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Sample records for cardiomyopathy iron status

  1. Iron status of vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Craig, W J

    1994-05-01

    An appropriately planned well-balanced vegetarian diet is compatible with an adequate iron status. Although the iron stores of vegetarians may be reduced, the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in vegetarians is not significantly different from that in omnivores. Restrictive vegetarian diets (eg, macrobiotic) are associated with more widespread iron-deficiency anemia. Western vegetarians who consume a variety of foods have a better iron status than do those in developing countries who consume a limited diet based on unleavened, unrefined cereals. Whereas phytates, polyphenolics, and other plant constituents found in vegetarian diets inhibit nonheme-iron absorption, vitamin C, citric acid, and other organic acids facilitate nonheme-iron absorption.

  2. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic myocardial fibrosis ... of the heart lining (endocardium), such as endomyocardial fibrosis and Loeffler syndrome (rare) Iron overload (hemochromatosis) Sarcoidosis ...

  3. Iron-overload injury and cardiomyopathy in acquired and genetic models is attenuated by resveratrol therapy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhash K.; Wang, Wang; Zhabyeyev, Pavel; Basu, Ratnadeep; McLean, Brent; Fan, Dong; Parajuli, Nirmal; DesAulniers, Jessica; Patel, Vaibhav B.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Oudit, Gavin Y.

    2015-01-01

    Iron-overload cardiomyopathy is a prevalent cause of heart failure on a world-wide basis and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with secondary iron-overload and genetic hemochromatosis. We investigated the therapeutic effects of resveratrol in acquired and genetic models of iron-overload cardiomyopathy. Murine iron-overload models showed cardiac iron-overload, increased oxidative stress, altered Ca2+ homeostasis and myocardial fibrosis resulting in heart disease. Iron-overload increased nuclear and acetylated levels of FOXO1 with corresponding inverse changes in SIRT1 levels in the heart corrected by resveratrol therapy. Resveratrol, reduced the pathological remodeling and improved cardiac function in murine models of acquired and genetic iron-overload at varying stages of iron-overload. Echocardiography and hemodynamic analysis revealed a complete normalization of iron-overload mediated diastolic and systolic dysfunction in response to resveratrol therapy. Myocardial SERCA2a levels were reduced in iron-overloaded hearts and resveratrol therapy restored SERCA2a levels and corrected altered Ca2+ homeostasis. Iron-mediated pro-oxidant and pro-fibrotic effects in human and murine cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts were suppressed by resveratrol which correlated with reduction in iron-induced myocardial oxidative stress and myocardial fibrosis. Resveratrol represents a clinically and economically feasible therapeutic intervention to reduce the global burden from iron-overload cardiomyopathy at early and chronic stages of iron-overload. PMID:26638758

  4. Iron-overload injury and cardiomyopathy in acquired and genetic models is attenuated by resveratrol therapy.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhash K; Wang, Wang; Zhabyeyev, Pavel; Basu, Ratnadeep; McLean, Brent; Fan, Dong; Parajuli, Nirmal; DesAulniers, Jessica; Patel, Vaibhav B; Hajjar, Roger J; Dyck, Jason R B; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2015-12-07

    Iron-overload cardiomyopathy is a prevalent cause of heart failure on a world-wide basis and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with secondary iron-overload and genetic hemochromatosis. We investigated the therapeutic effects of resveratrol in acquired and genetic models of iron-overload cardiomyopathy. Murine iron-overload models showed cardiac iron-overload, increased oxidative stress, altered Ca(2+) homeostasis and myocardial fibrosis resulting in heart disease. Iron-overload increased nuclear and acetylated levels of FOXO1 with corresponding inverse changes in SIRT1 levels in the heart corrected by resveratrol therapy. Resveratrol, reduced the pathological remodeling and improved cardiac function in murine models of acquired and genetic iron-overload at varying stages of iron-overload. Echocardiography and hemodynamic analysis revealed a complete normalization of iron-overload mediated diastolic and systolic dysfunction in response to resveratrol therapy. Myocardial SERCA2a levels were reduced in iron-overloaded hearts and resveratrol therapy restored SERCA2a levels and corrected altered Ca(2+) homeostasis. Iron-mediated pro-oxidant and pro-fibrotic effects in human and murine cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts were suppressed by resveratrol which correlated with reduction in iron-induced myocardial oxidative stress and myocardial fibrosis. Resveratrol represents a clinically and economically feasible therapeutic intervention to reduce the global burden from iron-overload cardiomyopathy at early and chronic stages of iron-overload.

  5. Iron status in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Wawer, Anna A; Gillings, Rachel; Jennings, Amy; Myint, Phyo K

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent in older age, particularly after the age of 80. Serum ferritin concentrations also decline, although there is no evidence to suggest that changes in iron stores are an inevitable consequence of ageing. Chronic inflammation is a common condition in older people, making the measurement of iron status difficult, and it is likely that elevated levels of circulating hepcidin are responsible for changes in iron metabolism that result in systemic iron depletion. Other contributory factors are poor diet and some medications, such as aspirin. Anaemia in older age has undesirable health outcomes, including increased susceptibility to falling and depression. However, there are concerns about possible adverse effects of iron supplements, either in relation to pro-inflammatory effects in the gut or inappropriate tissue iron deposition. Brain iron levels are increased with age-related degenerative diseases, but it is not known if this is the cause or a consequence of the disease, and genetic factors are likely to play a role. In order to maintain body iron within the normal range a personalised approach is required, taking into account all of the factors that may affect iron metabolism and the available strategies for preventing iron deficiency or overload.

  6. Iron and oxidative stress in cardiomyopathy in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Berdoukas, Vasilios; Coates, Thomas D; Cabantchik, Zvi Ioav

    2015-11-01

    With repeated blood transfusions, patients with thalassemia major rapidly become loaded with iron, often surpassing hepatic metal accumulation capacity within ferritin shells and infiltrating heart and endocrine organs. That pathological scenario contrasts with the physiological one, which is characterized by an efficient maintenance of all plasma iron bound to circulating transferrin, due to a tight control of iron ingress into plasma by the hormone hepcidin. Within cells, most of the acquired iron becomes protein-associated, as once released from endocytosed transferrin, it is used within mitochondria for the synthesis of protein prosthetic groups or it is incorporated into enzyme active centers or alternatively sequestered within ferritin shells. A few cell types also express the iron extrusion transporter ferroportin, which is under the negative control of circulating hepcidin. However, that system only backs up the major cell regulated iron uptake/storage machinery that is poised to maintain a basal level of labile cellular iron for metabolic purposes without incurring potentially toxic scenarios. In thalassemia and other transfusion iron-loading conditions, once transferrin saturation exceeds about 70%, labile forms of iron enter the circulation and can gain access to various types of cells via resident transporters or channels. Within cells, they can attain levels that exceed their ability to chemically cope with labile iron, which has a propensity for generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby inducing oxidative damage. This scenario occurs in the heart of hypertransfused thalassemia major patients who do not receive adequate iron-chelation therapy. Iron that accumulates in cardiomyocytes forms agglomerates that are detected by T2* MRI. The labile forms of iron infiltrate the mitochondria and damage cells by inducing noxious ROS formation, resulting in heart failure. The very rapid relief of cardiac dysfunction seen after intensive iron

  7. The Clinical Status of Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianyun; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Li, Jing; Li, Yaqi; Tan, Zirui; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Yan, Baoyong

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Stem cell-based therapy is emerging as a promising option for treatment of ICM. Several stem cell types including cardiac-derived stem cells (CSCs), bone marrow-derived stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), skeletal myoblasts (SMs), and CD34+ and CD 133+ stem cells have been applied in clinical researches. The clinical effect produced by stem cell administration in ICM mainly depends on the transdifferentiation and paracrine effect. One important issue is that low survival and residential rate of transferred stem cells in the infracted myocardium blocks the effective advances in cardiac improvement. Many other factors associated with the efficacy of cell replacement therapy for ICM mainly including the route of delivery, the type and number of stem cell infusion, the timing of injection, patient's physical condition, the particular microenvironment onto which the cells are delivered, and clinical condition remain to be addressed. Here we provide an overview of the pros and cons of these transferred cells and discuss the current state of their therapeutic potential. We believe that stem cell translation will be an ideal option for patients following ischemic heart disease in the future. PMID:26101528

  8. Iron endowment at birth: maternal iron status and other influences.

    PubMed

    Viteri, Fernando E

    2011-11-01

    The iron endowment at birth depends, in large part, on the newborn's birth weight and gestational age. These are determined by many factors, some of which are maternal characteristics, including the following: maternal iron stores at her own birth and during her own early life, maternal growth and development, maternal age at conception, intergenesic intervals, maternal body characteristics and iron status at conception and during early pregnancy, gestational body weight gain, and iron status throughout gestation, particularly at conception and early pregnancy, and gestational body weight gain. Although less studied, paternal influences on the initiation and progression of pregnancy and on maternal environmental exposures are also important. Even though tools for the quantitative evaluation of women's iron status are very well developed, the quantitative estimation of body iron in the newborn and young infant remains a challenge. This article describes the crucial role played by the placenta in protecting the embryo and the fetus. In addition, neonatal health, particularly early in pregnancy, is briefly addressed, as are some important aspects of antenatal nutritional interventions that include iron.

  9. [Iron stores status at early pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Barón, María Adela; Solano, Liseti; Peña, Evelyn; Del Real, Sara

    2005-06-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common cause of nutritional anemia. During pregnancy there is a high risk of developing it, due to the increase of iron requirements for fetal and maternal tissues growth. The objective of this study was to determine the iron nutritional status in early pregnancy and to determine its relationship with the dietary intake. The study applied a cross-sectional and descriptive design in 419 pregnant women (13-41 y) from Valencia, Carabobo, Venezuela. Serum ferritin was determined by enzimoinmunoassay and hemoglobin by a semi-automated method. Dietary iron intake was assessed through two non-consecutive 24 hours recalls. Statistical analysis included basic descriptives, Fisher exact test, Chi-square, and Mann-Whitney tests; with a statistical significance of p < 0.05. The iron deficiency and anemia prevalence were 16.2% and 14.4%, respectively; corresponding 36.6% to ferropenic anemia. 10.4%, 29.0% and 24.2% of the women had deficient intake for iron, vitamin C and A, respectively. There were no significant differences by age. A nutritional risk was observed regarding the iron status, demonstrated by the percentage of ferropenic anemia and because the main dietary contribution came from non-heme iron, which has low bioavailability. Additionally, there was an important percentage of inadequate vitamin C and A intakes; hence, their contribution to iron absorption was limited.

  10. Vitamin and iron status in new vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Helman, A D; Darnton-Hill, I

    1987-04-01

    This study assessed the biochemical status of a number of vitamins and iron in a group of new vegetarians. Values were compared with a group of omnivores of similar age. Satisfactory to high levels of serum folate, vitamin E, and riboflavin were found, and all were significantly higher in vegetarians than omnivores. Thiamin status was satisfactory in both groups although a small but statistically significant difference in favor of the omnivores was found. Serum vitamin B-12 was significantly lower in vegetarians, and iron status as measured by serum ferritin was very significantly lower in vegetarians. Pyridoxine status was similar in both groups. A number of sex differences were found in the vegetarian sample. New vegetarian women appear to be at particular risk of developing low iron stores.

  11. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20–40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  12. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  13. Infant iron status affects iron absorption in Peruvian breastfed infants at 2 and 5 mo of age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of prenatal iron supplementation on maternal postpartum iron status and early infant iron homeostasis remain largely unknown. We examined iron absorption and growth in exclusively breastfed infants in relation to fetal iron exposure and iron status during early infancy. Longitudinal, paired ...

  14. The relationship between the iron isotopic composition of human whole blood and iron status parameters.

    PubMed

    Van Heghe, Lana; Delanghe, Joris; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2013-11-01

    As the iron status of an individual cannot be adequately assessed on the basis of the (total) Fe concentration in whole blood or serum, in medicine a number of parameters, such as the serum concentrations of ferritin, transferrin and soluble transferrin receptor and the transferrin saturation, are routinely determined instead. As previous research has shown that also the isotopic composition of Fe in blood and tissues is dependent on the metabolism, the present study assessed whether Fe isotopic composition in whole blood provides information as to an individual's iron status. Fe isotopic analysis of whole blood samples from a reference population (healthy volunteers) was carried out using multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (after chromatographic target element isolation) and the results obtained were investigated by statistical means as to their potential relation with the iron status parameters conventionally used in medicine. A low δ(56)Fe value was demonstrated to coincide with high iron status and a high δ(56)Fe value with low iron status, thus reflecting the response of the body to this iron status in terms of iron uptake, distribution between blood and stores and mobilization of storage iron. In a second phase, the iron isotopic composition in blood from patients treated for hemochromatosis type I and from patients with anemia of chronic disease (ACD) was determined. The results for hemochromatosis patients plotted with the values of low iron status, while those for ACD patients plotted with the values of high iron status. By taking a closer look at the aberrant iron metabolism that comes with these diseases, it can be seen that the patient samples confirm the conclusions drawn for the reference population. Patients with hemochromatosis type I have a strongly upregulated iron uptake, like healthy individuals with low iron status. The metabolism of patients suffering from ACD tries to remove iron from the circulation by downregulating the iron uptake

  15. Restless Legs Syndrome, pica, and iron status in blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Bryan R.; Kleinman, Steven; Wright, David J.; Glynn, Simone A.; Rye, David B.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Mast, Alan E.; Cable, Ritchard G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The association of blood donation related iron deficiency with pica or Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) remains poorly elucidated. This study evaluated the prevalence of RLS and pica in blood donors completing the REDS-II Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) Study. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS RISE enrolled 2425 blood donors in a prospective cohort study; 1334 donors provided blood samples to characterize iron status and answered a questionnaire inquiring into symptoms of RLS and pica at a final visit after 15–24 months of follow-up. Associations between both conditions and iron status were evaluated. RESULTS There were 9% and 20% of donors reporting symptoms of Probable or Probable/Possible RLS, respectively. Iron depletion and donation intensity were not predictive of RLS. Pica was reported by 65 donors (5.5%), half of whom reported daily cravings. Prevalence of pica increased with degree of iron depletion in women (2% in iron replete females, 13% in those with ferritin < 12ng/mL), but not in men. Probable RLS and pica co-expressed in 8 individuals, but no more frequently than expected by chance. CONCLUSION RLS and pica have been associated with iron deficiency in non-donor populations. This study indicates a potentially high prevalence of RLS in frequent blood donors but shows no association with iron status or donation intensity. Low iron stores were associated with higher prevalence of pica, but only in females. Furthermore, the results are incompatible with RLS and pica sharing a common pathophysiology. PMID:23763445

  16. Iron status of female collegiate athletes involved in different sports.

    PubMed

    Gropper, Sareen S; Blessing, Daniel; Dunham, Kim; Barksdale, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Iron status was assessed in 70 female athletes aged 18-25 yr participating in collegiate cross-country track, tennis, softball, swimming, soccer, basketball, and gymnastics. No significant differences in mean hemoglobin, hematocrit, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin saturation, and ferritin were found among teams. The mean concentrations of each parameter for each of the teams were within the normal ranges. However, several athletes from different sports had suboptimal iron status indexes. Of 17 athletes with a serum ferritin concentration < or = 15 microg/L, 8 (4 freshmen, 2 sophomores, 2 unknown) also exhibited low serum iron concentrations (< 60 microg/dL) and low transferrin saturation (< 16%). Thirteen (6 freshmen, 3 sophomores, 2 juniors, 2 seniors) of 51 (25%) athletes failed to consume two-thirds of the Recommended Dietary Allowance for iron and exhibited suboptimal serum concentrations of ferritin, iron, and/or transferrin saturation. Of nine athletes taking iron supplements, one exhibited suboptimal iron status. In summary, nonanemic iron depletion was present among female collegiate athletes involved in many different sports and in all years of participation (freshmen, sophomore, junior, and senior athletes). Female athletes should continue to be individually and routinely evaluated for nutritional deficiencies throughout their collegiate athletic careers.

  17. Iron status of military personnel deployed to Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Candy; McClung, James P; Karl, J Philip; Brothers, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    Iron is a micronutrient necessary for energy metabolism and for oxygen transport and delivery. Depletion of iron stores (iron deficiency [ID]) may lead to iron deficiency anemia (IDA), which affects mood, cognitive function, and physical performance. Previous studies indicated that iron status may decline during military training. This study assessed the iron status and prevalence of ID and IDA in military personnel deployed to Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan (1492 m). Within the pool of 294 participants (149 male and 145 female), 2 males (1%) and 8 females (6%) presented with ID. Although IDA was not observed in males, 3 females (2%) met the criteria for IDA. Female sex (p = 0.05) and self-reported history of anemia (p < 0.05) were associated with diminished iron status. Amenorrhea was associated with higher ferritin (p < 0.05) and hemoglobin (p < 0.05) levels. Although ID and IDA did not affect a large portion of the deployed population assessed in this study, findings suggest that risk factors including female sex, history of anemia, and regular menstruation should be considered in the assessment of iron status in military personnel.

  18. Iron status and cellular immune competence.

    PubMed

    Good, M F; Powell, L W; Halliday, J W

    1988-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that both iron overload and iron deficiency are associated with significant abnormalities of immune function. In diseases associated with iron overload there is increased susceptibility to both infection and neoplasia. The precise mechanisms are still being unravelled but iron overload has been shown to impair antigen-specific immune responses and to reduce the number of functional helper precursor cells. Similarly, iron in vitro in concentrations reported to be present in the serum of patients with iron overload impairs the generation of cytotoxic T-cells, enhances suppressor T-cell activity and reduces the proliferative capacity of helper T-cells. The predominant tumor seen in iron overload is primary hepatocellular carcinoma; however other aetiological factors appear to be involved in addition to iron overload, especially hepatic cirrhosis. Nevertheless, primary liver cancer occurs much more frequently in hemochromatosis than in other forms of cirrhosis. Iron deficiency is associated with an altered response to infection but the relationship is again a complex one. The cellular mechanisms involved have yet to be clearly defined, although impaired T and B cell function have been demonstrated.

  19. Training for cross-country skiing and iron status.

    PubMed

    Haymes, E M; Puhl, J L; Temples, T E

    1986-04-01

    Effects of iron supplements and training for cross-country skiing on hematological and iron status were studied in nine men and ten women from the U. S. Nordic ski team. Four men and five women received a multiple vitamin, multiple mineral supplement containing 18 mg iron for 8 months while five men and five women received a placebo. Fasting blood samples were taken from all skiers prior to supplementation (May) and in August, November, and January. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), percentage of transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, free erythrocyte porphyrin, and haptoglobin were measured on each sample. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and TIBC were higher in November when both men and women skiers trained at altitude than in August. In January TIBC was further increased, haptoglobin was increased, hemoglobin for the men fell below May levels, and hematocrit returned to May levels. Skiers receiving iron had lower TIBC levels in November and January than the placebo group. Six women and two men had ferritin levels below 28 ng X ml-1, which suggests prelatent iron deficiency. Free erythrocyte porphyrin levels above 100 micrograms X dl-1 RBC were found in all skiers at some point during training. The results suggest that multivitamin, multimineral supplements containing iron have little effect on the iron status of cross-country skiers.

  20. Influence of welding fume on systemic iron status.

    PubMed

    Casjens, Swaantje; Henry, Jana; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Welge, Peter; Lotz, Anne; Gelder, Rainer Van; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Stiegler, Hugo; Eisele, Lewin; Weiss, Tobias; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate

    2014-11-01

    Iron is the major metal found in welding fumes, and although it is an essential trace element, its overload causes toxicity due to Fenton reactions. To avoid oxidative damage, excess iron is bound to ferritin, and as a result, serum ferritin (SF) is a recognized biomarker for iron stores, with high concentrations linked to inflammation and potentially also cancer. However, little is known about iron overload in welders. Within this study, we assessed the iron status and quantitative associations between airborne iron, body iron stores, and iron homeostasis in 192 welders not wearing dust masks. Welders were equipped with personal samplers in order to determine the levels of respirable iron in the breathing zone during a working shift. SF, prohepcidin and other markers of iron status were determined in blood samples collected after shift. The impact of iron exposure and other factors on SF and prohepcidin were estimated using multiple regression models. Our results indicate that respirable iron is a significant predictor of SF and prohepcidin. Concentrations of SF varied according to the welding technique and respiratory protection used, with a median of 103 μg l(-1) in tungsten inert gas welders, 125 μg l(-1) in those wearing air-purifying respirators, and 161 μg l(-1) in other welders. Compared to welders with low iron stores (SF < 25 μg l(-1)), those with excess body iron (SF ≥ 400 μg l(-1)) worked under a higher median concentration of airborne iron (60 μg m(-3) versus 148 μg m(-3)). Even though air concentrations of respirable iron and manganese were highly correlated, and low iron stores have been reported to increase manganese uptake in the gastrointestinal tract, no correlation was seen between SF and manganese in blood. In conclusion, monitoring SF may be a reasonable method for health surveillance of welders. Respiratory protection with air-purifying respirators can decrease iron exposure and avoid chronically higher SF in welders working with

  1. Influence of welding fume on systemic iron status.

    PubMed

    Casjens, Swaantje; Henry, Jana; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Welge, Peter; Lotz, Anne; Gelder, Rainer Van; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Stiegler, Hugo; Eisele, Lewin; Weiss, Tobias; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate

    2014-11-01

    Iron is the major metal found in welding fumes, and although it is an essential trace element, its overload causes toxicity due to Fenton reactions. To avoid oxidative damage, excess iron is bound to ferritin, and as a result, serum ferritin (SF) is a recognized biomarker for iron stores, with high concentrations linked to inflammation and potentially also cancer. However, little is known about iron overload in welders. Within this study, we assessed the iron status and quantitative associations between airborne iron, body iron stores, and iron homeostasis in 192 welders not wearing dust masks. Welders were equipped with personal samplers in order to determine the levels of respirable iron in the breathing zone during a working shift. SF, prohepcidin and other markers of iron status were determined in blood samples collected after shift. The impact of iron exposure and other factors on SF and prohepcidin were estimated using multiple regression models. Our results indicate that respirable iron is a significant predictor of SF and prohepcidin. Concentrations of SF varied according to the welding technique and respiratory protection used, with a median of 103 μg l(-1) in tungsten inert gas welders, 125 μg l(-1) in those wearing air-purifying respirators, and 161 μg l(-1) in other welders. Compared to welders with low iron stores (SF < 25 μg l(-1)), those with excess body iron (SF ≥ 400 μg l(-1)) worked under a higher median concentration of airborne iron (60 μg m(-3) versus 148 μg m(-3)). Even though air concentrations of respirable iron and manganese were highly correlated, and low iron stores have been reported to increase manganese uptake in the gastrointestinal tract, no correlation was seen between SF and manganese in blood. In conclusion, monitoring SF may be a reasonable method for health surveillance of welders. Respiratory protection with air-purifying respirators can decrease iron exposure and avoid chronically higher SF in welders working with

  2. Associations between dietary iron and zinc intakes, and between biochemical iron and zinc status in women.

    PubMed

    Lim, Karen; Booth, Alison; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Gibson, Rosalind S; Bailey, Karl B; Irving, David; Nowson, Caryl; Riddell, Lynn

    2015-04-20

    Iron and zinc are found in similar foods and absorption of both may be affected by food compounds, thus biochemical iron and zinc status may be related. This cross-sectional study aimed to: (1) describe dietary intakes and biochemical status of iron and zinc; (2) investigate associations between dietary iron and zinc intakes; and (3) investigate associations between biochemical iron and zinc status in a sample of premenopausal women aged 18-50 years who were recruited in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. Usual dietary intakes were assessed using a 154-item food frequency questionnaire (n = 379). Iron status was assessed using serum ferritin and hemoglobin, zinc status using serum zinc (standardized to 08:00 collection), and presence of infection/inflammation using C-reactive protein (n = 326). Associations were explored using multiple regression and logistic regression. Mean (SD) iron and zinc intakes were 10.5 (3.5) mg/day and 9.3 (3.8) mg/day, respectively. Median (interquartile range) serum ferritin was 22 (12-38) μg/L and mean serum zinc concentrations (SD) were 12.6 (1.7) μmol/L in fasting samples and 11.8 (2.0) μmol/L in nonfasting samples. For each 1 mg/day increase in dietary iron intake, zinc intake increased by 0.4 mg/day. Each 1 μmol/L increase in serum zinc corresponded to a 6% increase in serum ferritin, however women with low serum zinc concentration (AM fasting < 10.7 μmol/L; AM nonfasting < 10.1 μmol/L) were not at increased risk of depleted iron stores (serum ferritin <15 μg/L; p = 0.340). Positive associations were observed between dietary iron and zinc intakes, and between iron and zinc status, however interpreting serum ferritin concentrations was not a useful proxy for estimating the likelihood of low serum zinc concentrations and women with depleted iron stores were not at increased risk of impaired zinc status in this cohort.

  3. Iron bath smelting - current status and understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Fruehan, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Currently there is a worldwide effort to develop an iron and steelmaking process which uses coal directly rather than coke for reduction and energy. The most promising of the new processes is Bath Smelting in which coal, iron ore and oxygen or air are reacted in an iron bath. Research and development of the process is underway in Europe, Australia, Japan and the USA; while other countries are planning work for the near future. A brief description of the processes and the current state of their development is briefly discussed. The current state of knowledge on the critical basic phenomena which control bath smelting are reviewed. The major production limiting processes, reduction of iron oxide, heat transfer and slag foaming are discussed. A simple reduction model is presented which predicts how the production rate will vary with operating parameters and estimates the rate itself. From the foam index for smelting slags, and the gas generation for the specific operating conditions, the foam height in the process can be estimated. Coke in the slag can significantly reduce slag foaming. Future developments are briefly discussed. 15 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Effects of training and iron supplementation on iron status of cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Pattini, A; Schena, F

    1990-12-01

    We have studied the effects of iron treatment on iron deficient cross-country skiers. Kind and duration of their daily training were also considered. Forty-eight athletes were divided in three balanced groups: Group A received 160 mg ferritinic iron/die, Group B received the same amount of iron and 1 gr of ascorbic acid and Group C was untreated. Blood samples were taken at the start, after two months and four months of supplementation. Hematological and iron status parameters were determined. Average training duration was 80 min a day. Running was the most frequent method of training but also roll and country skiing were commonly used. At the initial sample low serum ferritin values were found in all the three groups (Group A = 23.3 micrograms/l, Group B = 20.9 micrograms/l and Group C = 23.5 micrograms/l). After iron treatment serum ferritin increased in Groups A and B (+67.8% and +63.6% respectively) but was slightly reduced in Group C. Serum iron was unchanged and total iron binding capacity decreased following ferritin increase. Ascorbic acid failed to increase iron absorption in Group B. A significant reduction of haptoglobin (-14% and -9% in Group A and B respectively) was also documented. We conclude that cross-country skiers extensively use running in their training and it may be one of the cause of their poor iron status. Ferritinic iron treatment seems to be effective in replacing iron stores in cross-country skiers who underwent heavy training.

  5. Timing of umbilical cord clamping: effect on iron endowment of the newborn and later iron status.

    PubMed

    Chaparro, Camila M

    2011-11-01

    The optimal timing of umbilical cord clamping has been debated in the scientific literature for at least the last century, when cord clamping practices shifted from delayed towards immediate clamping. Recent research provides evidence for the beneficial effect of delayed cord clamping on infant iron status. The present review describes the physiological basis for the impact of cord clamping time on total body iron at birth and the relationship between birth body iron, as affected by cord clamping time, and iron status later in infancy. This research is discussed in the context of current clamping practices, which tend towards early cord clamping in most settings, as well as the high levels of anemia present in young infants in many countries worldwide.

  6. The Influence of Vitamin A Supplementation on Iron Status

    PubMed Central

    Michelazzo, Fernanda B.; Oliveira, Julicristie M.; Stefanello, Juliana; Luzia, Liania A.; Rondó, Patricia H. C.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA) and iron deficiencies are important nutritional problems, affecting particularly preschool children, as well as pregnant and lactating women. A PubMed (National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA) literature review was carried out to search for clinical trials published from 1992 to 2013 that assessed the influence of vitamin A supplementation on iron status. Simultaneous use of iron and vitamin A supplements seemed to be more effective to prevent iron deficiency anemia than the use of these micronutrients alone. Some studies did not include a placebo group and only a few of them assessed vitamin A status of the individuals at baseline. Moreover, the studies did not consider any inflammatory marker and a reasonable number of iron parameters. Another important limitation was the lack of assessment of hemoglobin variants, especially in regions with a high prevalence of anemia. Assessment of hemoglobin variants, inflammatory markers and anemia of chronic inflammation would be important to the studies investigated. Studies involving different populations are necessary to elucidate the interaction between the two micronutrients, especially regarding iron absorption and modulation of erythropoiesis. PMID:24212089

  7. The influence of vitamin A supplementation on iron status.

    PubMed

    Michelazzo, Fernanda B; Oliveira, Julicristie M; Stefanello, Juliana; Luzia, Liania A; Rondó, Patricia H C

    2013-11-07

    Vitamin A (VA) and iron deficiencies are important nutritional problems, affecting particularly preschool children, as well as pregnant and lactating women. A PubMed (National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA) literature review was carried out to search for clinical trials published from 1992 to 2013 that assessed the influence of vitamin A supplementation on iron status. Simultaneous use of iron and vitamin A supplements seemed to be more effective to prevent iron deficiency anemia than the use of these micronutrients alone. Some studies did not include a placebo group and only a few of them assessed vitamin A status of the individuals at baseline. Moreover, the studies did not consider any inflammatory marker and a reasonable number of iron parameters. Another important limitation was the lack of assessment of hemoglobin variants, especially in regions with a high prevalence of anemia. Assessment of hemoglobin variants, inflammatory markers and anemia of chronic inflammation would be important to the studies investigated. Studies involving different populations are necessary to elucidate the interaction between the two micronutrients, especially regarding iron absorption and modulation of erythropoiesis.

  8. Iron and the female athlete: a review of dietary treatment methods for improving iron status and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Alaunyte, Ieva; Stojceska, Valentina; Plunkett, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Iron is a functional component of oxygen transport and energy production in humans and therefore is a critically important micronutrient for sport and exercise performance. Athletes, particularly female athletes participating in endurance sport, are at increased risk of compromised iron status due to heightened iron losses through menstruation and exercise-induced mechanisms associated with endurance activity. Conventionally oral iron supplementation is used in prevention or/and treatment of iron deficiency. However, this approach has been criticised because of the side effects and increased risk of iron toxicity associated with the use of supplements. Thus, more recently there has been a growing interest in using dietary modification rather than the use of supplements to improve iron status of athletes. Dietary iron treatment methods include the prescription of an iron-rich diet, or/and haem iron-based diet, dietary advice counselling and inclusion of novel iron-rich products into the daily diet. Although studies using dietary modification are still scarce, current literature suggests that dietary iron interventions can assist in maintaining iron status in female athletes, especially during intensive training and competition. Future research should focus on the most efficient method(s) of dietary modification for improvement of iron status and whether these approaches can have a favourable impact on sports and exercise performance. PMID:26448737

  9. Dietary phosphate supplementation delays the onset of iron deficiency anemia and affects iron status in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Mari; Yamamoto, Hironori; Nakahashi, Otoki; Ikeda, Shoko; Abe, Kotaro; Masuda, Masashi; Ishiguro, Mariko; Iwano, Masayuki; Takeda, Eiji; Taketani, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) plays critical roles in bone metabolism and is an essential component of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG). It has been reported that animals fed a low-iron diet modulate Pi metabolism, whereas the effect of dietary Pi on iron metabolism, particularly in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), is not fully understood. In this study, we hypothesized the presence of a link between Pi and iron metabolism and tested the hypothesis by investigating the effects of dietary Pi on iron status and IDA. Wistar rats aged 4 weeks were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 experimental dietary groups: normal iron content (Con Fe)+0.5% Pi, low-iron (Low Fe)+0.5% Pi, Con Fe+1.5% Pi, and Low Fe+1.5% Pi. Rats fed the 1.5% Pi diet for 14 days, but not for 28 days, maintained their anemia state and plasma erythropoietin concentrations within the reference range, even under conditions of low iron. In addition, plasma concentrations of 2,3-DPG were significantly increased by the 1.5% Pi diets and were positively correlated with plasma Pi concentration (r=0.779; P<.001). Dietary Pi regulated the messenger RNA expression of iron-regulated genes, including divalent metal transporter 1, duodenal cytochrome B, and hepcidin. Furthermore, iron concentration in liver tissues was increased by the 1.5% Pi in Con Fe diet. These results suggest that dietary Pi supplementation delays the onset of IDA and increases plasma 2,3-DPG concentration, followed by modulation of the expression of iron-regulated genes.

  10. Deferoxamine inhibition of malaria is independent of host iron status

    SciTech Connect

    Hershko, C.; Peto, T.E.

    1988-07-01

    The mechanism whereby deferoxamine (DF) inhibits the growth of malaria parasites was studied in rats infected with Plasmodium berghei. Peak parasitemia was 32.6% (day 14) in untreated controls and 0.15% (day 7) in rats receiving 0.33 mg/g in 8 hourly DF injections, subcutaneously. DF inhibition of parasite growth was achieved without any reduction in transferrin saturation or hemoglobin synthesis and with only a partial (56%) depletion of hepatic iron stores. Dietary iron depletion resulted in anemia (hematocrit 25 vs. 46%), microcytosis (MCV 54 vs. 60 fl), and reduced transferrin saturation (17 vs. 96%) without any effect on infection (peak parasitemia 30 vs. 36%). Similarly, parenteral iron loading with ferric citrate over 10 d (75 mg iron/kg) failed to aggravate infection. In a search for evidence of direct interaction between DF and parasitized erythrocytes, gel filtration and ultrafiltration was performed on hemolysates obtained from in vivo /sup 59/Fe-labeled parasitized erythrocytes. This showed that 1.1-1.9% of the intracellular radioiron was located in a chelatable, labile iron pool. Incubation of intact cells with 0-500 microM DF resulted in a proportional increase in intracellular iron chelation, and the chelation of all available labile intracellular iron was completed within 6 h. These observations indicate that the severity of P. berghei infection in rats and its in vivo suppression by DF are independent of host iron status and suggest that DF inhibition of malaria involves intracellular chelation of a labile iron pool in parasitized erythrocytes.

  11. Iron status in a healthy population of Hungarian secondary school boys and girls.

    PubMed

    Antal, M; Regöly-Mérei, A; Biró, L; Greiner, E; Sági, K; Agfalvy, R; Nagy, K; Biró, G

    1998-01-01

    Iron status was assessed in a sample of 103 male and 282 female students aged from 15 to 18 years attending secondary schools in Budapest. Using a ferritin model, in boys the prevalence of iron depletion, iron-deficient erythropoiesis and iron-deficient anemia was 3.9, 2.9 and 1.0%, respectively. In girls these values were 9.6, 8.2 and 2.8%, respectively. Males had better eating habits than females. Data for nutrients intake connected with iron status are discussed. The authors recommend the improvement of iron status by dietary means and oppose the indiscriminate iron supplementation. PMID:9522963

  12. Iron status in a healthy population of Hungarian secondary school boys and girls.

    PubMed

    Antal, M; Regöly-Mérei, A; Biró, L; Greiner, E; Sági, K; Agfalvy, R; Nagy, K; Biró, G

    1998-01-01

    Iron status was assessed in a sample of 103 male and 282 female students aged from 15 to 18 years attending secondary schools in Budapest. Using a ferritin model, in boys the prevalence of iron depletion, iron-deficient erythropoiesis and iron-deficient anemia was 3.9, 2.9 and 1.0%, respectively. In girls these values were 9.6, 8.2 and 2.8%, respectively. Males had better eating habits than females. Data for nutrients intake connected with iron status are discussed. The authors recommend the improvement of iron status by dietary means and oppose the indiscriminate iron supplementation.

  13. Iron status and dietary iron intake of adolescents from a rural community in Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Foo, Leng Huat; Khor, Geok Lin; Tee, E-Siong; Prabakaran, Dhanaraj

    2004-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the most prevalent micronutrient deficiency in the world affecting the general health and wellbeing of millions. In Malaysia, moderately high prevalences of anaemia have been reported amongst infants, young children and women of childbearing age. Data is scant for the adolescents. This study was undertaken to assess the iron status and dietary intake of 165 adolescents, comprising 74 male and 91 female subjects, aged 12 to 19 years, from the rural communities in Tuaran District of Sabah, Malaysia. Convenience sampling was used for the selection of study subjects. Multiple iron status indicators namely, serum ferritin (SF), transferrin saturation (TS), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and haemoglobin (Hb) were determined for the study. The mean age of the subjects was 15.2 +/-2.1 years. While the majority of the subjects (77.6%) had normal body mass index (BMI) values, 17.6% were underweight and 4.8% overweight. About 35% to 40% of the subjects showed deficient values for haematocrit, serum ferritin, serum iron, mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and transferrin saturation (TS), and 20% were anaemic (Hb <12 g/L). Using the multiple criteria of iron status indicators, the prevalence of iron depletion, iron deficiency and IDA in the male and female adolescents were 5.4% vs. 6.6%, 18.9% vs. 26.4% and 5.4% vs. 26.4%, respectively. Iron deficiency anaemia (85.0%) contributed largely to the prevalence of anaemia. The dietary iron intake of the adolescents was unsatisfactory, with approximately 98% of subjects failing to meet the Malaysian RDA level. Almost all the female subjects (91%) had dietary iron intake below two-thirds of the RDA level compared with a much smaller proportion for the male adolescents (68%). The prevalence of IDA in the present study population, especially in the female adolescents, appears to be a significant public health problem. Priority should therefore be given to the eradication of

  14. Evaluation of iron status in European adolescents through biochemical iron indicators: the HELENA Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, M; Mistura, L; Patterson, E; Sjöström, M; Díaz, L E; Stehle, P; Gonzalez-Gross, M; Kersting, M; Widhalm, K; Molnár, D; Gottrand, F; De Henauw, S; Manios, Y; Kafatos, A; Moreno, L A; Leclercq, C

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objectives: To assess the iron status among European adolescents through selected biochemical parameters in a cross-sectional study performed in 10 European cities. Subjects/Methods: Iron status was defined utilising biochemical indicators. Iron depletion was defined as low serum ferritin (SF<15 μg/l). Iron deficiency (ID) was defined as high-soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR>8.5 mg/l) plus iron depletion. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) was defined as ID with haemoglobin (Hb) below the WHO cutoff for age and sex: 12.0 g/dl for girls and for boys aged 12.5–14.99 years and 13.0 g/dl for boys aged ⩾15 years. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used as analytical method for SF, sTfR and C-reactive protein (CRP). Subjects with indication of inflammation (CRP >5 mg/l) were excluded from the analyses. A total of 940 adolescents aged 12.5–17.49 years (438 boys and 502 girls) were involved. Results: The percentage of iron depletion was 17.6%, significantly higher in girls (21.0%) compared with boys (13.8%). The overall percentage of ID and IDA was 4.7 and 1.3%, respectively, with no significant differences between boys and girls. A correlation was observed between log (SF) and Hb (r=0.36, P<0.01), and between log (sTfR) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (r=−0.30, P<0.01). Iron body stores were estimated on the basis of log (sTfR/SF). A higher percentage of negative values of body iron was recorded in girls (16.5%) with respect to boys (8.3%), and body iron values tended to increase with age in boys, whereas the values remained stable in girls. Conclusions: To ensure adequate iron stores, specific attention should be given to girls at European level to ensure that their dietary intake of iron is adequate. PMID:21245877

  15. Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kanu; Zhang, Jianqing; Honbo, Norman; Karliner, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Established doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is a lethal disease. When congestive heart failure develops, mortality is approximately 50%. Extensive research has been done to understand the mechanism and pathophysiology of doxorubicin cardiomyopathy, and considerable knowledge and experience has been gained. Unfortunately, no effective treatment for established doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is presently available. Extensive research has been done and is being done to discover preventive treatments. However an effective and clinically applicable preventive treatment is yet to be discovered. PMID:20016174

  16. Estimation of dietary iron bioavailability from food iron intake and iron status.

    PubMed

    Dainty, Jack R; Berry, Rachel; Lynch, Sean R; Harvey, Linda J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Currently there are no satisfactory methods for estimating dietary iron absorption (bioavailability) at a population level, but this is essential for deriving dietary reference values using the factorial approach. The aim of this work was to develop a novel approach for estimating dietary iron absorption using a population sample from a sub-section of the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS). Data were analyzed in 873 subjects from the 2000-2001 adult cohort of the NDNS, for whom both dietary intake data and hematological measures (hemoglobin and serum ferritin (SF) concentrations) were available. There were 495 men aged 19-64 y (mean age 42.7±12.1 y) and 378 pre-menopausal women (mean age 35.7±8.2 y). Individual dietary iron requirements were estimated using the Institute of Medicine calculations. A full probability approach was then applied to estimate the prevalence of dietary intakes that were insufficient to meet the needs of the men and women separately, based on their estimated daily iron intake and a series of absorption values ranging from 1-40%. The prevalence of SF concentrations below selected cut-off values (indicating that absorption was not high enough to maintain iron stores) was derived from individual SF concentrations. An estimate of dietary iron absorption required to maintain specified SF values was then calculated by matching the observed prevalence of insufficiency with the prevalence predicted for the series of absorption estimates. Mean daily dietary iron intakes were 13.5 mg for men and 9.8 mg for women. Mean calculated dietary absorption was 8% in men (50th percentile for SF 85 µg/L) and 17% in women (50th percentile for SF 38 µg/L). At a ferritin level of 45 µg/L estimated absorption was similar in men (14%) and women (13%). This new method can be used to calculate dietary iron absorption at a population level using data describing total iron intake and SF concentration. PMID:25356629

  17. MRI guided iron assessment and oral chelator use improve iron status in thalassemia major patients.

    PubMed

    Nichols-Vinueza, Diana X; White, Matthew T; Powell, Andrew J; Banka, Puja; Neufeld, Ellis J

    2014-07-01

    Oral iron chelators and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of heart and liver iron burden have become widely available since the mid 2000s, allowing for improved patient compliance with chelation and noninvasive monitoring of iron levels for titration of therapy. We evaluated the impact of these changes in our center for patients with thalassemia major and transfusional iron overload. This single center, retrospective observational study covered the period from 2005 through 2012. Liver iron content (LIC) was estimated both by a T2* method and by R2 (Ferriscan® ) technique. Cardiac iron was assessed as cT2*. Forty-two patients (55% male) with transfused thalassemia and at least two MRIs were included (median age at first MRI, 17.5 y). Over a mean follow-up period of 5.2 ± 1.9 y, 190 MRIs were performed (median 4.5 per patient). Comparing baseline to last MRI, 63% of patients remained within target ranges for cT2* and LIC, and 13% improved from high values to the target range. Both the median LIC and cT2* (cR2* = 1000/cT2*) status improved over time: LIC 7.3 to 4.5 mg/g dry weight, P = 0.0004; cR2* 33.4 to 28.3 Hz, P = 0.01. Individual responses varied widely. Two patients died of heart failure during the study period. Annual MRI iron assessments and availability of oral chelators both facilitate changes in chelation dose and strategies to optimize care.

  18. MRI guided iron assessment and oral chelator use improve iron status in thalassemia major patients.

    PubMed

    Nichols-Vinueza, Diana X; White, Matthew T; Powell, Andrew J; Banka, Puja; Neufeld, Ellis J

    2014-07-01

    Oral iron chelators and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of heart and liver iron burden have become widely available since the mid 2000s, allowing for improved patient compliance with chelation and noninvasive monitoring of iron levels for titration of therapy. We evaluated the impact of these changes in our center for patients with thalassemia major and transfusional iron overload. This single center, retrospective observational study covered the period from 2005 through 2012. Liver iron content (LIC) was estimated both by a T2* method and by R2 (Ferriscan® ) technique. Cardiac iron was assessed as cT2*. Forty-two patients (55% male) with transfused thalassemia and at least two MRIs were included (median age at first MRI, 17.5 y). Over a mean follow-up period of 5.2 ± 1.9 y, 190 MRIs were performed (median 4.5 per patient). Comparing baseline to last MRI, 63% of patients remained within target ranges for cT2* and LIC, and 13% improved from high values to the target range. Both the median LIC and cT2* (cR2* = 1000/cT2*) status improved over time: LIC 7.3 to 4.5 mg/g dry weight, P = 0.0004; cR2* 33.4 to 28.3 Hz, P = 0.01. Individual responses varied widely. Two patients died of heart failure during the study period. Annual MRI iron assessments and availability of oral chelators both facilitate changes in chelation dose and strategies to optimize care. PMID:24652616

  19. Effect of daily supplementation with iron and zinc on iron status of childbearing age women.

    PubMed

    Mujica-Coopman, María F; Borja, Angélica; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to determine the effect of daily supplementation with 30 mg of iron (Fe) plus 30 mg of zinc (Zn) for 3 months on Fe status of women of childbearing age. This was a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Eighty-one women (18-45 years) were randomly assigned to receive either a daily single dose of 30 mg of Fe (group 1; n = 28) and 30 mg of Fe plus 30 mg of Zn (group 2; n = 26) or placebo (n = 27) for 3 months. Hemoglobin (Hb), mean corpuscular volume, serum Fe, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin saturation, erythrocyte Zn protoporphyrin, serum ferritin (SF), serum transferrin receptor (TfR), total body Fe, serum Zn, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. At baseline, 3.7, 28.4, and 3.7 % of women had iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), Fe deficiency without anemia, and depleted Fe stores, respectively. No significant differences on Fe status were found between groups before supplementation. After supplementation, group 2 showed a significant increase of Hb and total body Fe and a significant decrease of TfR compared with placebo (p < 0.05). Moreover, serum Zn increased significantly in group 2 compared with group 1 (p < 0.01) and placebo (p < 0.01). In conclusion, daily supplementation with 30 mg of Fe plus 30 mg of Zn for 3 months improved significantly the Fe and Zn status of women, compared with those who received placebo. The positive effect of Fe supplementation on Fe status is enhanced by combined Zn supplementation.

  20. Ascorbate status modulates reticuloendothelial iron stores and response to deferasirox iron chelation in ascorbate-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Casey; Otto-Duessel, Maya; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Nick, Hanspeter; Wood, John C

    2012-10-01

    Iron chelation is essential to patients on chronic blood transfusions to prevent toxicity from iron overload and remove excess iron. Deferasirox (DFX) is the most commonly used iron chelator in the United States; however, some patients are relatively refractory to DFX therapy. We postulated that vitamin C supplementation would improve the availability of transfusional iron to DFX treatment by promoting iron's redox cycling, increasing its soluble ferrous form and promoting its release from reticuloendothelial cells. Osteogenic dystrophy rats (n = 54) were given iron dextran injections for 10 weeks. Cardiac and liver iron levels were measured after iron loading (n = 18), 12 weeks of sham chelation (n = 18), and 12 weeks of DFX chelation (n = 18) at 75 mg/kg/day. Ascorbate supplementation of 150 ppm, 900 ppm, and 2250 ppm was used in the chow to mimic a broad range of ascorbate status; plasma ascorbate levels were 5.4 ± 1.9, 8.2 ± 1.4, 23.6 ± 9.8 μM, respectively (p < 0.0001). The most severe ascorbate deficiency produced reticuloenthelial retention, lowering total hepatic iron by 29% at the end of iron loading (p < 0.05) and limiting iron redistribution from cardiac and hepatic macrophages during 12 weeks of sham chelation. Most importantly, ascorbate supplementation at 2250 ppm improved DFX efficiency, allowing DFX to remove 21% more hepatic iron than ascorbate supplementation with 900 ppm or 150 ppm (p < 0.05). We conclude that vitamin C status modulates the release of iron from the reticuloendothelial system and correlates positively with DFX chelation efficiency. Our findings suggest that ascorbate status should be probed in patients with unsatisfactory response to DFX.

  1. What's Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or more chambers of the heart. Usually, the enlargement begins in one of the two lower pumping ... idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) and asymmetrical septal hypertrophy (ASH), non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) The second ...

  2. Clinical implications of changes in the modern diet: iron intake, absorption and status.

    PubMed

    Heath, Anne-Louise M; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2002-06-01

    The modern British diet contains less red meat and is lower in iron than that consumed 30 years ago. This is in spite of the fact that fortification of foods, particularly breakfast cereals, with iron has become more widespread. Although there is no clear relationship between dietary iron intake and iron status, isotope studies have identified multiple dietary factors that influence iron absorption, such as ascorbic acid, animal tissue, phytates and polyphenols. There is no evidence to suggest that current dietary changes will have a major impact on iron status in the general population; however, effects on the incidence of iron overload in individuals with HFE mutations and iron deficiency in children and premenopausal women remain to be determined.

  3. Maternal obesity during pregnancy is negatively associated with maternal and neonatal iron status

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrew D.; Zhao, Gengli; Jiang, Ya-ping; Zhou, Min; Xu, Guobin; Kaciroti, Niko; Zhang, Zhixiang; Lozoff, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Obesity among pregnant women may adversely affect both maternal iron status throughout pregnancy and placental transfer of iron. The objective of this study was to determine the association of maternal body mass index (BMI) with 1) maternal iron status and inflammation in mid and late pregnancy, 2) the change in maternal iron status throughout pregnancy, and 3) neonatal iron status. Subjects/Methods We examined longitudinal data from 1,613 participants in a pregnancy iron supplementation trial in rural China. Women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies were enrolled in the early second trimester of pregnancy and followed through parturition. Maternal blood samples obtained at enrollment and in the third trimester, and cord blood samples were analyzed for a range of hematological and iron biomarkers. Results There was a negative association between maternal BMI and iron status at enrollment (transferrin receptor (sTfR): r=0.20, P<0.001; body iron (BI): r=−0.05; P=0.03). This association was markedly stronger among obese women. Maternal BMI was positively associated with maternal inflammation (C-reactive protein: r=0.33, P<0.001). In multiple linear regression models, maternal BMI was negatively associated with neonatal iron status (cord serum ferritin: −0.01, P=0.008; BI: −0.06, P=0.006) and associated with a lower decrease in iron status throughout pregnancy (sTfR: −4.6, P<0.001; BI: 1.1, P=0.004). Conclusions Maternal obesity during pregnancy may adversely affect both maternal and neonatal iron status, potentially through inflammatory pathways. PMID:26813939

  4. Community-based dietary phytate reduction and its effect on iron status in Malawian children.

    PubMed

    Manary, Mark J; Krebs, Nancy F; Gibson, Rosalind S; Broadhead, Robin L; Hambidge, K Michael

    2002-06-01

    This study describes a community-based method used in rural Malawi to remove dietary phytate, an inhibitor of iron absorption, and notes an improvement in the iron status of ten children who participated in the trial. Phytate was removed by soaking maize flour in excess water with phytase and decanting the water before cooking the flour. Iron status, as measured by soluble transferrin receptor and zinc protoporphyrin, was improved but not normal.

  5. Fortified juice drink improved iron and zinc status of schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Angeles-Agdeppa, Imelda; Magsadia, Clarita R; Capanzana, Mario V

    2011-01-01

    Energy and micronutrient deficiency remain prevalent among Filipino children. Juice drinks are commonly consumed and could be a viable vehicle for fortification to supplement the nutrient gap. This study determined the effects of a newly developed non-carbonated fortified juice drink on the iron, zinc and nutritional status of schoolchildren. One hundred randomly selected anemic children were randomly allocated into two groups in a doubly-masked placebo controlled manner: Group 1 received the fortified juice, Group 2 received the non-fortified juice for 100 days, five days a week under strict supervision. The juice drink was fortified with vitamin A, zinc, iron, vitamin C and lysine. The non-fortified juice was fortified only with vitamin C. All children were dewormed prior to the intervention. Hemoglobin, plasma ferritin and plasma zinc, weight and height were assessed using standard methods before and after intervention. A two-day 24-hour food recall was also collected. The basal prevalence of anemia was significantly reduced in both the fortified group (100% to 13%) and the non-fortified group (100% to 40%) at endline. The mean plasma ferritin levels were similar in both groups at baseline and endline. At endline, mean plasma zinc in the fortified group has significantly increased by 20 μg/dL from a baseline value of 83.9 μg/dL to 103.9 μg/dL, while the non-fortified group remained at similar levels with baseline. Basal weight and height significantly increased among all children at endline. The fortified juice drink was effective in reducing the prevalence of anemia and improved the zinc status of children. PMID:22094838

  6. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Frédéric; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    The peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy resulting from alteration of angiogenesis toward the end of pregnancy. The diagnosis is based on the association of clinical heart failure and systolic dysfunction assessed by echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnoses to rule out are myocardial infarction, amniotic liquid embolism, myocarditis, inherited cardiomyopathy, and history of treatment by anthracycline. Risk factors are advance maternal age (>30), multiparity, twin pregnancy, African origin, obesity, preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, and prolonged tocolytic therapy. Treatment of acute phase is identical to usual treatment of acute systolic heart failure. After delivery, VKA treatment should be discussed in case of systolic function <25% because of higher risk of thrombus. A specific treatment by bromocriptine can be initiated on a case-by-case basis. Complete recovery of systolic function is observed in 50% of cases. The mortality risk is low. Subsequent pregnancy should be discouraged, especially if systolic function did not recover.

  7. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; de Groote, Pascal; Mouquet, Frédéric

    2009-06-01

    The peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Its etiology remains unclear and is likely multifactorial. The diagnosis is based on the association of clinical heart failure and systolic dysfunction assessed by echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis to rule out are myocardial infarction, myocarditis, inherited cardiomyopathy, history of treatment by anthracycline. Risk factors are advance maternal age (> 30), multiparity, twin pregnancy, african origin, obesity, pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, and prolonged tocolytic therapy. Treatment of acute phase is identical to usual treatment of acute systolic heart failure. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and VKA are contra indicated during pregnancy. After delivery, VKA treatment should be discussed in case of systolic function < 25 % because of higher risk of thrombus. Complete recovery of systolic function is observed in 50 % of the case. The mortality risk is low. Subsequent pregnancy should be discouraged, especially if systolic function did not recover.

  8. Effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on the metabolism of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in an animal model of alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bogden, J.D.; Al-Rabiai, S.; Gilani, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (AC) is one of the diseases caused by alcohol abuse, and there has been considerable debate about the possibility that nutritional factors may be important in the etiology of AC. In addition, there is evidence that ethanol may affect the metabolism of trace elements. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if chronic ethanol administration produces changes in the metabolism of the essential metals copper, iron, manganese, zinc, and selenium using an animal model of AC. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups; an ad libitum control group (AL), a pair-fed control group (PF), and an ethanol-dosed group (ETOH). The latter group received gradually increasing concentrations (5-25%) of ethanol in the drinking water for 15 wk. Food intake was monitored and urine and feces collected for a 4-d period during the study to determine ethanol effects on trace-element balance. Growth of both the PF and ETOH animals was inhibited. Ethanol produced substantial increases in liver manganese and decreases in liver copper and zinc. Metal concentrations in heart and concentrations in other tissues studied (spleen, testes, brain, bone, kidney, and muscle) did not differ significantly among the groups, except for testes selenium and kidney zinc. Reduced food intake and ethanol ingestion were associated with a reduced percentage of ingested selenium excreted in the urine. Deficiencies of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in myocardial tissue are not likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of AC in the rat. 38 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  9. The Study of HFE Genotypes and Its Expression Effect on Iron Status of Iranian Haemochromatosis, Iron Deficiency Anemia Patients, Iron-Taker and Non Iron-Taker Controls.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Elham; Abediankenari, Saeid; Rostamian, Mosayeb; Beiranvand, Behnoush; Naazeri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The role of HFE gene mutations or its expression in regulation of iron metabolism of hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) patients is remained controversial. Therefore here the correlation between two common HFE genotype (p.C282Y, p.H63D) and HFE gene expression with iron status in HH, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and healthy Iranian participants was studied. For this purpose genotype determination was done by polymerase chain reaction--restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Real-Time PCR was applied for evaluation of HFE gene expression. Biochemical parameters and iron consumption were also assessed. Homozygote p.H63D mutation was seen in all HH patients and p.C282Y was not observed in any member of the population. A significant correlation was observed between serum ferritin (SF) level and gender or age of HH patients. p.H63D homozygote was seen to be able to significantly increase SF and transferrin saturation (TS) level without affecting on liver function. Our results also showed that iron consumption affects on TS level increasing. HFE gene expression level of IDA patients was significantly higher than other groups. Also the HFE gene expression was negatively correlated with TS. Finally, the main result of our study showed that loss of HFE function in HH is not derived from its gene expression inhibition and much higher HFE gene expression might lead to IDA. However we propose repeating of the study for more approval of our finding.

  10. Compromised zinc status of experimental rats as a consequence of prolonged iron & calcium supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Jayalakshmi, S.; Platel, Kalpana

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Iron supplementation is usually given to pregnant and lactating women who may also have marginal deficiency of zinc. The negative impact of supplemental iron and calcium on zinc status is a cause of concern. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the effect of inclusion of iron and calcium in the diet at supplementary levels on zinc status of experimental rats. Methods: Groups of experimental rats were maintained on diets supplemented with iron (Molar ratio - Zn:Fe 1:30) and calcium (Molar ratio - Zn:Ca 1:667) both individually and in combination for six weeks. Zinc status of these rats was assessed by determining zinc concentration in circulation and in organs, and the activities of zinc containing enzymes in serum and liver. Results: The zinc status of experimental rats receiving supplemental levels of iron and calcium was significantly compromised. Zinc concentration in serum, kidney, spleen and liver was reduced significantly by both these minerals. Six weeks of supplementation of iron and calcium individually, significantly reduced the activity of liver and serum superoxide dismutase and alkaline phosphatase. Activity of liver alcohol dehydrogenase was lowered in calcium supplemented group and in calcium + iron supplemented group, while that of carbonic anhydrase was significantly reduced by iron, calcium and their combination. Interpretation & conclusions: Supplemental levels of iron and calcium, both individually and in combination, significantly compromised the zinc status of experimental rats. This negative effect of these two minerals was more prominent when these were supplemented for a period of six weeks. PMID:27121523

  11. Iron and zinc supplementation improved iron and zinc status, but not physical growth, of apparently healthy, breast-fed infants in rural communities of northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wasantwisut, Emorn; Winichagoon, Pattanee; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Yamborisut, Uruwan; Boonpraderm, Atitada; Pongcharoen, Tippawan; Sranacharoenpong, Kitti; Russameesopaphorn, Wanphen

    2006-09-01

    Iron deficiency is prevalent in children and infants worldwide. Zinc deficiency may be prevalent, but data are lacking. Both iron and zinc deficiency negatively affect growth and psychomotor development. Combined iron and zinc supplementation might be beneficial, but the potential interactions need to be verified. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial using 2 x 2 factorial design, 609 Thai infants aged 4-6 mo were supplemented daily with 10 mg of iron and/or 10 mg of zinc for 6 mo to investigate effects and interactions on micronutrient status and growth. Iron supplementation alone increased hemoglobin and ferritin concentrations more than iron and zinc combined. Anemia prevalence was significantly lower in infants receiving only iron than in infants receiving iron and zinc combined. Baseline iron deficiency was very low, and iron deficiency anemia was almost nil. After supplementation, prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia were significantly higher in infants receiving placebo and zinc than in those receiving iron or iron and zinc. Serum zinc was higher in infants receiving zinc (16.7 +/- 5.2 micromol/L), iron and zinc (12.1 +/- 3.8 micromol/L) or iron alone (11.5 +/- 2.5 micromol/L) than in the placebo group (9.8 +/- 1.9 micromol/L). Iron and zinc interacted to affect iron and zinc status, but not hemoglobin. Iron supplementation had a small but significant effect on ponderal growth, whereas zinc supplementation did not. To conclude, in Thai infants, iron supplementation improved hemoglobin, iron status, and ponderal growth, whereas zinc supplementation improved zinc status. Overall, for infants, combined iron and zinc supplementation is preferable to iron or zinc supplementation alone.

  12. Host iron status and iron supplementation mediate susceptibility to erythrocytic stage Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Martha A; Goheen, Morgan M; Fulford, Anthony; Prentice, Andrew M; Elnagheeb, Marwa A; Patel, Jaymin; Fisher, Nancy; Taylor, Steve M; Kasthuri, Raj S; Cerami, Carla

    2014-07-25

    Iron deficiency and malaria have similar global distributions, and frequently co-exist in pregnant women and young children. Where both conditions are prevalent, iron supplementation is complicated by observations that iron deficiency anaemia protects against falciparum malaria, and that iron supplements increase susceptibility to clinically significant malaria, but the mechanisms remain obscure. Here, using an in vitro parasite culture system with erythrocytes from iron-deficient and replete human donors, we demonstrate that Plasmodium falciparum infects iron-deficient erythrocytes less efficiently. In addition, owing to merozoite preference for young erythrocytes, iron supplementation of iron-deficient individuals reverses the protective effects of iron deficiency. Our results provide experimental validation of field observations reporting protective effects of iron deficiency and harmful effects of iron administration on human malaria susceptibility. Because recovery from anaemia requires transient reticulocytosis, our findings imply that in malarious regions iron supplementation should be accompanied by effective measures to prevent falciparum malaria.

  13. Influence of iron and zinc status on cadmium accumulation in Bangladeshi women

    SciTech Connect

    Kippler, Maria; Ekstroem, Eva-Charlotte; Loennerdal, Bo; Goessler, Walter; Akesson, Agneta; El Arifeen, Shams; Persson, Lars-Ake; Vahter, Marie . E-mail: Marie.Vahter@ki.se

    2007-07-15

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental contaminant present in food. The absorption in the intestine increases in individuals with low iron stores, but the effect of zinc deficiency is not clear. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of iron and zinc status on cadmium accumulation in pregnant Bangladeshi women. We measured cadmium in urine from 890 women using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Further, we also measured ferritin and zinc in plasma. The median cadmium concentration in urine was 0.59 {mu}g/L (adjusted to mean specific gravity of 1.012 g/mL). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that urinary cadmium was associated with plasma ferritin and plasma zinc via a significant interaction between dichotomized plasma ferritin and plasma zinc. The analysis was adjusted for age and socioeconomic status. Women with low iron stores and adequate zinc status had significantly higher urinary cadmium compared to women with both adequate iron stores and zinc status. There was no difference in urinary cadmium between women with both low iron stores and zinc status compared to those with both adequate iron stores and zinc status. In conclusion, low iron stores were associated with increased cadmium accumulation, but only at adequate zinc status.

  14. Urinary Hepcidin Levels in Iron-Deficient and Iron-Supplemented Piglets Correlate with Hepcidin Hepatic mRNA and Serum Levels and with Body Iron Status.

