.9%) versus 46/274 (16.8%), p=0.55], renal failure [2/72 (2.78%) versus 11/274 (4.01%), p=0.62], prolonged ventilation time [4/72 (5.56%) versus 27/274 (9.85%), p=0.26] and re-operation for bleeding [3/72 (4.17%) versus 13/274 (4.74%), p=0.84] showed no significant difference. Selective femoral cannulation provides a safe alternative to aortoatrial cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass and is especially important when performing minimally invasive cardiac surgery. When comparing aortoatrial and femoral cannulation, we found no significant difference in the postoperative complication rates and overall mortality.

  20. Outlier Payments For Cardiac Surgery And Hospital Quality

    PubMed Central

    Baser, Onur; Fan, Zhahoui; Dimick, Justin B.; Staiger, Douglas O.; Birkmeyer, John D.

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, several hospitals in the Tenet system were accused of overbilling Medicare for cardiac surgery. This led to increased scrutiny of so-called outlier payments, which are used to compensate hospitals when actual costs far exceed those anticipated under prospective payment. Since then, the overall proportion of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) procedures associated with outlier payments has fallen from 13 percent in 2000–02 to 8 percent in 2003–06. Still, there is variation across U.S. hospitals, with some hospitals experiencing much higher rates. These findings imply that there is potential for quality improvement to reduce costs while improving morbidity and mortality. PMID:19597215

  1. Late-presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Bana Agha; Mesned, Abdu Rahman; Mohamad, Tagelden; Kabbani, Mohamad S.

    2015-01-01

    Late presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery is a rare complication and its management is well defined once the initial diagnosis in made timely and appropriately. In this report we described a child who underwent atrioventricular septal defect repair with a normal sinus rhythm during the postoperative period, as well as during the first 2 years of follow up. She subsequently developed complete heart block with bradycardia that required insertion of a pacemaker. Here we discuss this unusual late-presenting complication, possible risk factors, and management. PMID:26778907

  2. Evaluation of Known or Suspected Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Blankstein, Ron; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown cause, and cardiac sarcoidosis affects at least 25% of patients and accounts for substantial mortality and morbidity from this disease. Cardiac sarcoidosis may present with heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, AV block, atrial or ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Cardiac involvement can be challenging to detect and diagnose because of the focal nature of the disease, as well as the fact that clinical criteria have limited diagnostic accuracy. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be enhanced by integrating both clinical and imaging findings. This article reviews the various roles that different imaging modalities provide in the evaluation and management of patients with known or suspected cardiac sarcoidosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Reduced Right Ventricular Function Predicts Long-Term Cardiac Re-Hospitalization after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Yulia; Chan, Jacqueline; Iskandir, Marina; Gulkarov, Iosif; Tortolani, Anthony; Brener, Sorin J.; Sacchi, Terrence J.; Heitner, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The significance of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF), independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and valve procedures remains unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the significance of abnormal RVEF by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), independent of LVEF in predicting outcomes of patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve surgery. Methods From 2007 to 2009, 109 consecutive patients (mean age, 66 years; 38% female) were referred for pre-operative CMR. Abnormal RVEF and LVEF were considered <35% and <45%, respectively. Elective primary procedures include CABG (56%) and valve (44%). Thirty-day outcomes were perioperative complications, length of stay, cardiac re-hospitalizations and early mortaility; long-term (> 30 days) outcomes included, cardiac re-hospitalization, worsening congestive heart failure and mortality. Mean clinical follow up was 14 months. Findings Forty-eight patients had reduced RVEF (mean 25%) and 61 patients had normal RVEF (mean 50%) (p<0.001). Fifty-four patients had reduced LVEF (mean 30%) and 55 patients had normal LVEF (mean 59%) (p<0.001). Patients with reduced RVEF had a higher incidence of long-term cardiac re-hospitalization vs. patients with normal RVEF (31% vs.13%, p<0.05). Abnormal RVEF was a predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization (HR 3.01 [CI 1.5-7.9], p<0.03). Reduced LVEF did not influence long-term cardiac re-hospitalization. Conclusion Abnormal RVEF is a stronger predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization than abnormal LVEF in patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve procedures. PMID:26197273

  4. The impact of cerebral embolization during infant cardiac surgery on neurodevelopmental outcomes at intermediate follow-up.

    PubMed

    Naik, R J; Wagner, J B; Chowdhury, D; Barnes, M l; Wagner, D S; Burson, K C; Eslinger, P J; Clark, J B

    2014-09-01

    Cerebral embolization during pediatric cardiac surgery may be an underappreciated source of subsequent neurodevelopmental impairment. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is a neuromonitoring tool that can provide intraoperative surveillance for cerebral embolization. We hypothesized that increased cerebral embolic signals detected during infant cardiac surgery would be associated with worse neurodevelopmental outcomes at follow-up. A study group of 24 children who underwent infant cardiac surgery with transcranial Doppler detection of cerebral embolic signals returned at intermediate follow-up for standardized neurodevelopmental assessment. The children were evaluated using two neurocognitive tests and the parents completed two questionnaires regarding observed behavior. Statistical analysis assessed for correlation between the number of cerebral embolic signals at surgery and the results of the neurodevelopmental assessment. Of the 67 test parameters analyzed, five showed a significant association with the number of embolic signals, yet, all in the contrary direction of the clinical hypothesis, likely representing a Type I error. Thus, in this small cohort of patients, the number of cerebral embolic signals detected during infant cardiac surgery was not shown to be associated with worse neurodevelopmental outcomes at intermediate follow-up. A larger study is probably necessary to ascertain the potential influence of cerebral embolic signals on eventual neurologic outcomes in children. The clinical relevance of cerebral embolic signals during pediatric cardiac surgery remains undetermined and deserves further investigation.

  5. Micro-RNA-208a, -208b, and -499 as Biomarkers for Myocardial Damage After Cardiac Surgery in Children.

    PubMed

    Bolkier, Yoav; Nevo-Caspi, Yael; Salem, Yishay; Vardi, Amir; Mishali, David; Paret, Gideon

    2016-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that cardiac-enriched micro-RNAs can serve as accurate biomarkers that reflect myocardial injury and to predict the postoperative course following pediatric cardiac surgery. Micro-RNAs have emerged as plasma biomarkers for many pathologic states. We aimed to quantify preoperative and postoperative plasma levels of cardiac-enriched micro-RNA-208a, -208b, and -499 in children undergoing cardiac surgery and to evaluate correlations between their levels, the extent of myocardial damage, and the postoperative clinical course. PICU. Thirty pediatric patients that underwent open heart surgery for the correction of congenital heart defects between January 2012 to July 2013. None. At 12 hours post surgery, the plasma levels of the micro-RNAs increased by 300- to 4,000-fold. At 24 hours, their levels decreased but remained significantly higher than before surgery. Micro-RNA levels were associated with troponin levels, longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic crossclamp times, maximal postoperative aspartate aminotransferase levels, and delayed hospital discharge. Circulating micro-RNA-208a, -208b, and -499 are detectable in the plasma of children undergoing cardiac surgery and may serve as novel biomarkers for monitoring and forecasting postoperative myocardial injury and recovery.

  6. [Cardiac surgery in the elderly: perioperative care and operative strategies].

    PubMed

    Albert, A; Ujvari, Z; Mauser, M; Ennker, J

    2008-11-01

    Caused by the age-dependent prevalence of cardiac diseases, the number of cardiac surgical interventions to geriatric patients is increasing. High life quality and life expectancy can be reached by cardiac operations. The advantage of cardiac surgical interventions is the decade's long positive effect. Accordingly also elderly benefit from complete revascularisation and from aortic valve replacement with biological prosthesis, which rarely degenerate in old age. A weak point is the surgical trauma, which can be reduced by less-invasive methods, such as OPCAB with aortic non-touch-technique, resulting in less than 1 % stroke. The indications for heart operations will be based on age-independent evidence-based guidelines. The decision for surgery is influenced by the expectation of the risk. This is defined by the co-morbidities and to lesser extent by the age per se. The operation risk can be calculated by risk-scores and hospital-specific data. The patient's expectations from the operation and his ability to overcome the accompanying stress must be thoroughly assessed. The operation must take place electively and at the right time. A good nutritional status and preoperative optimization of the organ functions are decisive for the prognosis. The blood-sugar-level must be optimized; thyroid function, (hidden) infections, anaemia and depression must be excluded or treated. The required screening tests should have been done already by the family doctor. The elderly are postoperatively susceptible to complications; especially low cardiac output, renal failure, respiratory insufficiency and stroke. Subsequently they need more intensive care.

  7. Neuroendocrine evaluation of cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Sisson, D David

    2004-09-01

    Current evidence favors the view that regardless of etiology, there is a predictable sequence of neuroendocrine activation that operates in most dogs and cats with progressive heart disease and that it is largely, but not entirely, independent of etiology. The natriuretic peptides and sympathetic nervous system seem to be early responders to developing cardiac and hemodynamic perturbations in both species. BNP plays a particularly prominent role in cats, possibly as a reflection of disease etiology. Shortly thereafter, plasma endothelin concentrations rise, reflecting the impact of the hemodynamic alterations on the vasculature. Endothelin and the natriuretic peptides directly suppress plasma renin release but have divergent effects on aldosterone. Activation of the tissue RAAS may operate early on to further the progression of heart failure, but evidence of plasma RAAS activation occurs comparatively late and near the time of development of overt CHF. Finally, in animals with severe CHF that are prone to hypotension,vasopressin levels may also rise, contributing to the retention of free water and congestion that is refractory to diuretics. Although oversimplified, this scenario seems to be consistent with data obtained in human, canine, and feline patients. These observations provide some impetus for evaluating ACE inhibitors in cats and beta-receptor-blocking drugs in dogs and cats. Perhaps we are also a little closer to identifying useful biochemical markers that can aid in the diagnosis of heart disease, guide therapy, and improve our understanding of the biologic processes occurring in our patients. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  8. Cardiac Dysrhythmias with General Anesthesia during Dental Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Chandra R.

    1988-01-01

    Dysrhythmias with general anesthesia during dental surgery have been frequently reported. The incidence appears higher in spontaneously breathing patients lightly anesthetized with halothane. Anxiety, sitting posture, hypoxia, Chinese race, and heart disease appear to aggravate the condition. Use of beta blockers or lidocaine prior to anesthesia, intravenous induction, controlled ventilation with muscle relaxants, and use of isoflurane or enflurane in spontaneously breathing patients appear to decrease the incidence. It is stressed that continuous cardiac monitoring should be done in patients undergoing dental surgery under anesthesia in order to detect diagnose and treat any dysrhythmia. The great majority of dysrhythmias disappear either spontaneously or when the stimulus is stopped. In some cases there may be an obvious cause that should be immediately corrected. The need for drug intervention is rare and must be used with great care when used. PMID:3046439

  9. Outcome Reporting in Cardiac Surgery Trials: Systematic Review and Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Michael; Drudi, Laura; Almohammadi, Mohammad; Langlois, Yves; Noiseux, Nicolas; Perrault, Louis; Piazza, Nicolo; Afilalo, Jonathan

    2015-08-17

    There is currently no accepted standard for reporting outcomes following cardiac surgery. The objective of this paper was to systematically review the literature to evaluate the current use and definition of perioperative outcomes reported in cardiac surgery trials. We reviewed 5 prominent medical and surgical journals on Medline from January 1, 2010, to June 30, 2014, for randomized controlled trials involving coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valve surgery. We identified 34 trials meeting inclusion criteria. Sample sizes ranged from 57 to 4752 participants (median 351). Composite end points were used as a primary outcome in 56% (n=19) of the randomized controlled trials and as a secondary outcome in 12% (n=4). There were 14 different composite end points. Mortality at any time (all-cause and/or cardiovascular) was reported as an individual end point or as part of a combined end point in 82% (n=28), myocardial infarction was reported in 68% (n=23), and bleeding was reported in 24% (n=8). Patient-centered outcomes, such as quality of life and functional classification, were reported in 29% (n=10). Definition of clinical events such as myocardial infarction, stroke, renal failure, and bleeding varied considerably among trials, particularly for postoperative myocardial infarction and bleeding, for which 8 different definitions were used for each. Outcome reporting in the cardiac surgery literature is heterogeneous, and efforts should be made to standardize the outcomes reported and the definitions used to ascertain them. The development of standardizing outcome reporting is an essential step toward strengthening the process of evidence-based care in cardiac surgery. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  10. Outcome Reporting in Cardiac Surgery Trials: Systematic Review and Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Michael; Drudi, Laura; Almohammadi, Mohammad; Langlois, Yves; Noiseux, Nicolas; Perrault, Louis; Piazza, Nicolo; Afilalo, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background There is currently no accepted standard for reporting outcomes following cardiac surgery. The objective of this paper was to systematically review the literature to evaluate the current use and definition of perioperative outcomes reported in cardiac surgery trials. Methods and Results We reviewed 5 prominent medical and surgical journals on Medline from January 1, 2010, to June 30, 2014, for randomized controlled trials involving coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valve surgery. We identified 34 trials meeting inclusion criteria. Sample sizes ranged from 57 to 4752 participants (median 351). Composite end points were used as a primary outcome in 56% (n=19) of the randomized controlled trials and as a secondary outcome in 12% (n=4). There were 14 different composite end points. Mortality at any time (all-cause and/or cardiovascular) was reported as an individual end point or as part of a combined end point in 82% (n=28), myocardial infarction was reported in 68% (n=23), and bleeding was reported in 24% (n=8). Patient-centered outcomes, such as quality of life and functional classification, were reported in 29% (n=10). Definition of clinical events such as myocardial infarction, stroke, renal failure, and bleeding varied considerably among trials, particularly for postoperative myocardial infarction and bleeding, for which 8 different definitions were used for each. Conclusions Outcome reporting in the cardiac surgery literature is heterogeneous, and efforts should be made to standardize the outcomes reported and the definitions used to ascertain them. The development of standardizing outcome reporting is an essential step toward strengthening the process of evidence-based care in cardiac surgery. PMID:26282561

  11. Gene therapy during cardiac surgery: role of surgical technique to minimize collateral organ gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Swain, JaBaris D.; Fargnoli, Anthony S.; Bridges, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Effective gene therapy for heart failure has not yet been achieved clinically. The aim of this study is to quantitatively assess the cardiac isolation efficiency of the molecular cardiac surgery with recirculating delivery (MCARD™) and to evaluate its efficacy as a means to limit collateral organ gene expression. 1014 genome copies (GC) of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector 6 encoding green fluorescent protein under control of the cytomegalovirus promoter was delivered to the nine arrested sheep hearts. Blood samples were assessed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT QPCR). Collateral organ gene expression was assessed at four-weeks using immunohistochemical staining. The blood vector GC concentration in the cardiac circuit during complete isolation trended from 9.59±0.73 to 9.05±0.65 (log GC/cm3), and no GC were detectable in the systemic circuit (P<0.001). The washing procedure performed prior to relinquishing the cardiac circuit decreased the systemic blood vector GC concentration >800-fold (P<0.001), consistent with >99% isolation efficiency. Conversely, incomplete isolation resulted in equalization of vector GC concentration in the circuits, leading to robust collateral organ gene expression. MCARD™ is an efficient, clinically translatable myocardial delivery platform for cardiac specific gene therapy. The cardiac surgical techniques utilized are critically important to limit collateral organ gene expression. PMID:20861057

  12. Management practices and major infections after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gelijns, Annetine C; Moskowitz, Alan J; Acker, Michael A; Argenziano, Michael; Geller, Nancy L; Puskas, John D; Perrault, Louis P; Smith, Peter K; Kron, Irving L; Michler, Robert E; Miller, Marissa A; Gardner, Timothy J; Ascheim, Deborah D; Ailawadi, Gorav; Lackner, Pamela; Goldsmith, Lyn A; Robichaud, Sophie; Miller, Rachel A; Rose, Eric A; Ferguson, T Bruce; Horvath, Keith A; Moquete, Ellen G; Parides, Michael K; Bagiella, Emilia; O'Gara, Patrick T; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2014-07-29

    Infections are the most common noncardiac complication after cardiac surgery, but their incidence across a broad range of operations, as well as the management factors that shape infection risk, remain unknown. This study sought to prospectively examine the frequency of post-operative infections and associated mortality, and modifiable management practices predictive of infections within 65 days from cardiac surgery. This study enrolled 5,158 patients and analyzed independently adjudicated infections using a competing risk model (with death as the competing event). Nearly 5% of patients experienced major infections. Baseline characteristics associated with increased infection risk included chronic lung disease (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21 to 2.26), heart failure (HR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.95), and longer surgery (HR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.21 to 1.41). Practices associated with reduced infection risk included prophylaxis with second-generation cephalosporins (HR: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.52 to 0.94), whereas post-operative antibiotic duration >48 h (HR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.28 to 2.88), stress hyperglycemia (HR: 1.32; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.73); intubation time of 24 to 48 h (HR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.04 to 2.14); and ventilation >48 h (HR: 2.45; 95% CI: 1.66 to 3.63) were associated with increased risk. HRs for infection were similar with either <24 h or <48 h of antibiotic prophylaxis. There was a significant but differential effect of transfusion by surgery type (excluding left ventricular assist device procedures/transplant) (HR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.07 to 1.20). Major infections substantially increased mortality (HR: 10.02; 95% CI: 6.12 to 16.39). Major infections dramatically affect survival and readmissions. Second-generation cephalosporins were strongly associated with reduced major infection risk, but optimal duration of antibiotic prophylaxis requires further study. Given practice variations, considerable opportunities exist for improving outcomes and

  13. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Pericardial Effusion and Cardiac Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Casares, Alejandro; Cesar, Sergi; Brunet-Garcia, Laia; Sanchez-de-Toledo, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Pericardial effusion (PEff) is defined by an increase in the physiological amount of fluid within the pericardial space. It can appear following different medical conditions, mainly related to inflammation and cardiac surgery. Cardiac tamponade is a critical condition that occurs after sudden and/or excessive accumulation of fluid in the pericardial space that restricts appropriate filling of the cardiac chambers disturbing normal hemodynamics and ultimately causing hypotension and cardiac arrest. It is, therefore, a life-threatening condition that must be diagnosed as soon as possible for correct treatment and management. Echocardiographic evaluation of PEff is paramount for timely and appropriate diagnosis and management. A structured echocardiographic approach including two-dimensional, M-mode, and Doppler echocardiographic evaluation assessing (i) quantity and quality of pericardial fluid, (ii) collapse of cardiac chambers, (iii) respiratory variation of the ventricular diameters, (iv) inferior vena cava collapsibility, and (v) flow patterns in atrioventricular valves should give the bedside clinician the necessary information to appropriately manage PEff. Here, we review these key echocardiographic signs that will ensure an appropriate assessment of a patient with PEff and/or cardiac tamponade. PMID:28484689

  14. [Effectiveness of activated factor VII in postoperative bleeding after cardiac surgery with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation].

