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Sample records for cardiorenal metabolic syndrome

  1. Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiometabolic Risks in Minority Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ferdinand, Keith C.; Rodriguez, Fatima; Nasser, Samar A.; Caballero, A. Enrique; Puckrein, Gary A.; Zangeneh, Farhad; Mansour, Michael; Foody, JoAnne Micale; Pemu, Priscilla E.; Ofili, Elizabeth O.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart disease and stroke, is the leading cause of death in the USA, regardless of self-determined race/ethnicity, and largely driven by cardiometabolic risk (CMR) and cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS). The primary drivers of increased CMR include obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease as well as associated adverse behaviors of physical inactivity, smoking, and unhealthy eating habits. Given the importance of CRS for public health, multiple stakeholders, including the National Minority Quality Forum (the Forum), the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the Association of Black Cardiologists (ABC), have developed this review to inform clinicians and other health professionals of the unique aspects of CMR in racial/ethnic minorities and of potential means to improve CMR factor control, to reduce CRS and CVD in diverse populations, and to provide more effective, coordinated care. This paper highlights CRS and CMR as sources of significant morbidity and mortality (particularly in racial/ethnic minorities), associated health-care costs, and an evolving index tool for cardiometabolic disease to determine geographical and environmental factors. Finally, this work provides a few examples of interventions potentially successful at reducing disparities in cardiometabolic health. PMID:24847329

  2. [Cardiorenal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Portolés Pérez, J; Cuevas Bou, X

    2008-01-01

    Nephrologists should promote the detection of CKD in heart disease patients. The evaluation should include estimation of GFR and detection of microalbuminuria in a recently voided urine sample by the albumin:creatinine ratio. Any patient with stage 3 or 4 CKD and rapid deterioration of GFR should be evaluated by the nephrologist. - Patients with CKD have a high risk of cardiovascular (CV) complications and heart disease patients have a high incidence of CKD and progression is also more rapid (Strength of Recommendation B). The most likely pathophysiological hypothesis is endothelial damage. - The CV risk profile should be established in each patient followed by adequate compliance with control goals for common CV risk factors: smoking, obesity, sedentarism, hypertension, dyslipidemia. Early treatment of anemia and bone mineral disease as CV risk factors requires special mention (Strength of Recommendation B). - Management of these patients will be based on individualization of treatment, close systematic follow-up, and integration between care levels: Specialized care (nephrologists and cardiologists) and primary care. - The cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is a condition in which both organs are simultaneously affected and their deleterious effects are reinforced in a feedback cycle, with accelerated progression of renal and myocardial damage. Because of its prognostic value, treatment of HF takes precedence over CKD. Most studies on cardiovascular risk and on HF exclude patients with stage 4-5 CKD. We thus do not have sufficient strong evidence and recommendations are based on the extrapolation of data from studies with normal GFR or milder grades of CKD, and on the empirical use of certain treatments. - ARBs and ACEIs are the mainstays of treatment of HF with systolic and diastolic dysfunction, and have been shown to reduce mortality in studies in the general population (Strength of Recommendation A). The may also slow progression of CKD, especially in diabetics. Dual

  3. [PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF THE CARDIORENAL SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Balint, I; Vučak, J; Bašić-Marković, N; Klarić, D; Šakić, V Amerl

    2016-12-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome, a complex pathophysiological disorder of both the heart and kidneys, is a condition in which acute or chronic damage to one organ can lead to acute or chronic dysfunction of the other organ. Depending on primary organ dysfunction and disease duration, there are five different types of cardiorenal syndrome. Type 1 cardiorenal syndrome (acute cardiorenal syndrome) is defined as acute kidney injury caused by sudden decrease in heart function. Type 2 cardiorenal syndrome (chronic cardiorenal syndrome) refers to chronic kidney disease linked to chronic heart failure. Type 3 cardiorenal syndrome (acute renocardial syndrome) is caused by acute kidney injury that leads to heart failure. Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome (chronic renocardial syndrome) includes chronic heart failure due to chronic kidney disease. Type 5 cardiorenal syndrome (secondary cardiorenal syndrome) is reversible or irreversible condition marked by simultaneous heart and kidney insufficiency, as a result of multiorgan disease such as sepsis, diabetes mellitus, sarcoidosis, amyloidosis, etc. The pathophysiological patterns of cardiorenal syndrome are extremely complicated. Despite numerous publications, perplexed physiological, biochemical and hormonal disturbances as parts of the main pathogenic mechanisms of cardiorenal syndrome remain obscure. Even though there are guidelines for the treatment of patients with heart failure and chronic kidney disease, similar guidelines for the treatment of cardiorenal syndrome are lacking. In everyday practice, it is crucial to diagnose cardiorenal syndrome and use all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures available to prevent or alleviate kidney and heart failure.

  4. Cardiorenal metabolic syndrome in the African diaspora: rationale for including chronic kidney disease in the metabolic syndrome definition.

    PubMed

    Lea, Janice P; Greene, Eddie L; Nicholas, Susanne B; Agodoa, Lawrence; Norris, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in African Americans while the reasons for this are unclear. The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and has been recently linked to incident CKD. Historically, fewer African Americans meet criteria for the definition of metabolic syndrome, despite having higher rates of cardiovascular mortality than Caucasians. The presence of microalbuminuria portends increased cardiovascular risks and has been shown to cluster with the metabolic syndrome. We recently reported that proteinuria is a predictor of CKD progression in African American hypertensives with metabolic syndrome. In this review we explore the potential value of including CKD markers--microalbuminuria/proteinuria or low glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-in refining the cluster of factors defined as metabolic syndrome, ie, "cardiorenal metabolic syndrome."

  5. Pharmacological Management of Cardiorenal Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    House, Andrew A.; Haapio, Mikko; Lassus, Johan; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndromes are disorders of the heart and kidneys whereby acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction of the other. The pharmacological management of Cardiorenal syndromes may be complicated by unanticipated or unintended effects of agents targeting one organ on the other. Hence, a thorough understanding of the pathophysiology of these disorders is paramount. The treatment of cardiovascular diseases and risk factors may affect renal function and modify the progression of renal injury. Likewise, management of renal disease and associated complications can influence heart function or influence cardiovascular risk. In this paper, an overview of pharmacological management of acute and chronic Cardiorenal Syndromes is presented, and the need for high-quality future studies in this field is highlighted. PMID:21660311

  6. Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro da Silva, Ana Luísa; Vaz da Silva, Manuel Joaquim

    2016-11-01

    The Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative consensus conference proposed a classification of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS), aiming for a better delineation of each subtype. Although the exact pathophysiology of type 4 CRS is not completely understood, the mechanisms involved are probably multifactorial. There is growing evidence that oxidative stress is a major connector in the development and progression of type 4 CRS. Giving its complexity, poor prognosis and increasing incidence, type 4 CRS is becoming a significant public health problem. Patients with chronic kidney disease are particularly predisposed to cardiac dysfunction, due to the high prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in this population, but the contribution of risk factors specific to chronic kidney disease should also be taken into account. Much remains to be elucidated about type 4 CRS: despite progress over the last decade, there are still significant questions regarding its pathophysiology and there is as yet no specific therapy. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved may provide potential targets for intervention. The present review will provide a brief description of the definition, epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, biomarkers and management strategies of type 4 CRS, and the pathophysiological mechanisms and risk factors presumably involved in its development will be particularly highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Uric Acid – Key Ingredient in the Recipe for Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kunal; Malhotra, Kunal; Sowers, James; Aroor, Annayya

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum uric acid levels are a frequent finding in persons with obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular and kidney disease as well as in those with the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome (CRS). The increased consumption of a fructose-rich Western diet has contributed to the increasing incidence of the CRS, obesity and diabetes especially in industrialized populations. There is also increasing evidence that supports a causal role of high dietary fructose driving elevations in uric acid in association with the CRS. Animal and epidemiological studies support the notion that elevated serum uric acid levels play an important role in promoting insulin resistance and hypertension and suggest potential pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to the development of the CRS and associated cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. To this point, elevated serum levels of uric acid appear to contribute to impaired nitric oxide production/endothelial dysfunction, increased vascular stiffness, inappropriate activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, enhanced oxidative stress, and maladaptive immune and inflammatory responses. These abnormalities, in turn, promote vascular, cardiac and renal fibrosis as well as associated functional abnormalities. Small clinical trials have suggested that uric acid-lowering therapies may be beneficial in such patients; however, a consensus on the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia is lacking. Larger randomized controlled trials need to be performed in order to critically evaluate the beneficial effect of lowering serum uric acid in patients with the CRS and those with diabetes and/or hypertension. PMID:24454316

  8. Novel Renal Biomarkers to Assess Cardiorenal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brisco, Meredith A.; Testani, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) in heart failure portends adverse outcomes and often limits aggressive medical and decongestive therapies. Despite the high prevalence in this population, not all forms of RD are prognostically or mechanistically equivalent: RD can result from irreversible nephron loss secondary to diabetic or hypertensive kidney disease or it can develop secondary to the HF itself, i.e. the cardiorenal syndrome. Furthermore, filtration is only one aspect of renal performance such that significant renal impairment secondary to cardiorenal syndrome can exist despite a normal glomerular filtration rate. Renal biomarkers have the potential to inform some of the intricacies involved in accurately assessing cardiorenal interactions. This article discusses novel biomarkers for cardiorenal syndrome and their utility in prognosis, diagnosis, and targeted treatment of heart failure-induced RD. PMID:25239434

  9. Protective effects of naringenin in cardiorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; An, Wenjun; Gao, Aibao

    2016-06-15

    Cardiorenal syndrome is a complicated and bidirectional interrelationship between the heart and kidneys. Naringenin (NG) is a naturally occurring flavonoid possessing various biological and pharmacological properties. We tested whether NG could improve cardiac and renal function in a rat model of cardiorenal syndrome. The results showed that NG-attenuated cardiac remodeling and cardiac dysfunction in rats with cardiorenal syndrome, as evidenced by decrease of left ventricle weight (LVW), increase of body weight (BW), decrease of LVW/BW, decrease of concentrations of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, type-B natriuretic peptide, aldosterone, angiotensin (Ang) II, C-reactive protein, and urine protein, increase of left ventricular systolic pressure and falling rates of left ventricular pressure (dp/dtmax), and decrease of left ventricular diastolic pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and -dp/dtmax. NG significantly inhibited the increase of lipid profiles including low-density lipoprotein, TC, and TG in rats. In addition, NG significantly inhibited the increase of cardiac expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and interferon γ. Moreover, NG decreased malonaldehyde level, increased superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione content in rats, and increased the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and catalytic subunit of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase (GCLc) in rats and Ang II-treated cardiac fibroblasts. Inhibition of Nrf2 and glutathione synthesis significantly suppressed NG-induced decrease of ROS level. Inhibition of Nrf2 markedly suppressed NG-induced increase of GCLc expression in Ang II-treated cardiac fibroblasts. The data provide novel options for therapy of patients and new insights into the cardioprotective effects of NG in cardiorenal syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardiorenal Involvement in Metabolic Syndrome Induced by Cola Drinking in Rats: Proinflammatory Cytokines and Impaired Antioxidative Protection

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Losada, Matilde; Gómez Llambí, Hernán; Ottaviano, Graciela; Cao, Gabriel; Müller, Angélica; Azzato, Francisco; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Milei, José

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental evidence confirming renal histopathology, proinflammatory mediators, and oxidative metabolism induced by cola drinking. Male Wistar rats drank ad libitum regular cola (C, n = 12) or tap water (W, n = 12). Measures. Body weight, nutritional data, plasma glucose, cholesterol fractions, TG, urea, creatinine, coenzyme Q10, SBP, and echocardiograms (0 mo and 6 mo). At 6 months euthanasia was performed. Kidneys were processed for histopathology and immunohistochemistry (semiquantitative). Compared with W, C rats showed (I) overweight (+8%, p < 0.05), hyperglycemia (+11%, p < 0.05), hypertriglyceridemia (2-fold, p < 0.001), higher AIP (2-fold, p < 0.01), and lower Q10 level (−55%, p < 0.05); (II) increased LV diastolic diameter (+9%, p < 0.05) and volume (systolic +24%, p < 0.05), posterior wall thinning (−8%, p < 0.05), and larger cardiac output (+24%, p < 0.05); (III) glomerulosclerosis (+21%, p < 0.05), histopathology (+13%, p < 0.05), higher tubular expression of IL-6 (7-fold, p < 0.001), and TNFα (4-fold, p < 0.001). (IV) Correlations were found for LV dimensions with IL-6 (74%, p < 0.001) and TNFα (52%, p < 0.001) and fully abolished after TG and Q10 control. Chronic cola drinking induced cardiac remodeling associated with increase in proinflammatory cytokines and renal damage. Hypertriglyceridemia and oxidative stress were key factors. Hypertriglyceridemic lipotoxicity in the context of defective antioxidant/anti-inflammatory protection due to low Q10 level might play a key role in cardiorenal disorder induced by chronic cola drinking in rats. PMID:27340342

  11. The cardiorenal syndrome in heart failure: cardiac? renal? syndrome?

    PubMed

    Triposkiadis, Filippos; Starling, Randall C; Boudoulas, Harisios; Giamouzis, Gregory; Butler, Javed

    2012-05-01

    There has been increasing interest on the so-called cardiorenal syndrome (CRS), defined as a complex pathophysiological disorder of the heart and kidneys whereby acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction in the other. In this review, we contend that there is lack of evidence warranting the adoption of a specific clinical construct such as the CRS within the heart failure (HF) syndrome by demonstrating that: (a) the approaches and tools regarding the definition of kidney involvement in HF are suboptimal; (b) development of renal failure in HF is often confounded by age, hypertension, and diabetes; (c) worsening of renal function (WRF) in HF may be largely independent of alterations in cardiac function; (d) the bidirectional association between HF and renal failure is not unique and represents one of the several such associations encountered in HF; and (e) inflammation is a common denominator for HF and associated noncardiac morbidities. Based on these arguments, we believe that dissecting one of the multiple bidirectional associations in HF and constructing the so-called cardiorenal syndrome is not justified pathophysiologically. Fully understanding of all morbid associations and not only the cardiorenal is of great significance for the clinician who is caring for the patient with HF.

  12. Cardiorenal syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Eriguchi, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to review current perspectives regarding the pathogenesis of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and current treatment guidelines for this condition. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of CRS in CKD include neurohumoral, haemodynamic and CKD-related mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that sympathetic nerve activity plays a role in CRS, but the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial failed to show a reduction of blood pressure after catheter-based renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension. Kidney injury in patients with heart failure was previously considered to result from arterial underfilling due to low cardiac output, but the role of renal venous hypertension in this process has also recently been investigated. It would be useful to develop a reliable treatment option for CRS due to haemodynamic mechanism other than volume control using diuretics. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic hormone that has recently been identified as a CKD-related factor affecting CRS. FGF23 treatment has both advantages and disadvantages in terms of CRS progression. Multiple disorders underlie the development of CRS. Current treatment options include renin-angiotensin system blockade and volume control, but remain limited. A multidisciplinary approach is required to prevent CRS, including renal sympathetic denervation, treatment of renal venous hypertension and FGF23 treatment.

  13. Cardiorenal syndrome in acute heart failure: a vicious cycle?

    PubMed

    Caetano, Francisca; Barra, Sérgio; Faustino, Ana; Botelho, Ana; Mota, Paula; Costa, Marco; Leitão Marques, António

    2014-03-01

    Worsening renal function has an unquestionably negative impact on prognosis in patients with acute heart failure (HF). In Portugal there is little information about the importance of this entity in HF patients admitted to hospital. The objective of this work was to assess the prevalence of cardiorenal syndrome and to identify its key predictors and consequences in patients admitted for acute HF. This was a retrospective study of 155 patients admitted for acute HF. Cardiorenal syndrome was defined as an increase in serum creatinine of ≥26.5 μmol/l. Clinical, laboratory and echocardiographic parameters were analyzed and compared. Mortality was assessed at 30 and 90 days. Cardiorenal syndrome occurred in 46 patients (29.7%), 5.4 ± 4.4 days after admission; 66.7% (n=24) did not recover baseline creatinine levels. The factors associated with cardiorenal syndrome were older age, chronic renal failure, moderate to severe mitral regurgitation, higher admission blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and troponin I, and lower glomerular filtration rate. Patients who developed cardiorenal syndrome had longer hospital stay, were treated with higher daily doses of intravenous furosemide, and more often required inotropic support and renal replacement therapy. They had higher in-hospital and 30-day mortality, and multivariate analysis identified cardiorenal syndrome as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Renal dysfunction is common in acute HF patients, with a negative impact on prognosis, which highlights the importance of preventing kidney damage through the use of new therapeutic strategies and identification of novel biomarkers. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. [Fabry's disease: an example of cardiorenal syndrome type 5].

    PubMed

    Villa, Gianluca; Romagnoli, Stefano; Sharma, Aashish; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    Fabry's disease (FD) is a severe congenital metabolic disorder characterized by the deficient activity of lysosomal exoglycohydrolase alpha-galactosidase, characterized by glycosphingolipid deposition in several cells, such as capillary endothelial cells, renal, cardiac, and nerve cells. As a systemic disease leading to a contemporaneous myocardial and renal dysfunction, FD might be an example of cardiorenal syndrome type 5 (CRS-5). Kidney damage is commonly characterized by proteinuria, isosthenuria and altered tubular function when occurs at the second-third decade, azotemia and end-stage renal disease in third-fifth decade. Beyond the irreversible glomerular, tubular and vascular damages, the podocytes foot process effacement is the major cause of kidney dysfunction. Myocardial damage is usually observed with right and left ventricular hypertrophy, arrhythmias (due to sinus node and conduction system impairment), diastolic dysfunction, congestive heart failure, myocardial ischemia, fibrosis and cardiac death. The enzymatic replacement therapy is essential for the management of FD, as well as the control of renal (with anti-proteinuric agents such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors- and/or angiotensin II receptor blockers), brain (coated aspirin, clopidogrel and statins to prevent strokes) and heart complications (calcium channel blockers for ischemic cardiomyopathy, warfarin and amiodarone or cardioverter device for arrhythmias). Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  15. Fabry's disease: an example of cardiorenal syndrome type 5.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aashish; Sartori, Marco; Zaragoza, Jose J; Villa, Gianluca; Lu, Renhua; Faggiana, Elena; Brocca, Alessandra; Di Lullo, Luca; Feriozzi, Sandro; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome type 5 (CRS-5) includes conditions where there is a simultaneous involvement of the heart and kidney from a systemic disorder. This is a bilateral organ cross talk. Fabry's disease (FD) is a devastating progressive inborn error of metabolism with lysosomal glycosphingolipid deposition in variety of cell types, capillary endothelial cells, renal, cardiac and nerve cells. Basic effect is absent or deficient activity of lysosomal exoglycohydrolase a-galactosidase A. Renal involvement consists of proteinuria, isosthenuria, altered tubular function, presenting in second or third decade leading to azotemia and end-stage renal disease in third to fifth decade mainly due to irreversible changes to glomerular, tubular and vascular structures, especially highlighted by podocytes foot process effacement. Cardiac involvement consists of left ventricular hypertrophy, right ventricular hypertrophy, arrhythmias (sinus node and conduction system impairment), diastolic dysfunction, myocardial ischemia, infarction, transmural replacement fibrosis, congestive heart failure and cardiac death. Management of FD is based on enzymatic replacement therapy and control of renal (with anti-proteinuric agents such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-and/or angiotensin II receptor blockers), brain (coated aspirin, clopidogrel and statin to prevent strokes) and heart complications (calcium channel blockers for ischemic cardiomyopathy, warfarin and amiodarone or cardioverter device for arrhythmias).

  16. Inflammatory activation: cardiac, renal, and cardio-renal interactions in patients with the cardiorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ganda, Anjali; Lin, Jeffrey; Onat, Duygu; Harxhi, Ante; Iyasere, Julia E.; Uriel, Nir; Cotter, Gad

    2013-01-01

    Although inflammation is a physiologic response designed to protect us from infection, when unchecked and ongoing it may cause substantial harm. Both chronic heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are known to cause elaboration of several pro-inflammatory mediators that can be detected at high concentrations in the tissues and blood stream. The biologic sources driving this chronic inflammatory state in CHF and CKD are not fully established. Traditional sources of inflammation include the heart and the kidneys which produce a wide range of proinflammatory cytokines in response to neurohormones and sympathetic activation. However, growing evidence suggests that non-traditional biomechanical mechanisms such as venous and tissue congestion due to volume overload are also important as they stimulate endotoxin absorption from the bowel and peripheral synthesis and release of proinflammatory mediators. Both during the chronic phase and, more rapidly, during acute exacerbations of CHF and CKD, inflammation and congestion appear to amplify each other resulting in a downward spiral of worsening cardiac, vascular, and renal functions that may negatively impact patients’ outcome. Anti-inflammatory treatment strategies aimed at attenuating end organ damage and improving clinical prognosis in the cardiorenal syndrome have been disappointing to date. A new therapeutic paradigm may be needed, which involves different anti-inflammatory strategies for individual etiologies and stages of CHF and CKD. It may also include specific (short-term) anti-inflammatory treatments that counteract inflammation during the unsettled phases of clinical decompensation. Finally, it will require greater focus on volume overload as an increasingly significant source of systemic inflammation in the cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:21688186

  17. [Organ damage and cardiorenal syndrome in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Casado Cerrada, Jesús; Pérez Calvo, Juan Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    Heart failure is a complex syndrome that affects almost all organs and systems of the body. Signs and symptoms of organ dysfunction, in particular kidney dysfunction, may be accentuated or become evident for the first time during acute decompensation of heart failure. Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney, regardless of which of the two organs may have suffered the initial damage and regardless also of their previous functional status. Research into the mechanisms regulating the complex relationship between the two organs is prompting the search for new biomarkers to help physicians detect renal damage in subclinical stages. Hence, a preventive approach to renal dysfunction may be adopted in the clinical setting in the near future. This article provides a general overview of cardiorenal syndrome and an update of the physiopathological mechanisms involved. Special emphasis is placed on the role of visceral congestion as an emergent mechanism in this syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure: Revisiting Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Julio; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney. Worsening renal function that occurs in patients with acute heart failure has been classified as cardiorenal syndrome type 1. In this setting, worsening renal function is a common finding and is due to complex, multifactorial, and not fully understood processes involving hemodynamic (renal arterial hypoperfusion and renal venous congestion) and nonhemodynamic factors. Traditionally, worsening renal function has been associated with worse outcomes, but recent findings have revealed mixed and heterogeneous results, perhaps suggesting that the same phenotype represents a diversity of pathophysiological and clinical situations. Interpreting the magnitude and chronology of renal changes together with baseline renal function, fluid overload status, and clinical response to therapy might help clinicians to unravel the clinical meaning of renal function changes that occur during an episode of heart failure decompensation. In this article, we critically review the contemporary evidence on the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of worsening renal function in acute heart failure. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. [Cardiorenal syndrome: the role of new biochemical markers].

    PubMed

    Vernuccio, Federica; Grutta, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Filippo; Novo, Giuseppina; Novo, Salvatore

    2012-12-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome is a pathophysiological heart and kidney disorder, in which acute or chronic dysfunction of one organ induces a damage in the other. It's a syndrome more and more often encountered in clinical practice and this implies the need to recognize the syndrome through biochemical markers with a good sensitivity and specificity, since its earliest stages in order to optimize therapy. In addition to widely validated biomarkers, such as BNP, pro BNP, creatinine, GFR and cystatin C, other promising molecules are available, like NGAL (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, KIM-1 (kidney injury molecule-1), MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic peptide), Netrin-1, interleuchin 18 and NAG (N-acetyl-β-glucosa-minidase). The role of these emerging biomarkers is still not completely clarified: hence the need of new clinical trials.

  20. Cardio-renal syndrome type 1: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Yousif; Kasmikha, Zaid; Green, Henry L; McCullough, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    One third of heart failure admissions may be complicated by acute kidney injury, resulting in a three-fold increase in length of stay and a greater likelihood of rehospitalization. Cardio-Renal syndrome type 1 refers to acute decompensation of cardiac function leading to acute renal failure. It often complicates acute coronary syndrome and acute decompensated heart failure. Both components of the syndrome contribute to morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of renal dysfunction is complex. Reduced cardiac output, passive congestion of the kidneys, and increased intra-abdominal pressure may contribute to the disorder. The heart, kidneys, renin-angiotensin system, sympathetic nervous system, immune system, and vasculature interact through intricate feedback loops. An imbalance in this complex system often will cause deterioration in both cardiac and renal function. Appreciation of these interactions is crucial to understanding the overall burden of disease, as well as its natural history, risk factors, associated morbidity and mortality, and therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nutritional status and intrarenal arterial stiffness in cardiorenal syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gigante, A; Di Mario, F; Barbano, B; Rosato, E; Di Lazzaro Giraldi, G; Pofi, R; Gasperini, M L; Amoroso, D; Cianci, R; Laviano, A

    2017-01-01

    Cardio-Renal Syndrome (CRS) is a condition, which is more frequently observed in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to explore nutritional status and intrarenal arterial stiffness in patients affected by CRS. 14 consecutive CRS patients, screened for anthropometry, biochemistry, nutritional and metabolic status underwent renal Doppler ultrasound and whole-body bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS). We found a positive correlation between phase angle (PA) and CKD-EPI and MDRD (p=0.011 and p=0.007), and between body mass index and renal resistive index (RRI) (p=0.002). Finally, we found a negative correlation between fat-free mass and RRI (p=0.024). Body composition assessment may improve the care of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Also, BIS may help identify changes in hydration status in CKD patients resulting as a significant predictor of mortality.