    PubMed

    Staroń, Robert; Van Swelm, Rachel P L; Lipiński, Paweł; Gajowiak, Anna; Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Bednarz, Aleksandra; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Pieszka, Marek; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Starzyński, Rafał R

    2015-01-01

    Among livestock, domestic pig (Sus scrofa) is a species, in which iron metabolism has been most intensively examined during last decade. The obvious reason for studying the regulation of iron homeostasis especially in young pigs is neonatal iron deficiency anemia commonly occurring in these animals. Moreover, supplementation of essentially all commercially reared piglets with iron entails a need for monitoring the efficacy of this routine practice followed in the swine industry for several decades. Since the discovery of hepcidin many studies confirmed its role as key regulator of iron metabolism and pointed out the assessment of its concentrations in biological fluids as diagnostic tool for iron-related disorder. Here we demonstrate that urine hepcidin-25 levels measured by a combination of weak cation exchange chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (WCX-TOF MS) are highly correlated with mRNA hepcidin expression in the liver and plasma hepcidin-25 concentrations in anemic and iron-supplemented 28-day old piglets. We also found a high correlation between urine hepcidin level and hepatic non-heme iron content. Our results show that similarly to previously described transgenic mouse models of iron disorders, young pigs constitute a convenient animal model to explore accuracy and relationship between indicators for assessing systemic iron status. PMID:26323096

  15. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  16. Iron Status in Toddlerhood Predicts Sensitivity to Psychostimulants in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Catharyn A.; Xie, Diqiong; Zimmerman, Bridget M.; Calarge, Chadi A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Iron deficiency is associated with impaired dopaminergic signaling and externalizing behavior. The authors examine, whether iron stores in toddlerhood influence later response to psychostimulants. Method: Youth participating in a study monitoring the long-term safety of risperidone were included in this analysis if they had received…

  17. Effect of repeated phlebotomy on iron status of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Mandell, C P; George, J W

    1991-05-01

    Iron status, as determined by hematologic values, serum iron concentration, total iron-binding capacity, and zinc protoporphyrin concentration, was determined in 2 groups of 6 nonpregnant monkeys. Monkeys of groups 1 and 2 had 10 and 5%, respectively, of their blood volume withdrawn per week for up to 10 weeks or until blood hemoglobin concentration was less than or equal to 10 g/dl. A third group of 6 monkeys served as controls. The majority (8/12) of the monkeys became anemic (hemoglobin concentration, less than or equal to 10 g/dl) after approximately 30 to 70% (mean, 49%) of their blood volume was removed. Anemia was accompanied by decrease in serum iron concentration and percentage of transferrin saturation. Microcytosis, hypochromasia, and increased zinc protoporphyrin concentration, all hematologic characteristics of iron deficiency, developed later. The calculated iron stores ranged from 1 to 133 mg, with mean value of 51 mg. Iron-depleted monkeys had mean calculated available iron store of 20.8 mg, whereas iron-replete monkeys had mean available iron store of 114.0 mg. Changes were not observed in monkeys of the control group during the study period. None of the baseline hematologic or biochemical analytes measured were good predictors of iron stores. The diet used at the research center did not provide sufficient iron to prevent iron deficiency in most of the monkeys from which a total amount of 30 to 70% of blood volume at 5 or 10%/week was withdrawn. Studies requiring that much blood may need to be modified to include iron supplementation, reduction of sample volume, or iron replacement after termination of projects. PMID:1854097

  18. The effect of humic acids and their complexes with iron on the functional status of plants grown under iron deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abros'kin, D. P.; Fuentes, M.; Garcia-Mina, J. M.; Klyain, O. I.; Senik, S. V.; Volkov, D. S.; Perminova, I. V.; Kulikova, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of humic acids (HAs) and their iron complexes (Fe-HAs) on the input of the main mineral elements into wheat seedlings, as well as on the efficiency of photosynthesis and the lipid profile of plants, under iron deficiency has been studied. The input of iron from Fe-HA complexes and its predominant accumulation in roots are demonstrated. It is found that HAs increase the efficiency of photosynthesis due to enhanced electron transport in photosystem II. It is shown that the application of HAs and Fe-HAs is accompanied by an enhanced input of Zn into plants, which could increase the antioxidant status of plants under iron deficiency conditions. In addition, a pronounced increase in the content of lipids in plants is revealed, which is indicative of the effect of HAs on plant metabolism. The obtained results suggest that the positive effect of Fe-HAs and HAs on plants under iron deficiency conditions is due to a combination of factors, among which the effect of HAs on the antioxidant status of plants and the plant lipid metabolism predominates.

  19. Dietary iron supplements and Moringa oleifera leaves influence the liver hepcidin messenger RNA expression and biochemical indices of iron status in rats.

    PubMed

    Saini, R K; Manoj, P; Shetty, N P; Srinivasan, K; Giridhar, P

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effects of iron depletion and repletion on biochemical and molecular indices of iron status were investigated in growing male Wistar rats. We hypothesized that iron from Moringa leaves could overcome the effects of iron deficiency and modulate the expression of iron-responsive genes better than conventional iron supplements. Iron deficiency was induced by feeding rats an iron-deficient diet for 10 weeks, whereas control rats were maintained on an iron-sufficient diet (35.0-mg Fe/kg diet). After the depletion period, animals were repleted with different source of iron, in combination with ascorbic acid. Iron deficiency caused a significant (P < .05) decrease in serum iron and ferritin levels by 57% and 40%, respectively, as compared with nondepleted control animals. Significant changes in the expression (0.5- to100-fold) of liver hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin, transferrin receptor-2, hemochromatosis type 2, ferroportin 1, ceruloplasmin, and ferritin-H were recorded in iron-depleted and iron-repleted rats, as compared with nondepleted rats (P < .05). Dietary iron from Moringa leaf was found to be superior compared with ferric citrate in overcoming the effects of iron deficiency in rats. These results suggest that changes in the relative expression of liver hepcidin messenger RNA can be used as a sensitive molecular marker for iron deficiency. PMID:25150122

  20. Dietary iron supplements and Moringa oleifera leaves influence the liver hepcidin messenger RNA expression and biochemical indices of iron status in rats.

    PubMed

    Saini, R K; Manoj, P; Shetty, N P; Srinivasan, K; Giridhar, P

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effects of iron depletion and repletion on biochemical and molecular indices of iron status were investigated in growing male Wistar rats. We hypothesized that iron from Moringa leaves could overcome the effects of iron deficiency and modulate the expression of iron-responsive genes better than conventional iron supplements. Iron deficiency was induced by feeding rats an iron-deficient diet for 10 weeks, whereas control rats were maintained on an iron-sufficient diet (35.0-mg Fe/kg diet). After the depletion period, animals were repleted with different source of iron, in combination with ascorbic acid. Iron deficiency caused a significant (P < .05) decrease in serum iron and ferritin levels by 57% and 40%, respectively, as compared with nondepleted control animals. Significant changes in the expression (0.5- to100-fold) of liver hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin, transferrin receptor-2, hemochromatosis type 2, ferroportin 1, ceruloplasmin, and ferritin-H were recorded in iron-depleted and iron-repleted rats, as compared with nondepleted rats (P < .05). Dietary iron from Moringa leaf was found to be superior compared with ferric citrate in overcoming the effects of iron deficiency in rats. These results suggest that changes in the relative expression of liver hepcidin messenger RNA can be used as a sensitive molecular marker for iron deficiency.

  1. Biomarkers of iron status and trace elements in welders.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Dag G; Chashchin, Maxim; Berlinger, Balazs; Konz, Tobias; Zibarev, Evgenij; Aaseth, Jan; Chashchin, Valery; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2014-07-01

    Iron status was studied in 137 welders exposed to a geometric mean (GM) air concentration of 214 μg/m(3) (range 1-3230) of manganese (Mn), in 137 referents and in 34 former welders. The GM concentrations of S-ferritin were 119 (3-1498), 112 (9-1277) and 98 (12-989) μg/L (p=0.24) in the three groups, respectively. Also the GM concentrations of S-hepcidin were not significantly different between the groups (8.4 μg/L (2.8-117); 6.6 μg/L (1.8-100); 6.5 μg/L (1.2-22)) (p=0.22). Multiple linear regression analysis including all welders and referents showed an increase in the concentration of S-ferritin associated with having serum carbohydrate deficient transferrin (S-CDT) above the upper reference limit of ≥1.7%, indicating high alcohol consumption. Serum C-reactive protein was not associated with exposure as welders, but an association with S-ferritin was shown. The GM S-ferritin concentrations among all welders and referents with S-CDT≥1.7% were 157 μg/L (95% CI 113-218) as compared to 104 μg/L (95% CI 94-116) (p=0.02) in those with S-CDT<1.7%. The GM concentrations of Mn in biological fluids were higher in the welders as compared to the referents, while S-Fe, S-Co and B-Co were statistically significantly lower. This could suggest a competitive inhibition from Mn on the uptake of Fe and Co. Increasing concentrations of S-CDT was associated with higher S-Mn, S-Fe and B-Co in the multiple linear regression analysis. The association between S-CDT and S-Fe remained when all subjects with high S-CDT (≥1.7%) were excluded, suggesting increased uptake of Fe even at lower alcohol consumption.

  2. Peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Tc; Ezenyeaku, Cct; Ikeako, Lc

    2013-07-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare form of unexplained cardiac failure of unknown origin, unique to the pregnant woman with highly variable outcome associated with high morbidity and mortality. PPCM is fraught with controversies in its definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. PPCM is frequently under diagnosed, inadequately treated and without a laid down follow-up regimen, thus, the aim of this review. Publications on PPCM were accessed using Medline, Google scholar and Pubmed databases. Relevant materials on PPCM, selected references from internet services, journals, textbooks, and lecture notes on PPCM were also accessed and critically reviewed. PPCM is multifactorial in origin. It is a diagnosis of exclusion and should be based on classic echocardiographic criteria. The outcome of PPCM is also highly variable with high morbidity and mortality rates. Future pregnancies are not recommended in women with persistent ventricular dysfunction because the heart cannot tolerate increased cardiovascular workload associated with the pregnancy. Although, multiparity is associated with PPCM, there is an increased risk of fetal prematurity and fetal loss. PPCM is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy of unknown origin, unique to pregnant women. The pathophysiology is poorly understood. Echocardiography is central to diagnosis of PPCM and effective treatment monitoring in patients of PPCM. The outcome is highly variable and related to reversal of ventricular dysfunction. PMID:24116305

  3. Iron Homeostasis and Inflammatory Status in Mice Deficient for the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Deschemin, Jean-Christophe; Allouche, Sarah; Brouillard, Franck; Vaulont, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR). Patients with CF suffer from chronic infections and severe inflammation, which lead to progressive pulmonary and gut diseases. Recently, an expanding body of evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis was abnormal in CF with, in particular, systemic iron deficiency and iron sequestration in the epithelium airway. The molecular mechanisms responsible for iron dysregulation and the relationship with inflammation in CF are unknown. Methods and Results We assessed the impact of CFTR deficiency on systemic and tissue iron homeostasis as well as inflammation in wildtype and CFTR knockout (KO) mice. First, in contrast to the systemic and intestinal inflammation we observed in the CFTR KO mice, we reported the absence of lung phenotype with regards to both inflammation and iron status. Second, we showed a significant decrease of plasma ferritin levels in the KO mice, as in CF patients, likely caused by a decrease in spleen ferritin levels. However, we measured unchanged plasma iron levels in the KO mice that may be explained by increased intestinal iron absorption. Conclusion These results indicate that in CF, the lung do not predominantly contributes to the systemic ferritin deficiency and we propose the spleen as the major organ responsible for hypoferritinemia in the KO mouse. These results should provide a better understanding of iron dysregulation in CF patients where treating or not iron deficiency remains a challenging question. PMID:26709821

  4. Anemia and iron status of Malay women attending an antenatal clinic in Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Rosline; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Nik Hussain, Nik Hazlina

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the frequency of iron deficiency anemia in women attending their first antenatal clinic at a Maternal and Child Health Clinic in Kubang Kerian, a district of Kelantan that is located on the East coast of Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was done over a two-month period and fifty-two Malay women were enrolled in this study. Red blood cell indices and serum ferritin were used as a screening tool for anemia and iron status. Eighteen patients (34.6%) were anemic. The majority were classified as having mild anemia (90%). Four of them had hypochromic microcytic anemia. Of 52 women, 7 had iron deficient erythropoiesis and 11 (61.1%) had iron deficient anemia. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in pregnant women was 21.2%, which is similar to other developing countries. The serum ferritin level was significantly associated with the hemoglobin level (p=0.003). Other red blood cell indices were not useful in predicting iron deficient erythropoiesis. It is important to detect iron deficient erythropoiesis during the first antenatal check-up, as it is an early manifestation of iron deficiency anemia. In conclusion, screening for iron deficient is recommended during first antenatal visit because iron deficiency anemia is still the leading cause of nutritional deficiency in pregnant women. This will initiate an early therapeutic intervention so as to reduce public health problem.

  5. Iron status and its determinants in a nationally representative sample of pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Amsalkhir, Sihame; Van Oyen, Herman; Egli, Ines; Ines, Egli; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo

    2013-05-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is associated with adverse neonatal health outcomes. Iron status and its determinants were assessed in a representative sample of Belgian pregnant women. Blood samples were collected and a questionnaire was completed face-to-face. Hemoglobin (Hb) and mean cell volume were measured using a Beckman Coulter Hematology Analyzer and serum ferritin (SF) and transferrin receptor (sTfr) concentrations by immunoassay. In total, 55 obstetric clinics and 1,311 pregnant women were included. Approximately 40% of third-trimester and 6% of first-trimester women had SF levels less than 15 μg/L. Approximately 21% of third-trimester and 4% of first-trimester women had anemia (Hb <110 g/L). Of the third-trimester women, 23% were iron-deficient nonanemic (SF <15 μg/L and Hb ≥110 g/L), 16% had iron-deficiency anemia (SF <15 μg/L and Hb <110 g/L), and approximately 7% had tissue iron deficiency (sTfr >8.5 mg/L). The median body iron stores were 8.1 mg/kg among first-trimester women, but only 3.6 mg/kg among third-trimester women. SF levels were significantly positively associated with age and education level, and were higher among nulliparous women and lower among North-African women. sTfr concentrations were significantly negatively associated with age and were lower among smokers, nulliparous women, and women who planned their pregnancy. Despite the fact that two thirds of Belgian pregnant women took iron-containing supplements, iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia were frequent in third-trimester women. The World Health Organization regards this as a moderate public health problem. National iron supplementation guidelines are needed in Belgium to optimize iron status during pregnancy.

  6. Effects of vitamin A supplementation on iron status indices and iron deficiency anaemia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Al-Zabedi, Ebtesam M; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T; Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K; Moktar, Norhayati; Sallam, Atiya A; Abdullah, Wan Ariffin; Jani, Rohana; Surin, Johari

    2013-12-31

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world including developed and developing countries. Despite intensive efforts to improve the quality of life of rural and aboriginal communities in Malaysia, anaemia and IDA are still major public health problems in these communities particularly among children. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Orang Asli (aboriginal) schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200,000 IU) on iron status indices, anaemia and IDA status. The effect of the supplement was assessed after 3 months of receiving the supplements; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/day of albendazole tablets. The prevalence of anaemia was found to be high: 48.5% (95% CI=42.3, 54.8). Moreover, 34% (95% CI=28.3, 40.2) of the children had IDA, which accounted for 70.1% of the anaemic cases. The findings showed that the reduction in serum ferritin level and the increments in haemoglobin, serum iron and transferrin saturation were found to be significant among children allocated to the vitamin A group compared to those allocated to the placebo group (p<0.01). Moreover, a significant reduction in the prevalence of IDA by almost 22% than prevalence at baseline was reported among children in the vitamin A group compared with only 2.3% reduction among children in the placebo group. In conclusion, vitamin A supplementation showed a significant impact on iron status indices and IDA among Orang Asli children. Hence, providing vitamin A supplementation and imparting the knowledge related to nutritious food should be considered in the efforts to improve the nutritional and health status of these children as a part of efforts to improve the quality of life in rural and aboriginal communities.

  7. Effects of Vitamin A Supplementation on Iron Status Indices and Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Al-Zabedi, Ebtesam M.; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T.; Atroosh, Wahib M.; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K.; Moktar, Norhayati; Sallam, Atiya A.; Abdullah, Wan Ariffin; Jani, Rohana; Surin, Johari

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world including developed and developing countries. Despite intensive efforts to improve the quality of life of rural and aboriginal communities in Malaysia, anaemia and IDA are still major public health problems in these communities particularly among children. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 250 Orang Asli (aboriginal) schoolchildren in Malaysia to investigate the effects of a single high-dose of vitamin A supplementation (200,000 IU) on iron status indices, anaemia and IDA status. The effect of the supplement was assessed after 3 months of receiving the supplements; after a complete 3-day deworming course of 400 mg/day of albendazole tablets. The prevalence of anaemia was found to be high: 48.5% (95% CI = 42.3, 54.8). Moreover, 34% (95% CI = 28.3, 40.2) of the children had IDA, which accounted for 70.1% of the anaemic cases. The findings showed that the reduction in serum ferritin level and the increments in haemoglobin, serum iron and transferrin saturation were found to be significant among children allocated to the vitamin A group compared to those allocated to the placebo group (p < 0.01). Moreover, a significant reduction in the prevalence of IDA by almost 22% than prevalence at baseline was reported among children in the vitamin A group compared with only 2.3% reduction among children in the placebo group. In conclusion, vitamin A supplementation showed a significant impact on iron status indices and IDA among Orang Asli children. Hence, providing vitamin A supplementation and imparting the knowledge related to nutritious food should be considered in the efforts to improve the nutritional and health status of these children as a part of efforts to improve the quality of life in rural and aboriginal communities. PMID:24384995

  8. Effects of polyacrylamide soil conditioner on the iron status of soybean plants. [Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Wallace, G.A.; Abouzamzam, A.M.; Char, J.W.

    1986-05-01

    An iron-inefficient cultivar of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. Bragg cv. PI-54619-5-1 was grown in two different calcareous soils, a Natrargid and a Torrifluvents, to determine if improvement of soil aeration with a synthetic polyacrylamide as a soil conditioner would decrease the tendency of the cultivar to lime-induced chlorosis. The results suggest that when soil is well aerated with good drainage from use of the soil conditioner, the iron status of plants is improved.

  9. Study of maternal influences on fetal iron status at term using cord blood transferrin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, D; Savage, G; Tubman, T; Lappin, T; Halliday, H

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine effects of maternal iron depletion and smoking on iron status of term babies using serum transferrin receptors (STfR) and their ratio to ferritin (TfR-F index) in cord blood.
METHODS—Iron, ferritin, STfR, and haemoglobin (Hb) concentration were measured and TfR-F index calculated in 67 cord /maternal blood pairs. Twenty six mothers were iron depleted (ferritin <10 µg/l) and 28 were smokers.
RESULTS—Maternal iron depletion was associated with decreased cord ferritin (113 v 171 µg/l) and Hb (156 v 168 g/l) but no change in STfR or TfR-F index. Smoking was associated with increased cord Hb (168 v 157 g/l) and TfR-F index (4.1 v 3.4), and decreased ferritin (123 v 190 µg/l). Cord TfR-F index and Hb were positively correlated (r = 0.48).
CONCLUSIONS—Maternal iron depletion is associated with reduced fetal iron stores but no change in free iron availability. Smoking is associated with increased fetal iron requirements for erythropoiesis.

 PMID:11124923

  10. Iron nutritional status in female karatekas, handball and basketball players, and runners.

    PubMed

    Nuviala, R J; Castillo, M C; Lapieza, M G; Escanero, J F

    1996-03-01

    The iron nutritional status was studied in 84 sportswomen (19 karatekas, 20 handball players, 20 basketball players, and 25 middle and long distance runners) and in 82 nonathletic females of similar characteristics (control group). After a 7-day nutritional survey by means of the food weighing method, it was found that iron intake was significantly higher in the handball players (p < 0.05), basketball players (p < 0.01), and runners (p < 0.01) with regard to the control group; the basketball players were the only ones to cover the recommended minimum intake (15 mg/day). The heme iron intake was significantly greater in the handball and basketball players (p < 0.01), who, together with the runners, reached the value of 1.5 mg/day, which is considered to be optimal. In relation to the control group, the karatekas and handball and basketball players had lower levels of serum ferritin, although their iron intake was greater, whereas the runners had higher values that were very similar to those of the control group, due to the iron supplementation they had received. Despite finding a marked prevalence of inadequate iron intake, both in the sportswomen and in the control group, the manifest cases of anemia are relatively scarce. The organic iron stores do not seem to depend exclusively on the iron intake but also on intimate mechanisms of intestinal absorption and diverse causes of iron loss.

  11. A Novel in Vivo Model for Assessing the Impact of Geophagic Earth on Iron Status.

    PubMed

    Seim, Gretchen L; Tako, Elad; Ahn, Cedric; Glahn, Raymond P; Young, Sera L

    2016-06-13

    The causes and consequences of geophagy, the craving and consumption of earth, remain enigmatic, despite its recognition as a behavior with public health implications. Iron deficiency has been proposed as both a cause and consequence of geophagy, but methodological limitations have precluded a decisive investigation into this relationship. Here we present a novel in vivo model for assessing the impact of geophagic earth on iron status: Gallus gallus (broiler chicken). For four weeks, animals were gavaged daily with varying dosages of geophagic material or pure clay mineral. Differences in haemoglobin (Hb) across treatment groups were assessed weekly and differences in liver ferritin, liver iron, and gene expression of the iron transporters divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), duodenal cytochrome B (DcytB) and ferroportin were assessed at the end of the study. Minimal impact on iron status indicators was observed in all non-control groups, suggesting dosing of geophagic materials may need refining in future studies. However, this model shows clear advantages over prior methods used both in vitro and in humans, and represents an important step in explaining the public health impact of geophagy on iron status.

  12. Curcumin may impair iron status when fed to mice for six months

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Dawn; Huebbe, Patricia; Frank, Jan; Rimbach, Gerald; Pallauf, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin has been shown to have many potentially health beneficial properties in vitro and in animal models with clinical studies on the toxicity of curcumin reporting no major side effects. However, curcumin may chelate dietary trace elements and could thus potentially exert adverse effects. Here, we investigated the effects of a 6 month dietary supplementation with 0.2% curcumin on iron, zinc, and copper status in C57BL/6J mice. Compared to non-supplemented control mice, we observed a significant reduction in iron, but not zinc and copper stores, in the liver and the spleen, as well as strongly suppressed liver hepcidin and ferritin expression in the curcumin-supplemented mice. The expression of the iron-importing transport proteins divalent metal transporter 1 and transferrin receptor 1 was induced, while hepatic and splenic inflammatory markers were not affected in the curcumin-fed mice. The mRNA expression of other putative target genes of curcumin, including the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and haem oxygenase 1 did not differ between the groups. Most of the published animal trials with curcumin-feeding have not reported adverse effects on iron status or the spleen. However, it is possible that long-term curcumin supplementation and a Western-type diet may aggravate iron deficiency. Therefore, our findings show that further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of curcumin supplementation on iron status. PMID:24634837

  13. A Novel in Vivo Model for Assessing the Impact of Geophagic Earth on Iron Status.

    PubMed

    Seim, Gretchen L; Tako, Elad; Ahn, Cedric; Glahn, Raymond P; Young, Sera L

    2016-01-01

    The causes and consequences of geophagy, the craving and consumption of earth, remain enigmatic, despite its recognition as a behavior with public health implications. Iron deficiency has been proposed as both a cause and consequence of geophagy, but methodological limitations have precluded a decisive investigation into this relationship. Here we present a novel in vivo model for assessing the impact of geophagic earth on iron status: Gallus gallus (broiler chicken). For four weeks, animals were gavaged daily with varying dosages of geophagic material or pure clay mineral. Differences in haemoglobin (Hb) across treatment groups were assessed weekly and differences in liver ferritin, liver iron, and gene expression of the iron transporters divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), duodenal cytochrome B (DcytB) and ferroportin were assessed at the end of the study. Minimal impact on iron status indicators was observed in all non-control groups, suggesting dosing of geophagic materials may need refining in future studies. However, this model shows clear advantages over prior methods used both in vitro and in humans, and represents an important step in explaining the public health impact of geophagy on iron status. PMID:27304966

  14. Consequences of Schistosoma haematobium infection on the iron status of schoolchildren in Niger.

    PubMed

    Prual, A; Daouda, H; Develoux, M; Sellin, B; Galan, P; Hercberg, S

    1992-09-01

    The relationship between iron status and degree of infection by Schistosoma haematobium was studied in 174 schoolchildren from Niger in an area endemic for urinary schistosomiasis. Iron deficiency was defined by a combination of three reliable indicators: a low serum ferritin level combined with a low transferrin saturation, a high erythrocyte protoporphyrin level, or both. Hematuria and proteinuria were found in 76.4% and 79.9% of the children, respectively, while 95.4% excreted eggs (geometric mean egg count of 31.5 eggs per 10 ml of urine). Anemia was observed in 59.7% of the subjects. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 47.1%. Anemia was associated with iron deficiency in 57.7% of the cases. The hemoglobin level and transferrin saturation decreased significantly when the degree of hematuria increased, while prevalence of anemia and prevalence of iron deficiency increased significantly. The hemoglobin level and the hematocrit were negatively correlated with egg count, while prevalence of anemia increased with increasing egg count. This inverse relationship between degree of infection by S. haematobium and iron status shows a deleterious consequence of urinary schistosomiasis on nutrition and hematopoietic status, which should be considered in the design of nutrition intervention programs.

  15. A Novel in Vivo Model for Assessing the Impact of Geophagic Earth on Iron Status

    PubMed Central

    Seim, Gretchen L.; Tako, Elad; Ahn, Cedric; Glahn, Raymond P.; Young, Sera L.

    2016-01-01

    The causes and consequences of geophagy, the craving and consumption of earth, remain enigmatic, despite its recognition as a behavior with public health implications. Iron deficiency has been proposed as both a cause and consequence of geophagy, but methodological limitations have precluded a decisive investigation into this relationship. Here we present a novel in vivo model for assessing the impact of geophagic earth on iron status: Gallus gallus (broiler chicken). For four weeks, animals were gavaged daily with varying dosages of geophagic material or pure clay mineral. Differences in haemoglobin (Hb) across treatment groups were assessed weekly and differences in liver ferritin, liver iron, and gene expression of the iron transporters divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), duodenal cytochrome B (DcytB) and ferroportin were assessed at the end of the study. Minimal impact on iron status indicators was observed in all non-control groups, suggesting dosing of geophagic materials may need refining in future studies. However, this model shows clear advantages over prior methods used both in vitro and in humans, and represents an important step in explaining the public health impact of geophagy on iron status. PMID:27304966

  16. Exercise and mineral status of athletes: calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and iron.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, P M; Haymes, E M

    1995-06-01

    Calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and iron are important to a wide variety of body functions, such as mineralization of bones, serving as cofactors to many enzyme systems, sustaining muscle and nerve excitation, and, in the case of iron, maintaining the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Many female athletes consume less calcium than the recommended dietary allowance (RDA). This is of concern because of the need to achieve peak bone mass during adolescence and the possible relationship of poor calcium intake to stress fractures. Athletes appear to have adequate magnesium and phosphorus status. However, those athletes who are on calorie-restricted diets may not be ingesting sufficient quantities of magnesium and possibly phosphorus. Limited data have suggested that magnesium status is indirectly related to strength improvement as well as the incidence of muscle cramps. Acute ingestion of phosphorus (phosphate loading) has been shown to improve aerobic capacity. Iron depletion is common in female athletes but similar to the general population. Iron supplements are of health benefit, but of questionable performance benefit, to those who are iron depleted and nonanemic. To maintain optimal status of these minerals, it is recommended that nutrient rich foods be ingested including dairy products and foods high in heme iron.

  17. Restrictive Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a buildup of iron in the body. Sarcoidosis is the name of an inflammatory disease that ... and form larger lumps that attack other organs. Sarcoidosis often affects your skin, eyes, or liver, but ...

  18. Incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abelmann, Walter H.

    1985-01-01

    Full reliable data on the incidence and prevalence of dilated cardiomyopathy are not available. In the United States, at least 0.7% of cardiac deaths are attributable to cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy probably contributes the great majority of these cases. The mortality rate for cardiomyopathy in males is twice that of females, and for blacks it is 2.4 times that of whites. Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed in 0.67% of patients discharged from hospitals in 1979 with diagnoses of disease of the circulatory system. Cardiomyopathy accounted for 1% of general cardiologists' and for 7% of academic cardiologists' patient encounters. In Scandinavia, population surveys suggested an annual incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy ranging from 0.73 to 7.5 cases per 100,000 population; for Tokyo this figure is 2.6. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy in underdeveloped and in tropical countries is considerably higher than in developed countries.

  19. Decreased serum hepcidin, inflammation, and improved functional iron status six-months post-restrictive bariatric surgery.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excess adiposity is associated with low-grade inflammation and decreased iron status. Iron depletion (ID) in obesity is thought to be mediated by an inflammation-induced increase in the body’s main regulator of iron homeostasis, hepcidin. Elevated hepcidin can result in ID as it prevents the release...

  20. Effects of a 7-day military training exercise on inflammatory biomarkers, serum hepcidin, and iron status

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepcidin, a peptide that is released into the blood in response to inflammation, prevents cellular iron export and results in declines in iron status. Elevated serum and urinary levels of hepcidin have been observed in athletes following exercise, and declines in iron status have been reported following prolonged periods of training. The objective of this observational study was to characterize the effects of an occupational task, military training, on iron status, inflammation, and serum hepcidin. Findings Volunteers (n = 21 males) included Norwegian Soldiers participating in a 7-day winter training exercise that culminated in a 3-day, 54 km ski march. Fasted blood samples were collected at baseline, on day 4 (PRE, prior to the ski march), and again on day 7 (POST, following the ski march). Samples were analyzed for hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and serum hepcidin. Military training affected inflammation and serum hepcidin levels, as IL-6 and hepcidin concentrations increased (P < 0.05) from the baseline to POST (mean ± SD, 9.1 ± 4.9 vs. 14.5 ± 8.4 pg/mL and 6.5 ± 3.5 vs. 10.2 ± 6.9 ng/mL, respectively). Iron status was not affected by the training exercise, as sTfR levels did not change over the course of the 7-day study. Conclusions Military training resulted in significant elevations in IL-6 and serum hepcidin. Future studies should strive to identify the role of hepcidin in the adaptive response to exercise, as well as countermeasures for the prevention of chronic or repeated elevations in serum hepcidin due to exercise or sustained occupational tasks which may result in longer term decrements in iron status. PMID:24188143

  1. Lead and iron status of breast and formula-fed infants

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, A.H.; Kasler, J.S.; Shrock, R.O.; Signs, S.A.

    1981-06-01

    We examined the iron and lead status of breast-fed and formula-fed infants from birth through the first year of life. Not only has the adequacy of iron intake of breast and formula-fed infants been questioned but also the contamination of breast milk with environmental pollutants such as Pb. In addition, it is believed that a state of Fe deficiency may promote the absorption of Pb. We compared the blood Pb and Fe levels of 23 breast-fed and 23 formula-fed infants whose mothers were enrolled in a longitudinal study determining the effects of maternal nutritional and environmental factors on the infants' subsequent growth and development. Serum iron, TIBC and %SAT values were obtained at 6 and 12 mo. Additional biochemical values including Pb and erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) concentrations were obtained at birth and 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 mo. Iron status was similar at 6 mo for the breast-fed and formula-fed infants, but somewhat higher for the breast-fed infants at 12 mo (NS). Results indicate no differences in Pb or EP status between breast-fed and formula-fed infants. Biochemical values were within normal limits. We conclude that dietary intake of Pb and Fe by infants whether breast-feeding or formula-feeding reflects adequate Fe status and apparent safe Pb state.

  2. Infant Arterial Stiffness and Maternal Iron Status in Pregnancy: A UK Birth Cohort (Baby VIP Study)

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Nisreen A.; Cade, Janet E.; McArdle, Harry J.; Greenwood, Darren C.; Hayes, Helen E.; Ciantar, Etienne; Simpson, Nigel A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background In animal studies, iron deficiency during pregnancy has been linked to increased offspring cardiovascular risk. No previous population studies have measured arterial stiffness early in life to examine its association with maternal iron status. Objective This study aimed to examine the association between maternal iron status in early pregnancy with infant brachio-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Methods The Baby VIP (Baby's Vascular Health and Iron in Pregnancy) study is a UK-based birth cohort which recruited 362 women after delivery from the Leeds Teaching Hospitals postnatal wards. Ferritin and transferrin receptor levels were measured in maternal serum samples previously obtained in the first trimester. Infant brachio-femoral PWV was measured during a home visit at 2–6 weeks. Results Iron depletion (ferritin <15 µg/l) was detected in 79 (23%) women in early pregnancy. Infant PWV (mean = 6.7 m/s, SD = 1.3, n = 284) was neither associated with maternal ferritin (adjusted change per 10 µg/l = 0.02, 95% CI: −0.01, 0.1), nor with iron depletion (adjusted change = −0.2, 95% CI: −0.6, 0.2). No evidence of association was observed between maternal serum transferrin receptor level and its ratio to ferritin with infant PWV. Maternal anaemia (<11 g/dl) at <20 weeks’ gestation was associated with a 1.0-m/s increase in infant PWV (adjusted 95% CI: 0.1, 1.9). Conclusion This is the largest study to date which has assessed peripheral PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness in infants. There was no evidence of an association between markers of maternal iron status early in pregnancy and infant PWV. PMID:25790854

  3. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to identify infections such as Lyme disease and HIV Iron tests of the blood Serum TSH and T4 test to identify thyroid problems Tests for amyloidosis Heart enlargement or other problems with the structure and function of the heart (such as weak ...

  4. Influence of diet on iron, copper, and zinc status in children under 24 months of age.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew; Redworth, Edward Wallis; Morgan, Jane B

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether iron and micronutrient status is improved with an increased amount of meat in the diet. To this end, a longitudinal prospective study with infants recruited at 4 mo and followed until 24 mo of age was undertaken. One hundred ninety-eight infants formed the original study cohort; 48 withdrew before the end of the study. Subjects were classified as nonmeat eaters or as mixed (red and white)-meat eaters subgrouped into tertiles depending on the meat content reported in diet diaries. Seven-day weighed food records were recorded at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 mo. Blood samples taken at 4, 12, and 24 mo were analyzed for parameters of iron and micronutrient status. Iron intake increased during the first year, thereafter remaining constant. The percentages of subjects with hemoglobin values below 110 g/L were 34.1, 23.1, and 13.4 at 4, 12, and 24 mo, respectively. For parameters of iron status, the number of results below the reference range was determined for each diet group and a significant negative relationship between serum iron and meat intake at 12 mo of age was seen (p<0.023). There was a trend for hemoglobin concentrations to be inversely related to the meat intake, at the same age (p<0.068). No effects on zinc or copper status were seen. We conclude that a weak association between dietary meat and iron/Hb suggests a positive role for red meat. There was no disadvantage to the nonmeat-eating infants with respect to zinc or copper.

  5. Efficacy of Multiple Micronutrients Fortified Milk Consumption on Iron Nutritional Status in Moroccan Schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    El Menchawy, Imane; El Hamdouchi, Asmaa; El Kari, Khalid; Saeid, Naima; Zahrou, Fatima Ezzahra; Benajiba, Nada; El Harchaoui, Imane; El Mzibri, Mohamed; El Haloui, Noureddine; Aguenaou, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency constitutes a major public health problem in Morocco, mainly among women and children. The aim of our paper is to assess the efficacy of consumption of multiple micronutrients (MMN) fortified milk on iron status of Moroccan schoolchildren living in rural region. Children (N = 195), aged 7 to 9 y, were recruited from schools and divided into two groups: the nonfortified group (NFG) received daily a nonfortified Ultra-High-Temperature (UHT) milk and the fortified group received (FG) daily UHT milk fortified with multiple micronutrients including iron sulfate. Blood samples were collected at baseline (T0) and after 9 months (T9). Hemoglobin (Hb) was measured in situ by Hemocue device; ferritin and C Reactive Protein were assessed in serum using ELISA and nephelometry techniques, respectively. Results were considered significant when the p value was <0.05. At T9 FG showed a reduction of iron deficiency from 50.9% to 37.2% (p = 0.037). Despite the low prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (1.9%); more than 50% of children in our sample suffered from iron deficiency at baseline. The consumption of fortified milk reduced the prevalence of iron deficiency by 27% in schoolchildren living in high altitude rural region of Morocco. Clinical Trial Registration. Our study is registered in the Pan African Clinical Trial Registry with the identification number PACTR201410000896410.

  6. Efficacy of Multiple Micronutrients Fortified Milk Consumption on Iron Nutritional Status in Moroccan Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    El Menchawy, Imane; El Hamdouchi, Asmaa; El Kari, Khalid; Saeid, Naima; Zahrou, Fatima Ezzahra; Benajiba, Nada; El Harchaoui, Imane; El Mzibri, Mohamed; El Haloui, Noureddine; Aguenaou, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency constitutes a major public health problem in Morocco, mainly among women and children. The aim of our paper is to assess the efficacy of consumption of multiple micronutrients (MMN) fortified milk on iron status of Moroccan schoolchildren living in rural region. Children (N = 195), aged 7 to 9 y, were recruited from schools and divided into two groups: the nonfortified group (NFG) received daily a nonfortified Ultra-High-Temperature (UHT) milk and the fortified group received (FG) daily UHT milk fortified with multiple micronutrients including iron sulfate. Blood samples were collected at baseline (T0) and after 9 months (T9). Hemoglobin (Hb) was measured in situ by Hemocue device; ferritin and C Reactive Protein were assessed in serum using ELISA and nephelometry techniques, respectively. Results were considered significant when the p value was <0.05. At T9 FG showed a reduction of iron deficiency from 50.9% to 37.2% (p = 0.037). Despite the low prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (1.9%); more than 50% of children in our sample suffered from iron deficiency at baseline. The consumption of fortified milk reduced the prevalence of iron deficiency by 27% in schoolchildren living in high altitude rural region of Morocco. Clinical Trial Registration. Our study is registered in the Pan African Clinical Trial Registry with the identification number PACTR201410000896410. PMID:26355324

  7. Intra-amniotic administration and dietary inulin affect the iron status and intestinal functionality of iron-deficient broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tako, E; Glahn, R P

    2012-06-01

    Inulin, a linear β-fructan, is present in a variety of plants, with relatively high levels of up to 20% in chicory root. It exhibits prebiotic properties and was shown to enhance mineral absorption. Our objectives were to assess the effect of intra-amniotic administration of inulin at 17 d of incubation on the iron status of broiler chicks (at hatch, 21 d) and to continue to monitor iron status with and without dietary inulin on these hatchlings for 42 d. The study included 3 prehatch treatment groups (n = 30): 1) inulin, inulin solution (4% inulin/0.85% saline); 2) control 1, untreated eggs; and 3) control 2, saline solution (0.85% saline). Solutions were injected into the naturally consumed amniotic fluid of 17-d-old chicken embryos (groups 1, 3). Upon hatch (93% hatchability), and from each group, 10 chicks were killed and their small intestine, liver, and cecum were removed for mRNA abundance of intestinal iron-related transporters, liver ferritin amounts, and bacterial analysis of cecal content, respectively. From the remaining chicks of each group, chicks were allocated to a standard corn-based diet (± 4% inulin, n = 10). During the trial, hemoglobin concentrations and body hemoglobin-Fe values were higher in the inulin group versus controls (P < 0.05). On d 42, birds were anesthetized and their duodenal loops were exposed. A nonocclusive catheter was inserted into the duodenal vein for blood sampling. A solution containing ⁵⁸Fe (0.1 mg of Fe/10 mM ascorbic acid) added to the digested diet sample was injected into the loop. Blood samples were collected every 5 min and for 90 min postinjection and analyzed by inductively coupled argon-plasma mass spectrometry for ⁵⁸Fe concentrations. At the end of the procedure, animals were killed and cecum contents and sections of the duodenum and liver were removed. Results showed that ⁵⁸Fe absorption rates were at times higher in the inulin group versus the other groups. Also, mRNA abundance of DMT1 (an Fe

  8. Zinc status as compared to zinc intake and iron status: a case study of Iranian populations from Isfahan province.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Nazanin; Wegmueller, Rita; Kelishadi, Roya; Schulin, Rainer; Hurrell, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) status of different age groups in rural (Rooran) and suburban (Khomeini Shahr) populations in central Iran, to relate the Zn status to Zn intake from animal and plant foods, and to examine the relationship between Zn and Fe status. Blood samples from 341 subjects including preschool children (27), schoolchildren (157), women (91), and men (66) were analyzed for serum zinc (SZn), serum ferritin (SF), total C-reactive protein, and hemoglobin. Daily Zn and phytic acid (PA) intakes from major food groups were estimated using a 3-day weighed food record. The overall prevalence of Zn deficiency based on low SZn was 5.9 % in Rooran and 7.2 % in Khomeini Shahr. Anemia was higher in the village than in the suburb (33.5 % vs. 22.7 %; p = 0.04) and almost half of the anemia in Khomeini Shahr and 36 % in Rooran was associated with iron deficiency (ID) based on low SF. The PA:Zn molar ratio in the diet was 10 - 13, indicating a diet of moderate Zn bioavailability. About 18 % of the population consumed less Zn than their WHO Estimated Average Requirements. There was no association between Zn status and Fe status. The modest prevalence of Zn deficiency in the study populations can be explained by a relatively high Zn intake from animal source foods. Anemia however is a serious public health problem affecting some 30 % of the subjects, with almost half due to ID. The lower Fe status than Zn status could be due to the frequent consumption of tea and dairy products.

  9. Iron status in pregnant women in the Republic of Seychelles

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Emeir M; Bonham, Maxine P; Wallace, Julie MW; Chang, Chin-Kuo; Robson, Paula J; Myers, Gary J; Davidson, Philip W; Clarkson, Thomas W; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Strain, JJ

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish the Fe status of pregnant women and their neonates in the Republic of Seychelles. Design A prospective study. Setting Republic of Seychelles. Subjects Pregnant women were recruited and blood samples taken at enrolment and post-delivery along with cord blood samples. Ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were measured in maternal (n 220) and cord blood (n 123) samples. Results Maternal Fe deficiency (ferritin<15 ng/ml, sTfR>28 nmol/l) was present in 6% of subjects at enrolment and in 20% at delivery. There was no significant decrease in maternal ferritin. A significant increase in sTfR was observed between enrolment and delivery (P<0·001). Maternal BMI and use of Fe supplements at 28 weeks’ gestation were associated with improved maternal Fe status at delivery, whereas parity had a negative effect on sTfR and ferritin at delivery. Conclusions Fe status of pregnant Seychellois women was, on average, within normal ranges. The incidence of Fe deficiency throughout pregnancy in this population was similar to that in a Westernised population. Increased awareness of the importance of adequate Fe intake during pregnancy, particularly in multiparous women, is warranted. PMID:19706210

  10. Rhizosphere microbial community structure in relation to root location and plant iron nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Yang, C H; Crowley, D E

    2000-01-01

    Root exudate composition and quantity vary in relation to plant nutritional status, but the impact of the differences on rhizosphere microbial communities is not known. To examine this question, we performed an experiment with barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants under iron-limiting and iron-sufficient growth conditions. Plants were grown in an iron-limiting soil in root box microcosms. One-half of the plants were treated with foliar iron every day to inhibit phytosiderophore production and to alter root exudate composition. After 30 days, the bacterial communities associated with different root zones, including the primary root tips, nonelongating secondary root tips, sites of lateral root emergence, and older roots distal from the tip, were characterized by using 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fingerprints generated by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results showed that the microbial communities associated with the different root locations produced many common 16S rDNA bands but that the communities could be distinguished by using correspondence analysis. Approximately 40% of the variation between communities could be attributed to plant iron nutritional status. A sequence analysis of clones generated from a single 16S rDNA band obtained at all of the root locations revealed that there were taxonomically different species in the same band, suggesting that the resolving power of DGGE for characterization of community structure at the species level is limited. Our results suggest that the bacterial communities in the rhizosphere are substantially different in different root zones and that a rhizosphere community may be altered by changes in root exudate composition caused by changes in plant iron nutritional status.

  11. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... cereals and breads. White beans, lentils, spinach, kidney beans, and peas. Nuts and some dried fruits, such as raisins. Iron in food comes in two forms: heme iron and nonheme iron. Nonheme iron is found in plant foods and iron-fortified food products. Meat, seafood, ...

  12. Body iron status and gastric cancer risk in the EURGAST study.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Agudo, Antonio; Aranda, Núria; Arija, Victoria; Cross, Amanda J; Molina, Esther; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Siersema, Peter; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Saieva, Calogero; Naccarati, Alessio; Ohlsson, Bodil; Sjöberg, Klas; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cadeau, Claire; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Key, Tim; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Peeters, Petra H; Gavrila, Diana; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, José Ramón; Barricarte, Aurelio; Jenab, Mazda; Zamora-Ros, Raúl; Freisling, Heinz; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Jakszyn, Paula

    2015-12-15

    Although it appears biologically plausible for iron to be associated with gastric carcinogenesis, the evidence is insufficient to lead to any conclusions. To further investigate the relationship between body iron status and gastric cancer risk, we conducted a nested case-control study in the multicentric European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The study included 456 primary incident gastric adenocarcinoma cases and 900 matched controls that occurred during an average of 11 years of follow-up. We measured prediagnostic serum iron, ferritin, transferrin and C-reactive protein, and further estimated total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) and transferrin saturation (TS). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of gastric cancer by iron metrics were estimated from multivariable conditional logistic regression models. After adjusting for relevant confounders, we observed a statistically significant inverse association between gastric cancer and ferritin and TS indices (ORlog2  = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.72-0.88; OR10%increment  = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.78-0.97, respectively). These associations appear to be restricted to noncardia gastric cancer (ferritin showed a p for heterogeneity = 0.04 and TS had a p for heterogeneity = 0.02), and no differences were found by histological type. TIBC increased risk of overall gastric cancer (OR50 µg/dl  = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.02-1.2) and also with noncardia gastric cancer (p for heterogeneity = 0.04). Additional analysis suggests that time between blood draw and gastric cancer diagnosis could modify these findings. In conclusion, our results showed a decreased risk of gastric cancer related to higher body iron stores as measured by serum iron and ferritin. Further investigation is needed to clarify the role of iron in gastric carcinogenesis.

  13. [Arrhythmic cardiomyopathy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Streangă, Violeta; Dimitriu, A G; Iordache, C; Georgescu, G; Grecu, Mihaela

    2004-01-01

    An 11 year-old boy was admitted with incessant sinus node reentrant tachycardia and secondary dilated arrhythmic cardiomyopathy, treated by radiofrequency ablation. Two years later he was admitted with incessant automatic atrial tachycardia and arrhythmic cardiomyopathy; a second catheter ablation procedure failed, but the third one, performed four month later, was successfully and resulted in a restoration of a normal sinus rhythm and a complete regression of arrhythmic cardiomyopathy.

  14. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  15. The association between low-grade inflammation, iron status and nucleic acid oxidation in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Broedbaek, Kasper; Siersma, Volkert; Andersen, Jon T.; Petersen, Morten; Afzal, Shoaib; Hjelvang, Brian; Weimann, Allan; Semba, Richard D.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    2016-01-01

    This study applied a case-control approach to investigate the association between low-grade inflammation, defined by high values within the normal range of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation. No differences in excretion of urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation between cases and controls were found and multivariable linear regression analysis showed no association between urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation and inflammatory markers. Post-hoc multivariable linear regression analysis showed significant associations between nucleic acid oxidation and various iron status markers and especially a close relationship between nucleic acid oxidation and ferritin. This study shows no association between low-grade inflammation and urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation in a population of elderly Italian people. The results suggest that low-grade inflammation only has a negligible impact on whole body nucleic acid oxidation, whereas iron status seems to be of great importance. PMID:21275071

  16. Midlife iron status is inversely associated with subsequent cognitive performance, particularly in perimenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Valentina A; Galan, Pilar; Arnaud, Josiane; Julia, Chantal; Hercberg, Serge; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2013-12-01

    The link between iron status and cognition has been established in infants and children, yet evidence in adults is scant and heterogeneous. We examined sex- and menopause-specific cross-time associations of iron status with cognition in the French Supplémentation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants Study cohort (1539 men, 1431 pre-/perimenopausal women, 962 postmenopausal women). Serum ferritin and hemoglobin data were obtained in 1995. Cognition was assessed after a mean of 13 y through 6 validated instruments, including the RI-48 cued recall test, phonemic and semantic fluency tasks, forward and backward digit span tasks, and a trail-making test. The standardized individual test scores were summed to form a composite cognitive performance measure. Associations between ferritin and hemoglobin and subsequent cognitive performance were examined through multivariable linear regression. Among men, no significant associations were observed. In postmenopausal women, an inverse association was found between ferritin and phonemic fluency (adjusted β: -0.11; 95% CI: -0.21, -0.01). Significant inverse associations between ferritin and both the composite cognitive measure (adjusted β: -0.09; 95% CI: -0.17, -0.00) and the forward digit span scores (adjusted β: -0.13; 95% CI: -0.22, -0.03) were observed only among premenopausal women aged ≥ 46 y at baseline. No significant findings with hemoglobin emerged. This study supports an inverse association between midlife iron status and subsequent cognitive performance that is sex- and menopause-dependent. Given the urgent need for prevention research on age-related disorders, future investigations of iron status and cognition are warranted. The study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00272428. PMID:24089418

  17. Hematological and Biochemical Markers of Iron Status in a Male, Young, Physically Active Population

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Lázaro Alessandro Soares; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti W.; Brenzikofer, René; Macedo, Denise Vaz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish reference intervals (RIs) for the hemogram and iron status biomarkers in a physically active population. The study population included male volunteers (n = 150) with an average age of 19 ± 1 years who had participated in a regular and controlled exercise program for four months. Blood samples were collected to determine hematological parameters using a Sysmex XE-5000 analyzer (Sysmex, Kobe, Japan). Iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation and ferritin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in serum samples were measured using commercial kits (Roche Diagnostics, GmbH, Mannheim, Germany) and a Roche/Hitachi 902 analyzer. The RIs were established using the RefVal program 4.1b. The leucocyte count, TIBC, and CRP and ferritin concentrations exhibited higher RIs compared with those in a nonphysically active population. Thirty volunteers (outliers) were removed from the reference population due to blood abnormalities. Among the outliers, 46% exhibited higher CRP concentrations and lower concentrations of iron and reticulocyte hemoglobin compared with the nonphysically active population (P < 0.001). Our results showed that it is important to establish RIs for certain laboratory parameters in a physically active population, especially for tests related to the inflammatory response and iron metabolism. PMID:25045665

  18. Iron status in female athletes participating in team ball-sports.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, A; Enayatizadeh, N; Akbarzadeh, M; Asadi, S; Tabatabaee, S H R

    2010-01-15

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most prevalent micronutrient deficiency in the world, affecting 20-50% of the world's population. It is estimated that 10 and 20% of male and female athletes are iron deficient, respectively. Iron deficiency has deleterious effects on the physical performance of athletes. It decreases aerobic capacity, increases heart rate and elongates the recovery time after exercise. In this cross-sectional study, 42 semi-professional female athletes who had been playing in basketball, volleyball and handball super league teams served as subjects. Data on socioeconomic and fertility status as well as the type of sport were obtained through a questionnaire. Nutritional data were gathered with a 3 day dietary recall. Total intake of calorie, iron, zinc, folate, vitamin C and B12 were also analyzed. In addition, ferritin and TIBC were measured and a CBC test was done for each subject. The results showed that the mean total calorie intake of women was 2049.79 +/- 735.12 kcal, where their iron intake was 22.33 +/- 9.24 mg day(-1). There was a significant difference between the iron intake of basketball and volleyball players (p = 0.036). Of our subjects, 33.33% had low ferritin levels (< 30 ng mL(-1)) and it was lowest in handball players. Higher than normal ferritin levels were seen in 12.5% of the subjects. We saw a significant difference in ferritin levels of basketball and handball players (p = 0.047). We conclude that the intake of calorie and iron is low in female athletes and therefore, their hematological indices such as ferritin level are below standard values.

  19. Ferritin and iron status in pregnancy: Relationship to fetal alcohol syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Baumstark, J.S.; Hill, W.C.; Chun, M.A.; Hunter, W.J. )

    1989-02-09

    Ferritin is a water soluble macromolecule of M{sub r} = 450,000 within whose inner core is stored approximately 4,500 atoms of iron (as ferric oxyhydroxide). The protein is the chief source of stored iron and its determination in serum is an excellent indicator of iron status. This laboratory is engaged in a study of iron metabolism and its relationship to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Ferritin and transferrin levels have been determined ion serial maternal sera, as well as cord serum. Patients were identified as high risk for the development of FAS by questionnaire. Transferrin levels for both maternal and cord serum were within normal literature values and increased, in maternal serum, at a rate of 5 mg/dl per week of gestation. Ferritin levels decreased at a rate of 1 ng/ml per gestational week. At term, the ferritin level for maternal serum in ten patients was 17 ng/ml {plus minus} 12 SD with a range of 2-35 ng/ml. The value for ferritin in cord serum was 78 {plus minus} 36 SD which is significantly lower than the normal mean value of 101 {plus minus} 52 ng/ml. Equating 101 ng/ml with 100% efficiency in iron metabolism it can be calculated that the high risk-for-FAS fetus is 23% less efficient in general iron metabolism than is the fetus of the normal patient. A decrease of 23% efficiency in iron metabolism could be associated with intrauterine growth retardation and/or the genesis of birth defects.

  20. Is Higher Consumption of Animal Flesh Foods Associated with Better Iron Status among Adults in Developed Countries? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Jacklyn; Williams, Rebecca; McEvoy, Mark; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Patterson, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most prevalent nutrient deficiency within the developed world. This is of concern as ID has been shown to affect immunity, thermoregulation, work performance and cognition. Animal flesh foods provide the richest and most bioavailable source of dietary (haem) iron, however, it is unclear whether low animal flesh diets contribute to ID. This systematic review aimed to investigate whether a higher consumption of animal flesh foods is associated with better iron status in adults. CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE and MEDLINE were searched for published studies that included adults (≥18 years) from developed countries and measured flesh intakes in relation to iron status indices. Eight experimental and 41 observational studies met the inclusion criteria. Generally, studies varied in population and study designs and results were conflicting. Of the seven high quality studies, five showed a positive association between animal flesh intake (85–300 g/day) and iron status. However, the optimum quantity or frequency of flesh intake required to maintain or achieve a healthy iron status remains unclear. Results show a promising relationship between animal flesh intake and iron status, however, additional longitudinal and experimental studies are required to confirm this relationship and determine optimal intakes to reduce ID development. PMID:26891320

  1. Improvements in Iron Status and Cognitive Function in Young Women Consuming Beef or Non-Beef Lunches

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Iron status is associated with cognitive performance and intervention trials show that iron supplementation improves mental function in iron-deficient adults. However, no studies have tested the efficacy of naturally iron-rich food in this context. This investigation measured the hematologic and cognitive responses to moderate beef consumption in young women. Participants (n = 43; age 21.1 ± 0.4 years) were randomly assigned to a beef or non-beef protein lunch group [3-oz (85 g), 3 times weekly] for 16 weeks. Blood was sampled at baseline, and weeks 8 and 16, and cognitive performance was measured at baseline and week 16. Body iron increased in both lunch groups (p < 0.0001), with greater improvement demonstrated in women with lower baseline body iron (p < 0.0001). Body iron had significant beneficial effects on spatial working memory and planning speed (p < 0.05), and ferritin responders (n = 17) vs. non-responders (n = 26) showed significantly greater improvements in planning speed, spatial working memory strategy, and attention (p < 0.05). Lunch group had neither significant interactions with iron status nor consistent main effects on test performance. These findings support a relationship between iron status and cognition, but do not show a particular benefit of beef over non-beef protein consumption on either measure in young women. PMID:24379009

  2. Improvements in iron status and cognitive function in young women consuming beef or non-beef lunches.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Iron status is associated with cognitive performance and intervention trials show that iron supplementation improves mental function in iron-deficient adults. However, no studies have tested the efficacy of naturally iron-rich food in this context. This investigation measured the hematologic and cognitive responses to moderate beef consumption in young women. Participants (n=43; age 21.1±0.4 years) were randomly assigned to a beef or non-beef protein lunch group [3-oz (85 g), 3 times weekly] for 16 weeks. Blood was sampled at baseline, and weeks 8 and 16, and cognitive performance was measured at baseline and week 16. Body iron increased in both lunch groups (p<0.0001), with greater improvement demonstrated in women with lower baseline body iron (p<0.0001). Body iron had significant beneficial effects on spatial working memory and planning speed (p<0.05), and ferritin responders (n=17) vs. non-responders (n=26) showed significantly greater improvements in planning speed, spatial working memory strategy, and attention (p<0.05). Lunch group had neither significant interactions with iron status nor consistent main effects on test performance. These findings support a relationship between iron status and cognition, but do not show a particular benefit of beef over non-beef protein consumption on either measure in young women. PMID:24379009

  3. Biventricular Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Associated with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Namho; Yoon, Byung Woo; Song, Yonggeon; Lee, Chang Kyun; Lee, Tae Yeon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in an elderly woman after status epilepticus. In an emergency echocardiography, not only left ventricular apical ballooning but also right ventricular apical hypokinesia was observed. After a medical management, the patient's condition was improved and a follow-up echocardiography showed substantial recovery of left and right ventricular apical ballooning. PMID:26755936

  4. The Iron Status of Sickle Cell Anaemia Patients in Ilorin, North Central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sani, Musa A; Adewuyi, James O; Babatunde, Abiola S; Olawumi, Hannah O; Shittu, Rasaki O

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is one of the commonest genetic disorders in the world. It is characterized by anaemia, periodic attacks of thrombotic pain, and chronic systemic organ damage. Recent studies have suggested that individuals with SCA especially from developing countries are more likely to be iron deficient rather than have iron overload. The study aims to determine the iron status of SCA patients in Ilorin, Nigeria. Methods. A cross-sectional study of 45 SCA patients in steady state and 45 non-SCA controls was undertaken. FBC, blood film, sFC, sTfR, and sTfR/log sFC index were done on all subjects. Results. The mean patients' serum ferritin (589.33 ± 427.61 ng/mL) was significantly higher than the mean serum ferritin of the controls (184.53 ± 119.74 ng/mL). The mean serum transferrin receptor of the patients (4.24 ± 0.17 μg/mL) was higher than that of the controls (3.96 ± 0.17 μg/mL) (p = 0.290). The mean serum transferrin receptor (sTfR)/log serum ferritin index of the patients (1.65 ± 0.27 μg/mL) was significantly lower than that of the control (1.82 ± 0.18 μg/mL) (p = 0.031). Conclusion. Iron deficiency is uncommon in SCA patients and periodic monitoring of the haematological, biochemical, and clinical features for iron status in SCA patients is advised. PMID:26550015

  5. Iron status of the Pakistani population-current issues and strategies.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saeed; Ahmed, Anwaar; Ahmad, Asif; Ali, Zulfiqar; Riaz, Muhammad; Ismail, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    The present review aims to highlight the magnitude of iron status of Pakistani population and possible remedies to address iron deficiency among vulnerable groups. A computer-based search was carried out on "PubMed", "Google Search" and "Sciencedirect.com" to retrieve relevant scientific literature published in the last two decades. The search yielded 193 articles, of which 64 were culled and further screening was performed based on the type of vulnerable population groups, age, sex and pregnancy. A thorough review of current literature reveals that iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) widely persist in Pakistan and necessitate immediate remedial actions. Females of reproductive age and children under 5 years have been shown to be the most IDA affected population segment. Fortification of wheat flour has been suggested as the most viable approach aptly matching Pakistan's needs for combating IDA. The present review further stresses the need for global involvement to scale up efforts for mitigating ID and IDA to achieve Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that are fundamentally based upon improving nutritional wellbeing of populations in developing economies by 2015.

  6. Iron status of the Pakistani population-current issues and strategies.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saeed; Ahmed, Anwaar; Ahmad, Asif; Ali, Zulfiqar; Riaz, Muhammad; Ismail, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    The present review aims to highlight the magnitude of iron status of Pakistani population and possible remedies to address iron deficiency among vulnerable groups. A computer-based search was carried out on "PubMed", "Google Search" and "Sciencedirect.com" to retrieve relevant scientific literature published in the last two decades. The search yielded 193 articles, of which 64 were culled and further screening was performed based on the type of vulnerable population groups, age, sex and pregnancy. A thorough review of current literature reveals that iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) widely persist in Pakistan and necessitate immediate remedial actions. Females of reproductive age and children under 5 years have been shown to be the most IDA affected population segment. Fortification of wheat flour has been suggested as the most viable approach aptly matching Pakistan's needs for combating IDA. The present review further stresses the need for global involvement to scale up efforts for mitigating ID and IDA to achieve Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that are fundamentally based upon improving nutritional wellbeing of populations in developing economies by 2015. PMID:23945403

  7. Effect of Spirulina maxima Supplementation on Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, and Zinc Status in Obese Patients with Treated Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Suliburska, J; Szulińska, M; Tinkov, A A; Bogdański, P

    2016-09-01

    The effects of Spirulina maxima supplementation on calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc status were studied in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 50 obese subjects with treated hypertension, each randomized to receive 2 g of spirulina or a placebo daily for 3 months. At baseline and after treatment, the calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc concentration in plasma was assessed. It was found that 3 months of S. maxima supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in the iron level in the plasma of obese patients. In conclusion, this is the first clinical study on the influence of spirulina supplementation on mineral status in obese patients with hypertension. Spirulina supplementation affects the iron status of obese Caucasians with well-treated hypertension. PMID:26779620

  8. Supplemental levels of iron and calcium interfere with repletion of zinc status in zinc-deficient animals.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, S; Platel, Kalpana

    2016-05-18

    Negative interactions between minerals interfering with each other's absorption are of concern when iron and calcium supplements are given to pregnant women and children. We have previously reported that supplemental levels of iron and calcium inhibit the bioaccessibility of zinc, and compromise zinc status in rats fed diets with high levels of these two minerals. The present study examined the effect of supplemental levels of iron and calcium on the recovery of zinc status during a zinc repletion period in rats rendered zinc-deficient. Iron and calcium, both individually and in combination, significantly interfered with the recovery of zinc status in zinc deficient rats during repletion with normal levels of zinc in the diet. Rats maintained on diets containing supplemental levels of these two minerals had significantly lower body weight, and the concentration of zinc in serum and organs was significantly lower than in zinc-deficient rats not receiving the supplements. Iron and calcium supplementation also significantly inhibited the activity of zinc-containing enzymes in the serum as well as liver. Both iron and calcium independently exerted this negative effect on zinc status, while their combination seemed to have a more prominent effect, especially on the activities of zinc containing enzymes. This investigation is probably the first systematic study on the effect of these two minerals on the zinc status of zinc deficient animals and their recovery during repletion with normal amounts of zinc. PMID:27101872

  9. Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Tracie L.; Neri, Daniela; Extein, Jason; Somarriba, Gabriel; Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are heterogeneous groups of serious disorders of the heart muscle and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality among children who have the disease. While enormous improvements have been made in the treatment and survival of children with congenital heart disease, parallel strides have not been made in the outcomes for cardiomyopathies. Thus, ancillary therapies, such as nutrition and nutritional interventions, that may not cure but may potentially improve cardiac function and quality of life, are imperative to consider in children with all types of cardiomyopathy. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical problems of children with cardiomyopathy with nearly one-third of children with this disorder manifesting some degree of growth failure during the course of their illness. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve cardiac function. In addition, several specific nutrients have been shown to correct myocardial abnormalities that often occur with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, antioxidants that can protect against free radical damage that often occurs in heart failure and nutrients that augment myocardial energy production are important therapies that have been explored more in adults with cardiomyopathy than in the pediatric population. Future research directions should pay particular attention to the effect of overall nutrition and specific nutritional therapies on clinical outcomes and quality of life in children with pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:18159216

  10. Nutritional zinc status in weaning infants: association with iron deficiency, age, and growth profile.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Chang, Ju Young; Hong, Jeana; Ko, Jae Sung; Seo, Jeong Kee; Shin, Sue; Lee, Eun Hee

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the correlation between iron deficiency (ID) and zinc deficiency (ZD) and explored the demographic, anthropometric, and feeding-related factors associated with hypozincemia and hair zinc content in weaning infants. Infants aged 6-24 months were recruited, their feeding history was recorded, and their heights and weights were measured. Hemoglobin content, serum iron/total iron-binding capacity, and ferritin and zinc concentrations of serum and hair (using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy) were assessed. Among 101 infants, 64 (63.4 %) infants exhibited ID. The median serum zinc concentration in iron-deficient infants was lower than that in non-iron-deficient infants, respectively, 73.5 μg/dL (interquartile range [IQR], 65.0-83.8) vs. 87.0 μg/dL (IQR, 77.5-97.0; p = 0.001). The frequency of hypozincemia was also significantly higher in the iron-deficient group than in the non-iron-deficient group (21 out of 64 [32.8 %] vs. 4 out of 37 [10.8 %], respectively; p = 0.014). In multiple regression analysis, the risk of hypozincemia was significantly increased in infants with ID (p = 0.026), mildly underweight infants (weight-for-age Z score < -1; p = 0.034), and infants with mild wasting (weight-for-height Z score < -1; p = 0.028). Hair zinc concentrations (n = 81) were not significantly associated with ID status (p > 0.1); however, there was an inverse relationship between hair zinc concentrations and age of infants (r = -0.250; p = 0.024). In weaning infants, ID is a risk factor for hypozincemia. Hair zinc concentrations appeared to decrease as the age of infants increased during late infancy. Further large-scale studies are needed to validate the relationship between hypozincemia and mild degrees of weight gain impairment in this age group.

  11. How Is Cardiomyopathy Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... arrest Stopping the disease from getting worse Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Your doctor may suggest lifestyle changes to manage a condition that’s causing your cardiomyopathy including: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for a healthy weight Managing stress ...