    PubMed

    López-Herce Cid, J; Arriola Pereda, G; Zunzunegui Martínez, J L; Brandstrup Azuero, K B

    2005-05-01

    A 4-year-old girl suffered severe postoperative chest tube drainage bleeding after cardiac transplant surgery requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Transfusions of platelets and fresh frozen plasma failed to decrease the bleeding. At 2.5 hours a dose of 180 mcg/kg of recombinant activated Factor VII was administered. The hemorrhage decreased from 45 ml/kg/h in the first 2.5 hours to 17 ml/kg/h in the next 2.5 hours. The same dose of recombinant activated Factor VII was administered and the hemorrhage suddenly decreased to 1.5 ml/kg/h in the next 2.5 hours, with subsequent disappearance. No adverse events related to activated Factor VII were observed. Recombinant activated Factor VII may be useful in some cases of severe postoperative bleeding in children after cardiac surgery. Randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm its safety and efficacy, and to evaluate the most suitable dose.

  15. Is levosimendan effective in paediatric heart failure and post-cardiac surgeries?

    PubMed

    Angadi, Ullas; Westrope, Claire; Chowdhry, Mohammed F

    2013-10-01

    other vasoactive drugs were insufficient to maintain stable haemodynamics. A small sample size was indeed a limitation in all the above studies. Furthermore, it is best used as a rescue drug on a named-patient basis. A small sample size was indeed a limitation in all the above studies. Larger, well-designed trials are required to further evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of levosimendan in paediatric heart failure and post-cardiac surgeries.

  16. Anesthesia for major general surgery in neonates with complex cardiac defects.

    PubMed

    Walker, Amy; Stokes, Monica; Moriarty, Anthony

    2009-02-01

    Centers with large cardiac workloads may be presented with neonates who need major general surgery before correction or palliation of a serious cardiac defect. This is still a rare situation with only three short case reports available in the medical literature (1-3). We have reviewed the anesthetic and analgesic regimens of 18 such neonates who presented to the Birmingham Children's Hospital in the 4-year period 2004-2007. These children require meticulous preoperative evaluation and although it might be anticipated that they would pose a serious challenge to anesthetists, in reality with thorough investigation, preparation, and careful management, they tolerate general anesthesia well. These children may be transferred to centers of specialist pediatric cardiac anesthesia to be benefited from experience obtained there.

  17. Cardiac catheterization in the early post-operative period after congenital cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, George T; Kim, Dennis W; Vincent, Robert N; Kogon, Brian E; Miller, Bruce E; Petit, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    This study sought to demonstrate that early cardiac catheterization, whether used solely as a diagnostic modality or for the use of transcatheter interventional techniques, can be used effectively and with an acceptable risk in the post-operative period. Cardiac catheterization offers important treatment for patients with congenital heart disease. Early post-operative cardiac catheterization is often necessary to diagnose and treat residual anatomic defects. Experience with interventional catheterization to address post-operative concerns is limited. This was a retrospective cohort study. The medical and catheterization data of pediatric patients who underwent a cardiac catheterization ≤30 days after congenital heart surgery between November 2004 and July 2013 were reviewed. Patients who underwent right heart catheterization and endomyocardial biopsy after heart transplantation were excluded. A total of 219 catheterizations (91 interventional procedures, 128 noninterventional catheterizations) were performed on 193 patients. Sixty-five interventions (71.43%) were dilations, either balloon angioplasty or stent implantation. There was no difference in survival to hospital discharge between those who underwent an interventional versus noninterventional catheterization (p = 0.93). One-year post-operative survival was comparable between those who underwent an intervention (66%) versus diagnostic (71%) catheterization (p = 0.58). There was no difference in the incidence of major or minor complications between the interventional and diagnostic catheterization cohorts (p = 0.21). Cardiac catheterization, including transcatheter interventions, can be performed safely in the immediate post-operative period after congenital heart surgery. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment in cardiac surgery: a simple percutaneous solution.

    PubMed

    Divakaran, Vijay; Caldera, Angel; Stephens, Jack; Gonzalez, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment is a reported complication after cardiac surgery from inadvertent suturing of the catheter to the vena-caval wall during surgery. This article reports a simple percutaneous technique to retrieve the trapped catheter.

  19. Outcomes of a Combined Approach of Percutaneous Coronary Revascularization and Cardiac Valve Surgery.

    PubMed

    Santana, Orlando; Singla, Sandeep; Mihos, Christos G; Pineda, Andrés M; Stone, Gregg W; Kurlansky, Paul A; George, Isaac; Kirtane, Ajay J; Smith, Craig R; Beohar, Nirat

    A subset of patients requiring coronary revascularization and valve surgery may benefit from a combined approach of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and valve surgery, as opposed to the standard median sternotomy approach of combined coronary artery bypass and valve surgery. To evaluate its potential benefits and limitations, a literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid, and the Cochrane library, through March 2016 to identify all studies involving a combined approach of PCI and valve surgery in patients with coronary artery and valvular disease. There were five studies included in the study with a total of 324 patients, of which 75 (23.1%) had a history of previous cardiac surgery. The interval between PCI and surgery ranged from simultaneous intervention to a median of 38 days (interquartile range, 18-65 days). The surgical approach performed consisted of a minimally invasive one or median sternotomy. There were 275 single valve surgery (84.9%) and 49 double-valve surgery (15.1%) with a 30-day mortality ranging from 0% to 5.5%. The 1-year survival ranged from 78% to 96%, and the follow-up period ranged from 1.3 to 5 years. Herein, we present a review of the literature using this technique.

  20. Training and assessment of technical skills and competency in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Lodge, Daniel; Grantcharov, Teodor

    2011-03-01

    The assessment of surgical competency has become a priority for both surgical educators and licensing boards. Surgical educators must incorporate rigorous, reliable, and valid means of assessment into residency programs. Objective evaluation of technical skills has been extensively explored in various surgical specialties, but its role in cardiac surgery has not been well studied and there is limited experience with integration into the educational curricula. Several cardiac and vascular surgery simulation models have been designed and evaluated, ranging from simple low-fidelity models using inert materials to a complex, computer-controlled, high-fidelity simulator using biological tissues to practice entire surgical cases. Most of the available models have not been well validated or integrated into educational curricula. The cardiac surgery simulation tools in development need validation and incorporation into structured, competency-based training curricula. The ongoing development of surgical simulators and educational curricula will enable a transition from the century-old graded responsibility training program to a competency-based program, where trainees must demonstrate technical competence to progress to the next level of training and gain certification and re-certification--ultimately ensuring better and faster technical skill acquisition as well as improved quality of care and patient safety.

  1. Sonolysis in Prevention of Brain Infarction During Cardiac Surgery (SONORESCUE)

    PubMed Central

    Školoudík, David; Hurtíková, Eva; Brát, Radim; Herzig, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Here, we examined whether intraoperative sonolysis can alter the risk of new ischemic lesions in the insonated brain artery territory during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or valve surgery. Silent brain ischemic lesions could be detected in as many as two-thirds of patients after CABG or valve surgery. Patients indicated for CABG or valve surgery were allocated randomly to sonolysis (60 patients, 37 males; mean age, 65.3 years) of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) during cardiac surgery and control group (60 patients, 37 males; mean age, 65.3 years). Neurologic examination, cognitive function tests, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were conducted before intervention as well as 24 to 72 hours and 30 days after surgery. New ischemic lesions on control diffusion-weighted MRI in the insonated MCA territory ≥0.5 mL were significantly less frequent in the sonolysis group than in the control group (13.3% vs 26.7%, P = 0.109). The sonolysis group exhibited significantly reduced median volume of new brain ischemic lesions (P = 0.026). Stenosis of the internal carotid artery ≥50% and smoking were independent predictors of new brain ischemic lesions ≥0.5 mL (odds ratio = 5.685 [1.272–25.409], P = 0.023 and 4.698 [1.092–20.208], P = 0.038, respectively). Stroke or transient ischemic attack occurred only in 2 control patients (P = 0.496). No significant differences were found in scores for postintervention cognitive tests (P > 0.05). This study provides class-II evidence that sonolysis during CABG or valve surgery reduces the risk of larger, new ischemic lesions in the brain. www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01591018). PMID:27196464

  2. Mortality after cardiac surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis classified by the Child-Pugh score.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Kirolos A; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Kranenburg, Guido; de Heer, Frederiek; Kluin, Jolanda

    2015-04-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a known risk factor for postoperative mortality in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Clinical assessment of liver cirrhosis using the widely accepted Child-Pugh (CP) score is thus vital for evaluation of surgical options and perioperative care. However, detailed mortality rates as a consequence of liver cirrhosis are unclear. This review aimed to stratify the risk of short-term (<30 days) and overall (up to 10 years) mortality after cardiac surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis, classified by the CP score. Thus, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were systematically reviewed by two independent investigators for studies published up to February 2014, in which mortality in cirrhotic patients, classified by the CP classification, undergoing cardiac surgery was evaluated postoperatively. A total of 993 articles were identified. After critical appraisal of 21 articles, 19 were selected for final analysis. Weighted short-term mortality of cirrhotic patients undergoing cardiac surgery was 19.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 16.4-22.5%]. Across the different CP groups, short-term mortality appeared to be 9.0% (95% CI: 6.6-12.2%), 37.7% (95% CI: 30.8-44.3%) and 52.0% (95% CI: 33.5-70.0%) in Groups A, B and C, respectively. Weighted overall mortality within 1 year was 42.0% (95% CI: 36.0-48.3%) in all cirrhotic patients. Subdivided in groups, overall mortality within that 1 year was 27.2% (95% CI: 20.9-34.7%), 66.2% (95% CI: 54.3-76.3%) and 78.9% (95% CI: 56.1-92.1%) in Groups A, B and C, respectively. In conclusion, short-term mortality is considerably increased in patients with liver cirrhosis CP class B and C. Overall mortality is significantly high in all classes of liver cirrhosis.

  3. Utilisation of Blood Components in Cardiac Surgery: A Single-Centre Retrospective Analysis with Regard to Diagnosis-Related Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Raoul Georg; Rotering, Heinrich; Buddendick, Hubert; Franz, Dominik; Bunzemeier, Holger; Roeder, Norbert; Kwiecien, Robert; Sibrowski, Walter; Scheld, Hans H.; Martens, Sven; Schlenke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    transfused cases was observed compared to the period from 2009 to 2011 before implementation of the PBM initiative (red blood cells p < 0.002; fresh frozen plasma p < 0.0006; platelets p < 0.00006). Conclusion Until now, cardiac surgery comes along with a significant blood supply. By using a case-related data evaluation programme, the consumption of each blood component can be linked to clinical performance groups and, if necessary, to individual patients. Based on the results obtained from this retrospective analysis, prospective studies are underway to begin conducting target / actual performance comparisons to better understand the individual decision-making by the attending physicians with respect to transfusions. PMID:26019702

  4. Utilisation of blood components in cardiac surgery: a single-centre retrospective analysis with regard to diagnosis-related procedures.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Raoul Georg; Rotering, Heinrich; Buddendick, Hubert; Franz, Dominik; Bunzemeier, Holger; Roeder, Norbert; Kwiecien, Robert; Sibrowski, Walter; Scheld, Hans H; Martens, Sven; Schlenke, Peter

    2015-03-01

    compared to the period from 2009 to 2011 before implementation of the PBM initiative (red blood cells p < 0.002; fresh frozen plasma p < 0.0006; platelets p < 0.00006). Until now, cardiac surgery comes along with a significant blood supply. By using a case-related data evaluation programme, the consumption of each blood component can be linked to clinical performance groups and, if necessary, to individual patients. Based on the results obtained from this retrospective analysis, prospective studies are underway to begin conducting target / actual performance comparisons to better understand the individual decision-making by the attending physicians with respect to transfusions.

  5. A Historic Case of Cardiac Surgery in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Heart disease is the leading cause of nonobstetric mortality in pregnant women. Because of high risk, medical management represents the first line of treatment. However, when medical treatment fails, cardiac surgery becomes necessary. Case Presentation. A 27-year-old female who underwent successfully cardiac surgery three times within 3 years. At the first time, she had an aortic valve replacement at 25 weeks of gestation after an infectious endocarditis complicated with an ischemic stroke. At 39 weeks of gestation, she had delivered, vaginally, a healthy baby boy weighing 2800 g. In the second time, pregnant again at 30 weeks of gestation, she had a mitral valve replacement with an aortic prosthesis reinforcement after a paraprosthetic regurgitation and a mitral vegetation. A fetal death in utero had occurred; the extraction of the fetus by cesarean section with a tubal ligation was performed after stabilization of the mother. In the third time, she underwent successfully a mitral prosthesis replacement with Bentall's procedure after a mitral prosthesis disinsertion with an abscess of aortic annulus due to new episode of infectious endocarditis. Conclusion. Our patient has assembled almost all poor prognosis factors, which makes her a real historic case, probably never described in the literature. PMID:27803828

  6. Hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mahdi; Faraoni, David

    2015-07-26

    Although red blood cells (RBCs) transfusion is sometimes associated with adverse reactions, anemia could also lead to increased morbidity and mortality in high-risk patients. For these reasons, the definition of perioperative strategies that aims to detect and treat preoperative anemia, prevent excessive blood loss, and define "optimal" transfusion algorithms is crucial. Although the treatment with preoperative iron and erythropoietin has been recommended in some specific conditions, several controversies exist regarding the benefit-to-risk balance associated with these treatments. Further studies are needed to better define the indications, dosage, and route of administration for preoperative iron with or without erythropoietin supplementation. Although restrictive transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery have been shown to effectively reduce the incidence and the amount of RBCs transfusion without increase in side effects, some high-risk patients (e.g., symptomatic acute coronary syndrome) could benefit from higher hemoglobin concentrations. Despite all efforts made last decade, a significant amount of work remains to be done to improve hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  7. Screening Cardiac Surgery Patients for MRSA: An Economic Computer Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Wiringa, Ann E.; Bailey, Rachel R.; Goyal, Vishal; Lewis, G. Jonathan; Tsui, Becky Y. K.; Smith, Kenneth J.; Muder, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the economic value of preoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening and decolonization for cardiac surgery patients. Study Design Monte Carlo decision-analytic computer simulation model. Methods We developed a computer simulation model representing the decision of whether to perform preoperative MRSA screening and decolonizing those patients with a positive MRSA culture. Sensitivity analyses varied key input parameters including MRSA colonization prevalence, decolonization success rates, the number of surveillance sites, and screening/decolonization costs. Separate analyses estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the screening and decolonization strategy from the third-party payer and hospital perspectives. Results Even when MRSA colonization prevalence and decolonization success rate were as low as 1% and 25%, respectively, the ICER of implementing routine surveillance was well under $15,000 per quality-adjusted life-year from both the third-party payer and hospital perspectives. The surveillance strategy was economically dominant (less costly and more effective than no testing) for most scenarios explored. Conclusions Our results suggest that routine preoperative MRSA screening of cardiac surgery patients could provide substantial economic value to third-party payers and hospitals over a wide range of MRSA colonization prevalence levels, decolonization success rates, and surveillance costs. Healthcare administrators, infection control specialists, and surgeons can compare their local conditions with our study’s benchmarks to make decisions about whether to implement preoperative MRSA testing. Third-party payers may want to consider covering such a strategy. PMID:20645662