  2. Cardiorenal Syndrome in End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Eriguchi, Masahiro; Yamada, Shunsuke; Hirakata, Hideki; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) represents mainly cardiovascular disease (CVD) due to various complications associated with renal dysfunction-defined as type 4 CRS by Ronco et al.-because the effect of cardiac dysfunction on the kidneys does not need to be taken into consideration, unlike in non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients with ESKD are often in a state of chronic inflammation due to the upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Chronic inflammation leads to malnutrition and consequently to vascular endothelial dysfunction and vascular calcification, which is referred to as malnutrition-inflammation-atherosclerosis (MIA) syndrome and acts as a major risk factor for CVD. Anemia also plays a crucial role in CVD, and individuals with erythropoietin-resistant anemia have a particularly high risk of CVD. However, caution is emphasized because not only anemia itself, but also the overtreatment of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents aimed at elevating hemoglobin to ≥13 g/dl can also increase the risk of CVD. In CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), phosphate load triggers the interactions between various factors such as calcium, parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, and fibroblast growth factor 23, promoting vascular calcification and thus becoming a risk factor for CVD. In addition to traditional atherosclerosis risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, the involvement of MIA syndrome, anemia, and CKD-MBD accompanying CKD have also become a focus for investigation as major players in CRS in patients with ESKD. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Uric acid: a danger signal from the RNA world that may have a role in the epidemic of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiorenal disease: evolutionary considerations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard J; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2011-09-01

    All human beings are uricase knockouts; we lost the uricase gene as a result of a mutation that occurred in the mid-Miocene epoch approximately 15 million years ago. The consequence of being a uricase knockout is that we have higher serum uric acid levels that are less regulatable and can be readily influenced by diet. This increases our risk for gout and kidney stones, but there is also increasing evidence that uric acid increases our risk for hypertension, kidney disease, obesity, and diabetes. This raises the question of why this mutation occurred. In this article we review current hypotheses. We suggest that uric acid is a danger and survival signal carried over from the RNA world. The mutation of uricase that occurred during the food shortage and global cooling that occurred in the Miocene epoch resulted in a survival advantage for early primates, particularly in Europe. Today, the loss of uricase functions as a thrifty gene, increasing our risk for obesity and cardiorenal disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Incidence and Outcome of Acute Cardiorenal Syndrome in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Athwani, Vivek; Bhargava, Maneesha; Chanchlani, Rahul; Mehta, Amar Jeet

    2017-06-01

    To determine the incidence, etiology and outcome of Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) in hospitalized children. A prospective cohort study was carried out in 242 children between 6 mo to 18 y of age hospitalized with primary cardiac, renal or any systemic disorder at a tertiary care center in India. The primary outcome was the development of CRS. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to determine the risk of mortality secondary to CRS. Among 242 children, 67 (27.7%) children developed CRS and the rest 175 (72.3%) did not. Among those with CRS, 40.3%, 20.9%, and 38.8% had CRS-1, 3 and 5, respectively. Cardiac diseases leading to CRS were myocarditis (40.7%) followed by congenital heart disease (25.9%), rheumatic heart disease (18.5%), and dilated cardiomyopathy (7.4%); renal disease associated with CRS was acute glomerulonephritis (100%) and major systemic disorders leading to CRS were septicemia (53.8%), malaria (23.1%), scrub typhus (7.7%), and acute gastroenteritis (3.8%). The occurrence of CRS was associated with an increased risk of mortality (OR 6.3, 95% CI: 2.8, 14.1; p 0.000). A subgroup analysis revealed that children with CRS having acute kidney injury stage 2 and 3 also had a higher risk of mortality (p 0.001). The incidence of CRS is quite high in children with cardiac, renal or systemic diseases and is associated with a significant risk of mortality. Children presenting with these illnesses should be monitored for the occurrence of CRS so that early intervention may reduce mortality.

  5. Dialysis-induced myocardial stunning: the other side of the cardiorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breidthardt, Tobias; McIntyre, Christopher W

    2011-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome is an umbrella term describing the range of interactions between the heart and kidneys. Commonly, this focuses on the potential for reduced renal function as a consequence of heart disease and the impact of reduced renal functional reserve on the heart. Importantly, these interactions include both consequences of the disease state and those arising from therapeutic interventions directed at the cardiorenal axis. This article focuses on the potential impact of dialysis treatment, which generates intermittent circulatory stress and results in both acute and chronic adverse cardiovascular effects. This largely unappreciated dimension of the cardiorenal interaction in patients with end-stage renal failure is common, associated with a significant increase in mortality, and may be amenable to a variety of therapeutic approaches in this population characterized by particularly significant clinical management challenges.

  6. The Physiopathology of Cardiorenal Syndrome: A Review of the Potential Contributions of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Denys; Drolet, Benoit; Simard, Chantale

    2017-01-01

    Inter-organ crosstalk plays an essential role in the physiological homeostasis of the heart and other organs, and requires a complex interaction between a host of cellular, molecular, and neural factors. Derangements in these interactions can initiate multi-organ dysfunction. This is the case, for instance, in the heart or kidneys where a pathological alteration in one organ can unfavorably affect function in another distant organ; attention is currently being paid to understanding the physiopathological consequences of kidney dysfunction on cardiac performance that lead to cardiorenal syndrome. Different cardiorenal connectors (renin–angiotensin or sympathetic nervous system activation, inflammation, uremia, etc.) and non-traditional risk factors potentially contribute to multi-organ failure. Of these, inflammation may be crucial as inflammatory cells contribute to over-production of eicosanoids and lipid second messengers that activate intracellular signaling pathways involved in pathogenesis. Indeed, inflammation biomarkers are often elevated in patients with cardiac or renal dysfunction. Epigenetics, a dynamic process that regulates gene expression and function, is also recognized as an important player in single-organ disease. Principal epigenetic modifications occur at the level of DNA (i.e., methylation) and histone proteins; aberrant DNA methylation is associated with pathogenesis of organ dysfunction through a number of mechanisms (inflammation, nitric oxide bioavailability, endothelin, etc.). Herein, we focus on the potential contribution of inflammation in pathogenesis of cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:29367550

  7. Determination of renal function and injury using near-infrared fluorimetry in experimental cardiorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Mizuko; Wakasaki, Rumie; Swide, Thomas; Lee, Jeong Heon; Miller, M. Bernie; Choi, Hak Soo; Anderson, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome type 1 causes acute kidney injury but is poorly understood; animal models and diagnostic aids are lacking. Robust noninvasive measurements of glomerular filtration rate are required for injury models and clinical use. Several have been described but are untested in translational models and suffer from biologic interference. We developed a mouse model of cardiorenal syndrome and tested the novel near-infrared fluorophore ZW800-1 to assess renal and cardiac function. We performed murine cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation followed by transthoracic echocardiography, 2 and 24 h later. Transcutaneous fluorescence of ZW800-1 bolus dispersion and clearance was assessed with whole animal imaging and compared with glomerular filtration rate (GFR; inulin clearance), tubular cell death (using unbiased stereology), and serum creatinine. Correlation, Bland-Altman, and polar analyses were used to compare GFR with ZW800-1 clearance. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation caused reversible cardiac failure, halving fractional shortening of the left ventricle (n = 12, P = 0.03). Acute kidney injury resulted with near-zero GFR and sixfold increase in serum creatinine 24 h later (n = 16, P < 0.01). ZW800-1 biodistribution and clearance were exclusively renal. ZW800-1 t1/2 and clearance correlated with GFR (r = 0.92, n = 31, P < 0.0001). ZW800-1 fluorescence was reduced in cardiac arrest, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation-treated mice compared with sham animals 810 s after injection (P < 0.01) and bolus time-dispersion curves demonstrated that ZW800-1 fluorescence dispersion correlated with left ventricular function (r = 0.74, P < 0.01). Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation lead to experimental cardiorenal syndrome type 1. ZW800-1, a small near-infrared fluorophore being developed for clinical intraoperative imaging, is favorable for evaluating cardiac and renal function noninvasively. PMID:28077373

  8. Determination of renal function and injury using near-infrared fluorimetry in experimental cardiorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Mizuko; Wakasaki, Rumie; Schenning, Katie J; Swide, Thomas; Lee, Jeong Heon; Miller, M Bernie; Choi, Hak Soo; Anderson, Sharon; Hutchens, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome type 1 causes acute kidney injury but is poorly understood; animal models and diagnostic aids are lacking. Robust noninvasive measurements of glomerular filtration rate are required for injury models and clinical use. Several have been described but are untested in translational models and suffer from biologic interference. We developed a mouse model of cardiorenal syndrome and tested the novel near-infrared fluorophore ZW800-1 to assess renal and cardiac function. We performed murine cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation followed by transthoracic echocardiography, 2 and 24 h later. Transcutaneous fluorescence of ZW800-1 bolus dispersion and clearance was assessed with whole animal imaging and compared with glomerular filtration rate (GFR; inulin clearance), tubular cell death (using unbiased stereology), and serum creatinine. Correlation, Bland-Altman, and polar analyses were used to compare GFR with ZW800-1 clearance. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation caused reversible cardiac failure, halving fractional shortening of the left ventricle ( n = 12, P = 0.03). Acute kidney injury resulted with near-zero GFR and sixfold increase in serum creatinine 24 h later ( n = 16, P < 0.01). ZW800-1 biodistribution and clearance were exclusively renal. ZW800-1 t 1/2 and clearance correlated with GFR ( r = 0.92, n = 31, P < 0.0001). ZW800-1 fluorescence was reduced in cardiac arrest, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation-treated mice compared with sham animals 810 s after injection ( P < 0.01) and bolus time-dispersion curves demonstrated that ZW800-1 fluorescence dispersion correlated with left ventricular function ( r = 0.74, P < 0.01). Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation lead to experimental cardiorenal syndrome type 1. ZW800-1, a small near-infrared fluorophore being developed for clinical intraoperative imaging, is favorable for evaluating cardiac and renal function noninvasively. Copyright © 2017 the American

  9. Pathophysiology of the cardio-renal syndromes types 1-5: An uptodate.

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, L; Bellasi, A; Barbera, V; Russo, D; Russo, L; Di Iorio, B; Cozzolino, M; Ronco, C

    According to the recent definition proposed by the Consensus conference on Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative Group, the term cardio-renal syndrome (CRS) has been used to define different clinical conditions in which heart and kidney dysfunction overlap. Type 1 CRS (acute cardio- renal syndrome) is characterized by acute worsening of cardiac function leading to AKI (5, 6) in the setting of active cardiac disease such as ADHF, while type - 2 CRS occurs in a setting of chronic heart disease. Type 3 CRS is closely link to acute kidney injury (AKI), while type 4 represent cardiovascular involvement in chronic kidney disese (CKD) patients. Type 5 CRS represent cardiac and renal involvement in several diseases such as sepsis, hepato - renal syndrome and immune - mediated diseases. Copyright © 2017 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Fosinopril in the treatment of cardiorenal syndrome in chronic cardiac failure].

    PubMed

    Tereshchenko, S N; Zhirov, I V

    2009-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is an independent risk factor of chronic cardiac failure (CCF) and death due to this disease. CCF patients are elderly patients with diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and long-term chronic cardiac insufficiency. CCF patients do not often have left ventricular systolic dysfunction, renal affection is not associated with low ejection syndrome. Renal affection in CCF is primarily caused by activation of the system rennin-angiotensin, inflammation, disturbed bioavailability of nitric oxide, hyperactivation of the sympathetic nervous system. ACE inhibitors correct pathophysiological disorders of renal flow in CCF. Fosinopril shows the highest efficacy and safety in management of cardiorenal syndrome in CCF patients. Fosinopril can also prevent renal dysfunction in CCF patients.

  11. Cardio-renal cachexia syndromes (CRCS): pathophysiological foundations of a vicious pathological circle.

    PubMed

    Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Anker, Stefan D; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-09-01

    Cardio-renal syndromes (CRS) are defined as disorders of the heart and kidney whereby acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction of the other. CRS have been classified into five categories, where types 2 and 4 represent respectively chronic cardio-renal and chronic reno-cardiac syndromes. In these conditions, the chronic disorder of either the heart or kidney has been shown to induce some degree of cachexia. At the same time, cachexia has been proposed as a possible mechanism contributing to the worsening of such pathological organ cross talk. Common pathogenetic mechanisms underlie body wasting in cachectic states of different chronic heart and kidney diseases. In these circumstances, a vicious circle could arise, in which cachexia associated with either heart failure or chronic kidney disease may contribute to further damage of the other organ. In chronic CRS, activation of the immune and neuroendocrine systems contributes to the genesis of cachexia, which in turn can negatively affect the heart and kidney function. In patients with cardiac sustained activation of the immune and neuroendocrine systems and oxidative stress, renal vascular resistance can increase and therefore impair renal perfusion, leading to worsening kidney function. Similarly, in renal cachexia, increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause progressive left ventricular systolic dysfunction, myocardial cell death, endothelial dysfunction and increased myocardial fibrosis, with consequent impairment of the chronic reno-cardiac syndrome type 4. Thus, we speculate that the occurrence of different types of chronic CRS could represent a fundamental step in the genesis of cachexia, being renal and cardiac dysfunction closely related to the occurrence of systemic disorders leading to a final common pathway. Therefore, the heart and kidney and cachexia represent a triad causing a vicious circle that increases mortality and morbidity: In such

  12. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  13. [Cardiorenal syndrome type 1 in the intensive coronary care unit of the Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza].

    PubMed

    Preza, Paul M; Hurtado, Abdías; Armas, Victoria; Cárcamo, César P

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the incidence of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) type 1 in a coronary care unit and its association with hospital mortality within 30 days of admission, as well as other epidemiological characteristics. The medical records of all the patients who were hospitalized with the diagnosis of acute heart failure in a 4-year period were reviewed. CRS type 1 was characterized by the presence of acute heart failure and an elevation of serum creatinine ≥0.3mg/dL in comparison to the baseline creatinine calculated by the MDRD75 equation and/or the elevation of ≥50% of the admission serum creatinine within a 48 h period. The incidence of CRS type 1 was 27.87%, 95% CI: 20.13-36.71 (34 of 122). There was a higher frequency of CRS type 1 in those patients who were admitted with the diagnosis of cardiogenic shock (adjusted RR 2.02, 95% CI: 1.20-3.93, p=0.0378) and in those with higher hemoglobin levels (p=0.0412). The CRS type 1 was associated with an increase of 30-day mortality (HR: 4.11, 95% CI: 1.20-14.09, p=0.0244). The incidence of CRS type 1 in the coronary care unit found in our study is similar to those found in foreign studies. The history of stroke and the higher values of hemoglobin were associated with a higher incidence of cardiorenal syndrome type 1. Patients with CRS type 1 had a higher hospital mortality within 30 days of admission. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of Pulsatile Hemodynamics in Acute Heart Failure: Implications for Type 1 Cardiorenal Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2013-10-01

    Heart failure has become a major health problem worldwide with a substantial financial burden mainly from hospitalization due to acute heart failure syndrome (AHFS). A considerable number of patients hospitalized for the treatment of AHFS experience significant worsening of renal function, which is now recognized as type 1 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) and is associated with worse outcomes. Currently known risk factors for acute CRS in AHFS include obesity, cachexia, hypertension, diabetes, proteinuria, uremic solute retention, anemia, and repeated subclinical acute kidney injury events. Venous renal congestion due to hemodynamic changes also contributes to type 1 CRS. Vascular aging and its aggravated pulsatile hemodynamics have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of AHFS. Suboptimal recovery of the perturbation of the pulsatile hemodynamics may predict 6-month post-discharge cardiovascular outcomes in patients hospitalized due to AHFS. Furthermore, on-admission pulsatile hemodynamics may also be helpful to identify and stratify patients with aggravated pulsatile hemodynamics who may benefit from customized therapy. There are close interplays and feedback loops between heart and kidney dysfunction. Increased arterial stiffness accelerates pulse wave velocity and causes an earlier return of the reflected wave, resulting in higher systolic, lower diastolic, and higher pulse pressure in the central aorta and renal arteries. Increased pulsatile hemodynamics have been associated with deterioration of renal function in subjects with a high coronary risk and patients with hypertension or chronic kidney disease. Thus, there is a potential role of vascular aging/pulsatile hemodynamics in the pathophysiological pathways of acute CRS in AHFS.

  15. Identifying evidence of cardio-renal syndrome in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy using cystatin C.

    PubMed

    Villa, Chet R; Kaddourah, Ahmad; Mathew, Jacob; Ryan, Thomas D; Wong, Brenda L; Goldstein, Stuart L; Jefferies, John L

    2016-10-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) develop dilated cardiomyopathy and are at risk for kidney injury. Creatinine based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is limited by low muscle mass with low serum creatinine levels in DMD. We assessed the relationship between cardiac function, modified Schwartz eGFR and cystatin C eGFR in patients with DMD. Ninety-three patients with DMD were screened for renal dysfunction in an outpatient neuromuscular clinic. Patients with new nephrotoxic medications, recent hospitalization or decompensated heart failure were excluded from the analysis. Eleven (12%) patients had evidence of renal dysfunction identified by cystatin C eGFR, while no patients had renal dysfunction by Schwartz eGFR. There was no significant correlation between cystatin C eGFR and age (r = -0.2, p = 0.11), prednisone dose (r = 0.06, p = 0.89) or deflazacort dose (r = -0.01, p = 0.63). There was a significant correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction and cystatin C GFR among patients with chronic left ventricular dysfunction (r = 0.46, p < 0.01), but not normal function (r = -0.07, p = 0.77). There was no significant correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction and Schwartz eGFR among patients with (r = 0.07, p = 0.59) or without (r = -0.27, p = 0.07) chronic left ventricular dysfunction. Cystatin C eGFR correlates with cardiac dysfunction in patients with DMD, thus providing novel evidence of cardio-renal syndrome in this population. Routine monitoring of renal function is recommended in patients with DMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Malnutrition is prevalent in patients with cardiorenal syndrome and negatively influences clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Gigante, A; Rosato, E; Barbano, B; Di Mario, F; Di Lazzaro-Giraldi, G; Gasperini, M L; Pofi, R; Laviano, A

    2018-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) describes the concurrent failure of cardiac and renal function, each influencing the other. Malnutrition and cachexia frequently develop in patients with heart failure or kidney failure. However, no information is currently available on the prevalence of malnutrition in CRS patients. We studied CRS patients admitted to an internal medicine ward during a 5-month period and evaluated their clinical characteristics and nutritional status. Malnutrition risk was assessed by using the validated screening tool NRS-2002 whilst body composition was assessed by bioimpedance analysis and muscle function was measured by handgrip (HG) strength. Cardiac mass was also recorded. Length of stay, hospital readmission and 6-month mortality were registered. During the study period, 22 CRS patients were studied. Twenty patients were diagnosed with either CRS type 1 or CRS type 5. In CRS patients, fat-free mass showed a trend toward representing a protective factor for 6-month mortality (OR=0.904; p=0.06). Also, fat-free mass correlated with HG strength and cardiac ejection fraction. Malnutrition risk was diagnosed in 45% of the patients, whereas 8 patients met the definition of cachexia. Even without statistical significance, CRS patients with malnutrition had lower BMI (Body Mass Index) (p=0.038) and fat-free mass (p= n.s.). However, CRS malnutrition was associated to higher 6-month mortality (p= 0.05), and appears to negatively influence the outcome in CRS (OR= 9; p= 0.06). Our results show that malnutrition is prevalent in CRS patients and influences the clinical outcome. The assessment of nutritional status, and particularly body composition, should be implemented in daily practice of patients with CRS.

  17. Inotropes and cardiorenal syndrome in acute heart failure - A retrospective comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Marta; Caetano, Francisca; Almeida, Inês; Fernandes, Andreia; Reis, Liliana; Costa, Marco; Gonçalves, Lino

    2017-09-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is common in acute heart failure (AHF), and is associated with dire prognosis. Levosimendan, a positive inotrope that also has diuretic effects, may improve patients' renal profile. Published results are conflicting. We aimed to assess the incidence of CRS in AHF patients according to the inotrope used and to determine its predictors in order to identify patients who could benefit from the most renoprotective inotrope. In a retrospective study, 108 consecutive patients with AHF who required inotropes were divided into two groups according to the inotrope used (levosimendan vs. dobutamine). The primary endpoint was CRS incidence. Follow-up for mortality and readmission for AHF was conducted. Seventy-one percent of the study population were treated with levosimendan and the remainder with dobutamine. No differences were found in heart failure etiology or chronic kidney disease. At admission, the dobutamine group had lower blood pressure; there were no differences in estimated glomerular filtration rate or cystatin C levels. The levosimendan group had lower left ventricular ejection fraction. CRS incidence was higher in the dobutamine group, and they more often had incomplete recovery of renal function at discharge. In multivariate analysis, cystatin C levels predicted CRS. The dobutamine group had higher in-hospital mortality, of which CRS and the inotrope used were predictors. Levosimendan appears to have some renoprotective effect, as it was associated with a lower incidence of CRS and better recovery of renal function at discharge. Identification of patients at increased risk of renal dysfunction by assessing cystatin C may enable more tailored therapy, minimizing the incidence of CRS and its negative impact on outcome in AHF. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Denke, Margo A

    2002-11-01

    The metabolic syndrome is like an elephant, and any literary review of its importance is shamefully reduced to an examination of tusks, trunk, and tail. Evidence continues to mount that this diminutive approach is an incorrect management strategy for such a large problem. Diet and lifestyle are effective strategies, but they must effectively compete with behaviors that have instant gratification. Our society has turned its focus away from the long-term rewards of good sustainable behaviors and has instead focused on short-term rewards of unsustainable behaviors. To tame the behaviors that promote the metabolic syndrome, simple answers from diet and drug therapy will require support from society to be effective.

  19. Metabolic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/pubmed/26718656 . Ruderman NB, Shulman GI. Metabolic syndrome. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 43. Review ... NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more Health ...

  20. Rolipram Improves Outcome in a Rat Model of Infant Sepsis-Induced Cardiorenal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Clark R.; Singh, Sharda P.; Mu, Shengyu; Gokden, Neriman; Zakaria, Dala; Nguyen, Trung C.; Mayeux, Philip R.

    2017-01-01

    While the mortality rate associated with sepsis in children has fallen over the years, it still remains unacceptably high. The development of both acute cardiac dysfunction and acute kidney injury during severe sepsis is categorized as type 5 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) and is poorly understood in infants. To address this lack of understanding and the need for an appropriate animal model in which to conduct relevant preclinical studies, we developed a model of infant sepsis-induced CRS in rat pups then evaluated the therapeutic potential of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor, rolipram. Rat pups at 17–18-days old were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce fecal polymicrobial sepsis. Uptake of Evans Blue dye was used to assess renal microvascular leakage. Intravital videomicroscopy was used to assess renal microvascular perfusion and oxidant generation. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was used to assess renal function. Left ventricular (LV) catheterization and echocardiography were used to assess cardiac function. Impairment of both cardiac and renal function developed rapidly following CLP, indicating type 5 CRS. Most notable were the rapid decline in LV diastolic function, the decline in cardiac output, renal microvascular failure, and the decline in GFR. A dose-response study with rolipram determined 0.1 mg/kg, ip as the lowest most efficacious dose to protect the renal microcirculation. Rolipram was then evaluated using a clinically relevant delayed dosing paradigm (a single dose at 6 h post-CLP). With delayed dosing, rolipram restored the renal microcirculation and reduced microvascular leakage but did not reduce oxidant generation in the kidney nor restore GFR. In contrast, delayed dosing with rolipram restored cardiac function. Rolipram also improved 4-days survival. In summary, CLP in the rat pup produces a clinically relevant pediatric model of sepsis-induced CRS. The PDE4 inhibitor rolipram was effective in improving renal

  1. Acute Kidney Injury in Heart Failure Revisited-The Ameliorating Impact of "Decongestive Diuresis" on Renal Dysfunction in Type 1 Acute Cardiorenal Syndrome: Accelerated Rising Pro B Naturetic Peptide Is a Predictor of Good Renal Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma; Sengodan, Mohan; Rosario, Karen Flores

    2017-08-29

    There is mounting evidence that forward heart failure as manifested by low cardiac output alone does not define the degree of renal dysfunction in cardiorenal syndrome. As a result, the term "congestive renal failure" was coined in 2012 by Ross to depict the role of renal venous hypertension in type 1 acute cardiorenal syndrome. If so, aggressive decongestive therapies, either through mechanical ultrafiltration with dialysis machines or pharmacologic ultrafiltration with potent diuretics, would lead to improved cardio and renal outcomes. Nevertheless, as recently as 2012, a review of this literature had concluded that a renal venous hypertension-directed approach using diuretics to manage cardio-renal syndrome was yet to be fully investigated. We, in this review, with three consecutive case series, describe our experience with pharmacologic decongestive diuresis in this paradigm of care and argue for studies of such therapeutic interventions in the management of cardiorenal syndrome. Finally, based on our observations in the Renal Unit, Mayo Clinic Health System, in Northwestern Wisconsin, we have hypothesized that patients with cardiorenal syndrome presenting with accelerated rising Pro B Naturetic Peptide levels appear to represent a group that would have good cardio- and renal-outcomes with such decongestive pharmacologic therapies.