  12. Household Food Insecurity, Mother's Feeding Practices, and the Early Childhood's Iron Status

    PubMed Central

    Salarkia, Nahid; Neyestani, Tirang R.; Omidvar, Nasrin; Zayeri, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health consequences of food insecurity among infants and toddlers have not been fully examined. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between household food insecurity, mother's infant feeding practices and iron status of 6–24 months children. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 423 mother-child pairs were randomly selected by multistage sampling method. Children blood samples were analyzed for hemoglobin and serum ferritin concentrations. Household food security was evaluated using a validated Household Food Insecurity Access Scale. The mother's feeding practices were evaluated using Infant and Young Child Feeding practice variables including: The duration of breastfeeding and the time of introducing of complementary feeding. Results: Based on the results, of the studied households only 47.7% were food secure. Mild and moderate-severe household food insecurity was 39.5% and 12.8%, respectively. Anemia, iron deficiency (ID), and iron deficiency anemia were seen in 29.1%, 12.2%, and 4.8% of children, respectively. There was no significant association between household food insecurity; mother's feeding practices and child ID with or without anemia. Conclusions: We found no association between household food insecurity and the occurrence of anemia in the 6–24 months children. However, these findings do not rule out the possibility of other micronutrient deficiencies among the food-insecure household children. PMID:26445633

  13. Status of neurocognitive and oxidative stress conditions in iron-steel workers.

    PubMed

    Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Mirabdollahi, Mansuoreh; Pilehvarian, Ali Asghar; Nassajpour, Ali Reza; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine oxidative stress status as well as ferrous (Fe) and Copper (Cu) levels in blood, neurocognitive impairment, and clinical markers in iron-steel workers. A comparative cross-sectional analysis was performed in 50 iron-steel workers who have been in contact with Fe and Cu in comparison with a control group containing 50 healthy subjects in the same age group and sex. Blood levels of lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity, Fe, and Cu along with neurocognitive impairment were measured in workers and controls. Clinical examination was accomplished to record any abnormal sign or symptoms. Comparing with controls, the workers showed higher blood levels of lipid peroxidation and Cu and also a lower total antioxidant capacity. There was a positive correlation between work history and interstitial lung disease that strengths the presumption to progress to chronic obstructive lung disease in future. The results indicate that exposure to a combination of Fe and Cu in iron-steel workers induces oxidative stress. Especially, in the present case, toxic effect of Cu has been more than positive effects of Fe, but the combined exposure resulted in no such critical toxicity.

  14. Iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc status and immune response in the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Henry-Christian, J.R.; Johnson, A.A.; Walters, C.S.; Greene, E.J.; Lindsey, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    The relationships of iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc status to cell-mediated immune response were investigated among 125 healthy, elderly persons (60-87 years of age). Plasma ferritin, plasma and red cell folate, and plasma vitamin B/sub 12/ levels were assayed immuno-radiometrically. Plasma and hair zinc levels were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Immune response was determined by transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (con A), and in mixed lymphocyte reaction. Deficiencies of iron, folacin vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc were each associated (independently) with significantly lower lymphocyte responses to PHA and con A, and mixed lymphocyte reaction (P < 0.01). These findings indicate a depression of cell-mediated immunity in elderly persons deficient in iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ or zinc. Further, they suggest that deficiencies of these nutrients may play a role in the depression of cell-mediated immunity with age, which in turn may lead to increased susceptibility to infectious diseases and cancer in the elderly.

  15. The effect of wheat prebiotics on the gut bacterial population and iron status of iron deficient broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a lot of interest in improving gut health, and consequently increasing Fe absorption, by managing the colonic microbial population. This is traditionally done by the consumption of probiotics, live microbial food supplements. However, an alternative, and often very effective approach, is the consumption of food ingredients known as prebiotics. Fructans and arabinoxylans are naturally occurring non-digestible oligosaccharides in wheat that exhibit prebiotic properties and may enhance intestinal iron (Fe) absorption. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prebiotics from wheat on Fe bioavailability in vitro (Caco-2 cells) and in vivo (broiler chickens, Gallus gallus). Methods In the current study, the effect of intra-amniotic administration of wheat samples extracts at 17 d of embryonic incubation on the Fe status and possible changes in the bacterial population in intestinal content of broiler hatchlings were investigated. A group of 144 eggs were injected with the specified solution (1 ml per egg) into the amniotic fluid. Immediately after hatch (21 d) and from each treatment group, 10 chicks were euthanized and their small intestine, liver and cecum were removed for relative mRNA abundance of intestinal Fe related transporters, relative liver ferritin amounts and bacterial analysis of cecal content, respectively. Results The in vivo results are in agreement with the in vitro observations, showing no differences in the hatchling Fe status between the treatment groups, as Fe bioavailability was not increased in vitro and no significant differences were measured in the intestinal expression of DMT1, Ferroportin and DcytB in vivo. However, there was significant variation in relative amounts of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the intestinal content between the treatments groups, with generally more bifidobacteria being produced with increased prebiotic content. Conclusions In this study we showed that prebiotics naturally

  16. Dietary intake and thiamin, iron, and zinc status in elite Nordic skiers during different training periods.

    PubMed

    Fogelholm, M; Rehunen, S; Gref, C G; Laakso, J T; Lehto, J; Ruokonen, I; Himberg, J J

    1992-12-01

    This study evaluated how different training periods affect dietary intake and biochemical indices of thiamin, iron, and zinc status in elite Nordic skiers. Subjects were 17 skiers and 39 controls, ages 18-38 yrs. Dietary data were collected by 7-day food records at 3-month intervals. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to indicate magnitude of seasonal changes. Energy intake for the year (28 food record days) was 3,802 kcal/day (CV 19.1%) in male skiers, 2,754 kcal/day (CV 3.7%) in male controls, 2,812 kcal/day (CV 9.1%) in female skiers, and 2,013 kcal/day (CV 5.9%) in female controls. CVs for thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc intake were 14.1-23.9% (male skiers), 2.9-15.0% (male controls), 4.8-24.5% (female skiers), and 4.3-11.5% (female controls). Seasonal changes in energy, carbohydrate, and micronutrient intakes reflected energy expenditure in male endurance athletes particularly. Erythrocyte transketolase activation coefficients and serum ferritin and zinc concentrations did not differ between skiers and controls. Seasonal variations in these biochemical indices of nutritional status were of the same magnitude in skiers and controls, despite large changes in skiers' physical activity.

  17. Biventricular Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Daoko, Joseph; Rajachandran, Manu; Savarese, Ronald; Orme, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy is associated with more hemodynamic instability than is isolated left ventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy; medical management is more invasive and the course of hospitalization is longer. In March 2011, a 62-year-old woman presented at our emergency department with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. On hospital day 2, she experienced chest pain. An electrocardiogram and cardiac enzyme levels suggested an acute myocardial infarction. She underwent cardiac angiography and was found to have severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction involving the mid and apical segments, which resulted in a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.10 to 0.15 in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Her hospital course was complicated by cardiogenic shock that required hemodynamic support with an intra-aortic balloon pump and dobutamine. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed akinesis of the mid-to-distal segments of the left ventricle and mid-to-apical dyskinesis of the right ventricular free wall characteristic of biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy. After several days of medical management, the patient was discharged from the hospital in stable condition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review of the literature on biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy that compares its hemodynamic instability and medical management requirements with those of isolated left ventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Herein, we discuss the case of our patient, review the pertinent medical literature, and convey the prevalence and importance of right ventricular involvement in patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:23914028

  18. Multi-micronutrient-fortified biscuits decreased the prevalence of anaemia and improved iron status, whereas weekly iron supplementation only improved iron status in Vietnamese school children.

    PubMed

    Hieu, Nguyen Trung; Sandalinas, Fanny; de Sesmaisons, Agnès; Laillou, Arnaud; Tam, Nguyen Phuong; Khan, Nguyen Cong; Bruyeron, Olivier; Wieringa, Frank Tammo; Berger, Jacques

    2012-10-28

    In Vietnam, nutrition interventions do not target school children despite a high prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies. The present randomised, placebo-controlled study evaluated the impact of providing school children (n 403) with daily multiple micronutrient-fortified biscuits (FB) or a weekly Fe supplement (SUP) on anaemia and Fe deficiency. Micronutrient status was assessed by concentrations of Hb, and plasma ferritin (PF), transferrin receptor (TfR), Zn and retinol. After 6 months of intervention, children receiving FB or SUP had a significantly better Fe status when compared with the control children (C), indicated by higher PF (FB: geometric mean 36·9 (95% CI 28·0, 55·4) μg/l; SUP: geometric mean 46·0 (95% CI 33·0, 71·7) μg/l; C: geometric mean 34·4 (95% CI 15·2, 51·2) μg/l; P < 0·001) and lower TfR concentrations (FB: geometric mean 5·7 (95% CI 4·8, 6·52) mg/l; SUP: geometric mean 5·5 (95% CI 4·9, 6·2) mg/l; C: geometric mean 5·9 (95% CI 5·1, 7·1) mg/l; P = 0·007). Consequently, body Fe was higher in children receiving FB (mean 5·6 (sd 2·2) mg/kg body weight) and SUP (mean 6·1 (sd 2·5) mg/kg body weight) compared with the C group (mean 4·2 (sd 3·3) mg/kg body weight, P < 0·001). However, anaemia prevalence was significantly lower only in the FB group (1·0%) compared with the C group (10·4%, P = 0·006), with the SUP group being intermediate (7·4%). Children receiving FB had better weight-for-height Z-scores after the intervention than children receiving the SUP (P = 0·009). Vitamin A deficiency at baseline modified the intervention effect, with higher Hb concentrations in vitamin A-deficient children receiving FB but not in those receiving the SUP. This indicates that vitamin A deficiency is implicated in the high prevalence of anaemia in Vietnamese school children, and that interventions should take other deficiencies besides Fe into account to improve Hb concentrations. Provision of biscuits fortified with multiple

  19. Association Between Chilli Food Habits with Iron Status and Insulin Resistance in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Xiao, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Some studies have indicated that the consumption of chilli-containing foods can influence iron absorption and affect serum insulin and glucose concentrations, which may help to alleviate diabetes or prediabetes. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between chilli food habits with iron status and insulin resistance in the Chinese population. Fasting blood samples, anthropometric data, and chilli food habit data collected from 8433 adults (aged 18 to 99), in 2009, as part of the China Health and Nutrition Survey, a large-scale longitudinal, household-based survey in China. Chilli food habits were assessed using chilli food eating frequencies (no eating, sometimes eating, often eating, and usually eating) and chilli food types (a little bit hot, moderately hot, and very hot). Fasting serum ferritin, insulin, and fasting plasma glucose were also measured. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used to estimate insulin resistance. Compared with the chilli-eating group, the no eating group had higher HOMA-IR levels for both men and women (P<.05). There were significant differences in HOMA-IR (P<.05) for both men and women and in ferritin (P<.001) for women according to different chilli food types. However, there was no significant difference in the ferritin level and HOMA-IR components for different chilli food eating frequencies in both sex groups. Chilli food habits, especially the different hotness levels of chilli food, were associated with iron status and insulin resistance in the Chinese population. Additional studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms of action and to establish causal inference. PMID:24479485

  20. Micronutrient Status in Female University Students: Iron, Zinc, Copper, Selenium, Vitamin B12 and Folate

    PubMed Central

    Fayet-Moore, Flavia; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Young women are at an increased risk of micronutrient deficiencies, particularly due to higher micronutrient requirements during childbearing years and multiple food group avoidances. The objective of this study was to investigate biomarkers of particular micronutrients in apparently healthy young women. Female students (n = 308; age range 18–35 year; Body Mass Index 21.5 ± 2.8 kg/m2; mean ± SD) were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Blood samples were obtained from participants in the fasted state and analysed for biomarkers of iron status, vitamin B12, folate, homocysteine, selenium, zinc, and copper. The results show iron deficiency anaemia, unspecified anaemia, and hypoferritinemia in 3%, 7% and 33.9% of participants, respectively. Low vitamin B12 concentrations (<120 pmol/L) were found in 11.3% of participants, while 4.7% showed sub-clinical deficiency based on serum methylmalonic acid concentrations >0.34 μmol/L. Folate concentrations below the reference range were observed in 1.7% (serum) or 1% (erythrocytes) of participants, and 99.7% of the participant had erythrocyte-folate concentrations >300 nmol/L. Serum zinc concentrations <10.7 μmol/L were observed in 2% of participants. Serum copper and selenium concentrations were below the reference range in 23% and 11% of participants, respectively. Micronutrient deficiencies including iron and vitamin B12, and apparent excess of folate are present in educated Australian female students of childbearing age, including those studying nutrition. The effects of dietary behaviours and food choices on markers of micronutrient status require further investigation. PMID:25401503

  1. Assessment of iron status among preschool children (6 to 59 months) with and without malaria in Western Province, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kisiangani, Isaac; Mbakaya, Charles; Makokha, Anzelimo; Magu, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Iron deficiency is a major public health concern. Globally, iron deficiency ranks number 9 and is responsible for about 60% of all anemia cases among preschool children. In Africa iron deficiency is 43-52% while in Kenya, children under 5 years constitute the largest burden with 69% of them being deficient. There is limited iron deficiency data in Kenya. This study determined haemoglobin levels, serum ferritin levels, nutritional status and P.falciparum malaria infection in preschool children. Methods A household cross sectional study was undertaken among 125 preschoolers in Western province, drawn from 37 clusters. Systematic random sampling was used for sample selection. Data was collected using pretested structured questionnaires, entered in Microsoft package. Data analysis was done in Statistical package for social science (SPSS) version 20 using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression and differences were considered significant at P < 0.05. Results The prevalence of iron deficiency (Serum ferritin <12mg/l), anaemia (Hb < 110g/l) and plasmodium falciparum malaria were 20.8%, 25% and 6.8% respectively. There was a significant association between iron deficiency and anaemia (OR = 3.43, 95% CI: 1.33-8.84, p = 0.008). A preschool child with anaemia was 3.43 times likely to be iron deficient compared to a preschool child who was not anaemic. Conclusion Iron deficiency, anaemia and plasmodium falciparum malaria was prevalent among preschool children. The findings revealed a significant association between iron deficiency and anaemia. Therefore effective interventions to improve iron status will have large health benefits by greatly reducing anaemia in preschool children. PMID:26405498

  2. Cardiomyopathy in congenital and acquired generalized lipodystrophy: a clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Lupsa, Beatrice C; Sachdev, Vandana; Lungu, Andreea O; Rosing, Douglas R; Gorden, Phillip

    2010-07-01

    Lipodystrophy is a rare disorder characterized by loss of adipose tissue and low leptin levels. This condition is characterized by severe dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, and steatohepatitis. Another phenotypic feature that occurs with considerable frequency in generalized lipodystrophy is cardiomyopathy. We report here the cardiac findings in a cohort of patients with generalized congenital and acquired lipodystrophy, and present a literature review of the cardiac findings in patients with generalized lipodystrophy. We studied 44 patients with generalized congenital and acquired lipodystrophy, most of them enrolled in a clinical trial of leptin therapy. Patients underwent electrocardiograms and transthoracic echocardiograms to evaluate their cardiac status. We followed these patients for an extended time period, some of them up to 8 years. Evaluation of our cohort of patients with generalized lipodystrophy shows that cardiomyopathy is a frequent finding in this population. Most of our patients had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and only a small number had features of dilated cardiomyopathy. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was more frequent in patients with seipin mutation, a finding consistent with the literature. The underlying mechanism for cardiomyopathy in lipodystrophy is not clear. Extreme insulin resistance and the possibility of a "lipotoxic cardiomyopathy" should be entertained as possible explanations.

  3. Maternal iron status in early pregnancy and birth outcomes: insights from the Baby's Vascular health and Iron in Pregnancy study.

    PubMed

    Alwan, Nisreen A; Cade, Janet E; McArdle, Harry J; Greenwood, Darren C; Hayes, Helen E; Simpson, Nigel A B

    2015-06-28

    Fe deficiency anaemia during early pregnancy has been linked with low birth weight and preterm birth. However, this evidence comes mostly from studies measuring Hb levels rather than specific measures of Fe deficiency. The present study aimed to examine the association between maternal Fe status during the first trimester of pregnancy, as assessed by serum ferritin, transferrin receptor and their ratio, with size at birth and preterm birth. In the Baby VIP (Baby's Vascular health and Iron in Pregnancy) study, we recruited 362 infants and their mothers after delivery in Leeds, UK. Biomarkers were measured in maternal serum samples previously obtained in the first trimester of pregnancy. The cohort included sixty-four (18 %) small for gestational age (SGA) babies. Thirty-three babies were born preterm (9 %; between 34 and 37 weeks). First trimester maternal Fe depletion was associated with a higher risk of SGA (adjusted OR 2·2, 95 % CI 1·1, 4·1). This relationship was attenuated when including early pregnancy Hb in the model, suggesting it as a mediator (adjusted OR 1·6, 95 % CI 0·8, 3·2). For every 10 g/l increase in maternal Hb level in the first half of pregnancy the risk of SGA was reduced by 30 % (adjusted 95 % CI 0, 40 %); levels below 110 g/l were associated with a 3-fold increase in the risk of SGA (95 % CI 1·0, 9·0). There was no evidence of association between maternal Fe depletion and preterm birth (adjusted OR 1·5, 95 % 0·6, 3·8). The present study shows that depleted Fe stores in early pregnancy are associated with higher risk of SGA. PMID:25946517

  4. Maternal iron status in early pregnancy and birth outcomes: insights from the Baby's Vascular health and Iron in Pregnancy study.

    PubMed

    Alwan, Nisreen A; Cade, Janet E; McArdle, Harry J; Greenwood, Darren C; Hayes, Helen E; Simpson, Nigel A B

    2015-06-28

    Fe deficiency anaemia during early pregnancy has been linked with low birth weight and preterm birth. However, this evidence comes mostly from studies measuring Hb levels rather than specific measures of Fe deficiency. The present study aimed to examine the association between maternal Fe status during the first trimester of pregnancy, as assessed by serum ferritin, transferrin receptor and their ratio, with size at birth and preterm birth. In the Baby VIP (Baby's Vascular health and Iron in Pregnancy) study, we recruited 362 infants and their mothers after delivery in Leeds, UK. Biomarkers were measured in maternal serum samples previously obtained in the first trimester of pregnancy. The cohort included sixty-four (18 %) small for gestational age (SGA) babies. Thirty-three babies were born preterm (9 %; between 34 and 37 weeks). First trimester maternal Fe depletion was associated with a higher risk of SGA (adjusted OR 2·2, 95 % CI 1·1, 4·1). This relationship was attenuated when including early pregnancy Hb in the model, suggesting it as a mediator (adjusted OR 1·6, 95 % CI 0·8, 3·2). For every 10 g/l increase in maternal Hb level in the first half of pregnancy the risk of SGA was reduced by 30 % (adjusted 95 % CI 0, 40 %); levels below 110 g/l were associated with a 3-fold increase in the risk of SGA (95 % CI 1·0, 9·0). There was no evidence of association between maternal Fe depletion and preterm birth (adjusted OR 1·5, 95 % 0·6, 3·8). The present study shows that depleted Fe stores in early pregnancy are associated with higher risk of SGA.

  5. Iron excess disturbs metabolic status and relative gonad mass in rats on high fat, fructose, and salt diets.

    PubMed

    Suliburska, Joanna; Bogdański, Paweł; Szulińska, Monika

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the metabolic and physiological changes in rats fed a diet high in fat, fructose, and salt, and with excess iron level. Mineral status was also estimated. Wistar rats were assigned to groups fed either a standard control diet (C) or a diet high in fat, fructose, and salt. The noncontrol diets contained either normal (M) or high level (MFe) of iron. After 6 weeks, the length and weight of the rats were measured, and the animals were euthanized. The kidneys and gonads were collected, and blood samples were taken. Serum levels of insulin, nitric oxide, and iron were measured. The iron, zinc, copper, and calcium concentrations of tissues were determined. It was found that the M diet led to a significant increase in the relative kidney mass of the rats compared with the control group. Among the rats fed the M diet, markedly higher serum level of iron and lower levels of zinc and copper were observed in tissues, while significantly higher calcium levels were found in the gonads. The MFe diet resulted in decreased obesity index, insulin level, and nitric oxide serum concentration in the rats, when compared with both the M and C diets. The high iron level in the modified diet increased the relative mass of the gonads. The excess iron level in the diet disturbed the zinc, copper, and calcium status of tissues. The decrease in insulin and nitric oxide in rats fed the diet high in iron, fat, fructose, and salt was associated with disorders of zinc, copper, and calcium status, as well as with an increase in the relative mass of the gonads.

  6. Positive association between dietary iron intake and iron status in HIV-infected children in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Herculina S; Balk, Lisanne J; Viljoen, Michelle; Meyers, Tammy M

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a common complication of pediatric HIV infection and is associated with suboptimal cognitive performance and growth failure. Routine iron supplementation is not provided to South African HIV-infected children. We hypothesized that dietary iron intake without supplementation is sufficient to protect against iron deficiency (ID) in HIV-infected children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. In this prospective study, the difference between dietary intakes of iron-deficient children (soluble transferrin receptor >9.4 mg/L) and iron-sufficient children after 18 months on highly active antiretroviral therapy was examined. The association between iron intake and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration was also assessed. Longitudinal data collected for 18 months from 58 HIV-infected African children were assessed by generalized estimation equations, with adjustment for demographic information, dietary intakes, growth parameters, and CD4%. After adjustment for covariates, the longitudinal association between dietary iron intake and Hb concentration remained significant. This association shows that for every 1-mg increase in iron intake per day, Hb increases by 1.1 g/L (P < .001). Mean Hb increased significantly after 18 months of follow-up (106 ± 14 to 129 ± 14 g/L, P < .01), but soluble transferrin receptor also increased (7.7 ± 2.7 to 8.9 ± 3.0 mg/L, P < .01). The incidence of ID increased from 15.2% at baseline to 37.2% after 18 months. Children with animal protein intakes greater than >20 g/d had significantly lower odds for ID at 18 months than did children with lower intakes (odds ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.21-0.77). Dietary iron intake was insufficient to protect against ID, pointing to a need for low-dose iron supplementation for iron-deficient HIV-infected children and interventions to increase the consumption of animal protein.

  7. Adequacy of maternal iron status protects against behavioral, neuroanatomical, and growth deficits in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Rufer, Echoleah S; Tran, Tuan D; Attridge, Megan M; Andrzejewski, Matthew E; Flentke, George R; Smith, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are the leading non-genetic cause of neurodevelopmental disability in children. Although alcohol is clearly teratogenic, environmental factors such as gravidity and socioeconomic status significantly modify individual FASD risk despite equivalent alcohol intake. An explanation for this variability could inform FASD prevention. Here we show that the most common nutritional deficiency of pregnancy, iron deficiency without anemia (ID), is a potent and synergistic modifier of FASD risk. Using an established rat model of third trimester-equivalent binge drinking, we show that ID significantly interacts with alcohol to impair postnatal somatic growth, associative learning, and white matter formation, as compared with either insult separately. For the associative learning and myelination deficits, the ID-alcohol interaction was synergistic and the deficits persisted even after the offsprings' iron status had normalized. Importantly, the observed deficits in the ID-alcohol animals comprise key diagnostic criteria of FASD. Other neurobehaviors were normal, showing the ID-alcohol interaction was selective and did not reflect a generalized malnutrition. Importantly ID worsened FASD outcome even though the mothers lacked overt anemia; thus diagnostics that emphasize hematological markers will not identify pregnancies at-risk. This is the first direct demonstration that, as suggested by clinical studies, maternal iron status has a unique influence upon FASD outcome. While alcohol is unquestionably teratogenic, this ID-alcohol interaction likely represents a significant portion of FASD diagnoses because ID is more common in alcohol-abusing pregnancies than generally appreciated. Iron status may also underlie the associations between FASD and parity or socioeconomic status. We propose that increased attention to normalizing maternal iron status will substantially improve FASD outcome, even if maternal alcohol abuse continues. These findings

  8. Local and systemic signaling of iron status and its interactions with homeostasis of other essential elements.

    PubMed

    Gayomba, Sheena R; Zhai, Zhiyang; Jung, Ha-Il; Vatamaniuk, Olena K

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is essential for plant growth and development. However, alkaline soils, which occupy approximately 30% of the world's arable lands, are considered Fe-limiting for plant growth because insoluble Fe (III) chelates prevail under these conditions. In contrast, high bioavailability of Fe in acidic soils can be toxic to plants due to the ability of Fe ions to promote oxidative stress. Therefore, plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense and respond to the fluctuation of Fe availability in the immediate environment and to the needs of developing shoot tissues to preclude deficiency while avoiding toxicity. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of local and systemic signaling of Fe status with emphasis on the contribution of Fe, its interaction with other metals and metal ligands in triggering molecular responses that regulate Fe uptake and partitioning in the plant body. PMID:26442030

  9. Local and systemic signaling of iron status and its interactions with homeostasis of other essential elements

    PubMed Central

    Gayomba, Sheena R.; Zhai, Zhiyang; Jung, Ha-il; Vatamaniuk, Olena K.

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is essential for plant growth and development. However, alkaline soils, which occupy approximately 30% of the world’s arable lands, are considered Fe-limiting for plant growth because insoluble Fe (III) chelates prevail under these conditions. In contrast, high bioavailability of Fe in acidic soils can be toxic to plants due to the ability of Fe ions to promote oxidative stress. Therefore, plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense and respond to the fluctuation of Fe availability in the immediate environment and to the needs of developing shoot tissues to preclude deficiency while avoiding toxicity. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of local and systemic signaling of Fe status with emphasis on the contribution of Fe, its interaction with other metals and metal ligands in triggering molecular responses that regulate Fe uptake and partitioning in the plant body. PMID:26442030

  10. Iron status of schoolchildren with varying intensities of Trichuris trichiura infection.

    PubMed

    Ramdath, D D; Simeon, D T; Wong, M S; Grantham-McGregor, S M

    1995-04-01

    The relationship between varying intensities of Trichuris trichiura infection and iron status was examined in Jamaican schoolchildren, aged 7 to 11 years. A total of 409 children was identified with T. trichiura (epg > 1200). A control group comprised 207 uninfected children who were matched by school and class to every pair of infected subjects. Blood samples were obtained from 421 children: 264 infected and 157 controls. Compared to the rest of the children, those with heavy infections (epg > 10,000) had significantly lower (P < 0.05) Hb (11.5 +/- 1.3 vs. 12.1 +/- 1.1 g/dl), MCV (78.6 +/- 6.3 vs. 81.2 +/- 5.5 fl), MCH (26.2 +/- 2.9 vs. 27.5 +/- 2.5 pg) and MCHC (33.2 +/- 1.5 vs. 33.9 +/- 1.4 g/dl). Similarly, the prevalence of anaemia (Hb < 11.0 g/dl) amongst heavily infected children (33%) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the rest of the sample (11%). These differences remained significant after controlling for confounding variables including socio-economic status, age, gender, area of residence and the presence of Ascaris infections. Differences in red cell count, ferritin, and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin were not statistically significant and showed no association with the infectious load. These results suggest that in the Jamaican children studied, iron deficiency anemia is associated with Trichuris infections over 10,000 epg, but not with less intense infections.

  11. Lifestyle, nutrient intake, iron status, and pregnancy outcome in pregnant women of advanced maternal age.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyun Sook

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how advanced maternal age influences lifestyle, nutrient intake, iron status, and pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women. The subjects of this study were 112 pregnant women who were receiving prenatal care at gynecologists located in Seoul. The subjects were divided into two groups according to their ages: those over age 35 were the advanced age group of pregnant women (AP) and those under age 35 were the young age group of pregnant women (YP). General factors, nutrient intakes, iron status, and pregnancy outcomes of the two groups were then compared. It was found that 72.5% of the YP group and 51.2% of the AP group had pre-pregnancy alcohol drinking experience; indicating that the YP group had more pre-pregnancy alcohol consumption than the AP group (P < 0.05). The only difference found in nutrient intake between the two groups was their niacin intakes which were 16.83 ± 8.20 mg/day and 13.76 ± 5.28 mg/day, respectively. When gestational age was shorter than 38.7 weeks, the average infant birth weight was 2.95 ± 0.08 kg, and when gestational age was longer than 40 weeks, it averaged at about 3.42 ± 0.08 kg. In other words, as gestational age increased, infant birth weight increased (P < 0.0001), and when maternal weight increased more than 15 kg, the infant birth weight increased significantly (P < 0.05). In conclusion, in order to secure healthy human resources, with respect to advanced aged women, it is necessary to intervene by promoting daily habits that consist of strategic increases in folate and calcium intake along with appropriate amounts of exercise.

  12. Treatment of Chagas Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Botoni, Fernando A.; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P.; Marinho, Carolina Coimbra; Lima, Marcia Maria Oliveira; Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira; Rocha, Manoel Otávio C.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas' disease (ChD), caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), was discovered and described by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas in 1909. After a century of original description, trypanosomiasis still brings much misery to humanity and is classified as a neglected tropical disease prevalent in underdeveloped countries, particularly in South America. It is an increasing worldwide problem due to the number of cases in endemic areas and the migration of infected subjects to more developed regions, mainly North America and Europe. Despite its importance, chronic chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) pathophysiology is yet poorly understood, and independently of its social, clinical, and epidemiological importance, the therapeutic approach of CCC is still transposed from the knowledge acquired from other cardiomyopathies. Therefore, the objective of this review is to describe the treatment of Chagas cardiomyopathy with emphasis on its peculiarities. PMID:24350293

  13. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiologic insights

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Mariann R.; Phillips, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is a specific heart muscle disease found in individuals with a history of long-term heavy alcohol consumption. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is associated with a number of adverse histological, cellular, and structural changes within the myocardium. Several mechanisms are implicated in mediating the adverse effects of ethanol, including the generation of oxidative stress, apoptotic cell death, impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics/stress, derangements in fatty acid metabolism and transport, and accelerated protein catabolism. In this review, we discuss the evidence for such mechanisms and present the potential importance of drinking patterns, genetic susceptibility, nutritional factors, race, and sex. The purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic paradigm for future research in the area of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24671642

  14. [Calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc in drinking water and status biomarkers of these minerals among elder people from Warsaw region].

    PubMed

    Madej, Dawid; Kaluza, Joanna; Antonik, Anna; Brzozowska, Anna; Roszkowski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc contents in drinking water on chosen parameters of nutritional status of these minerals in 164 elder people, 75-80 age, living in Warsaw region. Blood, hair and saliva were collected to assess the calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc nutritional status, while the samples of drinking water were collected to determine these minerals in water Mineral concentrations in blood, hair saliva and water were assessment using the atomic spectrophotometer absorption method It was showed that contribution of drinking water to calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc intake was: 15%, 4%, 5%, 9%, respectively. The relationship between the contents of these minerals in drinking water and their levels in the blood, hair and saliva had low correlation coefficients. It probably showed that homeostasis was maintained in the human body and other factors such as demographic or lifestyle factors were important.

  15. Cardiomyopathy Following Latrodectus Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Michael; Canning, Josh; Chase, Robyn; Ruha, Anne-Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Latrodectus envenomations are common throughout the United States and the world. While many envenomations can result in catecholamine release with resultant hypertension and tachycardia, myocarditis is very rare. We describe a case of a 22-year-old male who sustained a Latrodectus envenomation complicated by cardiomyopathy. PMID:21293781

  16. Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... on pediatric cardiomyopathy. The hope is that one day every affected child can be cured to live a full and active life. “A Cause for Today… A Cure for Tomorrow” CCF News & Updates Make this holiday season extra sweet and give from the heart to ...

  17. Myocardial mechanics in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Karen; Sengupta, Partho P

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that can be phenotypically recognized by specific patterns of ventricular morphology and function. The authors summarize recent clinical observations that mechanistically link the multidirectional components of left ventricular (LV) deformation with morphological phenotypes of cardiomyopathies for offering key insights into the transmural heterogeneity of myocardial function. Subendocardial dysfunction predominantly alters LV longitudinal shortening, lengthening and suction performance and contributes to the phenotypic patterns of heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF) seen with hypertrophic and restrictive patterns of cardiomyopathy. On the other hand, a more progressive transmural disease results in reduction of LV circumferential and twist mechanics leading to the phenotypic pattern of dilated cardiomyopathy and the clinical syndrome of HF with reduced (EF). A proper characterization of LV transmural mechanics, energetics, and space-time distributions of pressure and shear stress may allow recognition of early functional changes that can forecast progression or reversal of LV remodeling. Furthermore, the interactions between LV muscle and fluid mechanics hold the promise for offering newer mechanistic insights and tracking impact of novel therapies.

  18. The rice transcription factor IDEF1 directly binds to iron and other divalent metals for sensing cellular iron status.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Aung, May Sann; Senoura, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential for most living organisms and its availability often determines survival and proliferation. The Oryza sativa (rice) transcription factor IDEF1 plays a crucial role in regulating iron deficiency-induced genes involved in iron homeostasis. In the present report, we found characteristic histidine-asparagine repeat and proline-rich regions in IDEF1 and its homolog in Hordeum vulgare (barley), HvIDEF1. An immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography assay revealed that IDEF1 and HvIDEF1 bind to various divalent metals, including Fe(2+) and Ni(2+) . Recombinant IDEF1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli contained mainly Fe and Zn. This metal-binding activity of IDEF1 was almost abolished by deletion of the histidine-asparagine and proline-rich regions, but DNA-binding and trans-activation functions were not impaired by the deletion. Transgenic rice plants constitutively overexpressing IDEF1 without these metal-binding domains failed to cause pleiotropic effects conferred by overexpression of full-length IDEF1, including a low germination rate, impaired seedling growth, tolerance to iron deficiency in hydroponic culture, and enhanced expression of various iron deficiency-inducible genes. Impairment of the transcriptional regulation of IDEF1 by deletion of the metal-binding domains occurred primarily at an early stage of iron deficiency. These results suggest that the histidine-asparagine and proline-rich regions in rice IDEF1 directly bind to divalent metals and sense the cellular metal ion balance caused by changes in iron availability. PMID:21880076

  19. Supplementation with micronutrients in addition to iron and folic acid does not further improve the hematologic status of pregnant women in rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Christian, Parul; Shrestha, Jaibar; LeClerq, Steven C; Khatry, Subarna K; Jiang, Tianan; Wagner, Tracey; Katz, Joanne; West, Keith P

    2003-11-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the main causes of anemia during pregnancy, although other micronutrient deficiencies may play a role. We examined the effects of daily antenatal and postnatal supplementation with four combinations of micronutrients on maternal hematologic indicators in a double-masked randomized controlled community trial. Communities, called sectors, were randomly assigned to supplementation with folic acid (400 microg), folic acid plus iron (60 mg), folic acid plus iron and zinc (30 mg) and folic acid plus iron, zinc and 11 other micronutrients, each at the approximate recommended daily allowance for pregnancy all given with vitamin A as retinol acetate (1000 microg retinol equivalent), or vitamin A alone as the control group. Hemoglobin (Hb) and indicators of iron status were assessed at baseline and at 32 wk of gestation. At 6-wk postpartum, Hb assessment was repeated using a finger stick. Severely anemic women (Hb < 70 g/L) were treated according to WHO recommendations. Folic acid alone had no effect on maternal anemia or iron status. Hb concentrations were 14 g/L, [95% confidence limits (CL), 8.3-19.2], 10.0 g/L (CL, 5.2-14.8) and 9.4 g/L (CL, 4.7-14.1) higher in the groups receiving folic acid plus iron, folic acid plus iron and zinc and folic acid plus iron, zinc and multiple micronutrients, respectively, relative to the control. Anemia in the third trimester was reduced by 54% with folic acid plus iron, by 48% with folic acid plus iron and zinc and by 36% with folic acid plus iron, zinc and multiple micronutrients supplementation, relative to the control (P < 0.05). Thus, the combinations of folic acid plus iron and zinc and folic acid plus iron, zinc and multiple micronutrients provided no additional benefit in improving maternal hematologic status during pregnancy compared with folic acid plus iron. The level of compliance and baseline Hb concentrations modified the effect of iron.

  20. Reference Values of Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content and Their Relation With Other Indicators of Iron Status in Healthy Children.

    PubMed

    López-Ruzafa, Encarnación; Vázquez-López, Maria A; Lendinez-Molinos, Francisco; Poveda-González, Juan; Galera-Martínez, Rafael; Bonillo-Perales, Antonio; Martín-González, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) is considered an indicator of functional iron deficiency, but is understudied in children. The goals of this study are to determine the reference intervals for CHr in healthy children, and their relation with iron parameters, erythropoiesis, and individual conditions. A total of 902 children without iron deficiency, aged 1 to 11 years were analyzed in a cross-sectional study. Besides a physical examination of the subjects and a questionnaire completed by their parents, the complete blood count, serum transferrin receptor, ferritin, transferrin saturation, erythrocyte protoporphyrin, serum erythropoietin, C-reactive protein, and CHr levels were measured. Changes in CHr, iron status, and erythropoiesis at different age intervals were analyzed and linear multiple regression was used to identify the factors that determine CHr variability. Mean value obtained for CHr was 30.9±1.8 pg (P2.5-P97.5: 26.9 to 34.3 pg), but the influence of age on CHr (the values increased with age) and on the iron parameters justified the establishment of different reference ranges. In addition to age, nutritional status, hematologic measurements, reticulocytes, transferrin saturation, and erythrocyte protoporphyrin accounted for 39% of CHr variability.

  1. Lethal Cardiomyopathy in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjing; Barrientos, Tomasa; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Sauve, Anthony A; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-10-20

    Both iron overload and iron deficiency have been associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, but cardiac iron utilization is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the transferrin receptor (Tfr1) might play a role in cardiac iron uptake and used gene targeting to examine the role of Tfr1 in vivo. Surprisingly, we found that decreased iron, due to inactivation of Tfr1, was associated with severe cardiac consequences. Mice lacking Tfr1 in the heart died in the second week of life and had cardiomegaly, poor cardiac function, failure of mitochondrial respiration, and ineffective mitophagy. The phenotype could only be rescued by aggressive iron therapy, but it was ameliorated by administration of nicotinamide riboside, an NAD precursor. Our findings underscore the importance of both Tfr1 and iron in the heart, and may inform therapy for patients with heart failure. PMID:26456827

  2. Switching Patients with Non-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease from Oral Iron to Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose: Effects on Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Requirements, Costs, Hemoglobin and Iron Status

    PubMed Central

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Di Gennaro, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) often receive an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) and oral iron treatment. This study evaluated whether a switch from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose can reduce ESA requirements and improve iron status and hemoglobin in patients with ND-CKD. Methods This prospective, single arm and single-center study included adult patients with ND-CKD (creatinine clearance ≤40 mL/min), hemoglobin 11–12 g/dL and iron deficiency (ferritin <100 μg/L or transferrin saturation <20%), who were regularly treated with oral iron and ESA during 6 months prior to inclusion. Study patients received an intravenous ferric carboxymaltose dose of 1,000 mg iron, followed by a 6-months ESA/ ferric carboxymaltose maintenance regimen (target: hemoglobin 12 g/dL, transferrin saturation >20%). Outcome measures were ESA dose requirements during the observation period after initial ferric carboxymaltose treatment (primary endpoint); number of hospitalizations and transfusions, renal function before and after ferric carboxymaltose administration, number of adverse reactions (secondary endpoints). Hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, ferritin and transferrin saturation were measured monthly from baseline until end of study. Creatinine clearance, proteinuria, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase bimonthly from baseline until end of study. Results Thirty patients were enrolled (age 70.1±11.4 years; mean±SD). Mean ESA consumption was significantly reduced by 83.2±10.9% (from 41,839±3,668 IU/patient to 6,879±4,271 IU/patient; p<0.01). Hemoglobin increased by 0.7±0.3 g/dL, ferritin by 196.0±38.7 μg/L and transferrin saturation by 5.3±2.9% (month 6 vs. baseline; all p<0.01). No ferric carboxymaltose-related adverse events were reported and no patient withdrew or required transfusions during the study. Conclusion Among patients with ND

  3. The effect of wheat prebiotics on the gut bacterial population and iron status of iron deficient broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there is a lot of interest in improving the intestinal health, and consequently increasing minerals as iron absorption, by managing the intestinal microbial population. This is traditionally done by the consumption of probiotics, which are live microbial food supplements. However, a...

  4. Fortification of sugar with iron sodium ethylenediaminotetraacetate (FeNaEDTA) improves iron status in semirural Guatemalan populations.

    PubMed

    Viteri, F E; Alvarez, E; Batres, R; Torún, B; Pineda, O; Mejía, L A; Sylvi, J

    1995-05-01

    A 32-mo-long, double-blind field study involving one highland control community receiving only vitamin A-fortified sugar and three vitamin A- and FeNaEDTA-sugar-fortified communities, two in the lowlands and one in the highlands of Guatemala, was undertaken to test the effectiveness of this approach in controlling iron deficiency. The communities' population ranged between 1200 and 17000. Sugar fortified with 1 g FeNaEDTA and 15 mg retinol as retinyl palmitate/kg was stable, did not segregate, and was well accepted by the communities. The impact of fortification on iron nutrition was estimated at 8, 20, and 32 mo of intervention. All pregnant women and subjects with severe anemia received supplements or treatment and were excluded from the analysis. Iron stores in the fortified communities increased significantly except for women 18-48 y of age in one lowland community and > 49 y in the highland community. Iron stores in the control community remained unchanged except for a rise among adult males.

  5. The effect of iron overload on rat plasma and liver oxidant status in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Dabbagh, A J; Mannion, T; Lynch, S M; Frei, B

    1994-01-01

    There is ample evidence implicating reactive oxygen species in a number of human degenerative diseases such as atherosclerosis and haemochromatosis. Although lipid peroxidation underlies many of the toxic effects of oxidative stress, there is a lack of a sensitive and reliable method for its assessment in vivo. To understand the implications of oxidative stress in vivo, we have used dietary iron overload (IO) in the rat. Oxidant status in these animals was determined by assessing depletion of endogenous antioxidants and formation of various lipid peroxidation products, including acylated F2-isoprostanes, a novel class of free-radical-derived prostaglandin-F2-like compounds. IO led to a significant decrease in the concentration of the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid in plasma, and alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and ubiquinol-10 in liver. Whereas there was no significant lipid peroxidation in plasma, hepatic F2-isoprostane levels were moderately but significantly increased in IO. In addition, IO caused a significant increase in plasma total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, an effect that was correlated with depletion of plasma ascorbic acid but not alpha-tocopherol. The data demonstrate that IO causes lipid metabolism disturbances and oxidative stress which is associated with substantial depletion of endogenous antioxidants and moderate lipid peroxidative damage. PMID:8010963

  6. Current status of research and development on nickel and iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; George, E.P.; McKamey, C.G.

    1993-12-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive review of current status of research and development on nickel and iron aluminides based on Ni{sub 3}Al, NiAl, Fe{sub 3}Al and FeAl. These aluminides possess attractive properties for elevated-temperature structural use; however, brittle fracture and poor fracture resistance have limited their use as engineering materials in many cases. in recent years, considerable effort has been devoted to the study of the brittle fracture behavior of these aluminides; as a result, both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing brittle fracture have been identified. Surprisingly, moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement has been recognized as one of the major causes of low ductility and brittle fracture in Ni{sub 3}Al, Fe{sub 3}Al and FeAl at ambient temperatures. These efforts have led to the development of ductile and strong aluminide alloys for structural applications. Industrial interest in these aluminide alloys is high, and several examples of industrial involvement are mentioned.

  7. Influence of artistic gymnastics on iron nutritional status and exercise-induced hemolysis in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Sureira, Thaiz Mattos; Amancio, Olga Silverio; Pellegrini Braga, Josefina Aparecida

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between body iron losses and gains in artistic gymnastics female athletes. It shows that despite the low iron intake and exercise-induced hemolysis, iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia does not occur, but partial changes in the hematological profile do. The hypothesis that gymnasts' nutritional behavior contributes to anemia, which may be aggravated by exercise-induced hemolysis, led to this cross-sectional study, conducted with 43 female artistic gymnasts 6-16 yr old. The control group was formed by 40 nontraining girls, paired by age. Hemogram, serum iron, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, haptoglobin, total and fractional bilirubin, Type I urine, and parasitologic and occult fecal blood tests were evaluated. The athletes presented mean hematimetric and serum iron values (p = .020) higher than those of the control group. The bilirubin result discarded any hemolytic alteration in both groups. The haptoglobin results were lower in the athlete group (p = .002), confirming the incidence of exercise-induced hemolysis. Both groups presented low iron intake. The results suggest that artistic gymnastics practice leads to exercise-induced hemolysis and partially changes the hematological profile, although not causing iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia, even in the presence of low iron intake. PMID:22645172

  8. Influence of artistic gymnastics on iron nutritional status and exercise-induced hemolysis in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Sureira, Thaiz Mattos; Amancio, Olga Silverio; Pellegrini Braga, Josefina Aparecida

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between body iron losses and gains in artistic gymnastics female athletes. It shows that despite the low iron intake and exercise-induced hemolysis, iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia does not occur, but partial changes in the hematological profile do. The hypothesis that gymnasts' nutritional behavior contributes to anemia, which may be aggravated by exercise-induced hemolysis, led to this cross-sectional study, conducted with 43 female artistic gymnasts 6-16 yr old. The control group was formed by 40 nontraining girls, paired by age. Hemogram, serum iron, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, haptoglobin, total and fractional bilirubin, Type I urine, and parasitologic and occult fecal blood tests were evaluated. The athletes presented mean hematimetric and serum iron values (p = .020) higher than those of the control group. The bilirubin result discarded any hemolytic alteration in both groups. The haptoglobin results were lower in the athlete group (p = .002), confirming the incidence of exercise-induced hemolysis. Both groups presented low iron intake. The results suggest that artistic gymnastics practice leads to exercise-induced hemolysis and partially changes the hematological profile, although not causing iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia, even in the presence of low iron intake.

  9. Role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova; Kruzliak, Peter; Rabkin, Simon W

    2014-11-01

    The role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathy-associated heart failure has been garnering more attention. Several neuropeptides--Neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and their receptors have been studied in the various types of cardiomyopathies. The data indicate associations with the strength of the association varying depending on the kind of neuropeptide and the nature of the cardiomyopathy--diabetic, ischemic, inflammatory, stress-induced or restrictive cardiomyopathy. Several neuropeptides appear to alter regulation of genes involved in heart failure. Demonstration of an association is an essential first step in proving causality or establishing a role for a factor in a disease. Understanding the complexity of neuropeptide function should be helpful in establishing new or optimal therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure in cardiomyopathies.

  10. Cardiomyopathy in Friedreich ataxia: clinical findings and research.

    PubMed

    Payne, R Mark; Wagner, Gregory R

    2012-09-01

    Friedreich ataxia is the most common human ataxia and results from inadequate production of the frataxin protein, most often the result of a triplet expansion in the nuclear FXN gene. The gene cannot be transcribed to generate the messenger ribonucleic acid for frataxin. Frataxin is an iron-binding protein targeted to the mitochondrial matrix. In its absence, multiple iron-sulfur-dependent proteins in mitochondria and the cytosol lack proper assembly, destroying mitochondrial and nuclear function. Mitochondrial oxidant stress may also participate in ongoing cellular injury. Although progressive and debilitative ataxia is the most prominent clinical finding, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with heart failure is the most common cause of early death in this disease. There is no cure. In this review the authors cover recent basic and clinical findings regarding the heart in Friedreich ataxia, offer recommendations for clinical management of the cardiomyopathy in this disease, and point out new research directions to advance the field.

  11. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Brian A; Stevens, Gerin R

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a global disease with cases reported in all continents, affecting people of both genders and of various racial and ethnic origins. Widely accepted as a monogenic disease caused by a mutation in 1 of 13 or more sarcomeric genes, HCM can present catastrophically with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or ventricular arrhythmias or insidiously with symptoms of heart failure. Given the velocity of progress in both the fields of heart failure and HCM, we present a review of the approach to patients with HCM, with particular attention to those with HCM and the clinical syndrome of heart failure. PMID:25657602

  12. Influence of Diet, Menstruation and Genetic Factors on Iron Status: A Cross-Sectional Study in Spanish Women of Childbearing Age

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Toxqui, Laura; López-Parra, Ana M.; Baeza-Richer, Carlos; Pérez-Granados, Ana M.; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Vaquero, M. Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the combined influence of diet, menstruation and genetic factors on iron status in Spanish menstruating women (n = 142). Dietary intake was assessed by a 72-h detailed dietary report and menstrual blood loss by a questionnaire, to determine a Menstrual Blood Loss Coefficient (MBLC). Five selected SNPs were genotyped: rs3811647, rs1799852 (Tf gene); rs1375515 (CACNA2D3 gene); and rs1800562 and rs1799945 (HFE gene, mutations C282Y and H63D, respectively). Iron biomarkers were determined and cluster analysis was performed. Differences among clusters in dietary intake, menstrual blood loss parameters and genotype frequencies distribution were studied. A categorical regression was performed to identify factors associated with cluster belonging. Three clusters were identified: women with poor iron status close to developing iron deficiency anemia (Cluster 1, n = 26); women with mild iron deficiency (Cluster 2, n = 59) and women with normal iron status (Cluster 3, n = 57). Three independent factors, red meat consumption, MBLC and mutation C282Y, were included in the model that better explained cluster belonging (R2 = 0.142, p < 0.001). In conclusion, the combination of high red meat consumption, low menstrual blood loss and the HFE C282Y mutation may protect from iron deficiency in women of childbearing age. These findings could be useful to implement adequate strategies to prevent iron deficiency anemia. PMID:24663082

  13. Epidemiological evidence for a differential effect of hookworm species, Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus, on iron status of children.

    PubMed

    Albonico, M; Stoltzfus, R J; Savioli, L; Tielsch, J M; Chwaya, H M; Ercole, E; Cancrini, G

    1998-06-01

    Hookworms infect 1.3 billion people annually. Iron-deficiency anemia caused or exacerbated by intestinal blood loss is the major feature of hookworm infection, with such loss caused by the feeding of hookworms upon the intestinal mucosa. The hookworms Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus cause major gastrointestinal blood loss. While relatively greater blood loss has been reported in clinical studies due to infection with A. duodenale, there has been no evidence that endemic A. duodenale infection has a greater impact than N. americanus infection upon the iron status of populations. The authors compared the degree of anemia and iron deficiency associated with these 2 hookworm species at the individual and community levels using a sample of 525 school children in grades 1-4 in Pemba Island, Tanzania, and controlling for infection intensities and other child characteristics through multiple regression. In the 492 children with hookworm-positive fecal cultures, hemoglobin and ferritin concentrations decreased with increasing proportions of A. duodenale. Among children with only N. americanus larvae, the prevalence of anemia was 60.5% and the prevalence of ferritin under 12 mcg/l was 33.1%. In children with 50% or higher proportions of A. duodenale larvae, the respective prevalences were 80.6% and 58.9%. Children from schools with high prevalences of A. duodenale infection had significantly worse iron deficiency and anemia than did children from low prevalence schools.

  14. Iron loading: a risk factor for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, E D

    2006-12-01

    Iron loaded persons are at increased risk for infection, neoplasia, arthropathy, cardiomyopathy and an array of endocrine and neurodegenerative diseases. This report summarizes evidence of increased risk of iron loading for osteoporosis. Iron suppresses bone remodeling apparently by decreasing osteoblast formation and new bone synthesis. Low molecular mass iron chelators as well as a natural protein iron chelator, lactoferrin, may be useful in prevention of osteoporosis.

  15. Proteomic Analysis Reveals That Iron Availability Alters the Metabolic Status of the Pathogenic Fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Parente, Ana F. A.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Borges, Clayton L.; Parente, Juliana A.; Magalhães, Adriana D.; Ricart, Carlos A. O.; Soares, Célia M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermodimorphic fungus and the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). The ability of P. brasiliensis to uptake nutrients is fundamental for growth, but a reduction in the availability of iron and other nutrients is a host defense mechanism many pathogenic fungi must overcome. Thus, fungal mechanisms that scavenge iron from host may contribute to P. brasiliensis virulence. In order to better understand how P. brasiliensis adapts to iron starvation in the host we compared the two-dimensional (2D) gel protein profile of yeast cells during iron starvation to that of iron rich condition. Protein spots were selected for comparative analysis based on the protein staining intensity as determined by image analysis. A total of 1752 protein spots were selected for comparison, and a total of 274 out of the 1752 protein spots were determined to have changed significantly in abundance due to iron depletion. Ninety six of the 274 proteins were grouped into the following functional categories; energy, metabolism, cell rescue, virulence, cell cycle, protein synthesis, protein fate, transcription, cellular communication, and cell fate. A correlation between protein and transcript levels was also discovered using quantitative RT-PCR analysis from RNA obtained from P. brasiliensis under iron restricting conditions and from yeast cells isolated from infected mouse spleens. In addition, western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays validated the differential regulation of proteins identified by 2-D gel analysis. We observed an increase in glycolytic pathway protein regulation while tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycles, and electron transport chain proteins decreased in abundance under iron limiting conditions. These data suggest a remodeling of P. brasiliensis metabolism by prioritizing iron independent pathways. PMID:21829521

  16. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Nadia; Dietrich, Jennifer; Nyhan, Daniel; Mitter, Nanhi; Yee, May-Sann; Brady, MaryBeth

    2015-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively common disorder that anesthesiologists encounter among patients in the perioperative period. Fifty years ago, HCM was thought to be an obscure disease. Today, however, our understanding and ability to diagnose patients with HCM have improved dramatically. Patients with HCM have genotypic and phenotypic variability. Indeed, a subgroup of these patients exhibits the HCM genotype but not the phenotype (left ventricular hypertrophy). There are a number of treatment modalities for these patients, including pharmacotherapy to control symptoms, implantable cardiac defibrillators to manage malignant arrhythmias, and surgical myectomy and septal ablation to decrease the left ventricular outflow obstruction. Accurate diagnosis is vital for the perioperative management of these patients. Diagnosis is most often made using echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular hypertrophy, left ventricular outflow tract gradients, systolic and diastolic function, and mitral valve anatomy and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging also has a diagnostic role by determining the extent and location of left ventricular hypertrophy and the anatomic abnormalities of the mitral valve and papillary muscles. In this review on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy for the noncardiac anesthesiologist, we discuss the clinical presentation and genetic mutations associated with HCM, the critical role of echocardiography in the diagnosis and the assessment of surgical interventions, and the perioperative management of patients with HCM undergoing noncardiac surgery and management of the parturient with HCM. PMID:25695573

  17. Genetics of inherited cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Daniel; McKenna, William J.

    2012-01-01

    During the past two decades, numerous disease-causing genes for different cardiomyopathies have been identified. These discoveries have led to better understanding of disease pathogenesis and initial steps in the application of mutation analysis in the evaluation of affected individuals and their family members. As knowledge of the genetic abnormalities, and insight into cellular and organ biology has grown, so has appreciation of the level of complexity of interaction between genotype and phenotype across disease states. What were initially thought to be one-to-one gene-disease correlates have turned out to display important relational plasticity dependent in large part on the genetic and environmental backgrounds into which the genes of interest express. The current state of knowledge with regard to genetics of cardiomyopathy represents a starting point to address the biology of disease, but is not yet developed sufficiently to supplant clinically based classification systems or, in most cases, to guide therapy to any significant extent. Future work will of necessity be directed towards elucidation of the biological mechanisms of both rare and common gene variants and environmental determinants of plasticity in the genotype–phenotype relationship with the ultimate goal of furthering our ability to identify, diagnose, risk stratify, and treat this group of disorders which cause heart failure and sudden death in the young. PMID:21810862

  18. The Growth Attainment, Hematological, Iron Status and Inflammatory Profile of Guatemalan Juvenile End-Stage Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Casimiro de Almeida, Juliana; Lou-Meda, Randall; Olbert, Marion; Seifert, Markus; Weiss, Günter; Wiegerinck, Erwin T.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Solomons, Noel W.; Schümann, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background Stunting, anemia and inflammation are frequently observed in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Objectives To assess anthropometric, hematological and inflammatory data and to study their potential interrelationship in Guatemalan juveniles undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). Methods 54 juveniles 7–20 years of age were recruited in FUNDANIER, Guatemala City: 27 on HD and 27 PD. Hemoglobin, serum iron, transferrin, serum transferrin receptor (sTfR), serum ferritin, transferrin saturation and iron-binding capacity, white blood cell count (WBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as IL-6, IL-1 and TNF-α, weight and height were determined by standard methods. Hepcidin–25 (Hep-25) was assessed by weak cation exchange time-of-flight mass-spectrometry. Results 92% and 55% of HD and PD children, respectively, were stunted and 95% and 85% were anemic. Among iron status biomarkers, serum ferritin was massively increased and significantly higher in the HD group compared to the PD group. Hep-25 was also greatly elevated in both groups. 41% of HD patients showed increments in three or more inflammatory biomarkers, while it was 2 or less in all PD subjects. Conclusions The degree of stunting, the prevalence and severity of anemia in Guatemalan juvenile ESRD far exceed the national statistics for this low-income Central American country. Ferritin and Hep-25 concentrations were elevated, with the latter to an extraordinary magnitude. Additional biomarkers of inflammation not directly related to iron status were elevated as well. The role of both disease- and environment-related factors in combination best explains the magnitude of the biomarker abnormalities. PMID:26445018

  19. Diabetic cardiomyopathy, causes and effects

    PubMed Central

    Boudina, Sihem

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased incidence of heart failure even after controlling for coronary artery disease and hypertension. Thus, as diabetic cardiomyopathy has become an increasingly recognized entity among clinicians, a better understanding of its pathophysiology is necessary for early diagnosis and the development of treatment strategies for diabetes-associated cardiovascular dysfunction. We will review recent basic and clinical research into the manifestations and the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The discussion will be focused on the structural, functional and metabolic changes that occur in the myocardium in diabetes and how these changes may contribute to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy in affected humans and relevant animal models. PMID:20180026

  20. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (Broken heart syndrome).

    PubMed

    Javed, Aqib; Chitkara, Kamal; Mahmood, Arslan; Kainat, Aleesha

    2015-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute reversible cardiomyopathy characterised by transient regional left ventricular (LV) motion abnormalities. It is diagnosed on a coronary angiography and left ventriculography. We report the case of a 50-year-old lady who presented with sudden onset of chest pain, with no history of cardiac disease and no risk factors. Remarkably though, she had lost her husband the previous night. Coronary and LV angiography was done which revealed findings typical of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We report this case for its rarity. Informed consent was taken from the patient before undertaking and reporting this study. PMID:26564308

  1. Cardiomyopathy responsive to gluten withdrawal in a patient with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Samuel; Thomas, Angharad; Gorard, David Angelo

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with iron deficiency anaemia developed general malaise, exertional dyspnoea and features of cardiac failure out of proportion to his anaemia (haemoglobin 120 g/L). Investigations showed a severely dilated left ventricle with an ejection fraction of 15%, due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He was treated with high-dose diuretics, ACE inhibitors and β-blocker therapy. Subsequent investigation into his iron deficiency anaemia revealed a new diagnosis of coeliac disease. After starting a gluten-free diet, his cardiac function improved markedly, with ejection fraction reaching 70%, allowing his cardiac medications to be withdrawn. This case suggests a link between coeliac disease and cardiomyopathy. PMID:26976850

  2. Association of Body Iron Status with the Risk of Premature Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Pakistani Population

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Mohammad Perwaiz; Mehboobali, Naseema; Tareen, Asal Khan; Yakub, Mohsin; Iqbal, Saleem Perwaiz; Iqbal, Khalida; Haider, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease is very common in Pakistani population. Some of the studies carried out on Western populations have shown a relationship between body iron status as determined by the ratio of concentrations of serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) to ferritin and the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In order to investigate whether increased body iron status has any relationship with the risk of premature AMI in Pakistani population, a case-control study was carried out. Methodology/Principal findings In this case-control study, 203 consecutive AMI patients [146 males and 57 females; age range 18–45 years] admitted to the National Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases, Karachi, were enrolled with informed consent. In addition, 205 healthy controls whose gender and age (within 3 years) matched the patients, and who had a similar socio-economic background were recruited. Fasting venous blood was obtained and assessed for plasma/serum folate, vitamin B12, homocysteine, total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, sTfR and ferritin and blood lead. It was found that serum concentration of ferritin and blood lead levels were significantly higher in AMI patients compared to their age and gender-matched healthy controls (p value <0.05), while the concentrations of vitamin B12 and HDL-cholesterol were significantly lower in AMI patients compared to controls (p value <0.01). The ratio of sTfR to ferritin was significantly lower in AMI patients compared to controls [mean±SD/median (IQR) values 84.7±295/28.9 (38.4) vs 255±836/49.4 (83.8), respectively; p value <0.001]. Compared with the highest quartile of sTfR/ferritin (low body iron status), the OR for the risk of AMI was 3.29(95% CI, 1.54–7.03) for the lowest quartile (quartile 1) when the model was adjusted for vitamin B12 and HDL-cholesterol (p value for trend <0.01). Conclusions/Significance This study shows a positive association between total body iron

  3. Relationship between indices of iron status and coronary risk factors including diabetes and the metabolic syndrome in Saudi subjects without overt coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Alissa, Eman M; Ahmed, Waqar H; Al-Ama, Nabeel; Ferns, Gordon A A

    2007-01-01

    There have been inconsistent reports on the relationship between iron status and coronary artery diseases (CAD), and little data on this relationship in non-Caucasian populations. We assessed dietary iron by questionnaire and measured serum iron and ferritin levels in 270 Saudi male subjects without established CAD, 130 of whom were angiogram negative. Serum lipid profile, glucose, high sensitivity-C reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum soluble intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (sICAM-1), and caeruloplasmin were measured in all subjects. The angiogram negative patients, had lower serum ferritin (p<0.05) and iron (p<0.0001) levels than the 140 subjects without reported cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Serum iron correlated with serum triglycerides (p<0.0001) and total cholesterol (p<0.05) levels for this latter group and the groups combined. Serum ferritin correlated with serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol in the combined group (p<0.05), and was correlated with blood glucose and serum LDL-cholesterol (p<0.05) in the subjects without reported CVD. After adjustment for confounding variables, serum iron levels remained a significant correlate with total calorie intake and serum triglycerides. Serum ferritin also correlated significantly with cholesterol intake and fasting serum total cholesterol. Dietary iron was significantly related to dietary cholesterol and fiber, age, smoking habits, and serum total cholesterol level. Hence, indices of iron status were related to several coronary risk factors in the Saudi population.

  4. Molecular etiology of idiopathic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, T; Hayashi, T; Kimura, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is a primary cardiac disorder associated with abnormalities of ventricular wall thickness, size of ventricular cavity, contraction, relaxation, conduction and rhythm. Over the past two decades, molecular genetic analyses have revealed that mutations in the various genes cause ICM and such information concerning the genetic basis of ICM enables us to speculate the pathogenesis of this heterogeous cardiac disease. This review focuses on the molecular pathogenesis, i.e., genetic abnormalities and functional alterations due to the mutations especially in sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in three characteristic features of ICM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Understanding the functional abnormalities of the sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in ICM, has unraveled the function of these components not only as a contractile unit but also as a pivot for transduction of biochemical signals. PMID:18646564

  5. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26411603

  6. Misconceptions and Facts About Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Sherrid, Mark V; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common genetic heart disease. Once considered relentless, untreatable, and deadly, it has become a highly treatable disease with contemporary management. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is one of cardiology's "great masqueraders." Mistakes and delays in diagnosis abound. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy commonly "masquerades" as asthma, anxiety, mitral prolapse, and coronary artery disease. However, once properly diagnosed, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be effectively managed to improve both symptoms and survival. This review highlights some of the misconceptions about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Providers at all levels should have awareness of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to promptly diagnose and properly manage these individuals. PMID:26299316

  7. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy: pathophysiologic insights.

    PubMed

    Piano, Mariann R; Phillips, Shane A

    2014-12-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is a specific heart muscle disease found in individuals with a history of long-term heavy alcohol consumption. ACM is associated with a number of adverse histological, cellular, and structural changes within the myocardium. Several mechanisms are implicated in mediating the adverse effects of ethanol, including the generation of oxidative stress, apoptotic cell death, impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics/stress, derangements in fatty acid metabolism and transport, and accelerated protein catabolism. In this review, we discuss the evidence for such mechanisms and present the potential importance of drinking patterns, genetic susceptibility, nutritional factors, race, and sex. The purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic paradigm for future research in the area of ACM.