  8. Postoperative Pulmonary Dysfunction and Mechanical Ventilation in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Rafael; Lozano, Angels; Belda, F. Javier

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary dysfunction (PPD) is a frequent and significant complication after cardiac surgery. It contributes to morbidity and mortality and increases hospitalization stay and its associated costs. Its pathogenesis is not clear but it seems to be related to the development of a systemic inflammatory response with a subsequent pulmonary inflammation. Many factors have been described to contribute to this inflammatory response, including surgical procedure with sternotomy incision, effects of general anesthesia, topical cooling, and extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and mechanical ventilation (VM). Protective ventilation strategies can reduce the incidence of atelectasis (which still remains one of the principal causes of PDD) and pulmonary infections in surgical patients. In this way, the open lung approach (OLA), a protective ventilation strategy, has demonstrated attenuating the inflammatory response and improving gas exchange parameters and postoperative pulmonary functions with a better residual functional capacity (FRC) when compared with a conventional ventilatory strategy. Additionally, maintaining low frequency ventilation during ECC was shown to decrease the incidence of PDD after cardiac surgery, preserving lung function. PMID:25705516

  9. Obesity and oxidative stress predict AKI after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Billings, Frederic T; Pretorius, Mias; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Mercaldo, Nathaniel D; Byrne, John G; Ikizler, T Alp; Brown, Nancy J

    2012-07-01

    Obesity increases oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation, but the effect of obesity on postoperative AKI is not known. We examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and AKI in 445 patients undergoing cardiac surgery and whether oxidative stress (F(2)-isoprostanes), inflammation (IL-6), or antifibrinolysis (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 [PAI-1]) contribute to any identified relationship. Overall, 112 (25%) of the 445 patients developed AKI. Higher BMI was independently associated with increased odds of AKI (26.5% increase per 5 kg/m(2) [95% confidence interval, 4.3%-53.4%]; P=0.02). Baseline F(2)-isoprostane (P=0.04), intraoperative F(2)-isoprostane (P=0.003), and intraoperative PAI-1 (P=0.04) concentrations also independently predicted AKI. BMI no longer predicted AKI after adjustment for the effect of F(2)-isoprostanes, suggesting that obesity may affect AKI via effects on oxidative stress. In contrast, adjustment for IL-6 or PAI-1 did not substantially alter the association between BMI and AKI. Further, deconstruction of the obesity-AKI relationship into direct (i.e., independent of candidate pathways) and indirect (i.e., effect of BMI on AKI via each candidate pathway) effects indicated that F(2)-isoprostanes, but not IL-6 or PAI-1, partially mediate the relationship between obesity and AKI (P=0.001). In conclusion, obesity independently predicts AKI after cardiac surgery, and oxidative stress may partially mediate this association.

  10. Virtual Reality for Pain Management in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mosso-Vázquez, José Luis; Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Surgical anxiety creates psychological and physiological stress, causes complications in surgical procedures, and prolongs recovery. Relaxation of patients in postoperative intensive care units can moderate patient vital signs and reduce discomfort. This experiment explores the use of virtual reality (VR) cybertherapy to reduce postoperative distress in patients that have recently undergone cardiac surgery. Sixty-seven patients were monitored at IMSS La Raza National Medical Center within 24 hours of cardiac surgery. Patients navigated through a 30 minute VR simulation designed for pain management. Results were analyzed through comparison of pre- and postoperative vital signs and Likert scale survey data. A connection was found in several physiological factors with subjective responses from the Likert scale survey. Heavy positive correlation existed between breathing rate and Likert ratings, and a moderate correlation was found between mean arterial pressure and Likert ratings and heart rate and Likert ratings, all of which indicated lower pain and stress within patients. Further study of these factors resulted in the categorization of patients based upon their vital signs and subjective response, providing a context for the effectiveness of the therapy to specific groups of patients. PMID:24892200

  11. Derivation and Validation of Prognosis-Based Age Cutoffs to Define Elderly in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Afilalo, Jonathan; Steele, Russell; Manning, Warren J; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Rudski, Lawrence G; Langlois, Yves; Morin, Jean-Francois; Picard, Michael H

    2016-07-01

    The age cutoff to define elderly is controversial in cardiac surgery, empirically ranging from ≥65 to ≥80 years. Beyond semantics, this has important implications as a starting point for clinical care pathways and inclusion in trials. We sought to characterize the relationship between age and adverse outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and to derive and validate prognosis-based age cutoffs. Six thousand five hundred seventy one consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery at 3 hospitals in the United States and Canada were included in the cohort. Logistic regression models and generalized additive models with thin-plate splines were fit to the data. The age distribution was 50 to 59 years in 1244 (18.9%), 60 to 69 years in 2144 (32.6%), 70 to 79 years in 2000 (30.4%), ≥80 years in 1183 (18.0%) patients. After controlling for sex and type of operation, the relationship between age and 30-day operative mortality was found to be nonlinear. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the optimal cutoffs to identify older patients at higher risk of operative mortality were greater than 74, 78, and 75 years for isolated coronary bypass, isolated valve surgery, and coronary bypass plus valve surgery, respectively. These age cutoffs were validated in an independent cohort. The relationship between age and operative mortality is not linear, manifesting a steeper rise after age 75 for coronary bypass and approaching octogenarian age for isolated valve surgery. Rather than using arbitrary age cutoffs to define elderly, the outcomes-based cutoff of ≥75 years should be used to identify the population of older adults that has higher risk and may benefit from preoperative geriatric evaluation and optimization. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation during concomitant cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Pinho-Gomes, Ana C; Amorim, Mário J; Oliveira, Sílvia M; Azevedo, Luís; Almeida, Jorge; Monteiro, Vítor; Maciel, Maria Júlia; Pinho, Paulo; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F

    2014-01-01

    We present the experience of our centre with radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation concomitantly with cardiac surgery Methods: 170 patients underwent atrial fibrillation ablation with uni/bipolar-radiofrequency. They were followed for 3-months and then as appropriate for the cardiac disease. In 2013, patients still alive underwent rhythm monitoring with ECG and 24-hour tape if in sinus rhythm Mean age was 65 years old and 42% of the patients were male. Paroxysmal AF was rare (7%). Most patients had preserved ejection fraction and dilated left atria (diameter 53.2±7.5 mm). The most common indication for cardiac surgery was valve disease. More than 75% of the patients underwent prophylactic closure of the left atrial appendage. Pulmonary vein isolation was performed in all patients, followed by other left atrial ablation lines. Overall, surgical complications were rare, being the most frequent pacemaker implantation (15%). Median length of stay was 9 days (p25-p75:7-14). At discharge, 69% of the patients were in sinus rhythm, being 90% on anticoagulation and 69% on amiodarone. In-hospital mortality was less than 3% (5 patients), none of them related to the ablation procedure. At 3 months, 50% of the patients were in sinus rhythm, being 92% on anticoagulation and 75% on antiarrhythmic drugs. Direct current cardioversion was successful in 8 of 12 patients. In the multivariate analysis, being in sinus rhythm at discharge was the single independent predictor of maintaining sinus rhythm at 3 months. In 2013 (469 patients-year), 40% of the patients were in sinus rhythm, being 80% on anticoagulation and 45% on antiarrhythmic drugs. Concurrent atrial fibrillation ablation with radiofrequency achieves satisfactory and stable recovery of sinu rhythm without adding significant operative risk and post-operative complications.

  13. Implantable Defibrillators for Secondary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in Cardiac Surgery Patients With Perioperative Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nageh, Maged F.; Kim, John J.; Chen, Lie‐Hong; Yao, Janis F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized studies of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) have excluded sudden cardiac death survivors who had revascularization before or after an arrhythmic event. To evaluate the role of ICD and the effects of clinical variables including degree of revascularization, we studied cardiac surgery patients who had an ICD implanted for sustained perioperative ventricular arrhythmias. Methods and Results The electronic database for Southern California Kaiser Foundation hospitals was searched for patients who had cardiac surgery between 1999 and 2005 and an ICD implanted within 3 months of surgery. One hundred sixty‐four patients were identified; 93/164 had an ICD for sustained pre‐ or postoperative ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation requiring resuscitation. Records were reviewed for the following: presenting arrhythmia, ejection fraction, and degree of revascularization. The primary end point was total mortality (TM) and/or appropriate ICD therapy (ICD‐T), and secondary end points are TM and ICD‐T. During the mean follow up of 49 months, the primary endpoint of TM+ICD‐T and individual end points of TM and ICD‐T were observed in 52 (56%), 35 (38%), and 28 (30%) patients, respectively, with 55% of TM, and 23% of ICD‐T occurring within 2 years of implant. In multivariate risk analysis, none of the following was associated with any of the end points: incomplete revascularization, presenting ventricular arrhythmia, and timing of arrhythmias. Conclusion Our data supports the recent guidelines for ICD in this cohort of patients, as the presence of irreversible substrate and triggers of ventricular arrhythmias, cannot be reliably excluded even with complete revascularization. Further studies are needed to understand this complex group of patients. PMID:25146702

  14. How detrimental is reexploration for bleeding after cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Ruel, Marc; Chan, Vincent; Boodhwani, Munir; McDonald, Bernard; Ni, Xiaofang; Gill, Gurinder; Lam, Khanh; Hendry, Paul; Masters, Roy; Mesana, Thierry

    2017-09-01

    To establish the risk factors and impact of reexploration for bleeding in a large modern cardiac surgical cohort. At a tertiary referral center, baseline, index procedural, reexploration, outcome, and readmission characteristics of 16,793 consecutive adult cardiac surgery patients were prospectively entered into dedicated clinical databases. Correlates of reexploration for bleeding, as well as its association with outcomes and readmission, were examined with multivariable regression models. The mean patient age was 65.9 ± 12.1 years, and 11,991 patients (71.4%) patients were male. Perioperative mortality was 2.8% (458 of 16,132) in those who did not undergo reexploration for bleeding and 12.0% (81 of 661) in those who underwent reexploration for bleeding, corresponding to an odds ratio of 3.4 ± 0.5 (P <.001) over other predictors of mortality, including Euroscore II. Mortality was highest in patients who underwent reexploration after the day of index surgery (odds ratio, 6.4 ± 1.1). Hospital stay was longer in patients who underwent reexploration for bleeding (median, 12 days, vs 7 days in patients who did not undergo reexploration; P <.001), to an extent beyond any other correlate. Reexploration for bleeding also was independently associated with new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation, renal insufficiency, intensive care unit readmission, and wound infection. Risk factors for reexploration for bleeding were tricuspid valve repair, on-pump versus off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, emergency status, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, low body surface area, and lowest CPB hematocrit of <24%. Reexploration for bleeding is a lethal and morbid complication of cardiac surgery, with a detrimental effect that surpasses that of any other known potentially modifiable risk factor. All efforts should be made to minimize the incidence and burden of reexploration for bleeding, including further research on transfusion management during CPB. Copyright

  15. Ischemic Colitis after Cardiac Surgery: Can We Foresee the Threat?

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Rawa; Farag, Mina; Zaradzki, Marcin; Reissfelder, Christoph; Pianka, Frank; Bruckner, Thomas; Kremer, Jamila; Franz, Maximilian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Szabo, Gabor; Beller, Carsten J.; Karck, Matthias; Kallenbach, Klaus; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ischemic colitis (IC) remains a great threat after cardiac surgery with use of extracorporeal circulation. We aimed to identify predictive risk factors and influence of early catecholamine therapy for this disease. Methods We prospectively collected and analyzed data of 224 patients, who underwent laparotomy due to IC after initial cardiac surgery with use of extracorporeal circulation during 2002 and 2014. For further comparability 58 patients were identified, who underwent bypass surgery, aortic valve replacement or combination of both. Age ±5 years, sex, BMI ± 5, left ventricular function, peripheral arterial disease, diabetes and urgency status were used for match-pair analysis (1:1) to compare outcome and detect predictive risk factors. Highest catecholamine doses during 1 POD were compared for possible predictive potential. Results Patients’ baseline characteristics showed no significant differences. In-hospital mortality of the IC group with a mean age of 71 years (14% female) was significantly higher than the control group with a mean age of 70 (14% female) (67% vs. 16%, p<0.001). Despite significantly longer bypass time in the IC group (133 ± 68 vs. 101 ± 42, p = 0.003), cross-clamp time remained comparable (64 ± 33 vs. 56 ± 25 p = 0.150). The majority of the IC group suffered low-output syndrome (71% vs. 14%, p<0.001) leading to significant higher lactate values within first 24h after operation (55 ± 46 mg/dl vs. 31 ± 30 mg/dl, p = 0.002). Logistic regression revealed elevated lactate values to be significant predictor for colectomy during the postoperative course (HR 1.008, CI 95% 1.003–1.014, p = 0.003). However, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve calculates a cut-off value for lactate of 22.5 mg/dl (sensitivity 73% and specificity 57%). Furthermore, multivariate analysis showed low-output syndrome (HR 4.301, CI 95% 2.108–8.776, p<0.001) and vasopressin therapy (HR 1.108, CI 95% 1.012–1.213, p = 0.027) significantly

  16. MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND MAJOR INFECTIONS AFTER CARDIAC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Gelijns, Annetine C.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Acker, Michael A.; Argenziano, Michael; Geller, Nancy L.; Puskas, John D.; Perrault, Louis P.; Smith, Peter K.; Kron, Irving L.; Michler, Robert E.; Miller, Marissa A.; Gardner, Timothy J.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Lackner, Pamela; Goldsmith, Lyn A.; Robichaud, Sophie; Miller, Rachel A.; Rose, Eric A.; Ferguson, T. Bruce; Horvath, Keith A.; Moquete, Ellen G.; Parides, Michael K.; Bagiella, Emilia; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Blackstone, Eugene H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infections are the most common non-cardiac complication after cardiac surgery, but their incidence across a broad range of operations, as well as the management factors that shape infection risk, remain unknown. Objectives This study prospectively examines the frequency of postoperative infections and associated mortality, and modifiable management practices predictive of infections within 65 days from cardiac surgery. Methods This study enrolled 5,158 patients and analyzed independently adjudicated infections using a competing risk model (with death as the competing event). Results Nearly 5% of patients experienced major infections. Baseline characteristics associated with increased infection risk included chronic lung disease (hazard ratio [HR] 1.66; CI 1.21–2.26), heart failure (HR 1.47; CI 1.11–1.95), and longer surgery (HR 1.31; CI 1.21–1.41). Practices associated with reduced infection risk included prophylaxis with second-generation cephalosporins (HR 0.70; CI 0.52–0.94), whereas postoperative antibiotic duration >48 hours (HR 1.92; CI 1.28–2.88), stress hyperglycemia (HR 1.32; CI 1.01–1.73); intubation time of 24–48 hours (HR 1.49; CI 1.04–2.14); and ventilation >48 hours (HR 2.45; CI 1.66–3.63) were associated with increased risk. HRs for infection were similar with either <24 hours or <48 hours of antibiotic prophylaxis. There was a significant but differential effect of transfusion by surgery type (excluding left ventricular assist device procedures/transplant) (HR 1.13; CI 1.07–1.20). Major infections substantially increased mortality (HR 10.02; CI 6.12, 16.39). Conclusions Major infections dramatically affect survival and readmissions. Second-generation cephalosporins were strongly associated with reduced major infection risk, but optimal duration of antibiotic prophylaxis requires further study. Given practice variations, considerable opportunities exist for improving outcomes and preventing readmissions. PMID:25060372

  17. Plasma glutamine levels before cardiac surgery are related to post-surgery infections; an observational study.

    PubMed

    Buter, Hanneke; Koopmans, Matty; Kemperman, Ramses; Jekel, Lilian; Boerma, Christiaan