  2. The dark side of the kidney in cardio-renal syndrome: renal venous hypertension and congestive kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Di Nicolò, Pierpaolo

    2018-03-01

    Renal involvement in some forms of acute or chronic diseases, such as heart failure or sepsis, presents with a complex pathophysiological basis that is not always clearly distinguishable. In these clinical settings, kidney failure is traditionally and almost exclusively attributed to renal hypoperfusion and it is commonly accepted that causal elements are pre-renal, such as a reduction in the ejection fraction or absolute or relative hypovolemia acting directly on oxygen transport mechanisms and renal autoregulation systems, causing a reduction of glomerular filtration rate. Nevertheless, the concept emerging from accumulating clinical and experimental evidence is that in complex clinical pictures, kidney failure is strongly linked to the hemodynamic alterations occurring in the renal venous micro and macrocirculation. Accordingly, the transmission of the increased venous pressure to the renal venous compartment and the consequent increasing renal afterload has a pivotal role in determining and sustaining the kidney damage. The aim of this review was to clarify the physiopathological aspects of the link between worsening renal function and renal venous hypertension, analyzing the prognostic and therapeutic implications of the so-called congestive kidney failure in cardio-renal syndrome and in other clinical contexts of its possible onset.

  3. Evaluation of serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as a novel biomarker of cardiorenal syndrome in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jung, Han-Byeol; Kang, Min-Hee; Park, Hee-Myung

    2018-05-01

    Worsening renal function and azotemia in patients with heart failure (HF) are strongly associated with disease severity and poor prognosis. Increasing interest in this correlation led to the description and classification of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). We evaluated the role of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in the early detection of CRS in dogs with HF. Ten healthy dogs and 31 dogs admitted with HF were included in our study. NGAL and troponin-I were measured on samples collected on the day of admission; creatinine was measured on admission and again on day 7. The CRS group was defined as subsequently developing renal azotemia. Of 31 dogs with HF, 20 were included in the HF group, and 11 were included in the CRS group. The admission NGAL concentrations of the CRS group were significantly higher than those of other groups ( p < 0.001). The severity of HF evaluation based on the modified New York Heart Association classification showed significant correlation with NGAL ( p < 0.001) and troponin-I ( p = 0.009) concentration. However, only serum NGAL concentration at admission was significantly associated with the development of CRS in dogs with HF ( p = 0.021). The admission serum NGAL ≥ 16.0 ng/mL (optimal cutoff value) had a sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 90.0% in predicting the development of CRS.

  4. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... includes getting more physical activity and eating a healthy diet. Also, if you smoke, you should stop. Metabolic ... overweight, and to maintain your weight through a healthy diet and regular physical activity. Get more physical activity ...

  5. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  6. Left Ventricular Mass and Intrarenal Arterial Stiffness as Early Diagnostic Markers in Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5 due to Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gigante, Antonietta; Barilaro, Giuseppe; Barbano, Biagio; Romaniello, Antonella; Di Mario, Francesca; Quarta, Silvia; Gasperini, Maria Ludovica; Di Lazzaro Giraldi, Gianluca; Laviano, Alessandro; Amoroso, Antonio; Cianci, Rosario; Rosato, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiorenal syndrome type 5 (CRS-5) includes a group of conditions characterized by a simultaneous involvement of the heart and kidney in the course of a systemic disease. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is frequently involved in the etiology of acute and chronic CRS-5 among connective tissue diseases. In SSc patients, left ventricular mass (LVM) can be used as a marker of nutritional status and fibrosis, while altered intrarenal hemodynamic parameters are suggestive of early kidney involvement. Methods Forty-two consecutive patients with a diagnosis of SSc without cardiac and/or renal impairment were enrolled to assess whether cardiac muscle mass can be related to arterial stiffness. Thirty subjects matched for age and sex were also enrolled as healthy controls (HC). All patients performed echocardiography and renal ultrasound. Results Doppler indices of intrarenal stiffness and echocardiographic indices of LVM were significantly increased in SSc patients compared to HC. A positive correlation exists between LVM/body surface area and pulsatile index (p < 0.05, r = 0.36), resistive index (p < 0.05, r = 0.33) and systolic/diastolic ratio (p < 0.05, r = 0.38). Doppler indices of intrarenal stiffness and LVM indices were significantly higher in SSc patients with digital ulcers than in SSc patients without a digital ulcer history. Conclusions SSc is characterized by the presence of microvascular and multiorgan injury. An early cardiac and renal impairment is very common. LVM and intrarenal arterial stiffness can be considered as early markers of CRS onset. The clinical use of these markers permits a prompt identification of organ damage. An early diagnosis allows the appropriate setting of pharmacological management, by slowing disease progression. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:27022332

  7. Left Ventricular Mass and Intrarenal Arterial Stiffness as Early Diagnostic Markers in Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 5 due to Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Antonietta; Barilaro, Giuseppe; Barbano, Biagio; Romaniello, Antonella; Di Mario, Francesca; Quarta, Silvia; Gasperini, Maria Ludovica; Di Lazzaro Giraldi, Gianluca; Laviano, Alessandro; Amoroso, Antonio; Cianci, Rosario; Rosato, Edoardo

    2016-02-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome type 5 (CRS-5) includes a group of conditions characterized by a simultaneous involvement of the heart and kidney in the course of a systemic disease. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is frequently involved in the etiology of acute and chronic CRS-5 among connective tissue diseases. In SSc patients, left ventricular mass (LVM) can be used as a marker of nutritional status and fibrosis, while altered intrarenal hemodynamic parameters are suggestive of early kidney involvement. Forty-two consecutive patients with a diagnosis of SSc without cardiac and/or renal impairment were enrolled to assess whether cardiac muscle mass can be related to arterial stiffness. Thirty subjects matched for age and sex were also enrolled as healthy controls (HC). All patients performed echocardiography and renal ultrasound. Doppler indices of intrarenal stiffness and echocardiographic indices of LVM were significantly increased in SSc patients compared to HC. A positive correlation exists between LVM/body surface area and pulsatile index (p < 0.05, r = 0.36), resistive index (p < 0.05, r = 0.33) and systolic/diastolic ratio (p < 0.05, r = 0.38). Doppler indices of intrarenal stiffness and LVM indices were significantly higher in SSc patients with digital ulcers than in SSc patients without a digital ulcer history. SSc is characterized by the presence of microvascular and multiorgan injury. An early cardiac and renal impairment is very common. LVM and intrarenal arterial stiffness can be considered as early markers of CRS onset. The clinical use of these markers permits a prompt identification of organ damage. An early diagnosis allows the appropriate setting of pharmacological management, by slowing disease progression. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Apocynin Attenuates Cardiac Injury in Type 4 Cardiorenal Syndrome via Suppressing Cardiac Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 With Oxidative Stress Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xun; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Feifei; Wang, Jing-Feng; Tang, Wanchun; Huang, Hui

    2015-06-24

    Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) refers to the cardiac injury induced by chronic kidney disease. We aimed to assess oxidative stress and cardiac injury in patients with type 4 CRS, determine whether the antioxidant apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in rats with type 4 CRS, and explore potential mechanisms. A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with type 4 CRS (n=17) and controls (n=16). Compared with controls, patients with type 4 CRS showed elevated oxidative stress, which was significantly correlated with cardiac hypertrophy and decreased ejection fraction. In vivo study, male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy and sham surgery, followed with apocynin or vehicle treatment for 8 weeks. Eight weeks after surgery, the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats mimicked type 4 CRS, showing increased serum creatinine, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and decreased ejection fraction compared with sham-operated animals. Cardiac malondialdehyde, NADPH oxidase activity, fibroblast growth factor-2, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation increased significantly in the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats. These changes were significantly attenuated by apocynin. In vitro study showed that apocynin reduced angiotensin II-induced NADPH oxidase-dependent oxidative stress, upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in cardiac fibroblasts. Importantly, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 reduced the upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers in angiotensin II-treated fibroblasts. Oxidative stress is a candidate mediator for type 4 CRS. Apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in type 4 CRS rats via inhibiting NADPH oxidase-dependent oxidative stress-activated ERK1/2 pathway and subsequent fibroblast growth factor-2 upregulation. Our study added evidence to the beneficial effect of apocynin in type 4 CRS. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  9. Metabolic syndrome targets.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven R

    2004-10-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of easy-to-measure clinical phenotypes that serve as markers for increased risk for CVD and diabetes. There is no universal agreement as to the underlying pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome. At its core, the metabolic syndrome is the result of energy excess; therefore treating obesity is a good strategy to reverse the clinical features of the metabolic syndrome. Hypertension is a special case, may not be part of the core pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome, and will not be discussed. After a brief review of recent developments in the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome, this review will concentrate on peripheral targets in the following categories: ectopic fat and fat oxidation, intrinsic defects in substrate switching and mitochondrial biogenesis, lipolysis and lipid turnover, adipose tissue as an endocrine organ, nutrient / energy sensing systems, and inflammation. The advantages and pitfalls of these targets will be discussed with an eye towards the relevant literature.

  10. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Combined therapy with melatonin and exendin-4 effectively attenuated the deterioration of renal function in rat cardiorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Hung; Chen, Chih-Hung; Wallace, Christopher Glenn; Chen, Yen-Ta; Yang, Chih-Chao; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chua, Sarah; Yip, Hon-Kan; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey

    2017-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that combined therapy with melatonin (Mel) and exendin-4 (Ex4) would be superior to either therapy alone for preventing the deterioration of renal function in cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Male adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 48) were randomly and equally divided into sham-control (SC), chronic kidney disease (CKD; induced by 5/6 nephrectomy), CRS (CKD + dilated cardiomyopathy, DCM; induced by doxorubicin 7 mg/kg i.p. every 5 days, 4 doses), CRS-Mel (20 mg/kg/day), CRS-Ex4 (10 µg/kg/day) and CRS-Mel-Ex4. They were euthanized by day 60 after CRS induction. By day 60, plasma creatinine level, urine protein/creatinine ratio and kidney injury histopathology score were highest in CRS, lowest in SC, and progressively decreased from CKD, CRS-Mel, CRS-Ex4 to CRS-Mel-Ex4 (all P<0.0001). The kidney protein expressions of inflammation (TNF-α/NF-κB/MMP-9/iNOS/RANTES), oxidative stress (NOX-1/NOX-2/NOX-4/oxidized protein), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3/cleaved PARP/Bax), DNA-damaged marker (γ-H2AX) and fibrosis (p-mad3/TFG-β) showed identical patterns of creatinine level, whereas kidney protein expressions of GLP-1R showed a progressive increase from SC to CRS-Mel-Ex4 (all P<0.0001). Cellular expressions of inflammatory (CD14/CD68), DNA/kidney-damaged (γ-H2AX/KIM-1) and podocyte/renal tubule dysfunction signaling (β-catenin/Wnt1/Wnt4) biomarkers in kidney tissue exhibited an identical pattern of creatinine level (all P<0.0001). Podocyte components (podocin/dystroglycan/p-cadherin/synatopodin) were highest in SC, lowest in CRS, and significantly progressively increased from CKD to CRS-Mel-Ex4 (all P<0.0001). In conclusion, combined Mel-Ex4 therapy was superior to either one alone in preserving renal-function and kidney architectural integrity in the setting of CRS. PMID:28337255

  12. Personality and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Paul T.; Uda, Manuela; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schlessinger, David; Terracciano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has paralleled the sharp increase in obesity. Given its tremendous physical, emotional, and financial burden, it is of critical importance to identify who is most at risk and the potential points of intervention. Psychological traits, in addition to physiological and social risk factors, may contribute to metabolic syndrome. The objective of the present research is to test whether personality traits are associated with metabolic syndrome in a large community sample. Participants (N = 5,662) from Sardinia, Italy, completed a comprehensive personality questionnaire, the NEO-PI-R, and were assessed on all components of metabolic syndrome (waist circumference, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting glucose). Logistic regressions were used to predict metabolic syndrome from personality traits, controlling for age, sex, education, and current smoking status. Among adults over age 45 (n = 2,419), Neuroticism and low Agreeableness were associated with metabolic syndrome, whereas high Conscientiousness was protective. Individuals who scored in the top 10% on Conscientiousness were approximately 40% less likely to have metabolic syndrome (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.41–0.92), whereas those who scored in the lowest 10% on Agreeableness were 50% more likely to have it (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.09–2.16). At the facet level, traits related to impulsivity and hostility were the most strongly associated with metabolic syndrome. The present research indicates that those with fewer psychological resources are more vulnerable to metabolic syndrome and suggests a psychological component to other established risk factors. PMID:20567927

  13. Clinical metabolomics and hematic ADMA predict the future onset of cardiorenal syndrome in young grown-up subjects who were born preterm.

    PubMed

    Bassareo, P P; Fanos, V; Noto, A; Solla, P; Barberini, L; Flore, G; Puddu, M; Mercuro, G

    2014-04-01

    To look for differences in the urinary metabolic profile and in the hematic asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels between a group of young adults born preterm with an extremely low birthweight (<1000 g; ex-ELBW; n=19) and a control group of subjects born at term with a weight appropriate for their gestational age (AGA; n=13); and to look for a possible correlation between the urinary metabolic profile in ex-ELBW and their hematic levels of ADMA. Urine samples were analyzed by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and then submitted to unsupervised and supervised multivariate analysis. Samples of blood were collected and ADMA concentration was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Using supervised PLS-DA (partial least squares discriminant analysis) model, the authors were able to discriminate between ex-ELBW and AGA. Statistically significant differences were detected in the ADMA levels between ex-ELBW and AGA (p<0.02). Ex-ELBW metabolic profile correlated with ADMA concentrations (r=0.456, p<0.05). Conversely, ADMA levels in AGA did not correlated with their metabolic profiles. This study demonstrates the relevance of the metabolomic technique as a predictive tool of the metabolic status in ex-ELBW. The relationship between ex-ELBW urinary metabolic profile and their blood ADMA levels suggests the presence of a subclinical cardio-renal involvement in these subjects. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic syndrome pandemic.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Scott M

    2008-04-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a multiplex risk factor that consists of several risk correlates of metabolic origin. In addition, to dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycermia, the syndrome carries a prothrombotic state and a proinflammatory state. Persons with the metabolic syndrome are at essentially twice the risk for cardiovascular disease compared with those without the syndrome. It further raises the risk for type 2 diabetes by about 5-fold. Although some investigators favor keeping risk factors separate for purposes of clinical management, others believe that identifying individuals with an aggregation of risk factors provides additional useful information to guide clinical management. In particular it focuses attention on obesity and sedentary life habits that are the root of the syndrome. This review addresses the prevalence of this clustering phenomenon throughout the world. Such seems appropriate because of the increasing prevalence of obesity in almost all countries. The available evidence indicates that in most countries between 20% and 30% of the adult population can be characterized as having the metabolic syndrome. In some populations or segments of the population, the prevalence is even higher. On the other hand, in parts of developing world in which young adults predominate, the prevalence is lower; but with increasing affluence and aging of the population, the prevalence undoubtedly with rise.

  15. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 15 percent of people who have type 2 diabetes without metabolic syndrome. Treatment Heart-healthy lifestyle changes are the first line ... vision loss, and foot or leg amputation. If diabetes is present, the goal of treatment is to reduce your risk for heart disease ...

  16. Eicosanoids in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, James P.; Eckman, Katie; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Esterle, Andrew; Chilian, William M.; Chiang, John Y.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Chronic persistent inflammation plays a significant role in disease pathology of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome (MetS). MetS is a constellation of diseases that include obesity, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with many of the MetS diseases. These metabolic derangements trigger a persistent inflammatory cascade, which includes production of lipid autacoids (eicosanoids) that recruit immune cells to the site of injury and subsequent expression of cytokines and chemokines that amplify the inflammatory response. In acute inflammation, the transcellular synthesis of antiinflammatory eicosanoids resolve inflammation, while persistent activation of the autacoid-cytokine-chemokine cascade in metabolic disease leads to chronic inflammation and accompanying tissue pathology. Many drugs targeting the eicosanoid pathways have been shown to be effective in the treatment of MetS, suggesting a common linkage between inflammation, MetS and drug metabolism.The cross-talk between inflammation and MetS seems apparent because of the growing evidence linking immune cell activation and metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Thus modulation of lipid metabolism through either dietary adjustment or selective drugs may become a new paradigm in the treatment of metabolic disorders. This review focuses on the mechanisms linking eicosanoid metabolism to persistent inflammation and altered lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in MetS. PMID:23433458

  17. [Syndrome X vs metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Morales Villegas, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Himsworth in 1939 postulated that Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) was not only an insulin deficiency state but also a cellular insulin insensitivity disease. Thirty years later, DeFronzo and Reaven demonstrated that insulin resistance (IR) preceded and predisposed for DM2 and atherosclerotic-cardiovascular-disease (ACVD). Reaven was the first to point out the relationship between IR and with hyperglycemia, dyslipidosis, and hypertension as mediators for ACVD, creating the concept of Syndrome X (SX) in 1988. WHO and, thereafter, other medical societies and medical groups, mainly ATP-III, in 2002, based on the difficulty of diagnosing IR in a simple, reliable, and inexpensive way, proposed and published the Metabolic Syndrome (MS) concept, as a group of five variables, i.e., obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL, and hypertension, as an easy clinical approximation to suspect and treat an increased cardiometabolic risk. Nowadays, there are deep and extensive controversies on this issue; however, these controversies do not really exist since all discordant points of view are rather quantitative and not qualitative in nature. This article is aimed at differentiating and harmonizing the complementary concepts of SX and MS, at analyzing why MS is a good "clinical window" to look for IR and its underlying manifestations, and finally to accept that the MS concept complements, but does not substitute or antagonize, traditional scales used to asses cardiovascular risk, such as the Framingham scale.

  18. [Microbiota and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Altuntaş, Yüksel; Batman, Adnan

    2017-04-01

    The role of gut bacteria in the pathogenesis and treatment of various diseases has been a focus of attention in the last 10 years. Prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases continues to increase, in spite of technological developments and treatment alternatives. Microbial dysbiosis, described as the decrease of useful bacteria and the increase of harmful bacteria, has been associated with diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis, and metabolic syndrome. In microbial dysbiosis, increase of harmful metabolites and changes to composition of bile acids occur via carbohydrate and protein fermentation. As a result, insulin resistance pathways are activated, which initiate the processes of obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Healthy diet recommendations, including prebiotic and probiotic foods and the use of probiotic agents, look promising for future treatment of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mikolasevic, I; Milic, S; Orlic, L; Poropat, G; Jakopcic, I; Franjic, N; Klanac, A; Kristo, N; Stimac, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on the course of acute pancreatitis determined by disease severity, the presence of local and systemic complications and survival rate. 609 patients admitted to our hospital in the period from January 1, 2008 up to June 31, 2015 with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were analyzed. The diagnosis and the severity of acute pancreatitis were made according to the revised Atlanta classification criteria from 2012. Of 609 patients with acute pancreatitis, 110 fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome had statistically significantly higher incidence of moderately severe (38.2% vs. 28.5%; p=0.05) and severe (22.7% vs. 12.8%; p=0.01) acute pancreatitis in comparison to those without metabolic syndrome, while patients without metabolic syndrome had higher incidence of mild acute pancreatitis in comparison to those patients with metabolic syndrome (58.7% vs. 39.1%; p<0.001). Patients with metabolic syndrome had a higher number of local and systemic complications, and higher APACHE II score in comparison to patients without metabolic syndrome. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, the presence of metabolic syndrome was independently associated with moderately severe and severe acute pancreatitis. Comparing survival rates, patients suffering from metabolic syndrome had a higher death rate compared to patients without metabolic syndrome (16% vs. 4.5%; p<0.001). The presence of metabolic syndrome at admission portends a higher risk of moderately severe and severe acute pancreatitis, as well as higher mortality rate. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic syndrome in childhood.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Pablo Sanjurjo; Prieto Perera, Jose Angel; Lodeiro, Fernando Andrade; Azuara, Luis Aldámiz-Echevarría

    2007-10-01

    The so-called epidemic of childhood obesity has increased the interest in the metabolic syndrome (MS) due to the potential projection into adulthood. Prevalence of the MS in adolescents has been estimated to be 6.7% in young adults and 4.2% in adolescents. Figures rise up to 28.7% in overweight and obese adolescents. The most widely accepted hypothesis links the syndrome to obesity. In the Bogalusa study, the best predictors were obesity and being in the upper quartile of basal insulin levels. Ethnic and genetic factors play a role in order to explain the syndrome in the non-obese population and the differences of interobesity. The relationship between MS and type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease is well established in adults. This association can be suggested in children as well, although the syndrome in childhood urgently needs to be clearly defined. In this age group, it is also of great interest to identify diagnosis criteria of the so-called pre-MS. Detection of the syndrome focuses mainly on obese and overweight young people. Other population groups such as newborns with low or high birth weight, infants with accelerated growth, or children of obese or with gestational diabetes mothers are at a higher risk of developing peripheral insulin resistance. The measurement of abdominal circumference can be a useful screening tool. Physical exercise and restriction of saturated and trans fatty acids are basic for treatment. If reducing weight is necessary, a reduction of carbohydrate intake, especially for refined sugars, must be emphasised. Dietary fibre improves insulin sensitivity.

  1. Drug treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Altabas, Velimir

    2013-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases including: abdominal obesity, a decreased ability to metabolize glucose (increased blood glucose levels and/or presence of insulin resistance), dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Patients who have developed this syndrome have been shown to be at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Genetic factors and the environment both are important in the development of the metabolic syndrome, influencing all single components of this syndrome. The goals of therapy are to treat the underlying cause of the syndrome, to reduce morbidity, and to prevent complications, including premature death. Lifestyle modification is the preferred first-step treatment of the metabolic syndrome. There is no single effective drug treatment affecting all components of the syndrome equally known yet. However, each component of metabolic syndrome has independent goals to be achieved, so miscellaneous types of drugs are used in the treatment of this syndrome, including weight losing drugs, antidiabetics, antihypertensives, antilipemic and anticlothing drugs etc. This article provides a brief insight into contemporary drug treatment of components the metabolic syndrome.

  2. [Hypovitaminosis D and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miñambres, Inka; de Leiva, Alberto; Pérez, Antonio

    2014-12-23

    Metabolic syndrome and hypovitaminosis D are 2 diseases with high prevalence that share several risk factors, while epidemiological evidence shows they are associated. Although the mechanisms involved in this association are not well established, hypovitaminosis D is associated with insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. However, the apparent ineffectiveness of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic syndrome components, as well as the limited information about the effect of improving metabolic syndrome components on vitamin D concentrations, does not clarify the direction and the mechanisms involved in the causal relationship between these 2 pathologies. Overall, because of the high prevalence and the epidemiological association between both diseases, hypovitaminosis D could be considered a component of the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome Updated:Apr 13,2017 What are the symptoms ... Syndrome? This content was last reviewed August 2016. Metabolic Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • ...

  4. [Nutrition and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Matía Martín, Pilar; Lecumberri Pascual, Edurne; Calle Pascual, Alfonso L

    2007-01-01

    Sufficient evidence exists in relation to the association in clinical practice between disorders in the metabolism of glucose, lipoproteins, insulin action, arterial hypertension and centrally-distributed obesity. This association is named Metabolic Syndrome. Despite the existence thereof had been questioned by the ADA and EASD, it is a useful tool affording the possibility of identifying individuals at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Metabolic syndrome and/or its individual components are associated with a high incidence rate of cardiovascular disease. Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle are underlying risk factors along this syndrome's pathway to disease, changes in living habits therefore being a first-line intervention in the prevention and treatment of insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, aterogenic dyslipemia and arterial hypertension. Weight loss and exercise are the keys to the overall plan, one of the most important non-pharmacological cardiovascular risk reduction strategies however still being diet. Epidemiological studies have found a high intake of simple sugars, of foods having a glycemic index and of diets with a high glycemic load to be associated to insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol figures. Los saturated fat intake in favor of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids has been implied in a reduction of the incidence of type II diabetes mellitus and dyslipemia, although the debate is ongoing. Unrefined grain fiber in the diet has been beneficial in reducing the risk of diabetes. Among the diet patterns, the Mediterranean diet has been related to a lower incidence of diabetes and a reduction in the risk of death. Studies for intervention in the prevention of type II diabetes have suggested low-fat diets (reducing saturated and trans-fats), with a high degree of fiber and low glycemic index. Clinical trials have shown diets with small amounts of carbohydrates, low glycemic

  5. Adiponectin signaling and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuchang

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a combination of several serious metabolic disorders, including obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. A class of drugs called thiazolidinediones (TZDs) has been used for treatment of metabolic syndrome; however, TZDs also show side effects. Therefore, additional alternative medications that are both effective and safe for the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome are a big challenge for us. Adiponectin is exclusively expressed and secreted from adipocyte, and it has been proved as one thiazolidinediones with antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties for metabolic syndrome. Studies conducted in human and animal models of metabolic diseases have clearly demonstrated that adiponectin and adiponectin receptors as well as the signaling pathways involved can indeed have beneficial effects on these metabolic disorders. The use of macrophage cells as carriers for adiponectin and its receptors will provide a novel and unique strategy for studying the actions of adiponectin in vivo, and it also serves as a potential innovative therapeutic approach for treatment of metabolic syndrome in the future. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Equine metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, R.; Keen, J.; McGowan, C.