  8. Exercise Rehabilitation in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Somarriba, Gabriel; Extein, Jason; Miller, Tracie L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with cardiomyopathy carry significant risk of morbidity and mortality. New research and technology have brought about significant advancements to the diagnosis and clinical management of children with cardiomyopathy. However, currently heart transplantation remains the standard of care for children with symptomatic and progressive cardiomyopathy. Cardiovascular rehabilitation programs have yielded success in improving cardiac function, overall physical activity, and quality of life in adults with congestive heart failure from a variety of conditions. There is encouraging and emerging data on its effects in children with chronic illness and with its proven benefits in other pediatric disorders, the implementation of a program for with cardiomyopathy should be considered. Exercise rehabilitation programs may improve specific endpoints such quality of life, cardiovascular function and fitness, strength, flexibility, and metabolic risk. With the rapid rise in pediatric obesity, children with cardiomyopathy may be at similar risk for developing these modifiable risk factors. However, there are potentially more detrimental effects of inactivity in this population of children. Future research should focus on the physical and social effects of a medically supervised cardiac rehabilitation program with correct determination of the dosage and intensity of exercise for optimal benefits in this special population of children. It is imperative that more detailed recommendations for children with cardiomyopathy be made available with evidence-based research. PMID:18496603

  9. Dietary Intake, Anthropometric Characteristics, and Iron and Vitamin D Status of Female Adolescent Ballet Dancers Living in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kathryn L; Mitchell, Sarah; Foskett, Andrew; Conlon, Cathryn A; von Hurst, Pamela R

    2015-08-01

    Ballet dancing is a multifaceted activity requiring muscular power, strength, endurance, flexibility, and agility; necessitating demanding training schedules. Furthermore dancers may be under aesthetic pressure to maintain a lean physique, and adolescent dancers require extra nutrients for growth and development. This cross-sectional study investigated the nutritional status of 47 female adolescent ballet dancers (13-18 years) living in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants who danced at least 1 hr per day 5 days per week completed a 4-day estimated food record, anthropometric measurements (Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry) and hematological analysis (iron and vitamin D). Mean BMI was 19.7 ± 2.4 kg/m2 and percentage body fat, 23.5 ± 4.1%. The majority (89.4%) of dancers had a healthy weight (5th-85th percentile) using BMI-for-age growth charts. Food records showed a mean energy intake of 8097.3 ± 2155.6 kJ/day (48.9% carbohydrate, 16.9% protein, 33.8% fat, 14.0% saturated fat). Mean carbohydrate and protein intakes were 4.8 ± 1.4 and 1.6 ± 0.5 g/kg/day respectively. Over half (54.8%) of dancers consumed less than 5 g carbohydrate/kg/day, and 10 (23.8%) less than 1.2 g protein/kg/day. Over 60% consumed less than the estimated average requirement for calcium, folate, magnesium and selenium. Thirteen (28.3%) dancers had suboptimal iron status (serum ferritin (SF) < 20 μg/L). Of these, four had iron deficiency (SF < 12 μg/L, hemoglobin (Hb) ≥ 120 g/L) and one iron deficiency anemia (SF < 12 μg/L, Hb < 120 g/L). Mean serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D was 75.1 ± 18.6 nmol/L, 41 (91.1%) had concentrations above 50 nmol/L. Female adolescent ballet dancers are at risk for iron deficiency, and possibly inadequate nutrient intakes. PMID:25386731

  10. Dietary Intake, Anthropometric Characteristics, and Iron and Vitamin D Status of Female Adolescent Ballet Dancers Living in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kathryn L; Mitchell, Sarah; Foskett, Andrew; Conlon, Cathryn A; von Hurst, Pamela R

    2015-08-01

    Ballet dancing is a multifaceted activity requiring muscular power, strength, endurance, flexibility, and agility; necessitating demanding training schedules. Furthermore dancers may be under aesthetic pressure to maintain a lean physique, and adolescent dancers require extra nutrients for growth and development. This cross-sectional study investigated the nutritional status of 47 female adolescent ballet dancers (13-18 years) living in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants who danced at least 1 hr per day 5 days per week completed a 4-day estimated food record, anthropometric measurements (Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry) and hematological analysis (iron and vitamin D). Mean BMI was 19.7 ± 2.4 kg/m2 and percentage body fat, 23.5 ± 4.1%. The majority (89.4%) of dancers had a healthy weight (5th-85th percentile) using BMI-for-age growth charts. Food records showed a mean energy intake of 8097.3 ± 2155.6 kJ/day (48.9% carbohydrate, 16.9% protein, 33.8% fat, 14.0% saturated fat). Mean carbohydrate and protein intakes were 4.8 ± 1.4 and 1.6 ± 0.5 g/kg/day respectively. Over half (54.8%) of dancers consumed less than 5 g carbohydrate/kg/day, and 10 (23.8%) less than 1.2 g protein/kg/day. Over 60% consumed less than the estimated average requirement for calcium, folate, magnesium and selenium. Thirteen (28.3%) dancers had suboptimal iron status (serum ferritin (SF) < 20 μg/L). Of these, four had iron deficiency (SF < 12 μg/L, hemoglobin (Hb) ≥ 120 g/L) and one iron deficiency anemia (SF < 12 μg/L, Hb < 120 g/L). Mean serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D was 75.1 ± 18.6 nmol/L, 41 (91.1%) had concentrations above 50 nmol/L. Female adolescent ballet dancers are at risk for iron deficiency, and possibly inadequate nutrient intakes.

  11. Horse meat consumption affects iron status, lipid profile and fatty acid composition of red blood cells in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Del Bó, Cristian; Simonetti, Paolo; Gardana, Claudio; Riso, Patrizia; Lucchini, Giorgio; Ciappellano, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of moderate consumption of horse meat on iron status, lipid profile and fatty acid composition of red blood cells in healthy male volunteers. Fifty-two subjects were randomly assigned to two groups of 26 subjects each: a test group consuming two portions of 175 g/week of horse meat, and a control group that abstained from eating horse meat during the 90 days trial. Before and after 90 days, blood samples were collected for analysis. Horse meat consumption significantly (p ≤ 0.05) reduced serum levels of total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ( - 6.2% and - 9.1%, respectively) and transferrin ( - 4.6%). Total n - 3, long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids n - 3 and docosahexeanoic acid content in erythrocytes increased (p ≤ 0.05) by about 7.8%, 8% and 11%, respectively. In conclusion, the regular consumption of horse meat may contribute to the dietary intake of n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and may improve lipid profile and iron status in healthy subjects.

  12. Maternal Iron Status in Pregnancy and Long-Term Health Outcomes in the Offspring.

    PubMed

    Alwan, Nisreen A; Hamamy, Hanan

    2015-06-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient and is important not only in carrying oxygen but also to the catalytic activity of a variety of enzymes. In the fetus, it is vital to the synthesis of hemoglobin and in brain development. Iron deficiency (ID) anemia in pregnancy is a common problem, even in high-income country settings. Around 50% of pregnant women worldwide are anemic, with at least half of this burden due to ID. Iron supplements are widely recommended and used during pregnancy globally. However, the evidence on the extent of benefit they contribute to the offspring's health is not well established, and their routine use has its side effects and drawbacks. Dietary iron intake is difficult to assess accurately and it is unlikely to be sufficient to meet the demands of pregnancy if women start with inadequate body iron stores at conception. Evidence from experimental animal models suggests that maternal ID during pregnancy is associated with fetal growth restriction, as well as offspring obesity and high blood pressure later in life. The possible biological mechanisms for this observed association may be due to ID-induced changes in placental structure and function, enzyme expression, nutrient absorption, and fetal organ development. However, such evidence is limited in human studies. Prenatal ID in experimental animal models also adversely affected the developing brain structures, neurotransmitter systems, and myelination resulting in acute brain dysfunction during the period of deficiency and persistence of various postnatal neurobehavioral abnormalities as well as persistent dysregulation of some genes into adult life after iron repletion pointing to the possibility of gene expression changes. The evidence from human population studies is limited and heterogeneous and more research is needed in the future, investigating the effects of ID in pregnancy on future offspring health outcomes. PMID:27617121

  13. A novel in vivo model for assessing the impact of geophagic earth on iron status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The causes and consequences of geophagy, the craving and consumption of earth, remain enigmatic, despite its recognition as a behavior with public health implications. Iron deficiency has been proposed as both a cause and consequence of geophagy, but methodological limitations have precluded a decis...

  14. The Twannberg (IIG) Iron Strewn Field, Switzerland: Status of Exploration and Relation with Quaternary Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, B. A.; Raselli, R.; Pettke, T.; Smith, T.; Leya, I.

    2016-08-01

    The Twannberg IIG iron in Switzerland has evolved to a strewn field. Meteorites appear transported in two find complexes while the third and largest represents a preserved section of the original strewn field. The fall pre-dates the last ice age.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Dilated Cardiomyopathy Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Primary dilated cardiomyopathy ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (36 links) ...

  16. [Levosimendan for septic shock with takotsubo cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Schlürmann, C-N; Reinöhl, J; Kalbhenn, J

    2016-01-01

    As a stress-induced disease, takotsubo cardiomyopathy can also occur in septic syndromes; however, the hemodynamic management is fundamentally different from the treatment approaches for classical septic cardiomyopathy, as beta mimetics can increase the heart failure symptoms in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. This article reports the case of an 82-year-old female patient who presented with acute abdomen due to adhesion ileus and takotsubo cardiomyopathy, developed severe septic shock with peritonitis and could be successfully hemodynamically stabilized with levosimendan.

  17. Peripartum cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy: different at heart

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Ilse A. E.; Van Deel, Elza D.; Kuster, Diederik W. D.; Van Der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a severe cardiac disease occurring in the last month of pregnancy or in the first 5 months after delivery and shows many similar clinical characteristics as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) such as ventricle dilation and systolic dysfunction. While PPCM was believed to be DCM triggered by pregnancy, more and more studies show important differences between these diseases. While it is likely they share part of their pathogenesis such as increased oxidative stress and an impaired microvasculature, discrepancies seen in disease progression and outcome indicate there must be differences in pathogenesis as well. In this review, we compared studies in DCM and PPCM to search for overlapping and deviating disease etiology, pathogenesis and outcome in order to understand why these cardiomyopathies share similar clinical features but have different underlying pathologies. PMID:25642195

  18. Peripartum cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy: different at heart.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Ilse A E; Van Deel, Elza D; Kuster, Diederik W D; Van Der Velden, Jolanda

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a severe cardiac disease occurring in the last month of pregnancy or in the first 5 months after delivery and shows many similar clinical characteristics as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) such as ventricle dilation and systolic dysfunction. While PPCM was believed to be DCM triggered by pregnancy, more and more studies show important differences between these diseases. While it is likely they share part of their pathogenesis such as increased oxidative stress and an impaired microvasculature, discrepancies seen in disease progression and outcome indicate there must be differences in pathogenesis as well. In this review, we compared studies in DCM and PPCM to search for overlapping and deviating disease etiology, pathogenesis and outcome in order to understand why these cardiomyopathies share similar clinical features but have different underlying pathologies. PMID:25642195

  19. Cardiac arrhythmias in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, I; Hardarson, T; Jonsson, S

    1982-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias in a group of relatives of patients who had come to necropsy with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Another aim of the study was to assess the validity of an interventricular septal thickness of 1.3 cm or more, measured by echocardiography, as a diagnostic criterion of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy among relatives of cases proven at necropsy. Fifty close relatives of eight deceased patients were examined. By the above definition 22 relatives had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 28 did not. A comparison of the prevalence and types of cardiac arrhythmias, as shown by 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, was made between the two groups and a third apparently healthy group of 40 people. The patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy showed a significant increase in supraventricular extrasystoles/24 hours, supraventricular arrhythmias, high grade ventricular arrhythmia, and the number of patients with more than 10 ventricular extrasystoles every 24 hours when compared with the other groups. There was no significant difference between normal relatives and controls. The prevalence and types of arrhythmia in these patients were similar to those found by other investigators using different diagnostic criteria. These results support the contention that these patients do indeed have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and suggest that all close relatives of necropsy proven cases should be examined by echocardiography and subsequently by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring if the interventricular septal thickness is 1.3 more. PMID:7201843

  20. [Plasma selenium and peripartum cardiomyopathy in Bamako, Mali].

    PubMed

    Cénac, A; Touré, K; Diarra, M B; Sergeant, C; Jobic, Y; Sanogo, K; Dembele, M; Fayol, V; Simonoff, M

    2004-01-01

    Peripartum heart failure due to unexplained dilated cardiomyopathy is a common disorder as Savannak-Sahelian Africa. One of the many suspected risk factors identified is selenium deficiency. The purpose of this study was to measure plasma selenium levels in patients with peripartum heart failure due to cardiomyopathy in Bamako, Republic of Mali and compare data with healthy Sahalian women with the same obstetrical status. Plasma selenium was measured in a patient group consisting of 28 Malian women presenting peripartum heart failure and in a control group of 28 healthy breast-feeding Nigerien women of comparable age. The criteria for matching the two groups was parity (similar number of deliveries) since multiparity is a risk factor for peripartum cardiomyopathy. The Wilcoxon test (nonparametric) was used to compare the 2 groups considering up value < 0.05 as significant. Plasma selenium was significantly lower in patients from Mali than in controls from Niger (65 +/- 17 ng/ml vs. 78 +/- 17 ng/ml, p = 0.01). The results of this study showing lower plasma selenium in Bamako patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy than in a matching healthy control population confirms the previous data from the Niamey study. PMID:15460143

  1. Unbreak My Heart: Targeting Mitochondrial Autophagy in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kubli, Dieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Diabetes is strongly associated with increased incidence of heart disease and mortality due to development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Even in the absence of cardiovascular disease, cardiomyopathy frequently arises in diabetic patients. Current treatment options for cardiomyopathy in diabetic patients are the same as for nondiabetic patients and do not address the causes underlying the loss of contractility. Recent Advances: Although there are numerous distinctions between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, recent evidence suggests that the two disease states converge on mitochondria as an epicenter for cardiomyocyte damage. Critical Issues: Accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria contributes to cardiac tissue injury in both acute and chronic conditions. Removal of damaged mitochondria by macroautophagy, termed “mitophagy,” is critical for maintaining cardiomyocyte health and contractility both under normal conditions and during stress. However, very little is known about the involvement of mitophagy in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. A growing interest in this topic has given rise to a wave of publications that aim at deciphering the status of autophagy and mitophagy in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Future Directions: This review summarizes these recent studies with the goal of drawing conclusions about the activation or suppression of autophagy and mitophagy in the diabetic heart. A better understanding of how autophagy and mitophagy are affected in the diabetic myocardium is still needed, as well as whether they can be targeted therapeutically. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1527–1544. PMID:25808102

  2. Dilated cardiomyopathy: an anaesthetic challenge.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Haramritpal; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Aggarwal, Shobha

    2013-06-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is a primary myocardial disease of unknown etiology characterized by left ventricular or biventricular dilation and impaired contractility. Depending upon diagnostic criteria used, the reported annual incidence varies between 5 and 8 cases per 100,000 populations. Dilated cardiomyopathy is defined by presence of: a) fractional myocardial shortening less than 25% (>2SD) and/or ejection fraction less than 45% (>2SD) and b) Left Ventricular End Diastolic Diameter (LVEDD) greater than 117% excluding any known cause of myocardial disease. Such cases are always a challenge to the anesthesiologist as they are most commonly complicated by progressive cardiac failure. We report the anesthetic management of a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy undergoing surgery for carcinoma breast. PMID:23905133

  3. Superparamagnetic iron oxide based MRI contrast agents: Current status of clinical application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J

    2011-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) MR contrast agents are composed of nano-sized iron oxide crystals coated with dextran or carboxydextran. Two SPIO agents are clinically approved, namely: ferumoxides (Feridex in the USA, Endorem in Europe) with a particle size of 120 to 180 nm, and ferucarbotran (Resovist) with a particle size of about 60 nm. The principal effect of the SPIO particles is on T2* relaxation and thus MR imaging is usually performed using T2/T2*-weighted sequences in which the tissue signal loss is due to the susceptibility effects of the iron oxide core. Enhancement on T1-weighted images can also be seen with the smaller Resovist. Both Feridex and Resovist are approved specifically for MRI of the liver. The difference being that Resovist can be administered as a rapid bolus (and thus can be used with both dynamic and delayed imaging), whereas Feridex needs to be administered as a slow infusion and is used solely in delayed phase imaging. In the liver, these particles are sequestered by phagocytic Kupffer cells in normal reticuloendothelial system (RES), but are not retained in lesions lacking Kupffer cells. Consequently, there are significant differences in T2/T2* relaxation between normal tissue and lesions, resulting in increased lesion conspicuity and detectability. SPIO substantially increase the detectability of hepatic metastases. For focal hepatocellular lesions, SPIO-enhanced MR imaging exhibits slightly better diagnostic performance than dynamic CT. A combination of dynamic and static MR imaging technique using T1- and T2 imaging criteria appears to provide clinically more useful patterns of enhancement. Feridex and Resovist are also used for evaluating macrophage activities in some inflammatory lesions, but their clinical values remain to be further confirmed. The clinical development of Ferumoxtran (Combidex in the USA, Sinerem in Europe), designed for lymph node metastasis evaluation, is currently stopped.

  4. Suppressed cytokine production in whole blood cultures is related to iron status and is partially corrected following weight reduction in morbidly obese pre-menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assess ex vivo whole-blood cytokine production and its association with iron status in obese versus non-obese women. Determine the change in ex vivo whole-blood cytokine production six months after restrictive bariatric surgery in the obese group. Subjects were 17 obese (BMI: 46.6 ±7.9 kg/m2) and 1...

  5. The Metabolic Status Drives Acclimation of Iron Deficiency Responses in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as Revealed by Proteomics Based Hierarchical Clustering and Reverse Genetics*

    PubMed Central

    Höhner, Ricarda; Barth, Johannes; Magneschi, Leonardo; Jaeger, Daniel; Niehues, Anna; Bald, Till; Grossman, Arthur; Fufezan, Christian; Hippler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Iron is a crucial cofactor in numerous redox-active proteins operating in bioenergetic pathways including respiration and photosynthesis. Cellular iron management is essential to sustain sufficient energy production and minimize oxidative stress. To produce energy for cell growth, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses the metabolic flexibility to use light and/or carbon sources such as acetate. To investigate the interplay between the iron-deficiency response and growth requirements under distinct trophic conditions, we took a quantitative proteomics approach coupled to innovative hierarchical clustering using different “distance-linkage combinations” and random noise injection. Protein co-expression analyses of the combined data sets revealed insights into cellular responses governing acclimation to iron deprivation and regulation associated with photosynthesis dependent growth. Photoautotrophic growth requirements as well as the iron deficiency induced specific metabolic enzymes and stress related proteins, and yet differences in the set of induced enzymes, proteases, and redox-related polypeptides were evident, implying the establishment of distinct response networks under the different conditions. Moreover, our data clearly support the notion that the iron deficiency response includes a hierarchy for iron allocation within organelles in C. reinhardtii. Importantly, deletion of a bifunctional alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH1), which is induced under low iron based on the proteomic data, attenuates the remodeling of the photosynthetic machinery in response to iron deficiency, and at the same time stimulates expression of stress-related proteins such as NDA2, LHCSR3, and PGRL1. This finding provides evidence that the coordinated regulation of bioenergetics pathways and iron deficiency response is sensitive to the cellular and chloroplast metabolic and/or redox status, consistent with systems approach data. PMID:23820728

  6. Cow milk feeding in infancy: gastrointestinal blood loss and iron nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Fomon, S J; Ziegler, E E; Nelson, S E; Edwards, B B

    1981-04-01

    Eighty-one normal infants were studied between 112 and 196 days of age. Thirty-nine infants were fed pasteurized cow milk and the remainder were fed either Enfamil or heat-treated cow milk. During the age interval of 112 to 140 days, the proportion of infants with guaiac-positive stools was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater among infants fed pasteurized cow milk than among those fed Enfamil or heat-treated cow milk. Similarly, infants fed cow milk had a significantly (P less than 0.001) greater number of guaiac-positive stools than did the other infants. After 140 days of age, there was no difference between feeding groups in the number of guaiac-positive stools. No significant differences were observed in mean hemoglobin, hematocrit, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity, or transferrin saturation between feeding groups nor between infants with and those without guaiac-positive stools, It is concluded that pasteurized cow milk should not be fed before 140 days of age.

  7. Intermittent Iron Folate Supplementation: Impact on Hematinic Status and Growth of School Girls

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Aditi; Kanani, Shubhada

    2012-01-01

    In view of high iron needs for adolescent growth, this paper studied the impact of daily vs. intermittent (once and twice weekly) iron folic acid (IFA) supplementation on hemoglobin levels and pubertal growth among primary school girls in early adolescence (9–13 years) of Vadodara, India. Methods. Hemoglobin (Hb), height and weight of the girls were assessed using standard methods. In three experimental schools (ES) IFA tablets in a dose of 100 mg Fe + 0.5 mg folic acid was given either daily, once weekly or twice weekly for one year. The fourth school (control: CS) did not receive any intervention. Results. Hb levels significantly improved (P < 0.01) in all ES compared to CS. Body Mass Index (BMI) increment in ES vs CS was significant (P < 0.05) in twice weekly IFA and daily IFA. Within ES groups, mean Hb and BMI increments were comparable between twice weekly IFA and daily IFA. Anemic ES girls showed higher Hb and BMI increments vs. non-anemic girls. Better the Hb response, greater was the benefit on BMI. Conclusion: Twice-weekly IFA supplementation was comparable to daily IFA as regards impact on Hb and growth; at less cost and greater feasibility. Once-weekly dose was inadequate to significantly improve growth. PMID:22919508

  8. Is religious fasting related to iron status in Greek Orthodox Christians?

    PubMed

    Sarri, Katerina O; Kafatos, Anthony G; Higgins, Siobhan

    2005-08-01

    The Orthodox Christian diet is unique in regularly interchanging from an omnivore to a vegetarian-type diet, and no study to date has focused on the impact of this on Fe status. Thirty-five Greek Orthodox Christian strict fasters (n 17 male, n 18 female; mean age 43.6+/-13.2 years) and twenty-four controls (n 11 male, n 13 female; mean age 39.8+/-7.6 years) were studied before (pre) and near completion (end) of the Christmas fasting (CF) period (40 d), during which meat and dairy products are prohibited. Fe status was assessed using standard haematological parameters, and Fe deficiency was determined via serum ferritin levels (<12 ng/ml) and the tri-index model. While fasters had marginally poorer pre haematological indicators, values were well above the cut-off levels, suggesting that intermittent fasting for a mean of 22.5+/-15.5 years did not have any substantial adverse effects on Fe status. During the CF period the changes in Fe status indices were more beneficial for fasters than for control subjects. In particular, fasters increased their ferritin levels (P = 0.02) and decreased their total Fe-binding capacity (P < 0.001). Compared with males, the effect of CF was more pronounced in female fasters. No subjects were detected with Fe deficiency at the end of the CF period. End dietary Fe and fibre intake were significantly higher in the fasters as compared with the control group (P = 0.038 and P = 0.001, respectively). Adherence to the Orthodox Christian dietary guidelines does not have a major impact on Fe status and is not associated with a significantly greater degree of Fe deficiency.

  9. The genetics of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dellefave, Lisa; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review More than forty different individual genes have been implicated in the inheritance of dilated cardiomyopathy. For a subset of these genes, mutations can lead to a spectrum of cardiomyopathy that extends to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction. In nearly all cases, there is an increased risk of arrhythmias. With some genetic mutations, extracardiac manifestations are likely to be present. The precise genetic etiology can usually not be discerned from the cardiac and/or extracardiac manifestations and requires molecular genetic diagnosis for prognostic determination and cardiac care. Recent findings Newer technologies are influencing genetic testing, especially cardiomyopathy genetic testing, where an increased number of genes are now routinely being tested simultaneously. While this approach to testing multiple genes is increasing the diagnostic yield, the analysis of multiple genes in one test is also resulting in a large amount of genetic information of unclear significance. Summary Genetic testing is highly useful in the care of patients and families, since it guides diagnosis, influences care and aids in prognosis. However, the large amount of benign human genetic variation may complicate genetic results, and often requires a skilled team to accurately interpret the findings. PMID:20186049

  10. Impact of Multi-Micronutrient Fortified Rice on Hemoglobin, Iron and Vitamin A Status of Cambodian Schoolchildren: a Double-Blind Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Perignon, Marlène; Fiorentino, Marion; Kuong, Khov; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine A.; Burja, Kurt; Parker, Megan; Chamnan, Chhoun; Berger, Jacques; Wieringa, Frank T.

    2016-01-01

    In Cambodia, micronutrient deficiencies remain a critical public health problem. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of multi-micronutrient fortified rice (MMFR) formulations, distributed through a World Food Program school-meals program (WFP-SMP), on the hemoglobin concentrations and iron and vitamin A (VA) status of Cambodian schoolchildren. The FORISCA-UltraRice+NutriRice study was a double-blind, cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Sixteen schools participating in WFP-SMP were randomly assigned to receive extrusion-fortified rice (UltraRice Original, UltraRice New (URN), or NutriRice) or unfortified rice (placebo) six days a week for six months. Four additional schools not participating in WFP-SMP were randomly selected as controls. A total of 2440 schoolchildren (6–16 years old) participated in the biochemical study. Hemoglobin, iron status, estimated using inflammation-adjusted ferritin and transferrin receptors concentrations, and VA status, assessed using inflammation-adjusted retinol-binding protein concentration, were measured at the baseline, as well as at three and six months. Baseline prevalence of anemia, depleted iron stores, tissue iron deficiency, marginal VA status and VA deficiency were 15.6%, 1.4%, 51.0%, 7.9%, and 0.7%, respectively. The strongest risk factors for anemia were hemoglobinopathy, VA deficiency, and depleted iron stores (all p < 0.01). After six months, children receiving NutriRice and URN had 4 and 5 times less risk of low VA status, respectively, in comparison to the placebo group. Hemoglobin significantly increased (+0.8 g/L) after three months for the URN group in comparison to the placebo group; however, this difference was no longer significant after six months, except for children without inflammation. MMFR containing VA effectively improved the VA status of schoolchildren. The impact on hemoglobin and iron status was limited, partly by sub-clinical inflammation. MMFR combined with non-nutritional approaches

  11. Impact of Multi-Micronutrient Fortified Rice on Hemoglobin, Iron and Vitamin A Status of Cambodian Schoolchildren: a Double-Blind Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Perignon, Marlène; Fiorentino, Marion; Kuong, Khov; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine A; Burja, Kurt; Parker, Megan; Chamnan, Chhoun; Berger, Jacques; Wieringa, Frank T

    2016-01-07

    In Cambodia, micronutrient deficiencies remain a critical public health problem. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of multi-micronutrient fortified rice (MMFR) formulations, distributed through a World Food Program school-meals program (WFP-SMP), on the hemoglobin concentrations and iron and vitamin A (VA) status of Cambodian schoolchildren. The FORISCA-UltraRice+NutriRice study was a double-blind, cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Sixteen schools participating in WFP-SMP were randomly assigned to receive extrusion-fortified rice (UltraRice Original, UltraRice New (URN), or NutriRice) or unfortified rice (placebo) six days a week for six months. Four additional schools not participating in WFP-SMP were randomly selected as controls. A total of 2440 schoolchildren (6-16 years old) participated in the biochemical study. Hemoglobin, iron status, estimated using inflammation-adjusted ferritin and transferrin receptors concentrations, and VA status, assessed using inflammation-adjusted retinol-binding protein concentration, were measured at the baseline, as well as at three and six months. Baseline prevalence of anemia, depleted iron stores, tissue iron deficiency, marginal VA status and VA deficiency were 15.6%, 1.4%, 51.0%, 7.9%, and 0.7%, respectively. The strongest risk factors for anemia were hemoglobinopathy, VA deficiency, and depleted iron stores (all p < 0.01). After six months, children receiving NutriRice and URN had 4 and 5 times less risk of low VA status, respectively, in comparison to the placebo group. Hemoglobin significantly increased (+0.8 g/L) after three months for the URN group in comparison to the placebo group; however, this difference was no longer significant after six months, except for children without inflammation. MMFR containing VA effectively improved the VA status of schoolchildren. The impact on hemoglobin and iron status was limited, partly by sub-clinical inflammation. MMFR combined with non-nutritional approaches

  12. Evaluating environmental and social influences on iron and zinc status of pregnant subsistence farmers in two geographically contrasting regions of Southern Malawi.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, N; Rankin, J; Pollard, M; Maleta, K; Robertson, C; Hursthouse, A

    2014-12-01

    Micronutrient deficiency affects over 4.5 billion people worldwide, the majority in developing countries. Deficiencies of iron (and associated anaemia) and zinc in pregnancy are associated with complications, maternal and neonatal mortality, and developmental disorders in the foetus and growing child. We report the results of pilot study which used an interdisciplinary approach to explore environmental and sociocultural factors influencing the micronutrient status in the soil-plant-human transfer for pregnant subsistence farmers in two geographically contrasting regions of Southern Malawi. It evaluated micronutrient status in soil and the staple crop and explored the context for their transfer to pregnant women. Scientific and social science methods were used to collect data, following full sensitisation of the communities. A total of 99 participants were recruited from Chiradzulu (plateau) and Chikwawa (floodplain). Soil, maize and blood samples were collected, along with food frequency and health behaviour questionnaires and anthropological observation. Statistical analysis revealed that soil iron was significantly higher in Chiradzulu than in Chikwawa; total iron concentration is not deemed to be deficient in either area. Soil zinc was not significantly different between areas. Maize concentrations of iron and zinc were not significantly different between areas, and were not deficient relative to improved cultivars. Blood iron deficiency and associated anaemia were problematic in both areas, but more so in Chikwawa than in Chiradzulu, and zinc deficiency was similar in both areas. The study has identified a significant difference in the blood iron status of the participants of the two communities, and has shown that this difference is not accounted for by the staple crop maize. Socio-geographical factors appear to play a significant role in the micronutrient health of the populations. The findings lend support to multifaceted community intervention studies which

  13. Genetic contribution to iron status: SNPs related to iron deficiency anaemia and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 calcium channel subunit.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Richer, Carlos; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Toxqui, Laura; Remacha, Angel; Vaquero, M Pilar; López-Parra, Ana M

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies associate genetic markers with iron- and erythrocyte-related parameters, but few relate them to iron-clinical phenotypes. Novel SNP rs1375515, located in a subunit of the calcium channel gene CACNA2D3, is associated with a higher risk of anaemia. The aim of this study is to further investigate the association of this SNP with iron-related parameters and iron-clinical phenotypes, and to explore the potential role of calcium channel subunit region in iron regulation. Furthermore, we aim to replicate the association of other SNPs reported previously in our population. We tested 45 SNPs selected via systematic review and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 region, with haematological and biochemical traits in 358 women of reproductive age. Multivariate analyses include back-step logistic regression and decision trees. The results replicate the association of SNPs with iron-related traits, and also confirm the protective effect of both A allele of rs1800562 (HFE) and G allele of rs4895441 (HBS1L-MYB). The risk of developing anaemia is increased in reproductive age women carriers of A allele of rs1868505 (CACNA2D3) and/or T allele of rs13194491 (HIST1H2BJ). Association of SNPs from fine mapping with ferritin and serum iron suggests that calcium channels could be a potential pathway for iron uptake in physiological conditions.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia (DCMA) syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  15. Circadian clock adjustment to plant iron status depends on chloroplast and phytochrome function

    PubMed Central

    Salomé, Patrice A; Oliva, Michele; Weigel, Detlef; Krämer, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Plant chloroplasts are not only the main cellular location for storage of elemental iron (Fe), but also the main site for Fe, which is incorporated into chlorophyll, haem and the photosynthetic machinery. How plants measure internal Fe levels is unknown. We describe here a new Fe-dependent response, a change in the period of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, the period lengthens when Fe becomes limiting, and gradually shortens as external Fe levels increase. Etiolated seedlings or light-grown plants treated with plastid translation inhibitors do not respond to changes in Fe supply, pointing to developed chloroplasts as central hubs for circadian Fe sensing. Phytochrome-deficient mutants maintain a short period even under Fe deficiency, stressing the role of early light signalling in coupling the clock to Fe responses. Further mutant and pharmacological analyses suggest that known players in plastid-to-nucleus signalling do not directly participate in Fe sensing. We propose that the sensor governing circadian Fe responses defines a new retrograde pathway that involves a plastid-encoded protein that depends on phytochromes and the functional state of chloroplasts. PMID:23241948

  16. Circadian clock adjustment to plant iron status depends on chloroplast and phytochrome function.

    PubMed

    Salomé, Patrice A; Oliva, Michele; Weigel, Detlef; Krämer, Ute

    2013-02-20

    Plant chloroplasts are not only the main cellular location for storage of elemental iron (Fe), but also the main site for Fe, which is incorporated into chlorophyll, haem and the photosynthetic machinery. How plants measure internal Fe levels is unknown. We describe here a new Fe-dependent response, a change in the period of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, the period lengthens when Fe becomes limiting, and gradually shortens as external Fe levels increase. Etiolated seedlings or light-grown plants treated with plastid translation inhibitors do not respond to changes in Fe supply, pointing to developed chloroplasts as central hubs for circadian Fe sensing. Phytochrome-deficient mutants maintain a short period even under Fe deficiency, stressing the role of early light signalling in coupling the clock to Fe responses. Further mutant and pharmacological analyses suggest that known players in plastid-to-nucleus signalling do not directly participate in Fe sensing. We propose that the sensor governing circadian Fe responses defines a new retrograde pathway that involves a plastid-encoded protein that depends on phytochromes and the functional state of chloroplasts. PMID:23241948

  17. Schoolchildren with Learning Difficulties Have Low Iron Status and High Anemia Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Arcanjo, C. P. C.; Santos, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In developing countries there is high prevalence of iron deficiency anemia, which reduces cognitive performance, work performance, and endurance; it also causes learning difficulties and negative impact on development for infant population. Methods. The study concerns a case-control study; data was collected from an appropriate sample consisting of schoolchildren aged 8 years. The sample was divided into two subgroups: those with deficient initial reading skills (DIRS) (case) and those without (control). Blood samples were taken to analyze hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels. These results were then used to compare the two groups with Student's t-test. Association between DIRS and anemia was analyzed using odds ratio (OR). Results. Hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels of schoolchildren with DIRS were statistically lower when compared to those without, hemoglobin p = 0.02 and serum ferritin p = 0.04. DIRS was statistically associated with a risk of anemia with a weighted OR of 1.62. Conclusions. In this study, schoolchildren with DIRS had lower hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels when compared to those without. PMID:27703806

  18. Iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc status and immune response in elderly subjects in the Washington D. C. metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect

    Henry-Christian, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/, and zinc status of a group of economically and socially disadvantaged elderly persons in the Washington Metropolitan Area was evaluated. Factors related to deficiencies of these nutrients, the relationships between the status of these nutrients and cell-mediated immunity, and the relationships of iron, folacin and vitamin B/sub 12/ status to hemoglobin levels in the subjects were also examined. It was also determined whether there were any interactions among iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc status in their relationships to cell-mediated immunity. Socio-demographic and nutritional data on the subjects were obtained using a questionnaire. Dietary data were obtained using a dietary record. A fasting blood sample was drawn and the levels of ferritin, folate and vitamin B/sub 12/, and the erythrocyte levels of folate were determined by radioassay. Plasma and hair zinc levels were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cell-mediated immune response was determined by transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes after stimulation by mitogens, and by allogenic lymphocytes in the mixed lymphocyte reaction.

  19. Biological Status and Dietary Intakes of Iron, Zinc and Vitamin A among Women and Preschool Children in Rural Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Prevel, Yves; Allemand, Pauline; Nikiema, Laetitia; Ayassou, Kossiwavi A.; Ouedraogo, Henri Gautier; Moursi, Mourad; De Moura, Fabiana F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Food-based approaches such as biofortification are meant to sustainably address micronutrient deficiencies in poor settings. Knowing more about micronutrient intakes and deficiencies is a prerequisite to designing and evaluating interventions. Objective The objectives of the study were to assess biological status and dietary intakes of iron, zinc and vitamin A among women and children aged 36–59 months in rural Burkina Faso and to study relationships between intake and status to better inform future food-based interventions. Design A cross-sectional survey was carried out in two rural provinces of Burkina Faso on a random cluster sample of 480 mother-child pairs. Dietary data was obtained by 24-hour recalls repeated on a random sub-selection of 37.5% of subjects to allow calculation of nutrient’s probability of adequacy (PA). Biomarkers were measured on a sub-sample of 180 mother-child pairs. Blood samples were analyzed for hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR), C-reactive protein, alpha-1-glycoprotein, serum zinc concentration (SZnC) and retinol. For each micronutrient the relationship between biomarker and dietary intake was investigated by multiple linear regression models accounting for inflammatory biomarkers. Results Mean PA for iron, zinc and vitamin A was 0.49, 0.87 and 0.21 among women and 0.61, 0.95 and 0.33 among children, respectively. Prevalence of anemia, corrected low serum ferritin and high sTfR was 37.6%, 4.0% and 77.5% among women and 72.1%, 1.5% and 87.6% among children, respectively. Prevalence of low SZnC and corrected low serum retinol was 39.4% and 12.0% among women and 63.7% and 24.8% among children, respectively. There was a tendency for a positive relationship between vitamin A intakes and serum retinol among women (β = 0.0003, P = 0.06). Otherwise, no link was found between micronutrients biomarkers and intakes. Conclusion Our study depicted different images of micronutrient deficiencies when

  20. Inter-pregnancy folate and iron status of women in an inner-city population.

    PubMed

    Doyle, W; Srivastava, A; Crawford, M A; Bhatti, R; Brooke, Z; Costeloe, K L

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether micronutrient supplementation improved the nutritional status of women with poor diets during the inter-pregnancy interval. Fifty-five women who had given birth to a low birth weight baby (<2.5 kg), and who planned to have a further pregnancy, were recruited to a prospective randomised study in East London, UK. Of the fifty-five mothers recruited, forty-four (78 %) met fewer than four of sixteen dietary reference values according to the information provided in a 7 d diet diary, and were categorised as having an 'inadequate' diet. Half of the mothers in the 'inadequate'-diet group were randomly assigned to receive a micronutrient and a single cell oil supplement containing docosahexaenoic acid. All participants received dietary advice based on analysis of their diet diaries, and general lifestyle advice on preparing for pregnancy. Mothers had a blood sample taken at 3 and 9 months post-partum to measure their folate, Fe stores and fatty acid status. Mean serum and erythrocyte folate levels increased significantly between 3 and 9 months post-partum in both the adequate-diet group and the supplemented group. At 9 months post-partum, over half of the unsupplemented, inadequate-diet group remained severely deficient in folate (serum folate <230 nmol/l) and had low serum ferritin levels (<15 microg/l). The high prevalence of inadequate diets in this inner-city population and the low motivation of women to participate in a nutrition programme suggests that consideration should be given to the provision of free folate and Fe supplements to all women in this and similar populations, or at least to women who have delivered a low birth weight baby, who plan further pregnancies. PMID:11432768

  1. Respiratory health status and its predictors: a cross-sectional study among coal-based sponge iron plant workers in Barjora, India

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Kaushik; Chattopadhyay, Chaitali; Kaltenthaler, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives During the past decade, coal-based sponge iron plants, a highly polluted industry, have grown rapidly in Barjora, India. The toxic effects of particulate matters and gaseous pollutants include various respiratory diseases. Understanding workers’ perception of respiratory health is essential in people-centred healthcare. The aim of the study was to assess their respiratory health status and to determine its predictors. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Coal-based sponge iron plants in Barjora, India. Participants 258 coal-based sponge iron plant workers. Primary outcome measure Respiratory health status was measured using the St. George's respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ) total score. 100 and 0 represent the worst and best possible respiratory health status, respectively. Statistical analyses The two-part model (frequency (any worse respiratory health status) and severity (amount of worse respiratory health status)) was developed for the score, as the data were positively skewed with many zeros. Results The mean (SD) SGRQ total score was 7.7 (14.5), the median (IQR) was 0.9 (9.0), and the observed range was 0–86.6. The best possible SGRQ total score was reported by 46.9% of workers. Independent predictors of worse respiratory health status were cleaner domestic cooking fuel (coefficient −0.76, 95% CI −1.46 to −0.06, p=0.034) and personal history of any respiratory disease (1.76, 1.04 to 2.47, p<0.001) in case of frequency; and family history of any respiratory disease (0.43, 0.02 to 0.83, p=0.039) and personal history (1.19, 0.83 to 1.54, p<0.001) in case of severity. Conclusions Less than half of the coal-based sponge iron plant workers in Barjora have the best possible respiratory health status. The predictors of worse respiratory health status were identified. The study findings could be taken into consideration in future interventional studies aimed at improving the respiratory health status of these workers. PMID:25795696

  2. The role of inflammation, iron, and nutritional status in cancer-related anemia: results of a large, prospective, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Gramignano, Giulia; Mulas, Carlo; Tanca, Luciana; Cherchi, Maria Cristina; Floris, Carlo; Omoto, Itaru; Barracca, Antonio; Ganz, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Anemia in oncology patients is often considered a side effect of cancer therapy; however, it may occur before any antineoplastic treatment (cancer-related anemia). This study was aimed to evaluate the prevalence of cancer-related anemia in a large cohort of oncology patients and whether inflammation and malnutrition were predictive of its development and severity. The present study included 888 patients with cancer at different sites between May 2011 and January 2014. Patients were assessed at diagnosis before any cancer treatment. The prevalence of anemia according to the main clinical factors (tumor site, stage and performance status) was analyzed. In each patient markers of inflammation, iron metabolism, malnutrition and oxidative stress as well as the modified Glasgow prognostic score, a combined index of malnutrition and inflammation, were assessed and their role in predicting hemoglobin level was evaluated. The percentage of anemic patients was 63% with the lowest hemoglobin levels being found in the patients with most advanced cancer and compromised performance status. Hemoglobin concentration differed by tumor site and was lowest in patients with ovarian cancer. Hemoglobin concentration was inversely correlated with inflammatory markers, hepcidin, ferritin, erythropoietin and reactive oxygen species, and positively correlated with leptin, albumin, cholesterol and antioxidant enzymes. In multivariate analysis, stage, interleukin-6 and leptin were independent predictors of hemoglobin concentration. Furthermore, hemoglobin was inversely dependent on modified Glasgow Prognostic Score. In conclusion, cancer-related anemia is a multifactorial problem with immune, nutritional and metabolic components that affect its severity. Only a detailed assessment of the pathogenesis of cancer-related anemia may enable clinicians to provide safe and effective individualized treatment. PMID:25239265

  3. The role of inflammation, iron, and nutritional status in cancer-related anemia: results of a large, prospective, observational study.

    PubMed

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Gramignano, Giulia; Mulas, Carlo; Tanca, Luciana; Cherchi, Maria Cristina; Floris, Carlo; Omoto, Itaru; Barracca, Antonio; Ganz, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Anemia in oncology patients is often considered a side effect of cancer therapy; however, it may occur before any antineoplastic treatment (cancer-related anemia). This study was aimed to evaluate the prevalence of cancer-related anemia in a large cohort of oncology patients and whether inflammation and malnutrition were predictive of its development and severity. The present study included 888 patients with cancer at different sites between May 2011 and January 2014. Patients were assessed at diagnosis before any cancer treatment. The prevalence of anemia according to the main clinical factors (tumor site, stage and performance status) was analyzed. In each patient markers of inflammation, iron metabolism, malnutrition and oxidative stress as well as the modified Glasgow prognostic score, a combined index of malnutrition and inflammation, were assessed and their role in predicting hemoglobin level was evaluated. The percentage of anemic patients was 63% with the lowest hemoglobin levels being found in the patients with most advanced cancer and compromised performance status. Hemoglobin concentration differed by tumor site and was lowest in patients with ovarian cancer. Hemoglobin concentration was inversely correlated with inflammatory markers, hepcidin, ferritin, erythropoietin and reactive oxygen species, and positively correlated with leptin, albumin, cholesterol and antioxidant enzymes. In multivariate analysis, stage, interleukin-6 and leptin were independent predictors of hemoglobin concentration. Furthermore, hemoglobin was inversely dependent on modified Glasgow Prognostic Score. In conclusion, cancer-related anemia is a multifactorial problem with immune, nutritional and metabolic components that affect its severity. Only a detailed assessment of the pathogenesis of cancer-related anemia may enable clinicians to provide safe and effective individualized treatment.

  4. Oxidative status, in vitro iron-induced lipid oxidation and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in rhea meat.

    PubMed

    Terevinto, A; Ramos, A; Castroman, G; Cabrera, M C; Saadoun, A

    2010-04-01

    Rhea (Rhea americana) muscles Obturatorius medialis (OM) Iliotibialis lateralis (IL) and Iliofibularis (I), obtained from farmed animals, were evaluated regarding their oxidative/antioxidant status. The mean level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) expressed as malonaldehyde (MDA) content was of 0.84 mg MDA/kg wet tissue for the three muscles. TBARS level was significantly higher in IL than OM and I, with the two latter showing similar levels. The mean level of carbonyl proteins expressed as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was 1.59 nmol DNPH mg(-1). Carbonyl protein levels were significantly different (P<0.05) between the three muscles (IL>OM>I). Iron-induced TBARS generation was not significantly different between the three muscles at any time, nor for each muscle during the 5 h of the experiment. Superoxide dismutase activity in IL muscle was significantly higher (P<0.05) than in I muscle. However, the difference between IL and OM muscles was not significant. The differences between the three muscles became not significant when the results were expressed by mg of protein contained in the extract, instead by g of wet tissue. No differences were found for catalase (micromol of discomposed H(2)O(2) min(-1) g(-1) wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) and glutathione peroxidase (micromol ol of oxidized NADPH min(-1) g(-1) of wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) activities between the three muscles.

  5. Are biofortified staple food crops improving vitamin A and iron status in women and children? New evidence from efficacy trials.

    PubMed

    De Moura, Fabiana F; Palmer, Amanda C; Finkelstein, Julia L; Haas, Jere D; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Wenger, Michael J; Birol, Ekin; Boy, Erick; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo

    2014-09-01

    Biofortification is the breeding of crops to increase their nutritional value, including increased contents of micronutrients or their precursors. Biofortification aims to increase nutrient levels in crops during plant growth rather than during processing of the crops into foods. Emerging research from 8 human trials conducted in the past decade with staple food crops that have been biofortified by traditional plant breeding methods were presented in this symposium. Specifically, data from 6 efficacy and 2 effectiveness trials were discussed to assess the effects of regular consumption of these enhanced staple crops on improving population vitamin A and iron status and reducing the burden of micronutrient deficiencies in targeted populations living in South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America. Biofortified food crops appear to have a positive impact on nutritional and functional health outcomes, as the results from the trials suggest. Additional implementation research will be needed to ensure maximization of the beneficial impact of this intervention and a smooth scaling up to make biofortification a sustainable intervention in public health. The challenge for the global health community remains how to take this efficacious intervention and implement at large scale in the real world.

  6. The effect of nutritional status, body composition, inflammation and serum iron on the developement of insulin resistance among patients on long-term hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Rasić-Milutinović, Zorica; Perunicić, Gordana; Pljesa, Steva; Gluvić, Zoran; Ilić, Mirka; Stokić, Edita

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effect of body composition, nutrition, inflammation and iron status on insulin resistance in patients with long-term hemodialysis. We selected 43 stable end-stage chronic renal failure patients, on maintenance hemodialysis. We evaluated the nutritional status, body composition by subjective global assessment (SGA), anthropometric measurements (BMI and waist circumference), bioelectrical impedance analysis and biochemical parameters measurements [serum albumin, cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, hematocrit, hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, calcium, phosphorus, intact parathormone (i-PTH), TNF-alpha, IL-6 and high sensitivity C-reactive protein]. All parameters were evaluated by comparisons between HOMA-IR tertiles, and after simple regression analysis, by backward multivariate regression analysis we identified independent variables for IR. As the tertile of HOMA-IR increased, serum level of glucose, insulin, and waist increascd, whereas HDL-cholesterol level decreased, or the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased across the tertiles of HOMA-IR. After adjustment for gender, age, hemodialysis duration, ferritin, phosphorus, waist and total fat percentages, multivariate regression analysis was performed and the association with HOMA-IR was still strong only for serum levels of iron and TNF-alpha. That explains 16% of the total variation in HOMA-IR. Our results suggest that the increase of IR in end-stage chronic renal failure patients on hemodialysis could be related to anemia and particularly to iron overload. Moreover, chronic inflammatory status with over-production of adipokine TNF-alpha participate in the pathogenesis of IR too. The present study demonstrated that adipokine TNF-alpha and serum iron participated as independent predictors in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance on long-term hemodialysis patients.

  7. Atomoxetine-related Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Naguy, Ahmed; Al-Mutairi, Haya; Al-Tajali, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Many psychotropic medications target norepinephrine receptors, which can have serious cardiovascular implications, especially in the context of overdoses, polypharmacy, and high-risk populations. This article presents the case of a patient with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder who developed takotsubo cardiomyopathy subsequent to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between atomoxetine, a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, and fluoxetine. Clinicians should be mindful of the potential for cardiovascular adverse effects when prescribing agents that target noradrenergic receptors. PMID:27123802

  8. [Stress-induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Høst, Ulla; Søgaard, Peter; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2009-09-14

    A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is described in a postmenopausal woman admitted for suspected recent myocardial infarction, triggered by significant social stress during a family Christmas dinner. Coronary angiography showed no significant lesions. Acute echocardiography demonstrated apical ballooning and an ejection fraction of 30%. The clinical course was uneventful and after one month, echocardiography showed complete resolution of the apical ballooning and recovery of left ventricular systolic function.

  9. Maternal Serum Ferritin Concentration Is Positively Associated with Newborn Iron Stores in Women with Low Ferritin Status in Late Pregnancy123

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jie; Lou, Jingan; Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.; Kaciroti, Niko; Felt, Barbara T.; Zhao, Zheng-Yan; Lozoff, Betsy

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is common in pregnant women and infants, particularly in developing countries. The relation between maternal and neonatal iron status remains unclear. This study considered the issue in a large sample of mother-newborn pairs in rural southeastern China. Hemoglobin (Hb) and serum ferritin (SF) were measured in 3702 pregnant women at ≥37 wk gestation and in cord blood of their infants born at term (37–42 wk gestation). Maternal anemia (Hb <110 g/L) was present in 27.5% and associated with maternal SF <20 μg/L in 86.9%. Only 5.6% of neonates were anemic (Hb <130 g/L) and 9.5% had cord-blood SF <75 μg/L. There were low-order correlations between maternal and newborn iron measures (r = 0.07–0.10 for both Hb and SF; P ≤ 0.0001 due to the large number). We excluded 430 neonates with suggestion of inflammation [cord SF >370 μg/L, n = 208 and/or C-reactive protein (CRP) >5 mg/L, n = 233]. Piecewise linear regression analyses identified a threshold for maternal SF at which cord-blood SF was affected. For maternal SF below the threshold of 13.6 μg/L (β = 2.4; P = 0.001), cord SF was 0.17 SD lower than in neonates whose mothers had SF above the threshold (167 ± 75 vs. 179 ± 80 μg/L). The study confirmed that ID anemia remains common during pregnancy in rural southeastern China. Despite widespread maternal ID, however, iron nutrition seemed to meet fetal needs except when mothers were very iron deficient. The impact of somewhat lower cord SF on iron status later in infancy warrants further study. PMID:23014493

  10. Skeletal muscle involvement in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Limongelli, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Raffaella; Maddaloni, Valeria; Rea, Alessandra; Sarkozy, Anna; McKenna, William J

    2013-12-01

    The link between heart and skeletal muscle disorders is based on similar molecular, anatomical and clinical features, which are shared by the 'primary' cardiomyopathies and 'primary' neuromuscular disorders. There are, however, some peculiarities that are typical of cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders. Skeletal muscle weakness presenting at any age may indicate a primary neuromuscular disorder (associated with creatine kinase elevation as in dystrophinopathies), a mitochondrial disease (particularly if encephalopathy, ocular myopathy, retinitis, neurosensorineural deafness, lactic acidosis are present), a storage disorder (progressive exercise intolerance, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa, as in Danon disease), or metabolic disorders (hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperammonaemia or other specific biochemical abnormalities). In such patients, skeletal muscle weakness usually precedes the cardiomyopathy and dominates the clinical picture. Nevertheless, skeletal involvement may be subtle, and the first clinical manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder may be the occurrence of heart failure, conduction disorders or ventricular arrhythmias due to cardiomyopathy. ECG and echocardiogram, and eventually, a more detailed cardiovascular evaluation may be required to identify early cardiac involvement. Paediatric and adult cardiologists should be proactive in screening for neuromuscular and related disorders to enable diagnosis in probands and evaluation of families with a focus on the identification of those at risk of cardiac arrhythmia and emboli who may require specific prophylactic treatments, for example, pacemaker, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and anticoagulation. PMID:24149064

  11. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy a short review.

    PubMed

    Roshanzamir, Shahbaz; Showkathali, Refai

    2013-08-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM), otherwise cardiomyopathy,apical ballooning syndrome or broken heart syndrome is a reversible cardiomyopathy, predominantly occurs in post-menopausal women and commonly due to emotional or physical stress. Typically, patients present with chest pain and ST elevation or T wave inversion on their electrocardiogram mimicking acute coronary syndrome, but with normal or non-flow limiting coronary artery disease. Acute dyspnoea, hypotension and even cardiogenic shock may be the presenting feature of this condition. The wall motion abnormalities typically involve akinesia of the apex of the left ventricle with hyperkinesia of the base of the heart. Atypical forms of TCM have also recently been described. An urgent left ventriculogram or echocardiogram is the key investigation to identify this syndrome. Characteristically, there is only a limited release of cardiac enzymes disproportionate to the extent of regional wall motion abnormality. Transient right ventricular dysfunction may occur and is associated with more complications, longer hospitalisation and worse left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Recently, cardiac MRI has been increasingly used to diagnose this condition and to differentiate from acute coronary syndrome in those who have abnormal coronary arteries. Treatment is often supportive, however beta-blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocking agent are being used in routine clinical practice. The syndrome is usually spontaneously reversible and cardiovascular function returns to normal after a few weeks. This review article will elaborate on the pathophysiology, clinical features including the variant forms, latest diagnostic tools, management and prognosis of this condition. PMID:23642025

  12. Troponins, intrinsic disorder, and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Kong, Min J; Straight, Shelby; Pinto, Jose R; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac troponin is a dynamic complex of troponin C, troponin I, and troponin T (TnC, TnI, and TnT, respectively) found in the myocyte thin filament where it plays an essential role in cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in troponin subunits are found in inherited cardiomyopathies, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The highly dynamic nature of human cardiac troponin and presence of numerous flexible linkers in its subunits suggest that understanding of structural and functional properties of this important complex can benefit from the consideration of the protein intrinsic disorder phenomenon. We show here that mutations causing decrease in the disorder score in TnI and TnT are significantly more abundant in HCM and DCM than mutations leading to the increase in the disorder score. Identification and annotation of intrinsically disordered regions in each of the troponin subunits conducted in this study can help in better understanding of the roles of intrinsic disorder in regulation of interactomes and posttranslational modifications of these proteins. These observations suggest that disease-causing mutations leading to a decrease in the local flexibility of troponins can trigger a whole plethora of functional changes in the heart. PMID:27074551

  13. A Novel Approach to Evaluating the Iron and Folate Status of Women of Reproductive Age in Uzbekistan after 3 Years of Flour Fortification with Micronutrients

    PubMed Central

    Hund, Lauren; Northrop-Clewes, Christine A.; Nazario, Ronald; Suleymanova, Dilora; Mirzoyan, Lusine; Irisova, Munira; Pagano, Marcello; Valadez, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Uzbekistan 1996 Demographic Health Survey reported 60.4% of women of reproductive age (WRA) had low hemoglobin concentrations (<120 g/L), and anemia was an important public health problem. Fortification of wheat flour was identified as an appropriate intervention to address anemia due to the ubiquitous consumption of wheat flour. A National Flour Fortification Program (NFFP) was implemented in 2005. Methodology/Principal Findings After 3-years of the NFFP, a national survey using large country-lot quality assurance sampling was carried out to assess iron, folate, hemoglobin and inflammation status of WRA; the coverage and knowledge of the fortified first grade UzDonMakhsulot (UDM) flour/grey loaf program; and consumption habits of women to investigate the dietary factors associated with anemia. Estimated anemia prevalence was 34.4% (95% CI: 32.0, 36.7), iron depletion 47.5% (95% CI: 45.1, 49.9) and folate deficiency 28.8% (95% CI: 26.8, 30.8); the effect of inflammation was minimal (4% with CRP >5 mg/L). Severe anemia was more prevalent among folate deficient than iron depleted WRA. Presence of UDM first grade flour or the grey loaf was reported in 71.3% of households. Among WRA, 32.1% were aware of UDM fortification; only 3.7% mentioned the benefits of fortification and 12.5% understood causes of anemia. Consumption of heme iron-containing food (91%) and iron absorption enhancers (97%) was high, as was the consumption of iron absorption inhibitors (95%). Conclusions/Significance The NFFP coincided with a substantial decline in the prevalence of anemia. Folate deficiency was a stronger predictor of severe anemia than iron depletion. However, the prevalence of iron depletion was high, suggesting that women are not eating enough iron or iron absorption is inhibited. Fortified products were prevalent throughout Uzbekistan, though UDM flour must be adequately fortified and monitored in the future. Knowledge of fortification and anemia was low, suggesting

  14. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  15. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in a weimaraner

    PubMed Central

    Eason, Bryan D.; Leach, Stacey B.; Kuroki, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) was diagnosed postmortem in a weimaraner dog. Syncope, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death in this patient combined with the histopathological fatty tissue infiltration affecting the right ventricular myocardium are consistent with previous reports of ARVC in non-boxer dogs. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy has not been previously reported in weimaraners. PMID:26483577

  16. Nemaline myopathy with dilated cardiomyopathy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Gatayama, Ryohei; Ueno, Kentaro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Yanagi, Sadamitsu; Ueda, Hideaki; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Seiyo

    2013-06-01

    We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with nemaline myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. The combination of nemaline myopathy and cardiomyopathy is rare, and this is the first reported case of dilated cardiomyopathy associated with childhood-onset nemaline myopathy. A novel mutation, p.W358C, in ACTA1 was detected in this patient. An unusual feature of this case was that the patient's cardiac failure developed during early childhood with no delay of gross motor milestones. The use of a β-blocker did not improve his clinical course, and the patient died 6 months after diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Congenital nonprogressive nemaline myopathy is not necessarily a benign disorder: deterioration can occur early in the course of dilated cardiomyopathy with neuromuscular disease, and careful clinical evaluation is therefore necessary. PMID:23650303

  17. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Associated with Severe Hypothyroidism in an Elderly Female.

    PubMed

    Brenes-Salazar, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as stress cardiomyopathy, is a syndrome that affects predominantly postmenopausal women. Despite multiple described mechanisms, intense, neuroadrenergic myocardial stimulation appears to be the main trigger. Hyperthyroidism, but rarely hypothyroidism, has been described in association with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Herein, we present a case of stress cardiomyopathy in the setting of symptomatic hypothyroidism. PMID:27512537

  18. Prevention and reversal of severe mitochondrial cardiomyopathy by gene therapy in a mouse model of Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perdomini, Morgane; Belbellaa, Brahim; Monassier, Laurent; Reutenauer, Laurence; Messaddeq, Nadia; Cartier, Nathalie; Crystal, Ronald G; Aubourg, Patrick; Puccio, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac failure is the most common cause of mortality in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), a mitochondrial disease characterized by neurodegeneration, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and diabetes. FRDA is caused by reduced levels of frataxin (FXN), an essential mitochondrial protein involved in the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, bioenergetics imbalance, deficit of Fe-S cluster enzymes and mitochondrial iron overload occur in the myocardium of individuals with FRDA. No treatment exists as yet for FRDA cardiomyopathy. A conditional mouse model with complete frataxin deletion in cardiac and skeletal muscle (Mck-Cre-Fxn(L3/L-) mice) recapitulates most features of FRDA cardiomyopathy, albeit with a more rapid and severe course. Here we show that adeno-associated virus rh10 vector expressing human FXN injected intravenously in these mice fully prevented the onset of cardiac disease. Moreover, later administration of the frataxin-expressing vector, after the onset of heart failure, was able to completely reverse the cardiomyopathy of these mice at the functional, cellular and molecular levels within a few days. Our results demonstrate that cardiomyocytes with severe energy failure and ultrastructure disorganization can be rapidly rescued and remodeled by gene therapy and establish the preclinical proof of concept for the potential of gene therapy in treating FRDA cardiomyopathy.

  19. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  20. Phase I study using desferrioxamine and iron sorbitol citrate in an attempt to modulate the iron status of tumor cells to enhance doxorubicin activity.

    PubMed

    Voest, E E; Neijt, J P; Keunen, J E; Dekker, A W; van Asbeck, B S; Nortier, J W; Ros, F E; Marx, J J

    1993-01-01

    A novel approach to enhance the activity of doxorubicin is to increase the availability of cellular "chelatable" iron to participate in doxorubicin-mediated free-radical generation. To achieve this, we designed a regimen consisting of desferrioxamine (DFO, 50 mg/kg daily given as an i.v. infusion over 72 h) to increase cellular iron uptake. Thereafter, the combination of iron sorbitol citrate (ISC) and doxorubicin (as a single agent or as part of the CHOP regimen) was given. In a phase I study we investigated the toxicity of this regimen in nine patients with refractory malignant disease. Severe but reversible ocular toxicity (i.e., acute maculopathy) was observed in two patients. As these patients were the only ones who were pretreated with cisplatin, we caution against the use of DFO in cisplatin-pretreated patients. Severe phlebitis was encountered in five of nine patients. A partial remission was observed in two of four patients with refractory Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who were treated with DFO, ISC, and doxorubicin as part of the CHOP regimen. We conclude that pretreatment with DFO and iron sorbitol citrate may be of benefit in the treatment of malignancies with doxorubicin-containing regimens, but ocular toxicity and severe phlebitis limits the use of DFO in this approach. The attachment of DFO to biocompatible polymers may be a method of overcoming the observed toxicity and warrants further study. PMID:8431969

  1. Modeling Dilated Cardiomyopathies in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past hundred years, the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has provided tremendous insights into genetics and human biology. Drosophila-based research utilizes powerful, genetically-tractable approaches to identify new genes and pathways that potentially contribute to human diseases. New resources available in the fly research community have advanced the ability to examine genome-wide effects on cardiac function and facilitate the identification of structural, contractile, and signaling molecules that contribute to cardiomyopathies. This powerful model system continues to provide discoveries of novel genes and signaling pathways that are conserved among species and translatable to human pathophysiology. PMID:22863366

  2. [To the question of rational nutrition, micronutrient status correction, prevention and treatment of iron deficiency in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Tayupova, I M

    2015-01-01

    In the article the features of healthy nutrition in pregnant women suffering from iron deficiency has been discussed. The criteria for diagnosis of anemia during pregnancy, the stage of the disease development, the specifics of iron deficiency during gestation, the need in this trace element in pregnant women have been defined. The necessity of an adequate selection of a balanced diet during pregnancy complicated with anemia has been based. Iron content in food products along with the extent of absorption depending upon the origin of the product have been considered. The compounds that contribute to a better absorption of iron, as well as medicinal substances that prevent its absorption have been presented. Special attention is paid to the questions of preventative measures in preventing anemia in pregnant women. In addition to a balanced diet and iron preparations for treatment and prevention of anemia, the appointment of vitamin-mineral supplements and specialized foods for pregnant enriched with micronutrients has been substantiated.