    2016-11-25

    A low plasma glutamine level was found in 34% of patients after elective cardiothoracic surgery. This could be a result of the inflammation caused by surgical stress or the use of extracorporeal circulation (ECC). But it is also possible that plasma glutamine levels were already lowered before surgery and reflect an impaired metabolic state and a higher likelihood to develop complications. In the present study plasma glutamine levels were measured before and after cardiac surgery and we questioned whether there is a relation between plasma glutamine levels and duration of ECC and the occurrence of postoperative infections. We performed a single-centre prospective, observational study in a closed-format, 20-bed, mixed ICU in a tertiary teaching hospital. We included consecutive patients after elective cardiac surgery with use of extracorporeal circulation. Blood samples were collected on the day prior to surgery and at admission on the ICU. The study was approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (Regional Review Committee Patient-related Research, Medical Centre Leeuwarden, nWMO 115, April 28th 2015). Ninety patients were included. Pre-operative plasma glutamine level was 0.42 ± 0.10 mmol/l and post-operative 0.38 ± 0.09 mmol/l (p < 0.001). There was no relation between duration of extracorporeal circulation or aortic occlusion time and changes in plasma glutamine levels. A logistic regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the presence of a positive culture during the post-operative course and pre-operative plasma glutamine levels (p = 0.04). Plasma glutamine levels are significantly lower just after cardiac surgery compared to pre-operative levels. We did not find a relation between the decrease in plasma glutamine levels and the duration of extracorporeal circulation or aortic clamp time. There was a correlation between pre-operative plasma glutamine levels and the presence of a positive culture after cardiac surgery

  18. Epidemiology of nosocomial pneumonia in infants after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Linhua; Sun, Xiaonan; Zhu, Xiongkai; Zhang, Zewei; Li, Jianhua; Shu, Qiang

    2004-02-01

    The pattern of nosocomial pneumonia (NP) in infants in a pediatric surgical ICU after cardiac surgery may differ from that seen in adult ICUs. The primary aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of NP in infants after cardiac surgery and, secondarily, to describe the changes of the distribution and antibiotic resistance of the pathogen during the last 3 years. Data were collected between June 1999 and June 2002 from 311 consecutive infants who underwent open-heart surgery in our hospital. We retrospectively analyzed the distribution and antibiotic resistance pattern of all the pathogenic microbial isolates cultured from lower respiratory tract aspirations. Of 311 infants, 67 patients (21.5%) acquired NP after cardiac surgery. The incidence of NP was more frequently associated with complex congenital heart defect (CHD) compared to simple CHD (43% vs 15.9%, chi(2) = 22.47, p < 0.0001). The proportion of late-onset NP was higher in patients with complex CHD (chi(2) = 6.02, p = 0.014). A total of 79 pathogenic microbial strains were isolated. Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) were the most frequent isolates (68 isolates, 86.1%), followed by fungi (6 isolates, 7.6%) and Gram-positive cocci (5 isolates, 6.3%). The main GNB were Acinetobacter baumanii (11 isolates, 13.9%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10 isolates, 12.7%); other commonly seen GNB were Flavobacterium meningosepticum (7 isolates, 8.9%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7 isolates, 8.9%), Escherichia coli (6 isolates, 7.6%), and Xanthomonas maltophilia (5 isolates, 6.2%). The most commonly seen Gram-positive cocci were Staphylococcus aureus (2 isolates, 2.5%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (2 isolates, 2.5%). The frequent fungi were Candida albicans (5 isolates, 6.3%). Most GNB were sensitive to cefoperazone-sulbactum, piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, amikacin. The bacteria producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases were mainly from K pneumoniae and E coli; the susceptibility of ESBL-producing strains

  19. Frequency of Recovery from Complete Atrioventricular Block After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Socie, Pierre; Nicot, Florence; Baudinaud, Pierre; Estagnasie, Philippe; Brusset, Alain; Squara, Pierre; Nguyen, Lee S

    2017-08-08

    Best timing for permanent pacemaker implantation to treat complete atrioventricular block (AVB) after cardiac surgery is unclear, as late pacemaker dependency was found low in recent observational studies. This study aimed to identify factors associated with spontaneous recovery from AVB. In a prospective and observational cohort, all patients who underwent cardiothoracic surgery during a 14-month-period were included (n = 1,200). Risk factors of postoperative AVB were assessed by logistic regression. Among patients who developed AVB, variables associated with recovery from AVB were assessed by Cox and logistic regression. Overall incidence of postoperative AVB was 6.0%. Risk factors of AVB were age (OR 1.03 [1.00 to 1.06], p = 0.023); female gender (OR 2.06 [1.24 to 3.41], p = 0.005), active endocarditis (OR 3.31 [1.33 to 8.26], p = 0.01), and aortic valve replacement (OR 3.17 [1.92 to 5.25], p <0.001). Among aortic valve replacement, sutureless aortic valve replacement was associated with more AVB (26.7% vs 8.1%, p <0.01). Recovery from AVB occurred in 30 patients (41.7%) in a median period of 3 days [interquartile range = 1;5]. Among patients who would recover from AVB, 90% of patients did so before day 7. None of the studied variable was independently associated with recovery from AVB. In conclusion, identified risk factors of postoperative AVB after cardiac surgery were age, female gender, endocarditis, and aortic valve replacement. Because most patients who would recover did so before day 7, this study validates modern guidelines suggesting permanent pacemaker implantation on day 7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reintubation of patients submitted to cardiac surgery: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Cíntia Yukie; de Figuereido, Luciana Castilho; Calixtre, Eveline Maria; Rodrigues, Cristiane Delgado Alves; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Martins, Pedro Paulo; dos Anjos, Ana Paula Ragonete; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To analyze patients after cardiac surgery that needed endotracheal reintubation and identify factors associated with death and its relation with the severity scores. Methods Retrospective analysis of information of 1,640 patients in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery between 2007 and 2015. Results The reintubation rate was 7.26%. Of those who were reintubated, 36 (30.3%) underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, 27 (22.7%) underwent valve replacement, 25 (21.0%) underwent correction of an aneurysm, and 8 (6.7%) underwent a heart transplant. Among those with comorbidities, 54 (51.9%) were hypertensive, 22 (21.2%) were diabetic, and 10 (9.6%) had lung diseases. Among those who had complications, 61 (52.6%) had pneumonia, 50 (42.4%) developed renal failure, and 49 (51.0%) had a moderate form of the transient disturbance of gas exchange. Noninvasive ventilation was performed in 53 (44.5%) patients. The death rate was 40.3%, and mortality was higher in the group that did not receive noninvasive ventilation before reintubation (53.5%). Within the reintubated patients who died, the SOFA and APACHE II values were 7.9 ± 3.0 and 16.9 ± 4.5, respectively. Most of the reintubated patients (47.5%) belonged to the high-risk group, EuroSCORE (> 6 points). Conclusion The reintubation rate was high, and it was related to worse SOFA, APACHE II and EuroSCORE scores. Mortality was higher in the group that did not receive noninvasive ventilation before reintubation.

  1. Temporary resolution of chronic atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery and the prolongation of ventricular repolarization.

    PubMed

    Obremska, Marta; Zyśko, Dorota; Nowicki, Rafał; Goździk, Anna; Rachwalik, Maciej; Grzebieniak, Tomasz; Kustrzycki, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Chronic atrial fibrillation may temporarily resolve after cardiac surgery. Prolongation of the ventricular repolarization period may be the electrophysiological background for this phenomenon. The aim of the study was to assess the association between resolution of atrial fibrillation and changes in the duration of the ventricular repolarization period in patients with pre-operative chronic atrial fibrillation who underwent cardiac surgery. A retrospective analysis of the medical recordings of patients with chronic atrial fibrillation who underwent cardiac surgery was performed. After exclusions the study group comprised 51 patients with chronic atrial fibrillation who underwent surgery in the Cardiac Surgery Department of Wrocław Medical University in 2008 and 2009. The 12-lead EKGs performed before and after the surgery were assessed and the QT and R-R intervals were measured. The patients were divided into Group 1, in whom atrial fibrillation persisted after the cardiac surgery, and Group 2, whose atrial fibrillation resolved after the surgery. In 31 patients (60.8%) atrial fibrillation disappeared during the first 24 hours after cardiac surgery. A significant prolongation of the QT interval after the surgery was found in Group 2 that was not observed in Group 1. Multiple regression analysis revealed that QT interval duration after surgery is related to the resolution of atrial fibrillation independently from the duration of the R-R interval duration and the need for cardiac pacing. Spontaneous temporary resolution of atrial fibrillation is a common finding after cardiac surgery in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. This phenomenon is related to a prolonged QT interval, therefore it may have an electrophysiological basis rather than a hemodynamic background. Further studies are required to assess the clinical importance of the prolongation of the QT interval after cardiac surgery.

  2. [Cardiac Mechanics Evaluated by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Abduch, Maria Cristina Donadio; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Mathias Jr, Wilson; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz de Campos

    2014-03-25

    Natural myocardial markers, or speckles, originated from constructive and destructive interference of ultrasound in the tissues may provide early diagnosis of myocardial changes and be used in the prediction of some cardiac events. Due to its relatively temporal stability, speckles can be tracked by dedicated software along the cardiac cycle, enabling the analysis of the systolic and diastolic function. They are identified by either conventional 2D grey scale and by 3D echo, conferring independence of the insonation angle, thus allowing assessment of cardiac mechanics in the three spatial planes: longitudinal, circumferential, and radial. The purposes of the present paper are: to discuss the role and the meaning of cardiac strain obtained by speckle tracking during the evaluation of cardiac physiology and to discuss clinical applications of this novel echocardiographic technology.

  3. Cardiac mechanics evaluated by speckle tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Abduch, Maria Cristina Donadio; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Mathias, Wilson; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz de Campos

    2014-04-01

    Natural myocardial markers, or speckles, originated from constructive and destructive interference of ultrasound in the tissues may provide early diagnosis of myocardial changes and be used in the prediction of some cardiac events. Due to its relatively temporal stability, speckles can be tracked by dedicated software along the cardiac cycle, enabling the analysis of the systolic and diastolic function. They are identified by either conventional 2D grey scale and by 3D echo, conferring independence of the insonation angle, thus allowing assessment of cardiac mechanics in the three spatial planes: longitudinal, circumferential, and radial. The purposes of the present paper are: to discuss the role and the meaning of cardiac strain obtained by speckle tracking during the evaluation of cardiac physiology and to discuss clinical applications of this novel echocardiographic technology.

  4. Cardiac Mechanics Evaluated by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Abduch, Maria Cristina Donadio; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Mathias, Wilson; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz de Campos

    2014-01-01

    Natural myocardial markers, or speckles, originated from constructive and destructive interference of ultrasound in the tissues may provide early diagnosis of myocardial changes and be used in the prediction of some cardiac events. Due to its relatively temporal stability, speckles can be tracked by dedicated software along the cardiac cycle, enabling the analysis of the systolic and diastolic function. They are identified by either conventional 2D grey scale and by 3D echo, conferring independence of the insonation angle, thus allowing assessment of cardiac mechanics in the three spatial planes: longitudinal, circumferential, and radial. The purposes of the present paper are: to discuss the role and the meaning of cardiac strain obtained by speckle tracking during the evaluation of cardiac physiology and to discuss clinical applications of this novel echocardiographic technology. PMID:24844877

  5. Acute Mesenteric Ischemia after Cardiac Surgery: An Analysis of 52 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gucu, Arif; Toktas, Faruk; Erdolu, Burak; Ozyazıcıoglu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a rare but serious complication after cardiac surgery. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence, outcome, and perioperative risk factors of AMI in the patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods. From January 2005 to May 2013, all patients who underwent cardiac surgery were screened for participation, and patients with registered gastrointestinal complications were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate analyses were performed. Results. The study included 6013 patients, of which 52 (0.86%) patients suffered from AMI, 35 (67%) of whom died. The control group (150 patients) was randomly chosen from among cases undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Preoperative parameters including age (P = 0.03), renal insufficiency (P = 0.004), peripheral vascular disease (P = 0.04), preoperative inotropic support (P < 0.001), poor left ventricular ejection fraction (P = 0.002), cardiogenic shock (P = 0.003), and preoperative intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) support (P = 0.05) revealed significantly higher levels in the AMI group. Among intra- and postoperative parameters, CPB time (P < 0.001), dialysis (P = 0.04), inotropic support (P = 0.007), prolonged ventilator time (P < 0.001), and IABP support (P = 0.007) appeared significantly higher in the AMI group than the control group. Conclusions. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment should be initiated as early as possible in any patient suspected of AMI, leading to dramatic reduction in the mortality rate. PMID:24288499

  6. [The value of an intervention for improving secondary prevention in patients undergoing cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Reyes, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Abella, Hugo; Cuerpo, Gregorio; López, José; Montalvo, Elena; Duarte, Juan; Vallejo, José L; Bueno, Héctor

    2008-07-01

    Given that treatment for secondary prevention in patients undergoing cardiac surgery is underused, we devised a hospital intervention to increase its implementation. The intervention involved all physicians in the department of cardiac surgery agreeing to complete a report on each patient before hospital discharge. The document recorded the indications for the recommended treatments, and prompted for details of the drugs prescribed, the doses used, the reasons for not prescribing the recommended drugs, if that was the case, and the use of alternative medicines. The efficacy of the intervention was evaluated by comparing the rate of drug use in the year in which it was introduced (2003, n=341) with retrospective data on the rate in the previous year (n=369). The rates of use of aspirin, statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and beta-blockers by patients who required them all showed an absolute increase, of 13.4%, 38.3%, 21.8%, and 21.5%, respectively. In conclusion, the introduction of a simple and inexpensive intervention was able to significantly increase the use of drugs for secondary prevention in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  7. Short-duration transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gregorini, Cristie; Cipriano Junior, Gerson; Aquino, Leticia Moraes de; Branco, João Nelson Rodrigues; Bernardelli, Graziella França

    2010-03-01

    Respiratory muscle strength has been related to the postoperative outcome of cardiac surgeries. The main documented therapeutic purpose of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is the reduction of pain, which could bring secondary benefits to the respiratory muscles and, consequently, to lung capacities and volumes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of short-duration transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the reduction of pain and its possible influence on respiratory muscle strength and lung capacity and volumes of patients in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery. Twenty five patients with mean age of 59.9 +/- 10.3 years, of whom 72% were men, and homogeneous as regards weight and height, were randomly assigned to two groups. One group received therapeutic TENS (n = 13) and the other, placebo TENS (n = 12), for four hours on the third postoperative day of cardiac surgery. Pain was analyzed by means of a visual analogue scale, and of respiratory muscle strength as measured by maximum respiratory pressures and lung capacity and volumes before and after application of TENS. Short-duration TENS significantly reduced pain of patients in the postoperative period (p < 0.001). Respiratory muscle strength (p < 0.001), tidal volume (p < 0.001) and vital capacity (p < 0.05) significantly improved after therapeutic TENS, unlike in the placebo group. Short-duration TENS proved effective for the reduction of pain and improvement of respiratory muscle strength, as well as of lung volumes and capacity.

  8. [Effect of neonatal perioperative anesthetic exposure in cardiac surgery on neuro- developmental outcomes in preschool children].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuejun; Wan, Yongling; Wen, Kailan; Liang, Tao; Lin, Tao; Li, Peng

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of neonatal perioperative anesthetic exposure in complex cardiac surgery on neurodevelopmental outcomes in preschool children. General clinical data and data concerning anesthetic exposure were collected from 89 infants undergoing complex cardiac surgery at Sichuan People' Hospital. The cohort was followed for neurodevelopment till preschool age (48-72 months) and assessed with Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-III, Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual Motor Integration (VMI-V), and General Adaptive Composite (GAC) of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-II. Seventy-one children were enrolled into the final analysis. Multiple linear regression found days on benzodiazepines (beta;=-0.49, P=0.005) and cumulative dose of benzodiazepines (β=-0.10, P=0.023) were associated with the full-scale IQ in these preschool children. Days on benzodiazepines (beta;=-0.39, P=0.009) and on chloral hydrate (beta;=-1.19, P=0.020) were associated with lower performance intelligence quotient (PIQ) at the preschool age. Cumulative dose of benzodiazepine exposure (beta;=-0.008, P=0.012) was associated with lower VMI scores. No correlations of other sedation/analgesia variables were found with the full-scale IQ, PIQ, Verbal IQ, VMI, or GAC scores. We found a significant association of days on benzodiazepines, cumulative dose of benzodiazepines, and days on chloral hydrate in neonatal cardiac surgery with neurodevelopmental outcomes at the preschool age, suggesting the need of minimizing anesthetic exposure during a neonatal cardiac surgery to improve the children's neurodevelopmental outcomes.