    2015-01-01

    Laminitis is one of the most common and frustrating clinical presentations in equine practice. While the principles of treatment for laminitis have not changed for several decades, there have been some important paradigm shifts in our understanding of laminitis. Most importantly, it is essential to consider laminitis as a clinical sign of disease and not as a disease in its own right. Once this shift in thinking has occurred, it is logical to then question what disease caused the laminitis. More than 90 per cent of horses presented with laminitis as their primary clinical sign will have developed it as a consequence of endocrine disease; most commonly equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Given the fact that many horses will have painful protracted and/or chronic recurrent disease, a good understanding of the predisposing factors and how to diagnose and manage them is crucial. Current evidence suggests that early diagnosis and effective management of EMS should be a key aim for practising veterinary surgeons to prevent the devastating consequences of laminitis. This review will focus on EMS, its diagnosis and management. PMID:26273009

  7. Metabolic syndrome, diet and exercise.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Sunita M C; Norman, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with a range of metabolic complications including insulin resistance (IR), obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. These compound risks result in a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and possibly increased cardiovascular (CV) disease. As the cardiometabolic risk of PCOS is shared amongst the different diagnostic systems, all women with PCOS should undergo metabolic surveillance though the precise approach differs between guidelines. Lifestyle interventions consisting of increased physical activity and caloric restriction have been shown to improve both metabolic and reproductive outcomes. Pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery may be considered in resistant metabolic disease. Issues requiring further research include the natural history of PCOS-associated metabolic disease, absolute CV risk and comparative efficacy of lifestyle interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  9. Neuroinflammatory basis of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Cai, Dongsheng

    2013-10-05

    Inflammatory reaction is a fundamental defense mechanism against threat towards normal integrity and physiology. On the other hand, chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and atherosclerosis, have been causally linked to chronic, low-grade inflammation in various metabolic tissues. Recent cross-disciplinary research has led to identification of hypothalamic inflammatory changes that are triggered by overnutrition, orchestrated by hypothalamic immune system, and sustained through metabolic syndrome-associated pathophysiology. While continuing research is actively trying to underpin the identity and mechanisms of these inflammatory stimuli and actions involved in metabolic syndrome disorders and related diseases, proinflammatory IκB kinase-β (IKKβ), the downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB and some related molecules in the hypothalamus were discovered to be pathogenically significant. This article is to summarize recent progresses in the field of neuroendocrine research addressing the central integrative role of neuroinflammation in metabolic syndrome components ranging from obesity, glucose intolerance to cardiovascular dysfunctions.

  10. Clinical biomarkers in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barazzoni, Rocco; Silva, Veronica; Singer, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    A biomarker can be defined as a measurable variable that may be used as an indicator of a given biological state or condition. Biomarkers have been used in health and disease for diagnostic purposes, as tools to assess effectiveness of nutritional or drug intervention, or as risk markers to predict the development of certain diseases. In nutrition studies, selecting appropriate biomarkers is important to assess compliance, or incidence of a particular dietary component in the biochemistry of the organism, and in the diagnosis and prognosis of nutrition-related diseases. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that occur simultaneously in the same individual, and it is associated with systemic alterations that may involve several organs and tissues. Given its close association with obesity and the increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide, identifying obese individuals at risk for metabolic syndrome is a major clinical priority. Biomarkers for metabolic syndrome are therefore potential important tools to maximize the effectiveness of treatment in subjects who would likely benefit the most. Choice of biomarkers may be challenging due to the complexity of the syndrome, and this article will mainly focus on nutrition biomarkers related to the diagnosis and prognosis of the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Surgical Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Runkel, Norbert; Brydniak, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is gastrointestinal surgery for weight control, and metabolic surgery refers to the use of surgery to primarily and purposely treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)/metabolic syndrome mellitus. Methods The most recent literature was reviewed for surgery and T2DM in a non-systematic fashion. Results Roux-Y gastric bypass, biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) are the dominant procedures today. SG is emerging as the most popular operation worldwide. Laparoscopy has made metabolic surgery as safe as other common abdominal procedures. A BMI > 60 kg/m2, however, exposes a significantly higher perioperative risk. Most patients experience a sustained improvement of glycemic control with subsequent reduction of cardiovascular events. The remission rates depend on the severity and duration of diabetes. Prevention of long-term nutritional deficits and monitoring of metabolism require lifelong medical surveillance of the patients. Conclusions The profound impact of weight reduction surgery on glucose metabolism explains the growing interest in treating T2DM by surgical means. Metabolic surgery is a safe option for carefully selected patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27921048

  12. Clinical outcomes in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhatheja, Rohit; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors. Its definition is the presence of any 3 of the following: obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein, hypertension, and impaired fasting glucose. The development of coronary artery disease is the most dreaded complication of this disease. In the United States, Mexican Americans and African American women are the most affected. Management of this syndrome includes physical exercise, weight loss, and effective drug treatment of dyslipidemia, high blood pressure, and impaired fasting blood glucose. Because of the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes, there is a rise in fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. With the development of effective antiplatelet medication and newer drug-eluting stents, percutaneous coronary intervention has become an effective revascularization strategy for those with coronary artery disease. Rates of stent restenosis and target-lesion revascularization have been reduced. Oral hypoglycemic drugs like thiazolidinediones improve insulin resistance and may have a favorable effect in those with metabolic syndrome. Diagnosis and appropriate management of metabolic syndrome are challenges as the presence of risk factors predates the coronary event.

  13. Gut microbiota and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Marasco, Giovanni; Taddia, Martina; Colecchia, Antonio

    2014-11-21

    Gut microbiota exerts a significant role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, as confirmed by studies conducted both on humans and animal models. Gut microbial composition and functions are strongly influenced by diet. This complex intestinal "superorganism" seems to affect host metabolic balance modulating energy absorption, gut motility, appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as hepatic fatty storage. An impairment of the fine balance between gut microbes and host's immune system could culminate in the intestinal translocation of bacterial fragments and the development of "metabolic endotoxemia", leading to systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. Diet induced weight-loss and bariatric surgery promote significant changes of gut microbial composition, that seem to affect the success, or the inefficacy, of treatment strategies. Manipulation of gut microbiota through the administration of prebiotics or probiotics could reduce intestinal low grade inflammation and improve gut barrier integrity, thus, ameliorating metabolic balance and promoting weight loss. However, further evidence is needed to better understand their clinical impact and therapeutic use.

  14. [Nutritional epigenomics of metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Junien, Claudine; Gallou-Kabani, Catherine; Vigé, Alexandre; Gross, Marie-Sylvie

    2005-12-01

    The importance of epigenetic alterations has been acknowledged in cancer for about two decades by an increasing number of molecular oncologists who contributed to deciphering the epigenetic codes and machinery and opened the road for a new generation of drugs now in clinical trials. However, the relevance of epigenetics to common diseases such as metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease was less conspicuous. This review focuses on converging data supporting the hypothesis that, in addition to "thrifty genotype" inheritance, individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS)--combining disturbances in glucose and insulin metabolism, excess of predominantly abdominally distributed weight, mild dyslipidemia and hypertension, with the subsequent development of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD)--have suffered improper "epigenetic programing" during their fetal/postnatal development due to maternal inadequate nutrition and metabolic disturbances and also during their life-time. Moreover, as seen for obesity and T2D, MetS tends to appear earlier in childhood, to be more severe from generation to generation and to affect more pregnant women. Thus, in addition to maternal effects, MetS patients may display "transgenerational effects" via the incomplete erasure of epigenetic marks endured by their parents and grandparents. We highlight the susceptibility of epigenetic mechanisms controlling gene expression to environmental influences due to their inherent malleability, emphasizing the participation of transposable elements and the potential role of imprinted genes during critical time windows in epigenetic programming, from the very beginning of development throughout life. Increasing our understanding on epigenetic patterns significance and small molecules (nutrients, drugs) that reverse epigenetic (in) activation should provide us with the means to he obsolete human thrifty genotype into a "squandering" phenotype.

  15. Metabolic syndrome--neurotrophic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hristova, M; Aloe, L

    2006-01-01

    An increasing number of researchers of the metabolic syndrome assume that many mechanisms are involved in its complex pathophysiology such as an increased sympathetic activity, disorders of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, the action of chronic subclinical infections, proinflammatory cytokines, and the effect of adipocytokines or psychoemotional stress. An increasing body of scientific research in this field confirms the role of the neurotrophins and mastocytes in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and immune diseases. Recently it has been proved that neurotrophins and mastocytes have metabotrophic effects and take part in the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In the early stage of the metabolic syndrome we established a statistically significant increase in the plasma levels of the nerve growth factor. In the generalized stage the plasma levels of the neutrophines were statistically decreased in comparison to those in the healthy controls. We consider that the neurotrophin deficit is likely to play a significant pathogenic role in the development of the metabolic anthropometric and vascular manifestations of the generalized stage of MetSyn. We suggest a hypothesis for the etiopathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome based on the neuro-immuno-endocrine interactions. The specific pathogenic pathways of MetSyn development include: (1) increased tissue and plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin-1(IL-1), Interleukin-6 (IL-6 ) and tumor necrosis factor - alpha (TNF-alpha) caused by inflammatory and/or emotional distress; (2) increased plasma levels of neurotrophin - nerve growth factor (NGF) caused by the high IL-1, IL-6 and TNFalpha levels; (3) high plasma levels of NGF which enhance activation of: the autonomous nerve system--vegetodystonia (disbalance of neurotransmitters); Neuropeptide Y (NPY)--enhanced feeding, obesity and increased leptin plasma levels; hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis--increased corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and

  16. Iron metabolism and incidence of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kilani, N; Vollenweider, P; Waeber, G; Marques-Vidal, P

    2015-11-01

    Whether iron metabolism affects metabolic syndrome (METS) is debated. We assessed the association between several markers of iron metabolism and incidence of METS. Data from 3271 participants (1870 women, 51.3 ± 10.4 years), free of METS at baseline and followed for 5.5 years. The association of serum iron, ferritin and transferrin with incident METS was assessed separately by gender. Incidence of METS was 22.6% in men and 16.5% in women (p < 0.001). After multivariate adjustment, a positive association was found between transferrin and incident METS in men: odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval for the fourth relative to the first quartile 1.55 (1.04-2.31), p for trend = 0.03, while no association was found for iron OR = 0.81 (0.53-1.24), p for trend = 0.33 and ferritin OR = 1.30 (0.88-1.92), p for trend = 0.018. In women, a negative association was found between iron and incident METS: OR for the fourth relative to the first quartile 0.51 (0.33-0.80), p for trend<0.03; the association between transferrin and incident METS was borderline significant: OR = 1.45 (0.97-2.17), p for trend = 0.07 and no association was found for ferritin: OR = 1.11 (0.76-1.63), p for trend = 0.58. Transferrin, not ferritin, is independently associated with an increased risk of incident METS; the protective effect of iron in women should be further explored. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic syndrome: a brain disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram B; Gupta, Siddharth; Dherange, Parinita; De Meester, Fabien; Wilczynska, Agnieszka; Alam, Shaan E; Pella, Daniel; Wilson, Douglas W

    2012-09-01

    Recent research indicates an association between brain dysfunction and the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. To investigate this, we created a Medline search (up to December 2011) of articles in PubMed. The results indicated that refined carbohydrates, saturated and total fat, high levels of ω-6 fatty acids, and low levels of ω-3 fatty acids and other long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), all in conjunction with sedentary behaviour and mental stress can predispose to inflammation. Increased sympathetic activity, with increased secretion of catecholamine, cortisol, and serotonin can cause oxidative stress, which may damage the arcuate nucleus as well as the hypothalamus and macrophages, and the liver may release pro-inflammatory cytokines. These, in conjunction with an underlying deficiency in long chain PUFA, may damage the arcuate nucleus as well as neuropeptide-Y and pro-opiomelanocortin neurons and insulin receptors in the brain, especially during fetal life, infancy, and childhood, resulting in their dysfunction. Of the fatty acids in the brain, 30%-50% are long chain PUFA, which are incorporated in the cell membrane phospholipids. Hence, ω-3 fatty acids, which are also known to enhance parasympathetic activity and increase the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 as well as acetylcholine in the hippocampus, may be protective. Therefore, treatment with ω-3 fatty acids may be applied for the prevention of metabolic syndrome.

  18. Nutrition, Epigenetics, and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjun; Wu, Zhenlong; Li, Defa; Li, Ning; Dindot, Scott V.; Satterfield, M. Carey; Bazer, Fuller W.

    2012-01-01

    Significance: Epidemiological and animal studies have demonstrated a close link between maternal nutrition and chronic metabolic disease in children and adults. Compelling experimental results also indicate that adverse effects of intrauterine growth restriction on offspring can be carried forward to subsequent generations through covalent modifications of DNA and core histones. Recent Advances: DNA methylation is catalyzed by S-adenosylmethionine-dependent DNA methyltransferases. Methylation, demethylation, acetylation, and deacetylation of histone proteins are performed by histone methyltransferase, histone demethylase, histone acetyltransferase, and histone deacetyltransferase, respectively. Histone activities are also influenced by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, ADP-ribosylation, sumoylation, and glycosylation. Metabolism of amino acids (glycine, histidine, methionine, and serine) and vitamins (B6, B12, and folate) plays a key role in provision of methyl donors for DNA and protein methylation. Critical Issues: Disruption of epigenetic mechanisms can result in oxidative stress, obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and vascular dysfunction in animals and humans. Despite a recognized role for epigenetics in fetal programming of metabolic syndrome, research on therapies is still in its infancy. Possible interventions include: 1) inhibition of DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and microRNA expression; 2) targeting epigenetically disturbed metabolic pathways; and 3) dietary supplementation with functional amino acids, vitamins, and phytochemicals. Future Directions: Much work is needed with animal models to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for the roles of specific nutrients in fetal and neonatal programming. Such new knowledge is crucial to design effective therapeutic strategies for preventing and treating metabolic abnormalities in offspring born to mothers with a previous experience of malnutrition. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 282–301. PMID

  19. Metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome: an intriguing overlapping.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Donatella; Adducchio, Gloria; Picchia, Simona; Ralli, Eleonora; Matteucci, Eleonora; Moscarini, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an increasing pathology in adults and in children, due to a parallel rise of obesity. Sedentary lifestyle, food habits, cultural influences and also a genetic predisposition can cause dyslipidemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity and insulin resistance which are the two main features of metabolic syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition directly associated with obesity, insulin resistance (HOMA index) and metabolic syndrome, and it is very interesting for its relationship and overlap with the metabolic syndrome. The relationship between the two syndromes is mutual: PCOS women have a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome and also women with metabolic syndrome commonly present the reproductive/endocrine trait of PCOS. Prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome and PCOS are similar for various aspects. It is necessary to treat excess adiposity and insulin resistance, with the overall goals of preventing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes and improving reproductive failure in young women with PCOS. First of all, lifestyle changes, then pharmacological therapy, bariatric surgery and laparoscopic ovarian surgery represent the pillars for PCOS treatment.

  20. [Epidemiological significance of the metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Horáková, D; Azeem, K; Dumbrovská, L; Vlčková, J; Horák, V; Kollárová, H

    From an epidemiological point of view, the metabolic syndrome is a group of risk factors causally, rather than coincidentally, related to insulin resistance. The metabolic syndrome is a condition with relatively high prevalence rates in both the Czech Republic and in other developed countries. There is a clear trend of increasing prevalence in both sexes depending on age. In the Czech Republic, the syndrome is less common in females (25.5%) than in males (37.6%). Epidemiological studies found white (Europoid race) males to be at higher risk due to abdominal obesity. The definition of the metabolic syndrome has evolved over time and helps to identify individuals at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, hence the use of the term cardiometabolic syndrome. Early detection of metabolic syndrome symptoms including insulin resistance should be performed mainly by general practitioners as part of regular check-ups.

  1. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

    PubMed

    Canuto, Raquel; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Macagnan, Jamile Block Araldi; Henn, Ruth Liane; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic (sex, skin color, age and marital status), socioeconomic (educational level, income and work shift), and behavioral characteristics (smoking, alcohol intake, leisure time physical activity, number of meals and sleep duration) of the sample. The multivariate analysis followed a theoretical framework for identifying metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers. RESULTS The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the sample was 9.3% (95%CI 7.4;11.2). The most frequently altered component was waist circumference (PR 48.4%; 95%CI 45.5;51.2), followed by high-density lipoprotein. Work shift was not associated with metabolic syndrome and its altered components. After adjustment, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was positively associated with women (PR 2.16; 95%CI 1.28;3.64), workers aged over 40 years (PR 3.90; 95%CI 1.78;8.93) and those who reported sleeping five hours or less per day (PR 1.70; 95%CI 1.09;2.24). On the other hand, metabolic syndrome was inversely associated with educational level and having more than three meals per day (PR 0.43; 95%CI 0.26;0.73). CONCLUSIONS Being female, older and deprived of sleep are probable risk factors for metabolic syndrome, whereas higher educational level and higher number of meals per day are protective factors for metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

  2. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Basit, Abdul; Shera, A Samad

    2008-09-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been a striking increase in the number of people with metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varies due to lack of an internationally agreed upon definition. Considering the increased cardiovascular risk among Asian people, a lower cutoff for waist circumference is defined. Obesity in terms of waist circumference is found to be 46-68% of the Pakistani population, with a strong association found between arm fat and insulin insensitivity. In studying dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia is found in 27-54% of the population, whereas 68-81% have low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Fifty percent were found to be at high risk of metabolic syndrome and as being hypertensive. With the high prevalence of all of these metabolic risk factors, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Pakistan according to different definitions is reported to be from 18% to 46%, comparable to the data from other South Asian countries. Thus, metabolic syndrome should be considered as a prime target for preventive medicine. The primary management goals for metabolic syndrome are to reduce the risks of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Lifestyle-related risk factors are associated with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Unless preventive programs are properly designed and implemented, we will continue to treat the majority of the cases after they have already developed the complications. A prospective primary prevention study is underway in Pakistan that will help to create a base for public awareness strategies and nationwide surveillance and prevention programs against noncommunicable diseases.

  3. Targets to treat metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mahalingaiah, Shruthi; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is comprised of a combination of the following states: increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, and increased abdominal obesity. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome over the course of their lives. Metabolic syndrome increases risk of major cardiovascular events, morbidity, quality of life, and overall health care costs. Though metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS is an area of great concern, there is no effective individual medical therapeutic to adequately treat this issue. This article will review key aspects of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. We will discuss classic and novel therapeutics to address metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. We will conclude with the importance of developing strategic interventions to increase the compliance to lifestyle and dietary modification, in addition to appreciation of the emerging pharmaceutical therapeutics available. Innovation in lifestyle modification, including diet, exercise, with and without dedicated stress reduction techniques is the future in treatment of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. Application of novel interventions, such as group medical care, may improve future adherence to lifestyle modification recommendations, in addition to or in combination with pharmaceutical therapeutics.

  4. Targets to treat metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingaiah, Shruthi; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Metabolic syndrome is comprised of a combination of the following states: increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, and increased abdominal obesity. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome over the course of their lives. Metabolic syndrome increases risk of major cardiovascular events, morbidity, quality of life, and overall health care costs. Though metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS is an area of great concern, there is no effective individual medical therapeutic to adequately treat this issue. Areas Covered This article will review key aspects of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. We will discuss classic and novel therapeutics to address metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. We will conclude with the importance of developing strategic interventions to increase the compliance to lifestyle and dietary modification, in addition to appreciation of the emerging pharmaceutical therapeutics available. Expert Opinion Innovation in lifestyle modification, including diet, exercise, with and without dedicated stress reduction techniques is the future in treatment of metabolic syndrome in PCOS. Application of novel interventions, such as group medical care, may improve future adherence to lifestyle modification recommendations, in addition to or in combination with pharmaceutical therapeutics. PMID:26488852

  5. Metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia and regulation of lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Al Qarni, Ali; Hawwari, Abbas; Al Ghanem, Ahmad F; Gasmelseed, Ahmed

    2017-07-05

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Development of these pathologies is associated with the disorders of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Dyslipidemia leads to the overproduction of potentially atherogenic lipid and lipoproteins. Furthermore, there is a decrease in the levels of high-density lipoproteins and an increase in the levels of remnant and small dense LDL particles. In the current review, we have discussed the pathophysiology of lipoprotein biosynthesis and metabolism in the metabolic syndrome. Finally, we describe regulation of lipoprotein metabolism which may be used as a potential target for treating dyslipidemia in metabolic syndrome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Medicinal agents and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Ruiz, M E; El Hafidi, M; Pérez-Torres, I; Baños, G; Guarner, V

    2013-01-01

    The definition of the Metabolic Syndrome (MS) has encountered difficulty in reaching a universal consensus although there exists an agreement of its main pathologies which are hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, inflammation and renal damage. The prevalent opinion is that three of those alterations may define the syndrome. The incidence of the MS has increased globally, particularly in the last few years, to the point of being regarded as an epidemic. The treatment of the MS can be approached from different angles, since it may be a multifaceted health problem. A healthy lifestyle, which means the practice of regular exercise is suggested to MS patients. Increasing physical activity has anti-inflammatory effects since there is an inverse association of physical activity and inflammatory biomarker concentrations. An adequate diet is recommended, such as the Mediterranean, which contains fish, tomatoes, garlic, red peppers, olive oil and includes red wine, that is, antioxidants and non-saturated oils. There are also the traditional herbal preparations, used in the alternative medicine. Several therapeutic tools can be used; the most common are the pharmaceutical products to deal with obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemias, diabetes and inflammation. In addition several pharmacological therapies such as non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are recommended. Recently new mechanisms of action of statins, fibrates, metformin and thiazolidinediones have demonstrated their anti-inflammatory effect and potential use to treat MS.

  7. Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Job Rank.

    PubMed

    Mehrdad, Ramin; Pouryaghoub, Gholamreza; Moradi, Mahboubeh

    2018-01-01

    The occupation of the people can influence the development of metabolic syndrome. To determine the association between metabolic syndrome and its determinants with the job rank in workers of a large car factory in Iran. 3989 male workers at a large car manufacturing company were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Demographic and anthropometric data of the participants, including age, height, weight, and abdominal circumference were measured. Blood samples were taken to measure lipid profile and blood glucose level. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in each participant based on ATPIII 2001 criteria. The workers were categorized based on their job rank into 3 groups of (1) office workers, (2) workers with physical exertion, and (3) workers with chemical exposure. The study characteristics, particularly the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its determinants were compared among the study groups. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our study was 7.7% (95% CI 6.9 to 8.5). HDL levels were significantly lower in those who had chemical exposure (p=0.045). Diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in those who had mechanical exertion (p=0.026). The frequency of metabolic syndrome in the office workers, workers with physical exertion, and workers with chemical exposure was 7.3%, 7.9%, and 7.8%, respectively (p=0.836). Seemingly, there is no association between metabolic syndrome and job rank.

  8. Relationships among personality traits, metabolic syndrome, and metabolic syndrome scores: The Kakegawa cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ohseto, Hisashi; Ishikuro, Mami; Kikuya, Masahiro; Obara, Taku; Igarashi, Yuko; Takahashi, Satomi; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Shigihara, Michiko; Yamanaka, Chizuru; Miyashita, Masako; Mizuno, Satoshi; Nagai, Masato; Matsubara, Hiroko; Sato, Yuki; Metoki, Hirohito; Tachibana, Hirofumi; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Kuriyama, Shinichi

    2018-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome and the presence of metabolic syndrome components are risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the association between personality traits and metabolic syndrome remains controversial, and few studies have been conducted in East Asian populations. We measured personality traits using the Japanese version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (Revised Short Form) and five metabolic syndrome components-elevated waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose-in 1322 participants aged 51.1±12.7years old from Kakegawa city, Japan. Metabolic syndrome score (MS score) was defined as the number of metabolic syndrome components present, and metabolic syndrome as having the MS score of 3 or higher. We performed multiple logistic regression analyses to examine the relationship between personality traits and metabolic syndrome components and multiple regression analyses to examine the relationship between personality traits and MS scores adjusted for age, sex, education, income, smoking status, alcohol use, and family history of CVD and diabetes mellitus. We also examine the relationship between personality traits and metabolic syndrome presence by multiple logistic regression analyses. "Extraversion" scores were higher in those with metabolic syndrome components (elevated waist circumference: P=0.001; elevated triglycerides: P=0.01; elevated blood pressure: P=0.004; elevated fasting glucose: P=0.002). "Extraversion" was associated with the MS score (coefficient=0.12, P=0.0003). No personality trait was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Higher "extraversion" scores were related to higher MS scores, but no personality trait was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A comprehensive definition for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Paul L

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome refers to the co-occurrence of several known cardiovascular risk factors, including insulin resistance, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia and hypertension. These conditions are interrelated and share underlying mediators, mechanisms and pathways. There has been recent controversy about its definition and its utility. In this article, I review the current definitions for the metabolic syndrome and why the concept is important. It identifies a subgroup of patients with shared pathophysiology who are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. By considering the central features of the metabolic syndrome and how they are related, we may better understand the underlying pathophysiology and disease pathogenesis. A comprehensive definition for the metabolic syndrome and its key features would facilitate research into its causes and hopefully lead to new insights into pharmacologic and lifestyle treatment approaches.

  10. Glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Melissa; Singleton, J Robinson; Smith, A Gordon

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or metabolic syndrome may result in peripheral nerve injury, although the exact relationship between the conditions is still being characterized. There is animal model, epidemiologic, and clinical evidence to suggest a pathophysiologic relationship between neuropathy and metabolic syndrome, along with its components including obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. IGT and metabolic syndrome are associated with subclinical nerve damage or are typically painful and sensory predominant, although autonomic involvement may also occur. Because there is often preferential small fiber injury and nerve conduction studies may be relatively insensitive, skin biopsy with assessment of intraepidermal nerve fiber density is often used to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment of metabolic syndrome and IGT-associated neuropathies should include diet and exercise counseling, maintenance of normoglycemia, and targeted pharmacologic therapy for modifiable risk factors. Further research is required to fully elucidate the complex pathophysiology, as well as identify optimal diagnostic and treatment approaches.

  11. Oxidized LDL and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Holvoet, Paul; De Keyzer, Dieuwke; Jacobs, David R

    2008-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a common and complex disorder combining obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and insulin resistance. It is associated with a high cardiovascular risk that can only partially be explained by its components. There is evidence that low-grade inflammation and high oxidative stress add to this risk. Oxidized LDL, a marker of lipoprotein-associated oxidative stress, is an emerging cardiovascular risk factor. In this review, we demonstrate that the metabolic syndrome exacerbates oxidized LDL in a feedback loop. We introduce molecular mechanisms underlying this loop. Finally, we demonstrate that weight loss and statin treatment lower metabolic syndrome factors associated with a reduction of oxidized LDL. The current data warrant further investigation into the role of lifestyle and therapeutic interventions that inhibit tissue-associated oxidation of LDL in the prevention of the metabolic syndrome.