  3. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Gillette, Thomas G.; Wang, Zhao V.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus are each increasing rapidly in our society. The majority of patients with diabetes succumb ultimately to heart disease, much of which stems from atherosclerotic disease and hypertension. However, cardiomyopathy can develop independent of elevated blood pressure or coronary artery disease, a process termed diabetic cardiomyopathy. This disorder is a complex diabetes-associated process characterized by significant changes in the physiology, structure, and mechanical function of the heart. Here, we review recently derived insights into mechanisms and molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21274425

  4. Micronutrient Fortified Milk Improves Iron Status, Anemia and Growth among Children 1–4 Years: A Double Masked, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sazawal, Sunil; Dhingra, Usha; Dhingra, Pratibha; Hiremath, Girish; Sarkar, Archana; Dutta, Arup; Menon, Venugopal P.; Black, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple micronutrient deficiencies are highly prevalent among preschool children and often lead to anemia and growth faltering. Given the limited success of supplementation and health education programs, fortification of foods could be a viable and sustainable option. We report results from a community based double-masked, randomized trial among children 1–4 years evaluating the effects of micronutrients (especially of zinc and iron) delivered through fortified milk on growth, anemia and iron status markers as part of a four group study design, running two studies simultaneously. Methods and Findings Enrolled children (n = 633) were randomly allocated to receive either micronutrients fortified milk (MN = 316) or control milk (Co = 317). Intervention of MN milk provided additional 7.8 mg zinc, 9.6 mg iron, 4.2 µg selenium, 0.27 mg copper, 156 µg vitamin A, 40.2 mg vitamin C, and 7.5 mg vitamin E per day (three serves) for one year. Anthropometry was recorded at baseline, mid- and end-study. Hematological parameters were estimated at baseline and end-study. Both groups were comparable at baseline. Compliance was over 85% and did not vary between groups. Compared to children consuming Co milk, children consuming MN milk showed significant improvement in weight gain (difference of mean: 0.21 kg/year; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12 to 0.31, p<0.001) and height gain (difference of mean: 0.51 cm/year; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.75, p<0.001). Mean hemoglobin (Hb) (difference of 13.6 g/L; 95% CI 11.1 to 16.0, p<0.001) and serum ferritin levels (difference of 7.9 µg/L; 95% CI 5.4 to 10.5, p<0.001) also improved. Children in MN group had 88% (odds ratio = 0.12, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.20, p<0.001) lower risk of iron deficiency anemia. Conclusions/Significance Milk provides an acceptable and effective vehicle for delivery of specific micronutrients, especially zinc and iron. Micronutrient bundle improved growth and iron status and reduced anemia in children

  5. Evolving Approaches to Genetic Evaluation of Specific Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Teo, Loon Yee Louis; Moran, Rocio T; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of the genetic basis of cardiomyopathy has expanded significantly over the past 2 decades. The increasing availability, shortening diagnostic time, and lowering costs of genetic testing have provided researchers and physicians with the opportunity to identify the underlying genetic determinants for thousands of genetic disorders, including inherited cardiomyopathies, in effort to improve patient morbidities and mortality. As such, genetic testing has advanced from basic scientific research to clinical application and has been incorporated as part of patient evaluations for suspected inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic evaluation framework of inherited cardiomyopathies typically encompasses careful evaluation of family history, genetic counseling, clinical screening of family members, and if appropriate, molecular genetic testing. This review summarizes the genetics, current guideline recommendations, and evidence supporting the genetic evaluation framework of five hereditary forms of cardiomyopathy: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). PMID:26472190

  6. Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines during Immune Stimulation: Modulation of Iron Status and Red Blood Cell Profile

    PubMed Central

    Koorts, A. M.; Levay, P. F.; Becker, P. J.; Viljoen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Forty-eight patients were subdivided according to C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, resulting in 19 patients with normal (2.8 ± 2.8 mg/L) and 29 with elevated (82.2 ± 76.2 mg/L) CRP levels. The elevated CRP group had iron and red blood cell (RBC) profiles characteristic of chronic immune stimulation (CIS), and the normal CRP group, profiles of true iron deficiency. Normal relationships between storage iron, bioavailable iron, and RBC indices were absent in the elevated CRP group—implying the role of iron as major determinant of the RBC profile to be diminished during CIS. The elevated CRP group had significant increases in proinflammatory cytokines (INF-γ, TNF-α, Il-1β, Il-6, and Il-8). Anti-inflammatory cytokine levels were normal, except for Il-10, supporting previous indications that Il-10 contributes to reducing bioavailable iron. Regression analysis suggested decreases in transferrin to be related to increases in Il-8 and an increase in ferritin to be related to a decrease in Il-12 levels. TGF-β levels were positively related to transferrin and negatively to ferritin. PMID:21547258

  7. Genetics Home Reference: familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiomyopathy is a heart condition characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle . Thickening usually occurs ... also lead to symptoms of the condition. Cardiac hypertrophy often begins in adolescence or young adulthood, although ...

  8. Left Ventricular Noncompaction: A Distinct Genetic Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Favalli, Valentina; Narula, Nupoor; Serio, Alessandra; Grasso, Maurizia

    2016-08-30

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) describes a ventricular wall anatomy characterized by prominent left ventricular (LV) trabeculae, a thin compacted layer, and deep intertrabecular recesses. Individual variability is extreme, and trabeculae represent a sort of individual "cardioprinting." By itself, the diagnosis of LVNC does not coincide with that of a "cardiomyopathy" because it can be observed in healthy subjects with normal LV size and function, and it can be acquired and is reversible. Rarely, LVNC is intrinsically part of a cardiomyopathy; the paradigmatic examples are infantile tafazzinopathies. When associated with LV dilation and dysfunction, hypertrophy, or congenital heart disease, the genetic cause may overlap. The prevalence of LVNC in healthy athletes, its possible reversibility, and increasing diagnosis in healthy subjects suggests cautious use of the term LVNC cardiomyopathy, which describes the morphology but not the functional profile of the cardiomyopathy. PMID:27561770

  9. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T.; Hauptman, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  10. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T; Hauptman, Paul J; Stolker, Joshua M

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  11. Mechanical aberrations in hypetrophic cardiomyopathy: emerging concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, Dimitrios; Tzimagiorgis, Georgios; Efthimiadis, Georgios K.; Karvounis, Haralambos

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common monogenic disorder in cardiology. Despite important advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, it is not clear how flaws in individual sarcomere components are responsible for the observed phenotype. The aim of this article is to provide a brief interpretative analysis of some currently proposed pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with a special emphasis on alterations in the cardiac mechanical properties. PMID:26347658

  12. Dilated cardiomyopathy due to a phospholamban duplication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa M; Addonizio, Linda J; Chung, Wendy K

    2014-10-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterised by dilation and impaired systolic function. We present the case of a child with dilated cardiomyopathy caused by a 624 kb duplication of 6q22.31, which includes the phospholamban gene. The patient also has failure to thrive and developmental delay due to complex cytogenetic abnormalities including a 5p15 deletion associated with Cri du Chat and an 11p15 duplication associated with Russell-Silver syndrome. PMID:24451198

  13. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A New Perspective in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Marmoush, Fady Y.; Barbour, Mohamad F.; Noonan, Thomas E.; Al-Qadi, Mazen O.

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is an entity of reversible cardiomyopathy known for its association with physical or emotional stress and may mimic myocardial infarction. We report an exceedingly rare case of albuterol-induced TCM with moderate asthma exacerbation. An interesting association that may help in understanding the etiology of TCM in the asthmatic population. Although the prognosis of TCM is excellent, it is crucial to recognize beta agonists as a potential stressor. PMID:26246918

  14. Obesity Cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiologic Factors and Nosologic Reevaluation.

    PubMed

    Bhatheja, Samit; Panchal, Hemang B; Ventura, Hector; Paul, Timir K

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease in populations with obesity is a major concern because of its epidemic proportion. Obesity leads to the development of cardiomyopathy directly via inflammatory mediators and indirectly by obesity-induced hypertension, diabetes and coronary artery diseases. The aim of this review article is to re-visit the available knowledge and the evidence on pathophysiologic mechanisms of obesity-related cardiomyopathy and to propose its placement into a specific category of myocardial disease. PMID:27524223

  15. [Lipoprotein lipase and diabetic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yu; Yin, Wei-Dong; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-02-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins into free fatty acids (FFA) to provide energy for cardiac tissue. During diabetes, cardiac energy supply is insufficient due to defected utilization of glucose. As a compensation of cardiac energy supply, FFAs are released through the hydrolysis of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and chylomicrons (CM) due to activation of LPL activity. In diabetic patients, activated LPL activity and elevated FFAs result in the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species and lipids in myocardium and potentially induce the diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms of myocardial LPL and the pathogenesis of DCM induced by LPL and provides novel therapeutic targets and pathways for DCM. PMID:24873138

  16. Stimulant-related Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Mike; Riguzzi, Christine; Frenkel, Oron; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a rare but increasingly recognized mimic of acute coronary syndrome. Patients present with angina,ST-segment changes on electrocardiogram (both elevations and depressions),and rapid rises in cardiac biomarkers. Many kinds of stressful events have been associated with TC, but only a handful of drug-related cases have previously been reported. We describe the case of a 58-year-old woman who developed TC 2 days after crack cocaine use, a diagnosis first suggested as bedside echocardiography in the emergency department.Recognition of the classic echocardiographic appearance of TC—apical hypokinesis causing “ballooning” of the left ventricle during systole—may greatly assist providers in the early identification of this condition.

  17. Molecular Pathology of Dilated Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Pathak, S K; Kukreja, R C; Hess, M

    1996-02-01

    The term idiopathic, defined as being of unknown etiology or mechanism, is no longer applicable to the dilated cardiomyopathies. The tools of molecular biology and clinical investigation have made significant progress, and it is now to the rare and exceptional case that one is forced to apply the term idiopathic. Further, having arrived at more precise cause, direct therapeutic intervention will become possible. The concept of gene insertion and "genetic therapy" is under active investigation. Unfortunately, the significant advances in the cause and disease mechanisms of DCM have not been matched in therapeutics. With few exceptions, we indirectly treat the DCMs by managing the CHF syndrome. However, several important points have emerged. The concept of LV afterload reduction is valid and efficacious. The use of vasodilator therapy has significantly reduced both mortality and morbidity and, in certain forms of cardiomyopathy (e.g., hypertensive, alcoholic, and doxorubicin-related), have significantly altered hemodynamics and permitted the injured heart to heal and return to a near normal functional state. However, as much as we want to congratulate ourselves on the progress bought with the use of vasodilators and ACE inhibitors, one must keep in mind that under the best of circumstances, the DCMs still carry an unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. A 40% to 50% 4- to 5-year mortality rate is depressing. Herein lies the challenge. With the significant progress in pathogenesis and etiology, we now stand at the threshold of new, innovative advances in therapeutics. These new concepts in both therapeutics and prevention will require courage, dedication, and hard work. But bit by bit, these seemingly insolvable problems will yield to the discipline and imagination of the investigator. The DCMs will continue to be a challenging problem for future investigators. Progress has been dramatic, and it should continue even at an accelerated pace as we approach the twenty

  18. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Dundon, B K; Puri, R; Leong, D P; Worthley, M I

    2008-07-01

    Lightning strike is the most common environmental cause of sudden cardiac death, but may also be associated with a myriad of injuries to various organ systems. Direct myocardial injury may be manifest as electrocardiographic alterations or elevation in cardiac-specific isoenzymes; however, significant electrical cardiac trauma appears uncommon. A case is presented of severe acute cardiomyopathy in a "Takotsubo" distribution causing cardiogenic shock following lightning strike in a previously healthy 37-year-old woman. Although rarely identified in this context, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (also known as "transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome") is characterised by transient cardiac dysfunction, electrocardiographic changes that may mimic acute myocardial infarction and minimal release of cardiac-specific enzymes in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. The condition is associated with a substantial female bias (up to 90% of cases) in reported series, and despite occasionally dramatic presentations recovery of left ventricular function is almost universal over days to weeks. In rare instances, however, the syndrome has been associated with more catastrophic complications such as papillary muscle or cardiac free wall rupture, necessitating emergency surgical intervention to preserve life. In clinical practice, non-lethal lightning strike-induced cardiac injury is frequently associated with small elevations of cardiac isoenzymes without overt clinical sequelae; however, the incidence of silent myocardial mechanical dysfunction remains unknown. Cases such as the one presented highlight the potential for serious, albeit usually transient, cardiac sequelae from lightning strike injury and remind us that our mothers' advice to remain indoors during thunderstorms is probably worth heeding. PMID:18573973

  19. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Dundon, Benjamin K; Puri, Rishi; Leong, Darryl P; Worthley, Matthew Ian

    2009-01-01

    Lightning strike is the most common environmental cause of sudden cardiac death, but it may also be associated with a myriad of injuries to various organ systems. Direct myocardial injury may be manifest as electrocardiographic alterations or elevation in cardiac-specific isoenzymes; however, significant electrical cardiac trauma appears uncommon. A case is presented of severe acute cardiomyopathy in a "Takotsubo" distribution causing cardiogenic shock following lightning strike in a previously healthy 37-year-old woman. Although rarely identified in this context, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (also known as "transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome") is characterised by transient cardiac dysfunction, electrocardiographic changes that may mimic acute myocardial infarction and minimal release of cardiac-specific enzymes in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. The condition is associated with a substantial female bias (up to 90% of cases) in reported series, and despite occasionally dramatic presentations recovery of left ventricular function is almost universal over days to weeks. In rare instances, however, the syndrome has been associated with more catastrophic complications such as papillary muscle or cardiac free wall rupture, necessitating emergency surgical intervention to preserve life. In clinical practice, non-lethal lightning strike-induced cardiac injury is frequently associated with small elevations of cardiac isoenzymes without overt clinical sequelae; however, the incidence of silent myocardial mechanical dysfunction remains unknown. Cases such as the one presented highlight the potential for serious, albeit usually transient, cardiac sequelae from lightning strike injury and remind us that our mothers' advice to remain indoors during thunderstorms is probably worth heeding. PMID:21686980

  20. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 65. McKenna WJ, Elliott P. ... eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 60. McMurray JJV, Pfeffer MA. ...

  1. Chagas Cardiomyopathy in the Context of the Chronic Disease Transition

    PubMed Central

    Hidron, Alicia I.; Gilman, Robert H.; Justiniano, Juan; Blackstock, Anna J.; LaFuente, Carlos; Selum, Walter; Calderon, Martiza; Verastegui, Manuela; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Valencia, Eduardo; Tornheim, Jeffrey A.; O'Neal, Seth; Comer, Robert; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Bern, Caryn

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chagas disease have migrated to cities, where obesity, hypertension and other cardiac risk factors are common. Methodology/Principal Findings The study included adult patients evaluated by the cardiology service in a public hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Data included risk factors for T. cruzi infection, medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and contact 9 months after initial data collection to ascertain mortality. Serology and PCR for Trypanosoma cruzi were performed. Of 394 participants, 251 (64%) had confirmed T. cruzi infection by serology. Among seropositive participants, 109 (43%) had positive results by conventional PCR; of these, 89 (82%) also had positive results by real time PCR. There was a high prevalence of hypertension (64%) and overweight (body mass index [BMI] >25; 67%), with no difference by T. cruzi infection status. Nearly 60% of symptomatic congestive heart failure was attributed to Chagas cardiomyopathy; mortality was also higher for seropositive than seronegative patients (p = 0.05). In multivariable models, longer residence in an endemic province, residence in a rural area and poor housing conditions were associated with T. cruzi infection. Male sex, increasing age and poor housing were independent predictors of Chagas cardiomyopathy severity. Males and participants with BMI ≤25 had significantly higher likelihood of positive PCR results compared to females or overweight participants. Conclusions Chagas cardiomyopathy remains an important cause of congestive heart failure in this hospital population, and should be evaluated in the context of the epidemiological transition that has increased risk of obesity, hypertension and chronic cardiovascular disease. PMID:20502520

  2. The use of radiofrequency catheter ablation to cure dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S B; Lobban, J H; Reddy, S; Hoelper, M; Palmer, D L

    1997-01-01

    Incessant supraventricular tachycardia can cause a dilated cardiomyopathy. This article discusses the case of a 55-year-old woman whose cardiomyopathy was reversed when she underwent successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of a unifocal atrial tachycardia. PMID:9197188

  3. Iron metabolism and iron supplementation in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Heinz; Evstatiev, Rayko; Kornek, Gabriela; Aapro, Matti; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Fridrik, Michael; Geissler, Dietmar; Geissler, Klaus; Gisslinger, Heinz; Koller, Elisabeth; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Lang, Alois; Rumpold, Holger; Steurer, Michael; Kamali, Houman; Link, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency-associated anemia are common complications in cancer patients. Most iron deficient cancer patients present with functional iron deficiency (FID), a status with adequate storage iron, but insufficient iron supply for erythroblasts and other iron dependent tissues. FID is the consequence of the cancer-associated cytokine release, while in absolute iron deficiency iron stores are depleted resulting in similar but often more severe symptoms of insufficient iron supply. Here we present a short review on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, clinical symptoms, and treatment of iron deficiency in cancer patients. Special emphasis is given to intravenous iron supplementation and on the benefits and limitations of different formulations. Based on these considerations and recommendations from current international guidelines we developed recommendations for clinical practice and classified the level of evidence and grade of recommendation according to the principles of evidence-based medicine.

  4. Diagnostic and prognostic value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) is recognised as a valuable clinical tool which in a single scan setting can assess ventricular volumes and function, myocardial fibrosis, iron loading, flow quantification, tissue characterisation and myocardial perfusion imaging. The advent of CMR using extrinsic and intrinsic contrast-enhanced protocols for tissue characterisation have dramatically changed the non-invasive work-up of patients with suspected or known cardiomyopathy. Although the technique initially focused on the in vivo identification of myocardial necrosis through the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) technique, recent work highlighted the ability of CMR to provide more detailed in vivo tissue characterisation to help establish a differential diagnosis of the underlying aetiology, to exclude an ischaemic substrate and to provide important prognostic markers. The potential application of CMR in the clinical approach of a patient with suspected non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy is discussed in this review. PMID:22857649

  5. Could it be Quetiapine-induced Peripartum Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Mandeep; Shakur, Rameen; Learner, Hazel I; Deaner, Andrew; Howard, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Peri-partum Cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare and life threatening complication of pregnancy. There are only two cases registered with the World Health Organization of cases of cardiomyopathy in patients taking Quetiapine. Here we discuss an interesting case of potential Quetiapine induced cardiomyopathy.

  6. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  7. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated hyperinsulinaemia can promote the development of a specific form of cardiomyopathy that is independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, this form of cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed nations, and the prevalence of this condition is rising in parallel with increases in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of note, female patients seem to be particularly susceptible to the development of this complication of metabolic disease. The diabetic cardiomyopathy observed in insulin-resistant or hyperinsulinaemic states is characterized by impaired myocardial insulin signalling, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, impaired calcium homeostasis, abnormal coronary microcirculation, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and maladaptive immune responses. These pathophysiological changes result in oxidative stress, fibrosis, hypertrophy, cardiac diastolic dysfunction and eventually systolic heart failure. This Review highlights a surge in diabetic cardiomyopathy research, summarizes current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition and explores potential preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26678809

  8. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy; Summary of 41 Years

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Ugur; Aydogdu, Sinan; Abboud, Hanna Emily

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have an increased risk for development of cardiomyopathy, even in the absence of well known risk factors like coronary artery disease and hypertension. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was first recognized approximately four decades ago. To date, several pathophysiological mechanisms thought to be responsible for this new entity have also been recognized. In the presence of hyperglycemia, non-enzymatic glycosylation of several proteins, reactive oxygen species formation, and fibrosis lead to impairment of cardiac contractile functions. Impaired calcium handling, increased fatty acid oxidation, and increased neurohormonal activation also contribute to this process. Demonstration of left ventricular hypertrophy, early diastolic and late systolic dysfunction by sensitive techniques, help us to diagnose diabetic cardiomyopathy. Traditional treatment of heart failure is beneficial in diabetic cardiomyopathy, but specific strategies for prevention or treatment of cardiac dysfunction in diabetic patients has not been clarified yet. In this review we will discuss clinical and experimental studies focused on pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy, and summarize diagnostic and therapeutic approaches developed towards this entity. PMID:26240579

  9. Histochemical and enzymehistochemical alterations during experimental cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kirvalidze, I; Khetsuriani, R; Jorbenadze, T; Shukakidze, A; Kipiani, T

    2006-05-01

    Investigation of ethiology, pathogenesis, morphogenesis, pathokinesis, treatment and prevention of cardiomyopathy is one of the most important problems of cardiology. Last years many scientific forums have been devoted to cardiomyopathy problems and still many issues remain disputable and needs further investigation and definition. In particular, investigation of metabolic processes in cardiac muscle seems of great importance. Obtained data will promote elaboration of adequate means toward the correction of cardiac decompensation during cardiomyopathy. The main goal of present study was the investigation of oxidation-reduction and electron transport associated protein activity in myocardium during experimental cardiomyopathy. Experiments were carried out on 30 male rats (180 - 200 g weight). Based on histological, histochemical, enzymehistological investigations conclusion has been made that during experimental autoimmune cardiomyopathy activity of oxidation-reduction and electron transport enzymes is sharply decreased along with the decrease of ascorbic acid and tiny granule glycogen amount (with altered topographic distribution) determining energy deficiency and weakening of cardiac muscle contractile function. It is possible to consider that the present study will open the way for future research and prompt us to select optimal therapeutic agents. PMID:16783088

  10. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies.

  11. [Study of the factors determining an unexpected occurrecne of Chagas cardiomyopathy in Sucre, Bolivia].

    PubMed

    De Muynck, A; Muñoz, R; Manirankunda, L; Pizzaro, J C; Gutierrez, J

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this case-control study carried out between February 1, 1994 and December 22, 1994 at the "Instituto de Gastroenterologia Boliviano-Japonés" in Sucre, Bolivia was to determine risk factors for chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in adult patients with positive serological tests for Trypanosoma cruzi. A total of 196 subjects were included. Inclusion criteria were positive serological tests for Trypanosoma cruzi, residence in the city of Sucre, Bolivia for at least 3 months, and age over 14 years. There were 62 cases presenting electrocardiographic findings consistent with Chagas cardiomyopathy and 134 controls presenting normal electrocardiographic findings. Both cases and controls underwent a standardized protocol including physical examination and laboratory tests. Interviews were set up to evaluate personal and familial history of Chagas disease, socioeconomic status, and presence of Triatoma infestans in the home. Bivariate analysis of data indicated that Chagas cardiomyopathy was associated with the following risk factors: heart rate (p < 0.05), fecaloma (p < 0.05), occupation requiring strenuous physical exertion (p < 0.001), proximity with domestic animals (p < 0.005), especially pigs (p < 0.005), dwelling features including outbuildings, more than 2 bedrooms, and inside ceilings (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following risk factors: occupation requiring strenuous physical exertion (p < 0.005), a yard around the house (p < 0.05), and inside ceilings (p < 0.05). The results of this study show that prevention of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in Sucre, Bolivia will depend on improvement of living conditions.

  12. Prevalence, Clinical Profile, Iron Status, and Subject-Specific Traits for Excessive Erythrocytosis in Andean Adults Living Permanently at 3,825 Meters Above Sea Level

    PubMed Central

    De Ferrari, Aldo; Miranda, J. Jaime; Gilman, Robert H.; Dávila-Román, Victor G.; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Rivera-Ch, Maria; Huicho, Luis; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Wise, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excessive erythrocytosis (EE) is a prevalent condition in populations living at high altitudes (> 2,500 m above sea level). Few large population-based studies have explored the association between EE and multiple subject-specific traits including oxygen saturation, iron status indicators, and pulmonary function. METHODS: We enrolled a sex-stratified and age-stratified sample of 1,065 high-altitude residents aged ≥ 35 years from Puno, Peru (3,825 m above sea level) and conducted a standardized questionnaire and physical examination that included spirometry, pulse oximetry, and a blood sample for multiple clinical markers. Our primary objectives were to estimate the prevalence of EE, characterize the clinical profile and iron status indicators of subjects with EE, and describe subject-specific traits associated with EE. RESULTS: Overall prevalence of EE was 4.5% (95% CI, 3.3%-6.0%). Oxygen saturation was significantly lower among EE than non-EE group subjects (85.3% vs 90.1%, P < .001) but no difference was found in iron status indicators between both groups (P > .09 for all values). In multivariable logistic regression, we found that age ≥ 65 years (OR = 2.45, 95% CI, 1.16-5.09), male sex (3.86, 1.78-9.08), having metabolic syndrome (2.66, 1.27-5.75) or being overweight (5.20, 1.95-16.77), pulse oximetry < 85% (14.90, 6.43-34.90), and % predicted FVC < 80% (13.62, 4.40-41.80) were strongly associated with EE. Attributable fractions for EE were greatest for being overweight (26.7%), followed by male sex (21.5%), pulse oximetry < 85% (16.4%), having metabolic syndrome (14.4%), and % predicted FVC < 80% (9.3%). CONCLUSIONS: We found a lower prevalence of EE than in previous reports in the Peruvian Andes. Although the presence of hypoxemia and decreased vital capacity were strongly associated with excessive erythrocytosis, being overweight or having metabolic syndrome were associated with an important fraction of cases in our study population. PMID

  13. Peripartum cardiomyopathy – case series

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gowri Sayi; Bhupali, Ashok; Prasad, Sayi; Patil, Ajit N.; Deka, Yashodhan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To study the pattern of presentation, course of disease and outcome of pregnancy in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy. Methods A prospective study of sixteen cases of PPCM was conducted at Apple Saraswati Multispecialty Hospital and Dr. D.Y. Patil Medical College and Hospital, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India from January 2006 to December 2012. Data included age distribution, parity, gestational age, symptoms and risk factors. Medical management and pregnancy outcome were documented. Serial echocardiography data was compiled for a period of one year. Results In our study 9/16 (56%) were primigravidae, 4/16 (25%) had pre-eclamsia and 6/16 (35%) had co-existing hypertension. The difference in Echocardiography parameters observed between recovered and non-recovered patients was significant: Left Ventricular End diastolic dimension (5.6 cm vs 6.06 cm), Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (28.7% vs 22.4%) and Left Ventricular fractional shortening (17.5% vs 13.4%). Thirteen out of sixteen patients were followed up for a period of one year out of which 61% (8/13) patients recovered completely. There was one mortality. Conclusion PPCM is a diagnosis of exclusion. Majority were young primigravidae presenting postnatally. Pre-eclampsia and hypertension were risk factors. ECHO parameters were reliable predictors of recovery. Future pregnancies are better avoided. PMID:24814122

  14. Electrocardiographic predictors of peripartum cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karaye, Kamilu M; Karaye, Kamilu M; Lindmark, Krister; Henein, Michael Y; Lindmark, Krister; Henein, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To identify potential electrocardiographic predictors of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Methods: This was a case–control study carried out in three hospitals in Kano, Nigeria. Logistic regression models and a risk score were developed to determine electrocardiographic predictors of PPCM. Results: A total of 54 PPCM and 77 controls were consecutively recruited after satisfying the inclusion criteria. After controlling for confounding variables, a rise in heart rate of one beat/minute increased the risk of PPCM by 6.4% (p = 0.001), while the presence of ST–T-wave changes increased the odds of PPCM 12.06-fold (p < 0.001). In the patients, QRS duration modestly correlated (r = 0.4; p < 0.003) with left ventricular dimensions and end-systolic volume index, and was responsible for 19.9% of the variability of the latter (R2 = 0.199; p = 0.003). A risk score of ≥ 2, developed by scoring 1 for each of the three ECG disturbances (tachycardia, ST–T-wave abnormalities and QRS duration), had a sensitivity of 85.2%, specificity of 64.9%, negative predictive value of 86.2% and area under the curve of 83.8% (p < 0.0001) for potentially predicting PPCM. Conclusion In postpartum women, using the risk score could help to streamline the diagnosis of PPCM with significant accuracy, prior to confirmatory investigations PMID:27213852

  15. Iron, radiation, and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R G; Kalkwarf, D R

    1990-01-01

    Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer. PMID:2269234

  16. X-linked cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.J.; Sillence, D.O.; Mulley, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Two major loci of X-linked cardiomyopathy have been mapped by linkage analysis. The gene for X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is mapped to the dystrophin locus at Xp21, while Barth syndrome has been localised to distal Xq28. XLCM usually presents in juvenile males with no skeletal disease but decreased dystrophin in cardiac muscle. Barth syndrome most often presents in infants and is characterized by skeletal myopathy, short stature and neutropenia in association with cardiomyopathy of variable severity. Prior to carrier or prenatal diagnosis in a family, delineation of the cardiomyopathy locus involved is essential. We report the linkage mapping of a large kindred in which several male infants have died with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There is a family history of unexplained death of infant males less than 6 months old over 4 generations. Features of Barth syndrome such as short stature, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia have not been observed. Genotyping at 10 marker loci in Xq28 has revealed significant pairwise lod scores with the cardiomyopathy phenotype at DXS52 (Z=2.21 at {theta}=0.0), at markers p26 and p39 near DXS15 (Z=2.30 at {theta}=0.0) and at F8C (Z=2.24 at {theta}=0.0). A recombinant detected with DXS296 defines the proximal limit to the localization. No recombinants were detected at any of the loci distal to DXS296. The most distal marker in Xq28, DXS1108, is within 500 kb of the telomere. As the gene in this family is localized to Xq28, it is possible that this disorder is an allelic variant at the Barth syndrome locus.

  17. An exploratory study of the associations between maternal iron status in pregnancy and childhood wheeze and atopy.

    PubMed

    Nwaru, Bright I; Hayes, Helen; Gambling, Lorraine; Craig, Leone C A; Allan, Keith; Prabhu, Nanda; Turner, Steven W; McNeill, Geraldine; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Seaton, Anthony; McArdle, Harry J; Devereux, Graham

    2014-12-28

    Maternal nutritional status during pregnancy has been reported to be associated with childhood asthma and atopic disease. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children has reported associations between reduced umbilical cord Fe status and childhood wheeze and eczema; however, follow-up was short and lung function was not measured. In the present study, the associations between maternal Fe status during pregnancy and childhood outcomes in the first 10 years of life were investigated in a subgroup of 157 mother-child pairs from a birth cohort with complete maternal, fetal ultrasound, blood and child follow-up data. Maternal Fe intake was assessed using FFQ at 32 weeks of gestation and Hb concentrations and serum Fe status (ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor and TfR-F (transferrin receptor:ferritin) index) were measured at 11 weeks of gestation and at delivery. Maternal Fe intake, Hb concentrations and serum Fe status were found to be not associated with fetal or birth measurements. Unit increases in first-trimester maternal serum TfR concentrations (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.05, 1.99) and TfR-F index (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.10, 1.82) (i.e. decreasing Fe status) were found to be associated with an increased risk of wheeze, while unit increases in serum ferritin concentrations (i.e., increasing Fe status) were found to be associated with increases in standardised mean peak expiratory flow (PEF) (β 0.25, 95% CI 0.09, 0.42) and forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) (β 0.20, 95% CI 0.08, 0.32) up to 10 years of age. Increasing maternal serum TfR-F index at delivery was found to be associated with an increased risk of atopic sensitisation (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02, 1.79). The results of the present study suggest that reduced maternal Fe status during pregnancy is adversely associated with childhood wheeze, lung function and atopic sensitisation, justifying further studies on maternal Fe status and childhood asthma and atopic disease.

  18. Cardiomyopathy from 1,1-Difluoroethane Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suwen; Joginpally, Tejaswini; Kim, David; Yadava, Mrinal; Norgais, Konchok; Laird-Fick, Heather S

    2016-10-01

    Consumer aerosol products can be inhaled for their psychoactive effects, but with attendant adverse health effects including "sudden sniffing death." Cardiomyopathy has rarely been described in association with 1,1-difluoroethane (DFE), a common aerosol propellant. We report a 33-year-old male who developed acute myocardial injury and global hypokinesis along with rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, and fulminant hepatitis after 2 days' nearly continuous huffing. Workup for other causes, including underlying coronary artery disease, was negative. His cardiac function improved over time. The exact mechanism of DFE's effects is uncertain but may include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, coronary vasospasm, or direct cellular toxicity.

  19. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  20. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: can hearts really break?

    PubMed

    Farris, Cindy; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise; Kanayama, Tiffanie

    2014-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM), or broken-heart syndrome, is a form of cardiomyopathy (CM) that is significantly different from other common types. This form of CM occurs spontaneously and can be easily reversed. TCM is seen primarily in postmenopausal women with a recent stressful event. Patients with TCM often present with symptoms suggestive of a myocardial infarction. Home health-care and hospice clinicians interact frequently with caregivers and other family members who are living under stressful circumstances. It is important that home care clinicians be familiar with TCM and understand the relationship that may exist between stress, stressful events, triggers, and TCM. PMID:24978575

  1. Cardiomyopathy from 1,1-Difluoroethane Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suwen; Joginpally, Tejaswini; Kim, David; Yadava, Mrinal; Norgais, Konchok; Laird-Fick, Heather S

    2016-10-01

    Consumer aerosol products can be inhaled for their psychoactive effects, but with attendant adverse health effects including "sudden sniffing death." Cardiomyopathy has rarely been described in association with 1,1-difluoroethane (DFE), a common aerosol propellant. We report a 33-year-old male who developed acute myocardial injury and global hypokinesis along with rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, and fulminant hepatitis after 2 days' nearly continuous huffing. Workup for other causes, including underlying coronary artery disease, was negative. His cardiac function improved over time. The exact mechanism of DFE's effects is uncertain but may include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, coronary vasospasm, or direct cellular toxicity. PMID:26613951

  2. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a college athlete.

    PubMed

    Simons, S M; Moriarity, J

    1992-12-01

    The greatest catastrophy in sports is an athlete's unexpected sudden death. Identifying those athletes at risk remains a great challenge to physicians performing preseason examinations. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common cause of nontraumatic sudden death in athletes. Most cases of this diseased heart are diagnosed easily by echocardiography. The case presented exemplifies the attention to detail required to differentiate the borderline diseased heart from the conditioned athletic heart. Once a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is made, further participation in intense physical exercise is discouraged. This recommendation is necessary despite the unknown relative sudden death risk for the minimal criteria cases.

  3. Extruded rice grains fortified with zinc, iron, and vitamin A increase zinc status of Thai school children when incorporated into a school lunch program.

    PubMed

    Pinkaew, Siwaporn; Winichagoon, Pattanee; Hurrell, Richard F; Wegmuller, Rita

    2013-03-01

    Iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), and vitamin A (VA) deficiencies are common among children in developing countries and often occur in the same individual. Rice is widely consumed in the developing countries of Asia and the low phytate in polished rice makes it ideal for Zn and Fe fortification. Triple-fortified rice grains with Zn, Fe, and VA were produced using hot extrusion technology. The main objective of the present study was to determine the impact of triple-fortified extruded rice on Zn status in school children in Southern Thailand. Although serum zinc was the main outcome indicator, Fe and VA status were also assessed. School children with low serum zinc (n = 203) were randomized to receive either triple-fortified rice (n = 101) or natural control rice (n = 102) as a component of school lunch meals for 5 mo. Serum Zn, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, serum retinol, and C-reactive protein were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. After the intervention, serum Zn increased (P < 0.05) in both the fortification (11.3 ± 1.3 μmol/L) and control (10.6 ± 1.4 μmol/L) groups, most likely due to the proper implementation of the school lunch and school milk programs, with the increase greater in the group receiving the triple-fortified rice (P < 0.05). Because the children were not Fe or VA deficient at baseline, there was no change in Fe or VA status. We conclude that Zn fortification of extruded rice grains is efficacious and can be used to improve Zn status in school children. PMID:23303870

  4. Clinical utility of natriuretic peptides and troponins in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Devin W; Buttan, Anshu; Siegel, Robert J; Rader, Florian

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is based on clinical, echocardiographic and in some cases genetic findings. However, prognostication remains limited except in the subset of patients with high-risk indicators for sudden cardiac death. Additional methods are needed for risk stratification and to guide clinical management in HCM. We reviewed the available data regarding natriuretic peptides and troponins in HCM. Plasma levels of natriuretic peptides, and to a lesser extent serum levels of troponins, correlate with established disease markers, including left ventricular thickness, symptom status, and left ventricular hemodynamics by Doppler measurements. As a reflection of left ventricular filling pressure, natriuretic peptides may provide an objective measure of the efficacy of a specific therapy. Both natriuretic peptides and troponins predict clinical risk in HCM independently of established risk factors, and their prognostic power is additive. Routine measurement of biomarker levels therefore may be useful in the clinical evaluation and management of patients with HCM.

  5. [Insulin combined with selenium inhibit p38MAPK/CBP pathway and suppresses cardiomyocyte apoptosis in rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianjiao; Liu, Yong; Deng, Yating; Meng, Jin; Li, Ping; Xu, Xiaoli; Zeng, Jurong

    2016-07-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of insulin in combination with selenium on p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase/CREB-binding protein (p38MAPK/CBP) pathway in rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy. Methods Fifty SD rats were randomly grouped into control group, diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) group, diabetic cardiomyopathy with insulin treatment (DCM-In) group, diabetic cardiomyopathy with selenium treatment (DCM-Se) group, and diabetic cardiomyopathy with insulin and selenium combination treatment (DCM-In-Se) group. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle. TUNEL staining was used to detect cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Western blotting was used to examine the levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, Bax, Bcl-2, p38MAPK, p-p38MAPK, CBP and Ku70. Co-immunoprecipitation was used to examine the acetylation status of Ku70. Results Insulin in combination with selenium significantly inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis, increased Bcl-2 levels and decreased Bax, cyclin D1, cyclin E, p38MAPK, p-p38MAPK, CBP, Ku70 and acetylated Ku70 levels. Conclusion The combined treatment of insulin and selenium suppresses cardiomyocyte apoptosis by inhibiting p38MAPK/CBP pathway. PMID:27363274

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction in uremic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David; Bhandari, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Uremic cardiomyopathy (UCM) is characterized by metabolic remodelling, compromised energetics, and loss of insulin-mediated cardioprotection, which result in unsustainable adaptations and heart failure. However, the role of mitochondria and the susceptibility of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) formation in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in UCM are unknown. Using a rat model of chronic uremia, we investigated the oxidative capacity of mitochondria in UCM and their sensitivity to ischemia-reperfusion mimetic oxidant and calcium stressors to assess the susceptibility to mPTP formation. Uremic animals exhibited a 45% reduction in creatinine clearance (P < 0.01), and cardiac mitochondria demonstrated uncoupling with increased state 4 respiration. Following IRI, uremic mitochondria exhibited a 58% increase in state 4 respiration (P < 0.05), with an overall reduction in respiratory control ratio (P < 0.01). Cardiomyocytes from uremic animals displayed a 30% greater vulnerability to oxidant-induced cell death determined by FAD autofluorescence (P < 0.05) and reduced mitochondrial redox state on exposure to 200 μM H2O2 (P < 0.01). The susceptibility to calcium-induced permeability transition showed that maximum rates of depolarization were enhanced in uremia by 79%. These results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration in the uremic heart is chronically uncoupled. Cardiomyocytes in UCM are characterized by a more oxidized mitochondrial network, with greater susceptibility to oxidant-induced cell death and enhanced vulnerability to calcium-induced mPTP formation. Collectively, these findings indicate that mitochondrial function is compromised in UCM with increased vulnerability to calcium and oxidant-induced stressors, which may underpin the enhanced predisposition to IRI in the uremic heart. PMID:25587120

  7. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  8. Contractile Dysfunction in Sarcomeric Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    MacIver, David H; Clark, Andrew L

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the clinical phenotype of sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are controversial. The development of cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension and aortic stenosis is usually described as a compensatory mechanism that normalizes wall stress. We suggest that an important abnormality in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reduced contractile stress (the force per unit area) generated by myocardial tissue secondary to abnormalities such as cardiomyocyte disarray. In turn, a progressive deterioration in contractile stress provokes worsening hypertrophy and disarray. A maintained or even exaggerated ejection fraction is explained by the increased end-diastolic wall thickness producing augmented thickening. We propose that the nature of the hemodynamic load in an individual with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy could determine its phenotype. Hypertensive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are more likely to develop exaggerated concentric hypertrophy; athletic individuals an asymmetric pattern; and inactive individuals a more apical hypertrophy. The development of a left ventricular outflow tract gradient and mitral regurgitation may be explained by differential regional strain resulting in mitral annular rotation.

  9. Secondary coronary artery vasospasm promotes cardiomyopathy progression.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew T; Korcarz, Claudia E; Collins, Keith A; Lapidos, Karen A; Hack, Andrew A; Lyons, Matthew R; Zarnegar, Sara; Earley, Judy U; Lang, Roberto M; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2004-03-01

    Genetic defects in the plasma membrane-associated sarcoglycan complex produce cardiomyopathy characterized by focal degeneration. The infarct-like pattern of cardiac degeneration has led to the hypothesis that coronary artery vasospasm underlies cardiomyopathy in this disorder. We evaluated the coronary vasculature of gamma-sarcoglycan mutant mice and found microvascular filling defects consistent with arterial vasospasm. However, the vascular smooth muscle sarcoglycan complex was intact in the coronary arteries of gamma-sarcoglycan hearts with perturbation of the sarcoglycan complex only within the adjacent myocytes. Thus, in this model, coronary artery vasospasm derives from a vascular smooth muscle-cell extrinsic process. To reduce this secondary vasospasm, we treated gamma-sarcoglycan-deficient mice with the calcium channel antagonist verapamil. Verapamil treatment eliminated evidence of vasospasm and ameliorated histological and functional evidence of cardiomyopathic progression. Echocardiography of verapamil-treated, gamma-sarcoglycan-null mice showed an improvement in left ventricular fractional shortening (44.3 +/- 13.3% treated versus 37.4 +/- 15.3% untreated), maximal velocity at the aortic outflow tract (114.9 +/- 27.9 cm/second versus 92.8 +/- 22.7 cm/second), and cardiac index (1.06 +/- 0.30 ml/minute/g versus 0.67 +/- 0.16 ml/minute/g, P < 0.05). These data indicate that secondary vasospasm contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and is an important therapeutic target to limit cardiomyopathy progression.

  10. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  11. The assessment of soil availability and wheat grain status of zinc and iron in Serbia: Implications for human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Miroslav; Nikolic, Nina; Kostic, Ljiljana; Pavlovic, Jelena; Bosnic, Predrag; Stevic, Nenad; Savic, Jasna; Hristov, Nikola

    2016-05-15

    The deficiency of zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) is a global issue causing not only considerable yield losses of food crops but also serious health problems. We have analysed Zn and Fe concentrations in the grains of two bread wheat cultivars along native gradient of micronutrient availability throughout Serbia. Although only 13% of the soil samples were Zn deficient and none was Fe deficient, the levels of these micronutrients in grain were rather low (median values of 21 mg kg(-1) for Zn and 36 mg kg(-1) for Fe), and even less adequate in white flour. Moreover, excessive P fertilization of calcareous soils in the major wheat growing areas strongly correlated with lower grain concentration of Zn. Our results imply that a latent Zn deficiency in wheat grain poses a high risk for grain quality relevant to human health in Serbia, where wheat bread is a staple food. PMID:26925726

  12. Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Fernando; Ramos, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela C.; Fariñas, M. Carmen; de Berrazueta, José Ramón; Zarauza, Jesús; Pericás Pulido, Juan Manuel; Paré, Juan Carlos; de Alarcón, Arístides; Sousa, Dolores; Rodriguez Bailón, Isabel; Montejo-Baranda, Miguel; Noureddine, Mariam; García Vázquez, Elisa; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) complicating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a poorly known entity. Although current guidelines do not recommend IE antibiotic prophylaxis (IEAP) in HCM, controversy remains. This study sought to describe the clinical course of a large series of IE HCM and to compare IE in HCM patients with IE patients with and without an indication for IEAP. Data from the GAMES IE registry involving 27 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. From January 2008 to December 2013, 2000 consecutive IE patients were prospectively included in the registry. Eleven IE HCM additional cases from before 2008 were also studied. Clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic characteristics were analyzed in IE HCM patients (n = 34) and in IE HCM reported in literature (n = 84). Patients with nondevice IE (n = 1807) were classified into 3 groups: group 1, HCM with native-valve IE (n = 26); group 2, patients with IEAP indication (n = 696); group 3, patients with no IEAP indication (n = 1085). IE episode and 1-year follow-up data were gathered. One-year mortality in IE HCM was 42% in our study and 22% in the literature. IE was more frequent, although not exclusive, in obstructive HCM (59% and 74%, respectively). Group 1 exhibited more IE predisposing factors than groups 2 and 3 (62% vs 40% vs 50%, P < 0.01), and more previous dental procedures (23% vs 6% vs 8%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, Group 1 experienced a higher incidence of Streptococcus infections than Group 2 (39% vs 22%, P < 0.01) and similar to Group 3 (39% vs 30%, P = 0.34). Overall mortality was similar among groups (42% vs 36% vs 35%, P = 0.64). IE occurs in HCM patients with and without obstruction. Mortality of IE HCM is high but similar to patients with and without IEAP indication. Predisposing factors, previous dental procedures, and streptococcal infection are higher in IE HCM, suggesting that HCM patients could benefit from IEAP. PMID:27368014

  13. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  14. Emergency management of decompensated peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lata, Indu; Gupta, Renu; Sahu, Sandeep; Singh, Harpreet

    2009-05-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare life-threatening cardiomyopathy of unknown cause that occurs in the peripartum period in previously healthy women.[1] the symptomatic patients should receive standard therapy for heart failure, managed by a multidisciplinary team. The diagnosis of PPCM rests on the echocardiographic identification of new left ventricular systolic dysfunction during a limited period surrounding parturition. Diagnostic criteria include an ejection fraction of less than 45%, fractional shortening of less than 30%, or both, and end-diastolic dimension of greater than 2.7 cm/m(2) body surface-area. This entity presents a diagnostic challenge because many women in the last month of a normal pregnancy experience dyspnea, fatigue, and pedal edema, symptoms identical to early congestive heart failure. There are no specific criteria for differentiating subtle symptoms of heart failure from normal late pregnancy. Therefore, it is important that a high index of suspicion be maintained to identify the rare case of PPCM as general examination showing symptoms of heart failure with pulmonary edema. PPCM remains a diagnosis of exclusion. No additional specific criteria have been identified to allow distinction between a peripartum patient with new onset heart failure and left ventricular systolic dysfunction as PPCM and another form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Therefore, all other causes of dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure must be systematically excluded before accepting the designation of PPCM. Recent observations from Haiti[2] suggest that a latent form of PPCM without clinical symptoms might exist. The investigators identified four clinically normal postpartum women with asymptomatic systolic dysfunction on echocardiography, who subsequently either developed clinically detectable dilated cardiomyopathy or improved and completely recovered heart function. PMID:19561973

  15. Psoriasis and dilated cardiomyopathy: coincidence or associated diseases?

    PubMed

    Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Shuvy, Mony; Lotan, Chaim; Planer, David

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated disease which affects 1-3% of the population. The etiology of psoriasis is unknown. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is probably the end result of a variety of toxic, metabolic or infectious agents. During a computerized search for cardiomyopathy among all patients hospitalized with psoriasis in the Hadassah University Hospital since 1980 we found an increased prevalence of cardiomyopathy, and specifically dilated cardiomyopathy. We present 4 patients who suffer from both conditions. In accordance with previous data, an association between preexisting psoriasis and dilated cardiomyopathy is suggested. We suggest that the genetic risk factors of dilated cardiomyopathy are shared by psoriasis, and more specifically psoriatic arthritis. Alternatively, the immune reaction that is triggered in dilated cardiomyopathy leading to the progression of the disease might be enhanced in patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Chronic inflammation and persistent secretion of proinflammatory cytokines may be considered a potential pathway, triggering the initiation and progression of dilated cardiomyopathy in psoriatic patients. Further investigation of the genetic and immune risk factors involved in dilated cardiomyopathy and in psoriasis may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  16. Sports in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy and desmosomal mutations.

    PubMed

    Sawant, A C; Calkins, H

    2015-05-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is a rare cardiomyopathy associated with life-threatening arrhythmias and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In addition to mutations in desmosomal genes, environmental factors such as exercise and sport have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent studies have shown that exercise may be associated with adverse outcomes in patients with ARVD/C. On the basis of current evidence, patients with ARVD/C are recommended to limit exercise irrespective of their mutation status. Some studies have suggested the presence of an entirely acquired form of the disease caused by exercise, which has been dubbed "exercise-induced ARVD/C."

  17. An unusual ST-segment elevation: apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows the ace up its sleeve.

    PubMed

    de Santis, Francesco; Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Pero, Gaetano; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is part of the broad clinical and morphologic spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report a patient with electrocardiographic abnormalities in whom acute coronary syndrome was excluded and apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by careful differential diagnosis.

  18. Pro-inflammatory alterations and status of blood plasma iron in a model of blast-induced lung trauma.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, N V; McFaul, S J; Januszkiewicz, A; Atkins, J L

    2005-01-01

    Impact of blast shock waves (SW) with the body wall produces blast lung injuries characterized by bilateral traumatic hemorrhages. Such injuries often have no external signs, are difficult to diagnose, and therefore, are frequently underestimated. Predictive assessment of acute respiratory distress syndrome outcome in SW-related accidents should be based on experimental data from appropriate animal models. Blood plasma transferrin is a major carrier of blood iron essential for proliferative "emergency" response of hematopoietic and immune systems as well as injured tissue in major trauma. Iron-transferrin complexes (Fe3+ TRF) can be quantitatively analyzed in blood and tissue samples with low-temperature EPR techniques. We hypothesized that use of EPR techniques in combination with assays for pro-inflammatory cytokines and granulocytes in the peripheral blood and BAL would reveal a pattern of systemic sequestration of (Fe3+)TRF that could be useful for development of biomarkers of the systemic inflammatory response to lung injury. With this goal we (i) analyzed time-dependent dynamics of (Fe3+)TRF in the peripheral blood of rats after impacts of SW generated in a laboratory shock-tube and (ii) assayed the fluctuation of granulocyte (PMN) counts and expression of CD11b adhesion molecules on the surface of PMNs during the first 24 h after SW induced injury. Sham-treated animals were used as control. Exposure to SW led to a significant decrease in the amount of blood (Fe3+)TRF that correlated with the extent of lung injury and developed gradually during the first 24 h. Thus, sequestration of (Fe3+)TRF occurred as early as 3 h post-exposure. At that time, the steady state concentration of (Fe3+)TRF in blood samples decreased from 19.7+/-0.6 microM in controls to 7.5+/-1.3 microM in exposed animals. The levels of (Fe3+)TRF remained decreased throughout the entire study period. PMN counts increased 5-fold and 3.5-fold over controls respectively, at 3 and 6 h postexposure

  19. [Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in an adult: a case history].

    PubMed

    Tafanelli, L; Avierinos, J-F; Thuny, F; Pelissier, J-F; Jacquier, A; Renard, S; Amabile, N; Gaubert, J-Y; Habib, G

    2007-12-01

    We report an original case of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy discovered in a young woman during an episode of cardiac decompensation. The diagnosis was suspected from the echocardiographic appearances of granite-like heterogeneous hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. It was confirmed by endomyocardial biopsies. The clinical evolution was favourable with classical treatment. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy is a rare cause of cardiomyopathy, generally observed in children, with multisystemic localisation. The pathophysiology and genetics are complex. Cardiac involvement is observed in 25% of cases, with the principal manifestation being hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In the absence of any specific clinical or paraclinical signs, echocardiography and MRI are the techniques of choice for morphological evaluation. Diagnosis relies upon myocardial biopsy, which should be readily advocated in every unexplained case of cardiomyopathy in a young subject. The prognosis is poor and no specific treatment is available.

  20. Enzymic analysis of endomyocardial biopsy specimens from patients with cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, T J; Wells, G; Oakley, C M; Brooksby, I A; Jenkins, B S; Webb-Peploe, M M; Coltart, D J

    1977-01-01

    Myocardial biopsies have been obtained from patients with hypertrophic or congestive cardiomyopathies. Marker enzymes for the principal subcellular organelles of the myocardium were estimated using highly sensitive assay procedures. The results were compared with those obtained in tissue from patients with valvular heart disease with good or poor left ventricular function. Left ventricular myocardial tissue from patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy showed essentially normal levels of enzymic activities. In congestive cardiomyopathy, right ventricular tissue showed reduced levels of mitochondrial enzymes with increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase. Left ventricular tissue from patients with congestive cardiomyopathy showed reduced levels of mitochondrial and myofibril enzymes but high levels of lactate dehydrogenase. The reduced levels of myofibril Ca++-activated ATP in congestive cardiomyopathy is similar to that found in patients with impaired left ventricular function secondary to valvular disease. It is suggested that defective mitochondrial function is a characteristic feature of congestive cardiomyopathy and that the increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase reflect a compensatory response. PMID:564201

  1. Reversible catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy due to pheochromocytoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Satendra, Milan; de Jesus, Cláudia; Bordalo e Sá, Armando L; Rosário, Luís; Rocha, José; Bicha Castelo, Henrique; Correia, Maria José; Nunes Diogo, António

    2014-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor originating from chromaffin tissue. It commonly presents with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess, such as hypertension, tachycardia, headache and sweating. Cardiovascular manifestations include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which may present as severe left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. We report a case of pheochromocytoma which was diagnosed following investigation of dilated cardiomyopathy. We highlight the dramatic symptomatic improvement and reversal of cardiomyopathy, with recovery of left ventricular function after treatment.

  2. Influence of Iron Status on Cadmium and Zinc Uptake by Different Ecotypes of the Hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens1

    PubMed Central

    Lombi, Enzo; Tearall, Kathryn L.; Howarth, Jonathan R.; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; McGrath, Steve P.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously identified an ecotype of the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens (Ganges), which is far superior to other ecotypes (including Prayon) in Cd uptake. In this study, we investigated the effect of Fe status on the uptake of Cd and Zn in the Ganges and Prayon ecotypes, and the kinetics of Cd and Zn influx using radioisotopes. Furthermore, the T. caerulescens ZIP (Zn-regulated transporter/Fe-regulated transporter-like protein) genes TcZNT1-G and TcIRT1-G were cloned from the Ganges ecotype and their expression under Fe-sufficient and -deficient conditions was analyzed. Both short- and long-term studies revealed that Cd uptake was significantly enhanced by Fe deficiency only in the Ganges ecotype. The concentration-dependent kinetics of Cd influx showed that the Vmax of Cd was 3 times greater in Fe-deficient Ganges plants compared with Fe-sufficient plants. In Prayon, Fe deficiency did not induce a significant increase in Vmax for Cd. Zn uptake was not influenced by the Fe status of the plants in either of the ecotypes. These results are in agreement with the gene expression study. The abundance of ZNT1-G mRNA was similar between the Fe treatments and between the two ecotypes. In contrast, abundance of the TcIRT1-G mRNA was greatly increased only in Ganges root tissue under Fe-deficient conditions. The present results indicate that the stimulatory effect of Fe deficiency on Cd uptake in Ganges may be related to an up-regulation in the expression of genes encoding for Fe2+ uptake, possibly TcIRT1-G. PMID:11950984

  3. Influence of iron status on cadmium and zinc uptake by different ecotypes of the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Lombi, Enzo; Tearall, Kathryn L; Howarth, Jonathan R; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; McGrath, Steve P

    2002-04-01

    We have previously identified an ecotype of the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens (Ganges), which is far superior to other ecotypes (including Prayon) in Cd uptake. In this study, we investigated the effect of Fe status on the uptake of Cd and Zn in the Ganges and Prayon ecotypes, and the kinetics of Cd and Zn influx using radioisotopes. Furthermore, the T. caerulescens ZIP (Zn-regulated transporter/Fe-regulated transporter-like protein) genes TcZNT1-G and TcIRT1-G were cloned from the Ganges ecotype and their expression under Fe-sufficient and -deficient conditions was analyzed. Both short- and long-term studies revealed that Cd uptake was significantly enhanced by Fe deficiency only in the Ganges ecotype. The concentration-dependent kinetics of Cd influx showed that the V(max) of Cd was 3 times greater in Fe-deficient Ganges plants compared with Fe-sufficient plants. In Prayon, Fe deficiency did not induce a significant increase in V(max) for Cd. Zn uptake was not influenced by the Fe status of the plants in either of the ecotypes. These results are in agreement with the gene expression study. The abundance of ZNT1-G mRNA was similar between the Fe treatments and between the two ecotypes. In contrast, abundance of the TcIRT1-G mRNA was greatly increased only in Ganges root tissue under Fe-deficient conditions. The present results indicate that the stimulatory effect of Fe deficiency on Cd uptake in Ganges may be related to an up-regulation in the expression of genes encoding for Fe(2+) uptake, possibly TcIRT1-G. PMID:11950984

  4. Progress with genetic cardiomyopathies: screening, counseling, and testing in dilated, hypertrophic, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Ray E; Cowan, Jason; Morales, Ana; Siegfried, Jill D

    2009-05-01

    This review focuses on the genetic cardiomyopathies: principally dilated cardiomyopathy, with salient features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy, regarding genetic etiology, genetic testing, and genetic counseling. Enormous progress has recently been made in identifying genetic causes for each cardiomyopathy, and key phenotype and genotype information is reviewed. Clinical genetic testing is rapidly emerging with a principal rationale of identifying at-risk asymptomatic or disease-free relatives. Knowledge of a disease-causing mutation can guide clinical surveillance for disease onset, thereby enhancing preventive and treatment interventions. Genetic counseling is also indicated for patients and their family members regarding the symptoms of their cardiomyopathy, its inheritance pattern, family screening recommendations, and genetic testing options and possible results.

  5. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a neonate associated with nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mir, Arshid; Lemler, Matthew; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Blalock, Shannon; Ikemba, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a congenital nonprogressive skeletal muscle disorder with a characteristic rod body formation in the skeletal muscle fibers. Cardiac involvement in nemaline myopathy is rare, although both dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have been reported. We describe an infant diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypotonia on the first day of life. Muscle biopsy confirmed nemaline myopathy at 3 weeks of age. The diagnosis of nemaline myopathy precluded consideration of heart transplantation, thus shifting the focus to comfort care. This is the earliest presentation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy reported in the literature in the setting of nemaline myopathy. The approach to determining an etiology for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an infant is reviewed. PMID:22067214

  6. Psychological disorders in adults with inherited cardiomyopathies and Takotsubo syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suárez Bagnasco, Mariana; Núñez-Gil, Iván J

    2016-06-03

    We performed a narrative review about psychological disorders in adults with Takotsubo syndrome and inherited cardiomyopathies. Through the electronic database PubMed and PsycINFO we searched all relevant related manuscripts published between 2000 and 2015. We found twelve studies that explore psychological disorders in Takotsubo syndrome and eight about inherited cardiomyopathies: five enrolled patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, two dilated cardiomyopathy, and one arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. All papers reported the presence of psychological disorders. In Takotsubo syndrome, depression fluctuates between 20.5 and 48% and anxiety was present among 26 and 56%. A study reported that anxiety increases the probability of developing Takotsubo syndrome. In dilated cardiomyopathy, anxiety was present in 50% and depression in 22%. In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, younger age, poorer functional capacity and having experienced at least one implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock, were significant independent predictors of both device-specific and generalized anxiety. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, anxiety and depression were present in 45.2% and 17.9%, respectively. Thirty seven percent met diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorders and 21% for mood disorders. Nearby half hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients report triggering of chest pain, dyspnea, and dizziness by emotional stress. Due to the small number of studies, conclusions are limited. However, we discuss some results.

  7. A multiple-micronutrient-fortified beverage affects hemoglobin, iron, and vitamin A status and growth in adolescent girls in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hyder, S M Ziauddin; Haseen, Farhana; Khan, Marufa; Schaetzel, Tom; Jalal, Chowdhury S B; Rahman, Mizanur; Lönnerdal, Bo; Mannar, Venkatesh; Mehansho, Haile

    2007-09-01

    Adolescent girls have high nutrient needs and are susceptible to micronutrient deficiencies. The objective of this study was to test the effect of a multiple-micronutrient-fortified beverage on hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, micronutrient status, and growth among adolescent girls in rural Bangladesh. A total of 1125 girls (Hb > or = 70 g/L) enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and were allocated to either a fortified or nonfortified beverage of similar taste and appearance. The beverage was provided at schools 6 d/wk for 12 mo. Concentrations of Hb and serum ferritin (sFt), retinol, zinc, and C-reactive protein were measured in venous blood samples at baseline, 6 mo, and 12 mo. In addition, weight, height, and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) measurements were taken. The fortified beverage increased the Hb and sFt and retinol concentrations at 6 mo (P < 0.01). Adolescent girls in the nonfortified beverage group were more likely to suffer from anemia (Hb <120 g/L), iron deficiency (sFt <12 microg/L), and low serum retinol concentrations (serum retinol <0.70 micromol/L) (OR = 2.04, 5.38, and 5.47, respectively; P < 0.01). The fortified beverage group had greater increases in weight, MUAC, and BMI over 6 mo (P < 0.01). Consuming the beverage for an additional 6 mo did not further improve the Hb concentration, but the sFt level continued to increase (P = 0.01). The use of multiple-micronutrient-fortified beverage can contribute to the reduction of anemia and improvement of micronutrient status and growth in adolescent girls in rural Bangladesh.

  8. Cadmium in blood and urine--impact of sex, age, dietary intake, iron status, and former smoking--association of renal effects.

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Ing-Marie; Bensryd, Inger; Lundh, Thomas; Ottosson, Helena; Skerfving, Staffan; Oskarsson, Agneta

    2002-01-01

    We studied determinants of cadmium status and kidney function in nonsmoking men and women living on farms in southern Sweden. Median blood Cd (BCd) was 1.8 nmol/L (range, 0.38-18) and median urinary Cd (UCd) was 0.23 nmol/mmol creatinine (range, 0.065-0.99). The intake of Cd per kilogram body weight did not significantly differ between sexes and did not correlate with BCd or UCd, which may be explained by a low and varying bioavailibility of Cd from food items. However, when a subgroup of the study population, couples of never-smoking men and women, were compared, a lower intake per kilogram body weight was found in the women, but the women had a 1.8 times higher BCd and a 1.4 times higher UCd. The higher female BCd and UCd may be explained by higher absorption due to low iron status. BCd and UCd both increased with age and were higher in the ex-smokers, who had stopped smoking more than 5 years before the study, compared to never-smokers. The contribution of locally produced food to the total Cd intake was relatively low and varied. Males living in areas with low soil Cd had lower UCd than the others. However, Cd levels in kidneys from pigs, fed locally produced cereals, did not predict BCd or UCd in humans at the same farms. The kidney function parameter ss2-microglobulin-creatinine clearance was related to UCd, whereas urinary protein-HC, N-acetyl-ss-glucoseaminidase or albumin-creatinine clearance was not when age was accounted for. Hence, even at the low exposure levels in this study population, there was an indication of effect on biochemical markers of renal function. PMID:12460796

  9. Developments in the management of Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Spray, David C; Friedman, Joel M; Weiss, Oren S; Lora, Jose N; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Moraes, Diego N; Garg, Nisha Jain; Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2015-12-01

    Over 100 years have elapsed since the discovery of Chagas disease and there is still much to learn regarding pathogenesis and treatment. Although there are antiparasitic drugs available, such as benznidazole and nifurtimox, they are not totally reliable and often toxic. A recently released negative clinical trial with benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy further reinforces the concerns regarding its effectiveness. New drugs and new delivery systems, including those based on nanotechnology, are being sought. Although vaccine development is still in its infancy, the reality of a therapeutic vaccine remains a challenge. New ECG methods may help to recognize patients prone to developing malignant ventricular arrhythmias. The management of heart failure, stroke and arrhythmias also remains a challenge. Although animal experiments have suggested that stem cell based therapy may be therapeutic in the management of heart failure in Chagas cardiomyopathy, clinical trials have not been promising.

  10. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Malley, Tamir; Watson, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the case of a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who was admitted to hospital for an elective autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant after cytotoxic treatment with lomustine, cytarabine, cyclophosphomide and etoposide (LACE). On the final day of chemotherapeutic treatment, she developed sudden onset dyspnoea. Electrocardiography confirmed acute antero-lateral T-wave inversion. She went onto have coronary angiography that demonstrated unobstructed coronary arteries. Left ventriculography demonstrated apical ballooning, consistent with Takotsubo (stress) cardiomyopathy. The link between chemotherapy and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has become increasingly recognized in recent years, although causality remains to be established and the mechanism of action is not yet fully understood. PMID:27066260

  11. [Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Cause of a Cardiogenic Shock].