  9. The effect of preoperative intravenous paracetamol administration on postoperative fever in pediatrics cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Mohammad-Hasan; Foruzan-Nia, Khalil; Behjati, Mostafa; Bagheri, Babak; Khanbabayi-Gol, Mehdi; Dareshiri, Shahla; Pishgahi, Alireza; Zarezadeh, Rafie; Lotfi-Naghsh, Nazgol; Lotfi-Naghsh, Ainaz; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    Post-operative fever is a common complication of cardiac operations, which is known to be correlated with a greater degree of cognitive dysfunction 6 weeks after cardiac surgery. The aim of the present study was to examine efficacy and safety of single dose intravenous Paracetamol in treatment of post-operative fever in children undergoing cardiac surgery. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 80 children, aged 1-12 years, presenting for open heart surgery were entered in the trial and randomly allocated into two groups: Placebo and Paracetamol. After induction of anaesthesia, 15 mg/kg intravenous Paracetamol solution was infused during 1 h in the Paracetamol group. Patients in placebo group received 15 mg/kg normal saline infusion during the same time. Since the end of operation until next 24 h in intensive care unit, axillary temperature of the two group patients was recorded in 4-h intervals. Any fever that occurred during this period had been treated with Paracetamol suppository (125 mg) and the amount of antipyretic drug consumption for each patient had been recorded. In order to examine the safety of Paracetamol, patients were evaluated for drug complication at the same time. Mean axillary temperature during first 24 h after operation was significantly lower in Paracetamol group compared with placebo group (P = 0.001). Overall fever incidence during 24 h after operation was higher in placebo group compared with Paracetamol group (P = 0.012). Of Paracetamol group patients, 42.5% compared with 15% of placebo group participants had no consumption of antipyretic agent (Paracetamol suppository) during 24 h after operation (P = 0.001). This study suggests that single dose administration of intravenous Paracetamol before paediatric cardiac surgeries using cardiopulmonary bypass; reduce mean body temperature in the first 24 h after operation.

  10. The effect of preoperative intravenous paracetamol administration on postoperative fever in pediatrics cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Mohammad-Hasan; Foruzan-nia, Khalil; Behjati, Mostafa; Bagheri, Babak; Khanbabayi-Gol, Mehdi; Dareshiri, Shahla; Pishgahi, Alireza; Zarezadeh, Rafie; Lotfi-Naghsh, Nazgol; Lotfi-Naghsh, Ainaz; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Post-operative fever is a common complication of cardiac operations, which is known to be correlated with a greater degree of cognitive dysfunction 6 weeks after cardiac surgery. The aim of the present study was to examine efficacy and safety of single dose intravenous Paracetamol in treatment of post-operative fever in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 80 children, aged 1-12 years, presenting for open heart surgery were entered in the trial and randomly allocated into two groups: Placebo and Paracetamol. After induction of anaesthesia, 15 mg/kg intravenous Paracetamol solution was infused during 1 h in the Paracetamol group. Patients in placebo group received 15 mg/kg normal saline infusion during the same time. Since the end of operation until next 24 h in intensive care unit, axillary temperature of the two group patients was recorded in 4-h intervals. Any fever that occurred during this period had been treated with Paracetamol suppository (125 mg) and the amount of antipyretic drug consumption for each patient had been recorded. In order to examine the safety of Paracetamol, patients were evaluated for drug complication at the same time. Results: Mean axillary temperature during first 24 h after operation was significantly lower in Paracetamol group compared with placebo group (P = 0.001). Overall fever incidence during 24 h after operation was higher in placebo group compared with Paracetamol group (P = 0.012). Of Paracetamol group patients, 42.5% compared with 15% of placebo group participants had no consumption of antipyretic agent (Paracetamol suppository) during 24 h after operation (P = 0.001). Conclusion: This study suggests that single dose administration of intravenous Paracetamol before paediatric cardiac surgeries using cardiopulmonary bypass; reduce mean body temperature in the first 24 h after operation. PMID:25298601

  11. Glycemic control in cardiac surgery: implementing an evidence-based insulin infusion protocol.

    PubMed

    Hargraves, Joelle D

    2014-05-01

    Acute hyperglycemia following cardiac surgery increases the risk of deep sternal wound infection, significant early morbidity, and mortality. Insulin infusion protocols that target tight glycemic control to treat hyperglycemia have been linked to hypoglycemia and increased mortality. Recently published studies examining glycemic control in critical illness and clinical practice guidelines from professional organizations support moderate glycemic control. To measure critical care nurses' knowledge of glycemic control in cardiac surgery before and after education. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an evidence-based insulin infusion protocol targeting moderate glycemic control in cardiac surgery patients. This evidence-based practice change was implemented in the cardiovascular unit in a community teaching hospital. Nurses completed a self-developed questionnaire to measure knowledge of glycemic control. Blood glucose data, collected (retrospectively) from anesthesia end time through 11:59 PM on postoperative day 2, were compared from 2 months before to 2 months after the practice change. Nurses' knowledge (test scores) increased significantly after education (pretest mean = 53.10, SD = 11.75; posttest mean = 79.10, SD = 12.02; t54 = -8.18, P < .001). Mean blood glucose level after implementation was 148 mg/dL. The incidence of hypoglycemia, 2.09% before and 0.22% after the intervention, was significantly reduced ( $${\\hbox{ \\chi }}_{1}^{2}$$ [n = 29] = 13.9, P < .001). The percentage of blood glucose levels less than 180 mg/dL was 88.30%. Increasing nurses' knowledge of glycemic control and implementing an insulin infusion protocol targeting moderate glycemic control were effective for treating acute hyperglycemia following cardiac surgery with decreased incidence of hypoglycemia.

  12. The predictors of surgical site infection post cardiac surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Musallam, Eyad

    2014-09-01

    We sought to conduct a systematic review to evaluate the predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiac surgery. We included published, peer-reviewed, English-language, retrospective and prospective studies identified in a search of Medline, CINAHL, and PubMed from 2005 and through February 20, 2012. The studies involved adults (age >18 years) undergoing cardiac surgery (defined by ICD-9 codes) and could be of any study design, in English, published within last 7 years, with data collection taking place in United States within last 10 years. We excluded animal studies, duplicates, summaries, commentaries, editorials, case reports, studies that conducted outside United States, and studies published before last 7 years or studies with data collection take place before last 10 years (2002). Three types of predictors emerge: Predictors of general infection post cardiac surgery, predictors of micro-organisms' specific SSIs and tracheotomy, and allogenic blood transfusion as specific predictors of SSI. Although the reviewed articles cover wide range of SSIs predictors, none of these articles investigate preoperative skin preparation, using pre- and postoperative prophylaxes antibiotics, postoperative wound care (appropriate time for first dressing), and patient nutritional status as a predictors of SSIs after cardiac surgery. Investigating these predictors for SSIs will enhance nurses' understanding of the importance of specific types of nutrition in preventing SSIs and enhancing wound healing, implementing a protocol for the wound care postoperatively, and implementing a protocol for the use of prophylactic antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines on Perioperative Cardiac Risk Assessment and Management for Patients Who Undergo Noncardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Duceppe, Emmanuelle; Parlow, Joel; MacDonald, Paul; Lyons, Kristin; McMullen, Michael; Srinathan, Sadeesh; Graham, Michelle; Tandon, Vikas; Styles, Kim; Bessissow, Amal; Sessler, Daniel I; Bryson, Gregory; Devereaux, P J

    2017-01-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines Committee and key Canadian opinion leaders believed there was a need for up to date guidelines that used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system of evidence assessment for patients who undergo noncardiac surgery. Strong recommendations included: 1) measuring brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal fragment of proBNP (NT-proBNP) before surgery to enhance perioperative cardiac risk estimation in patients who are 65 years of age or older, are 45-64 years of age with significant cardiovascular disease, or have a Revised Cardiac Risk Index score ≥ 1; 2) against performing preoperative resting echocardiography, coronary computed tomography angiography, exercise or cardiopulmonary exercise testing, or pharmacological stress echocardiography or radionuclide imaging to enhance perioperative cardiac risk estimation; 3) against the initiation or continuation of acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of perioperative cardiac events, except in patients with a recent coronary artery stent or who will undergo carotid endarterectomy; 4) against α2 agonist or β-blocker initiation within 24 hours before surgery; 5) withholding angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor blocker starting 24 hours before surgery; 6) facilitating smoking cessation before surgery; 7) measuring daily troponin for 48 to 72 hours after surgery in patients with an elevated NT-proBNP/BNP measurement before surgery or if there is no NT-proBNP/BNP measurement before surgery, in those who have a Revised Cardiac Risk Index score ≥1, age 45-64 years with significant cardiovascular disease, or age 65 years or older; and 8) initiating of long-term acetylsalicylic acid and statin therapy in patients who suffer myocardial injury/infarction after surgery.

  14. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage following cardiac surgery: a comparative study with vascular surgery patients from a single centre.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, Anthoor; McGrath, Christine; McCullagh, Emily; Smith, Frank; Angelini, Gianni; Probert, Christopher

    2004-02-01

    To compare the frequency and outcome of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (UGH) patients who had undergone cardiac surgery with a control group of vascular surgery patients. Patients who had undergone cardiac or vascular surgery from January 1999 to December 2000 were identified from departmental records. The inclusion criteria used were haematemesis and/or melaena in the post-operative period. Only 20 of the 2274 (0.9%) cardiac operations were complicated by UGH compared to eight of 708 (1.1%) vascular operations. Among those with UGH, 90% of the cardiac and 43% of the vascular patients were taking aspirin, warfarin or both. The mean interval between surgery and the UGH was 9.6 days (range 1-30) for the cardiac and 6 days (range 0-15) for the vascular patients. Duodenal and gastric ulcers were the most common cause of UGH (60%) in the cardiac group. Despite endoscopic intervention, more than one third of ulcer associated haemorrhages required surgical over-sewing, but none of the patients who had surgery died. The overall mortality on the cardiac surgery patients who experienced UGH was 15%, significantly higher than the 2.3% for the whole cardiac surgery group during the study period (P = 0.00075, OR = 8, 95% confidence interval 2.3-28). However, even this mortality is less than that of general inpatients who suffer UGH (33%). Cardiac and vascular surgical patients have similar low post-operative rate of UGH. Post-operative UGH is associated with increased mortality after primary surgery. Early surgical intervention appears to be life saving in those patients who are too ill to compensate for the haemodynamic disturbance of untreated UGH.

  15. Structured electronic documentation (SED) cardiac surgery and PowerNote- a pilot project.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Daniel P; Raghu, Sujatha; Waechter, Darcy K

    2005-01-01

    User Specific templates were created through Cerner PowerNote to fit the need for improving the turnaround time for the Operative notes for Cardiac Surgery Patients. This eliminated the lag time of 37.5hours for Intensive Care Unit staff to access the detailed Operative notes on Cardiac surgery patients.

  16. Postoperative Biomarkers Predict Acute Kidney Injury and Poor Outcomes after Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Prasad; Zappitelli, Michael; Sint, Kyaw; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Li, Simon; Kim, Richard W.; Koyner, Jay L.; Coca, Steven G.; Edelstein, Charles L.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Garg, Amit X.; Krawczeski, Catherine D.

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly after pediatric cardiac surgery and associates with poor outcomes. Biomarkers may help the prediction or early identification of AKI, potentially increasing opportunities for therapeutic interventions. Here, we conducted a prospective, multicenter cohort study involving 311 children undergoing surgery for congenital cardiac lesions to evaluate whether early postoperative measures of urine IL-18, urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), or plasma NGAL could identify which patients would develop AKI and other adverse outcomes. Urine IL-18 and urine and plasma NGAL levels peaked within 6 hours after surgery. Severe AKI, defined by dialysis or doubling in serum creatinine during hospital stay, occurred in 53 participants at a median of 2 days after surgery. The first postoperative urine IL-18 and urine NGAL levels strongly associated with severe AKI. After multivariable adjustment, the highest quintiles of urine IL-18 and urine NGAL associated with 6.9- and 4.1-fold higher odds of AKI, respectively, compared with the lowest quintiles. Elevated urine IL-18 and urine NGAL levels associated with longer hospital stay, longer intensive care unit stay, and duration of mechanical ventilation. The accuracy of urine IL-18 and urine NGAL for diagnosis of severe AKI was moderate, with areas under the curve of 0.72 and 0.71, respectively. The addition of these urine biomarkers improved risk prediction over clinical models alone as measured by net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement. In conclusion, urine IL-18 and urine NGAL, but not plasma NGAL, associate with subsequent AKI and poor outcomes among children undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:21836147

  17. Apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes during pediatric cardiac surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, J.; Pipek, M.; Hambsch, J.; Schneider, P.; Tárnok, A.

    2006-02-01

    There is a constant need for clinical diagnostic systems that enable to predict disease course for preventative medicine. Apoptosis, programmed cell death, is the end point of the cell's response to different induction and leads to changes in the cell morphology that can be rapidly detected by optical systems. We tested whether apoptosis of T-cells in the peripheral blood is useful as predictor and compared different preparation and analytical techniques. Surgical trauma is associated with elevated apoptosis of circulating leukocytes. Increased apoptosis leads to partial removal of immune competent cells and could therefore in part be responsible for reduced immune defence. Cardiovascular surgery with but not without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induces transient immunosuppression. Its effect on T-cell apoptosis has not been shown yet. Flow-cytometric data of blood samples from 107 children (age 3-16 yr.) who underwent cardiac surgery with (78) or without (29) CPB were analysed. Apoptotic T-lymphocytes were detected based on light scatter and surface antigen (CD45/CD3) expression (ClinExpImmunol2000;120:454). Results were compared to staining with CD3 antibodies alone and in the absence of antibodies. T-cell apoptosis rate was comparable when detected with CD45/CD3 or CD3 alone, however not in the absence of CD3. Patients with but not without CPB surgery had elevated lymphocyte apoptosis. T-cell apoptosis increased from 0.47% (baseline) to 0.97% (1 day postoperatively). In CPB patients with complication 1.10% significantly higher (ANOVA p=0.01) comparing to CPB patients without complications. Quantitation of circulating apoptotic cells based on light scatter seems an interesting new parameter for diagnosis. Increased apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes and neutrophils further contributes to the immune suppressive response to surgery with CPB. (Support: MP, Deutsche Herzstiftung, Frankfurt, Germany)

  18. Dielectric constant of skin and subcutaneous fat to assess fluid changes after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Petäjä, Liisa; Nuutinen, Jouni; Uusaro, Ari; Lahtinen, Tapani; Ruokonen, Esko

    2003-05-01

    The ability to objectively determine the degree of tissue edema and to monitor on-line fluid balance in critically ill patients would be a clinical benefit. In this prospective descriptive trial, we evaluated a new noninvasive method--dielectric constant of skin and subcutaneous fat (SSF)--in assessing fluid balance during cardiac surgery. The dielectric constant at the applied high radiofrequency is a direct measure of tissue water content. Twenty-nine patients with elective cardiac surgery participated in the study. Dielectric constants on forearm, thigh and abdomen were measured before surgery, within 1 h after surgery and in the first, second, third and fourth postoperative morning. At the same time the patients were weighed, except immediately after the operation and the first postoperative day when fluid balances were calculated. A statistically significant correlation (r = 0.60, p < 0.01) was found between the increase of the dielectric constant of SSF and weight gain of the patients from the baseline to the second postoperative morning. From the second to the fourth postoperative day when the patients were losing the weight, a statistical significant correlation between the dielectric constant and weight loss was not found. The results suggest that the measurement of the dielectric constant is a promising new method in assessing the fluid status of operated patients during the time the patients cannot be weighed.

  19. Are cardiac interventions without onsite surgery worth the risk?

    PubMed Central

    van der Graaf, Y.

    2005-01-01

    There is a considerable decline in the use of CABG for failed PCI and the pressure to perform cardiac interventions in centres without onsite surgery is high. But is it necessary to increase the number of PCI centres in a densely populated country as the Netherlands? Advocates for expansion suggest a better patient outcome, but the evidence is not very solid. Arguments such as transport time are probably quite valid in large countries, but do not pertain to the Netherlands. Increasing the number of PCI centres will inevitably lead to fewer procedures per centre, per cardiologist and more complications and higher mortality. Waiting lists are no longer a relevant issue. Other less altruistic reasons might be the driving force. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is considered a commercially attractive intervention by cardiologists and institutions and seems to be the main motive for extension of the number of PCI centres. PMID:25696419

  20. Mending broken hearts: marriage and survival following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Idler, Ellen L; Boulifard, David A; Contrada, Richard J

    2012-03-01

    Marriage has long been linked to lower risk for adult mortality in population and clinical studies. In a regional sample of patients (n = 569) undergoing cardiac surgery, we compared 5-year hazards of mortality for married persons with those of widowed, separated or divorced, and never married persons using data from medical records and psychosocial interviews. After adjusting for demographics and pre- and postsurgical health, unmarried persons had 1.90 times the hazard of mortality of married persons; the disaggregated widowed, never married, and divorced or separated groups had similar hazards, as did men and women. The adjusted hazard for immediate postsurgical mortality was 3.33; the adjusted hazard for long-term mortality was 1.71, and this was mediated by married persons' lower smoking rates. The findings underscore the role of spouses (both male and female) in caregiving during health crises and the social control of health behaviors.