  12. Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome: the evidence.

    PubMed

    Babio, Nancy; Bulló, Mònica; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2009-09-01

    The Mediterranean diet has long been related to a lower cardiovascular disease risk; however, more recent evidences also indicate that it has a favourable effect on adiposity and type 2 diabetes. Review of the available literature in relation to Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome. Several components of Mediterranean diet patterns have been inversely related with body mass index. They are considered to be modulators of insulin resistance, can exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, improve atherogenic dyslipidemia or attenuate the inflammatory burden associated with metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome has been associated with dietary patterns rich in fruits and vegetables, nuts, olive oil, legumes and fish, moderate in alcohol and low in red meat, processed meat, refined carbohydrates and whole-fat dairy products. There is much evidence suggesting that the Mediterranean diet could serve as an anti-inflammatory dietary pattern, which could help to fight diseases related to chronic inflammation, including metabolic syndrome.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome and Risk of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Katherine; Chiodini, Paolo; Colao, Annamaria; Lenzi, Andrea; Giugliano, Dario

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Available evidence supports the emerging hypothesis that metabolic syndrome may be associated with the risk of some common cancers. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between metabolic syndrome and risk of cancer at different sites. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted an electronic search for articles published through October 2011 without restrictions and by reviewing reference lists from retrieved articles. Every included study was to report risk estimates with 95% CIs for the association between metabolic syndrome and cancer. RESULTS We analyzed 116 datasets from 43 articles, including 38,940 cases of cancer. In cohort studies in men, the presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with liver (relative risk 1.43, P < 0.0001), colorectal (1.25, P < 0.001), and bladder cancer (1.10, P = 0.013). In cohort studies in women, the presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with endometrial (1.61, P = 0.001), pancreatic (1.58, P < 0.0001), breast postmenopausal (1.56, P = 0.017), rectal (1.52, P = 0.005), and colorectal (1.34, P = 0.006) cancers. Associations with metabolic syndrome were stronger in women than in men for pancreatic (P = 0.01) and rectal (P = 0.01) cancers. Associations were different between ethnic groups: we recorded stronger associations in Asia populations for liver cancer (P = 0.002), in European populations for colorectal cancer in women (P = 0.004), and in U.S. populations (whites) for prostate cancer (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of common cancers; for some cancers, the risk differs betweens sexes, populations, and definitions of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23093685

  14. Pediatric Metabolic Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Laboratory Assessment.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Victoria; Adeli, Khosrow

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric overweight and obesity is an emerging public health priority as rates have rapidly increased worldwide. Obesity is often clustered with other metabolic abnormalities including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, leading to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This cluster of risk factors, termed the metabolic syndrome, has traditionally been reported in adults. However, with the increased prevalence of pediatric obesity, the metabolic syndrome is now evident in children and adolescents. This complex cluster of risk factors is the result of the pathological interplay between several organs including adipose tissue, muscle, liver, and intestine with a common antecedent - insulin resistance. The association of the metabolic syndrome with several systemic alterations that involve numerous organs and tissues adds to the complexity and challenge of diagnosing the metabolic syndrome and identifying useful clinical indicators of the disease. The complex physiology of growing and developing children and adolescents further adds to the difficulties in standardizing laboratory assessment, diagnosis, and prognosis for the diverse pediatric population. However, establishing a consensus definition is critical to identifying and managing children and adolescents at high risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. As a result, the examination of novel metabolic syndrome biomarkers which can detect these metabolic abnormalities early with high specificity and sensitivity in the pediatric population has been of interest. Understanding this complex cluster of risk factors in the pediatric population is critical to ensure that this is not the first generation where children have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. This review will discuss the pathophysiology, consensus definitions and laboratory assessment of pediatric metabolic syndrome as well as potential novel biomarkers.

  15. Metabolic syndrome and cerebral vasomotor reactivity.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, S; Boden-Albala, B; Choi, J H; Carrera, E; Doyle, M; Perez, T; Marshall, R S

    2010-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been proposed as a risk factor for stroke and transient ischaemic attack. One pathophysiological mechanism could be impairment of endothelial function. Thus, we hypothesized that cerebral vasomotor reactivity would be decreased in patients with metabolic syndrome, compared to patients without metabolic syndrome. In this retrospective analysis, 83 consecutive patients (aged 59.19 ± 15.98; 33 women) underwent Doppler examination for carotid artery disease including bi-hemispherical vasomotor reactivity assessment using transcranial Doppler monitoring. Vasomotor reactivity data were analyzed from the hemisphere with no or low-grade carotid stenosis (<40%). Cerebral vasomotor reactivity was calculated as percent increase in mean flow velocity per mmHg pCO(2) during 2 min of 5% CO(2) inhalation delivered by anesthesia mask (normal if ≥ 2%/mmHg). Univariate and multivariable linear regression models were used to determine factors, including metabolic syndrome, that were independently associated with pathologic vasomotor reactivity. After adjusting for the presence of contralateral carotid stenosis and ipsilateral stroke in the multivariable model, metabolic syndrome was independently associated with lower vasomotor reactivity values (2.27 ± 1.24% vs. 2.68 ± 1.37; ß = -0.258, P = 0.033). In this model, there was no association of cerebral vasomotor reactivity with age, gender, race, cardiac disease, current statin therapy, or small vessel disease. Our findings suggest that impaired cerebral vasomotor reactivity may be a mediator of stroke in patients with metabolic syndrome, a syndrome affecting a significant and growing proportion of the population. A prospective longitudinal study is warranted to study the cerebral haemodynamic effect of metabolic syndrome. © 2010 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2010 EFNS.

  16. Gout and Metabolic Syndrome: a Tangled Web.

    PubMed

    Thottam, Gabrielle E; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Pillinger, Michael H

    2017-08-26

    The complexity of gout continues to unravel with each new investigation. Gout sits at the intersection of multiple intrinsically complex processes, and its prevalence, impact on healthcare costs, and association with important co-morbidities make it increasingly relevant. The association between gout and type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, renal disease, and obesity suggest that either gout, or its necessary precursor hyperuricemia, may play an important role in the manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. In this review, we analyze the complex interconnections between gout and metabolic syndrome, by reviewing gout's physiologic and epidemiologic relationships with its major co-morbidities. Increasing evidence supports gout's association with metabolic syndrome. More specifically, both human studies and animal models suggest that hyperuricemia may play a role in promoting inflammation, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, adipogenesis and lipogenesis, insulin and glucose dysregulation, and liver disease. Fructose ingestion is associated with increased rates of hypertension, weight gain, impaired glucose tolerance, and dyslipidemia and is a key driver of urate biosynthesis. AMP kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of processes that tend to mitigate against the metabolic syndrome. Within hepatocytes, leukocytes, and other cells, a fructose/urate metabolic loop drives key inhibitors of AMPK, including AMP deaminase and fructokinase, that may tilt the balance toward metabolic syndrome progression. Preliminary evidence suggests that agents that block the intracellular synthesis of urate may restore AMPK activity and help maintain metabolic homeostasis. Gout is both an inflammatory and a metabolic disease. With further investigation of urate's role, the possibility of proper gout management additionally mitigating metabolic syndrome is an evolving and important question.

  17. The metabolic syndrome in Africa: Current trends

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Christian I.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of several cardiovascular risk factors. Contrary to earlier thoughts, metabolic syndrome is no longer rare in Africa. The prevalence is increasing, and it tends to increase with age. This increase in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the continent is thought to be due to departure from traditional African to western lifestyles. In Africa, it is not limited to adults but is also becoming common among the young ones. Obesity and dyslipidemia seem to be the most common occurring components. While obesity appears more common in females, hypertension tends to be more predominant in males. Insulin resistance has remained the key underlying pathophysiology. Though pharmacologic agents are available to treat the different components of the syndrome, prevention is still possible by reverting back to the traditional African way of life. PMID:22276253

  18. Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components

    PubMed Central

    El-Aty, Mahmoud Abd; Mabry, Ruth; Morsi, Magdi; Al-Lawati, Jawad; Al-Riyami, Asya; El-Sayed, Medhat

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to describe the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components among Omani adults. Methods: The 2008 Oman World Health Survey dataset was used to determine the national prevalence of MS. Logistic regression using all key sociodemographic, clinical and behavioural variables was used to identify the associations of independent variables with MS. Results: The age-adjusted prevalence of MS was 23.6%. MS was significantly associated with age, marital and work status and wealth level. MS was more common for people aged 50 years and older compared to the youngest cohort (OR 3.6, CI: 2.4–5.3; P <0.001) and in people who were married or employed (OR 1.6, CI: 1.3–2.1; P <0.001 and OR 1.3, CI: 1.1–1.8; P = 0.043, respectively) compared to their unmarried and unemployed counterparts. MS was also more common in people in the second lowest wealth quintile (OR 1.6, CI: 1.2–2.2; P = 0.05) compared to the lowest quintile and in those who sat for more than six hours per day (OR 1.3, CI: 1.1–1.7; P = 0.035). Conclusion: One in four adults had MS in Oman. This may fuel the epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Oman, particularly given the increasingly elderly population. Urgent action is required to ensure quality patient care at all levels of the healthcare system. Further research on behavioural risk factors is needed. Developing and implementing a multisectoral strategy to prevent NCDs should be at the top of the current health agenda for Oman. PMID:25364547

  19. Holter registers and metabolic syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; Ramírez-Hernández, L.; Aguilar-Molina, A. M.; Zamora-Justo, J. A.; Gutiérrez-Calleja, R. A.; Virgilio-González, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    There is a relationship between the state of the cardiovascular system and metabolic syndrome (MS). A way to diagnose the heart state of a person is to monitor the electrical activity of the heart using a 24 hours Holter monitor. Scanned ECG signal can be analyzed beat-by-beat by algorithms that separate normal of abnormal heartbeats. If the percentage of abnormal heartbeats is too high it could be argued that the patient has heart problems. We have algorithms that can not only identify the abnormal heartbeats, but they can also classify them, so we classified and counted abnormal heartbeats in patients with MS and subjects without MS. Most of our patients have large waist circumference, high triglycerides and high levels of LDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol although some of them have high blood pressure. We enrolled adult patients with MS free of diabetes in a four month lifestyle intervention program including diet and physical aerobic exercise, and compared with healthy controls. We made an initial registration with a Holter, and 24 hours ECG signal is analyzed to identify and classify the different types of heartbeats. The patients then begin with diet or exercise (at least half an hour daily). Periodically Holter records were taken up and we describe the evolution in time of the number and type of abnormal heartbeats. Results show that the percentage of abnormal heartbeats decreases over time, in some cases the decline is very significant, and almost a reduction to half or less of abnormal heartbeats after several months since the patients changed their eating or physical activity habits.

  20. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Ghosh, Balaram

    2013-01-01

    Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma. PMID:23840225

  1. Cardiorenal Safety of OTC Analgesics.

    PubMed

    White, William B; Kloner, Robert A; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Davidson, Michael H

    2018-03-01

    Over-the-counter analgesics are used globally for the relief of acute pain. Although effective, these agents can be associated with adverse effects that may limit their use in some people. In the early 2000s, observations from clinical trials of prescription-strength and supratherapeutic doses of nonselective and cyclooxygenase-2-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) raised safety concerns regarding the risk of cardiovascular adverse effects with the use of these medications. Subsequently, the US Food and Drug Administration mandated additional study of the cardiovascular safety of NSAIDs for a more comprehensive understanding of their risk. As these data were being collected, and based on a comprehensive review of prescription data and the recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee, the warning labels of over-the-counter NSAIDs were updated to emphasize the potential cardiovascular risks of these agents. The recently reported "Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Celecoxib Integrated Safety versus Ibuprofen or Naproxen" (PRECISION) trial, in which participants with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis and underlying cardiovascular risk factors were treated with prescription-strength celecoxib, ibuprofen, or naproxen, revealed similar rates of cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes including hemorrhagic death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke) among the 3 treatment groups. Although informative, the cardiovascular safety findings derived from PRECISION cannot be extrapolated to the safety of the over-the-counter pain relievers ibuprofen and naproxen, given that the doses used were higher (mean [standard deviation]: ibuprofen, 2045 [246] mg; naproxen, 852 [103] mg) and the durations of use longer (∼20 months) than recommended with over-the-counter use of NSAIDs, which for ibuprofen is up to 10 days. This review discusses the cardiorenal safety of the most commonly used over

  2. [Metabolic syndrome and aortic stiffness].

    PubMed

    Simková, A; Bulas, J; Murín, J; Kozlíková, K; Janiga, I

    2010-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of risk factors that move the patient into higher level of risk category of cardiovascular disease and the probability of type 2 diabetes mellitus manifestation. Definition of MS is s based on the presence of selected risk factors as: abdominal obesity (lager waist circumpherence), atherogenic dyslipidemia (low value of HDL-cholesterol and increased level of triglycerides), increased fasting blood glucose (or type 2 DM diagnosis), higher blood pressure or antihypertensive therapy. In 2009 there were created harmonizing criteria for MS definition; the condition for assignment of MS is the presence of any 3 criteria of 5 mentioned above. The underlying disorder of MS is an insulin resistance or prediabetes. The patients with MS more frequently have subclinical (preclinical) target organ disease (TOD) which is the early sings of atherosclerosis. Increased aortic stiffness is one of the preclinical diseases and is defined by pathologically increased carotidofemoral pulse wave velocity in aorta (PWV Ao). With the aim to assess the influence of MS on aortic stiffness we examined the group of women with arterial hypertension and MS and compare them with the group of women without MS. The aortic stiffness was examined by Arteriograph--Tensiomed, the equipment working on the oscillometric principle in detection of pulsations of brachial artery. This method determines the global aortic stiffness based on the analysis of the shape of pulse curve of brachial artery. From the cohort of 49 pts 31 had MS, the subgroups did not differ in age or blood pressure level. The mean number of risk factors per person in MS was 3.7 comparing with 1.7 in those without MS. In the MS group there was more frequently abdominal obesity present (87% vs 44%), increased fasting blood glucose (81% vs 22%) and low HDL-cholesterol level. The pulse wave velocity in aorta, PWV Ao, was significantly higher in patients with MS (mean value 10,19 m/s vs 8,96 m

  3. Greenselect Phytosome for Borderline Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Andrea; Hu, Shu; Cesarone, Maria Rosa; Feragalli, Beatrice

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of Greenselect Phytosome, a proprietary lecithin formulation of a caffeine-free green tea catechin extract, were evaluated in a controlled registry study on 50 asymptomatic subjects borderline for metabolic syndrome factors and with increased plasma oxidative stress. After 24 weeks of intervention, improvement in weight, blood lipid profile, and blood pressure positioned 68% of subjects in the treatment arm out of the metabolic syndrome profile, while 80% of the subjects in the control group still remained in their initial borderline disease signature. Compared to the control (lifestyle and dietary changes alone), Greenselect Phytosome was especially effective for weight/waist changes. These results highlight the relevance of addressing multiple factors involved in the development of metabolic syndrome with a pleiotropic agent capable of improving the beneficial effects of lifestyle and dietary changes and foster the attainment of a globally improved health profile. PMID:24348726

  4. [Metabolic syndrome and hypertension: prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Bernardi, R; Cosentino, E R; Borghi, C

    2006-04-01

    Since the 1950s the definition of the aggregate of metabolic disorders possibly presenting with adult obesity has evolved without reaching a unifying agreement on what metabolic syndrome is. After years of consensus on and research into identifying the extent to which certain criteria of metabolic syndrome may be predisposing factors for cardiovascular events, a reverse shift can be noticed in recent studies raising numerous points of contention about various elements that may be diagnostic for the syndrome. Of these, one of the most tenuous is probably arterial hypertension. Uncertainties have emerged regarding the arbitrariness of cut-off values, which differ according to the classification system the study applied, the methods of measurement, and the dilemma of hyperinsulinemia/insulin resistance which is present in only 50-60% of individuals with hypertension. Currently available data fail to solve these conundrums; however, some studies have correlated hypertension and dislipidemia with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. International epidemiologic data indicate that the prevalence of the syndrome varies between populations and between the sexes within the same populations, suggesting that diagnostic criteria need to take better account of ethnic group origin. Prevention of metabolic syndrome is still based on lifestyle changes; the huge risk of an imminent pandemic has called the attention of the American Heart Association to the importance of prevention and early treatment of the pediatric population--a new segment at risk of early cardiovascular events. Pharmacological therapy is directed at controlling various risk factors, particularly hypertension and metabolic disturbances. ACE inhibitors, sartans and statins are currently the drugs of first choice in treating metabolic syndrome.

  5. The pharmacological management of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rask Larsen, Julie; Dima, Lorena; Correll, Christoph U; Manu, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The metabolic syndrome includes a constellation of several well-established risk factors, which need to be aggressively treated in order to prevent overt type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. While recent guidelines for the treatment of individual components of the metabolic syndrome focus on cardiovascular benefits as resulted from clinical trials, specific recent recommendations on the pharmacological management of metabolic syndrome are lacking. The objective of present paper was to review the therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome and its components, the available evidence related to their cardiovascular benefits, and to evaluate the extent to which they should influence the guidelines for clinical practice. Areas covered: A Medline literature search was performed to identify clinical trials and meta-analyses related to the therapy of dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension, glucose metabolism and obesity published in the past decade. Expert commentary: Our recommendation for first-line pharmacological are statins for dyslipidemia, renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system inhibitors for arterial hypertension, metformin or sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors or glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) for glucose intolerance, and the GLP-1RA liraglutide for achieving body weight and waist circumference reduction.

  6. Metabolic Syndrome after Kidney Transplantation - Are You at Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of serious complications that may result from having metabolic syndrome. Treatment recommendations mirror those mentioned above for prevention of ... achieve these goals, as well as others for treatment of metabolic syndrome. If these strategies are not sufficient, your physician ...

  7. Epigenetic priming of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Kimberley D; Cagampang, Felino R

    2011-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including central obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, hyperinsulinemia and microalbuminuria, and more recently, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and atherosclerosis. Although the concept of the MetS is subject to debate due to lack of a unifying underlying mechanism, the prevalence of a metabolic syndrome phenotype is rapidly increasing worldwide. Moreover, it is increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents of obese mothers. Evidence from both epidemiological and experimental animal studies now demonstrates that MetS onset is increasingly likely following exposure to suboptimal nutrition during critical periods of development, as observed in maternal obesity. Thus, the developmental priming of the MetS provides a common origin for this multifactorial disorder. Consequently, the mechanisms leading to this developmental priming have recently been the subject of intensive investigation. This review discusses recent data regarding the epigenetic modifications resulting from nutrition during early development that mediate persistent changes in the expression of key metabolic genes and contribute toward an adult metabolic syndrome phenotype. In addition, this review considers the role of the endogenous molecular circadian clock system, which has the potential to act at the interface between nutrient sensing and epigenetic processing. A continued and greater understanding of these mechanisms will eventually aid in the identification of individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes, and help develop therapeutic interventions, in accordance with current global government strategy.

  8. The Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yee V.; Cook, Paul; Somani, Bhaskar K.

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing prevalence of kidney stones over the last 2 decades worldwide. Many studies have indicated a possible association between metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease, particularly in overweight and obese patients. Many different definitions of metabolic syndrome have been suggested by various organizations, although the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is universally considered as the most acceptable definition. The IDF definition revolves around 4 core components: obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall's plaque hypothesis. Similarly the pathophysiology of calcium and uric acid stone formation has been investigated to determine a connection between the two conditions. Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors. Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures. PMID:25873954

  9. Plasma viscosity in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ucak, Sema; Basat, Okcan; Cetinkaya, Emel

    2013-01-01

    Plasma viscosity, which is affected by plasma lipid and protein composition, is a hemorheological parameter accepted as an early cardiovascular risk factor. In this study we aimed to investigate the alterations in plasma viscosity in patients with metabolic syndrome since both are early predictors of CVD. A total number of 70 patients aged between 25-55 years with the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to IDF 2005 criteria and 32 age and sex matched healthy subjects were allocated consecutively in the study. Body mass index (BMI), arterial blood pressure, blood glucose, total cholesterol, HDL and triglyceride levels were measured and plasma viscosity was measured. The results of patients with MS and healthy subjects were compared. Correlation between components of the Metabolic Syndrome and plasma viscosity was assessed. BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, serum lipid and glucose levels and plasma viscosity levels were higher in patient group (p < 0.001). A positive correlation was determined between plasma viscosity and waist circumference, hypertension and serum lipid levels (r = 0.401, p = 0.003). Plasma viscosity is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome and it is associated with waist circumference, hypertension and plasma lipid levels.

  10. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and microbiota: multiple interactions.

    PubMed

    Tilg, Herbert

    2010-09-01

    The incredible number and diversity of microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract represent a very diverse set of features, which support the host in important functions such as digestion of complex carbohydrates. Conventionalization of germ-free mice with a normal gut microbiota harvested from the intestine of conventionally raised mice results in weight gain and obesity. Development of obesity in genetically or diet-induced obese mice is associated with dramatic changes in the composition and metabolic function of the microbiota. This trait is transmissible as colonization of germ-free mice with an "obese-gut-derived" microflora results in a much greater increase in total body fat and leads to obesity. The first studies in obese and lean twins suggest that a core gut microbiome exists, and that obese individuals exhibit reduced diversity and an altered representation of metabolic pathways in their microbiota. Diet may have a fundamental effect on the composition of our microbiota. Early studies highlight the importance for specific diets such as a high-fat diet, which efficiently and very rapidly (within a single day) modulates the gut microbiome. The innate immune system might influence the metabolic syndrome and obesity, as mice deficient in Toll-like receptor 5 develop hyperphagia, become obese and insulin resistant. Importantly, transmission of the microbiota from these mice to healthy mice results in features of the metabolic syndrome. Available data suggest that the microbiota might play a role in the development of metabolic syndrome and obesity.

  11. The association between the metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score and pulmonary function in non-smoking adults.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun; Gi, Mi Young; Cha, Ju Ae; Yoo, Chan Uk; Park, Sang Muk

    2018-03-01

    This study assessed the association of metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score with the predicted forced vital capacity and predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s) values in Korean non-smoking adults. We analysed data obtained from 6684 adults during the 2013-2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. After adjustment for related variables, metabolic syndrome ( p < 0.001) and metabolic syndrome score ( p < 0.001) were found to be inversely associated with the predicted forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s values. The odds ratios of restrictive pulmonary disease (the predicted forced vital capacity < 80.0% with forced expiratory volume in 1 s/FVC ⩾ 70.0%) by metabolic syndrome score with metabolic syndrome score 0 as a reference group showed no significance for metabolic syndrome score 1 [1.061 (95% confidence interval, 0.755-1.490)] and metabolic syndrome score 2 [1.247 (95% confidence interval, 0.890-1.747)], but showed significant for metabolic syndrome score 3 [1.433 (95% confidence interval, 1.010-2.033)] and metabolic syndrome score ⩾ 4 [1.760 (95% confidence interval, 1.216-2.550)]. In addition, the odds ratio of restrictive pulmonary disease of the metabolic syndrome [1.360 (95% confidence interval, 1.118-1.655)] was significantly higher than those of non-metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score were inversely associated with the predicted forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s values in Korean non-smoking adults. In addition, metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score were positively associated with the restrictive pulmonary disease.

  12. Relationship between hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-ying; Zhu, Wen-hua; Chen, Zhou-wen; Dai, Hong-lei; Ren, Jing-jing; Chen, Jian-hua; Chen, Lei-qian; Fang, Li-zheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between metabolic syndrome and hyperuricemia. Methods: A total of 2 374 subjects who received health examination in our hospital from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2006 were enrolled in our study. Hyperuricemia is defined as ≥7 mg/dl (in men) or ≥6.0 mg/dl (in women). Metabolic syndrome was defined using AHA/NHLBI (American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) criteria. Results: (1) The overall prevalence of hyperuricemia was 13.10%. The condition was more common in men than in women (19.07% vs 3.42%). (2) Among men, uric acid concentration is statistically significantly positively correlated with waist circumference, blood pressure, and triglyceride. Uric acid is negatively correlated with serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). Uric acid concentration is most strongly correlated with serum triglyceride (r=0.379) and waist circumference (r=0.297). Among women, statistically significant positive correlations were noted for the serum uric acid concentrations with waist circumference, triglyceride and fasting plasma glucose. Serum triglyceride (r=0.329) and waist circumference (r=0.234) are most strongly correlated with uric acid concentrations. (3) Men with hyperuricemia had a 1.634-fold increased risk of metabolic syndrome as compared with those without hyperuricemia [odds ratio (OR)=1.634, P=0.000]. Women with hyperuricemia had a 1.626-fold increased risk of metabolic syndrome (OR=1.626, P=0.000) as compared with those without hyperuricemia. Conclusion: Hyperuricemia is prevalent among Chinese population. Additionally, serum uric acid is positively associated with metabolic syndrome. PMID:17657863

  13. Historical perspectives of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oda, Eiji

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) or insulin resistance syndrome is a constellation of obesity-related metabolic derangements predisposing to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In 1998, WHO defined the first criteria of MetS. Three years later, the user-friendly National Cholesterol Education Program criteria of MetS were proposed. Different criteria were issued by the International Diabetes Federation in 2005, making abdominal obesity a necessary component. Several international societies, including The International Diabetes Federation, jointly adopted the revised National Cholesterol Education Program criteria as harmonizing criteria of MetS in 2009. WHO warned the next year that MetS has limited practical utility as a management tool. Adipose tissue inflammation has been shown to be a fundamental mechanism of metabolic derangements, associated with ectopic lipid deposit and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle and the liver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sleep symptoms predict the development of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Troxel, Wendy M; Buysse, Daniel J; Matthews, Karen A; Kip, Kevin E; Strollo, Patrick J; Hall, Martica; Drumheller, Oliver; Reis, Steven E

    2010-12-01

    Sleep complaints are highly prevalent and associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. This is the first prospective study to report the association between commonly reported sleep symptoms and the development of the metabolic syndrome, a key CVD risk factor. Participants were from the community-based Heart Strategies Concentrating on Risk Evaluation study. The sample was comprised of 812 participants (36% African American; 67% female) who were free of metabolic syndrome at baseline, had completed a baseline sleep questionnaire, and had metabolic syndrome evaluated 3 years after baseline. Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was measured cross-sectionally using a portable monitor in a subset of 290 participants. Logistic regression examined the risk of developing metabolic syndrome and its components according to individual sleep symptoms and insomnia syndrome. Specific symptoms of insomnia (difficulty falling asleep [DFA] and "unrefreshing" sleep), but not a syndromal definition of insomnia, were significant predictors of the development of metabolic syndrome. Loud snoring more than doubled the risk of developing the metabolic syndrome and also predicted specific metabolic abnormalities (hyperglycemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). With further adjustment for AHI or the number of metabolic abnormalities at baseline, loud snoring remained a significant predictor of metabolic syndrome, whereas DFA and unrefreshing sleep were reduced to marginal significance. Difficulty falling asleep, unrefreshing sleep, and, particularly, loud snoring, predicted the development of metabolic syndrome in community adults. Evaluating sleep symptoms can help identify individuals at risk for developing metabolic syndrome.