    PubMed

    Fevereiro, Maria do Carmo; Simões, Maria Inês; Lampreia, Fátima; Marcão, Isabel; Godinho, António; Lopes, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, of unknown etiology, is characterized by sudden and transient systolic dysfunction of the mid-apical segments of the left ventricle without significant coronary disease, and full normalization of segmental changes. More common in middle-aged women, it is cause of differential diagnosis with acute coronary syndrome. We present the case of a 59 year old woman admitted to the emergency room with sudden chest pain and dyspnea. At presentation: acute hypotensive pulmonary edema requiring aminergic support and invasive ventilation. Blood tests showed elevated necrosis myocardial enzymes. Serial electrocardiograms: sinus rhythm with progressive inversion of the T wave through the precordial leads (v2 - v6). Control echocardiograms: overall decreased systolic function with apical akinesia, and full reversal of the changes in 2 weeks. Cardiogenic shock of unknown etiology was admitted and a coronary computed tomography angiography was performed excluding coronary heart disease, supporting the diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  12. Developments in the management of Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Spray, David C; Friedman, Joel M; Weiss, Oren S; Lora, Jose N; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Moraes, Diego N; Garg, Nisha Jain; Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2015-12-01

    Over 100 years have elapsed since the discovery of Chagas disease and there is still much to learn regarding pathogenesis and treatment. Although there are antiparasitic drugs available, such as benznidazole and nifurtimox, they are not totally reliable and often toxic. A recently released negative clinical trial with benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy further reinforces the concerns regarding its effectiveness. New drugs and new delivery systems, including those based on nanotechnology, are being sought. Although vaccine development is still in its infancy, the reality of a therapeutic vaccine remains a challenge. New ECG methods may help to recognize patients prone to developing malignant ventricular arrhythmias. The management of heart failure, stroke and arrhythmias also remains a challenge. Although animal experiments have suggested that stem cell based therapy may be therapeutic in the management of heart failure in Chagas cardiomyopathy, clinical trials have not been promising. PMID:26496376

  13. Targets for therapy in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tardiff, Jil C.; Carrier, Lucie; Bers, Donald M.; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Maier, Lars S.; Ashrafian, Houman; Huke, Sabine; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    To date, no compounds or interventions exist that treat or prevent sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. Established therapies currently improve the outcome, but novel therapies may be able to more fundamentally affect the disease process and course. Investigations of the pathomechanisms are generating molecular insights that can be useful for the design of novel specific drugs suitable for clinical use. As perturbations in the heart are stage-specific, proper timing of drug treatment is essential to prevent initiation and progression of cardiac disease in mutation carrier individuals. In this review, we emphasize potential novel therapies which may prevent, delay, or even reverse hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by sarcomeric gene mutations. These include corrections of genetic defects, altered sarcomere function, perturbations in intracellular ion homeostasis, and impaired myocardial energetics. PMID:25634554

  14. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cavayero, Chase; Kar, Pran; Kar, Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Although originally considered to be uncommon, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is becoming increasingly visible, annually comprising an increasing portion of suspected diagnoses of acute coronary syndrome. This condition is characterized by reversible left ventricular akinesis without significant coronary artery obstruction. This case study presents five patients diagnosed with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, as confirmed by echocardiogram and angiography. All of the patients presented with classic myocardial chest pain and elevated troponins. Following diagnosis, they were treated with supportive measures, particularly angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and beta-blockers. All patients made a full recovery. Though the mechanism of Takotsubo has not been fully elucidated, hypotheses suggest it may be related to excessive catecholamine levels causing either myocardial stunning or coronary vasospasm. Recognition and understanding of this unusual pathology are essential because it can lead to improved clinical management. PMID:27446769

  15. Immersion pulmonary oedema and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Andrew; Edmonds, Carl

    2015-12-01

    A 67-year-old female scuba diver developed a typical immersion pulmonary oedema (IPE), but investigations strongly indicated Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC). The cardiac abnormalities included increased cardiac enzymes, electrocardiographic anomalies and echocardiographic changes, all reverting to normal within days. This case demonstrates a similarity and association between IPE and TC, and the importance of prompt cardiac investigations both in the investigation of IPE and in making the diagnosis of TC. PMID:26687314

  16. Immersion pulmonary oedema and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Andrew; Edmonds, Carl

    2015-12-01

    A 67-year-old female scuba diver developed a typical immersion pulmonary oedema (IPE), but investigations strongly indicated Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC). The cardiac abnormalities included increased cardiac enzymes, electrocardiographic anomalies and echocardiographic changes, all reverting to normal within days. This case demonstrates a similarity and association between IPE and TC, and the importance of prompt cardiac investigations both in the investigation of IPE and in making the diagnosis of TC.

  17. The broken heart syndrome: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Peters, Matthew N; George, Praveen; Irimpen, Anand M

    2015-05-01

    First described in 1990, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy consists of a transient systolic dysfunction of localized segments of the left ventricle. Commonly occurring in postmenopausal women, Takotsubo is often associated with intense physical and/or emotional stress. It is traditionally identified by distinctive wall motion patterns on transthoracic echocardiogram and left ventriculography. Further understanding of the disease mechanisms and recognition of at-risk populations has potentially tremendous therapeutic benefit. PMID:25576036

  18. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  19. [Dilated cardiomyopathy induced by ectopic atrial tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Velázquez Rodríguez, E; Martínez Enríquez, A

    2000-01-01

    The deleterious effect of chronic or incessant supraventricular tachycardia on ventricular function is well-known and it has been demonstrated than can ultimately lead to dilated cardiomyopathy if unrecognized. Any variety of supraventricular tachycardia with chronic evolution may lead to left ventricular dysfunction, ectopic atrial tachycardia because of its persistent nature, often incessant and poorly responsive to antiarrhythmic drugs is a frequent cause of reversible congestive heart failure in patients without other demonstrable organic heart disease. Five patients (aged 14 to 52 years) were referred with symptoms of heart failure, NYHA functional class II (one patient), class III (one patient) and class IV (3 patients) associated with an incessant ectopic atrial tachycardia. Four patients underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of the ectopic focus and one patient was treated with amiodarone. All patients were successfully treated and the echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular function indicated regression of the cardiomyopathy picture with recovery of systolic function, (mean left ventricular ejection fraction 39.2 +/- 6.1% before vs mean 62.4 +/- 4.8% after (p < 0.01). The clinical and echocardiographic picture of cardiomyopathy induced by incessant ectopic atrial tachycardia is reversible after successful treatment. This stresses the necessity of recognizing such arrhythmia as cause of primary heart failure. PMID:10959459

  20. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Deborah E; Basha, Haseeb Ilias; Koenig, Mary Kay

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial disease is a heterogeneous group of multisystemic diseases that develop consequent to mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA. The prevalence of inherited mitochondrial disease has been estimated to be greater than 1 in 5,000 births; however, the diagnosis and treatment of this disease are not taught in most adult-cardiology curricula. Because mitochondrial diseases often occur as a syndrome with resultant multiorgan dysfunction, they might not immediately appear to be specific to the cardiovascular system. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy can be described as a myocardial condition characterized by abnormal heart-muscle structure, function, or both, secondary to genetic defects involving the mitochondrial respiratory chain, in the absence of concomitant coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease, or congenital heart disease. The typical cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial disease--hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, left ventricular myocardial noncompaction, and heart failure--can worsen acutely during a metabolic crisis. The optimal management of mitochondrial disease necessitates the involvement of a multidisciplinary team, careful evaluations of patients, and the anticipation of iatrogenic and noniatrogenic complications. In this review, we describe the complex pathophysiology of mitochondrial disease and its clinical features. We focus on current practice in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy, including optimal therapeutic management and long-term monitoring. We hope that this information will serve as a guide for practicing cardiologists who treat patients thus affected.

  1. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.).

    PubMed

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly.

  2. SPARC–Dependent Cardiomyopathy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Bodmer, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Background— The Drosophila heart is an important model for studying the genetics underpinning mammalian cardiac function. The system comprises contractile cardiomyocytes, adjacent to which are pairs of highly endocytic pericardial nephrocytes that modulate cardiac function by uncharacterized mechanisms. Identifying these mechanisms and the molecules involved is important because they may be relevant to human cardiac physiology. Methods and Results— This work aimed to identify circulating cardiomodulatory factors of potential relevance to humans using the Drosophila nephrocyte–cardiomyocyte system. A Kruppel-like factor 15 (dKlf15) loss-of-function strategy was used to ablate nephrocytes and then heart function and the hemolymph proteome were analyzed. Ablation of nephrocytes led to a severe cardiomyopathy characterized by a lengthening of diastolic interval. Rendering adult nephrocytes dysfunctional by disrupting their endocytic function or temporally conditional knockdown of dKlf15 led to a similar cardiomyopathy. Proteomics revealed that nephrocytes regulate the circulating levels of many secreted proteins, the most notable of which was the evolutionarily conserved matricellular protein Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC), a protein involved in mammalian cardiac function. Finally, reducing SPARC gene dosage ameliorated the cardiomyopathy that developed in the absence of nephrocytes. Conclusions— The data implicate SPARC in the noncell autonomous control of cardiac function in Drosophila and suggest that modulation of SPARC gene expression may ameliorate cardiac dysfunction in humans. PMID:26839388

  3. Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy: Immunopathology and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chevillard, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and affects ca. 10 million people worldwide. About 30% of Chagas disease patients develop chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), a particularly lethal inflammatory cardiomyopathy that occurs decades after the initial infection, while most patients remain asymptomatic. Mortality rate is higher than that of noninflammatory cardiomyopathy. CCC heart lesions present a Th1 T-cell-rich myocarditis, with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and prominent fibrosis. Data suggest that the myocarditis plays a major pathogenetic role in disease progression. Major unmet goals include the thorough understanding of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic targets and identification of prognostic genetic factors. Chagas disease thus remains a neglected disease, with no vaccines or antiparasitic drugs proven efficient in chronically infected adults, when most patients are diagnosed. Both familial aggregation of CCC cases and the fact that only 30% of infected patients develop CCC suggest there might be a genetic component to disease susceptibility. Moreover, previous case-control studies have identified some genes associated to human susceptibility to CCC. In this paper, we will review the immunopathogenesis and genetics of Chagas disease, highlighting studies that shed light on the differential progression of Chagas disease patients to CCC. PMID:25210230

  4. hiPSC MODELING OF INHERITED CARDIOMYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Gwanghyun; Bernstein, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) represent a powerful new model system to study the basic mechanisms of inherited cardiomyopathies. hiPSC-CMs have been utilized to model several cardiovascular diseases, achieving the most success in the inherited arrhythmias, including long QT and Timothy syndromes (1,2) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) (3). Recently, studies have applied hiPSC-CMs to the study of both dilated (DCM) (4) and hypertrophic (HCM) cardiomyopathies (5,6), providing new insights into basic mechanisms of disease. However, hiPSC-CMs do not recapitulate many of the structural and functional aspects of mature human cardiomyocytes, instead mirroring an immature, embryonic or fetal, phenotype. Thus, much work remains to better understand these differences as well as to develop methods to induce hiPSC-CMs into a fully mature phenotype. Despite these limitations, hiPSC-CMs represent the best current in vitro correlate of the human heart and an invaluable tool in the search for mechanisms underlying cardiomyopathy and for screening new pharmacologic therapies. PMID:24838688

  5. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Deborah E; Basha, Haseeb Ilias; Koenig, Mary Kay

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial disease is a heterogeneous group of multisystemic diseases that develop consequent to mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA. The prevalence of inherited mitochondrial disease has been estimated to be greater than 1 in 5,000 births; however, the diagnosis and treatment of this disease are not taught in most adult-cardiology curricula. Because mitochondrial diseases often occur as a syndrome with resultant multiorgan dysfunction, they might not immediately appear to be specific to the cardiovascular system. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy can be described as a myocardial condition characterized by abnormal heart-muscle structure, function, or both, secondary to genetic defects involving the mitochondrial respiratory chain, in the absence of concomitant coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease, or congenital heart disease. The typical cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial disease--hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, left ventricular myocardial noncompaction, and heart failure--can worsen acutely during a metabolic crisis. The optimal management of mitochondrial disease necessitates the involvement of a multidisciplinary team, careful evaluations of patients, and the anticipation of iatrogenic and noniatrogenic complications. In this review, we describe the complex pathophysiology of mitochondrial disease and its clinical features. We focus on current practice in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy, including optimal therapeutic management and long-term monitoring. We hope that this information will serve as a guide for practicing cardiologists who treat patients thus affected. PMID:24082366

  6. Evolving molecular diagnostics for familial cardiomyopathies: at the heart of it all

    PubMed Central

    Callis, Thomas E; Jensen, Brian C; Weck, Karen E; Willis, Monte S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are an important and heterogeneous group of common cardiac diseases. An increasing number of cardiomyopathies are now recognized to have familial forms, which result from single-gene mutations that render a Mendelian inheritance pattern, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. Recently, clinical genetic tests for familial cardiomyopathies have become available for clinicians evaluating and treating patients with these diseases, making it necessary to understand the current progress and challenges in cardiomyopathy genetics and diagnostics. In this review, we summarize the genetic basis of selected cardiomyopathies, describe the clinical utility of genetic testing for cardiomyopathies and outline the current challenges and emerging developments. PMID:20370590

  7. Niacin, thiamin, iron and protein status of humans as affected by the consumption of tea (Camellia sinensis) infusions.

    PubMed

    Wang, R S; Kies, C

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the project was to determine the effects of tea (Camellia sinensis) leaf beverage consumption on the apparent utilization of niacin, thiamin, and protein in human subjects. During two randomly arranged experimental periods of 14 days each, 10 adult female human subjects were fed a constant (same foods each day), measured, laboratory-controlled diet. Tea was fed during one period while no tea was allowed during the other period. A dehydrated black tea infusion product (instant tea, 8 g/subject/day/dry weight basis) was used which subjects were allowed to dilute in water. Subjects made complete collections of urine and stools. Fasting blood samples were drawn at the end of each experimental period. No effects on protein status were demonstrated. Urinary thiamin losses were depressed with the use of tea but niacin losses were increased. Blood serum concentrations of thiamin diphosphate also were depressed during the tea drinking period as compared to values during the non-tea period. No significant effect on blood serum levels of nicotinaminde or N'-methylnicotinamine were found but values tended to be lower during the tea than the non-tea period. These results suggest that tea consumption inhibits the utilization of thiamin. However, niacin availability was unaffected by tea drinking. Because of the decreased availability of thiamin, the need for niacin was depressed which caused a greater than expected urinary loss of this vitamin. PMID:1796091

  8. Double-blind cluster randomised controlled trial of wheat flour chapatti fortified with micronutrients on the status of vitamin A and iron in school-aged children in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ahmed S; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Ahmed, Faiz; Alam, Mohammad S; Wahed, Mohammad A; Sack, David A

    2015-12-01

    Food fortification is a cost-effective and sustainable strategy to prevent or correct micronutrient deficiencies. A double-blind cluster (bari) randomised controlled trial was conducted in a rural community in Bangladesh to evaluate the impact of consumption of chapatti made of micronutrient-fortified wheat flour for 6 months by school-aged children on their vitamin A, haemoglobin and iron status. A total of 43 baris (group of households) were randomly selected. The baris were randomly assigned to either intervention or control group. The intervention group received wheat flour fortified with added micronutrients (including 66 mg hydrogen-reduced elemental iron and 3030 μg retinol equivalent as retinyl palmitate per kilogram of flour), while the control group received wheat flour without added micronutrients. A total of 352 children were enrolled in the trial, 203 in the intervention group and 149 in the control group. Analyses were carried out on children who completed the study (191 in the intervention group and 143 in the control group). Micronutrient-fortified wheat flour chapatti significantly increased serum retinol concentration at 6 months by 0.12 μmol L(-1) [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06, 0.19; P < 0.01]. The odds of vitamin A deficiency was significantly lower for children in the intervention group at 3 months [odds ratio (OR) = 0.26; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07, 0.89; P < 0.05] and 6 months (OR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.68; P < 0.01). No demonstrable effect of fortified chapatti consumption on iron status, haemoglobin levels or anaemia was observed. Consumption of fortified chapattis demonstrated a significant improvement in the vitamin A status, but not in iron, haemoglobin or anaemia status. PMID:23800099

  9. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Ware, James S; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P; Tsai, Emily J; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F; Wittstein, Ilan S; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-21

    Background Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. Methods In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. Results We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P=1.3×10(-7)) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P=0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P=2.7×10(-10)); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P=0.005). Conclusions The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder.

  10. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ware, James S.; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M.; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P.; Tsai, Emily J.; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A.; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A.; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K.; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F.; Wittstein, Ilan S.; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J.; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M.; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. METHODS In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. RESULTS We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P = 1.3×10−7) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P = 0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P = 2.7×10−10); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder. PMID:26735901

  11. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Ware, James S; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P; Tsai, Emily J; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F; Wittstein, Ilan S; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-21

    Background Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. Methods In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. Results We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P=1.3×10(-7)) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P=0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P=2.7×10(-10)); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P=0.005). Conclusions The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder. PMID:26735901

  12. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rozema, Tamika; Klein, Lisa R

    2016-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, "broken heart syndrome", is a well-known diagnosis in adults; however, this entity remains rare and is not well represented in the paediatric population. This report illustrates a case of takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a premature neonate with a brief discussion of the condition. PMID:26175107

  13. Genetics Home Reference: DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2344-7. Review. Citation on PubMed Berko BA, Swift M. X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy. N Engl J ... Gelb B, Zhu XM, Chamberlain JS, McCabe ER, Swift M. X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy. Molecular genetic evidence ...

  14. Lessons learned from the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry (PCMR) Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, James D; Westphal, Joslyn A; Bansal, Neha; Czachor, Jason D; Razoky, Hiedy; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2015-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a rare disorder of the heart muscle, affecting 1.13 cases per 100,000 children, from birth to 18 years of age. Cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of heart transplantation in children over the age of 1. The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry funded in 1994 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute was established to examine the epidemiology of the disease in children below 18 years of age. More than 3500 children across the United States and Canada have been enrolled in the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, which has followed-up these patients until death, heart transplantation, or loss to follow-up. The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry has provided the most in-depth illustration of this disease regarding its aetiology, clinical course, associated risk factors, and patient outcomes. Data from the registry have helped in guiding the clinical management of cardiomyopathy in children under 18 years of age; however, questions still remain regarding the most clinically effective diagnostic and treatment approaches for these patients. Future directions of the registry include the use of next-generation whole-exome sequencing and cardiac biomarkers to identify aetiology-specific treatments and improve diagnostic strategies. This article provides a brief synopsis of the work carried out by the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry since its inception, including the current knowledge on the aetiologies, outcomes, and treatments of cardiomyopathy in children.

  15. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    PubMed

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  16. Patient with Eating Disorder, Carnitine Deficiency and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fotino, A Domnica; Sherma, A

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by a dilated and poorly functioning left ventricle and can result from several different etiologies including ischemic, infectious, metabolic, toxins, autoimmune processes or nutritional deficiencies. Carnitine deficiency-induced cardiomyopathy (CDIM) is an uncommon cause of dilated cardiomyopathy that can go untreated if not considered. Here, we describe a 30-year-old woman with an eating disorder and recent percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy (PEG) tube placement for weight loss admitted to the hospital for possible PEG tube infection. Carnitine level was found to be low. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed ejection fraction 15%. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis from a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). She was discharged on a beta-blocker and carnitine supplementation. One month later her cardiac function had normalized. Carnitine deficiency-induced myopathy is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy and should be considered in adults with decreased oral intake or malabsorption who present with cardiomyopathy. PMID:27159507

  17. Cardiomyopathy induced by incessant fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Rodríguez, Enrique; Rodríguez-Piña, Horacio; Pacheco-Bouthillier, Alex; Deras-Mejía, Luz María

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl with symptoms of fatigue, decreased exercise tolerance and progressive dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class III) with a possible diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to viral myocarditis. Because of incessant wide QRS tachycardia refractory to antiarrhythmic drugs, she was referred for electrophysiological study. The diagnosis was idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia involving the posterior fascicle of the left bundle branch. After successful treatment with radiofrequency catheter ablation guided by a Purkinje potential radiological and echocardiographic evaluation showed complete reversal of left ventricular function in the first 3 months and no recurrence of arrhythmia during 2 years of follow up.

  18. Refractory dilated cardiomyopathy associated with metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Peter; Jefferies, John L; Kearney, Debra; Russell, Heidi

    2010-10-01

    A 2-year-old African American male presented with heart failure and an abdominal mass. Computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed a 7 cm adrenal lesion, confirmed as poorly differentiated neuroblastoma (NB). CT and meta-iodobenzoguanidine (MIBG) scans identified multiple metastases, but cardiac MIBG imaging was absent. Cardiac ejection fraction (EF) was 8% with 7% shortening fraction. The patient underwent six cycles of chemotherapy and investigational immunotherapy. Cardiac function improved to 26% EF. However, the tumor proved unresponsive to treatment. The patient died from stage IV congestive heart failure (CHF) and progressive NB. Autopsy confirmed dilated cardiomyopathy with endocardial fibroelastosis.

  19. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with toluene abuse.

    PubMed

    Vural, Mutlu; Ogel, Kultegin

    2006-01-01

    The use of paint thinner and glue to achieve an euphoric state has been associated with serious social and health problems in children and young adults. We present the case of a 21-year-old man with dilated cardiomyopathy occurring following abuse of paint thinner and glue containing toluene as main compound. After cessation of toluene abuse, the patient recovered rapidly and completely. Because of the increasing prevalence of toluene abuse, harmful effects of this volatile agent on the heart are also discussed. PMID:16479101

  20. Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats.

    PubMed

    Häggström, Jens; Luis Fuentes, Virginia; Wess, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats, and it can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Cats are often screened for HCM because of the presence of a heart murmur, but screening for breeding purposes has also become common. These cats are usually purebred cats of breeding age, and generally do not present with severe disease or with any clinical signs. This type of screening is particularly challenging because mild disease may be difficult to differentiate from a normal phenotype, and the margin for error is small, with potentially major consequences for the breeder. This article reviews HCM screening methods, with particular emphasis on echocardiography.

  1. Contemporary Outcome in Patients With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Broch, Kaspar; Murbræch, Klaus; Andreassen, Arne Kristian; Hopp, Einar; Aakhus, Svend; Gullestad, Lars

    2015-09-15

    Outcome is better in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) than in ischemic heart failure (HF), but morbidity and mortality are nevertheless presumed to be substantial. Most data on the prognosis in IDC stem from research performed before the widespread use of current evidence-based treatment, including implantable devices. We report outcome data from a cohort of patients with IDC treated according to current HF guidelines and compare our results with previous figures: 102 consecutive patients referred to our tertiary care hospital with idiopathic IDC and a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% were included in a prospective cohort study. After extensive baseline work-up, follow-up was performed after 6 and 13 months. Vital status and heart transplantation were recorded. Over the first year of follow-up, the patients were on optimal pharmacological treatment, and 24 patients received implantable devices. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased from 26 ± 10% to 41 ± 11%, peak oxygen consumption increased from 19.5 ± 7.1 to 23.4 ± 7.8 ml/kg/min, and functional class improved substantially (all p values <0.001). After a median follow-up of 3.6 years, 4 patients were dead, and heart transplantation had been performed in 9 patients. According to our literature search, survival in patients with IDC has improved substantially over the last decades. In conclusion, patients with IDC have a better outcome than previously reported when treated according to current guidelines.

  2. Daily supplementation with iron increases lipid peroxidation in young women with low iron stores.

    PubMed

    King, Sarah M; Donangelo, Carmen M; Knutson, Mitchell D; Walter, Patrick B; Ames, Bruce N; Viteri, Fernando E; King, Janet C

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether women with low iron stores (plasma ferritin iron supplement for 8 wks at a level commonly used to treat poor iron status develop increased lipid peroxidation as measured by ethane exhalation rates and plasma malondialdehyde. The women served as their own control as pre- and post-supplementation periods were compared. Twelve women participated in the study for a 70-day period and consumed daily iron supplements (98 mg of iron as ferrous sulfate) from day 14 to day 70. Baseline blood and expired air samples were obtained on days 1 and 14; measurements during supplementation were performed on days 56 and 70, that is at 6 and 8 weeks of supplementation. Iron status improved during the iron supplementation period; biochemical indicators of lipid peroxidation also increased. After 6 wks of iron supplementation, serum ferritin almost doubled and body iron more than doubled. Hemoglobin levels increased slightly and other indicators of iron status became normal. However, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and breath ethane exhalation rates (BEER) increased by more than 40% between baseline and 6 wks of supplementation; these increases correlated significantly with plasma iron and ferritin levels. MDA was positively correlated with BEER. BEER increased further after 8 wks of iron supplementation. The increased indicators of lipid peroxidation with duration of supplementation and as iron status improved suggest that providing daily nearly 100 mg iron may not be a totally innocuous regimen for correcting iron depletion in women.

  3. The significance of intercalated discs in the pathogenesis of Friedreich cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, Arnulf H; Becker, Alyssa B; Feustel, Paul J; Gelman, Benjamin B; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E

    2016-08-15

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a complex clinical and neuropathological phenotype, but the most frequent cause of death is cardiomyopathy. The principal autopsy findings in FRDA hearts are concentric hypertrophy, enlargement of cardiomyocytes, myofiber necrosis, inflammatory infiltration, scarring, and random accumulation of iron. In addition, the myocardium shows generalized disorganization of intercalated discs (ICD), the Velcro-like end-to-end connections of heart fibers that provide mechanical cohesion and ionic coupling. The principal components of ICD are fascia adherens junctions (FAJ), desmosomes, and gap junctions. Frataxin deficiency in FRDA may cause improper assembly of ICD early in life, making hearts vulnerable to mechanical stress in childhood and adolescence. We studied the ICD in the myocardium of left ventricular wall (LVW), right ventricular wall, and ventricular septum in 18 genetically confirmed FRDA patients (age of death, 10 to 87years) and 12 normal controls (age of death, 13 to 69years). In cases with juvenile onset, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry of N-cadherin and vinculin, two abundant FAJ proteins, showed enlargement of ICD, discontinuity, and hyperconvolution. Reaction product of the desmosomal protein desmoglein 2 was similar. The distribution of the gap junction protein connexin 43 at ICD was also irregular and displayed abnormal lateralization to the plasma membranes of cardiomyocytes. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of α-actinin, affinity fluorescence microscopy of actin with rhodamine-labeled phalloidin, and electron microscopy, revealed the principal integrity of sarcomeres of the myocardium in FRDA. In two late-onset long-surviving FRDA patients (ages 79 and 87), clinical cardiomyopathy was absent, and ICD were normal. The described observations in patients with a broad range of disease onset and duration allow us to conclude that faulty assembly of ICD interferes with

  4. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat

    2016-01-01

    This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete’s heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation.

  5. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: review of pathophysiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chayanupatkul, Maneerat

    2014-01-01

    Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is a cardiac condition observed in patients with cirrhotic regardless of the etiologies. It is characterized by the impaired systolic response to physical stress, diastolic dysfunction, and electrophysiological abnormalities, especially QT interval prolongation. Its pathophysiology and clinical significance has been a focus of various researchers for the past decades. The impairment of β-adrenergic receptor, the increase in endogenous cannabinoids, the presence of cardiosuppressants such as nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines are the proposed mechanisms of systolic dysfunction. The activation of cardiac renin-angiotensin system and salt retention play the role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and impaired diastolic function. QT interval prolongation, which is observed in 40-50 % of cirrhotic patients, occurs as a result of the derangement in membrane fluidity and ion channel defect. The increased recognition of this disease will prevent the complications of overt heart failure after procedures such as transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) and liver transplantation. Better understandings of the pathogenesis and pathology of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is crucial in developing more accurate diagnostic tools and specific treatments of this condition. PMID:25221635

  6. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat; Saguner, Ardan M

    2016-08-01

    This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete's heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation. PMID:27617087

  7. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat

    2016-01-01

    This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete’s heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation. PMID:27617087

  8. Phidippides cardiomyopathy: a review and case illustration.

    PubMed

    Trivax, Justin E; McCullough, Peter A

    2012-02-01

    Phidippides was a Greek messenger who experienced sudden death after running more than 175 miles in two days. In today's world, marathon running and other endurance sports are becoming more popular and raising concern about sudden deaths at these events. Once etiologies such has hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, anomalous coronary arteries, and coronary atherosclerosis have been excluded, there is now an additional consideration termed Phidippides cardiomyopathy. Because endurance sports call for a sustained increase in cardiac output for several hours, the heart is put into a state of volume overload. It has been shown that approximately one-third of marathon runners experience dilation of the right atrium and ventricle, have elevations of cardiac troponin and natriuretic peptides, and in a smaller fraction later develop small patches of cardiac fibrosis that are the likely substrate for ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden death. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is emerging as the diagnostic test of choice for this condition. This review and case report summarizes the key features of this newly appreciated disorder.

  9. Genetic Variation in Cardiomyopathy and Cardiovascular Disorders.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    With the wider deployment of massively-parallel, next-generation sequencing, it is now possible to survey human genome data for research and clinical purposes. The reduced cost of producing short-read sequencing has now shifted the burden to data analysis. Analysis of genome sequencing remains challenged by the complexity of the human genome, including redundancy and the repetitive nature of genome elements and the large amount of variation in individual genomes. Public databases of human genome sequences greatly facilitate interpretation of common and rare genetic variation, although linking database sequence information to detailed clinical information is limited by privacy and practical issues. Genetic variation is a rich source of knowledge for cardiovascular disease because many, if not all, cardiovascular disorders are highly heritable. The role of rare genetic variation in predicting risk and complications of cardiovascular diseases has been well established for hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, where the number of genes that are linked to these disorders is growing. Bolstered by family data, where genetic variants segregate with disease, rare variation can be linked to specific genetic variation that offers profound diagnostic information. Understanding genetic variation in cardiomyopathy is likely to help stratify forms of heart failure and guide therapy. Ultimately, genetic variation may be amenable to gene correction and gene editing strategies.

  10. Right ventricular filling in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, S.; Parker, K. H.; Gibson, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE--To assess right ventricular filling in dilated cardiomyopathy. PATIENTS--32 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and 24 healthy controls. METHODS--Stroke distances were measured by pulsed Doppler echocardiography at left ventricular outflow and left and right ventricular inflow. The inflow tract dimensions of both ventricles and the outflow tract dimension of the left ventricle were measured from two dimensional images. Right and left sided atrioventricular (AV) ring excursions were measured by M mode echocardiography at the tricuspid and mitral rings. Stroke volume was derived as stroke distance multiplied by left ventricular outflow tract area. Total stroke distances were calculated as the sum of AV valve Doppler stroke distances and ring excursion. The effective orifice areas of the two AV valves were thus defined as stroke volumes divided by total stroke distance. RESULTS--Total tricuspid stroke distance was normally less than mitral (6.0 (1.7) v 7.6 (1.7) cm, P < 0.05), implying that effective orifice area of the tricuspid valve was consistently greater (6.6 (1.6) v 4.5 (0.8) cm2, P < 0.01). Total tricuspid ring excursion was normally more than mitral (2.30 (0.30) v 1.62 (0.22) cm, P < 0.01). Total tricuspid stroke distance in dilated cardiomyopathy was also less than mitral (7.8 (2.4) v 9.7 (2.8) cm, P < 0.05). Tricuspid stroke distance was significantly increased in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy compared with that in healthy controls (P < 0.05 v controls), though stroke volume was much smaller (26 (10) v 63 (11) ml, P < 0.01) so that tricuspid effective orifice area was reduced to less than half normal (2.7 (1.2) cm2, P < 0.01). Total tricuspid ring long axis excursion was more than mitral (1.37 (0.6) v 0.74 (0.21) cm, P < 0.01). Right ventricular end diastolic inflow dimension was increased compared with that in healthy controls (3.9 (0.7) v 2.8 (0.5) cm, P < 0.01), correlating inversely with tricuspid effective orifice area (r = -0.71, P

  11. Hypothyroid cardiomyopathy in a patient post-doxorubicin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Silver, Adam Jeffrey; Patel, Hena N; Okwuosa, Tochi

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism may cause decreased cardiac output and heart failure-and when severe, bradycardia and pericardial effusions may develop. Chemotherapies, particularly doxorubicin, are known and often irreversible causes of cardiomyopathy. As such, when cardiomyopathy develops in patients who have been exposed to anthracycline chemotherapy, the importance of ruling out other reversible causes such as hypothyroidism cannot be overstated. We present a case of acute systolic heart failure in a patient post-doxorubicin chemotherapy and radiation therapy for alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, found to have severe hypothyroidism as a reversible cause of cardiomyopathy. PMID:27053539

  12. Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy and neonatal hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fayol, L; Masson, P; Millet, V; Simeoni, U

    2004-10-01

    Cushing's syndrome is rare in pregnancy but can cause spontaneous abortion, stillbirth or premature birth. We report a case of transient hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a newborn whose mother had hypercortisolism due to a primary adrenal lesion. There was no family history of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Follow-up revealed complete resolution of the cardiac abnormalities in the infant. Cushing's syndrome in the mother resolved after delivery. Although maternal hypercortisolism seldom results in symptomatic hypercortisolism in the newborn, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy can occur. PMID:15499965

  13. Hypocalcemic cardiomyopathy as initial presentation of primary hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Velayuthan, Sujithra; Gungor, Neslihan; McVie, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a rare but life-threatening condition in children. Myocarditis is the leading cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and prognosis is generally poor without heart transplantation. We report a rare case of hypocalcemic DCM due to primary hypoparathyroidism in a male infant. In our patient, aggressive management of hypoparathyroidism significantly improved the manifestations of DCM. He is currently 10 years old and has no symptoms of exercise intolerance. Latest echocardiogram revealed near-normal cardiac function. Our case emphasizes that early diagnosis of this treatable cause of cardiomyopathy prevents serious sequelae.

  14. Chronic respiratory illness as a predictor of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: the Washington, DC, Dilated Cardiomyopathy Study.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. A.; Coughlin, S. S.; Metayer, C.; René, A. A.; Hammond, I. W.

    1996-01-01

    Although bronchial asthma and emphysema have been associated with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy in case-control studies, little is known about the prognostic importance of chronic respiratory disease in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. To study this, we examined history of bronchial asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis, and respiratory medication use as possible predictors of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy using data from a Washington, DC, population-based study (n = 129). The cumulative survival rates among patients with a history of emphysema or chronic bronchitis were 60% and 48% at 12 and 36 months, respectively, compared with 81.8% and 67.2% among patients without emphysema or chronic bronchitis. The survival rates of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy patients with and without a history of bronchial asthma at the time of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy diagnosis were similar. In multivariate analysis using the proportional hazards model, only ventricular arrhythmias and ejection fraction were found to be statistically significant predictors of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. The adjusted relative risk estimate for emphysema and chronic bronchitis was close to one. Thus, the results of this population-based study do not suggest that history of chronic respiratory illness is an independent predictor of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:8961693

  15. Nutritional iron deficiency: the role of oral iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lachowicz, J I; Nurchi, V M; Fanni, D; Gerosa, C; Peana, M; Zoroddu, M A

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency represents a relevant health problem mainly in developing countries. Children and pregnant women represent the main target of this disease, and the low amount of bio-available iron mostly depends on plant-based diets. Iron deficiency may have serious consequences, with severe impairment of the immune function leading to infectious diseases. The brain development in embryos and fetuses during gestation can be greatly affected by iron deficiency of the mother with heavy outcomes on the cognition status of children. A better understanding of molecular pathways involved in iron absorption and metabolism are the basis for new strategies for developing a therapy for iron deficiency. Different therapeutic strategies are summarized, and iron fortification appears the best tool.

  16. [Left ventricular hypertrophy in the cat - "when hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is not hypertrophic cardiomyopathy"].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Wess, G

    2010-07-01

    According to WHO classification hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary genetic cardiomyopathy. Echocardiographically HCM is characterized by symmetric, asymmetric or focal left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) without recognizable underlying physical cause. However, echocardiographically HCM in cats may not be distinguishable from other causes of a thick appearing left ventricle. Hypovolemia can look like a hypertrophied ventricle but is basically only pseudohypertrophic. Well recognized and logical physical causes of LVH include systemic hypertension and outflow obstruction. LVH similar to HCM may also be found in feline hyperthyroidism. The context of the disease helps to differentiate these physical / physiological causes of LVH. Difficult to distinguish from HCM, particularly when based on a snapshot of a single echocardiographic exam, are myocarditis and . Only the clinical and echocardiographic course allow a reasonably confident etiological diagnosis and the differentiation between HCM and secondary LVH. PMID:20582898

  17. A young man with hemoptysis: Rare association of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, celiac disease and dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khilnani, Gopi C; Jain, Neetu; Tiwari, Pavan; Hadda, Vijay; Singh, Lavleen

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare cause of recurrent diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) with no specific treatment. Herein, we discuss a case of hemoptysis, who had IPH and other rare associations. A 19-year-old man presented with recurrent hemoptysis, generalized weakness and progressive dyspnea for 3 years. Earlier, he was diagnosed with anemia and was treated with blood transfusions and hematinics. On examination he had pallor, tachycardia and was underweight. Investigations revealed low level of hemoglobin (7.8 g/dl) and iron deficiency. An electrocardiography (ECG) showed sinus tachycardia, interventricular conduction delay and T-wave inversion. Echocardiography revealed dilated cardiomyopathy with left ventricular dysfunction. Computed tomography of the chest demonstrated bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity suggestive of pulmonary hemorrhage. Pulmonary function tests showed restrictive pattern with increased carbon monoxide diffusion. Bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial lung biopsy showed hemosiderin-laden macrophages. Patient could recall recurrent episodes of diarrhea in childhood. Serum antitissue transglutamase antibodies were raised (291.66 IU/ml, normal <30 IU/ml). Duodenal biopsy showed subtotal villous atrophy consistent with celiac disease. He was started on gluten-free diet, beta blockers and diuretics. After two years of treatment, he has been showing consistent improvement. Screening for CD is important in patients with IPH. Cardiomyopathy forms rare third association. All three show improvement with gluten-free diet. PMID:25624603

  18. Potential genetic predisposition for anthracycline-associated cardiomyopathy in families with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wasielewski, Marijke; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Westerink, Nico-Derk L; Jongbloed, Jan D H; Postma, Aleida; Gietema, Jourik A; van Tintelen, J Peter; van den Berg, Maarten P

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anthracyclines are successfully used in cancer treatment, but their use is limited by their cardiotoxic side effects. Several risk factors for anthracycline-associated cardiomyopathy (AACM) are known, yet the occurrence of AACM in the absence of these known risk factors suggests that other factors must play a role. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a genetic predisposition for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) could be a potential risk factor for AACM. Methods A hospital-based registry of 162 DCM families and two hospital-based registries of patients with cancer treated with systemic cancer therapy (n>6000) were reviewed focusing on AACM. Selected patients with AACM/DCM families with possible AACM (n=21) were analysed for mutations in cardiomyopathy-associated genes and presymptomatic cardiological evaluation of first-degree relatives was performed. Results We identified five DCM families with AACM and one patient with AACM with a family member with a possible early sign of mild DCM. Pathogenic MYH7 mutations were identified in two of these six families. The MYH7 c.1633G>A (p.Asp545Asn) and c.2863G>A (p.Asp955Asn) mutations (one double mutant allele) were identified in a DCM family with AACM. The MYH7 c.4125T>A (p.Tyr1375X) mutation was identified in one patient with AACM. Conclusions This study further extends the hypothesis that a genetic predisposition to DCM could be a potential risk factor for AACM. PMID:25332820

  19. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Isoproterenol-induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats (SHHFs) take far longer to develop compensated heart failure and congestive decompensation than common surgical models of heart failure. Isoproterenol (ISO) infusion can accelerate cardiomyopathy in young SHHFs, while dietary salt loa...

  20. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM) is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sometimes present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The precise relationship between mutations in the DMD gene and cardiomyopathy remain unclear. However, some hypothetical mechanisms are being considered to be associated with the presence of some several dystrophin isoforms, certain reported mutations, and an unknown dystrophin-related pathophysiological mechanism. Recent therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the severe dystrophinopathy phenotype, appears promising, but the presence of XLDCM highlights the importance of focusing on cardiomyopathy while elucidating the pathomechanism and developing treatment.

  1. Cardiomyopathies in Noonan syndrome and the other RASopathies

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Bruce D.; Roberts, Amy E.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome and related disorders (Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, Costello syndrome, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair, and other related traits) are autosomal dominant traits. Mutations causing these disorders alter proteins relevant for signaling through RAS. Thus, these traits are now collectively called the RASopathies. While the RASopathies have pleiomorphic features, this review will focus on the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy observed in varying percentages of all of these traits. In addition, inherited abnormalities in one pathway gene, RAF1, cause pediatric-onset dilated cardiomyopathy. The pathogeneses for the RASopathy-associated cardiomyopathies are being elucidated, principally using animal models, leading to genotype-specific insights into how signal transduction is perturbed. Based on those findings, small molecule therapies seem possible for RASopathy-associated cardiomyopathies. PMID:26380542

  2. Positron emission tomography for the evaluation and treatment of cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Palak; Choi, Brian G; Mazhari, Ramesh

    2011-06-01

    Congestive heart failure accounts for tremendous morbidity and mortality worldwide. There are numerous causes of cardiomyopathy, the most common of which is coronary artery disease. Positron emission tomography (PET) has an established and expanding role in the evaluation of patients with cardiomyopathy. The specific application of PET to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cardiac sarcoidosis, and diabetic cardiomyopathy has been studied extensively and promises to be a useful tool for managing these patients. Furthermore, evaluating the efficacy of standard treatments for congestive heart failure is important as health care costs continue to rise. Recently, there have been significant developments in the field of cardiovascular stem cell research. Familiarity with the mechanisms by which stem cells benefit patients with cardiovascular disease is the key to understanding these advances. Molecular imaging techniques including PET/CT imaging play an important role in monitoring stem cell therapy in both animals and humans. These noninvasive imaging techniques will be highlighted in this paper.

  3. Therapeutic effect of recombinant lentiviral vector containing succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein on the treatment of experimental autoimmunity myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Han, Lina; Wang, Chunxi; Guo, Shuli; Liu, Siyu; Yang, Liming

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac autoimmune reaction takes part in myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Existing literature has confirmed that the occurrence of cardiomyopathy belongs to mitochondrial diseases and is related to the oxidative respiratory chain subunit. The special structure of iron-sulfur protein (ISP) is responsible for the oxidative stress in oxidative phosphorylation, which is also a target that is easily attacked by various damage factors. Using gene therapy technology to restore succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein (SDISP) function- and thus resume myocardial mitochondria function and myocardial function is hypothesized to alleviate the experimental autoimmunity myocarditis (EAM).

  4. Tako-tsubo-like cardiomyopathy after EpiPen administration.

    PubMed

    Zubrinich, C M; Farouque, H M Omar; Rochford, S E; Sutherland, M F

    2008-11-01

    Tako-tsubo-like cardiomyopathy is characterized by acute chest pain, electrocardiographic changes and increased cardiac enzymes in the absence of obstructive coronary vessel disease. We describe the development of tako-tsubo-like cardiomyopathy in an elderly woman after the use of an EpiPen for generalized urticaria and angioedema. As adrenaline may participate in the pathogenesis of this condition, the need for careful patient selection and education in the use of adrenaline self-injectors remains imperative. PMID:19120537

  5. Tako-tsubo-like cardiomyopathy after EpiPen administration.

    PubMed

    Zubrinich, C M; Farouque, H M Omar; Rochford, S E; Sutherland, M F

    2008-11-01

    Tako-tsubo-like cardiomyopathy is characterized by acute chest pain, electrocardiographic changes and increased cardiac enzymes in the absence of obstructive coronary vessel disease. We describe the development of tako-tsubo-like cardiomyopathy in an elderly woman after the use of an EpiPen for generalized urticaria and angioedema. As adrenaline may participate in the pathogenesis of this condition, the need for careful patient selection and education in the use of adrenaline self-injectors remains imperative.

  6. Genetics of Human and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Siobhan; Edwards, Jennifer; Ferguson-Mignan, Thomas F. N.; Cobb, Malcolm; Mongan, Nigel P.; Rutland, Catrin S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in both humans and dogs. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) accounts for a large number of these cases, reported to be the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans and the second most common in dogs. In human studies of DCM there are more than 50 genetic loci associated with the disease. Despite canine DCM having similar disease progression to human DCM studies into the genetic basis of canine DCM lag far behind those of human DCM. In this review the aetiology, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of canine DCM are examined, along with highlighting possible different subtypes of canine DCM and their potential relevance to human DCM. Finally the current position of genetic research into canine and human DCM, including the genetic loci, is identified and the reasons many studies may have failed to find a genetic association with canine DCM are reviewed. PMID:26266250

  7. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in two cats.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A M; Battersby, I A; Faena, M; Fews, D; Darke, P G G; Ferasin, L

    2005-03-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a disease characterised by infiltration of the myocardium by adipose and fibrous tissue. The disease is an important cause of sudden death in humans, but has rarely been described in animals. This report describes ARVC in two cats with right-sided congestive heart failure. One cat had also experienced previous episodes of syncope. Standard six-lead and 24-hour (Holter) electrocardiogram recording revealed complete atrioventricular block and multiform ventricular ectopics in both cats, with the addition of ventricular tachycardia, ventricular bigeminy and R-on-T phenomenon in one of them. On echocardiography, the right ventricle and atrium were massively dilated and hypokinetic. The survival times of the cats were three days and 16 days following diagnosis. Histopathology in one case revealed fibro-fatty infiltration of the myocardium, predominantly affecting the right ventricular free wall. PMID:15789811

  8. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy/Dysplasia1

    PubMed Central

    Indik, Julia H; Marcus, Frank I

    2003-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) is characterized by the patchy replacement of myocardium by fatty or fibrofatty tissue. These changes lead to structural abnormalities including right ventricular enlargement and wall motion abnormalities that can be detected by echocardiography, angiography, and cine MRI. ARVC/D is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, since it has been linked to several chromosomal loci. Myocarditis may also be a contributing etiological factor. Patients are typically diagnosed during adolescence or young adulthood. Presenting symptoms are generally related to ventricular arrhythmias. Concern for the risk of sudden cardiac death may lead to the implantation of an intracardiac defibrillator. An ongoing multicenter international registry should further our understanding of this disease. PMID:16943913

  9. Constrictive Pericarditis Versus Restrictive Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mario J

    2016-05-01

    About one-half of the patients with congestive heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although the etiology of HFpEF is most commonly related to long-standing hypertension and atherosclerosis, a significant number of suspected HFpEF patients have a restrictive cardiomyopathy or chronic pericardial disease. Recognizing these syndromes is important because early diagnosis may lead to instituting specific therapy that may prolong survival, improve quality of life, and/or recognize and treat an underlying systemic disorder. Advances in diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and genetic testing today allow identification of the specific etiology in most cases. Novel pharmacological, immunologic, and surgical therapies are leading to improved quality of life and survival. PMID:27126534

  10. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Komamura, Kazuo; Fukui, Miho; Iwasaku, Toshihiro; Hirotani, Shinichi; Masuyama, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    In 1990, takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) was first discovered and reported by a Japanese cardiovascular specialist. Since then, this heart disease has gained worldwide acceptance as an independent disease entity. TCM is an important entity that differs from acute myocardial infarction. It occurs more often in postmenopausal elderly women, is characterized by a transient hypokinesis of the left ventricular (LV) apex, and is associated with emotional or physical stress. Wall motion abnormality of the LV apex is generally transient and resolves within a few days to several weeks. Its prognosis is generally good. However, there are some reports of serious TCM complications, including hypotension, heart failure, ventricular rupture, thrombosis involving the LV apex, and torsade de pointes. It has been suggested that coronary spasm, coronary microvascular dysfunction, catecholamine toxicity and myocarditis might contribute to the pathogenesis of TCM. However, its pathophysiology is not clearly understood. PMID:25068020

  11. Constrictive Pericarditis Versus Restrictive Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mario J

    2016-05-01

    About one-half of the patients with congestive heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although the etiology of HFpEF is most commonly related to long-standing hypertension and atherosclerosis, a significant number of suspected HFpEF patients have a restrictive cardiomyopathy or chronic pericardial disease. Recognizing these syndromes is important because early diagnosis may lead to instituting specific therapy that may prolong survival, improve quality of life, and/or recognize and treat an underlying systemic disorder. Advances in diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and genetic testing today allow identification of the specific etiology in most cases. Novel pharmacological, immunologic, and surgical therapies are leading to improved quality of life and survival.

  12. CNS disease triggering Takotsubo stress cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Wahbi, Karim

    2014-12-15

    There are a number of hereditary and non-hereditary central nervous system (CNS) disorders, which directly or indirectly affect the heart (brain-heart disorders). The most well-known of these CNS disorders are epilepsy, stroke, infectious or immunological encephalitis/meningitis, migraine, and traumatic brain injury. In addition, a number of hereditary and non-hereditary neurodegenerative disorders may impair cardiac functions. Affection of the heart may manifest not only as arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, autonomic impairment, systolic dysfunction/heart failure, arterial hypertension, or pulmonary hypertension, but also as stress cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo syndrome, TTS). CNS disease triggering TTS includes subarachnoid bleeding, epilepsy, ischemic stroke, intracerebral bleeding, migraine, encephalitis, traumatic brain injury, PRES syndrome, or ALS. Usually, TTS is acutely precipitated by stress triggered by various different events. TTS is one of the cardiac abnormalities most frequently induced by CNS disorders. Appropriate management of TTS from CNS disorders is essential to improve the outcome of affected patients. PMID:25213573

  13. Biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy: case study and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Daoko, Joseph; Rajachandran, Manu; Savarese, Ronald; Orme, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy is associated with more hemodynamic instability than is isolated left ventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy; medical management is more invasive and the course of hospitalization is longer. In March 2011, a 62-year-old woman presented at our emergency department with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. On hospital day 2, she experienced chest pain. An electrocardiogram and cardiac enzyme levels suggested an acute myocardial infarction. She underwent cardiac angiography and was found to have severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction involving the mid and apical segments, which resulted in a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.10 to 0.15 in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Her hospital course was complicated by cardiogenic shock that required hemodynamic support with an intra-aortic balloon pump and dobutamine. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed akinesis of the mid-to-distal segments of the left ventricle and mid-to-apical dyskinesis of the right ventricular free wall characteristic of biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy. After several days of medical management, the patient was discharged from the hospital in stable condition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review of the literature on biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy that compares its hemodynamic instability and medical management requirements with those of isolated left ventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Herein, we discuss the case of our patient, review the pertinent medical literature, and convey the prevalence and importance of right ventricular involvement in patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  14. Efficacy of a multi micronutrient-fortified drink in improving iron and micronutrient status among schoolchildren with low iron stores in India: A randomised, double-masked placebo-controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiple micronutrient-fortified drink could be an effective strategy to combating micronutrient deficiencies in school-going children. Our objective was to assess the efficacy of a multiple micronutrient-fortified drink in reducing iron deficiency (ID), ID anemia (IDA), anemia and improving micro...

  15. Female infant with oncocytic cardiomyopathy and microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS): A clue to the pathogenesis of oncocytic cardiomyopathy?

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.M.; Krous, H.F.; Eichenfield, L.F.; Swalwell, C.I.; Jones, M.C.

    1994-11-01

    A infant girl had red stellate skin lesions on the cheeks and neck, and mildly short palpebral fissures. Her skin abnormality was typical of microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS), a newly recognized syndrome consisting of congenital linear skin defects and ocular abnormalities in females monosomic for Xp22. She died suddenly and unexpectedly at age 4 months; the cause of death was ascribed to oncocytic cardiomyopathy. Oncocytic cardiomyopathy occurs only in young children, who present with refractory arrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest. The coexistence of two rare conditions, one of which is mapped to the X chromosome, and an excess of affected females with oncocytic cardiomyopathy is also X-linked, with Xp22 being a candidate region. Overlapping manifestations in the two conditions (ocular abnormalities in cases of oncocytic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias in MLS) offer additional support for this hypothesis. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  17. Novel Investigation of Iron Cross Sections via Spherical Shell Transmission Measurements and Particle Transport Calculations for Material Embrittlement Studies. Quarterly Status Report 5

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Derek W. Storm

    2002-04-25

    Previously, measurements were made of the transmission of 14 MeV neutrons through various spherical shell thicknesses of iron in a comprehensive investigation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) about 30 years ago. Two of these spheres, composed of hemispherical sections, have appropriate dimensions for the lower energy neutron measurements that we propose to make. Due to their interest in our experimental results, LLNL has agreed to make these hemispheres available for our work. Those hemispheres have been shipped. In addition, a spherical iron shell, composed of two hemispherical sections with an annular thickness of approximately 1 inch, was fabricated at NEST. However, since we will need additional hemispheres for our experiments, we purchased a radius cutter that will allow us to fabricate hemispheres as large as 5 inches in radius at the Ohio University Machine Shop. This will give us maximum flexibility to adapt to the needs of the spherical shell transmission experiments. High purity (99.94% iron) Armco iron has been obtained which can be used to make the smaller hemispheres. Larger hemispheres will be made using ASTM designation steel with high iron content. In all cases compositional analyses will be made of the hemispheres.

  18. A Clinical Risk Score to Improve the Diagnosis of Tachycardia-Induced Cardiomyopathy in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy P; Wang, Shuo; Albers, Erin L; Salerno, Jack C; Stephenson, Elizabeth A; Shah, Maully J; Pflaumer, Andreas; Czosek, Richard J; Garnreiter, Jason M; Collins, Kathryn; Papez, Andrew L; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Cain, Nicole B; Kannankeril, Prince J; Perry, James C; Mandapati, Ravi; Silva, Jennifer N A; Balaji, Seshadri; Shannon, Kevin M

    2016-10-01

    Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC) is a treatable cause of heart failure in children, but there is little information as to which clinical variables best discriminate TIC from other forms of cardiomyopathy. TIC cases with dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) from 16 participating centers were identified and compared with controls with other forms of DC. Presenting clinical, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic characteristics were collected. Heart rate (HR) percentile was defined as HR/median HR for age, and PR index as the PR/RR interval. P-wave morphology (PWM) was defined as possible sinus or nonsinus based on a predefined algorithm. Eighty TIC cases and 135 controls were identified. Cases demonstrated lower LV end-diastolic diameter and LV end-systolic diameter than DC controls (4.3 vs 6.5, p <0.001; 7.4 vs 10.9, p <0.001) and were less likely to receive inotropic medication at presentation (p <0.001 for both). Multivariable logistic regression identified HR percentile (OR 2.1 per 10% increase, CI 1.3 to 4.6; p = 0.014), PR index (OR 1.2, CI 1.1 to 1.4; p = 0.004), and nonsinus PWM (OR 104.9, CI 15.2 to 1,659.8; p <0.001) as predictive of TIC status. A risk score using HR percentile >130%, PR index >30%, and nonsinus PWM was associated with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 87% for the diagnosis of TIC. Model training and validation area under the curves were similar at 0.97 and 0.94, respectively. In conclusion, pediatric TIC may be accurately discriminated from other forms of DC using simple electrocardiographic parameters. This may allow for rapid diagnosis and early treatment of this condition. PMID:27515893

  19. Furthering the link between the sarcomere and primary cardiomyopathies: restrictive cardiomyopathy associated with multiple mutations in genes previously associated with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Caleshu, Colleen; Sakhuja, Rahul; Nussbaum, Robert L; Schiller, Nelson B; Ursell, Philip C; Eng, Celeste; De Marco, Teresa; McGlothlin, Dana; Burchard, Esteban González; Rame, J Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    Mutations in genes that encode components of the sarcomere are well established as the cause of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere genes, however, are increasingly being associated with other cardiomyopathies. One phenotype more recently recognized as a disease of the sarcomere is restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). We report on two patients with RCM associated with multiple mutations in sarcomere genes not previously associated with RCM. Patient 1 presented with NYHA Class III/IV heart failure at 22 years of age. She was diagnosed with RCM and advanced heart failure requiring heart transplantation. Sequencing of sarcomere genes revealed previously reported homozygous p.Glu143Lys mutations in MYL3, and a novel heterozygous p.Gly57Glu mutation in MYL2. The patient's mother is a double heterozygote for these mutations, with no evidence of cardiomyopathy. Patient 2 presented at 35 years of age with volume overload while hospitalized for oophorectomy. She was diagnosed with RCM and is being evaluated for heart transplantation. Sarcomere gene sequencing identified homozygous p.Asn279His mutations in TPM1. The patient's parents are consanguineous and confirmed heterozygotes. Her father was diagnosed with HCM at 42 years of age. This is the first report of mutations in TPM1, MYL3, and MYL2 associated with primary, non-hypertrophied RCM. The association of more sarcomere genes with RCM provides further evidence that mutations in the various sarcomere genes can cause different cardiomyopathy phenotypes. These cases also contribute to the growing body of evidence that multiple mutations have an additive effect on the severity of cardiomyopathies. PMID:21823217

  20. Reduction in mitochondrial iron alleviates cardiac damage during injury.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Wu, Rongxue; Shang, Meng; Sato, Tatsuya; Chen, Chunlei; Shapiro, Jason S; Liu, Ting; Thakur, Anita; Sawicki, Konrad T; Prasad, Sathyamangla V N; Ardehali, Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Excess cellular iron increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and causes cellular damage. Mitochondria are the major site of iron metabolism and ROS production; however, few studies have investigated the role of mitochondrial iron in the development of cardiac disorders, such as ischemic heart disease or cardiomyopathy (CM). We observe increased mitochondrial iron in mice after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and in human hearts with ischemic CM, and hypothesize that decreasing mitochondrial iron protects against I/R damage and the development of CM. Reducing mitochondrial iron genetically through cardiac-specific overexpression of a mitochondrial iron export protein or pharmacologically using a mitochondria-permeable iron chelator protects mice against I/R injury. Furthermore, decreasing mitochondrial iron protects the murine hearts in a model of spontaneous CM with mitochondrial iron accumulation. Reduced mitochondrial ROS that is independent of alterations in the electron transport chain's ROS producing capacity contributes to the protective effects. Overall, our findings suggest that mitochondrial iron contributes to cardiac ischemic damage, and may be a novel therapeutic target against ischemic heart disease. PMID:26896449

  1. Characterization and Long-Term Prognosis of Postmyocarditic Dilated Cardiomyopathy Compared With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Marco; Anzini, Marco; Bussani, Rossana; Artico, Jessica; Barbati, Giulia; Stolfo, Davide; Gigli, Marta; Muça, Matilda; Naso, Paola; Ramani, Federica; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Pinamonti, Bruno; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2016-09-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) is the final common pathway of different pathogenetic processes and presents a significant prognostic heterogeneity, possibly related to its etiologic variety. The characterization and long-term prognosis of postmyocarditic dilated cardiomyopathy (PM-DC) remain unknown. This study assesses the clinical-instrumental evolution and long-term prognosis of a large cohort of patients with PM-DC. We analyzed 175 patients affected with DC consecutively enrolled from 1993 to 2008 with endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) data available. PM-DC was defined in the presence of borderline myocarditis at EMB or persistent left ventricular dysfunction 1 year after diagnosis of active myocarditis at EMB. Other patients were defined as affected by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). Analysis of follow-up evaluations was performed at 24, 60, and 120 months. We found 72 PM-DC of 175 enrolled patients (41%). Compared with IDC, patients with PM-DC were more frequently females and less frequently presented a familial history of DC. No other baseline significant differences were found. During the long-term follow-up (median 154, first to third interquartile range 78 to 220 months), patients with PM-DC showed a trend toward slower disease progression. Globally, 18 patients with PM-DC (25%) versus 49 with IDC (48%) experienced death/heart transplantation (p = 0.045). The prognostic advantage for patients with PM-DC became significant beyond 40 months of follow-up. At multivariable time-dependent Cox analysis, PM-DC was confirmed to have a global independent protective role (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.28 to 0.97, p = 0.04). In conclusion, PM-DC is characterized by better long-term prognosis compared with IDC. An exhaustive etiologic characterization appears relevant in the prognostic assessment of DC.

  2. BPA-induced DNA hypermethylation of the master mitochondrial gene PGC-1α contributes to cardiomyopathy in male rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Xia, Wei; Yang, Jie; Zhu, Yingshuang; Chang, Huailong; Liu, Juan; Huo, Wenqian; Xu, Bing; Chen, Xi; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Shunqing

    2015-03-01

    Implication of environmental endocrine disruptors, such as bisphenol A (BPA), on the development of cardiopathy has been poorly investigated. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to BPA at the reference dose on the myocardium of rats, and the underlying mechanisms. Male rats received corn oil or 50 μg/kg/day of BPA since delactation. At 24 and 48 weeks (wk), cardiac function and mitochondrial function were examined. The mRNA expression and the methylation status of PCG-1α, a major regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac muscle, were also tested. At 48 wk, BPA-exposed rats displayed cardiomyopathy, characterized by myocardium hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte enlargement, and impairment of cardiac function. At 24 wk, significantly reduced ATP production, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) and declined mitochondrial respiratory complex (MRC) activity in cardiomyocytes were observed in BPA-exposed rats compared with the control rats, indicating a decrease in mitochondrial function occurs before the development of cardiomyopathy. Additionally, BPA exposure decreased the expression of PGC-1α and induced hypermethylation of PGC-1 α in heart tissue in 24- and 48-week-old rats. The change in methylation of PGC-1α was observed more pronounced in BPA-exposed rats at 48 wk. Overall, long-term BPA exposure induces cardiomyopathy in male rats, and the underlying mechanism may involve the impairment of cardiac mitochondrial function and the disturbance of methylation of PGC-1α.

  3. A rare form of cardiomyopathy: left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goud, Aditya; Padmanabhan, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular non-compaction is a recently recognized, rare form of cardiomyopathy. It is based on the arrest of endomyocardial morphogenesis during embryogenesis. It was first described in 1984 by Engberding who described it as isolated ‘sinusoids’ within the LV. Right now its prevalence is estimated at 0.014 to 1.3 and 3–4% in heart failure patients. Its clinical manifestations are highly variable, ranging from no symptoms to disabling congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and systemic thromboemboli. Doppler Echocardiogram is considered the diagnostic procedure of choice and treatment is symptomatic management of its symptoms and complications. PMID:26908378

  4. Genetic evaluation of cardiomyopathy--a Heart Failure Society of America practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Ray E; Lindenfeld, Joann; Mestroni, Luisa; Seidman, Christine E; Taylor, Matthew R G; Towbin, Jeffrey A

    2009-03-01

    Substantial progress has been made recently in understanding the genetic basis of cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathies with known genetic cause include hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), restrictive (RCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). HCM, DCM, and RCM have been recognized as distinct clinical entities for decades, whereas ARVD/C and LVNC are relative newcomers to the field. Hence the clinical and genetic knowledge for each cardiomyopathy varies, as do the recommendations and strength of evidence.

  5. Reversible cardiomyopathy after radiofrequency ablation of 30-year persistent atrial tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Arai, Kotaro; Shoda, Morio

    2013-01-01

    Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC) is a reversible form of the left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction and is believed to be a relatively acute process. We report a TIC case with a 30-year history of long-lasting persistent atrial tachycardia involving a 44-year-old man previously diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy and a low LV ejection fraction (LVEF) of 20%. ECG revealed atrial tachycardia at 110–120 bpm. He was hospitalised with a worsening heart failure. His clinical status was New York Heart Association functional class III, and echocardiography revealed LV dilation and an LVEF of 9%. A two-dimensional speckle-tracking strain measurement revealed LV mechanical dyssynchrony. He underwent radiofrequency ablation for atrial tachycardia. After restoring sinus rhythm, his cardiac symptoms improved immediately. The LV mechanical dyssynchrony decreased a week after ablation, without changes in the LV dilation or LVEF. Thereafter, the LV dilation and systolic function gradually improved, and atrial tachycardia and heart failure remained absent. PMID:24326427

  6. Dual color photoactivation localization microscopy of cardiomyopathy-associated desmin mutants.

    PubMed

    Brodehl, Andreas; Hedde, Per Niklas; Dieding, Mareike; Fatima, Azra; Walhorn, Volker; Gayda, Susan; Šarić, Tomo; Klauke, Bärbel; Gummert, Jan; Anselmetti, Dario; Heilemann, Mike; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Milting, Hendrik

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in the DES gene coding for the intermediate filament protein desmin may cause skeletal and cardiac myopathies, which are frequently characterized by cytoplasmic aggregates of desmin and associated proteins at the cellular level. By atomic force microscopy, we demonstrated filament formation defects of desmin mutants, associated with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. To understand the pathogenesis of this disease, it is essential to analyze desmin filament structures under conditions in which both healthy and mutant desmin are expressed at equimolar levels mimicking an in vivo situation. Here, we applied dual color photoactivation localization microscopy using photoactivatable fluorescent proteins genetically fused to desmin and characterized the heterozygous status in living cells lacking endogenous desmin. In addition, we applied fluorescence resonance energy transfer to unravel short distance structural patterns of desmin mutants in filaments. For the first time, we present consistent high resolution data on the structural effects of five heterozygous desmin mutations on filament formation in vitro and in living cells. Our results may contribute to the molecular understanding of the pathological filament formation defects of heterozygous DES mutations in cardiomyopathies.