  1. Public reporting of cardiac surgery performance: Part 2--implementation.

    PubMed

    Shahian, David M; Edwards, Fred H; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Prager, Richard L; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Shewan, Cynthia M; O'Brien, Sean M; Peterson, Eric D; Grover, Frederick L

    2011-09-01

    Appropriate implementation is essential to create a credible public reporting system. Ideally, data should be obtained from an audited clinical data registry, and structure, process, or outcomes metrics may be reported. Composite measures are increasingly used, as are measures of appropriateness, patient satisfaction, functional status, and health-related quality of life. Classification of provider performance should use statistical criteria appropriate to the policy objectives and to the desired balance of sensitivity and specificity. Public reports should use simplified visual or tabular presentation aids that maximize correct interpretation of numerical data. Because of sample size issues, and to emphasize that cardiac surgery requires team-based care, public reporting should generally be focused at the program rather than individual surgeon level. This may also help to mitigate risk aversion, the avoidance of high-risk patients.

  2. Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery in Gdansk in its new location – previous activity and perspectives for development

    PubMed Central

    Chojnicki, Maciej; Steffens, Mariusz; Jaworski, Radosław; Szofer-Sendrowska, Aneta; Paczkowski, Konrad; Kwaśniak, Ewelina; Romanowicz, Anna; Szymanowicz, Wiktor; Gierat-Haponiuk, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    The Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery in Gdansk is the only pediatric cardiac surgery center in northern Poland providing comprehensive treatment to children with congenital heart defects. The Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery in Gdansk currently offers a full spectrum of advanced procedures of modern cardiac surgery and interventional cardiology dedicated to patients from infancy to adolescence. January 19, 2016 marked the official opening of its new location. PMID:28515759

  3. Myocardial Oxidative Stress in Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sznycer-Taub, Nathaniel; Mackie, Stewart; Peng, Yun-Wen; Donohue, Janet; Yu, Sunkyung; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Charpie, John

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease often necessitates a period of myocardial ischemia during cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest, followed by reperfusion after aortic cross-clamp removal. In experimental models, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion is associated with significant oxidative stress and ventricular dysfunction. A prospective observational study was conducted in infants (<1 year) who underwent elective surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect (VSD) or tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Blood samples were drawn following anesthetic induction (baseline) and directly from the coronary sinus at 1, 3, 5, and 10 min following aortic cross-clamp removal. Samples were analyzed for oxidant stress using assays for thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl, 8-isoprostane, and total antioxidant capacity. For each subject, raw assay data were normalized to individual baseline samples and expressed as fold-change from baseline. Results were compared using a one-sample t test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Sixteen patients (ten with TOF and six with VSD) were enrolled in the study, and there were no major postoperative complications observed. For the entire cohort, there was an immediate, rapid increase in myocardial oxidative stress that was sustained for 10 min following aortic cross-clamp removal in all biomarker assays (all P < 0.01), except total antioxidant capacity. Infant cardiac surgery is associated with a rapid, robust, and time-dependent increase in myocardial oxidant stress as measured from the coronary sinus in vivo. Future studies with larger enrollment are necessary to assess any association between myocardial oxidative stress and early postoperative outcomes.

  4. Protocol guided bleeding management improves cardiac surgery patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pearse, B L; Smith, I; Faulke, D; Wall, D; Fraser, J F; Ryan, E G; Drake, L; Rapchuk, I L; Tesar, P; Ziegenfuss, M; Fung, Y L

    2015-10-01

    Excessive bleeding is a risk associated with cardiac surgery. Treatment invariably requires transfusion of blood products; however, the transfusion itself may contribute to postoperative sequelae. Our objective was to analyse a quality initiative designed to provide an evidenced-based approach to bleeding management. A retrospective analysis compared blood product transfusion and patient outcomes 15 months before and after implementation of a bleeding management protocol. The protocol incorporated point-of-care coagulation testing (POCCT) with ROTEM and Multiplate to diagnose the cause of bleeding and monitor treatment. Use of the protocol led to decreases in the incidence of transfusion of PRBCs (47·3% vs. 32·4%; P < 0·0001), FFP (26·9% vs. 7·3%; P < 0·0001) and platelets (36·1% vs. 13·5%; P < 0·0001). During the intra-operative period, the percentage of patients receiving cryoprecipitate increased (2·7% vs. 5·1%; P = 0·002), as did the number of units transfused (248 vs. 692; P < 0·0001). The proportion of patients who received tranexamic acid increased (13·7% to 68·2%; P < 0·0001). There were reductions in re-exploration for bleeding (5·6% vs. 3·4; P = 0·01), superficial chest wound (3·3% vs. 1·4%; P = 0·002), leg wound infection (4·6% vs. 2·0%; P < 0·0001) and a 12% reduction in mean length of stay from operation to discharge (95%: 9-16%, P < 0·0001). Acquisition cost of blood products decreased by $1 029 118 in the 15-month period with the protocol. The implementation of a bleeding management protocol supported by POCCT in a cardiac surgery programme was associated with significant reductions in the transfusion of allogeneic blood products, improved outcomes and reduced cost. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  5. Postoperative respiratory failure after cardiac surgery: use of noninvasive ventilation.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, Manuel; Navarrete, Inés; García-Palma, Maria José; Colmenero, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    To analyze the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in respiratory failure after extubation in patients after cardiac surgery, the factors associated with respiratory failure, and the need for reintubation. Retrospective observational study. Intensive care unit in a university hospital. Patients (n = 63) with respiratory failure after extubation after cardiac surgery over a 3-year period. Mechanical NIV. Demographic and surgical data, respiratory history, causes of postoperative respiratory failure, durations of mechanical ventilation and spontaneous breathing, gas exchange values, and the mortality rate were recorded. Of 1,225 postsurgical patients, 63 (5.1%) underwent NIV for respiratory failure after extubation. The median time from extubation to the NIV application was 40 hours (18-96 hours). The most frequent cause of respiratory failure was lobar atelectasis (25.4%). The NIV failed in 52.4% of patients (33/63) who had a lower pH at 24 hours of treatment (7.35 v 7.42, p = 0.001) and a higher hospital mortality (51.5% v 6.7%, p = 0.001) than those in whom NIV was successful. An interval <24 hours from extubation to NIV was a predictive factor for NIV failure (odds ratio, 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-17.9), whereas obesity was associated with NIV success (odds ratio, 0.22; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.91). Reintubation was required in half of the NIV-treated patients and was associated with an increased hospital mortality rate. Early respiratory failure after extubation (≤24 hours) is a predictive factor for NIV failure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Video-assisted cardiac surgery: 6 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Fortunato Júnior, Jeronimo Antonio; Pereira, Marcelo Luiz; Martins, André Luiz M; Pereira, Daniele de Souza C; Paz, Maria Evangelista; Paludo, Luciana; Branco Filho, Alcides; Milosewich, Branka

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive and video-assisted cardiac surgery (VACS) has increased in popularity over the past 15 years. The small incisions have been associated with a good aesthetic effect and less surgical trauma, therefore less postoperative pain and rapid recovery. To present our series with VACS, after 6 years of use of the method. 136 patients underwent VACS, after written consent, between September 2005 and October 2011, 50% for men and age of 47.8 ± 15, 4 anos, divided into two groups: with cardiopulmonary (CEC) (GcCEC=105 patients): mitral valve disease (47/105), aortic disease (39/105), congenital heart disease (19/105) and without extracorporeal circulation (CEC) (GsCEC=31 patients): cardiac resynchronization (18/ 31), cardiac tumor (4/31) and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting (6/31). GcCEC was held in right minithoracotomy (3 to 5 cm) and femoral access to perform cannulation. In GcCEC, mean length of ICU stay and hospital stay were respectively 2.4 ± 4.5 days and 5.0 ± 6.8 days. Twelve patients presented complications in post-operative and five (4.8%) death. Ninety-three (88.6%) patients evolved uneventful, were extubated in operating room, and remained a mean of 1.8 ± 0.9 days in ICU and 3.6 ± 1.3 days in the hospital. In GsCEC, were mean 1.3 ± 0.7 days in ICU and 2.9 ± 1.4 days in hospital and without complications or deaths. The results found in this series are comparable to those of world literature and confirm the method as an option the conventional technique.

  7. [Surgery in children with atrial septal defects without cardiac catheterization].

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Rosas, S J; Santamaría-Díaz, H; Gómez-Gómez, M; Alba-Espinosa, C; Maulen-Radovan, X; Palacios-Macedo, X

    1988-01-01

    We describe the results of surgical repair of atrial septal defects in 36 children who did not undergo pre-op cardiac catheterization. These cases were seen at the Hospital de Cardiologia y Neumología Dr. Luis Méndez del Centro Médico Nacional. There were 24 (67%) females and twelve (33%) males. The mean age was 6.4 +/- 2.4 years with a range from three to thirteen. All cases had auscultatory findings typical of atrial septal defect. Five patients with associated tricuspid murmur (chest film showed grade I cardiomegaly in 21 (58.3 per cent), grade II cardiomegaly in fifteen (41.7 percent). Pulmonary artery shadow was normal in 24 (66.6 percent) and increased in twelve (33.3%). Pulmonary blood flow was increased in all of them. Electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm in 35 (97.2%). In one instance left atrial rhythm; all EKGs demonstrated right axis deviation, complete right bundle branch block and right ventricular hypertrophy with diastolic overload. Only three had right atrial hypertrophy. The M-mode echocardiogram showed right ventricular dilatation in all and paradoxically septal motion in 26 (72.2%). Two-dimensional echo with the subxiphoid view allowed direct visualization of the defect in all cases. We performed contrast echocardiogram in eight cases and Doppler echocardiogram in six of them. Cardiac surgery findings were ostium secundum atrial septal defect in 34 (94.4%). Two of them also had partial anomalous venous connection. All had uneventful recovery. We conclude that in typical atrial septal defects operative repair is feasible without prior cardiac catheterization.

  8. Intraoperative renal regional oxygen desaturation can be a predictor for acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dae-Kee; Kim, Wook-Jong; Chin, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Ho; Don Hahm, Kyung; Yeon Sim, Ji; Cheol Choi, In

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of renal regional oxygen saturation (renal rSO2) in predicting the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery. A prospective observational study. Tertiary care university hospital. One hundred patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Renal rSO2 was monitored continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) throughout the anesthetic period. Postoperative AKI was defined using the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage (RIFLE) criteria. Of 95 patients who were included in the final analysis, 34 patients developed AKI after surgery. Recorded renal rSO2 data were used to calculate the total duration of the time when renal rSO2 was below the threshold values of 70%, 65%, 60%, 55%, and 50%. The total periods when the renal rSO2 level was below each of the threshold values were significantly longer in patients with AKI than in those without AKI (p = 0.001 or p<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the predictive power of renal rSO2 for AKI. The ROC curve analysis showed that renal rSO2 could predict the risk of AKI with statistical significance and that a renal rSO2<55% had the best performance (area under the curve-ROC, 0.777; 95% CI, 0.669-0.885; p<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that AKI significantly correlated with the duration of renal rSO2<55% (p = 0.002) and logistic EuroSCORE (p = 0.007). Intraoperative renal regional oxygen desaturation can be a good predictor of AKI in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardiac evaluation in children with hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, İlkay; Sarıalioğlu, Faik

    2016-09-01

    Hemangiomas are tumors most commonly encountered in pediatric patients, and are frequently treated with propranolol. However, there are currently no standard methods for evaluating cardiac function in patients prior to propranolol treatment. The present study was designed to aid in the evaluation of pretreatment cardiac and effects of propranolol on vital signs in pediatric hemangioma patients. A pediatric oncology specialist and a pediatric cardiology specialist examined all patients prior to initiation of propranolol treatment. All patients were examined by the same 2 physicians. Cardiac evaluation included complete echocardiogram and electrocardiography. From September 2009 to January 2014, 146 patients aged 4 days to 10 years were screened. No patient had cardiac contraindication to propranolol. The effect of hemangioma on left ventricle size was examined, but left ventricle dilatation was found in only 3 patients. However, 68 patients had abnormal echocardiogram: 17 had patent foramen ovale, 4 had ventricular septal defect, 9 had atrial septal defect (associated with right heart enlargement), 8 had patent ductus arteriosus, 6 had physiologic pulmonary stenosis, and 1 had an aortic coarctation. No contraindications to propranolol or side effects were observed. However, cardiac anatomic defects were more common in this patient group than in the general population. Hemangiomas in infants or children, even in small or premature infants, can be treated with propranolol without significant cardiac side effects. In addition, large dermal hemangiomas were not found to affect ventricular size in pediatric patients.

  10. Current status of cardiac surgery allied health professionals in Asia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Ye, W

    2011-01-01

    More and more allied health professions are getting involved in clinical health care. One estimate reported allied health personnel makes up 60 percent of the total health workforce. In Asia, in the field of cardiothoracic surgery, allied health personnel includes perfusionists, physician assistants, physiotherapist, intensivists, rehabilitation therapists, nutritionists and social workers. They work in collaboration with surgeons to provide a range of diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, cardiac care and support services to the patients and their families.Some allied health professions are more specialized. They must adhere to national training and education standards and their professional scope of practice. For example, the training of perfusionists consists of at least five years of academic in medical schools and another three-year-long clinical training in the hospital. The cardiac intensivists usually are medical doctors with a background in cardiology. They spend 3-4 years rotating in Internal Medicine, Anesthesiology, Emergency Rooms and Intensive Care Units. There have specialized medical societies to grant certified credentials and to provide continuing education. Other allied health professions require no special training or credentials and are trained for their work by the hospitals through on-the-job training. Many young health care providers are getting involved in the allied health personnel projects. They consider this as a career ladder because of the opportunities for advancement within specific fields.

  11. Subject-specific models for image-guided cardiac surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Moore, John; Drangova, Maria; Peters, Terry

    2008-10-01

    Three-dimensional visualization for planning and guidance is still not routinely available for minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS). This can be addressed by providing the surgeon with subject-specific geometric models derived from 3D preoperative images for planning of port locations or to rehearse the procedure. For guidance purposes, these models can also be registered to the subject using intraoperative images. In this paper, we present a method for extracting subject-specific heart geometry from preoperative MR images. The main obstacle we face is the low quality of clinical data in terms of resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and presence of artefacts. Instead of using these images directly, we approach the problem in three steps: (1) generate a high quality template model, (2) register the template with the preoperative data, and (3) animate the result over the cardiac cycle. Validation of this approach showed that dynamic subject-specific models can be generated with a mean error of 3.6 ± 1.1 mm from low resolution target images (6 mm slices). Thus, the models are sufficiently accurate for MICS training and procedure planning. In terms of guidance, we also demonstrate how the resulting models may be adapted to the operating room using intraoperative ultrasound imaging.

  12. Cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation and concomitant malignancy: early and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Paolo; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pugliese, Marta; Bovio, Emanuele; Chiariello, Luigi; Ruvolo, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    We retrospectively evaluated early and long-term results of cardiac surgery using extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in patients affected by malignancies and the potential influence of ECC on malignancy progression during follow-up. Out of 7078 patients referred for cardiac surgery from January 2001 to December 2012, 241 consecutive patients (3.4%) (mean age 72 ± 8 years; men 170) had malignancy either known before or detected during hospital stay. Organ malignancies were present in 201 patients (83%) and hematological malignancies in 40 (17%). Early stages of cancer (I-II, in remission) were present in 180 (75%) patients, and advanced stages (III-IV for organ malignancies , multiple organ involvement for hematological malignancies) in 61 (25%). EuroSCORE I and II were 8.6 ± 5.4 and 3.8 ± 2.1%, respectively. Cardiac surgery with ECC consisted in isolated (n = 176) or multiple procedures (n = 65). Follow-up (mean 57 ± 40 months) was 99% complete. In-hospital mortality was 5.8% (n = 14); 1.67% (n = 4) died from cancer-related causes. Ten-year survival was 65 ± 5%, and freedom from cardiac death was 92 ± 3.5%. Freedom from cancer-related death was 90 ± 3% for patients operated on in early stages of cancer compared with 60 ± 8.4% for those who operated on in advanced stages (P < 0.0001), and 89 ± 2.6% for organ malignancies compared with 48 ± 13% for hematological malignancies (P = 0.0002); hematological malignancies different from Hodgkin/non-Hodgkin lymphoma affected long-term survival (P < 0.05). Progression of malignancy was observed in 29 patients (12.8%) at 18 ± 10 months. Cardiac surgery in cancer patients is not associated with increased in-hospital mortality and provides satisfactory freedom from cardiac death. Long-term survival in early stages of cancer appears satisfactory. Time interval between ECC and progression of malignancy during follow-up should apparently exclude

  13. Current status of brain protection during surgery for congenital cardiac defect.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takahiko

    2016-02-01

    The long-term neurodevelopmental outcome has been a great concern for cardiac surgeons although it is still unclear. There are some risks regarding the neurological and neuropsychological deficits before, during and after cardiovascular surgery. Current status of brain protection during congenital heart surgery could be reported. The incidence of neurologic outcome and the appropriate CPB strategy for brain protection are stated, and the latest data of neurodevelopmental outcome after pediatric cardiac surgery are clarified.