  15. [Nutrition, metabolic syndrome and morbid obesity].

    PubMed

    Ruano Gil, M; Silvestre Teruel, V; Aguirregoicoa García, E; Criado Gómez, L; Duque López, Y; García-Blanch, G

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, and specifically morbid obesity (MO), is a chronic disease with serious health consequences related to the associated comorbidities and constitutes a leading risk factor for the metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the present study we analyze the abnormalities related to MO in the plasmatic levels of nutrients (both macro and micronutrients). We retrospectively evaluated data of 497 patients, 369 women and 128 men diagnosed of MO. The average age of the patients was 40.07 (rank: 16-62). Previous to the study anthropometric measures, blood pressure (BP) and plasma levels of insulin and macronutrients and micronutrients were measured. The higher body mass index (BMI) in women and the waist circumference (WC) in both sexes demonstrates the existence of visceral obesity. Hypertensive disease (HD) was found in 18.6% of men and 33.5% of women. 55.1% of the men and 42.3% of the women had three or more criteria defining the risk of developing MetS. We found hyperglycemia, insulinemia and dyslipemia. We did not find protein malnutrition, but there were elevated values of reactive C-protein. Biochemical indicators of macro and micronutrients were not altered. The high incidence of patients with HD, carriers of three or more criteria that defines the metabolic syndrome (SM), suggests that a very significant part of our patients suffered the metabolic syndrome (MS). The term metabolic syndrome defines the group of factors of metabolic risk of CVD, which is confirmed by the elevated levels of reactive C-protein. We did not find abnormalities in the plasmatic levels of biochemical markers of nutrients.

  16. Nitric oxide and mitochondria in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Litvinova, Larisa; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Fattakhov, Nikolai; Vasilenko, Mariia; Zatolokin, Pavel; Kirienkova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders that collectively increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in the pathogeneses of MS components and is involved in different mitochondrial signaling pathways that control respiration and apoptosis. The present review summarizes the recent information regarding the interrelations of mitochondria and NO in MS. Changes in the activities of different NO synthase isoforms lead to the formation of metabolic disorders and therefore are highlighted here. Reduced endothelial NOS activity and NO bioavailability, as the main factors underlying the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in MS, are discussed in this review in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction. We also focus on potential therapeutic strategies involving NO signaling pathways that can be used to treat patients with metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The article may help researchers develop new approaches for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:25741283

  17. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness in Gorgan

    PubMed Central

    Kamkar, Mohammad Zaman; Sanagoo, Akram; Zargarani, Fatemeh; Jouybari, Leila; Marjani, Abdoljalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is commonly associated with cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric mental illness. Hence, we aimed to assess the metabolic syndrome among severe mental illness (SMI). Materials and Methods: The study included 267 patients who were referred to the psychiatric unit at 5th Azar Education Hospital of Golestan University of Medical Sciences in Gorgan, Iran. Results: The mean waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the SMI with metabolic syndrome, but the high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol was significantly lower. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI patients was 20.60%. There were significant differences in the mean of waist circumference, systolic (except for women) and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and fasting blood glucose in men and women with metabolic syndrome when compared with subjects without metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI women was higher than men. The most age distribution was in range of 30-39 years old. The most prevalence of metabolic syndrome was in age groups 50-59 years old. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was increased from 30 to 59 years old. Conclusion: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with SMI in Gorgan is almost similar to those observed in Asian countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was lower than western countries. These observations may be due to cultural differences in the region. It should be mention that the families of mental illness subjects in our country believe that their patients must be cared better than people without mental illness. These findings of this study suggest that mental illness patients are at risk of metabolic syndrome. According to our results, risk factors such as age and gender differences may play an important role in the presence of metabolic syndrome. In our country, women do less

  18. [Water and electrolyte metabolism disturbances in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, V N; Alekseev, A V; Agaverdiev, A F; Ishemgulov, R R

    2012-01-01

    Taking into account the high prevalence of renal disease in metabolic syndrome (MS), relationship between the reduction of the renal function and severity of disorders of lipid metabolism and increased risk of cardiovascular complications, evaluation of electrolyte and nitrogen metabolism was performed for 112 patients with MS. In addition, serum levels ofaldosterone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, cortisol, beta2-microglobulin, vasopressin, and level of microalbumin in urine were assessed. MS patients showed a reduction of the daily expression of the main osmotically active substance - urea, potassium, sodium and chloride. The increased production of antidiuretic hormone and related water retention, increased microalbumin excretion, indicating the development of systemic endothelial dysfunction and glomerular hyperfiltration, were detected. Reported violations are developing by type of "vicious circle": fluid retention leads to hyperfiltration, renal dysfunction exacerbates water-electrolyte disorders.

  19. Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Akhlaq A; Farooqui, Tahira; Panza, Francesco; Frisardi, Vincenza

    2012-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of common pathologies: abdominal obesity linked to an excess of visceral fat, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. At the molecular level, metabolic syndrome is accompanied not only by dysregulation in the expression of adipokines (cytokines and chemokines), but also by alterations in levels of leptin, a peptide hormone released by white adipose tissue. These changes modulate immune response and inflammation that lead to alterations in the hypothalamic 'bodyweight/appetite/satiety set point,' resulting in the initiation and development of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for neurological disorders such as stroke, depression and Alzheimer's disease. The molecular mechanism underlying the mirror relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders is not fully understood. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that all cellular and biochemical alterations observed in metabolic syndrome like impairment of endothelial cell function, abnormality in essential fatty acid metabolism and alterations in lipid mediators along with abnormal insulin/leptin signaling may represent a pathological bridge between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the involvement of brain in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, but also to link the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome with neurochemical changes in stroke, Alzheimer's disease and depression to a wider audience of neuroscientists with the hope that this discussion will initiate more studies on the relationship between metabolic syndrome and neurological disorders. © Springer Basel AG 2011

  20. [Testosterone deficiency, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Miró, Mercè; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-01-15

    Testosterone deficiency in adult age is associated with a decrease in libido, energy, hematocrit, muscle mass and bone mineral density, as well as with depression. More recently, testosterone deficiency has also been associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome, which in turn is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. AMPK, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, Neil B; Carling, David; Prentki, Marc; Cacicedo, José M

    2013-07-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) and hyperinsulinemia are hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome, as are central adiposity, dyslipidemia, and a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and certain cancers. Regular exercise and calorie restriction have long been known to increase insulin sensitivity and decrease the prevalence of these disorders. The subsequent identification of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its activation by exercise and fuel deprivation have led to studies of the effects of AMPK on both IR and metabolic syndrome-related diseases. In this review, we evaluate this body of literature, with special emphasis on the hypothesis that dysregulation of AMPK is both a pathogenic factor for these disorders in humans and a target for their prevention and therapy.

  2. Presence of Metabolic Syndrome in Football Linemen

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Jackie L; Calland, Doug; Hanks, Fiona; Johnston, Bruce; Pester, Benjamin; Sweeney, Robert; Thorne, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Context: Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of symptoms associated with abdominal obesity that demonstrates a high risk for cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. Objective: To evaluate football linemen in National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III schools for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute criteria as well as to document other related biomarkers. Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting: Three university locations on the first full day of football camp in early morning. Patients or Other Participants: Of 76 football linemen, 70 were able to provide blood samples. Main Outcome Measure(s): Height, mass, blood pressure, upper-body skinfolds, and waist circumference were measured at various stations. Two small venous samples of blood were collected and analyzed in a hospital laboratory for fasting insulin, glucose, high-density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and glycosylated hemoglobin. The last station was a verbal family history for cardiovascular disease and diabetes; also, athletes filled out a nutrition attitudes questionnaire. Results: Of the 70 athletes, 34 were identified as having metabolic syndrome according to measures of blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting glucose, high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. The mean total cholesterol-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio for the group was 4.95, with 32 participants displaying values higher than 5.0. Twelve volunteers had total cholesterol levels greater than 200 mmol/L, 15 had high levels of C-reactive protein, and 9 had slightly elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin. Conclusions: Although athletes might be assumed to be protected from risks of cardiovascular disease, we found a high incidence of metabolic syndrome and other associated adverse biomarkers for heart disease in collegiate football linemen. Early

  3. Presence of metabolic syndrome in football linemen.

    PubMed

    Buell, Jackie L; Calland, Doug; Hanks, Fiona; Johnston, Bruce; Pester, Benjamin; Sweeney, Robert; Thorne, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of symptoms associated with abdominal obesity that demonstrates a high risk for cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. To evaluate football linemen in National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III schools for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute criteria as well as to document other related biomarkers. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Three university locations on the first full day of football camp in early morning. Of 76 football linemen, 70 were able to provide blood samples. Height, mass, blood pressure, upper-body skinfolds, and waist circumference were measured at various stations. Two small venous samples of blood were collected and analyzed in a hospital laboratory for fasting insulin, glucose, high-density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and glycosylated hemoglobin. The last station was a verbal family history for cardiovascular disease and diabetes; also, athletes filled out a nutrition attitudes questionnaire. Of the 70 athletes, 34 were identified as having metabolic syndrome according to measures of blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting glucose, high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. The mean total cholesterol-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio for the group was 4.95, with 32 participants displaying values higher than 5.0. Twelve volunteers had total cholesterol levels greater than 200 mmol/L, 15 had high levels of C-reactive protein, and 9 had slightly elevated levels of glycosylated hemoglobin. Although athletes might be assumed to be protected from risks of cardiovascular disease, we found a high incidence of metabolic syndrome and other associated adverse biomarkers for heart disease in collegiate football linemen. Early screening, awareness, and intervention may have favorable effects on the overall health outcomes of football linemen.

  4. The Global Epidemic of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saklayen, Mohammad G

    2018-02-26

    Metabolic syndrome, variously known also as syndrome X, insulin resistance, etc., is defined by WHO as a pathologic condition characterized by abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Though there is some variation in the definition by other health care organization, the differences are minor. With the successful conquest of communicable infectious diseases in most of the world, this new non-communicable disease (NCD) has become the major health hazard of modern world. Though it started in the Western world, with the spread of the Western lifestyle across the globe, it has become now a truly global problem. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is often more in the urban population of some developing countries than in its Western counterparts. The two basic forces spreading this malady are the increase in consumption of high calorie-low fiber fast food and the decrease in physical activity due to mechanized transportations and sedentary form of leisure time activities. The syndrome feeds into the spread of the diseases like type 2 diabetes, coronary diseases, stroke, and other disabilities. The total cost of the malady including the cost of health care and loss of potential economic activity is in trillions. The present trend is not sustainable unless a magic cure is found (unlikely) or concerted global/governmental/societal efforts are made to change the lifestyle that is promoting it. There are certainly some elements in the causation of the metabolic syndrome that cannot be changed but many are amenable for corrections and curtailments. For example, better urban planning to encourage active lifestyle, subsidizing consumption of whole grains and possible taxing high calorie snacks, restricting media advertisement of unhealthy food, etc. Revitalizing old fashion healthier lifestyle, promoting old-fashioned foods using healthy herbs rather than oil and sugar, and educating people about choosing healthy/wholesome food over junks

  5. Berry Fruit Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vendrame, Stefano; Del Bo', Cristian; Ciappellano, Salvatore; Riso, Patrizia; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy

    2016-09-30

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of risk factors which often includes central obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, as well as a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-thrombotic environment. This leads to a dramatically increased risk of developing type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death both in the United States and worldwide. Increasing evidence suggests that berry fruit consumption has a significant potential in the prevention and treatment of most risk factors associated with Metabolic Syndrome and its cardiovascular complications in the human population. This is likely due to the presence of polyphenols with known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, such as anthocyanins and/or phenolic acids. The present review summarizes the findings of recent dietary interventions with berry fruits on human subjects with or at risk of Metabolic Syndrome. It also discusses the potential role of berries as part of a dietary strategy which could greatly reduce the need for pharmacotherapy, associated with potentially deleterious side effects and constituting a considerable financial burden.

  6. Nutritional adequacy in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mesquita de Carvalho, Cláudia; Dias Mendonça, Dayana; Haas Piovesan, Carla; Edler Macagnan, Fabrício; Pandolfo Feoli, Ana Maria

    2014-11-16

    The nutritional approach in the treatment of metabolic syndrome is a fundamental factor. It is important to raise awareness to patients about the benefits of following the treatments when you want to promote changes in lifestyle. The aim of this study was to assess nutritional adequacy in subjects with metabolic syndrome according to the dietary recommendations prescribed. Quasi-experimental research with 72 subjects with metabolic syndrome, held in southern Brazil. A nutritional orientation was conducted, related or not with physical exercise for three months. A 24-hour recall and two-day food record, were the reference method of dietary intake assessment. Nutritional adequacy was determined by the energy and nutrient intakes as defined by the Brazilian Food Guide Pyramid groups. Volunteers reached on average 80% of the energy consumption recommended. Protein and lipid intake was higher, and carbohydrate consumption was lower than recommended levels. There was a low intake of cereals, vegetables, dairy product and beans (p<0.001) as compared with the recommended servings. A high consumption of meat (p<0.001) and an adequate intake of fruit (p=0.149) were observed. The dietary intake was insufficient to meet the recommendation of energy, although the goal for weight loss was achieved. Still, the results show the need for a balance in food intake and quality of the diet to achieve nutritional adequacy. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic syndrome: definition and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Hari; Ryan, Debra A; Celzo, Ma Florence; Stapleton, Dwight

    2012-01-01

    The collection of impaired glucose metabolism, central obesity, elevated blood pressure, and dyslipidemia is identified as metabolic syndrome (MetS). It is estimated that approximately 25% of the world's population has MetS. In the United States, MetS is more common in men and Hispanics, and its incidence increases with age. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The underlying risk factors include insulin resistance and abdominal obesity. Confusion about MetS exists in part due to the lack of a consensus definition and treatment protocol. Treatment of MetS begins with therapeutic lifestyle changes and then pharmacologic treatment of the syndrome's individual components. Effective interventions include diet modification, exercise, and use of pharmacologic agents to treat risk factors. Weight loss and increasing physical activity significantly improve all aspects of MetS. A diet that includes more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, monounsaturated fats, and low-fat dairy products will benefit most patients with MetS. Physicians can be most effective in advising patients by customizing specific lifestyle recommendations after assessing patients for the presence of risk factors.

  8. Olive Polyphenols and the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saibandith, Bandhita; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Rowland, Ian R; Commane, Daniel M

    2017-06-29

    Here, the effects of consuming polyphenol-rich olive products, including olive leaves, their crude extract, and extra virgin olive oil, on aspects of the metabolic syndrome are reviewed. We have sought to summarize the available scientific evidence from dietary intervention trials demonstrating a role for these phytochemicals in ameliorating aberrant glucose metabolism, high blood pressure and elevated blood lipids, and we discuss the potential mechanisms underpinning these observations. Searches for relevant literature published in English were conducted via PubMed and Science Direct. Based on published dietary intervention studies, there is convincing evidence to show that olive polyphenols, independently of olive lipids, reduce risk factors for metabolic syndrome, in particular by improving blood sugar and blood pressure control, and in reducing low density lipoprotein oxidation. There is more limited evidence to suggest that the consumption of olive polyphenols or related products can reduce body weight and visceral fat or impede weight gain, and similarly there are some limited data suggesting improved lipid profiles. There is some mechanistic data to support observations made in human volunteers, but further work is needed in this area. The consumption of olive polyphenols within the context of a healthy pattern of food intake may, in part, explain the reduced risk of metabolic disease associated with adherence to the Mediterranean diet.

  9. PPARγ Regulation in Hypertension and Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stump, Madeliene; Mukohda, Masashi; Hu, Chunyan; Sigmund, Curt D

    2015-12-01

    Dysregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) activity leads to significant alterations in cardiovascular and metabolic regulation. This is most keenly observed by the metabolic syndrome-like phenotypes exhibited by patients carrying mutations in PPARγ. We will summarize recent findings regarding mechanisms of PPARγ regulation in the cardiovascular and nervous systems focusing largely on PPARγ in the smooth muscle, endothelium, and brain. Canonically, PPARγ exerts its effects by regulating the expression of target genes in these cells, and we will discuss mechanisms by which PPARγ targets in the vasculature regulate cardiovascular function. We will also discuss emerging evidence that PPARγ in the brain is a mediator of appetite and obesity. Finally, we will briefly review how novel PPARγ activators control posttranslational modifications of PPARγ and their prospects to offer new therapeutic options for treatment of metabolic diseases without the adverse side effects of thiazolidinediones which strongly activate transcriptional activity of PPARγ.

  10. Melatonin, mitochondria, and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Vigo, Daniel E

    2017-11-01

    A number of risk factors for cardiovascular disease including hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, obesity, and elevated blood pressure are collectively known as metabolic syndrome (MS). Since mitochondrial activity is modulated by the availability of energy in cells, the disruption of key regulators of metabolism in MS not only affects the activity of mitochondria but also their dynamics and turnover. Therefore, a link of MS with mitochondrial dysfunction has been suspected since long. As a chronobiotic/cytoprotective agent, melatonin has a special place in prevention and treatment of MS. Melatonin levels are reduced in diseases associated with insulin resistance like MS. Melatonin improves sleep efficiency and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, partly for its role as a metabolic regulator and mitochondrial protector. We discuss in the present review the several cytoprotective melatonin actions that attenuate inflammatory responses in MS. The clinical data that support the potential therapeutical value of melatonin in human MS are reviewed.

  11. [Dietary correction of nutrition status in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pogozheva, A V; Derbeneva, A R; Bogdanov, A R; Kaganov, B S

    2009-01-01

    Effectivity was studied of a low-caloric diet in patients with metabolic syndrome. Results of the study show that enrichment of a low-caloric diets in patients with metabolic syndrome improved clinic status, antropometric levels, metabolism and lipid spectrum of blood.

  12. Metabolic syndrome: clinical concept and molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Tohru; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of insulin resistance, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia and is a common basis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated, a practical definition is needed. A worldwide definition that considers increased waist circumference as an essential component has been settled. Visceral fat locates upstream of the liver. Free fatty acids and glycerol derived from visceral fat reach the liver and stimulate lipoprotein synthesis and gluconeogenesis, respectively. The adipose tissue produces a variety of bioactive substances conceptualized as 'adipocytokines'. Overproduction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tumor necrosis factor- seems to relate to the thrombotic and inflammatory tendency. On the other hand, adiponectin, which has antiatherogenic and antidiabetic activities, is reduced in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In Japan, the waist circumference criterion based on visceral fat accumulation has been adopted. The concept of this syndrome has been widely publicized, and health promotion programs based on the concept have commenced in various areas of the country. Such 'Adipo-Do-It' movement is an incentive to encourage physical exercise to reduce visceral fat and is a big challenge to prevent life-style-related diseases and CVD.

  13. Pharmacological treatment and therapeutic perspectives of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo; Eckel, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a disorder based on insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome is diagnosed by a co-occurrence of three out of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressures, elevated glucose, high triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Clinical implication of metabolic syndrome is that it increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome has increased globally, particularly in the last decade, to the point of being regarded as an epidemic. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the USA is estimated to be 34% of adult population. Moreover, increasing rate of metabolic syndrome in developing countries is dramatic. One can speculate that metabolic syndrome is going to induce huge impact on our lives. The metabolic syndrome cannot be treated with a single agent, since it is a multifaceted health problem. A healthy lifestyle including weight reduction is likely most effective in controlling metabolic syndrome. However, it is difficult to initiate and maintain healthy lifestyles, and in particular, with the recidivism of obesity in most patients who lose weight. Next, pharmacological agents that deal with obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia can be used singly or in combination: anti-obesity drugs, thiazolidinediones, metformin, statins, fibrates, renin-angiotensin system blockers, glucagon like peptide-1 agonists, sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibitors, and some antiplatelet agents such as cilostazol. These drugs have not only their own pharmacologic targets on individual components of metabolic syndrome but some other properties may prove beneficial, i.e. anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative. This review will describe pathophysiologic features of metabolic syndrome and pharmacologic agents for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, which are currently available.

  14. Accessing Autonomic Function Can Early Screen Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Meng; Li, Mian; Yang, Zhi; Xu, Min; Xu, Yu; Lu, Jieli; Chen, Yuhong; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang; Bi, Yufang

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is time-consuming and invasive. Convenient instruments that do not require laboratory or physical investigation would be useful in early screening individuals at high risk of metabolic syndrome. Examination of the autonomic function can be taken as a directly reference and screening indicator for predicting metabolic syndrome. Methodology and Principal Findings The EZSCAN test, as an efficient and noninvasive technology, can access autonomic function through measuring electrochemical skin conductance. In this study, we used EZSCAN value to evaluate autonomic function and to detect metabolic syndrome in 5,887 participants aged 40 years or older. The EZSCAN test diagnostic accuracy was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Among the 5,815 participants in the final analysis, 2,541 were diagnosed as metabolic syndrome and the overall prevalence was 43.7%. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased with the elevated EZSCAN risk level (p for trend <0.0001). Moreover, EZSCAN value was associated with an increase in the number of metabolic syndrome components (p for trend <0.0001). Compared with the no risk group (EZSCAN value 0–24), participants at the high risk group (EZSCAN value: 50–100) had a 2.35 fold increased risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome after the multiple adjustments. The area under the curve of the EZSCAN test was 0.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.61–0.64) for predicting metabolic syndrome. The optimal operating point for the EZSCAN value to detect a high risk of prevalent metabolic syndrome was 30 in this study, while the sensitivity and specificity were 71.2% and 46.7%, respectively. Conclusions and Significance In conclusion, although less sensitive and accurate when compared with the clinical definition of metabolic syndrome, we found that the EZSCAN test is a good and simple screening technique for early predicting metabolic syndrome. PMID:22916265

  15. Connexins, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hamelin, Romain; Allagnat, Florent; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    Diabetes and the related metabolic syndrome are multi system disorders that result from improper interactions between various cell types. Even though the underlying mechanism remains to be fully understood, it is most likely that both the long and the short distance range cell interactions, which normally ensure the physiologic functioning of the pancreas, and its relationships with the insulin-targeted organs, are altered. This review focuses on the short-range type of interactions that depend on the contact between adjacent cells and, specifically, on the interactions that are dependent on connexins. The widespread distribution of these membrane proteins, their multiple modes of action, and their interactions with conditions/molecules associated to both the pathogenesis and the treatment of the 2 main forms of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, make connexins an essential part of the chain of events that leads to metabolic diseases. Here, we review the present state of knowledge about the molecular and cell biology of the connexin genes and proteins, their general mechanisms of action, the roles specific connexin species play in the endocrine pancreas and the major insulin-targeted organs, under physiological and patho-physiological conditions.

  16. Metabolic syndrome and renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-Ming; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2014-07-29

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities, which has been regarded as a pivotal risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies focusing on the relationship between MS and cancer have recognized the significant role of MS on carcinogenesis. Likewise, growing evidence suggests that MS has a strong association with increased renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk. This review outlines the link between MS and RCC, and some underlying mechanisms responsible for MS-associated RCC. A National Center for Biotechnology Information PubMed search (http://www.pubmed.gov) was conducted using medical subject headings 'metabolic syndrome', 'obesity', 'hypertension', 'diabetes', 'dyslipidemia', and 'renal cell carcinoma'. This revealed that a variety of molecular mechanisms secondary to MS are involved in RCC formation, progression, and metastasis. A deeper understanding of these molecular mechanisms may provide some strategies for the prevention and treatment of RCC. In summary, there is a large body of evidence regarding the link between MS and RCC, within which each component of MS is considered to have a close causal association with RCC.

  17. Relationship between peripheral arterial disease and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maksimovic, Milos; Vlajinac, Hristina; Radak, Djordje; Marinkovic, Jelena; Jorga, Jagoda

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among 388 patients with peripheral arterial disease, to determine the relationship between the number of metabolic syndrome components (metabolic syndrome score) and the degree of established and some of the emerging vascular risk factors, and to estimate whether there was any relationship of metabolic syndrome score and other vascular risk factors with the severity of peripheral arterial disease clinical manifestations. Metabolic syndrome was present in 59.8% of the patients with peripheral arterial disease. All metabolic syndrome components were significantly related to metabolic syndrome score. The same was true for the body weight, body mass index, percentage of body fat, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, uric acid, and percentage of patients with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. The metabolic syndrome score was also significantly, but inversely, related to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smoking. The degree of peripheral arterial disease clinical manifestations was not related to metabolic syndrome score, but gangrene was significantly positively associated with increased fasting glucose, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and lower education.