  7. Dual Color Photoactivation Localization Microscopy of Cardiomyopathy-associated Desmin Mutants*

    PubMed Central

    Brodehl, Andreas; Hedde, Per Niklas; Dieding, Mareike; Fatima, Azra; Walhorn, Volker; Gayda, Susan; Šarić, Tomo; Klauke, Bärbel; Gummert, Jan; Anselmetti, Dario; Heilemann, Mike; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Milting, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the DES gene coding for the intermediate filament protein desmin may cause skeletal and cardiac myopathies, which are frequently characterized by cytoplasmic aggregates of desmin and associated proteins at the cellular level. By atomic force microscopy, we demonstrated filament formation defects of desmin mutants, associated with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. To understand the pathogenesis of this disease, it is essential to analyze desmin filament structures under conditions in which both healthy and mutant desmin are expressed at equimolar levels mimicking an in vivo situation. Here, we applied dual color photoactivation localization microscopy using photoactivatable fluorescent proteins genetically fused to desmin and characterized the heterozygous status in living cells lacking endogenous desmin. In addition, we applied fluorescence resonance energy transfer to unravel short distance structural patterns of desmin mutants in filaments. For the first time, we present consistent high resolution data on the structural effects of five heterozygous desmin mutations on filament formation in vitro and in living cells. Our results may contribute to the molecular understanding of the pathological filament formation defects of heterozygous DES mutations in cardiomyopathies. PMID:22403400

  8. Delayed cardiomyopathy in dystrophin deficient mdx mice relies on intrinsic glutathione resource.

    PubMed

    Khouzami, Lara; Bourin, Marie-Claude; Christov, Christo; Damy, Thibaud; Escoubet, Brigitte; Caramelle, Philippe; Perier, Magali; Wahbi, Karim; Meune, Christophe; Pavoine, Catherine; Pecker, Françoise

    2010-09-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although they have been a model for DMD, mdx mice exhibit slowly developing cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that disease process was delayed owing to the development of an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress, involving glutathione synthesis. At 15 to 20 weeks of age, mdx mice displayed a 33% increase in blood glutathione levels compared with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cardiac glutathione content was similar in mdx and C57BL/6 mice as a result of the balanced increased expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits ensuring glutathione synthesis in the mdx mouse heart, as well as increased glutathione peroxidase-1 using glutathione. Oral administration from 10 weeks of age of the glutamate cysteine ligase inhibitor, l-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO, 5 mmol/L), led to a 33% and 50% drop in blood and cardiac glutathione, respectively, in 15- to 20-week-old mdx mice. Moreover, 20-week-old BSO-treated mdx mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction, discontinuities in beta-dystroglycan expression, micronecrosis and microangiopathic injuries. Examination of the glutathione status in four DMD patients showed that three displayed systemic glutathione deficiency as well. In conclusion, low glutathione resource hastens the onset of cardiomyopathy linked to a defect in dystrophin in mdx mice. This is relevant to the glutathione deficiency that DMD patients may suffer.

  9. Delayed Cardiomyopathy in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice Relies on Intrinsic Glutathione Resource

    PubMed Central

    Khouzami, Lara; Bourin, Marie-Claude; Christov, Christo; Damy, Thibaud; Escoubet, Brigitte; Caramelle, Philippe; Perier, Magali; Wahbi, Karim; Meune, Christophe; Pavoine, Catherine; Pecker, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although they have been a model for DMD, mdx mice exhibit slowly developing cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that disease process was delayed owing to the development of an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress, involving glutathione synthesis. At 15 to 20 weeks of age, mdx mice displayed a 33% increase in blood glutathione levels compared with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cardiac glutathione content was similar in mdx and C57BL/6 mice as a result of the balanced increased expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits ensuring glutathione synthesis in the mdx mouse heart, as well as increased glutathione peroxidase-1 using glutathione. Oral administration from 10 weeks of age of the glutamate cysteine ligase inhibitor, l-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO, 5 mmol/L), led to a 33% and 50% drop in blood and cardiac glutathione, respectively, in 15- to 20-week-old mdx mice. Moreover, 20-week-old BSO-treated mdx mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction, discontinuities in β-dystroglycan expression, micronecrosis and microangiopathic injuries. Examination of the glutathione status in four DMD patients showed that three displayed systemic glutathione deficiency as well. In conclusion, low glutathione resource hastens the onset of cardiomyopathy linked to a defect in dystrophin in mdx mice. This is relevant to the glutathione deficiency that DMD patients may suffer. PMID:20696779

  10. Microbial Siderophores Exert a Subtle Role in Arabidopsis during Infection by Manipulating the Immune Response and the Iron Status1[W

    PubMed Central

    Dellagi, Alia; Segond, Diego; Rigault, Martine; Fagard, Mathilde; Simon, Clara; Saindrenan, Patrick; Expert, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Siderophores (ferric ion chelators) are secreted by organisms in response to iron deficiency. The pathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi produces two siderophores, achromobactin and chrysobactin (CB), which are required for systemic dissemination in host plants. Previous studies have shown that CB is produced in planta and can trigger the up-regulation of the plant ferritin gene AtFER1. To further investigate the function of CB during pathogenesis, we analyzed its effect in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants following leaf infiltration. CB activates the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated signaling pathway, while the CB ferric complex is ineffective, suggesting that the elicitor activity of this siderophore is due to its iron-binding property. We confirmed this hypothesis by testing the effect of siderophores structurally unrelated to CB, including deferrioxamine. There was no activation of SA-dependent defense in plants grown under iron deficiency before CB treatment. Transcriptional analysis of the genes encoding the root ferrous ion transporter and ferric chelate reductase, and determination of the activity of this enzyme in response to CB or deferrioxamine, showed that these compounds induce a leaf-to-root iron deficiency signal. This root response as well as ferritin gene up-regulation in the leaf were not compromised in a SA-deficient mutant line. Using the Arabidopsis-E. chrysanthemi pathosystem, we have shown that CB promotes bacterial growth in planta and can modulate plant defenses through an antagonistic mechanism between SA and jasmonic acid signaling cascades. Collectively, these data reveal a new link between two processes mediated by SA and iron in response to microbial siderophores. PMID:19448037

  11. Iron Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A meteorite composed mainly of nickel-iron, with traces of other metals; also referred to simply as an iron, and formerly known as a siderite. Irons account for over 6% of all known meteorite specimens. They are the easiest type to identify, being heavy, magnetic and rust-colored; their metallic sheen tarnishes quickly on the Earth's surface, but otherwise irons show better resistance to weatheri...

  12. Successful heart transplantation using a donor heart afflicted by takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Yazhini; Campagna, Ryan; Rosas, Paola C; Essa, Essa; Hasan, Ayesha K; Higgins, Robert S D; Emani, Sitaramesh; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as apical ballooning syndrome, stress cardiomyopathy, or broken heart syndrome, is a disease characterized by transient ventricular dysfunction in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Herein, we present a case in which a heart with mild takotsubo cardiomyopathy was utilized as the donor organ for an orthotopic heart transplant. PMID:26722178

  13. The Use of Fluoxetine in a Patient With Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Suki K; Catalano, Maria C; Catalano, Glenn

    2016-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute coronary syndrome that is believed to be brought on by stress. Symptoms, which are similar to an acute myocardial infarction, include chest pain, shortness of breath, arrhythmias, and cardiogenic shock, and the electrocardiogram often shows ST and T wave changes. Left ventricular wall hypokinesis along with a significantly reduced ejection fraction are seen on echocardiogram. The great majority of these symptoms all occur in the absence of occlusive disease. Many cases have been reported in which the development of takotsubo cardiomyopathy was associated with serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. However, no cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been reported involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. This article presents the case of a 51-year-old woman receiving stable therapy with fluoxetine who developed takotsubo cardiomyopathy after an acute stress. We also discuss the clinical presentation of takotsubo cardiomyopathy, review possible causes, and discuss the treatment of depressive symptoms in patients who are at increased risk of developing this illness.

  14. Right ventricular cardiomyopathies: a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Limongelli, Giuseppe; Rea, Alessandra; Masarone, Daniele; Francalanci, M Paola; Anastasakis, Aris; Calabro', Raffaele; Giovanna, Russo Maria; Bossone, Eduardo; Elliott, Perry Mark; Pacileo, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The physiological importance of the right ventricle (RV) has been underestimated over the past years. Finally in the early 1950s through the 1970s, cardiac surgeons recognized the importance of RV function. Since then, the importance of RV function has been recognized in many acquired cardiac heart disease. RV can be mainly or together with left ventricle (LV) affected by inherited or acquired cardiomyopathy. In fact, RV morphological and functional remodeling occurs more common during cardiomyopathies than in ischemic cardiomyopathies and more closely parallels LV dysfunction. Moreover, there are some cardiomyopathy subtypes showing a predominant or exclusive involvement of the RV, and they are probably less known by cardiologists. The clinical approach to right ventricular cardiomyopathies is often challenging. Imaging is the first step to raise the suspicion and to guide the diagnostic process. In the differential diagnosis, cardiologists should consider athlete's heart, congenital heart diseases, multisystemic disorders, and inherited arrhythmias. However, a multiparametric and multidisciplinary approach, involving cardiologists, experts in imaging, geneticists, and pathologists with a specific expertise in these heart muscle disorders is required.

  15. Genetic advances in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ho, Carolyn Y; Charron, Philippe; Richard, Pascale; Girolami, Francesca; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Pinto, Yigal

    2015-04-01

    Genetic studies in the 1980s and 1990s led to landmark discoveries that sarcomere mutations cause both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere mutations also likely play a role in more complex phenotypes and overlap cardiomyopathies with features of hypertrophy, dilation, diastolic abnormalities, and non-compaction. Identification of the genetic cause of these important conditions provides unique opportunities to interrogate and characterize disease pathogenesis and pathophysiology, starting from the molecular level and expanding from there. With such insights, there is potential for clinical translation that may transform management of patients and families with inherited cardiomyopathies. If key pathways for disease development can be identified, they could potentially serve as targets for novel disease-modifying or disease-preventing therapies. By utilizing gene-based diagnostic testing, we can identify at-risk individuals prior to the onset of clinical disease, allowing for disease-modifying therapy to be initiated early in life, at a time that such treatment may be most successful. In this section, we review the current application of genetics in clinical management, focusing on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as a paradigm; discuss state-of-the-art genetic testing technology; review emerging knowledge of gene expression in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies; and discuss both the prospects, as well as the challenges, of bringing genetics to medicine.

  16. The Use of Fluoxetine in a Patient With Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Suki K; Catalano, Maria C; Catalano, Glenn

    2016-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute coronary syndrome that is believed to be brought on by stress. Symptoms, which are similar to an acute myocardial infarction, include chest pain, shortness of breath, arrhythmias, and cardiogenic shock, and the electrocardiogram often shows ST and T wave changes. Left ventricular wall hypokinesis along with a significantly reduced ejection fraction are seen on echocardiogram. The great majority of these symptoms all occur in the absence of occlusive disease. Many cases have been reported in which the development of takotsubo cardiomyopathy was associated with serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. However, no cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been reported involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. This article presents the case of a 51-year-old woman receiving stable therapy with fluoxetine who developed takotsubo cardiomyopathy after an acute stress. We also discuss the clinical presentation of takotsubo cardiomyopathy, review possible causes, and discuss the treatment of depressive symptoms in patients who are at increased risk of developing this illness. PMID:27123803

  17. Mendelian bases of myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Piluso, G; Aurino, S; Cacciottolo, M; Del Vecchio Blanco, F; Lancioni, A; Rotundo, IL; Torella, A; Nigro, V

    2010-01-01

    Summary A second genetic revolution is approaching thanks to next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. In the next few years, the 1,000$-genome sequencing promises to reveal every individual variation of DNA. There is, however, a major problem: the identification of thousands of nucleotide changes per individual with uncertain pathological meaning. This is also an ethical issue. In the middle, there is today the possibility to address the sequencing analysis of genetically heterogeneous disorders to selected groups of genes with defined mutation types. This will be cost-effective and safer. We assembled an easy-to manage overview of most Mendelian genes involved in myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies. This was entirely put together using a number of open access web resources that are listed below. During this effort we realized that there are unexpected countless sources of data, but the confusion is huge. In some cases, we got lost in the validation of disease genes and in the difficulty to discriminate between polymorphisms and disease-causing alleles. In the table are the annotated genes, their associated disorders, genomic, mRNA and coding sizes. We also counted the number of pathological alleles so far reported and the percentage of single nucleotide mutations. PMID:22029103

  18. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: current management and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Haghikia, Arash; Nonhoff, Justus; Bauersachs, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with marked physiological changes challenging the cardiovascular system. Among the more severe pregnancy associated cardiovascular complications, peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a potentially life-threatening heart disease emerging towards the end of pregnancy or in the first postpartal months in previously healthy women. A major challenge is to distinguish the peripartum discomforts in healthy women (fatigue, shortness of breath, and oedema) from the pathological symptoms of PPCM. Moreover, pregnancy-related pathologies such as preeclampsia, myocarditis, or underlying genetic disease show overlapping symptoms with PPCM. Difficulties in diagnosis and the discrimination from other pathological conditions in pregnancy may explain why PPCM is still underestimated. Additionally, underlying pathophysiologies are poorly understood, biomarkers are scarce and treatment options in general limited. Experience in long-term prognosis and management including subsequent pregnancies is just beginning to emerge. This review focuses on novel aspects of physiological and pathophysiological changes of the maternal cardiovascular system by comparing normal conditions, hypertensive complications, genetic aspects, and infectious disease in PPCM-pregnancies. It also presents clinical and basic science data on the current state of knowledge on PPCM and brings them in context thereby highlighting promising new insights in diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches and management. PMID:25636745

  19. The embryological basis of subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Captur, Gabriella; Ho, Carolyn Y; Schlossarek, Saskia; Kerwin, Janet; Mirabel, Mariana; Wilson, Robert; Rosmini, Stefania; Obianyo, Chinwe; Reant, Patricia; Bassett, Paul; Cook, Andrew C; Lindsay, Susan; McKenna, William J; Mills, Kevin; Elliott, Perry M; Mohun, Timothy J; Carrier, Lucie; Moon, James C

    2016-06-21

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins, the commonest being MYBPC3 encoding myosin-binding protein C. It is characterised by left ventricular hypertrophy but there is an important pre-hypertrophic phenotype with features including crypts, abnormal mitral leaflets and trabeculae. We investigated these during mouse cardiac development using high-resolution episcopic microscopy. In embryonic hearts from wildtype, homozygous (HO) and heterozygous (HET) Mybpc3-targeted knock-out (KO) mice we show that crypts (one or two) are a normal part of wildtype development but they almost all resolve by birth. By contrast, HO and HET embryos had increased crypt presence, abnormal mitral valve formation and alterations in the compaction process. In scarce normal human embryos, crypts were sometimes present. This study shows that features of the human pre-hypertrophic HCM phenotype occur in the mouse. In an animal model we demonstrate that there is an embryological HCM phenotype. Crypts are a normal part of cardiac development but, along with the mitral valve and trabeculae, their developmental trajectory is altered by the presence of HCM truncating Mybpc3 gene mutation.

  20. Monoamniotic monochorionic twins discordant for noncompaction cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Dianna; Bouhlal, Yosr; Ursell, Philip C; Shieh, Joseph T C

    2013-06-01

    Occasionally "identical twins" are phenotypically different, raising the question of zygosity and the issue of genetic versus environmental influences during development. We recently noted monochorionic-monoamniotic twins, one of which had an isolated cardiac abnormality, noncompaction cardiomyopathy, a condition characterized by cardiac ventricular hypertrabeculation. We examined the prenatal course and subsequent pathologic correlation since ventricular morphogenesis may depend on early muscular contraction and blood flow. The monochorionic-monoamniotic female twin pair was initially identified since one fetus presented with increased nuchal translucency. Complete heart block was later identified in the fetus with nuchal translucency who did not survive after delivery. In contrast, the unaffected twin had normal cardiac studies both prenatally and postnatally. Pathologic analysis of the affected twin demonstrated noncompaction of the left ventricle with dysplasia of the aortic and pulmonary valves. Dissection of the cardiac conduction system disclosed atrioventricular bundle fibrosis. Maternal lupus studies, amniocentesis with karyotype, and studies for 22q11.2 were normal. To test for zygosity, we performed multiple STR marker analysis and found that all markers were shared even using nonblood tissues from the affected twin. These studies demonstrate that monozygotic twins that are monochorionic monoamniotic can be discordant for cardiac noncompaction. The results suggest further investigation into the potential roles of pathologic fibrosis, contractility, and blood flow in cardiac ventricle development. PMID:23636980

  1. The embryological basis of subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Captur, Gabriella; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Schlossarek, Saskia; Kerwin, Janet; Mirabel, Mariana; Wilson, Robert; Rosmini, Stefania; Obianyo, Chinwe; Reant, Patricia; Bassett, Paul; Cook, Andrew C.; Lindsay, Susan; McKenna, William J.; Mills, Kevin; Elliott, Perry M.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Carrier, Lucie; Moon, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins, the commonest being MYBPC3 encoding myosin-binding protein C. It is characterised by left ventricular hypertrophy but there is an important pre-hypertrophic phenotype with features including crypts, abnormal mitral leaflets and trabeculae. We investigated these during mouse cardiac development using high-resolution episcopic microscopy. In embryonic hearts from wildtype, homozygous (HO) and heterozygous (HET) Mybpc3-targeted knock-out (KO) mice we show that crypts (one or two) are a normal part of wildtype development but they almost all resolve by birth. By contrast, HO and HET embryos had increased crypt presence, abnormal mitral valve formation and alterations in the compaction process. In scarce normal human embryos, crypts were sometimes present. This study shows that features of the human pre-hypertrophic HCM phenotype occur in the mouse. In an animal model we demonstrate that there is an embryological HCM phenotype. Crypts are a normal part of cardiac development but, along with the mitral valve and trabeculae, their developmental trajectory is altered by the presence of HCM truncating Mybpc3 gene mutation. PMID:27323879

  2. The embryological basis of subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Captur, Gabriella; Ho, Carolyn Y; Schlossarek, Saskia; Kerwin, Janet; Mirabel, Mariana; Wilson, Robert; Rosmini, Stefania; Obianyo, Chinwe; Reant, Patricia; Bassett, Paul; Cook, Andrew C; Lindsay, Susan; McKenna, William J; Mills, Kevin; Elliott, Perry M; Mohun, Timothy J; Carrier, Lucie; Moon, James C

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins, the commonest being MYBPC3 encoding myosin-binding protein C. It is characterised by left ventricular hypertrophy but there is an important pre-hypertrophic phenotype with features including crypts, abnormal mitral leaflets and trabeculae. We investigated these during mouse cardiac development using high-resolution episcopic microscopy. In embryonic hearts from wildtype, homozygous (HO) and heterozygous (HET) Mybpc3-targeted knock-out (KO) mice we show that crypts (one or two) are a normal part of wildtype development but they almost all resolve by birth. By contrast, HO and HET embryos had increased crypt presence, abnormal mitral valve formation and alterations in the compaction process. In scarce normal human embryos, crypts were sometimes present. This study shows that features of the human pre-hypertrophic HCM phenotype occur in the mouse. In an animal model we demonstrate that there is an embryological HCM phenotype. Crypts are a normal part of cardiac development but, along with the mitral valve and trabeculae, their developmental trajectory is altered by the presence of HCM truncating Mybpc3 gene mutation. PMID:27323879

  3. Pediatric cardiomyopathies: causes, epidemiology, clinical course, preventive strategies and therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E; Cochran, Thomas R; Briston, David A; Brown, Stefanie R; Sambatakos, Peter J; Miller, Tracie L; Carrillo, Adriana A; Corcia, Liat; Sanchez, Janine E; Diamond, Melissa B; Freundlich, Michael; Harake, Danielle; Gayle, Tamara; Harmon, William G; Rusconi, Paolo G; Sandhu, Satinder K; Wilkinson, James D

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies, which are rare but serious disorders of the muscles of the heart, affect at least one in every 100,000 children in the USA. Approximately 40% of children with symptomatic cardiomyopathy undergo heart transplantation or die from cardiac complications within 2 years. However, a significant number of children suffering from cardiomyopathy are surviving into adulthood, making it an important chronic illness for both pediatric and adult clinicians to understand. The natural history, risk factors, prevalence and incidence of this pediatric condition were not fully understood before the 1990s. Questions regarding optimal diagnostic, prognostic and treatment methods remain. Children require long-term follow-up into adulthood in order to identify the factors associated with best clinical practice including diagnostic approaches, as well as optimal treatment approaches. In this article, we comprehensively review current research on various presentations of this disease, along with current knowledge about their causes, treatments and clinical outcomes. PMID:24180540

  4. Defective insulin signaling and mitochondrial dynamics in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Westermeier, Francisco; Navarro-Marquez, Mario; López-Crisosto, Camila; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Quiroga, Clara; Bustamante, Mario; Verdejo, Hugo E.; Zalaquett, Ricardo; Ibacache, Mauricio; Parra, Valentina; Castro, Pablo F.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a common consequence of longstanding type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and encompasses structural, morphological, functional, and metabolic abnormalities in the heart. Myocardial energy metabolism depends on mitochondria, which must generate sufficient ATP to meet the high energy demands of the myocardium. Dysfunctional mitochondria are involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic heart disease. A large body of evidence implicates myocardial insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of DCM. Recent studies show that insulin signaling influences myocardial energy metabolism by impacting cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dynamics and function under physiological conditions. However, comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanisms linking insulin signaling and changes in the architecture of the mitochondrial network in diabetic cardiomyopathy is lacking. This review summarizes our current understanding of how defective insulin signaling impacts cardiac function in diabetic cardiomyopathy and discusses the potential role of mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:25686534

  5. Dilated cardiomyopathy in an American cocker spaniel with taurine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gavaghan, B J; Kittleson, M D

    1997-12-01

    An American Cocker Spaniel with low plasma taurine concentration (< 2 nmol/mL) was presented with dyspnoea associated with pulmonary oedema and a left ventricular shortening fraction of 9%. Emergency therapy with furosemide, dobutamine, nitroglycerine and oxygen supplementation led to a good response. Chronic therapy was started with enalapril, furosemide, digoxin and taurine. Improvement in all echocardiographic indices were noted over a 22 week follow-up, most notably an increase in left ventricular shortening fraction to 20%, a decrease of E-point septal separation from 14 mm to 7 mm and marked left ventricular remodelling. This degree of improvement in myocardial function may represent a direct link between dilated cardiomyopathy in the American Cocker Spaniel and plasma taurine deficiency. Alternatively, this response may reflect a breed-related cardiomyopathy with a natural history and therapeutic response not commonly seen in the more common large breed cardiomyopathy presentations.

  6. Treatment of pre-existing cardiomyopathy during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Sofie; De Pauw, Michel; Tromp, Fiona; Ascoop, An-Kristien; Roelens, Kristien; De Backer, Julie

    2014-04-01

    Heart failure is an established predictor of primary cardiac events during pregnancy. Adequate heart failure treatment in pregnant women is hampered by important foetotoxicity of several conventional drugs. Hydralazine with or without long-acting nitrates has been proposed as an alternative for ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. There are no published data, however, on the use of hydralazine to treat heart failure during pregnancy. We describe the course and outcome of pregnancy in two patients with heart failure. A 31-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy was not treated with hydralazine during pregnancy and developed worsening heart failure. A 36-year-old woman with ischaemic cardiomyopathy was treated with hydralazine early during pregnancy and remained stable throughout and after pregnancy. We assume that early initiation of hydralazine as an alternative for ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers during pregnancy in patients with cardiomyopathy could prevent further left ventricular dilatation and worsening heart failure.

  7. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Teng J; Patchett, Nicholas D; Bernard, Sheilah A

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  8. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Teng J.

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  9. Rare case of stress cardiomyopathy due to intramuscular epinephrine administration.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Salik; Melnick, Stephen; Lohani, Saroj; Lloyd, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 37-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with retrosternal chest pain following intramuscular administration of epinephrine due to presumed anaphylaxis. On arrival, she was found to have ST segment depression in the anterolateral leads on ECG and elevated cardiac troponins. She was diagnosed with stress cardiomyopathy based on left ventricle dysfunction and angiographically normal coronary arteries on cardiac catheterisation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third reported case of takotsubo cardiomyopathy following appropriately dosed intramuscular administration of epinephrine for anaphylaxis. This case highlights the importance of considering stress cardiomyopathy in patients presenting with chest pain syndrome following systemic administration of epinephrine. PMID:27268785

  10. mRNA regulation of cardiac iron transporters and ferritin subunits in a mouse model of iron overload.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Casey J; Wood, Ruth I; Wood, John C

    2014-12-01

    Iron cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of death in iron overload. Men have twice the mortality rate of women, though the cause is unknown. In hemojuvelin-knockout mice, a model of the disease, males load more cardiac iron than females. We postulated that sex differences in cardiac iron import cause differences in cardiac iron concentration. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to measure mRNA of cardiac iron transporters in hemojuvelin-knockout mice. No sex differences were discovered among putative importers of nontransferrin-bound iron (L-type and T-type calcium channels, ZRT/IRT-like protein 14 zinc channels). Transferrin-bound iron transporters were also analyzed; these are controlled by the iron regulatory element/iron regulatory protein (IRE/IRP) system. There was a positive relationship between cardiac iron and ferroportin mRNA in both sexes, but it was significantly steeper in females (p < 0.05). Transferrin receptor 1 and divalent metal transporter 1 were more highly expressed in females than males (p < 0.01 and p < 0.0001, respectively), consistent with their lower cardiac iron levels, as predicted by IRE/IRP regulatory pathways. Light-chain ferritin showed a positive correlation with cardiac iron that was nearly identical in males and females (R(2) = 0.41, p < 0.01; R(2) = 0.56, p < 0.05, respectively), whereas heavy-chain ferritin was constitutively expressed in both sexes. This represents the first report of IRE/IRP regulatory pathways in the heart. Transcriptional regulation of ferroportin was suggested in both sexes, creating a potential mechanism for differential set points for iron export. Constitutive heavy-chain-ferritin expression suggests a logical limit to cardiac iron buffering capacity at levels known to produce heart failure in humans. PMID:25220979

  11. A vicious cycle of acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy and circulatory collapse secondary to pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Otusanya, Olufisayo; Goraya, Harmeen; Iyer, Priyanka; Landi, Kristen; Tibb, Amit; Msaouel, Pavlos

    2015-01-01

    Acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy is an uncommon, life-threatening manifestation of pheochromocytoma. The massive release of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla and their toxic effects on the coronary vessels and the cardiac myocytes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in patients with pheochromocytoma. Severe manifestations, such as acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy, may be the initial presentation, especially in unsuspected and untreated pheochromocytoma cases. The clinical course of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy is unpredictable as patients may rapidly deteriorate into circulatory collapse and multisystem crisis. We report a case of a 25-year-old man who presented with catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26512333

  12. Irukandji syndrome, catecholamines, and mid-ventricular stress cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tiong, Keith

    2009-03-01

    We present here the first reported case of mid-ventricular stress cardiomyopathy secondary to 'Irukandji syndrome', following envenomisation from a jellyfish. Carukia barnesi is a cubozoan or box jellyfish found in Far North Queensland, Australia prevalent during the warmer months of the year. It has been associated with 'Irukandji syndrome' as characterized by a sympathetic overdrive secondary to an excess of endogenous catecholamines release. There have been previous cases of sudden onset of left ventricular dysfunction and jellyfish. The author believes that this case is important because it highlights the possible association between the sudden release in catecholamines and stress cardiomyopathy. PMID:18801721

  13. Non-compaction cardiomyopathy in an asymptomatic athlete.

    PubMed

    Manus, Margaret Kapor; Roy, Satyajeet; Stag, Rosemarie; Hyman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of sudden cardiac death in athletes requires the screening and recognition of pathologies that often remain clinically silent for years until provoked by a physiologic stressor. This can result in the manifestation of disease and even death. Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC), newly classified as a distinct entity arising in the adult population, is a cardiomyopathy that at initial presentation can manifest as a wide spectrum of symptoms from asymptomatic to ventricular arrhythmias, systemic embolism and even sudden cardiac death. We present the case of an asymptomatic athlete found to have LVNC and discuss the implications this finding may have on sports participation. PMID:27535732

  14. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment of Cardiomyopathies in Children.

    PubMed

    Price, Jack F; Jeewa, Aamir; Denfield, Susan W

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart muscle, a term introduced in 1957 to identify a group of myocardial diseases not attributable to coronary artery disease. The definition has since been modified to refer to structural and or functional abnormalities of the myocardium where other known causes of myocardial dysfunction, such as systemic hypertension, valvular disease and ischemic heart disease, have been excluded. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical assessment and therapeutic strategies for hypertrophic, dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, with a particular focus on aspects unique to children.

  15. Hypothyroid cardiomyopathy complicated by a left ventricular laminar thrombus.

    PubMed

    Van Treeck, Benjamin J; Masoud, Amgad G

    2014-01-01

    Clinical hypothyroidism is the most common hormone deficiency in the United States and is found in 0.3% of the U.S. population. It is associated with characteristic symptoms that can be readily identified by a careful history and physical examination. Hypothyroidism affects many bodily systems; in particular the cardiovascular system is impacted via multiple mechanisms.3 Occasionally hypothyroidism leads to transient left ventricular systolic dysfunction, termed hypothyroid cardiomyopathy. A rare sequela of this condition is a left ventricular thrombus, which has been described in two case reports thus far. Here we report a third case of reversible hypothyroid cardiomyopathy complicated by a left ventricular laminar thrombus. PMID:25438369

  16. A Dilated Cardiomyopathy Revealing a Neuroblastoma: Which Link?

    PubMed

    Duhil de Bénazé, Gwenaelle; Iserin, Franck; Durand, Philippe; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Orbach, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Acute cardiac dysfunctions associated to neuroblastoma have rarely been reported. Cases already described are mainly related to high blood pressure, and rarely to an "acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy" more frequently found in adults with pheochromocytoma or secreting paraganglioma. We here report a case of an 8-month-old infant with severe acute cardiac failure with dilated cardiomyopathy and moderate ischemic myocardial signs, revealing a favorable histoprognosis neuroblastoma. After specific treatment, evolution was favorable, and cardiac function completely recovered. The association of reversible ischemic signs with high plasmatic level of catecholamines suggests the existence of a catecholamine-induced acute cardiac dysfunction which imitates a Tako-Tsubo syndrome in neuroblastoma.

  17. Adherence to thresholds: overdiagnosis of left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kini, Vinay; Ferrari, Victor A; Han, Yuchi; Jha, Saurabh

    2015-08-01

    Thresholds derived from quantification in imaging are increasingly used to define disease. This derivation is not an exact science. When one uses a threshold to define a disease, one does not clearly demarcate disease from normality because the threshold includes overlapping spectra of mild disease and normality. Thus, use of the threshold will mislabel normal individuals with disease. In this perspective, we will describe how the threshold has been derived for left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy, the statistical biases in the design of studies used to derive the threshold, and the dangers of overdiagnosis when the threshold is used to rule out left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy.

  18. Trimetazidine therapy prevents obesity-induced cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Ussher, John R; Fillmore, Natasha; Keung, Wendy; Mori, Jun; Beker, Donna L; Wagg, Cory S; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Inhibiting fatty acid oxidation has emerged as a novel approach for the treatment of ischemic heart disease. Our aim was to determine whether pharmacologic inhibition of 3-ketoacyl-coenzyme A thiolase (3-KAT), which catalyzes the final step of fatty acid oxidation, could improve obesity-induced cardiomyopathy. A 3-week treatment with the 3-KAT inhibitor trimetazidine prevented obesity-induced reduction in both systolic and diastolic function. Therefore, targeting cardiac fatty acid oxidation may be a novel therapeutic approach to alleviate the growing burden of obesity-related cardiomyopathy.

  19. A Dilated Cardiomyopathy Revealing a Neuroblastoma: Which Link?

    PubMed

    Duhil de Bénazé, Gwenaelle; Iserin, Franck; Durand, Philippe; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Orbach, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Acute cardiac dysfunctions associated to neuroblastoma have rarely been reported. Cases already described are mainly related to high blood pressure, and rarely to an "acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy" more frequently found in adults with pheochromocytoma or secreting paraganglioma. We here report a case of an 8-month-old infant with severe acute cardiac failure with dilated cardiomyopathy and moderate ischemic myocardial signs, revealing a favorable histoprognosis neuroblastoma. After specific treatment, evolution was favorable, and cardiac function completely recovered. The association of reversible ischemic signs with high plasmatic level of catecholamines suggests the existence of a catecholamine-induced acute cardiac dysfunction which imitates a Tako-Tsubo syndrome in neuroblastoma. PMID:27571126

  20. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Coexisting with Acute Pericarditis and Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Sezavar, Seyed Hashem; Riahi Beni, Hassan; Ghanavati, Reza; Hajahmadi, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is a stress-induced cardiomyopathy that occurs primarily in postmenopausal women. It mimics clinical picture of acute coronary syndrome with nonobstructive coronary arteries and a characteristic transient left (or bi-) ventricular apical ballooning at angiography. The exact pathogenesis of TCM is not well recognized. Hereby we present an unusual case of TCM that presents with signs and symptoms of acute pericarditis and was also found to have a coexisting coronary muscle bridge on coronary angiography. We discuss the impact of these associations in better understanding of the pathogenesis of TCM. PMID:27437150

  1. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia: an updated imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Stefan L

    2015-02-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) is a rare inherited cardiomyopathy characterized by fibrofatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium and risk of sudden death from ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients and family members suspected of having ARVC/D. This article discusses the epidemiology and pathophysiology of ARVC/D, reviews typical MR imaging findings and diagnostic criteria, and summarizes potential pitfalls in the MR imaging evaluation of patients suspected of having ARVC/D.

  2. Acute and Chronic Pheochromocytoma-Induced Cardiomyopathies: Different Prognoses?

    PubMed Central

    Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Pereira, Bruno; Motreff, Pascal; Pierrard, Romain; Burnot, Christelle; Vorilhon, Charles; Maqdasy, Salwan; Roche, Béatrice; Desbiez, Francoise; Clerfond, Guillaume; Citron, Bernard; Lusson, Jean-René; Tauveron, Igor; Eschalier, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPG) are rare and late-diagnosed catecholamine secreting tumors, which may be associated with unrecognized and/or severe cardiomyopathies. We performed a computer-assisted systematic search of the electronic Medline databases using the MESH terms “myocarditis,” “myocardial infarction,” “Takotsubo,” “stress cardiomyopathy,” “cardiogenic shock”, or “dilated cardiomyopathy,” and “pheochromocytoma” or “paraganglioma” from 1961 to August 2012. All detailed case reports of cardiomyopathy due to a PPG, without coronary stenosis, and revealed by acute symptoms were included and analyzed. A total of 145 cases reports were collected (49 Takotsubo Cardiomyopathies [TTC] and 96 other Catecholamine Cardiomyopathies [CC]). At initial presentation, prevalence of high blood pressure (87.7%), chest pain (49.0%), headaches (47.6%), palpitations (46.9%), sweating (39.3%), and shock (51.0%) were comparable between CC and TTC. Acute pulmonary edema (58.3% vs 38.8%, P = 0.03) was more frequent in CC. There was no difference in proportion of patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LV Ejection Fraction [LVEF] < 30%) at initial presentation between both groups (P = 0.15). LVEF recovery before (64.9% vs 40.8%, P = 0.005) and after surgical resection (97.7% vs73.3%, P = 0.001) was higher in the TTC group. Death occurred in 11 cases (7.6%). In multivariate analysis, only TTC was associated with a better LV recovery (0.15 [0.03–0.67], P = 0.03). Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma can lead to different cardiomyopathies with the same brutal and life-threatening initial clinical presentation but with a different recovery rate. Diagnosis of unexplained dilated cardiomyopathy or TTC should lead clinicians to a specific search for PPG. PMID:26683930

  3. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Tools for identifying risk and alleviating symptoms.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, M; Tak, T

    2000-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterized by left or right ventricular hypertrophy that is usually asymmetric and involves the interventricular septum. The condition has numerous genetic, anatomic, and clinical variations and continues to stimulate interest and investigation into causes and treatment options. New genetic forms of the disorder are being identified because of the rapid growth of molecular genetics. However, even with technological advances and a large database of information, risk stratification and treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy remain difficult and controversial. Because of the high risk of sudden death, it is imperative that patients be advised against participation in competitive sports.

  4. Iron deficiency and iron excess damage mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in rats.

    PubMed

    Walter, Patrick B; Knutson, Mitchell D; Paler-Martinez, Andres; Lee, Sonia; Xu, Yu; Viteri, Fernando E; Ames, Bruce N

    2002-02-19

    Approximately two billion people, mainly women and children, are iron deficient. Two studies examined the effects of iron deficiency and supplementation on rats. In study 1, mitochondrial functional parameters and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage were assayed in iron-deficient (< or =5 microg/day) and iron-normal (800 microg/day) rats and in both groups after daily high-iron supplementation (8,000 microg/day) for 34 days. This dose is equivalent to the daily dose commonly given to iron-deficient humans. Iron-deficient rats had lower liver mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and increased levels of oxidants in polymorphonuclear-leukocytes, as assayed by dichlorofluorescein (P < 0.05). Rhodamine 123 fluorescence of polymorphonuclear-leukocytes also increased (P < 0.05). Lowered respiratory control ratios were found in daily high-iron-supplemented rats regardless of the previous iron status (P < 0.05). mtDNA damage was observed in both iron-deficient rats and rats receiving daily high-iron supplementation, compared with iron-normal rats (P < 0.05). Study 2 compared iron-deficient rats given high doses of iron (8,000 microg) either daily or every third day and found that rats given iron supplements every third day had less mtDNA damage on the second and third day after the last dose compared to daily high iron doses. Both inadequate and excessive iron (10 x nutritional need) cause significant mitochondrial malfunction. Although excess iron has been known to cause oxidative damage, the observation of oxidant-induced damage to mitochondria from iron deficiency has been unrecognized previously. Untreated iron deficiency, as well as excessive-iron supplementation, are deleterious and emphasize the importance of maintaining optimal iron intake.

  5. Early postnatal iron repletion overcomes lasting effects of gestational iron deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Beard, John L; Unger, Erica L; Bianco, Laura E; Paul, Tessy; Rundle, Sarah E; Jones, Byron C

    2007-05-01

    Iron deficiency anemia in early childhood causes developmental delays and, very likely, irreversible alterations in neurological functioning. One primary goal for the present study was to determine whether the effects of late gestational iron deficiency on brain monoamine metabolism, iron content, and behavioral phenotypes could be repaired with iron intervention in early lactation. Young pregnant rats were provided iron-deficient or control diets from mid-gestation (G15). At postnatal d 4 (P4), pups from iron-deficient dams were out-fostered either to other ID dams or control dams while pups of control dams were similarly fostered to other control dams. Dietary treatments continued to adulthood (P65) when brain iron and regional monoamines were evaluated. P4 iron repletion normalized body iron status, brain iron concentrations, monoamine concentrations, and monoamine transporter and receptor densities in most brain regions. Dopamine transporter densities in caudate and substantia nigra were lower in ID rats but were normalized with iron repletion. Serotonin transporter levels in most brain regions and open-field exploration were also normalized with iron repletion. The success of this approach of early postnatal iron intervention following iron deficiency in utero contrasts to a relative lack of success when the intervention is performed at weaning. These data suggest that a window of opportunity exists for reversing the detrimental effects of iron deficiency in utero in rats and provides strong support of intervention approaches in humans with iron deficiency during pregnancy.

  6. Interactions among dietary manganese, heme iron, and nonheme iron in women.

    PubMed

    Davis, C D; Malecki, E A; Greger, J L

    1992-11-01

    The relationship among dietary intake of heme iron, nonheme iron, and manganese on indexes of hematological and nutritional status in regard to manganese of 47 women consuming their typical diets was investigated. Increasing dietary iron intake, by consuming more nonheme iron in the diet, had questionable effects on hematological status (hematocrit values and ferritin and transferrin concentrations) and negative effects on nutritional status in regard to manganese (serum manganese, urine manganese, and lymphocyte manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase activity). In contrast, heme-iron intake was positively correlated with hematological status and had no consistent effect on nutritional status in regard to manganese. Differences in dietary manganese intake had no consistent effect on indices of manganese or iron status, possibly because foods that contain significant amounts of manganese (green vegetables, breads, and cereals) often contain significant amounts of nonheme iron. Thus, increasing dietary manganese intake by consuming these foods is apt to have limited impact on manganese status because of the interaction between nonheme iron and manganese. PMID:1415012

  7. CINRG Duchenne Natural History Study demonstrates insufficient diagnosis and treatment of cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spurney, Christopher; Shimizu, Reiko; Hache, Lauren P.; Kolski, Hanna; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Clemens, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy is a common cause of morbidity and death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods A cross-sectional analysis of clinical data from a multi-institutional, international CINRG DMD Natural History Study of 340 DMD patients aged 2 to 28 years. Cardiomyopathy was defined as shortening fraction (SF) <28% or ejection fraction (EF) <55%. Results 231 participants reported a prior clinical echocardiogram study, and 174 had data for SF or EF. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy was 27% (47/174), and it was significantly associated with age and clinical stage. The association of cardiomyopathy with age and clinical stage was not changed by glucocorticoid use as a covariate (P>0.68). In patients with cardiomyopathy, 57 % (27/47) reported not taking any cardiac medications. Cardiac medications were used in 12% (15/127) of patients without cardiomyopathy. Discussion Echocardiograms were underutilized, and cardiomyopathy was undertreated in this DMD natural history cohort. PMID:24395289

  8. Echocardiography in the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Musat, Dan; Sherrid, Mark V

    2006-12-01

    Echocardiography is the best technique to diagnose, evaluate, follow-up and guide the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Diagnosis of HCM depends on left ventricular wall thickness >/=15 mm. Also noted are mitral valve systolic anterior motion, anteriorly positioned mitral valve leaflet coaptation, anomalous anterior insertion of papillary muscles, and diastolic dysfunction. Resting left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient occurs in 25% of patients and provocable gradients may be demonstrated in more than half of patients. Echocardiography is important for sudden death risk assessment; patients with a wall thickness more than 30 mm have a higher risk of sudden cardiac death, as often as 2%/year. Two thirds of the symptomatic obstructed patients can be successfully managed long term with medical treatment alone (beta-blockers, disopyramide, verapamil) guided by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) response and follow-up. Obstructed patients, who fail medical therapy, are usually offered invasive treatment: surgical septal myectomy, alcohol septal ablation, or DDD pacemaker. Preoperative TTE is a necessary guide for the surgeon in planning the operation. It gives the surgeon precise measurements of septal thickness, mitral valve leaflets length and floppiness and papillary muscle anomalies. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography is a very important tool for evaluating surgical results. Persistent SAM, resting outflow gradient more than 30 mm Hg or more than 50 mmHg with provocation, moderate to severe mitral regurgitation are indications for immediate revision. For patients >40 years old, and also not suitable for surgery because of comorbidities, alcohol septal ablation is viable alternative therapy for relief of obstruction and improvement of symptoms. Echocardiography is a valuable tool to choose the site of ablation (using myocardial contrast echocardiography), as well as for evaluation of results.

  9. Evidence of apoptosis in alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Solà, Joaquim; Fatjó, Francesc; Sacanella, Emilio; Estruch, Ramón; Bosch, Xavier; Urbano-Márquez, Alvaro; Nicolás, José-María

    2006-08-01

    Apoptosis is a mechanism of cell death implicated in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced organ damage. Experimental studies have suggested alcohol-mediated apoptosis in the cardiac muscle, and there is evidence of skeletal muscle apoptosis in long-term high-dose alcohol consumers. The relation between skeletal and cardiac muscle damage in alcoholism led us to consider the pathogenic role of apoptosis in alcoholic dilated cardiomyopathy. We evaluated apoptosis in the hearts of individuals with long-term alcoholism (n = 19), of those with long-standing hypertension (n = 20), and of those with no known disease as control subjects (n = 7). Alcohol consumption measurement, heart function evaluation, and myocardial immunohistochemical and morphometric analysis were performed. Apoptosis was evaluated with deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling assay, and BAX and BCL-2 expressions were used to detect induction of and protection from proapoptotic mechanisms, respectively. Hearts from patients with a history of alcoholism showed apoptotic indexes similar to those of organs from hypertensive donors. Subjects with structural heart damage of alcoholic or hypertensive origin showed higher apoptotic indexes in deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling, BAX, and BCL-2 assays as compared with control subjects (P < .001 for all). Moreover, New York Heart Association class I alcoholic patients displayed higher BAX and BCL-2 expressions as compared with control subjects. We conclude that apoptosis is present to a similar degree in the heart muscle of high-dose alcohol consumers and long-standing hypertensive subjects and is related to structural damage. Proapoptotic mechanisms are activated in alcoholic patients without heart damage.

  10. Cardiomyopathy in a Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus).

    PubMed

    Brandão, João; Reynolds, Caryn A; Beaufrère, Hugues; Serio, Jacqueline; Blair, Robert V; Gaschen, Lorrie; Johnson, James G; Del Piero, Fabio; Barker, Steven A; Nevarez, Javier G; Tully, Thomas N

    2016-07-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION An adult sexually intact female Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus) housed at a wildlife hospital was evaluated because of acute collapse during an educational exhibition. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination and hematologic analysis revealed no abnormalities; radiography revealed findings consistent with a previous tibiotarsal fracture. Coelioscopy with histologic examination and fungal culture of lung and air sac samples revealed anthracosis but no fungal infection. The hawk was discharged and temporarily removed from the education program; 1 month later, upon reintroduction into the program, it collapsed again. Physical examination and hematologic findings were similar to those after the first episode. Transcoelomic and transesophageal echocardiography and CT angiocardiography findings were consistent with cardiomyopathy. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Initial cardiac treatment included furosemide (0.5 mg/kg [0.23 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) and pimobendan (10 mg/kg [4.5 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h). After 10 days of treatment, peak and trough plasma concentrations of pimobendan were measured at 25, 196 and 715.97 ng/mL, respectively; the dosage was decreased to 0.25 mg/kg (0.11 mg/lb), PO, every 12 hours. No overt signs of toxicosis were detected. A sample was collected to reevaluate plasma pimobendan concentration after 30 days of treatment; results were not obtained prior to the patient's death but revealed a peak concentration of 16.8 ng/mL, with an undetectable trough concentration. The hawk was found dead 6 months after initial evaluation. Necropsy revealed cardiomegaly, but histologic examination did not reveal an inciting cause of cardiac dysfunction. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cardiac disease in raptors may be underreported. Transcoelomic and transesophageal echocardiography and CT angiography provided useful information for the diagnosis of cardiac disease in the hawk of this report. PMID:27379599

  11. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1–74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m2/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound. PMID:24414062

  12. Surviving competitive athletics with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maron, B J; Klues, H G

    1994-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is probably the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in youthful athletes, and this diagnosis has represented a contraindication to continued participation in competitive sports. Less well appreciated is the fact that within the clinical spectrum of HC are patients who, despite having this disease, have been able to undertake particularly intensive and often extraordinary levels of training for sports competition over many years without dying suddenly. Fourteen such patients (13 men and 1 woman, aged 30 to 66 years [mean 43]) form the present study group. HC was initially identified at 24 to 57 years of age (mean 34), usually under fortuitous circumstances. Patients most often competed in distance running (including the marathon, 7), but also in swimming, triathalon, basketball, and football. The duration of training ranged from 6 to 22 years (mean 15) and 5 continue to train and compete actively. The magnitude of training, competition, and achievement was considerable in most patients; 12 of the 14 performed either at the national, collegiate or professional level in their sport, completed numerous marathon and triathalon events, or sustained particularly rigorous training regimens of > or = 50 miles/week. Echocardiographic studies demonstrated a left ventricular wall thickness of 18 to 28 mm (mean 20) in most patients (12 of 14) having a relatively localized pattern of ventricular septal hypertrophy. It is possible for some patients with HC to tolerate particularly intense athletic training and competition for many years, and even maintain high levels of achievement without incurring symptoms and disease progression or dying suddenly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Alterations in connexin 43 during diabetic cardiomyopathy: competition of tyrosine nitration versus phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    COOK, Angela C.; SCHANBACHER, Brandon L.; BAUER, John Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cardiac conduction abnormalities are observed early in the progression of Type I diabetes, but the mechanism(s) involved are undefined. Connexin 43, a critical component of ventricular gap junctions, depends on tyrosine phosphorylation status to modulate channel conductance - alterations in connexin 43 content, distributions, and/or phosphorylation status may be involved in cardiac rhythm disturbances. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac content/distribution of connexin 43 are altered in a rat model of Type I diabetic cardiomyopathy, investigating a mechanistic role for tyrosine. Methods We conducted electrocardiographic analyses during the progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy in rats dosed with streptozotocin (65mg/kg), at 3, 7, and 35 days post-induction of diabetes. Following functional analyses, we conducted immunohistochemical and immunoprecipitation studies to assess alterations in connexin 43. Results We observed significant evidence of ventricular conduction abnormalities (QRS complex, Q-T interval) as early as 7 days post-streptozotocin, persisting throughout the study. Connexin 43 levels were increased 7d post- streptozotocin and remained elevated throughout the study. Connexin 40 content was unchanged relative to controls throughout the study. Changes in Connexin 43 distribution were also observed; connexin 43 staining was dispersed from myocyte short axis junctions. Connexin 43 tyrosine phosphorylation declined during the progression of diabetes, with concurrent increases in tyrosine nitration. Conclusions These data suggest that alterations in connexin 43 content and distribution occur during experimental diabetes and likely contribute to alterations in cardiac function, and that oxidative modification of tyrosine-mediated signaling may play a mechanistic role. PMID:24796789

  14. The Impact of HAART on Cardiomyopathy among Children and Adolescents Perinatally Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunjal; van Dyke, Russell B.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Colan, Steven D.; Oleske, James M.; Seage, George R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Previous studies of cardiomyopathy among children perinatally infected with HIV were conducted before the routine use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Nucleoside analogues (NRTIs), the backbone of HAART, have been associated with mitochondrial toxicity, which can lead to cardiomyopathy. We evaluated the association of HAART and specific NRTIs associated with mitochondrial toxicity, on development of cardiomyopathy among perinatally HIV-infected children. Design 3,035 perinatally HIV-infected children enrolled in a US-based multicenter prospective cohort study, were followed for cardiomyopathy, defined as a clinical diagnosis or initiation of digoxin, from 1993–2007. Methods Cox models were used to estimate the effects of HAART and NRTIs on cardiomyopathy, identify predictors of cardiomyopathy among HAART users, and estimate the association between development of cardiomyopathy and mortality. Results 99 cases of cardiomyopathy were identified over follow-up (incidence rate: 5.6 cases per 1,000 person-years) at a median age of 9.4 years. HAART was associated with a 50% lower incidence of cardiomyopathy compared to no HAART use (95% confidence interval: 20%, 70%). Zalcitabine (ddC) use, however, was associated with an 80% higher incidence of cardiomyopathy. Among HAART users, older age at HAART initiation, ddC use before HAART initiation, initiating a HAART regimen containing zidovudine (ZDV), and a nadir CD4<15% were independently associated with a higher rate of cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy was associated with a 6-fold higher mortality rate. Conclusions HAART has dramatically decreased the incidence of cardiomyopathy among perinatally HIV-infected children. However, they remain at increased risk for cardiomyopathy and ongoing ZDV exposure may increase this risk. PMID:22781228

  15. The effect of different anthelmintic treatment regimens combined with iron supplementation on the nutritional status of schoolchildren in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Jinabhai, C C; Couper, I; Kleinschmidt, I; Jogessar, V B

    2001-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial in KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa) of 428 primary-school pupils (stratified into 6 groups by age, sex and intervention) measured the effect of different anthelmintic treatments and iron supplementation regimens provided twice at 6-monthly intervals for 1 year (1996/97). Half the pupils received iron supplementation (ferrous fumarate 200 mg weekly for 10 weeks). Pupils received 2 anthelmintic regimens, either (i) albendazole 400 mg plus praziquantel 40 mg/kg or (ii) albendazole 400 mg on 3 consecutive days plus praziquantel 40 mg/kg or (iii) placebo. Baseline prevalences of Ascaris 55.9%, Trichuris 83.6%, hookworm spp. 59.4%, were reduced after 12 months for single-dose albendazole treatment to Ascaris 17.4% (P < 0.005), Trichuris 61.5% (NS), hookworm spp. 0% (P < 0.005), and for triple-dose albendazole treatment to Ascaris 14.8% (P < 0.005), Trichuris 25.0% (P < 0.01), hookworm 0% (P < 0.005). Schistosoma haematobium 43.4% was reduced among treated groups to 8.3% (P < 0.005). There were no significant changes in the anthropometry of the different treatment groups at either 6 or 12 months post treatment. Twelve months after treatment there was a significant increase in haemoglobin levels (P = 0.02) among pupils receiving triple-dose albendazole, praziquantel and ferrous fumarate; pupils receiving no anthelmintic treatment showed a significant decrease as did pupils who received triple-dose albendazole and praziquantel but no iron. Regular 6-monthly anthelmintic treatment significantly reduced the prevalence of Ascaris, hookworm spp. and S. haematobium infections (P < 0.05). Triple-dose treatment for Trichuris was significantly more effective than a single dose of albendazole 400 mg (P = 0.002). In areas with schistosomiasis, hookworm infection and high prevalence of Trichuris infection, combination treatment with praziquantel, triple-dose albendazole, plus iron supplementation, is likely to improve pupils' health and haemoglobin levels

  16. Combined Iron Chelator and Antioxidant Exerted Greater Efficacy on Cardioprotection Than Monotherapy in Iron-Overloaded Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wongjaikam, Suwakon; Kumfu, Sirinart; Khamseekaew, Juthamas; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Fucharoen, Suthat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron chelators are used to treat iron overload cardiomyopathy patients. However, a direct comparison of the benefits of three common iron chelators (deferoxamine (DFO), deferiprone (DFP) and deferasirox (DFX)) or an antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)) with a combined DFP and NAC treatments on left ventricular (LV) function with iron overload has not been investigated. Methods and Findings Male Wistar rats were fed with either a normal diet or a high iron diet (HFe group) for 4 months. After 2 months, the HFe-fed rats were divided into 6 groups to receive either: a vehicle, DFO (25 mg/kg/day), DFP (75 mg/kg/day), DFX (20 mg/kg/day), NAC (100 mg/kg/day) or the combined DFP and NAC for 2 months. Our results demonstrated that HFe rats had increased plasma non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI), malondialdehyde (MDA), cardiac iron and MDA levels and cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to LV dysfunction. Although DFO, DFP, DFX or NAC improved these parameters, leading to improved LV function, the combined DFP and NAC therapy caused greater improvement, leading to more extensively improved LV function. Conclusions The combined DFP and NAC treatment had greater efficacy than monotherapy in cardioprotection through the reduction of cardiac iron deposition and improved cardiac mitochondrial function in iron-overloaded rats. PMID:27428732

  17. Iron and mechanisms of emotional behavior.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghan; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2014-11-01

    Iron is required for appropriate behavioral organization. Iron deficiency results in poor brain myelination and impaired monoamine metabolism. Glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid homeostasis is modified by changes in brain iron status. Such changes produce not only deficits in memory/learning capacity and motor skills, but also emotional and psychological problems. An accumulating body of evidence indicates that both energy metabolism and neurotransmitter homeostasis influence emotional behavior, and both functions are influenced by brain iron status. Like other neurobehavioral aspects, the influence of iron metabolism on mechanisms of emotional behavior is multifactorial: brain region-specific control of behavior, regulation of neurotransmitters and associated proteins, temporal and regional differences in iron requirements, oxidative stress responses to excess iron, sex differences in metabolism, and interactions between iron and other metals. To better understand the role that brain iron plays in emotional behavior and mental health, this review discusses the pathologies associated with anxiety and other emotional disorders with respect to body iron status.

  18. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  19. Changes in Iron Metabolism and Oxidative Status in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Treated with Bis(maltolato) Oxovanadium (IV) as an Antidiabetic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-González, Cristina; López-Chaves, Carlos; Trenzado, Cristina E.; Aranda, Pilar; López-Jurado, María; Gómez-Aracena, Jorge; Montes-Bayón, María; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Llopis, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The role of vanadium as a micronutrient and hypoglycaemic agent has yet to be fully clarified. The present study was undertaken to investigate changes in the metabolism of iron and in antioxidant defences of diabetic STZ rats following treatment with vanadium. Four groups were examined: control; diabetic; diabetic treated with 1 mgV/day; and Diabetic treated with 3 mgV/day. The vanadium was supplied in drinking water as bis(maltolato) oxovanadium (IV) (BMOV). The experiment had a duration of five weeks. Iron was measured in food, faeces, urine, serum, muscle, kidney, liver, spleen, and femur. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, NAD(P)H: quinone-oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) activity, and protein carbonyl group levels in the liver were determined. In the diabetic rats, higher levels of Fe absorbed, Fe content in kidney, muscle, and femur, and NQO1 activity were recorded, together with decreased catalase activity, in comparison with the control rats. In the rats treated with 3 mgV/day, there was a significant decrease in fasting glycaemia, Fe content in the liver, spleen, and heart, catalase activity, and levels of protein carbonyl groups in comparison with the diabetic group. In conclusion BMOV was a dose-dependent hypoglycaemic agent. Treatment with 3 mgV/day provoked increased Fe deposits in the tissues, which promoted a protein oxidative damage in the liver. PMID:24511298

  20. Reversible transition from a hypertrophic to a dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spillmann, Frank; Kühl, Uwe; Van Linthout, Sophie; Dominguez, Fernando; Escher, Felicitas; Schultheiss, Heinz‐Peter; Pieske, Burkert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a 17‐year‐old female patient with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a Wolff‐Parkinson‐White syndrome. She came to our department for further evaluation of a new diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by an enlargement of the left ventricle and a fall in ejection fraction. Clinically, she complained about atypical chest pain, arrhythmic episodes with presyncopal events, and dyspnea (NYHA III) during the last 6 months. Non‐invasive and invasive examinations including magnetic resonance imaging, electrophysiological examinations, and angiography did not lead to a conclusive diagnosis. Therefore, endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) were taken to investigate whether a specific myocardial disease caused the impairment of the left ventricular function. EMB analysis resulted in the diagnosis of a virus‐negative, active myocarditis. Based on this diagnosis, an immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine was started, which led to an improvement of cardiac function and symptoms within 3 months after initiating therapy. In conclusion, we show that external stress triggered by myocarditis can induce a reversible transition from a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to a dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype. This case strongly underlines the need for a thorough and invasive examination of heart failure of unknown causes, including EMB investigations as recommend by the actual ESC position statement.

  1. Bradyarrhythmias: first presentation of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Burghouwt, Danielle E; Kammeraad, Janneke Ae; Knops, Paul; du Plessis, Frederik A; de Groot, Natasja Ms

    2015-04-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a disorder characterized by progressive replacement of myocardial cells by fibro-fatty tissue giving rise to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In this case report, we describe a pediatric patient with sinoatrial arrests and second degree atrioventricular conduction block several years before ARVC became apparent. These findings suggest that bradyarrhythmias can also be the first expression of ARVC.

  2. Cardiomyocyte GTP Cyclohydrolase 1 Protects the Heart Against Diabetic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsiang-En; Baumgardt, Shelley L; Fang, Juan; Paterson, Mark; Liu, Yanan; Du, Jianhai; Shi, Yang; Qiao, Shigang; Bosnjak, Zeljko J; Warltier, David C; Kersten, Judy R; Ge, Zhi-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy increases the risk of heart failure and death. At present, there are no effective approaches to preventing its development in the clinic. Here we report that reduction of cardiac GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) degradation by genetic and pharmacological approaches protects the heart against diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was induced in C57BL/6 wild-type mice and transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of GCH1 with streptozotocin, and control animals were given citrate buffer. We found that diabetes-induced degradation of cardiac GCH1 proteins contributed to adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in C57BL/6 mice, concomitant with decreases in tetrahydrobiopterin, dimeric and phosphorylated neuronal nitric oxide synthase, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) handling proteins, intracellular [Ca(2+)]i, and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) content and increases in phosphorylated p-38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and superoxide production. Interestingly, GCH-1 overexpression abrogated these detrimental effects of diabetes. Furthermore, we found that MG 132, an inhibitor for 26S proteasome, preserved cardiac GCH1 proteins and ameliorated cardiac remodeling and dysfunction during diabetes. This study deepens our understanding of impaired cardiac function in diabetes, identifies GCH1 as a modulator of cardiac remodeling and function, and reveals a new therapeutic target for diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27295516

  3. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  4. Nuclear angiography in a dog with congestive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, A.C.; Twardock, A.R.; Gelberg, H.B.

    1986-03-01

    Nuclear angiography was used as a diagnostic aid and in monitoring the clinical course of a case of congestive cardiomyopathy in a dog. Serial examinations revealed progressively deteriorating values for left ventricular ejection fraction before the dog's death. This noninvasive technique can be an alternative to echocardiography for the evaluation of cardiac performance.

  5. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zizek, David; Cvijić, Marta; Zupan, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic light chain amyloidosis carries poor prognosis. Amyloid deposition in the myocardium can alter regional left ventricular contraction and cause dyssynchrony. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced heart failure and echocardiographic dyssynchrony. We report a clinical and echocardiographic response of a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy, treated with a combination of chemotherapy and CRT.

  6. Cardiomyocyte GTP Cyclohydrolase 1 Protects the Heart Against Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsiang-En; Baumgardt, Shelley L.; Fang, Juan; Paterson, Mark; Liu, Yanan; Du, Jianhai; Shi, Yang; Qiao, Shigang; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.; Warltier, David C.; Kersten, Judy R.; Ge, Zhi-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy increases the risk of heart failure and death. At present, there are no effective approaches to preventing its development in the clinic. Here we report that reduction of cardiac GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) degradation by genetic and pharmacological approaches protects the heart against diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was induced in C57BL/6 wild-type mice and transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of GCH1 with streptozotocin, and control animals were given citrate buffer. We found that diabetes-induced degradation of cardiac GCH1 proteins contributed to adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in C57BL/6 mice, concomitant with decreases in tetrahydrobiopterin, dimeric and phosphorylated neuronal nitric oxide synthase, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ handling proteins, intracellular [Ca2+]i, and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content and increases in phosphorylated p-38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and superoxide production. Interestingly, GCH-1 overexpression abrogated these detrimental effects of diabetes. Furthermore, we found that MG 132, an inhibitor for 26S proteasome, preserved cardiac GCH1 proteins and ameliorated cardiac remodeling and dysfunction during diabetes. This study deepens our understanding of impaired cardiac function in diabetes, identifies GCH1 as a modulator of cardiac remodeling and function, and reveals a new therapeutic target for diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27295516

  7. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (Broken-Heart Syndrome): A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Potu, Kalyan Chakravarthy; Raizada, Amol; Gedela, Maheedhar; Stys, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also called "broken heart" syndrome or apical ballooning syndrome, is a reversible cardiomyopathy characterized by left ventricular dysfunction and ballooning of the left ventricular apex on imaging during systole. It predominantly occurs in post-menopausal women and is commonly associated with emotional or physical stress. Patients commonly present with chest pain and electrocardiographic evidence of ST segment elevation or T-wave-mimicking acute coronary syndrome, but with an absence of angiographic evidence of obstructive coronary disease. The exact cause is unknown, but potential contributors include catecholamine excess and sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity. There is no consensus on pharmacological treatment of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Based on the suspected pathophysiology of the disease, adrenergic blockade using beta-blocker therapy is employed. Near complete resolution of left ventricular wall motion dyskinesis occurs in the majority of takotsubo cardiomyopathy patients within a month. Although the prognosis is generally favorable, there are reports of complications during the acute phase, including cardiogenic shock, pulmonary edema, ventricular tachycardia, apical thrombus formation, and death. This review article will briefly discuss the epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of this condition. PMID:27263165

  8. Intramyocardial angiogenic cell precursors in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Arom, Kitipan V; Ruengsakulrach, Permyos; Belkin, Michael; Tiensuwan, Montip

    2009-08-01

    To determine the efficacy of intramyocardial injection of angiogenic cell precursors in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, 35 patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy underwent injections of angiogenic cell precursors into the left ventricle (cell group). Seventeen patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy were matched from the heart failure database to form a control group that was treated medically. Angiogenic cell precursors were obtained from autologous blood, cultured in vitro, and injected into all free-wall areas of the left ventricle in the cell group. After these injections, New York Heart Association functional class improved significantly by 1.1 +/- 0.7 classes at 284.7 +/- 136.2 days, and left ventricular ejection fraction improved in 71.4% of patients (25/35); the mean increase in left ventricular ejection fraction was 4.4% +/- 10.6% at 192.7 +/- 135.1 days. Improved quality of life was demonstrated by better physical function, role-physical, general health, and vitality domains in a short-form health survey at the 3-month follow-up. In the control group, there were no significant improvements in left ventricular ejection fraction or New York Heart Association class which increased by 0.6 +/- 0.8 classes. It was concluded that intramyocardial angiogenic cell precursor injection is probably effective in the treatment of nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:19713335

  9. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure.