  14. Overuse of preoperative cardiac stress testing in medicare patients undergoing elective noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Kristin M; McAdams, Patricia S; Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Goodwin, James S; Boyd, Casey A; Zhang, Dong; Riall, Taylor S

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency and predictors of cardiac stress testing before elective noncardiac surgery in Medicare patients with no indications for cardiovascular evaluation. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines indicate that patients without class I (American Heart Association high risk) or class II cardiac conditions (clinical risk factors) should not undergo cardiac stress testing before elective noncardiac, nonvascular surgery. We used 5% Medicare inpatient claims data (1996-2008) to identify patients aged ≥ 66 years who underwent elective general surgical, urological, or orthopedic procedures (N = 211,202). We examined the use of preoperative stress testing in the subset of patients with no diagnoses consistent with cardiac disease (N = 74,785). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify predictors of preoperative cardiac stress testing. Of the patients with no cardiac indications for preoperative stress testing, 3.75% (N = 2803) received stress testing in the 2 months before surgery. The rate of preoperative stress testing increased from 1.72% in 1996 to 6.44% in 2007 (P < 0.0001). A multivariate analysis adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics showed a significant increase in preoperative stress testing over time. Female sex [odds ratio (OR) 1.11; 95% CI: 1.02-1.21], presence of other comorbidities [OR 1.22; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09-1.35], high-risk procedure (OR 2.42; 95% CI: 2.04-2.89), and larger hospital size (OR 1.17; 95% CI: 1.03-1.32) were positive predictors of stress testing. Patients living in regions with greater Medicare expenditures (OR 1.24; 95% CI: 1.05-1.45) were also more likely to receive stress tests. In a 5% sample of Medicare claims data, 2803 patients underwent preoperative stress testing without any indications. When these results were applied to the entire Medicare population, we estimated that there are over 56,000 patients who underwent unnecessary

  15. Overuse of Preoperative Cardiac Stress Testing in Medicare Patients Undergoing Elective Noncardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sheffield, Kristin M.; Stone, Patricia S.; Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Goodwin, James S.; Boyd, Casey A.; Zhang, Dong; Riall, Taylor S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency and predictors of cardiac stress testing prior to elective noncardiac surgery in Medicare patients with no indications for cardiovascular evaluation. Background American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines indicate that patients without class I (AHA high risk) or class II cardiac conditions (clinical risk factors) should not undergo cardiac stress testing prior to elective noncardiac, non-vascular surgery. Methods We used 5% Medicare inpatient claims data (1996–2008) to identify patients aged ≥ 66 years who underwent elective general surgical, urologic, or orthopedic procedures (N=211,202). We examined use of preoperative stress testing in the subset of patients with no diagnoses consistent with cardiac disease (N=74,785). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify predictors of preoperative cardiac stress testing. Results Of the patients with no cardiac indications for preoperative stress testing, 3.75% (N= 2,803) received stress testing in the 2 months before surgery. The rate of preoperative stress testing increased from 1.72% in 1996 to 6.44% in 2007 (p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics showed a significant increase in preoperative stress testing over time. Female gender (OR=1.11, 95% CI=1.02–1.21), presence of other comorbidities (OR=1.22, 95% CI=1.09–1.35), high risk procedure (OR=2.42, 95% CI=2.04–2.89), and larger hospital size (OR=1.17, 95% CI=1.03–1.32) were positive predictors of stress testing. Patients living in regions with greater Medicare expenditures (OR=1.24, 95% CI=1.05–1.45) were more likely to receive stress tests. Conclusions In a 5% sample of Medicare claims data, 2,803 patients underwent preoperative stress testing without any indications. When these results are applied to the entire Medicare population, we estimate that there are over 56,000 patients who underwent unnecessary preoperative stress testing

  16. The use of the virtual reality as intervention tool in the postoperative of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Cacau, Lucas de Assis Pereira; Oliveira, Géssica Uruga; Maynard, Luana Godinho; Araújo Filho, Amaro Afrânio de; Silva, Walderi Monteiro da; Cerqueria Neto, Manoel Luiz; Antoniolli, Angelo Roberto; Santana-Filho, Valter J

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac surgery has been the intervention of choice in many cases of cardiovascular diseases. Susceptibility to postoperative complications, cardiac rehabilitation is indicated. Therapeutic resources, such as virtual reality has been helping the rehabilitational process. The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of virtual reality in the functional rehabilitation of patients in the postoperative period. Patients were randomized into two groups, Virtual Reality (VRG, n = 30) and Control (CG, n = 30). The response to treatment was assessed through the functional independence measure (FIM), by the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). Evaluations were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. On the first day after surgery, patients in both groups showed decreased functional performance. However, the VRG showed lower reduction (45.712.3) when compared to CG (35.0612.09, P<0.05) in first postoperative day, and no significant difference in performance on discharge day (P>0.05). In evaluating the NHP field, we observed a significant decrease in pain score at third assessment (P<0.05). These patients also had a higher energy level in the first evaluation (P<0.05). There were no differences with statistical significance for emotional reactions, physical ability, and social interaction. The length of stay was significantly shorter in patients of VRG (9.410.5 days vs. 12.2 1 0.9 days, P<0.05), which also had a higher 6MWD (319.9119.3 meters vs. 263.5115.4 meters, P<0.02). Adjunctive treatment with virtual reality demonstrated benefits, with better functional performance in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  17. Sustainability of protocolized handover of pediatric cardiac surgery patients to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Chenault, Kristin; Moga, Michael-Alice; Shin, Minah; Petersen, Emily; Backer, Carl; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Suresh, Santhanam

    2016-05-01

    Transfer of patient care among clinicians (handovers) is a common source of medical errors. While the immediate efficacy of these initiatives is well documented, sustainability of practice changes that results in better processes of care is largely understudied. The objective of the current investigation was to evaluate the sustainability of a protocolized handover process in pediatric patients from the operating room after cardiac surgery to the intensive care unit. This was a prospective study with direct observation assessment of handover performance conducted in the cardiac ICU (CICU) of a free-standing, tertiary care children's hospital in the United States. Patient transitions from the operating room to the CICU, including the verbal handoff, were directly observed by a single independent observer in all phases of the study. A checklist of key elements identified errors classified as: (1) technical, (2) information omissions, and (3) realized errors. Total number of errors was compared across the different times of the study (preintervention, postintervention, and the current sustainability phase). A total of 119 handovers were studied: 41 preintervention, 38 postintervention, and 40 in the current sustainability phase. The median [Interquartile range (IQR)] number of technical errors was significantly reduced in the sustainability phase compared to the preintervention and postintervention phase, 2 (1-3), 6 (5-7), and 2.5 (2-4), respectively P = 0.0001. Similarly, the median (IQR) number of verbal information omissions was also significantly reduced in the sustainability phase compared to the preintervention and postintervention phases, 1 (1-1), 4 (3-5) and 2 (1-3), respectively. We demonstrate sustainability of an improved handover process using a checklist in children being transferred to the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery. Standardized handover processes can be a sustainable strategy to improve patient safety after pediatric cardiac surgery.

  18. Predictive factors for bleeding-related re-exploration after cardiac surgery: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Camila T; Brunori, Evelise H Fadini Reis; Santos, Vinicius Batista; Moorhead, Sue A; Lopes, Juliana de Lima; de Barros, Alba L Bottura Leite

    2016-04-01

    Bleeding-related re-exploration is a life-threatening complication after cardiac surgery. Nurses must be aware of important risk factors for this complication so that their assessment, monitoring and evaluation activities can be prioritized, focused and anticipated. To identify the predictive factors for bleeding-related re-exploration after cardiac surgery and to describe the sources of postoperative bleeding. This is a prospective cohort study at a tertiary cardiac school-hospital in São Paulo/SP, Brazil. Adult patients (n=323) submitted to surgical correction of acquired cardiac diseases were included. Potential risk factors for bleeding-related re-exploration within the 24 hours following admission to the intensive care unit were investigated in the patients' charts. A univariate analysis and a multiple analysis through logistic regression were conducted to identify the outcome predictors. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was calculated as a measure of accuracy considering the cut-off points with the highest sensitivity and specificity. The univariate factors significantly associated with bleeding-related re-exploration were a lower preoperative platelet count, a lower number of bypasses in coronary artery bypass surgery and postoperatively, a lower body temperature, infusion of lower intravenous volume, a higher positive end-expiratory pressure during mechanical ventilation and transfusion of blood products. The independent predictors of bleeding-related re-exploration included postoperative red blood cell transfusion, and transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, platelet or cryoprecipitate units. These predictors had a sensitivity of 87.5%, a specificity of 99.28% and an accuracy of 97.93%. Blood product transfusion postoperatively is an independent predictor of bleeding-related re-exploration. Surgical errors prevailed as sources of bleeding. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  19. Evaluation of the brain anaesthesia response monitor during anaesthesia for cardiac surgery: a double-blind, randomised controlled trial using two doses of fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Shoushtarian, Mehrnaz; McGlade, Desmond P; Delacretaz, Louis J; Liley, David T J

    2016-12-01

    The brain anaesthesia response (BAR) monitor uses a method of EEG analysis, based on a model of brain electrical activity, to monitor the cerebral response to anaesthetic and sedative agents via two indices, composite cortical state (CCS) and cortical input (CI). It was hypothesised that CCS would respond to the hypnotic component of anaesthesia and CI would differentiate between two groups of patients receiving different doses of fentanyl. Twenty-five patients scheduled to undergo elective first-time coronary artery bypass graft surgery were randomised to receive a total fentanyl dose of either 12 μg/kg (fentanyl low dose, FLD) or 24 μg/kg (fentanyl moderate dose, FMD), both administered in two divided doses. Propofol was used for anaesthesia induction and pancuronium for intraoperative paralysis. Hemodynamic management was protocolised using vasoactive drugs. BIS, CCS and CI were simultaneously recorded. Response of the indices (CI, CCS and BIS) to propofol and their differences between the two groups at specific points from anaesthesia induction through to aortic cannulation were investigated. Following propofol induction, CCS and BIS but not CI showed a significant reduction. Following the first dose of fentanyl, CI, CCS and BIS decreased in both groups. Following the second dose of fentanyl, there was a significant reduction in CI in the FLD group but not the FMD group, with no significant change found for BIS or CCS in either group. The BAR monitor demonstrates the potential to monitor the level of hypnosis following anaesthesia induction with propofol via the CCS index and to facilitate the titration of fentanyl as a component of balanced anaesthesia via the CI index.

  20. Identification of systems failures in successful paediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, K R; Giddings, A E B; de Leval, M R; Peek, G J; Godden, P J; Utley, M; Gallivan, S; Hirst, G; Dale, T

    Patient safety will benefit from an approach to human error that examines systemic causes, rather than blames individuals. This study describes a direct observation methodology, based on a threat and error model, prospectively to identify types and sources of systems failures in paediatric cardiac surgery. Of substantive interest were the range, frequency and types of failures that could be identified and whether minor failures could accumulate to form more serious events, as has been the case in other industries. Check lists, notes and video recordings were employed to observe 24 successful operations. A total of 366 failures were recorded. Coordination and communication problems, equipment problems, a relaxed safety culture, patient-related problems and perfusion-related problems were most frequent, with a smaller number of skill, knowledge and decision-making failures. Longer and more risky operations were likely to generate a greater number of minor failures than shorter and lower risk operations, and in seven higher-risk cases frequently occurring minor failures accumulated to threaten the safety of the patient. Non-technical errors were more prevalent than technical errors and task threats were the most prevalent systemic source of error. Adverse events in surgery are likely to be associated with a number of recurring and prospectively identifiable errors. These may be co-incident and cumulative human errors predisposed by threats embedded in the system, rather than due to individual incompetence or negligence. Prospectively identifying and reducing these recurrent failures would lead to improved surgical standards and enhanced patient safety.

  1. The application of remote ischemic conditioning in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bosnjak, Zeljko J.; Ge, Zhi-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Perioperative myocardial ischemia and infarction are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality following anesthesia and surgery. The discovery of endogenous cardioprotective mechanisms has led to testing of new methods to protect the human heart. These approaches have included ischemic pre-conditioning, per-conditioning, post-conditioning, and remote conditioning of the myocardium. Pre-conditioning and per-conditioning include brief and repetitive periods of sub-lethal ischemia before and during prolonged ischemia, respectively; and post-conditioning is applied at the onset of reperfusion. Remote ischemic conditioning involves transient, repetitive, non-lethal ischemia and reperfusion in one organ or tissue (remote from the heart) that renders myocardium more resistant to lethal ischemia/reperfusion injury. In healthy, young hearts, many conditioning maneuvers can significantly increase the resistance of the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury. The large multicenter clinical trials with ischemic remote conditioning have not been proven successful in cardiac surgery thus far. The lack of clinical success is due to underlying risk factors that interfere with remote ischemic conditioning and the use of cardioprotective agents that have activated the endogenous cardioprotective mechanisms prior to remote ischemic conditioning. Future preclinical research using remote ischemic conditioning will need to be conducted using comorbid models. PMID:28690837

  2. Preventing and managing perioperative pulmonary complications following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, Manuel; Navarrete-Sánchez, Inés; Colmenero, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    To provide an update of research findings on the mechanisms underlying respiratory complications after cardiac surgery, especially acute respiratory distress syndrome, transfusion-related lung injury and ventilation-associated pneumonia. The article will review some of the preventive and therapeutic measures that can be implemented to reduce these complications, focusing on the use of protective invasive ventilation and postextubation noninvasive ventilation. The development of postoperative pulmonary complications is related to various perioperative factors. The most effective preventive measures are a correct preoperative preparation and an uneventful surgery. The implementation of nosocomial pneumonia prevention bundles, or early extubation in a fast-track program, has proven to be effective in reducing the complication rate. The application of protective invasive ventilation, with low tidal volumes, has been found to reduce lung injury and mortality in patients with lung injury or healthy lungs. The use of noninvasive ventilation as a preventive postextubation approach in patients at risk and rescue noninvasive ventilation in those developing respiratory failure remains under debate and is subject to ongoing research. Postoperative pulmonary complications are common, but severe complications are infrequent. Their reduction requires measures to prevent infection and mechanical ventilation-associated lung injury through the use of low tidal volumes and early extubation. Noninvasive ventilation after extubation can be utilized to avoid reintubation and the associated increased morbidity and mortality. However, noninvasive ventilation should be done under rigorous conditions and by following strict criteria.

  3. Preoperative Evaluation for Noncardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Steven L

    2016-12-06

    This issue provides a clinical overview of preoperative evaluation for noncardiac surgery, focusing on risk factors, elements of evaluation, medication management, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  4. Improved neurologic outcome after implementing evidence-based guidelines for cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Suojaranta-Ylinen, Raili Tuulikki; Roine, Risto Olavi; Vento, Antti Erland; Niskanen, Minnaliisa Marikki; Salmenperä, Markku Tapani

    2007-08-01

    A high incidence of neurologic complications was observed in the year 2001 in cardiac surgical patients in this department. This article attempts to show the impact of changing and optimizing management protocols on the incidence of neurologic morbidity after cardiac surgery. An observational study of cardiac surgical patients. University hospital. All cardiac surgical patients treated postoperatively in the cardiac surgical ICU in 2001 (n = 1,165, control group) and in 2003 (n = 1,222, intervention group) were evaluated. A quality improvement program started at the beginning of 2002, based on the Task Force Committee Guidelines, included surgical and cardiopulmonary bypass recommendations as well as peri- and postoperative care (eg, use of epiaortic echo and strict perfusion protocol, avoidance of hyperthermia and hyperglycemia, and minimization of cerebral edema). The number of neurologic complications decreased from 78 (6.7%) in 2001 to 33 (2.7%) in 2003 (p < 0.01), and corresponding numbers for ICU mortality were 44 (3.8%) and 24 (2.0%) (p < 0.01). The length of ICU stay also decreased (3.2 +/- 4.5 days in 2001 v 2.9 +/- 5.5 days in 2003, p < 0.001). In 2001, patients with neurologic complications consumed 853 ICU patient days (23% of all ICU patient days) and, in 2003, 549 (15% of all ICU patient days). According to logistic regression analysis that included 11 independent variables (treatment year, EuroSCORE, diabetes mellitus, history of stroke, and 7 different types of surgery), treatment in 2003 was independently associated with decreased risk for neurologic complications (odds ratio 0.30, 95% confidence intervals 0.19-0.47, p < 0.001). The occurrences of neurologic complications, mortality, and ICU resource consumption by this patient group decreased after implementation of an optimized management protocol and evidence-based guidelines.