  18. Metabolic syndrome induced by anticancer treatment in childhood cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Chueh, Hee Won; Yoo, Jae Ho

    2017-06-01

    The number of childhood cancer survivors is increasing as survival rates improve. However, complications after treatment have not received much attention, particularly metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome comprises central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance, and cancer survivors have higher risks of cardiovascular events compared with the general population. The mechanism by which cancer treatment induces metabolic syndrome is unclear. However, its pathophysiology can be categorized based on the cancer treatment type administered. Brain surgery or radiotherapy may induce metabolic syndrome by damaging the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, which may induce pituitary hormone deficiencies. Local therapy administered to particular endocrine organs directly damages the organs and causes hormone deficiencies, which induce obesity and dyslipidemia leading to metabolic syndrome. Chemotherapeutic agents interfere with cell generation and growth, damage the vascular endothelial cells, and increase the cardiovascular risk. Moreover, chemotherapeutic agents induce oxidative stress, which also induces metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity caused by cancer treatment or the cancer itself, dietary restrictions, and the frequent use of antibiotics may also be risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Since childhood cancer survivors with metabolic syndrome have higher risks of cardiovascular events at an earlier age, early interventions should be considered. The optimal timing of interventions and drug use has not been established, but lifestyle modifications and exercise interventions that begin during cancer treatment might be beneficial and tailored education and interventions that account for individual patients' circumstances are needed. This review evaluates the recent literature that describes metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors, with a focus on its pathophysiology.

  19. Metabolic Syndrome: Systems Thinking in Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Dommermuth, Ron; Ewing, Kristine

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors. MetS is associated with approximately 4-fold increase in the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and a 2-fold increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease complications. MetS is a progressive, proinflammatory, prothrombotic condition that manifests itself along a broad spectrum of disease. It is associated with hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, fatty liver disease, gout, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Intervening in and reversing the pathologic process become more difficult as the disease progresses, highlighting the needs for increased individual and community surveillance and primary prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic syndrome: is immunosuppression to blame?

    PubMed

    Watt, Kymberly D

    2011-11-01

    1. Metabolic syndrome (MS) is common after liver transplantation and has been associated with increased risks of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular death, liver-related death, and overall mortality. 2. Immunosuppression may increase the frequency of hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and hypertension and thus increase the risk and prevalence of MS after transplantation. 3. Corticosteroids are associated with increased rates of diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in the short term. These agents are now being used perhaps less frequently and certainly for shorter durations; therefore, the long-term effects on metabolic morbidities may be reduced. 4. Calcineurin inhibitors and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors affect many MS parameters to various degrees and contribute to long-term morbidity after transplantation. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  1. Salivary Amylase: Digestion and Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peyrot des Gachons, Catherine; Breslin, Paul A S

    2016-10-01

    Salivary amylase is a glucose-polymer cleavage enzyme that is produced by the salivary glands. It comprises a small portion of the total amylase excreted, which is mostly made by the pancreas. Amylases digest starch into smaller molecules, ultimately yielding maltose, which in turn is cleaved into two glucose molecules by maltase. Starch comprises a significant portion of the typical human diet for most nationalities. Given that salivary amylase is such a small portion of total amylase, it is unclear why it exists and whether it conveys an evolutionary advantage when ingesting starch. This review will consider the impact of salivary amylase on oral perception, nutrient signaling, anticipatory metabolic reflexes, blood sugar, and its clinical implications for preventing metabolic syndrome and obesity.

  2. Should the metabolic syndrome patient with prediabetes be offered pharmacotherapy?

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Shannon D; Ratner, Robert E

    2011-04-01

    Impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance reflect perturbations in glucose metabolism and define a prediabetic state in which risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increased. There is overlap between prediabetes and the metabolic syndrome, which itself increases the risk for T2DM and cardiovascular disease. The utility of medical interventions to prevent progression to diabetes in prediabetic individuals, many of whom also manifest metabolic syndrome, has been examined in several large clinical trials. Intensive lifestyle intervention consistently results in drastic reductions in the incidence of T2DM and reversal of metabolic syndrome. Additionally, pharmacotherapies-including metformin, acarbose, thiazolidinediones, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists, and renin-angiotensin inhibitors-also reduce diabetes incidence with variable effects on metabolic syndrome components. Taken together, we recommend that prediabetic patients undergo intensive lifestyle intervention, with the addition of pharmacotherapy based on the presence of specific features of the metabolic syndrome, for diabetes prevention.

  3. Metabolic phenotyping and systems biology approaches to understanding metabolic syndrome and fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Kinross, James; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, is becoming an increasing global health concern. Insulin resistance is often associated with metabolic syndrome and also typical hepatic manifestations such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Profiling of metabolic products (metabolic phenotyping or metabotyping) has provided new insights into metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Data from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry combined with statistical modeling and top-down systems biology have allowed us to analyze and interpret metabolic signatures in terms of metabolic pathways and protein interaction networks and to identify the genomic and metagenomic determinants of metabolism. For example, metabolic phenotyping has shown that relationships between host cells and the microbiome affect development of the metabolic syndrome and fatty liver disease. We review recent developments in metabolic phenotyping and systems biology technologies and how these methodologies have provided insights into the mechanisms of metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We discuss emerging areas of research in this field and outline our vision for how metabolic phenotyping could be used to study metabolic syndrome and fatty liver disease. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Consequences of metabolic syndrome on postoperative outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Zarzavadjian Le Bian, Alban; Fuks, David; Chopinet, Sophie; Gaujoux, Sébastien; Cesaretti, Manuela; Costi, Renato; Belgaumkar, Ajay P; Smadja, Claude; Gayet, Brice

    2017-05-07

    To analyze immediate postoperative outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy regarding metabolic syndrome. In two academic centers, postoperative outcomes of patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy from 2002 to 2014 were prospectively recorded. Patients presenting with metabolic syndrome [defined as at least three criteria among overweight (BMI ≥ 28 kg/m²), diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia] were compared to patients without metabolic syndrome. Among 270 consecutive patients, 29 (11%) presented with metabolic syndrome. In univariable analysis, patients with metabolic syndrome were significantly older (69.4 years vs 62.5 years, P = 0.003) and presented more frequently with soft pancreas (72% vs 22%, P = 0.0001). In-hospital morbidity (83% vs 71%) and mortality (7% vs 6%) did not differ in the two groups so as pancreatic fistula rate (45% vs 30%, P = 0.079) and severity of pancreatic fistula ( P = 0.257). In multivariable analysis, soft pancreas texture ( P = 0.001), pancreatic duct diameter < 3 mm ( P = 0.025) and BMI > 30 kg/m² ( P = 0.041) were identified as independent risk factors of pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy, but not metabolic syndrome. In spite of logical reasoning and appropriate methodology, present series suggests that metabolic syndrome does not jeopardize postoperative outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Therefore, definition of metabolic syndrome seems to be inappropriate and fatty pancreas needs to be assessed with an international consensual histopathological classification.

  5. Metabolic syndrome among patients receiving clozapine: A preliminary estimate

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Nebhinani, Naresh; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit; Kulhara, Parmanand

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients receiving clozapine. Materials and Methods: For this study, 100 patients attending the psychiatry outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital who were receiving clozapine for more than three months were evaluated for the presence of metabolic syndrome using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP-III) criteria. Results: Forty-six patients fulfilled IDF criteria and 47 met modified NCEP ATP-III criteria of metabolic syndrome. There was significant correlation between these two sets of criteria used to define the metabolic syndrome (Kappa value –0.821, P < 0.001). Among the individual parameters studied, increased waist circumference was the most common abnormality, followed by abnormal blood glucose levels and elevated triglyceride levels. All these abnormalities were seen in more than half (52-61%) of the patients. When the sample was divided into two groups, i.e., those with and without metabolic syndrome, patients with metabolic syndrome had significantly higher body mass index and had spent more time in school. Logistic regression analysis revealed that these two variables together explained about 19% of the variance in metabolic syndrome (adjusted r2 = 0193; F = 12.8; P < 0.001). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in subjects receiving clozapine. PMID:22022007

  6. Tea and cinnamon polyphenols improve the metabolic syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The metabolic syndrome is often a precursor of chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. Since the metabolic syndrome is multi-factorial, strategies for reducing its incidence and consequences must also be mult...

  7. Arginase inhibition alleviates hypertension in the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    El-Bassossy, Hany M; El-Fawal, Rania; Fahmy, Ahmed; Watson, Malcolm L

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose We have previously shown that arginase inhibition alleviates hypertension associated with in a diabetic animal model. Here, we investigated the protective effect of arginase inhibition on hypertension in metabolic syndrome. Experimental Approach Metabolic syndrome was induced in rats by administration of fructose (10% in drinking water) for 12 weeks to induce vascular dysfunction. Three arginase inhibitors (citrulline, norvaline and ornithine) were administered daily in the last 6 weeks of study before and tail BP was recorded in conscious animals. Concentration response curves for phenylephrine (PE), KCl and ACh in addition to ACh-induced NO generation were obtained in thoracic aorta rings. Serum glucose, insulin, uric acid and lipid profile were determined as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and arginase activity. Key Results Arginase activity was elevated in metabolic syndrome while significantly inhibited by citrulline, norvaline or ornithine treatment. Metabolic syndrome was associated with elevations in systolic and diastolic BP, while arginase inhibition significantly reduced elevations in diastolic and systolic BP. Metabolic syndrome increased vasoconstriction responses of aorta to PE and KCl and decreased vasorelaxation to ACh, while arginase inhibition completely prevented impaired responses to ACh. In addition, arginase inhibition prevented impaired NO generation and exaggerated ROS formation in metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, arginase inhibition significantly reduced hyperinsulinaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia without affecting hyperuricaemia or hypercholesterolaemia associated with metabolic syndrome. Conclusions and Implications Arginase inhibition alleviates hypertension in metabolic syndrome directly through endothelial-dependent relaxation/NO signalling protection and indirectly through inhibition of insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridaemia. PMID:23441715

  8. Targeted estrogen delivery reverses the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finan, Brian; Yang, Bin; Ottaway, Nickki; Stemmer, Kerstin; Müller, Timo D; Yi, Chun-Xia; Habegger, Kirk; Schriever, Sonja C; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Kabra, Dhiraj G; Hembree, Jazzminn; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Seeley, Randy J; Hans, Wolfgang; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Tiano, Joseph P; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Zhang, Lianshan; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2012-12-01

    We report the development of a new combinatorial approach that allows for peptide-mediated selective tissue targeting of nuclear hormone pharmacology while eliminating adverse effects in other tissues. Specifically, we report the development of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-estrogen conjugate that has superior sex-independent efficacy over either of the individual hormones alone to correct obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in mice. The therapeutic benefits are driven by pleiotropic dual hormone action to improve energy, glucose and lipid metabolism, as shown by loss-of-function models and genetic action profiling. Notably, the peptide-based targeting strategy also prevents hallmark side effects of estrogen in male and female mice, such as reproductive endocrine toxicity and oncogenicity. Collectively, selective activation of estrogen receptors in GLP-1-targeted tissues produces unprecedented efficacy to enhance the metabolic benefits of GLP-1 agonism. This example of targeting the metabolic syndrome represents the discovery of a new class of therapeutics that enables synergistic co-agonism through peptide-based selective delivery of small molecules. Although our observations with the GLP-1-estrogen conjugate justify translational studies for diabetes and obesity, the multitude of other possible combinations of peptides and small molecules may offer equal promise for other diseases.

  9. Fat-soluble micronutrients and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. MetS prevalence has been associated with diet inadequacy. Conversely, the cumulative incidence of MetS has been inversely associated with a Mediterranean-style diet that includes many different health-beneficial nutrients. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet could reduce or at least stabilize metabolic risk factors. Recent findings Low serum level of fat-soluble micronutrients, such as carotenoids, vitamin (vit) A, D and E, has been linked to MetS. Fat-soluble micronutrients could contribute to prevent MetS thanks to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties (vit E, carotenoids) or to their central role as hormone regulators (vit D) and/or lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis sensors (vit D and E). Summary This review summarizes recent epidemiological studies linking fat-soluble micronutrients to MetS and highlights new evidence on their mechanisms of actions. PMID:28858890

  10. Targeted estrogen delivery reverses the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Brian; Yang, Bin; Ottaway, Nickki; Stemmer, Kerstin; Müller, Timo D; Yi, Chun-Xia; Habegger, Kirk; Schriever, Sonja C; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Kabra, Dhiraj G; Hembree, Jazzminn; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Seeley, Randy J; Hans, Wolfgang; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Tiano, Joseph P; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Zhang, Lianshan; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a new combinatorial approach that allows for peptide-mediated selective tissue targeting of nuclear hormone pharmacology while eliminating adverse effects in other tissues. Specifically, we report the development of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-estrogen conjugate that has superior sex-independent efficacy over either of the individual hormones alone to correct obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in mice. The therapeutic benefits are driven by pleiotropic dual hormone action to improve energy, glucose and lipid metabolism, as shown by loss-of-function models and genetic action profiling. Notably, the peptide-based targeting strategy also prevents hallmark side effects of estrogen in male and female mice, such as reproductive endocrine toxicity and oncogenicity. Collectively, selective activation of estrogen receptors in GLP-1–targeted tissues produces unprecedented efficacy to enhance the metabolic benefits of GLP-1 agonism. This example of targeting the metabolic syndrome represents the discovery of a new class of therapeutics that enables synergistic co-agonism through peptide-based selective delivery of small molecules. Although our observations with the GLP-1–estrogen conjugate justify translational studies for diabetes and obesity, the multitude of other possible combinations of peptides and small molecules may offer equal promise for other diseases. PMID:23142820

  11. Mediators of sympathetic activation in metabolic syndrome obesity.

    PubMed

    Straznicky, Nora E; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Esler, Murray D

    2008-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome represents a major public health burden because of its high prevalence in the general population and its association with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Accumulated evidence based on biochemical, neurophysiologic, and indirect measurements of autonomic activity indicate that visceral obesity and the metabolic syndrome are associated with enhanced sympathetic neural drive and vagal impairment. The mechanisms linking metabolic syndrome with sympathetic activation are complex and not completely understood, and cause-effect relationships need further clarification from prospective trials. Components of the metabolic syndrome that may directly or indirectly enhance sympathetic drive include hyperinsulinemia, leptin, nonesterified fatty acids, proinflammatory cytokines, angiotensinogen, baroreflex impairment, and obstructive sleep apnea. beta-Adrenoceptor polymorphisms have also been associated with adrenoceptor desensitization, increased adiposity, insulin resistance, and enhanced sympathetic activity. Because chronic sympathetic activation contributes to hypertension and its target-organ damage, sympathoinhibition remains an important goal in the therapeutic management of the metabolic syndrome.

  12. Effect of metabolic syndrome on the outcome of corticosteroid injection for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roh, Y H; Lee, B K; Baek, J R; Park, M H; Noh, J H; Gong, H S; Baek, G H

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse peripheral nerve impairment is common in metabolic syndrome: in patients with metabolic syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome this might affect the outcome of treatment by local corticosteroid injection. A total of 55 consecutive patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and metabolic syndrome treated with corticosteroid injection (10 mg triamcinolone acetonide) were age and sex matched with 55 control patients without metabolic syndrome. Grip strength, perception of touch with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaires were assessed at the baseline and at 6, 12 and 24 weeks follow-up. The two groups had similar pre-operative grip strength and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire scores. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire symptom and function scores of the metabolic syndrome group were significantly greater than the control group at 12 and 24 weeks follow-up. Except for significantly greater grip strength at the 12-week follow-up in the control group, there were no significant differences in grip strength between the groups. Semmes-Weinstein monofilament sensory index for the control group was significantly greater than that of the metabolic syndrome group throughout the 24-week follow-up. After 24 weeks, five patients (13%) in the control group and 13 patients (27%) in the metabolic syndrome group had had carpal tunnel surgery. Patients with metabolic syndrome are at risk for poor functional outcome and failure of treatment after corticosteroid injection for carpal tunnel syndrome. Treatment benefits III.

  13. Risk factors of diabetes in North Indians with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pratyush, Daliparthy D; Tiwari, Shalbha; Singh, Saurabh; Singh, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome progresses to diabetes and determinants of this progression like hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and genetic factors have been speculative. The present study was aimed at quantifying the insulin resistance and influence of family history of diabetes in subjects with metabolic syndrome developing prediabetes and diabetes. Consecutive subjects attending the endocrine clinic were evaluated for metabolic syndrome as per definition of International Diabetes Federation, 2005. The family history of diabetes in their first degree relatives was ascertained and Homeostasis model assessment of Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), Homeostasis model assessment for beta cell function (HOMA-B) and Quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) were calculated in 163 subjects enrolled. HOMA-IR was higher (p<0.05) but HOMA-B and QUICKI were lower (p<0.0001) in subjects with metabolic syndrome+prediabetes or diabetes compared to metabolic syndrome with normal glucose tolerance. HOMA-B was lower and prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes was higher in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes than in those without such family history (p<0.05). subjects with metabolic syndrome having prediabetes and diabetes had more severe insulin resistance than those with metabolic syndrome only. Beta cell dysfunction was remarkable and prevalence of prediabetes was high in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes. Both the severity of the insulin resistance and family history of diabetes are therefore proposed to be determinants of diminished Beta cell function leading to diabetes in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Plant-derived therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Brittany L; Raskin, Ilya; Cefalu, William T; Ribnicky, David M

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is defined as a set of coexisting metabolic disorders that increase an individual’s likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Medicinal plants, some of which have been used for thousands of years, serve as an excellent source of bioactive compounds for the treatment of metabolic syndrome because they contain a wide range of phytochemicals with diverse metabolic effects. In order for botanicals to be effectively used against metabolic syndrome, however, botanical preparations must be characterized and standardized through the identification of their active compounds and respective modes of action, followed by validation in controlled clinical trials with clearly defined endpoints. This review assesses examples of commonly known and partially characterized botanicals to describe specific considerations for the phytochemical, preclinical and clinical characterization of botanicals associated with metabolic syndrome. PMID:20872313

  15. Plant-derived therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graf, Brittany L; Raskin, Ilya; Cefalu, William T; Ribnicky, David M

    2010-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome is defined as a set of coexisting metabolic disorders that increase an individual's likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Medicinal plants, some of which have been used for thousands of years, serve as an excellent source of bioactive compounds for the treatment of metabolic syndrome because they contain a wide range of phytochemicals with diverse metabolic effects. In order for botanicals to be effectively used against metabolic syndrome, however, botanical preparations must be characterized and standardized through the identification of their active compounds and respective modes of action, followed by validation in controlled clinical trials with clearly defined endpoints. This review assesses examples of commonly known and partially characterized botanicals to describe specific considerations for the phytochemical, preclinical and clinical characterization of botanicals associated with metabolic syndrome.

  16. Symposium introduction: metabolic syndrome and the onset of cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin-Rong; Blackburn, George L; Walker, W Allan

    2007-09-01

    Diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders are among the most pressing of today's health care concerns. Recent evidence from epidemiologic and basic research studies, as well as translational, clinical, and intervention studies, supports the emerging hypothesis that metabolic syndrome may be an important etiologic factor for the onset of cancer. On March 15-16, 2006, The Harvard Medical School Division of Nutrition hosted the symposium "Metabolic Syndrome and the Onset of Cancer" as a platform to systematically evaluate the evidence in support of this hypothesis. This symposium, which gathered leaders in the fields of metabolism, nutrition, and cancer, will stimulate further research investigating the etiologic role of metabolic syndrome in cancer. Furthermore, it will help to guide the development of effective cancer prevention strategies via nutritional and lifestyle modifications to alleviate metabolic syndrome.

  17. Hepatic Insulin Clearance Is Closely Related to Metabolic Syndrome Components

    PubMed Central

    Pivovarova, Olga; Bernigau, Wolfgang; Bobbert, Thomas; Isken, Frank; Möhlig, Matthias; Spranger, Joachim; Weickert, Martin O.; Osterhoff, Martin; Pfeiffer, Andreas F.H.; Rudovich, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin clearance is decreased in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) for unknown reasons. Subjects with metabolic syndrome are hyperinsulinemic and have an increased risk of T2DM. We aimed to investigate the relationship between hepatic insulin clearance (HIC) and different components of metabolic syndrome and tested the hypothesis that HIC may predict the risk of metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Individuals without diabetes from the Metabolic Syndrome Berlin Brandenburg (MeSyBePo) study (800 subjects with the baseline examination and 189 subjects from the MeSyBePo recall study) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with assessment of insulin secretion (insulin secretion rate [ISR]) and insulin sensitivity. Two indices of HIC were calculated. RESULTS Both HIC indices showed lower values in subjects with metabolic syndrome (P < 0.001) at baseline. HIC indices correlate inversely with waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and OGTT-derived insulin secretion index. During a mean follow-up of 5.1 ± 0.9 years, 47 individuals developed metabolic syndrome and 33 subjects progressed to impaired glucose metabolism. Both indices of HIC showed a trend of an association with increased risk of metabolic syndrome (HICC-peptide odds ratio 1.13 [95% CI 0.97–1.31], P = 0.12, and HICISR 1.38 [0.88–2.17], P = 0.16) and impaired glucose metabolism (HICC-peptide 1.12 [0.92–1.36], P = 0.26, and HICISR 1.31 [0.74–2.33] P = 0.36), although point estimates reached no statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS HIC was associated with different components of metabolic syndrome and markers of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. Decreased HIC may represent a novel pathophysiological mechanism of the metabolic syndrome, which may be used additionally for early identification of high-risk subjects. PMID:24026549

  18. Understanding cachexia as a cancer metabolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Porporato, P E

    2016-02-22

    Metabolic reprogramming occurs in tumors to foster cancer cell proliferation, survival and metastasis, but as well at a systemic level affecting the whole organism, eventually leading to cancer cachexia. Indeed, as cancer cells rely on external sources of nitrogen and carbon skeleton to grow, systemic metabolic deregulation promoting tissue wasting and metabolites mobilization ultimately supports tumor growth. Cachectic patients experience a wide range of symptoms affecting several organ functions such as muscle, liver, brain, immune system and heart, collectively decreasing patients' quality of life and worsening their prognosis. Moreover, cachexia is estimated to be the direct cause of at least 20% of cancer deaths. The main aspect of cachexia syndrome is the unstoppable skeletal muscle and fat storage wasting, even with an adequate caloric intake, resulting in nutrient mobilization - both directly as lipid and amino acids and indirectly as glucose derived from the exploitation of liver gluconeogenesis - that reaches the tumor through the bloodstream. From a metabolic standpoint, cachectic host develops a wide range of dysfunctions, from increased insulin and IGF-1 resistance to induction of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and fat tissue browning resulting in an increased energy expenditure and heat generation, even at rest. For a long time, cachexia has been merely considered an epiphenomenon of end-stage tumors. However, in specific tumor types, such as pancreatic cancers, it is now clear that patients present markers of tissue wasting at a stage in which tumor is not yet clinically detectable, and that host amino acid supply is required for tumor growth. Indeed, tumor cells actively promote tissue wasting by secreting specific factors such as parathyroid hormone-related protein and micro RNAs. Understanding the molecular and metabolic mediators of cachexia will not only advance therapeutic approaches against cancer, but also improve patients' quality of life.