  10. Clinical Utility of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by substantial genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, leading to considerable diversity in clinical course including the most common cause of sudden death in young people and a determinant of heart failure symptoms in patients of any age. Traditionally, two-dimensional echocardiography has been the most reliable method for establishing a clinical diagnosis of HCM. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), with its high spatial resolution and tomographic imaging capability, has emerged as a technique particularly well suited to characterize the diverse phenotypic expression of this complex disease. For example, CMR is often superior to echocardiography for HCM diagnosis, by identifying areas of segmental hypertrophy (ie., anterolateral wall or apex) not reliably visualized by echocardiography (or underestimated in terms of extent). High-risk HCM patient subgroups identified with CMR include those with thin-walled scarred LV apical aneurysms (which prior to CMR imaging in HCM remained largely undetected), end-stage systolic dysfunction, and massive LV hypertrophy. CMR observations also suggest that the cardiomyopathic process in HCM is more diffuse than previously regarded, extending beyond the LV myocardium to include thickening of the right ventricular wall as well as substantial morphologic diversity with regard to papillary muscles and mitral valve. These findings have implications for management strategies in patients undergoing invasive septal reduction therapy. Among HCM family members, CMR has identified unique phenotypic markers of affected genetic status in the absence of LV hypertrophy including: myocardial crypts, elongated mitral valve leaflets and late gadolinium enhancement. The unique capability of contrast-enhanced CMR with late gadolinium enhancement to identify myocardial fibrosis has raised the expectation that this may represent a novel marker, which may enhance risk stratification. At

  11. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy : The result of dosage and individual predisposition.

    PubMed

    Maisch, B

    2016-09-01

    The individual amount of alcohol consumed acutely or chronically decides on harm or benefit to a person's health. Available data suggest that one to two drinks in men and one drink in women will benefit the cardiovascular system over time, one drink being 17.6 ml 100 % alcohol. Moderate drinking can reduce the incidence and mortality of coronary artery disease, heart failure, diabetes, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. More than this amount can lead to alcoholic cardiomyopathy, which is defined as alcohol toxicity to the heart muscle itself by ethanol and its metabolites. Historical examples of interest are the Munich beer heart and the Tübingen wine heart. Associated with chronic alcohol abuse but having different etiologies are beriberi heart disease (vitamin B1 deficiency) and cardiac cirrhosis as hyperdynamic cardiomyopathies, arsenic poising in the Manchester beer epidemic, and cobalt intoxication in Quebec beer drinker's disease. Chronic heavy alcohol abuse will also increase blood pressure and cause a downregulation of the immune system that could lead to increased susceptibility to infections, which in turn could add to the development of heart failure. Myocardial tissue analysis resembles idiopathic cardiomyopathy or chronic myocarditis. In the diagnostic work-up of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, the confirmation of alcohol abuse by carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) and increased liver enzymes, and the involvement of the heart by markers of heart failure (e.g., NT-proBNP) and of necrosis (e.g., troponins or CKMb) is mandatory. Treatment of alcoholic cardiomyopathy consists of alcohol abstinence and heart failure medication. PMID:27582365

  12. Influence of mercury and selenium chemistries on the progression of cardiomyopathy in pygmy sperm whales, Kogia breviceps.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Colleen E; Davis, W Clay; McFee, Wayne E; Neumann, Carola A; Schulte, Jennifer; Bossart, Gregory D; Christopher, Steven J

    2012-10-01

    More than half of pygmy sperm whales (Kogia breviceps) that strand exhibit signs of cardiomyopathy (CMP). Many factors may contribute to the development of idiopathic CMP in K. breviceps, including genetics, infectious agents, contaminants, biotoxins, and dietary intake (e.g. selenium, mercury, and pro-oxidants). This study assessed trace elements in K. breviceps at various stages of CMP progression using fresh frozen liver and heart samples collected from individuals that stranded along US Atlantic and Gulf coasts between 1993 and 2007. Standard addition calibration and collision cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were employed for total Se analysis and pyrolysis atomic absorption (AA) was utilized for total Hg analysis to examine if the Se/Hg detoxification pathway inhibits the bioavailability of Se. Double spike speciated isotope dilution gas chromatography ICP-MS was utilized to measure methyl Hg and inorganic Hg. Immunoblot detection and colorimetric assays were used to assess protein oxidation status. Data collected on trace elements, selenoproteins, and oxidative status were evaluated in the context of animal life history and other complementary histological information to gain insight into the biochemical pathways contributing to the development of CMP in K. breviceps. Cardiomyopathy was only observed in adult pygmy sperm whales, predominantly in male animals. Both Hg:Se molar ratios and overall protein oxidation were greater in males than females and increased with progression of CMP.

  13. Hepcidin and Its Role in Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kwapisz, Justyna; Slomka, Artur

    2009-01-01

    Hepcidin, a small peptide secreted mainly by the liver, plays a central role in iron status regulation. The experiments on hepcidin seemed very promising and gave new life to understanding iron metabolism. Many authors suggest that hepcidin measurement can be used as a clinical tool for the diagnosis and management of a wide range of iron-related disorders. The current review presents data concerning hepcidin, especially its biology, mechanism of action and its role in pathomechanism of many diseases.

  14. Minimal impact of an iron-fortified lipid-based nutrient supplement on Hb and iron status: a randomised controlled trial in malnourished HIV-positive African adults starting antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    James, Philip; Friis, Henrik; Woodd, Susannah; Rehman, Andrea M; PrayGod, George; Kelly, Paul; Koethe, John R; Filteau, Suzanne

    2015-08-14

    Anaemia, redistribution of Fe, malnutrition and heightened systemic inflammation during HIV infection confer an increased risk of morbidity and mortality in HIV patients. We analysed information on Fe status and inflammation from a randomised, double blind, controlled phase-III clinical trial in Lusaka, Zambia and Mwanza, Tanzania. Malnourished patients (n 1815) were recruited at referral to antiretroviral therapy (ART) into a two-stage nutritional rehabilitation programme, randomised to receive a lipid-based nutrient supplement with or without added micronutrients. Fe was included in the intervention arm during the second stage, given from 2 to 6 weeks post-ART. Hb, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were measured at recruitment and 6 weeks post-ART. Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the impact of the intervention, and the effect of reducing inflammation from recruitment to week 6 on Hb and Fe status. There was no effect of the intervention on Hb, serum ferritin, sTfR or serum CRP. A one-log decrease of serum CRP from recruitment to week 6 was associated with a 1.81 g/l increase in Hb (95% CI 0.85, 2.76; P< 0.001), and a 0.11 log decrease in serum ferritin (95% CI - 0.22, 0.03; P= 0.012) from recruitment to week 6. There was no association between the change in serum CRP and the change in sTfR over the same time period (P= 0.78). In malnourished, HIV-infected adults receiving dietary Fe, a reduction in inflammation in the early ART treatment period appears to be a precondition for recovery from anaemia.

  15. cMRI-BED: A novel informatics framework for cardiac MRI biomarker extraction and discovery applied to pediatric cardiomyopathy classification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a rare, yet heterogeneous group of pathologies of the myocardium that are routinely examined clinically using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cMRI). This gold standard powerful non-invasive tool yields high resolution temporal images that characterize myocardial tissue. The complexities associated with the annotation of images and extraction of markers, necessitate the development of efficient workflows to acquire, manage and transform this data into actionable knowledge for patient care to reduce mortality and morbidity. Methods We develop and test a novel informatics framework called cMRI-BED for biomarker extraction and discovery from such complex pediatric cMRI data that includes the use of a suite of tools for image processing, marker extraction and predictive modeling. We applied our workflow to obtain and analyze a dataset of 83 de-identified cases and controls containing cMRI-derived biomarkers for classifying positive versus negative findings of cardiomyopathy in children. Bayesian rule learning (BRL) methods were applied to derive understandable models in the form of propositional rules with posterior probabilities pertaining to their validity. Popular machine learning methods in the WEKA data mining toolkit were applied using default parameters to assess cross-validation performance of this dataset using accuracy and percentage area under ROC curve (AUC) measures. Results The best 10-fold cross validation predictive performance obtained on this cMRI-derived biomarker dataset was 80.72% accuracy and 79.6% AUC by a BRL decision tree model, which is promising from this type of rare data. Moreover, we were able to verify that mycocardial delayed enhancement (MDE) status, which is known to be an important qualitative factor in the classification of cardiomyopathies, is picked up by our rule models as an important variable for prediction. Conclusions Preliminary results show the feasibility of our framework

  16. Influence of Inflammatory Disorders and Infection on Iron Absorption and Efficacy of Iron- Fortified Foods

    PubMed Central

    Hurrell, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    The provision of iron- fortified foods is a common strategy to prevent iron deficiency; however, ensuring adequate iron absorption is a challenge. Iron bioavailability depends on the choice of iron compound, the presence enhancers and inhibitors of absorption in the food matrix, and the physiological state of the consumer, including iron status, other nutritional deficiencies and inflammatory disorders. Inflammation associated with infections and inflammatory disorders would be expected to decrease iron absorption and reduce the efficacy of iron- fortified foods. The decreased absorption is due to an increase in circulating hepcidin in response to inflammatory cytokines. Hepcidin degrades ferroportin and blocks the passage of iron from the intestinal cell to the plasma. This is the innate immune response to infections and aims to restrict pathogen growth by restricting iron supply. Stable isotope studies have reported women and children with chronic malaria parasitemia or febrile malaria to have increased inflammatory cytokines, increased hepcidin and much decreased iron absorption. No studies have specifically investigated the efficacy of iron- fortified foods in the absence and presence of infections. In contrast, inflammation and increased hepcidin associated with adiposity in overweight have been linked to both lower iron absorption and the decreased efficacy of iron- fortified foods. PMID:25762975

  17. Markers of iron status are associated with stage of pregnancy and acute-phase response, but not with parity among pregnant women in Guinea-Bissau.

    PubMed

    Kæstel, Pernille; Aaby, Peter; Ritz, Christian; Friis, Henrik

    2015-10-14

    While prenatal Fe supplementation prevents maternal Fe deficiency and anaemia, it is uncertain whether it improves infant health outcomes, at least when taken by Fe-replete women. Inflammation as well as physiological changes complicates the assessment of Fe status during pregnancy. In the present study, we measured the concentrations of serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR), Hb and the acute-phase proteins C-reactive protein (CRP) and α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) in a cross-sectional study among 738 pregnant women attending antenatal care in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify the predictors of Fe status markers. The mean gestational age was 23 (sd 7) weeks. Serum ferritin values were lower with progressing gestation, from 27% lower during weeks 16-20 of gestation up to 59% lower after 29 weeks of gestation compared with early pregnancy. Using cut-off values for Fe deficiency as established in non-pregnant individuals, 52% of the women had sTfR levels >2·3 mg/l, while only 25% had serum ferritin levels 2·3 mg/l decreased to 47% after adjustment for elevated serum CRP and ACT levels. On the contrary, the proportion of serum ferritin < 12 μg/l increased to 33% after adjustment for ACT and CRP. The high proportion of elevated serum sTfR calls for pregnancy-specific cut-offs since increased erythropoiesis is expected in response to increased plasma volume of pregnancy. The present study further underlines the need to adjust for inflammation when serum sTfR and serum ferritin are used to assess Fe status in pregnancy.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathies: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina I; Mullins, Carola; Stewart, Kevan; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are defined as either primary or secondary diseases of the myocardium resulting in cardiac dysfunction. While primary cardiomyopathies are confined to the heart and can be genetic or acquired, secondary cardiomyopathies show involvement of the heart as a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease including metabolic, inflammatory, granulomatous, infectious, or autoimmune entities. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are currently classified as hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, or unclassifiable, including left ventricular non-compaction. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) not only has the capability to assess cardiac morphology and function, but also the ability to detect edema, hemorrhage, fibrosis, and intramyocardial deposits, providing a valuable imaging tool in the characterization of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This pictorial essay shows some of the most important non-ischemic cardiomyopathies with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features.

  19. Fatal arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in 2 related subadult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Tong, L J; Flach, E J; Sheppard, M N; Pocknell, A; Banerjee, A A; Boswood, A; Bouts, T; Routh, A; Feltrer, Y

    2014-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as an important cause of morbidity and mortality in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). This report records 2 cases of sudden cardiac death in closely related subadult captive chimpanzees with marked replacement fibrosis and adipocyte infiltration of the myocardium, which resemble specific atypical forms of the familial human disease arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Changes were consistent with left-dominant and biventricular subtypes, which are both phenotypic variants found within human families with familial arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Previously reported fibrosing cardiomyopathies in chimpanzees were characterized by nonspecific interstitial fibrosis, in contrast to the replacement fibrofatty infiltration with predilection for the outer myocardium seen in these 2 cases. To the authors' knowledge, this case report is the first to describe cardiomyopathy resembling arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in nonhuman primates and the first to describe left-dominant arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy-type lesions in an animal.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathies: A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina I; Mullins, Carola; Stewart, Kevan; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are defined as either primary or secondary diseases of the myocardium resulting in cardiac dysfunction. While primary cardiomyopathies are confined to the heart and can be genetic or acquired, secondary cardiomyopathies show involvement of the heart as a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease including metabolic, inflammatory, granulomatous, infectious, or autoimmune entities. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are currently classified as hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, or unclassifiable, including left ventricular non-compaction. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) not only has the capability to assess cardiac morphology and function, but also the ability to detect edema, hemorrhage, fibrosis, and intramyocardial deposits, providing a valuable imaging tool in the characterization of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This pictorial essay shows some of the most important non-ischemic cardiomyopathies with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features. PMID:26199786

  1. Chagas Cardiomyopathy: Usefulness of EKG and Echocardiogram in a Non-Endemic Country

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Salvador, Fernando; Rodríguez-Palomares, José; Sulleiro, Elena; Sao-Avilés, Augusto; Roure, Sílvia; Valerio, Lluís; Evangelista, Arturo; Molina, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (CD) is a major cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America, and migration movements have now spread the disease worldwide. However, data regarding Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC) and the usefulness of echocardiography in non endemic countries are still scarce. Methods and results We selected 485 patients in the chronic phase of CD from two Spanish settings. Data from physical examination, electrocardiogram (EKG), x-ray, and two dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram were recorded. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was assessed by PCR in peripheral blood. Patients were stratified according to the Kuschnir classification and a combination of echocardiogram and electrocardiogram findings. Patients mainly came from Bolivia (459; 94.6%). One hundred and forty three patients (31.5%) had at least one electrocardiogram abnormality. Twenty seven patients (5.3%) had an abnormal echocardiography. Patients with abnormal echocardiography were older (47 (IQR 38–57) years vs 41 (IQR 38–57) years); p = 0.019) and there was a greater proportion of males (66.7% vs 29.7%); p<0.001). Among echocardiographic variables, diastolic dysfunction was associated with poor cardiac status. In the multivariate analysis, abnormal EKG and gender were associated with abnormal echocardiography. Echocardiography may be spared for males under 30 and females under 45 years old with normal EKG as the likelihood of having an abnormal echocardiography is minimal. Association between T. cruzi DNA in the peripheral blood and cardiac involvement was not observed. Conclusion CC rates in the studied population are low. Age and sex are important determinants for the development of CC, and with the EKG should guide echocardiogram performance. PMID:27308824

  2. Hearing Profile in Patients with Dilated and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Zarea, Gehan Abd El-Rahman; Hassan, Yasser Elsayed Mohamed; Mahmoud, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy may cause disruptions in the micro-vascular system of the stria vascularis in the cochlea, and, subsequently, may result in cochlear degeneration. Degeneration in the stria vascularis affects the physical and chemical processes in the organ of Corti, thereby causing a possible hearing impairment. The objective of this study was to assess the hearing profiles of patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies to determine the relationship between the degree of hearing loss and the degree and duration of the disease and to compare the dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies as regards hearing profile. Methods In this case control study, we studied 21 patients (cases/study group/group 1) and 15 healthy individuals (controls/group 2). Six patients (group 1a) had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and 15 patients (group 1b) had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The data were analyzed using the t-test, chi-squared test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and the Multiple Mann-Whitney test. Results The results of this study showed that 80% of those patients with DCM (group 1b) had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and 100% of the patients with HCM (group 1a) had mild to severe bilateral sloping SNHL. Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) were present in 14% of the study group and in 100 % of the control group. The results of the measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) showed that 50% of the study group had abnormal latencies compared to the control group, and there was no correlation between the duration of the disease and the degree of hearing loss or DPOAE. Fifty percent of the patients with HCM and 35% of the patients with DCM had positive family histories of similar conditions, and 35% of those with HCM had a positive family history of sudden death. Conclusion The results of this study suggested that the link between heart disease and hearing loss and early identification of hearing loss in patients with

  3. Occupational Exposure to Welding Fume among Welders: Alterations of Manganese, Iron, Zinc, Copper, and Lead in Body Fluids and the Oxidative Stress Status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guojun Jane; Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Wu, Ping; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Welders in this study were selected from a vehicle manufacturer; control subjects were from a nearby food factory. Airborne manganese levels in the breathing zones of welders and controls were 1.45 ± SD1.08 mg/m3 and 0.11 ± 0.07 μg/m3, respectively. Serum levels of manganese and iron in welders were 4.3-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively, higher than those of controls. Blood lead concentrations in welders increased 2.5-fold, whereas serum zinc levels decreased 1.2-fold, in comparison with controls. Linear regression revealed the lack of associations between blood levels of five metals and welder’s age. Furthermore, welders had erythrocytic superoxide dismutase activity and serum malondialdehyde levels 24% less and 78% higher, respectively, than those of controls. These findings suggest that occupational exposure to welding fumes among welders disturbs the homeostasis of trace elements in systemic circulation and induces oxidative stress. PMID:15091287

  4. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  5. Effects of Pregnancy and Lactation on Iron Metabolism in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guofen; Liu, Shang-Yuan; Wang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Tian-Wei; Yu, Peng; Duan, Xiang-Lin; Zhao, Shu-E; Chang, Yan-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In female, inadequate iron supply is a highly prevalent problem that often leads to iron-deficiency anemia. This study aimed to understand the effects of pregnancy and lactation on iron metabolism. Rats with different days of gestation and lactation were used to determine the variations in iron stores and serum iron level and the changes in expression of iron metabolism-related proteins, including ferritin, ferroportin 1 (FPN1), ceruloplasmin (Cp), divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), and the major iron-regulatory molecule—hepcidin. We found that iron stores decline dramatically at late-pregnancy period, and the low iron store status persists throughout the lactation period. The significantly increased FPN1 level in small intestine facilitates digestive iron absorption, which maintains the serum iron concentration at a near-normal level to meet the increase of iron requirements. Moreover, a significant decrease of hepcidin expression is observed during late-pregnancy and early-lactation stages, suggesting the important regulatory role that hepcidin plays in iron metabolism during pregnancy and lactation. These results are fundamental to the understanding of iron homeostasis during pregnancy and lactation and may provide experimental bases for future studies to identify key molecules expressed during these special periods that regulate the expression of hepcidin, to eventually improve the iron-deficiency status. PMID:26788496

  6. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry (HCMR): The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P.; Friedrich, Matthias G.; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A.; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Maron, Martin S.; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S.; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. HCM is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. While the majority of patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or progress to refractory heart failure (HF). The HCMR study is a National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 2750 patient, 41 site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for assessment of left ventricular (LV) mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analysis will be performed. HCMR has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. PMID:26299218

  7. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Two Patients without Any Cardiac Symptom on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Hiroyasu; Hiraoka, Hisatoyo

    2013-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a disorder characterized by left ventricular apical ballooning and electrocardiographic changes in the absence of coronary artery disease. While reversible in many cases, the mechanism of this disorder remains unclear. The most frequent clinical symptoms of takotsubo cardiomyopathy on admission are chest pain and dyspnea, resembling acute myocardial infarction. Here, we describe two cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy without chest pain or dyspnea in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. The asymptomatic nature of these two cases may be due to the patients being on hemodialysis. Periodic electrocardiograms (ECG) may be helpful in screening this population for asymptomatic takotsubo cardiomyopathy and in evaluating its incidence. PMID:24527248

  8. Supplementation of iron alone and combined with vitamins improves haematological status, erythrocyte membrane fluidity and oxidative stress in anaemic pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ai Guo; Schouten, Evert G; Sun, Yong Ye; Yang, Fang; Han, Xiu Xia; Zhang, Feng Zhi; Jiang, Dian Chen; Kok, Frans J

    2010-12-01

    Pregnancy is a condition exhibiting increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, and Fe plays a central role in generating harmful oxygen species. The objective of the present study is to investigate the changes in haematological status, oxidative stress and erythrocyte membrane fluidity in anaemic pregnant women after Fe supplementation with and without combined vitamins. The study was a 2 months double-blind, randomised trial. Pregnant women (n 164) were allocated to four groups: group C was the placebo control group; group I was supplemented daily with 60 mg Fe (ferrous sulphate) daily; group IF was supplemented daily with Fe plus 400 μg folic acid; group IM was supplemented daily with Fe plus 2 mg retinol and 1 mg riboflavin, respectively. After the 2-month trial, Hb significantly increased by 15.8, 17.3 and 21.8 g/l, and ferritin by 2.8, 3.6 and 11.0 μg/l, in the I, IF and IM groups compared with placebo. Polarisation (ρ) and microviscosity (η) decreased significantly in other groups compared with placebo, indicating an increase in membrane fluidity. Significant decreases of ρ and η values compared with group C were 0.033 and 0.959 for group I, 0.037 and 1.074 for group IF and 0.064 and 1.865 for group IM, respectively. In addition, significant increases of glutathione peroxidase activities and decreases of malondialdehyde were shown in all treated groups, as well as increases of plasma retinol and urine riboflavin in group IM. The findings show that supplementation with Fe and particularly in combination with vitamins could improve the haematological status as well as oxidative stress and erythrocyte membrane fluidity.

  9. Effect of single-dose albendazole and vitamin A supplementation on the iron status of pre-school children in Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Xie, Hu Mina; Tian, Weizheng; Zheng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Alice C

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of single-dose albendazole and vitamin A intervention on the anaemic status and Fe metabolism of pre-school children. This study was a randomised, placebo-controlled and double-blinded intervention trial. All eligible anaemic pre-school children were randomly divided into three groups: group 1 received no intervention, which served as the control group, group 2 received 400 mg single-dose albendazole administration and group 3 received a 60000 μg vitamin A capsule combined with 400 mg single-dose albendazole at the beginning of the study. The follow-up period was for 6 months. Anthropometry and biochemical index about Fe metabolism were measured before and after intervention. A total of 209 pre-school anaemic children were randomly divided into three intervention groups (sixty-four, sixty-two and sixty for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively). The mean age of the children in the study was 4·4 (sd 0·7) years and 50·5 % of the children were female (94/186). After a follow-up period of 6 months, the levels of serum retinol, ferritin, transferrin receptor-ferritin index and body total Fe content of children in group 3 were significantly higher compared with children in groups 1 and 2 (P<0·05). Moreover, the proportion of vitamin A deficiency, marginal vitamin A deficiency and Fe deficiency among children in group 3 were markedly lower compared with children in groups 1 and 2 (P<0·05). Albendazole plus vitamin A administration showed more efficacy on the improvement of serum retinol and Fe metabolic status.

  10. [The characteristics of cardiomyopathy in different geographical regions].

    PubMed

    Faez, H V; Korovina, E A; Shatkovskiĭ, N P; Shelepin, A A; Moiseev, V S

    1992-01-01

    Region-specific characteristics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) were compared for 108 relevant patients living in Dubai (United Arab Emirates) and Moscow (Russia). Out of 49 citizens of Dubai 17 had HC, 32 DC, and 59 Moscow patients had HC in 23, DC in 36 cases. It was found that HC in Dubai tends to run a silent latent course, involving mainly basal septum and right ventricle. Apical lesions were more typical for Moscow citizens who also display more severe myocardial impairment. DC in Dubai produces weaker cardiac insufficiency and arrhythmia. Incidence of idiopathic and periportal DC proved higher in Dubai, while alcohol and virus infection underlie DC more frequently in Moscow.

  11. Transient stress cardiomyopathies in the elderly: Clinical & Pathophysiologic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Transient stress-induced cardiomyopathies have been increasingly recognized and while rare, they tend to affect elderly women more than other demographic groups. One type, often called tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC), is typically triggered by significant emotional or physical stress and is associated with chest pain, electrocardiogram (ECG) changes and abnormal cardiac enzymes. Significant left ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities usually include an akinetic “ballooning” apex with normal or hyperdynamic function of the base. A second type, often called neurogenic stunned myocardium, typically associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, also usually presents with ECG changes and positive enzymes, but the typical wall motion abnormalities seen include normal basal and apical left ventricular contraction with akinesis of the mid-cavity in a circumferential fashion. The pathophysiology, clinical care and typical courses, are reviewed. PMID:22783322

  12. Trypanosomiasis, cardiomyopathy and the risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2010-05-01

    American (Chagas disease) and African (sleeping sickness) trypanosomiasis are neglected tropical diseases and are a heavy burden in Latin America and Africa, respectively. Chagas disease is an independent risk factor for stroke. Apical aneurysm, heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias are associated with ischemic stroke in chagasic cardiomyopathy. Not all chagasic patients who suffer an ischemic stroke have a severe cardiomyopathy, and stroke may be the first manifestation of Chagas disease. Cardioembolism affecting the middle cerebral artery is the most common stroke subtype. Risk of recurrence is high and careful evaluation of recurrence risk should be addressed. Repolarization changes, low voltage and prolonged QT interval are common electrocardiography alterations in human African trypanosomiasis, and can be found in more than 70% of patients. Epidemiological studies are needed to asses the risk of stroke in African trypanosomiasis perimyocarditis.

  13. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the context of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis].

    PubMed

    Núñez, D; Bermejo, R; Rodríguez-Velasco, A

    2014-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy consists of a transient dysfunction of the left ventricle. It is characterised by an impaired left ventricular segmentary contractility, without significant coronary lesions in the coronary angiography. It usually occurs after an episode of physical or emotional stress. We present the case of a 70 year-old woman, who, in the postoperative period of an ankle osteosynthesis, developed a Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the context of a sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus. She presented with acute lung oedema and a clinical picture of low cardiac output. The echocardiogram showed left ventricular medioapical akinesia. Coronary angiography was normal. She was treated with supportive measures with good progress. At 33 days from onset she was able to be discharged from hospital to home with normal systolic function on echocardiography.

  14. An 'Omics' Perspective on Cardiomyopathies and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Raghow, Rajendra

    2016-09-01

    Pathological enlargement of the heart, represented by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), occurs in response to many genetic and non-genetic factors. The clinical course of cardiac hypertrophy is remarkably variable, ranging from lifelong absence of symptoms to rapidly declining heart function and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Unbiased omics studies have begun to provide a glimpse into the molecular framework underpinning altered mechanotransduction, mitochondrial energetics, oxidative stress, and extracellular matrix in the heart undergoing physiological and pathological hypertrophy. Omics analyses indicate that post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays an overriding role in the normal and diseased heart. Studies to date highlight a need for more effective bioinformatics to better integrate patient omics data with their comprehensive clinical histories. PMID:27499035

  15. [Cardiac resynchronization therapy in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Weretka, S; Rüb, N; Weig, H J; Laszlo, R; Dörnberger, V; Gawaz, M; Schreieck, J

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy is recommended in patients with advanced heart failure (usually NYHA class III or IV) despite optimal pharmacologic therapy, severe systolic dysfunction (eg, left ventricular ejection fraction < 35 percent) and intraventricular conduction delay or echocardiographic indices of dyssynchrony and wide QRS complex (eg, QRS > or = 120 ms). Viral infection is the most common cause of myocarditis and has been implicated in the development of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. We report on a patient who developed progressive congestive heart failure caused by non-ischemic cardiomyopathy after liver transplantation and reactivation of the underlying hepatitis C. Due to an insufficient response to optimized pharmacological therapy, the patient was successfully treated using cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  16. Neurogenic cardiomyopathy in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies.

    PubMed

    Kesdangsakonwut, S; Sunden, Y; Yamada, K; Nishizono, A; Sawa, H; Umemura, T

    2015-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies have been rarely described in rabbits. Here we report myocardial necrosis of the ventricular wall in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies. Myocardial lesions were found only in rabbits with brain lesions, and the severity of the cardiac lesions was proportional to that of the brain lesions. Neither the frequency nor the cumulative dose of anesthesia was related to the incidence or the severity of the myocardial lesions. The myocardial lesions were characterized by degeneration and/or necrosis of myocardial cells and were accompanied by contraction band necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The brain lesions due to rabies virus infection were most prominent in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, brainstem, and medulla. Rabies virus antigen was not found in the hearts of any rabbits. Based on these findings, the myocardial lesions were classified as neurogenic cardiomyopathy.

  17. RBM20, a gene for hereditary cardiomyopathy, regulates titin splicing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Greaser, Marion L.; Radke, Michael H.; Liss, Martin; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Maatz, Henrike; Schulz, Herbert; Li, Shijun; Parrish, Amanda M.; Dauksaite, Vita; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Klaassen, Sabine; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Hacker, Timothy A.; Saupe, Kurt W.; Dec, G. William; Ellinor, Patrick T.; MacRae, Calum A.; Spallek, Bastian; Fischer, Robert; Perrot, Andreas; Özcelik, Cemil; Saar, Kathrin; Hubner, Norbert; Gotthardt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in the adaptation of cardiac function exemplified by the isoform switch of titin, which adjusts ventricular filling. We previously identified a rat strain deficient in titin splicing. Using genetic mapping, we found a loss-of-function mutation in RBM20 as the underlying cause for the pathological titin isoform expression. Mutations in human RBM20 have previously been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. We showed that the phenotype of Rbm20 deficient rats resembles the human pathology. Deep sequencing of the human and rat cardiac transcriptome revealed an RBM20 dependent regulation of alternative splicing. Additionally to titin we identified a set of 30 genes with conserved regulation between human and rat. This network is enriched for genes previously linked to cardiomyopathy, ion-homeostasis, and sarcomere biology. Our studies emphasize the importance of posttranscriptional regulation in cardiac function and provide mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:22466703

  18. Endothelial cell-cardiomyocyte crosstalk in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Andrea; Rodrigues, Brian

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing globally, with cardiovascular disease accounting for a substantial number of diabetes-related deaths. Although atherosclerotic vascular disease is a primary reason for this cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure in patients with diabetes might also be an outcome of an intrinsic heart muscle malfunction, labelled diabetic cardiomyopathy. Changes in cardiomyocyte metabolism, which encompasses a shift to exclusive fatty acid utilization, are considered a leading stimulus for this cardiomyopathy. In addition to cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells (ECs) make up a significant proportion of the heart, with the majority of ATP generation in these cells provided by glucose. In this review, we will discuss the metabolic machinery that drives energy metabolism in the cardiomyocyte and EC, its breakdown following diabetes, and the research direction necessary to assist in devising novel therapeutic strategies to prevent or delay diabetic heart disease. PMID:27288009

  19. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  20. Longitudinal Evaluation of Externalizing and Internalizing Behavior Problems Following Iron Deficiency in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Corapci, Feyza; Calatroni, Agustin; Kaciroti, Niko; Jimenez, Elias

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examined externalizing and internalizing behavior problem trajectories as a function of both iron status in infancy and infant characteristics. Methods A sample of 185 healthy Costa Rican children who either had chronic, severe iron deficiency or good iron status in infancy were followed for 19 years. Results Mother ratings of externalizing and internalizing problems from age 5 to 11–14 years were higher for the chronic iron deficiency group compared with those with the good iron status. Iron deficiency in infancy predicted persisting externalizing problems over this time period, especially for those with low physical activity in infancy. Beyond adolescence, youth in the chronic iron deficiency group did not report more problems than those in the good iron group. Conclusions These findings underscore the importance of considering infant iron status along with early behavioral characteristics to better identify those children at greatest risk for persisting long-term behavior problems. PMID:19736288

  1. Reversion of Severe Mitral Insufficiency in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Using Levosimendan

    PubMed Central

    Nieto Estrada, Victor H.; Molano Franco, Daniel L.; Valencia Moreno, Albert Alexander; Rojas Gambasica, Jose A.; Jaller Bornacelli, Yamil E.; Martinez Del Valle, Anacaona

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic peripartum cardiomyopathy presenting with heart failure is a true diagnostic and treatment challenge. Goal oriented clinical management aims at the relapse of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. A 35-year-old patient on her 12th day post-delivery presents progressive signs of heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography showed severe mitral insufficiency, mild left ventricular dysfunction, mild tricuspid insufficiency, severe pulmonary hypertension, and right atrial enlargement. With wet and cold heart failure signs, the patient was a candidate for inodilator cardiovascular support and volume depletion therapy. As the patient presented a persistent tachycardia at rest, levosimendan was chosen over dobutamine. Levosimendan was administered at a dose of 0.2 µg/kg/min during a period of 24 hours. After inodilator therapy, the patient’s signs and symptoms of heart failure began to decrease, showing improvement of dyspnea, mitral murmur grade went from IV/IV to II/IV, filling pressures and systemic and pulmonary resistance indexes decreased, arterial blood gases improved, and an echocardiography performed 72 h later showed non-dilated cardiomyopathy, mild cardiac contractile dysfunction, mild mitral insufficiency, type I diastolic dysfunction and improvement of pulmonary hypertension. Cardiovascular function in peripartum cardiomyopathy tends to go back to normality in 23-41% of the cases, but in a large group of patients, severe ventricle dysfunction remains months after initial symptoms. This article describes the diagnostic process of a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy and a successful reversion of a severe case of mitral insufficiency using levosimendan as a new therapeutic strategy in this clinical context. PMID:26566415

  2. Reversion of Severe Mitral Insufficiency in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Using Levosimendan.

    PubMed

    Nieto Estrada, Victor H; Molano Franco, Daniel L; Valencia Moreno, Albert Alexander; Rojas Gambasica, Jose A; Jaller Bornacelli, Yamil E; Martinez Del Valle, Anacaona

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic peripartum cardiomyopathy presenting with heart failure is a true diagnostic and treatment challenge. Goal oriented clinical management aims at the relapse of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. A 35-year-old patient on her 12th day post-delivery presents progressive signs of heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography showed severe mitral insufficiency, mild left ventricular dysfunction, mild tricuspid insufficiency, severe pulmonary hypertension, and right atrial enlargement. With wet and cold heart failure signs, the patient was a candidate for inodilator cardiovascular support and volume depletion therapy. As the patient presented a persistent tachycardia at rest, levosimendan was chosen over dobutamine. Levosimendan was administered at a dose of 0.2 µg/kg/min during a period of 24 hours. After inodilator therapy, the patient's signs and symptoms of heart failure began to decrease, showing improvement of dyspnea, mitral murmur grade went from IV/IV to II/IV, filling pressures and systemic and pulmonary resistance indexes decreased, arterial blood gases improved, and an echocardiography performed 72 h later showed non-dilated cardiomyopathy, mild cardiac contractile dysfunction, mild mitral insufficiency, type I diastolic dysfunction and improvement of pulmonary hypertension. Cardiovascular function in peripartum cardiomyopathy tends to go back to normality in 23-41% of the cases, but in a large group of patients, severe ventricle dysfunction remains months after initial symptoms. This article describes the diagnostic process of a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy and a successful reversion of a severe case of mitral insufficiency using levosimendan as a new therapeutic strategy in this clinical context. PMID:26566415

  3. Embryonic stem cell therapy of heart failure in genetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2008-10-01

    Pathogenic causes underlying nonischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being resolved, yet repair therapies for these commonly heritable forms of heart failure are lacking. A case in point is human dilated cardiomyopathy 10 (CMD10; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #608569), a progressive organ dysfunction syndrome refractory to conventional therapies and linked to mutations in cardiac ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel subunits. Embryonic stem cell therapy demonstrates benefit in ischemic heart disease, but the reparative capacity of this allogeneic regenerative cell source has not been tested in inherited cardiomyopathy. Here, in a Kir6.2-knockout model lacking functional K(ATP) channels, we recapitulated under the imposed stress of pressure overload the gene-environment substrate of CMD10. Salient features of the human malignant heart failure phenotype were reproduced, including compromised contractility, ventricular dilatation, and poor survival. Embryonic stem cells were delivered through the epicardial route into the left ventricular wall of cardiomyopathic stressed Kir6.2-null mutants. At 1 month of therapy, transplantation of 200,000 cells per heart achieved teratoma-free reversal of systolic dysfunction and electrical synchronization and halted maladaptive remodeling, thereby preventing end-stage organ failure. Tracked using the lacZ reporter transgene, stem cells engrafted into host heart. Beyond formation of cardiac tissue positive for Kir6.2, transplantation induced cell cycle activation and halved fibrotic zones, normalizing sarcomeric and gap junction organization within remuscularized hearts. Improved systemic function induced by stem cell therapy translated into increased stamina, absence of anasarca, and benefit to overall survivorship. Embryonic stem cells thus achieve functional repair in nonischemic genetic cardiomyopathy, expanding indications to the therapy of heritable heart failure. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is

  4. Secondary athrocytotic cardiomyopathy--heart damage due to Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kaduk, B; Metze, K; Schmidt, P F; Brandt, G

    1980-01-01

    Post-mortem atomic absorption spectrophotometry of the myocardium of a 14-year-old boy revealed a hundred-fold increase in copper. Further electrolyte analysis of the myocardium showed changes corresponding to metabolic heart muscle damage. Ultrastructural examination showed all the feature of a cardiomyopathy at the cellular level. Laser-Microprobe-Mass-Analysis demonstrated an inhomogeneous distribution of copper. An essential factor in the mechanism of death is heart damage.

  5. Noncompaction and Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Patient with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Stöllberger, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Psychosis and left ventricular hypertrabeculation (or noncompaction) (LVHT) have not been described in the same patient. Here we report a patient with a long-term history of schizophrenia who was later diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy (dCMP) and LVHT. Case Report. A 47-year-old Caucasian male developed nondifferentiated schizophrenia at the age of 26 y. Since the age of 33 y he was regularly drinking alcohol. At the age of 47 y he developed heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography showed an enlarged left ventricle, reduced systolic function, and surprisingly LVHT in the apical segment. Additionally, the left atrium was enlarged, the right ventricular cavities were mildly enlarged, and there were pulmonary hypertension and a small pericardial effusion. Cardiac MRI confirmed the echocardiographic findings. Since coronary angiography was normal, dilated cardiomyopathy was additionally diagnosed. Since he was taking clozapine during years, dilated cardiomyopathy could be due to not only alcohol consumption but also the long-term neuroleptic medication. Conclusions. LVHT may be associated with nondifferentiated psychosis. Management of LVHT is challenging in patients with psychosis due to poor compliance and adherence of these patients. Patients with LVHT and psychosis need particular attention since they usually take cardiotoxic drugs for a long time, which may further deteriorate the prognosis of LVHT. PMID:27547471

  6. Molecular profiling of dilated cardiomyopathy that progresses to heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Michael A.; Chang, Stephen; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Joshua M.; Conner, David A.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; DePalma, Steve R.; Eminaga, Seda; Konno, Tetsuo; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined by progressive functional and structural changes. We performed RNA-seq at different stages of disease to define molecular signaling in the progression from pre-DCM hearts to DCM and overt heart failure (HF) using a genetic model of DCM (phospholamban missense mutation, PLNR9C/+). Pre-DCM hearts were phenotypically normal yet displayed proliferation of nonmyocytes (59% relative increase vs. WT, P = 8 × 10–4) and activation of proinflammatory signaling with notable cardiomyocyte-specific induction of a subset of profibrotic cytokines including TGFβ2 and TGFβ3. These changes progressed through DCM and HF, resulting in substantial fibrosis (17.6% of left ventricle [LV] vs. WT, P = 6 × 10–33). Cardiomyocytes displayed a marked shift in metabolic gene transcription: downregulation of aerobic respiration and subsequent upregulation of glucose utilization, changes coincident with attenuated expression of PPARα and PPARγ coactivators -1α (PGC1α) and -1β, and increased expression of the metabolic regulator T-box transcription factor 15 (Tbx15). Comparing DCM transcriptional profiles with those in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) revealed similar and distinct molecular mechanisms. Our data suggest that cardiomyocyte-specific cytokine expression, early fibroblast activation, and the shift in metabolic gene expression are hallmarks of cardiomyopathy progression. Notably, key components of these profibrotic and metabolic networks were disease specific and distinguish DCM from HCM. PMID:27239561

  7. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy and Metabolic Remodeling of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Lopez-Crisosto, Camila; Wang, Zhao V.; Nemchenko, Andriy; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus are each increasing rapidly in societies around the globe. The majority of patients with diabetes succumb ultimately to heart disease, much of which stems from atherosclerotic disease and hypertension. However, the diabetic milieu is itself intrinsically noxious to the heart, and cardiomyopathy can develop independent of elevated blood pressure or coronary artery disease. This process, termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, is characterized by significant changes in the physiology, structure, and mechanical function of the heart. Presently, therapy for patients with diabetes focuses largely on glucose control, and attention to the heart commences with the onset of symptoms. When the latter develops, standard therapy for heart failure is applied. However, recent studies highlight that specific elements of the pathogenesis of diabetic heart disease are unique, raising the prospect of diabetes-specific therapeutic intervention. Here, we review recently unveiled insights into the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy and associated metabolic remodeling with an eye toward identifying novel targets with therapeutic potential. PMID:23123443

  8. Premature Ventricular Complexes and Premature Ventricular Complex Induced Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Latchamsetty, Rakesh; Bogun, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Presentation, prognosis, and management of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) vary significantly among patients and depend on PVC characteristics as well as patient comorbidities. Presentation can range from incidental discovery in an asymptomatic patient to debilitating heart failure. Prognosis depends on, among other factors, the presence or absence of structural heart disease, PVC burden and other factors detailed in this review. Our understanding of the clinical significance of frequent PVCs, particularly as it relates to development of cardiomyopathy, has advanced greatly in the past decade. In this article, we explore the mechanisms governing PVC initiation and discuss prevalence and frequency of PVCs in the general population. We also explore prognostic implications based on PVC frequency as well as the presence or absence of underlying heart disease. We then take a focused look at PVC-induced cardiomyopathy and identify predictors for developing cardiomyopathy. Finally, we discuss clinical evaluation and management of patients presenting with frequent PVCs. Management can include clinical observation, addressing reversible causes, lifestyle modification, pharmacotherapy, or catheter ablation.

  9. Nesprin-1 mutations in human and murine cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Puckelwartz, Megan J.; Kessler, Eric J.; Kim, Gene; DeWitt, Megan M.; Zhang, Yuan; Earley, Judy U.; Depreux, Frederic F.S.; Holaska, James; Mewborn, Stephanie K.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in LMNA, the gene encoding the nuclear membrane proteins, lamins A and C, produce cardiac and muscle disease. In the heart, these autosomal dominant LMNA mutations lead to cardiomyopathy frequently associated with cardiac conduction system disease. Herein, we describe a patient with the R374H missense variant in nesprin-1α, a protein that binds lamin A/C. This individual developed dilated cardiomyopathy requiring cardiac transplantation. Fibroblasts from this individual had increased expression of nesprin-1α and lamins A and C, indicating changes in the nuclear membrane complex. We characterized mice lacking the carboxy-terminus of nesprin-1 since this model expresses nesprin-1 without its carboxy-terminal KASH domain. These Δ/Δ KASH mice have a normally assembled but dysfunctional nuclear membrane complex and provide a model for nesprin-1 mutations. We found that Δ/Δ KASH mice develop cardiomyopathy with associated cardiac conduction system disease. Older mutant animals were found to have elongated P wave duration, elevated atrial and ventricular effective refractory periods indicating conduction defects in the myocardium, and reduced fractional shortening. Cardiomyocyte nuclei were found to be elongated with reduced heterochromatin in the Δ/Δ KASH hearts. These findings mirror what has been described from lamin A/C gene mutations and reinforce the importance of an intact nuclear membrane complex for a normally functioning heart. PMID:19944109

  10. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy: prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Putko, Brendan N; Wen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard B; Mullen, John; Shanks, Miriam; Yogasundaram, Haran; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2015-03-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the inappropriate accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in tissues due to a deficiency in the enzyme α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is characterized by structural, valvular, vascular and conduction abnormalities, and is now the most common cause of mortality in patients with AFD. Large-scale metabolic and genetic screening studies have revealed AFD to be prevalent in populations of diverse ethnic origins, and the variant form of AFD represents an unrecognized health burden. Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder, and genetic testing is critical for the diagnosis of AFD in women. Echocardiography with strain imaging and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late enhancement and T1 mapping are important imaging tools. The current therapy for AFD is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which can reverse or prevent AFD progression, while gene therapy and the use of molecular chaperones represent promising novel therapies for AFD. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially reversible cause of heart failure that involves LVH, increased susceptibility to arrhythmias and valvular regurgitation. Genetic testing and cardiac MRI are important diagnostic tools, and AFD cardiomyopathy is treatable if ERT is introduced early.

  11. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: vectorcardiographic findings in echocardiographically unaffected relative.

    PubMed Central

    Loperfido, F; Fiorilli, R; Digaetano, A; Di Gennaro, M; Santarelli, P; Bellocci, F; Coppola, E; Zecchi, P

    1982-01-01

    The electrocardiographic and vectorcardiographic (Frank system) features of the first degree relatives of subjects with documented familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were analysed. A total of nine affected members and 29 relatives were examined in four families. THe subjects were considered to be affected when the septal to free posterior wall thickness ratio exceeded 1.3 at M-mode echocardiography. Four relatives had asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Among 25 relatives without evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy, two over 20 years and 10 under 20 years of age showed increased voltage of QRS anterior forces (Qz amplitude greater than 0.80 mV) on the orthogonal electrocardiogram. The vectorcardiographic data of the relatives under 20 years of age without evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy (18 subjects) were compared with those of 38 normal control subjects of comparable age range. The young relatives without disproportionate septal hypertrophy had significantly greater Qz amplitude and Q/Rz ratio than the normal control subjects. In contrast, the echocardiographic data were not significantly different. We suggest that the electrocardiographic finding of abnormal anterior forces in one or more first degree relatives of subjects with documented hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may constitute a valuable aid in ascertaining the genetic transmission of the disease and in recognising affected members without echocardiographic evidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Images PMID:7200794

  12. The C57BL/6 genetic background confers cardioprotection in iron-overloaded mice

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Marco; Maccari, Sonia; Sestili, Paola; Massimi, Alessia; Corritore, Elisa; Marano, Giuseppe; Catalano, Liviana

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic transfusion therapy causes a progressive iron overload that damages many organs including the heart. Recent evidence suggests that L-type calcium channels play an important role in iron uptake by cardiomyocytes under conditions of iron overload. Given that beta-adrenergic stimulation significantly enhances L-type calcium current, we hypothesised that beta-adrenergic blocking drugs could reduce the deleterious effects of iron overload on the heart. Methods Iron overload was generated by intraperitoneal injections of iron dextran (1g/kg) administered once a week for 8 weeks in male C57bl/6 mice, while propranolol was administered in drinking water at the dose of 40 mg/kg/day. Cardiac function and ventricular remodelling were evaluated by echocardiography and histological methods. Results As compared to placebo, iron injection caused cardiac iron deposition. Surprisingly, despite iron overload, myocardial function and ventricular geometry in the iron-treated mice resulted unchanged as compared to those in the placebo-treated mice. Administration of propranolol increased cardiac performance in iron-overloaded mice. Specifically, as compared to the values in the iron-overloaded group, in iron-overloaded animals treated with propranolol left ventricular fractional shortening increased (from 31.6% to 44.2%, P =0.01) whereas left ventricular end-diastolic diameter decreased (from 4.1±0.1 mm to 3.5±0.1 mm, P =0.03). Propranolol did not alter cardiac systolic function or left ventricular sizes in the placebo group. Conclusions These results demonstrate that C57bl/6 mice are resistant to iron overload-induced myocardial injury and that treatment with propranolol is able to increase cardiac performance in iron-overloaded mice. However, since C57bl/6 mice were resistant to iron-induced injury, it remains to be evaluated further whether propranolol could prevent iron-overload cardiomyopathy. PMID:22790263

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2* for tissue iron assessment in the heart.

    PubMed

    He, Taigang

    2014-10-01

    Until recently, even in Europe and the US, iron induced cardiomyopathy was the most common cause of death for patients with thalassemia major (TM). In order to prevent deaths from this potentially reversible condition, accurate measurement of myocardial iron is needed to detect iron early and guide chelation therapy. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) T2* is the method of choice for the assessment of cardiac iron and in the UK, where it was first introduced clinically, 60% reductions in overall mortality for TM have been observed. The history of T2* development is described in this article. T2* image acquisition and post processing techniques are reviewed. Remaining challenges and emerging techniques to potentially improve characterization of tissue iron are also discussed.

  14. Potential of common bean to enhance dietary iron availability in humans: Germplasm diversity and QTL analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are interested in the improvement of iron nutritional status of humans living in developing world countries where iron deficiency anemia is quite severe. We also wish to promote the use of plant-based food sources to improve human iron status, and thus are focusing on staple food crops like comm...

  15. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. PMID:26475190

  16. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy.

    PubMed

    Thotakura, Sudhir; Costa, Steven M; Cable, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms.

  17. Left ventricular assist for pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy using the Medos VAD cannula and a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Chien; Chi, Nai-Hsin; Chen, Chun-An; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Ko, Wen-Je; Wang, Shoei-Shen

    2009-11-01

    Ventricular assist devices for small pediatric patients are expensive and commercially unavailable in Taiwan. We used the Medos ventricular assist device cannula (Medos, Aachen, Germany) and a centrifugal pump to support pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and decompensated heart failure. From January 2007 to December 2008, three pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy were supported using a centrifugal pump as the left ventricular assist device. The Medos arterial cannula was sutured to the ascending aorta, and the Apex cannula was fixed into the left ventricular apex. When the patient was weaned off of cardiopulmonary bypass, the left ventricular assist device pump was started. The pump flow was gradually titrated according to the filling status of the left ventricle. All the left ventricular assist devices were successfully implanted and functioned well. Two patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation had severe lung edema before left ventricular assist device implantation. Both patients required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for the postoperative period until the pulmonary edema was resolved. Among the three patients, two successfully bridged to heart transplantation after support for 6 and 11 days, respectively. The first patient (10 kg) expired due to systemic emboli 30 days after left ventricular assist device support. In summary, these results suggest that the Medos ventricular assist device cannula and a centrifugal pump is an option for temporary left ventricular assist device support in patients with intractable heart failure and as a bridge to heart transplantation.

  18. Total iron absorption by young women from iron-biofortified pearl millet composite meals is double that from regular millet meals but less than that from post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals.

    PubMed

    Cercamondi, Colin I; Egli, Ines M; Mitchikpe, Evariste; Tossou, Felicien; Zeder, Christophe; Hounhouigan, Joseph D; Hurrell, Richard F

    2013-09-01

    Iron biofortification of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) is a promising approach to combat iron deficiency (ID) in the millet-consuming communities of developing countries. To evaluate the potential of iron-biofortified millet to provide additional bioavailable iron compared with regular millet and post-harvest iron-fortified millet, an iron absorption study was conducted in 20 Beninese women with marginal iron status. Composite test meals consisting of millet paste based on regular-iron, iron-biofortified, or post-harvest iron-fortified pearl millet flour accompanied by a leafy vegetable sauce or an okra sauce were fed as multiple meals for 5 d. Iron absorption was measured as erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Fractional iron absorption from test meals based on regular-iron millet (7.5%) did not differ from iron-biofortified millet meals (7.5%; P = 1.0), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the meals based on iron-biofortified millet (1125 vs. 527 μg; P < 0.0001). Fractional iron absorption from post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (10.4%) was higher than from regular-iron and iron-biofortified millet meals (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (1500 μg; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Results indicate that consumption of iron-biofortified millet would double the amount of iron absorbed and, although fractional absorption of iron from biofortification is less than that from fortification, iron-biofortified millet should be highly effective in combatting ID in millet-consuming populations.

  19. Total Iron Absorption by Young Women from Iron-Biofortified Pearl Millet Composite Meals Is Double That from Regular Millet Meals but Less Than That from Post-Harvest Iron-Fortified Millet Meals123

    PubMed Central

    Cercamondi, Colin I.; Egli, Ines M.; Mitchikpe, Evariste; Tossou, Felicien; Zeder, Christophe; Hounhouigan, Joseph D.; Hurrell, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Iron biofortification of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) is a promising approach to combat iron deficiency (ID) in the millet-consuming communities of developing countries. To evaluate the potential of iron-biofortified millet to provide additional bioavailable iron compared with regular millet and post-harvest iron-fortified millet, an iron absorption study was conducted in 20 Beninese women with marginal iron status. Composite test meals consisting of millet paste based on regular-iron, iron-biofortified, or post-harvest iron-fortified pearl millet flour accompanied by a leafy vegetable sauce or an okra sauce were fed as multiple meals for 5 d. Iron absorption was measured as erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Fractional iron absorption from test meals based on regular-iron millet (7.5%) did not differ from iron-biofortified millet meals (7.5%; P = 1.0), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the meals based on iron-biofortified millet (1125 vs. 527 μg; P < 0.0001). Fractional iron absorption from post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (10.4%) was higher than from regular-iron and iron-biofortified millet meals (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (1500 μg; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Results indicate that consumption of iron-biofortified millet would double the amount of iron absorbed and, although fractional absorption of iron from biofortification is less than that from fortification, iron-biofortified millet should be highly effective in combatting ID in millet-consuming populations. PMID:23884388

  20. Reversal of premature ventricular complex-induced cardiomyopathy following successful radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Efremidis, Michalis; Letsas, Konstantinos P; Sideris, Antonios; Kardaras, Fotios

    2008-06-01

    Premature ventricular complex (PVC)-induced cardiomyopathy is an underappreciated cause of left-ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The present report describes the case of an elderly man with a very high burden of monomorphic PVCs and LV dysfunction. Elimination of the left ventricular focus following radiofrequency catheter ablation resulted in reversal of cardiomyopathy.

  1. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy in the pre- and post-liver transplantation phase.

    PubMed

    Zardi, Enrico Maria; Zardi, Domenico Maria; Chin, Diana; Sonnino, Chiara; Dobrina, Aldo; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Patients with advanced liver cirrhosis may develop a clinical syndrome characterized by a blunted contractile responsiveness to stress and/or altered diastolic relaxation, called "cirrhotic cardiomyopathy." This syndrome, which is initially asymptomatic, is often misdiagnosed due to the presence of symptoms that characterize other disorders present in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis, such as exercise intolerance, fatigue, and dyspnea. Stress and other conditions such as liver transplantation and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may unmask this syndrome. Liver transplantation in this group of patients results in a clinical improvement and can be a cure for the cardiomyopathy. However, post-transplant prognosis depends on the identification of cirrhotics with cardiomyopathy in the pre-transplant phase; an early diagnosis of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy in the pre-transplant phase may avoid an acute onset or worsening of cardiac failure after liver transplantation. Since a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction may mask the presence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, the use of newer noninvasive diagnostic techniques (i.e. tissue Doppler, myocardial strain) is necessary to identify cirrhotics with this syndrome, in the pre-transplant phase. A pre-transplant treatment of heart failure in cirrhotics with cardiomyopathy improves the quality of life in this phase and reduces the complications during and immediately after liver transplantation. Since specific therapies for cirrhotic cardiomyopathy are lacking, due to the absence of a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the cardiomyopathy, further research in this field is required. PMID:26074443

  2. Mid-ventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with an apical aneurysm caused by vasospastic angina.

    PubMed

    Kiyooka, Takahiko; Satoh, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-20

    Mid-ventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (MVOHCM) is a rare form of cardiomyopathy, characterized by the presence of a pressure gradient between the left ventricular basal and apical chambers and is frequently associated with an apical aneurysm. However, the exact cause of this aneurysm remains unknown. We here describe a patient with MVOHCM in whom the apical aneurysm may be caused by vasospastic angina.

  3. Animal Models of Congenital Cardiomyopathies Associated With Mutations in Z-Line Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bang, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac Z-line at the boundary between sarcomeres is a multiprotein complex connecting the contractile apparatus with the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The Z-line is important for efficient force generation and transmission as well as the maintenance of structural stability and integrity. Furthermore, it is a nodal point for intracellular signaling, in particular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. Mutations in various genes encoding Z-line proteins have been associated with different cardiomyopathies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction, and mutations even within the same gene can cause widely different pathologies. Animal models have contributed to a great advancement in the understanding of the physiological function of Z-line proteins and the pathways leading from mutations in Z-line proteins to cardiomyopathy, although genotype-phenotype prediction remains a great challenge. This review presents an overview of the currently available animal models for Z-line and Z-line associated proteins involved in human cardiomyopathies with special emphasis on knock-in and transgenic mouse models recapitulating the clinical phenotypes of human cardiomyopathy patients carrying mutations in Z-line proteins. Pros and cons of mouse models will be discussed and a future outlook will be given. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 38-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27171814

  4. [Cardiomyopathies and pregnancy--how often, when to decide to terminate?].

    PubMed

    Nowalany-Kozielska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a small percentage of heart disease in pregnant women, but usually cause severe complications. It is not know the exact incidence of cardiomyopathy associated with pregnancy in Europe. In these patients, there is a higher probability of death due to changes in hemodynamic, metabolic and hemostatic that occur in pregnancy. Pregnant mortality is 2.4% vs. 0.007%--in the normal population. The most common cause of severe maternal complications is peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). In dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) is usually observed significant clinical deterioration during pregnancy. On the other hand, in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), pregnancy and childbirth are often associated with a low risk of complications. There is a greater risk in women presenting symptoms before and on pregnancy and in women with large inrtaventricular and subaortic pressure gradient. There are only a few case reports of pregnancy in patients with rare storage diseases and infiltrative phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. For these patients the pregnancy is contraindicated. In patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is sometimes the severity of arrhythmia in the third trimester of pregnancy, and childbirth (natural or cesarean section) is usually safe. Remember to informing women with various cardiomyopathies both the risks of pregnancy and about the possibility of transferring the disease to offspring. Contraception should be advised in many cases. PMID:26455023

  5. Iron-Responsive Olfactory Uptake of Manganese Improves Motor Function Deficits Associated with Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghan; Li, Yuan; Buckett, Peter D.; Böhlke, Mark; Thompson, Khristy J.; Takahashi, Masaya; Maher, Timothy J.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D2 (D2R) levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed “rescue response” with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status. PMID:22479410

  6. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  7. Impact of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in non-ischemic cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kalisz, Kevin; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies include a wide spectrum of disease states afflicting the heart, whether a primary process or secondary to a systemic condition. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has established itself as an important imaging modality in the evaluation of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. CMR is useful in the diagnosis of cardiomyopathy, quantification of ventricular function, establishing etiology, determining prognosis and risk stratification. Technical advances and extensive research over the last decade have resulted in the accumulation of a tremendous amount of data with regards to the utility of CMR in these cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review CMR findings of various non-ischemic cardiomyopathies and focus on current literature investigating the clinical impact of CMR on risk stratification, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:26981210

  8. Longitudinal analysis of heart and liver iron in thalassemia major patients according to chelation treatment.

    PubMed

    Danjou, F; Origa, R; Anni, F; Saba, L; Cossa, S; Podda, G; Galanello, R

    2013-10-01

    Iron chelators and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for assessing iron loading in liver and heart have greatly improved survival of thalassemic patients suffering iron overload-associated cardiomyopathy. However, the correlation between liver iron concentration and myocardial siderosis is ambiguous. Using an objective metric of time delay, scientists have demonstrated a lag in the loading and unloading of cardiac iron with respect to that of the liver. In the present study, we further tested this hypothesis with different chelation treatments. We analyzed the effect of three chelating treatment approaches on liver and cardiac iron content in 24 highly compliant patients who underwent 3 or more MRIs under each chelation treatment. Of the 84 MRIs considered, 32 were performed on deferoxamine (DFO - 8 patients), 24 on deferiprone (DFP - 7 patients), and 28 on combined therapy (DFO+DFP - 9 patients). In patients treated with DFO, changes in cardiac iron significantly lagged changes in liver iron but the opposite pattern was observed in patients treated with DFP (p=0.005), while combined therapy showed a pattern in-between DFO and DFP. We conclude that the temporality of changes of cardiac and liver iron is chelator-dependent, so that chelation therapy can be tailored to balance iron elimination from the liver and the heart.

  9. Calcein as a fluorescent probe for ferric iron. Application to iron nutrition in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, F; Serratrice, G; Béguin, C; Aman, E S; Pierre, J L; Fontecave, M; Laulhère, J P

    1999-05-01

    The recent use of calcein (CA) as a fluorescent probe for cellular iron has been shown to reflect the nutritional status of iron in mammalian cells (Breuer, W., Epsztejn, S., and Cabantchik, Z. I. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 24209-24215). CA was claimed to be a chemosensor for iron(II), to measure the labile iron pool and the concentration of cellular free iron(II). We first study here the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of iron binding by CA. Chelation of a first iron(III) involves one aminodiacetic arm and a phenol. The overall stability constant log beta111 of FeIIICAH is 33. 9. The free metal ion concentration is pFeIII = 20.3. A (FeIII)2 CA complex can be formed. A reversible iron(III) exchange from FeIIICAH to citrate and nitrilotriacetic acid is evidenced when these ligands are present in large excess. The kinetics of iron(III) exchange by CA is compatible with metabolic studies. The low reduction potential of FeIIICAH shows that the ferric form is highly stabilized. CA fluorescence is quenched by 85% after FeIII chelation but by only 20% using FeII. Real time iron nutrition by Arabidopsis thaliana cells has been measured by fluorimetry, and the iron buffer FeIIICAH + CA was used as source of iron. As a siderophore, FeIIICAH promotes cell growth and regreening of iron-deficient cells more rapidly than FeIIIEDTA. We conclude that CA is a good chemosensor for iron(III) in cells and biological fluids, but not for Fe(II). We discuss the interest of quantifying iron buffers in biochemical studies of iron, in vitro as well as in cells.

  10. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Talavera, Jesús; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality. PMID:26788502

  12. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Talavera, Jesús; Giraldo, Alejandro; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality.

  13. Simultaneous interstitial pneumonitis and cardiomyopathy induced by venlafaxine* **

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Pedro Gonçalo; Costa, Susana; Dias, Nuno; Ferreira, António Jorge; Franco, Fátima

    2014-01-01

    Venlafaxine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor used as an antidepressant. Interindividual variability and herb-drug interactions can lead to drug-induced toxicity. We report the case of a 35-year-old female patient diagnosed with synchronous pneumonitis and acute cardiomyopathy attributed to venlafaxine. The patient sought medical attention due to dyspnea and dry cough that started three months after initiating treatment with venlafaxine for depression. The patient was concomitantly taking Centella asiatica and Fucus vesiculosus as phytotherapeutic agents. Chest CT angiography and chest X-ray revealed parenchymal lung disease (diffuse micronodules and focal ground-glass opacities) and simultaneous dilated cardiomyopathy. Ecocardiography revealed a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 21%. A thorough investigation was carried out, including BAL, imaging studies, autoimmune testing, right heart catheterization, and myocardial biopsy. After excluding other etiologies and applying the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale, a diagnosis of synchronous pneumonitis/cardiomyopathy associated with venlafaxine was assumed. The herbal supplements taken by the patient have a known potential to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzyme complex, which is responsible for the metabolization of venlafaxine. After venlafaxine discontinuation, there was rapid improvement, with regression of the radiological abnormalities and normalization of the LVEF. This was an important case of drug-induced cardiopulmonary toxicity. The circumstantial intake of inhibitors of the CYP2D6 isoenzyme and the presence of a CYP2D6 slow metabolism phenotype might have resulted in the toxic accumulation of venlafaxine and the subsequent clinical manifestations. Here, we also discuss why macrophage-dominant phospholipidosis was the most likely mechanism of toxicity in this case. PMID:25029655

  14. Tachycardiomyopathy with familial predisposition masquerading as peripartum cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central<