  5. Post cardiac surgery vasoplegia is associated with high preoperative copeptin plasma concentration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Post cardiac surgery vasodilatation (PCSV) is possibly related to a vasopressin deficiency that could relate to chronic stimulation of adeno-hypophysis. To assess vasopressin system activation, a perioperative course of copeptin and vasopressin plasma concentrations were studied in consecutive patients operated on for cardiac surgery. Methods Sixty-four consecutive patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were studied. Hemodynamic, laboratory and clinical data were recorded before and during cardiopulmonary bypass, and at the eighth postoperative hour (H8). At the same time, blood was withdrawn to determine plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin (AVP, radioimmunoassay) and copeptin (immunoluminometric assay). PCSV was defined as mean arterial blood pressure < 60 mmHg with cardiac index ≥ 2.2 l/min/m2, and was treated with norepinephrine to restore mean blood pressure > 60 mmHg. Patients with PCSV were compared with the other patients (controls). Student's t test, Fisher's exact test, or nonparametric tests (Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon) were used when appropriate. Correlation between AVP and copeptin was evaluated and receiver-operator characteristic analysis assessed the utility of preoperative copeptin to distinguish between controls and PCSV patients. Results Patients who experienced PCSV had significantly higher copeptin plasma concentration before cardiopulmonary bypass (P < 0.001) but lower AVP concentrations at H8 (P < 0.01) than controls. PCSV patients had preoperative hyponatremia and decreased left ventricle ejection fraction, and experienced more complex surgery (redo). The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve of preoperative copeptin concentration was 0.86 ± 0.04 (95% confidence interval = 0.78 to 0.94; P < 0.001). The best predictive value for preoperative copeptin plasma concentration was 9.43 pmol/l with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 77%. Conclusions High preoperative

  6. Validation of a Novel Virtual Reality Training Curriculum for Robotic Cardiac Surgery: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Valdis, Matthew; Chu, Michael W A; Schlachta, Christopher M; Kiaii, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Robotic cardiac surgery training has relied entirely on classical methods of surgical teaching. We sought to evaluate the impact of a virtual reality (VR) simulation curriculum to improve skill acquisition in robotic cardiac surgery. We randomly assigned 20 surgical trainees to undergo a 9-exercise VR curriculum on a robotic surgical simulator or a control group that received no additional training. The trainees were then evaluated in a blinded fashion by assessing their de-identified video recordings of the following: (1) standardized robotic internal thoracic artery harvest and (2) mitral valve annuloplasty performed in porcine models, using a validated time-based scoring system and an objective intraoperative scoring tool. Postintervention assessments were compared to baseline. Trainees randomized to the VR group were faster than the control group for both the internal thoracic artery harvest (957.3 ± 98.9 vs. 749.1 ± 171.9; P = 0.004) and mitral annuloplasty (580.4 ± 14.4 vs. 463.8 ± 86.4; P < 0.001) and scored significantly higher with the intraoperative scoring tool (22.8 ± 2.7 vs. 11.0 ± 4.5; P < 0.001). Additionally, the VR group achieved a proficiency level similar to our experts for both time-based scores (P = 0.624 and P = 0.967), and the intraoperative assessment (P = 0.110), whereas the control group was not able to meet this level of proficiency for any of the primary outcomes. The average duration of training to successfully complete all required tasks was 9.3 hours. We have demonstrated that a VR simulation curriculum can significantly improve the efficiency and quality of learning in robotic cardiac surgery. Further evaluation of this curriculum is required for its widespread implementation in surgical training (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT#02357056).

  7. Skeletal muscle and plasma concentrations of cefazolin during cardiac surgery in infants.

    PubMed

    Himebauch, Adam S; Nicolson, Susan C; Sisko, Martha; Moorthy, Ganesh; Fuller, Stephanie; Gaynor, J William; Zuppa, Athena F; Fox, Elizabeth; Kilbaugh, Todd J

    2014-12-01

    To describe the pharmacokinetics and tissue disposition of prophylactic cefazolin into skeletal muscle in a pediatric population undergoing cardiac surgery. The subjects included 12 children, with a median age of 146 days (interquartile range, 136-174) and median weight of 5.5 kg (interquartile range, 5.2-7.3) undergoing cardiac surgery and requiring cardiopulmonary bypass with or without deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Institutional cefazolin at standard doses of 25 mg/kg before incision and 25 mg/kg in the bypass prime solution were administered. Serial plasma and skeletal muscle microdialysis samples were obtained intraoperatively and the unbound cefazolin concentrations measured. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed and the tissue disposition evaluated. After the first dose of cefazolin, the skeletal muscle concentrations peaked at a median microdialysis collection interval of 30 to 38.5 minutes. After the second dose, the peak concentrations were delayed a median of 94 minutes in subjects undergoing deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Skeletal muscle exposure to cefazolin measured by the area under concentration time curve 0-last measurement was less in the subjects who underwent deep hypothermic circulatory arrest than in those who received cardiopulmonary bypass alone (P = .04). The skeletal muscle concentrations of cefazolin exceeded the goal concentrations for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus prophylaxis; however, the goal concentrations for gram-negative pathogens associated with surgical site infections were achieved only 42.1% to 84.2% and 0% to 11.2% of the intraoperative time in subjects undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass alone or deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, respectively. This cefazolin dosing strategy resulted in skeletal muscle concentrations that are likely not effective for surgical prophylaxis against gram-negative pathogens but are effective against methicillin-sensitive S aureus in infants undergoing

  8. Postoperative Biomarkers Predict Acute Kidney Injury and Poor Outcomes after Adult Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coca, Steven G.; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Shlipak, Michael G.; Koyner, Jay L.; Wang, Zhu; Edelstein, Charles L.; Devarajan, Prasad; Patel, Uptal D.; Zappitelli, Michael; Krawczeski, Catherine D.; Passik, Cary S.; Swaminathan, Madhav; Garg, Amit X.

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of cardiac surgery and increases morbidity and mortality. The identification of reliable biomarkers that allow earlier diagnosis of AKI in the postoperative period may increase the success of therapeutic interventions. Here, we conducted a prospective, multicenter cohort study involving 1219 adults undergoing cardiac surgery to evaluate whether early postoperative measures of urine IL-18, urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), or plasma NGAL could identify which patients would develop AKI and other adverse patient outcomes. Urine IL-18 and urine and plasma NGAL levels peaked within 6 hours after surgery. After multivariable adjustment, the highest quintiles of urine IL-18 and plasma NGAL associated with 6.8-fold and 5-fold higher odds of AKI, respectively, compared with the lowest quintiles. Elevated urine IL-18 and urine and plasma NGAL levels associated with longer length of hospital stay, longer intensive care unit stay, and higher risk for dialysis or death. The clinical prediction model for AKI had an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.69. Urine IL-18 and plasma NGAL significantly improved the AUC to 0.76 and 0.75, respectively. Urine IL-18 and plasma NGAL significantly improved risk prediction over the clinical models alone as measured by net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI). In conclusion, urine IL-18, urine NGAL, and plasma NGAL associate with subsequent AKI and poor outcomes among adults undergoing cardiac surgery. (Clinical Trials.gov number, NCT00774137). PMID:21836143

  9. Prevalence of post-operative morbidity risk factors following cardiac surgery in patients with chronic viral hepatitis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, W C; Chen, P C; George, G; Tinica, G; Corciova, F-C

    2015-01-01

    Current cardiac risk assessments such as EuroSCORE II and the STS-Score do not take liver dysfunction into account. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and post-operative morbidity risk factors following cardiac surgery of patients with chronic viral hepatitis. The study group consisted of 105 patients with documented chronic viral hepatitis who were subject to elective cardiac surgery from 2001 to 2012. Subjects were evaluated for pre-operative liver dysfunction according to the MELD score. The average MELD score of the study group was 10.00 ± 6.00. The average EuroSCORE ii of the study group was 2.07% ± 1.62%. The primary post-operative complication was cardiac complications (n=57, 54.3%). Analysis showed significant differences in meld score, bilirubin and smoking. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the variables entering into the model included such risk factors with a significant or near significant (p < 0.2) influence on hospital morbidity and consisted in valve vs. coronary artery disease, valve/cad, aortic valve replacement vs. Coronary artery bypass graft, and bilirubin (mg/dl). it is vital that liver dysfunction is added to the risk models which are currently utilized to predict the post-operative morbidity of cardiac surgery patients.

  10. Effect of Pre-Operative Use of Medications on the Risk of Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eton, Vic; Sinyavskaya, Liliya; Langlois, Yves; Morin, Jean François; Suissa, Samy; Brassard, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Median sternotomy, the most common means of accessing the heart for cardiac procedures, is associated with higher risk of surgical site infections (SSIs). A limited number of studies reporting the impact of medication use prior to cardiac surgery on the subsequent risk of SSIs usually focused on antibacterial prophylaxis. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of medications prescribed commonly to cardiac patients on the risk of incident SSIs. The study analyzed data on consecutive cardiac surgery patients undergoing median sternotomy at a McGill University teaching hospital between April 1, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Exposure of interest was use of medications for heart disease and cardiovascular conditions in the seven days prior to surgery and those for comorbid conditions. The main outcome was SSIs occurring within 90 d after surgery. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]) was used to evaluate the effect. The cohort included 1,077 cardiac surgery patients, 79 of whom experienced SSIs within 90 d of surgery. The rates for sternal site infections and harvest site infections were 5.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4-7.3) and 2.5 (95% CI: 1.4-3.7) per 100 procedures, respectively. The risk of SSI was increased with the pre-operative use of immunosuppressors/steroids (AOR 3.47, 95% CI: 1.27-9.52) and α-blockers (AOR 3.74, 95% CI: 1.21-1.47). Our findings support the effect of immunosuppressors/steroids on the risk of SSIs and add evidence to the previously reported association between the use of anti-hypertensive medications and subsequent development of infection/sepsis.

  11. The Association of Brain MRI Characteristics and Postoperative Delirium in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Charles; Faigle, Roland; Klinker, Lauren; Bahouth, Mona; Max, Laura; LaFlam, Andrew; Neufeld, Karin J.; Mandal, Kaushik; Gottesman, Rebecca; Hogue, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Delirium is common after cardiac surgery, and it is associated with short- and long-term consequences, including cognitive decline. Identification of patients who are vulnerable to delirium might allow for early implementation of delirium-prevention strategies in older adults undergoing surgery. Brain MRI findings provide insight into structural brain changes that may identify vulnerable patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between brain MRI characteristics potentially associated with delirium vulnerability and the development of postoperative delirium in a nested cohort of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods We identified 79 cardiac surgery patients who had brain MRI imaging after cardiac surgery, as part of an ongoing randomized trial evaluating the efficacy of blood pressure management based on cerebral autoregulation monitoring versus standard management for improving neurological outcomes. Cerebral lateral ventricular size, cortical sulcal width, and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on brain MRI scans were graded on a validated 0 to 9 scale, and categorized into tertiles. New ischemic lesions were characterized as present or absent. Delirium was assessed using a validated chart-review. Neuropsychological testing performed before surgery was used to establish preoperative cognitive baseline. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the independent association between MRI characteristics and postoperative delirium. Findings Twenty-eight of 79 (35.4%) patients developed postoperative delirium. Patients with delirium had higher unadjusted ventricular size (median 4 vs. 3, p=0.003), and there was a trend towards higher sulcal sizes and WMH grades. Increasing tertiles of ventricular size (Odds Ratio [OR] 3.59; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.59–8.12; p=0.002) and sulcal size (OR 2.15; 95%CI 1.13–4.12; p=0.02) were associated with postoperative delirium, with a trend for tertiles of WMH grade (OR 1

  12. Performance and user evaluation of a novel capacitance-based automatic urinometer compared with a manual standard urinometer after elective cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Anton; Slettengren, Martin; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-04-21

    In the intensive care setting, most physiologic parameters are monitored automatically. However, urine output (UO) is still monitored hourly by manually handled urinometers. In this study, we evaluated an automatic urinometer (AU) and compared it with a manual urinometer (MU). This prospective study was carried out in the intensive care unit of a cardiothoracic surgical clinic. In postoperative patients (n = 34) with indwelling urinary catheters and an expected stay of 24 hours or more, hourly UO samples were measured with an AU (Sippi, n = 220; Observe Medical, Gothenburg, Sweden) or an MU (UnoMeter™ 500, n = 188; Unomedical, Birkerød, Denmark) and thereafter validated by cylinder measurements. Malposition of the instrument at the time of reading excluded measurement. Data were analyzed with the Bland-Altman method. The performance of the MU was used as the minimum criterion of acceptance when the AU was evaluated. The loss of precision with the MU due to temporal deviation from fixed hourly measurements was recorded (n = 108). A questionnaire filled out by the ward staff (n = 28) was used to evaluate the ease of use of the AU compared with the MU. Bland-Altman analysis showed a smaller mean bias for the AU (+1.9 ml) compared with the MU (+5.3 ml) (P <0.0001). There was no statistical difference in measurement precision between the two urinometers, as defined by their limits of agreement (±15.2 ml vs. ±16.6 ml, P = 0.11). The mean temporal variation with the MU was ±7.4 minutes (±12.4%), and the limits of agreement were ±23.9 minutes (±39.8%), compared with no temporal variation with the AU (P <0.0001). The ward staff considered the AU easy to learn to use and rated it higher than the MU (P <0.0001). The AU was not inferior to the MU and was significantly better in terms of bias, temporal deviation and staff opinion, although the clinical relevance of these findings may be open to discussion.

  13. Gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge for preventing sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Targońska, Sylwia; Stążka, Janusz; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of sternal wound infection (SWI) after cardiac surgery ranges from 0.5% to 8% and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and treatment cost. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis is not sufficient to fully prevent the contamination of the surgical access site. One of the most effective methods for the prevention of wound infection seems to be the use of gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge, which is successfully used in abdominal and orthopedic surgery. Surgically implantable topical antibiotics can reduce wound infection in cardiac patients as well, but the efficacy of SWI prevention in cardiac surgery still raises many questions. PMID:26336388

  14. Gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge for preventing sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kozioł, Małgorzata; Targońska, Sylwia; Stążka, Janusz; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2014-03-01

    The frequency of sternal wound infection (SWI) after cardiac surgery ranges from 0.5% to 8% and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and treatment cost. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis is not sufficient to fully prevent the contamination of the surgical access site. One of the most effective methods for the prevention of wound infection seems to be the use of gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge, which is successfully used in abdominal and orthopedic surgery. Surgically implantable topical antibiotics can reduce wound infection in cardiac patients as well, but the efficacy of SWI prevention in cardiac surgery still raises many questions.

  15. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database: 2017 Update on Outcomes and Quality.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Badhwar, Vinay; Paone, Gaetano; Rankin, J Scott; Han, Jane M; McDonald, Donna; Edwards, Fred H; Shahian, David M

    2017-01-01

    Established in 1989, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database is one of the most comprehensive clinical data registries in health care. It is widely regarded as the gold standard for benchmarking risk-adjusted outcomes in cardiac surgery and is the foundation for all quality measurement and improvement activities of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This is the second in a series of annual reports that summarizes current aggregate national outcomes in cardiac surgery and reviews database-related activities in the areas of quality measurement and performance improvement during the past year.

  16. Pediatric cardiac surgery Parent Education Discharge Instruction (PEDI) program: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Staveski, Sandra L; Zhelva, Bistra; Paul, Reena; Conway, Rosalind; Carlson, Anna; Soma, Gouthami; Kools, Susan; Franck, Linda S

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, more children with complex cardiac defects now receive treatment for their condition. For successful long-term outcomes, children also need skilled care at home after discharge. The Parent Education Discharge Instruction (PEDI) program was developed to educate nurses on the importance of discharge teaching and to provide them with a structured process for conducting parent teaching for home care of children after cardiac surgery. The aim of this pilot study was to generate preliminary data on the feasibility and acceptability of the nurse-led structured discharge program on an Indian pediatric cardiac surgery unit. A pre-/post-design was used. Questionnaires were used to evaluate role acceptability, nurse and parent knowledge of discharge content, and utility of training materials with 40 nurses and 20 parents. Retrospective audits of 50 patient medical records (25 pre and 25 post) were performed to evaluate discharge teaching documentation. Nurses' discharge knowledge increased from a mean of 81% to 96% (P = .001) after participation in the training. Nurses and parents reported high levels of satisfaction with the education materials (3.75-4 on a 4.00-point scale). Evidence of discharge teaching documentation in patient medical records improved from 48% (12 of 25 medical records) to 96% (24 of 25 medical records) six months after the implementation of the PEDI program. The structured nurse-led parent discharge teaching program demonstrated feasibility, acceptability, utility, and sustainability in the cardiac unit. Future studies are needed to examine nurse, parent, child, and organizational outcomes related to this expanded nursing role in resource-constrained environments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Milrinone Use is Associated With Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation Following Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Gregory A.; Murray, Katherine T.; Yu, Chang; Byrne, John G.; Greelish, James P.; Petracek, Michael R.; Hoff, Steven J.; Ball, Stephen K.; Brown, Nancy J.; Pretorius, Mias

    2009-01-01

    Background Postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF), a frequent complication following cardiac