  19. Understanding cachexia as a cancer metabolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Porporato, P E

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming occurs in tumors to foster cancer cell proliferation, survival and metastasis, but as well at a systemic level affecting the whole organism, eventually leading to cancer cachexia. Indeed, as cancer cells rely on external sources of nitrogen and carbon skeleton to grow, systemic metabolic deregulation promoting tissue wasting and metabolites mobilization ultimately supports tumor growth. Cachectic patients experience a wide range of symptoms affecting several organ functions such as muscle, liver, brain, immune system and heart, collectively decreasing patients' quality of life and worsening their prognosis. Moreover, cachexia is estimated to be the direct cause of at least 20% of cancer deaths. The main aspect of cachexia syndrome is the unstoppable skeletal muscle and fat storage wasting, even with an adequate caloric intake, resulting in nutrient mobilization – both directly as lipid and amino acids and indirectly as glucose derived from the exploitation of liver gluconeogenesis – that reaches the tumor through the bloodstream. From a metabolic standpoint, cachectic host develops a wide range of dysfunctions, from increased insulin and IGF-1 resistance to induction of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and fat tissue browning resulting in an increased energy expenditure and heat generation, even at rest. For a long time, cachexia has been merely considered an epiphenomenon of end-stage tumors. However, in specific tumor types, such as pancreatic cancers, it is now clear that patients present markers of tissue wasting at a stage in which tumor is not yet clinically detectable, and that host amino acid supply is required for tumor growth. Indeed, tumor cells actively promote tissue wasting by secreting specific factors such as parathyroid hormone-related protein and micro RNAs. Understanding the molecular and metabolic mediators of cachexia will not only advance therapeutic approaches against cancer, but also improve patients' quality of

  20. Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Retondario, Anabelle; Fernandes, Ricardo; Rockenbach, Gabriele; Alves, Mariane de Almeida; Bricarello, Liliana Paula; Trindade, Erasmo Benicio Santos de Moraes; Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes de

    2018-03-02

    Metabolic syndrome is a multi-causal disease. Its treatment includes lifestyle changes with a focus on weight loss. This systematic review assessed the association between Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome. Data were collected mainly from four databases: PubMed, CENTRAL (Cochrane), Scopus and Web of Knowledge. Keywords related to metabolic syndrome, selenium, as well as metabolic syndrome features were searched. This review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement. A systematic review protocol was registered at PROSPERO (n. 42016046321). Two reviewers independently screened 2957 abstracts. Six studies were included to perform data extraction with standardized spreadsheets. The risk of bias was assessed by using specific tools according to the design of the relevant studies. An assessment was carried out based on the appropriateness of the study reports accordingly to STROBE and the CONSORT-based checklist for each study design. Three studies found no association between Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome; two of them found an inverse association; and one study found a direct association between Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome. One study also showed an inverse association between Selenium intake and the prevalence of high waist circumference, high diastolic blood pressure, and hyperglycaemia in women. Overall, based on the argumentation and results of this study, it is possible to conclude that Selenium intake and metabolic syndrome are not clearly associated in adults and elderly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of Autophagy in Metabolic Syndrome-Associated Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Sidney Y.; Xu, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of multiple metabolic risk factors including abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Over the past decades, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome has increased dramatically, imposing a devastating, pandemic health threat. More importantly, individuals with metabolic syndrome are at an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and overall cardiovascular diseases. One of the common comorbidities of metabolic syndrome is heart anomalies leading to the loss of cardiomyocytes, cardiac dysfunction and ultimately heart failure. Up-to-date, a plethora cell signaling pathways have been postulated for the pathogenesis of cardiac complications in obesity including lipotoxicity, inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis and sympathetic overactivation although the precise mechanism of action underscoring obesity-associated heart dysfunction remains elusive. Recent evidence has indicated a potential role of protein quality control in components of metabolic syndrome. Within the protein quality control system, the autophagy-lysosome pathway is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for bulk degradation of large intracellular organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy has been demonstrated to play an indispensible role in the maintenance of cardiac geometry and function under both physiological and pathological conditions. Accumulating studies have demonstrated that autophagy plays a pivotal role in the etiology of cardiac anomalies under obesity and metabolic syndrome. In this mini review, we will discuss on how autophagy is involved in the regulation of cardiac function in obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:24810277

  2. Pleiotropic genes for metabolic syndrome and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kraja, Aldi T.; Chasman, Daniel I.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josée; Johnson, Andrew D.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Chu, Audrey Y.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Dastani, Zari; Morris, Andrew; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Sun, Yan V.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Vaez, Ahmad; Lin, Honghuang; Ligthart, Symen; Marullo, Letizia; Rohde, Rebecca; Shao, Yaming; Ziegler, Mark A.; Im, Hae Kyung; Schnabel, Renate B.; Jørgensen, Torben; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Stolk, Ronald P.; Snieder, Harold; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Franco, Oscar H.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Richards, J. Brent; Rotimi, Charles; Wilson, James G.; Lange, Leslie; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Nalls, Mike; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Pankow, James S.; Coresh, Josef; Tang, Weihong; Kao, W.H. Linda; Boerwinkle, Eric; Morrison, Alanna C.; Ridker, Paul M.; Becker, Diane M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Larson, Martin G.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Province, Michael A.; Tracy, Russell; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; O’Donnell, Christopher; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Prokopenko, Inga; Meigs, James B.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become a health and financial burden worldwide. The MetS definition captures clustering of risk factors that predict higher risk for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Our study hypothesis is that additional to genes influencing individual MetS risk factors, genetic variants exist that influence MetS and inflammatory markers forming a predisposing MetS genetic network. To test this hypothesis a staged approach was undertaken. (a) We analyzed 17 metabolic and inflammatory traits in more than 85,500 participants from 14 large epidemiological studies within the Cross Consortia Pleiotropy Group. Individuals classified with MetS (NCEP definition), versus those without, showed on average significantly different levels for most inflammatory markers studied. (b) Paired average correlations between 8 metabolic traits and 9 inflammatory markers from the same studies as above, estimated with two methods, and factor analyses on large simulated data, helped in identifying 8 combinations of traits for follow-up in meta-analyses, out of 130,305 possible combinations between metabolic traits and inflammatory markers studied. (c) We performed correlated meta-analyses for 8 metabolic traits and 6 inflammatory markers by using existing GWAS published genetic summary results, with about 2.5 million SNPs from twelve predominantly largest GWAS consortia. These analyses yielded 130 unique SNPs/genes with pleiotropic associations (a SNP/gene associating at least one metabolic trait and one inflammatory marker). Of them twenty-five variants (seven loci newly reported) are proposed as MetS candidates. They map to genes MACF1, KIAA0754, GCKR, GRB14, COBLL1, LOC646736-IRS1, SLC39A8, NELFE, SKIV2L, STK19, TFAP2B, BAZ1B, BCL7B, TBL2, MLXIPL, LPL, TRIB1, ATXN2, HECTD4, PTPN11, ZNF664, PDXDC1, FTO, MC4R and TOMM40. Based on large data evidence, we conclude that inflammation is a feature of MetS and several gene variants show pleiotropic genetic

  3. Natural approaches in metabolic syndrome management.

    PubMed

    Patti, Angelo Maria; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Giglio, Rosaria Vincenza; Nikolic, Dragana; Mannina, Carlo; Castellino, Giuseppa; Chianetta, Roberta; Banach, Maciej; Cicero, Arrigo F G; Lippi, Giuseppe; Montalto, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterized as a group of cardiometabolic risk factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes mellitus and stroke. Treatment strategies include pharmacologic interventions and supplementary (or "alternative") treatments. Nutraceuticals are derived from food sources (isolated nutrients, dietary supplements and herbal products) that are purported to provide health benefits, in addition to providing basic nutritional value. Nutraceuticals are claimed to prevent chronic diseases, improve health, delay the aging process, increase life expectancy, and support the structure and function of the body. The study of the beneficial effects of nutraceuticals in patients with MetS, including product standardization, duration of supplementation and definition of optimal dosing, could help better define appropriate treatment. This review focuses on widely marketed nutraceuticals (namely polyphenols, omega-3 fatty acids, macroelements and vitamins) with clinically demonstrated effects on more than one component of MetS.

  4. Nutritional determinants of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Josse, Andrea R; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2008-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome has attracted interest because of its relevance to major contemporary chronic diseases associated with inactive lifestyles and the abundance of food, both of which have resulted in a way of life which challenges our genetic makeup. Changing the fuel mix by the introduction of more monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, a reduction in saturated fatty acids, an increase in fiber, and the use of low glycemic index slow-release carbohydrate foods may make a difference, as will increasing the amount of vegetable protein and plant foods such as nuts, rich in monounsaturated fatty acids and antioxidant systems. Nevertheless, these supportive measures will be overwhelmed in the absence of calorie restriction combined with adequate energy expenditure. This situation appears to be one where the subsidiary solutions are complex and the central issue is simple.

  5. Natural approaches in metabolic syndrome management

    PubMed Central

    Patti, Angelo Maria; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Giglio, Rosaria Vincenza; Nikolic, Dragana; Mannina, Carlo; Castellino, Giuseppa; Chianetta, Roberta; Banach, Maciej; Cicero, Arrigo F.G.; Lippi, Giuseppe; Montalto, Giuseppe; Toth, Peter P.

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterized as a group of cardiometabolic risk factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes mellitus and stroke. Treatment strategies include pharmacologic interventions and supplementary (or “alternative”) treatments. Nutraceuticals are derived from food sources (isolated nutrients, dietary supplements and herbal products) that are purported to provide health benefits, in addition to providing basic nutritional value. Nutraceuticals are claimed to prevent chronic diseases, improve health, delay the aging process, increase life expectancy, and support the structure and function of the body. The study of the beneficial effects of nutraceuticals in patients with MetS, including product standardization, duration of supplementation and definition of optimal dosing, could help better define appropriate treatment. This review focuses on widely marketed nutraceuticals (namely polyphenols, omega-3 fatty acids, macroelements and vitamins) with clinically demonstrated effects on more than one component of MetS. PMID:29593818

  6. Androgen deficiency and metabolic syndrome in men

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Ashley G.; Zhao, Fujun

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a growing health concern worldwide. Initially a point of interest in cardiovascular events, the cluster of HTN, obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance known as MetS has become associated with a variety of other disease processes, including androgen deficiency and late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Men with MetS are at a higher risk of developing androgen deficiency, and routine screening of testosterone (T) is advised in this population. The pathophysiology of androgen deficiency in MetS is multifactorial, and consists of inflammatory, enzymatic, and endocrine derangements. Many options for the concomitant treatment of both disorders exist. Direct treatment of MetS, whether by diet, exercise, or surgery, may improve T levels. Conversely, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been shown to improve MetS parameters in multiple randomized controlled trials (RTCs). PMID:26816752

  7. Systems Metabolomics for Prediction of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Brandolini, Marion; Pétéra, Mélanie; Grissa, Dhouha; Joly, Charlotte; Lyan, Bernard; Herquelot, Éléonore; Czernichow, Sébastien; Zins, Marie; Goldberg, Marcel; Comte, Blandine

    2017-06-02

    The evolution of human health is a continuum of transitions, involving multifaceted processes at multiple levels, and there is an urgent need for integrative biomarkers that can characterize and predict progression toward disease development. The objective of this work was to perform a systems metabolomics approach to predict metabolic syndrome (MetS) development. A case-control design was used within the French occupational GAZEL cohort (n = 112 males: discovery study; n = 94: replication/validation study). Our integrative strategy was to combine untargeted metabolomics with clinical, sociodemographic, and food habit parameters to describe early phenotypes and build multidimensional predictive models. Different models were built from the discriminant variables, and prediction performances were optimized either when reducing the number of metabolites used or when keeping the associated signature. We illustrated that a selected reduced metabolic profile was able to reveal subtle phenotypic differences 5 years before MetS occurrence. Moreover, resulting metabolomic markers, when combined with clinical characteristics, allowed improving the disease development prediction. The validation study showed that this predictive performance was specific to the MetS component. This work also demonstrates the interest of such an approach to discover subphenotypes that will need further characterization to be able to shift to molecular reclassification and targeting of MetS.

  8. Nutrigenetics, metabolic syndrome risk and personalized nutrition.

    PubMed

    Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Phillips, Catherine M; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of metabolic risk factors reflecting overnutrition and sedentary lifestyle and its increasing prevalence is reaching epidemic proportions. The importance of MetS lies in its close association with the risk of cardiometabolic disease. In this scenario, the principal goals of pharmacological therapy for these patients are to achieve and maintain an optimal cardiometabolic control, including lipids, blood glucose and blood pressure; in order to prevent and treat potential complications. Moreover nutrition has commonly been accepted as a cornerstone of treatment for MetS, with the expectation that an appropriate intake of energy and nutrients will improve its control. However the question arises as to whether dietary therapy may require a more personalised approach. In this regard improvements in genetic analysis have enhanced our understanding of the role of genetics in this dietrelated condition. In this review we will present recent data highlighting the importance of gene-nutrient interactions in the context of MetS risk.

  9. Laminitis and the equine metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip J; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; LaCarrubba, Alison; Ganjam, V K Seshu; Messer, Nat T

    2010-08-01

    Although much has been written about laminitis in the context of its association with inflammatory processes, recognition is growing that most cases of laminitis examined by veterinarians in private practice are those associated with pasture grazing, obesity, and insulin resistance (IR). The term 'endocrinopathic laminitis' has been adopted to classify the instances of laminitis in which the origin seems to be more strongly associated with an underlying endocrinopathy, such as either IR or the influence of corticosteroids. Results of a recent study suggest that obesity and IR represent the most common metabolic and endocrinopathic predispositions for laminitis in horses. IR also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of laminitis that develops when some horses or ponies are allowed to graze pastures at certain times of the year. The term equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) has been proposed as a label for horses whose clinical examination results (including both physical examination and laboratory testing) suggest heightened risk for developing laminitis as a result of underlying IR. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary strategies to reduce metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Catherine J; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by central obesity, dyslipidemias, hypertension, high fasting glucose, chronic low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress. This condition has become an increasing problem in our society where about 34 % of adults are diagnosed with MetS. In parallel with the adult situation, a significant number of children present lipid abnormalities and insulin resistance, which can be used as markers of MetS in the pediatric population. Changes in lifestyle including healthy dietary regimens and increased physical activity should be the first lines of therapy to decrease MetS. In this article, we present the most recent information on successful dietary modifications that can reduce the parameters associated with MetS. Successful dietary strategies include energy restriction and weight loss, manipulation of dietary macronutrients--either through restriction of carbohydrates, fat, or enrichment in beneficial fatty acids, incorporation of functional foods and bioactive nutrients, and adherence to dietary and lifestyle patterns such the Mediterranean diet and diet/exercise regimens. Together, the recent findings presented in this review serve as evidence to support the therapeutic treatment of MetS through diet.

  11. [Fattening diet and metabolic syndrome in Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Hauhouot-Attoungbré, Marie Laure; Yayo, Eric Sagou; Konan, Jean-Louis; Koné, Fatoumata; Siara, Eugénie; Monnet, Dagui

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a particular state of morbidity characterized by the association of several factors contributing to the increase in the cardiovascular risk. This constellation of factors associates the glucose intolerance and its corollary the hyperglycemia, the overweight, the hypertriglyceridemia, the fall of the HDL-cholesterol and arterial hypertension. In Africa, it is difficult to evaluate in the actual prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. The present study aims was to determine the prediction and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a group of nurse--lactating mothers--in Abidjan (Ivory Coast), who were submitted at a particularly rich food lipids. Our populations were composed to 100 lactating women, and we used the definition of « National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III ». The results obtained showed that the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is 7%, and 30% of them are presented an abdominal obesity. Our populations were composed to 100 lactating women, which belong to the Ethie where the habit are to eat, after giving birth, high foods lipids for 6 months. We used the definition of "National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III" to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in this population and see if the diet has a negative influence. The results obtained showed that the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is 7%, and 30% of them are presented an abdominal obesity. The risk to develop a metabolic syndrome in this specific population of nurse is particularly big and it's linked to their eating habits.

  12. [Metabolic syndrome in workers of a second level hospital].

    PubMed

    Mathiew-Quirós, Alvaro; Salinas-Martínez, Ana María; Hernández-Herrera, Ricardo Jorge; Gallardo-Vela, José Alberto

    2014-01-01

    People with metabolic syndrome (20-25 % of the world population) are three times more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke and twice as likely to die from this cause. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in workers of a second level hospital. This was a cross-sectional study with 160 healthcare workers in Monterrey, México. Sociodemographic, anthropometric and biochemical data were obtained to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analysis were carried out in order to assess the relationship between metabolic syndrome and sociodemographic and occupational variables. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among workers was 38.1 %. Nurses were more affected with 32.8 %. Overweight and obesity were prevalent in 78 %. In the logistic regression there was a significant association between metabolic syndrome and not having partner (OR 3.98, 95 % CI [1.54-10.25]) and obesity (OR 4.69, 95 % CI [1.73-12.73]). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity is alarming. Appropriate and prompt actions must be taken in order to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population.

  13. Definition of the metabolic syndrome: current proposals and controversies.

    PubMed

    Reisin, Efrain; Alpert, Martin A

    2005-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome includes a clustering of metabolic derangements that cause affected subjects to have an increased risk for developing diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and, according to recent epidemiologic studies, chronic kidney disease. The present review discusses four definitions of metabolic syndrome published by different national and international committees. In an effort to bridge the differences existent in those classifications, a unified definition that recognizes the increased biologic activity of the upper visceral fatty tissue and the strong association of abdominal obesity as a leading part of metabolic syndrome is proposed herein. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome is reserved for pre-diabetic patients who share the risk of becoming diabetic or developing cardiovascular or chronic kidney disease.

  14. Neprilysin, obesity and the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Standeven, Kristina F.; Hess, Katharina; Carter, Angela M.; Rice, Gillian I.; Cordell, Paul A.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Lu, Bao; Scott, D. Julian; Turner, Anthony J.; Hooper, Nigel M.; Grant, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Neprilysin (NEP), a zinc metallo-endopeptidase, has a role in blood pressure control and lipid metabolism. The present study tested the hypothesis that NEP is associated with insulin resistance and features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a study of 318 healthy human subjects and in murine obesity and investigated NEP production by adipocytes in-vitro. Methods and Results In 318 white European males, plasma NEP was elevated in the MetS and increased progressively with increasing MetS components. Plasma NEP activity correlated with insulin, homeostasis model assessment and body mass index in all subjects (p<0.01). Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting showed that in human pre-adipocytes NEP expression is upregulated 25-30 fold during differentiation into adipocytes. Microarray analysis of mRNA from differentiated human adipocytes confirmed high NEP expression comparable to adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. In a murine model of diet-induced insulin resistance, plasma NEP levels were significantly higher in high fat diet (HFD)-fed compared with normal chow diet (NCD)-fed animals (1642±529 and 820±487 pg/μl, respectively; p<0.01). Tissue NEP was increased in mesenteric fat in HFD compared with NCD-fed mice (p<0.05). NEP knock out mice did not display any changes in insulin resistance, glucose tolerance or body and epididymal fat pad weight compared to wild type mice. Conclusions In humans, NEP activity correlated with body mass index and measures of insulin resistance with increasing levels in subjects with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. NEP protein production in human adipocytes increased during cell differentiation and plasma and adipose tissue levels of NEP were increased in obese insulin resistant mice. Our results indicate that NEP associates with cardio-metabolic risk in the presence of insulin resistance and increases in obesity. PMID:21042321

  15. Atherogenic dyslipidemia associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Scott M

    2006-01-01

    Atherogenic dyslipidemia, a component of metabolic syndrome, is characterized by high levels of apolipoprotein B (apo B)-containing lipoproteins, including very-low-density lipoprotein remnants and small low-density lipoprotein particles, and reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III includes elevations in blood pressure and plasma glucose in the definition of metabolic syndrome, the broader scope of metabolic syndrome includes proinflammatory and prothrombotic states, which derive from the secretory activity of adipose tissue. Abdominal fat can adversely affect insulin action and the disposal of glucose through an increase in the release of free fatty acid, resulting in accumulation of triglyceride in muscle and liver, thereby depressing insulin action and increasing output of apo B-containing lipoproteins. Impaired regulation of adipokines, bioactive substances secreted from adipose tissue, likely produces systemic inflammation, which can promote atherogenesis. Insulin resistance is recognized as an important metabolic defect linking the components of metabolic syndrome. One molecule that may play an important role in metabolic syndrome to regulate metabolic and vascular pathways is the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma). Studies have established PPAR-gamma deficiency as a cause of lipodystrophy and confirmed its adipogenic role. Patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome should undergo global risk assessment for cardiovascular disease and future cardiovascular events to determine an overall treatment strategy.

  16. Stressful life events and incident metabolic syndrome: the Hoorn study.

    PubMed

    Rutters, Femke; Pilz, Stefan; Koopman, Anitra D M; Rauh, Simone P; Pouwer, Frans; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Elders, Petra J; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline M

    2015-01-01

    Stressful life events are associated with the metabolic syndrome in cross-sectional studies, but prospective studies addressing this issue are rare and limited. We therefore evaluated whether the number of stressful life events is associated with incident metabolic syndrome. We assessed the association between the number of stressful life events experienced in the 5 years up until baseline and incident metabolic syndrome after 6.5 years at follow-up in the Hoorn study, a middle-aged and elderly population-based cohort. Participants with prevalent metabolic syndrome at baseline were excluded. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III, including fasting plasma glucose levels, HDL-C levels, triglyceride levels, waist circumference and hypertension. We included 1099 participants (47% male; age 60 ± 7 years). During 6.5 years of follow-up, 238 participants (22%) developed the metabolic syndrome. Logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, education level and follow-up duration showed a positive association between the number of stressful life events at baseline and incident metabolic syndrome [OR 1.13 (1.01-1.27) per event, p = 0.049]. In addition, a Poisson model showed a significant positive association between the number of stressful life events at baseline and the number of metabolic syndrome factors at follow-up [OR 1.05 (1.01-1.11) per event, p = 0.018]. Finally, we observed a significant association between the number of stressful life events at baseline and waist circumference at follow-up [adjusted for confounders β 0.86 (0.39-1.34) cm per event, p < 0.001]. Overall, we concluded that persons who reported more stressful life events at baseline had a significantly increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome during 6.5 years of follow-up, in a middle-aged and elderly population-based cohort.

  17. Biochemical and nutritional markers and antioxidant activity in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernabé García, Juana; Zafrilla Rentero, Pilar; Mulero Cánovas, Juana; Gómez Jara, Purificación; Leal Hernández, Mariano; Abellán Alemán, José

    2014-01-01

    1) Nutritional assessment of the diet followed by patients with metabolic syndrome, and 2) biochemical analysis of the oxidation-reduction level in patients with metabolic syndrome. A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients with metabolic syndrome in Murcia. Fifty-three patients, 33 with and 20 without (control group) metabolic syndrome, were selected. The intervention consisted of completion of a recall survey and a test to nutritionally assess dietary intake. Anthropometric and laboratory variables, including those related to antioxidant activity, were also tested. Antioxidant activity was within normal limits in both groups (1.7 ± 0.2 mmol/L in the control group and 1.8 ± 0.1 mmol/L in the metabolic syndrome group) (NS). Superoxide dismutase levels were not significantly different between the groups. Mean glutathione reductase levels (U/L) were higher in the control group as compared to patients with metabolic syndrome (P<.05). As regards oxidative stress biomarkers, mean isoprostane levels were higher in the control group (4.9 ± 6.2 ng/mL) than in metabolic syndrome patients (3.5 ± 3.9 ng/mL) (P<.05). Oxidized LDL values tended to be higher in metabolic syndrome patients (96 ± 23.2U/L) as compared to the control group (86.2 ± 17.3 U/L), but differences were not significant. There is a trend to a poorer nutritional and biochemical profile in patients with metabolic syndrome, who also tend to have a greater degree of oxidative stress. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. [Clinical analysis of metabolic syndrome in vertiginous diseases].

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Fukuda, Takehiko; Sawai, Yachiyo; Shirota, Shiho; Shimizu, Naoki; Murai, Takayuki; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Fujita, Nobuya; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    To explore the relationship between metabolic syndrome and vertigo, we measured waist circumference, plasma glucose, triglycerides and blood pressure in 333 subjects aged 20-79 years with vertigo. We found overall metabolic syndrome prevalence defined by Japanese diagnostic criteria to be 13.2%, similar to that in other national surveys by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The 6-fold higher prevalence in men over women exceeded that of other reports, however. The highest frequency was in vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) disorders, suggesting that conditions such as VBI in men with vertigo could involve metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for vertigo incidence.

  19. Dietary intake, eating habits, and metabolic syndrome in Korean men.

    PubMed

    Shin, Aesun; Lim, Sun-Young; Sung, Joohon; Shin, Hai-Rim; Kim, Jeongseon

    2009-04-01

    Dietary factors contribute to the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, a disorder associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and some cancers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between the intake frequencies of certain food groups, eating habits, and the risk of metabolic syndrome in a cross-sectional study of Korean men. Study participants were recruited from the National Cancer Center in South Korea. A total of 7,081 men aged 30 years and older were recruited between August 2002 and May 2007. Metabolic syndrome was defined as having three or more of the following conditions: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, high triglyceride level, and high fasting blood glucose level. The association of metabolic syndrome and sociodemographic characteristics, food intake frequencies, and eating habits assessed by a food frequency questionnaire, was examined. The prevalence rate of metabolic syndrome for men aged 30 to 39, 40 to 49, 50 to 59, and 60+ years was 18.2%, 19.8%, 21.9%, and 20.5%, respectively. The study participants with metabolic syndrome had significantly higher family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (27.6% vs 21.6%, P<0.001), and were more likely to be current smokers (50.1% vs 45.3%, P=0.005) than their counterparts. Among food group items, participants with metabolic syndrome showed significantly higher intake of seaweed (odds ratio [OR] 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05 to 1.50), and oily foods (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.57) than participants without metabolic syndrome. In addition, the group with metabolic syndrome was more likely to eat quickly (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.60 to 3.12 for fast vs slow) and to overeat frequently (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.85 to 3.05 for more than 4 times a week vs less than once a week). The results suggest that high intake of seaweed and oily foods as well as eating habits such as eating faster and frequent

  20. Cardiovascular Risk Stratification in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome Without Diabetes or Cardiovascular Disease: Usefulness of Metabolic Syndrome Severity Score.

    PubMed

    Masson, Walter; Epstein, Teo; Huerín, Melina; Lobo, Lorenzo Martín; Molinero, Graciela; Angel, Adriana; Masson, Gerardo; Millán, Diana; De Francesca, Salvador; Vitagliano, Laura; Cafferata, Alberto; Losada, Pablo

    2017-09-01

    The estimated cardiovascular risk determined by the different risk scores, could be heterogeneous in patients with metabolic syndrome without diabetes or vascular disease. This risk stratification could be improved by detecting subclinical carotid atheromatosis. To estimate the cardiovascular risk measured by different scores in patients with metabolic syndrome and analyze its association with the presence of carotid plaque. Non-diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome (Adult Treatment Panel III definition) without cardiovascular disease were enrolled. The Framingham score, the Reynolds score, the new score proposed by the 2013 ACC/AHA Guidelines and the Metabolic Syndrome Severity Calculator were calculated. Prevalence of carotid plaque was determined by ultrasound examination. A Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis was performed. A total of 238 patients were enrolled. Most patients were stratified as "low risk" by Framingham score (64%) and Reynolds score (70.1%). Using the 2013 ACC/AHA score, 45.3% of the population had a risk ≥7.5%. A significant correlation was found between classic scores but the agreement (concordance) was moderate. The correlation between classical scores and the Metabolic Syndrome Severity Calculator was poor. Overall, the prevalence of carotid plaque was 28.2%. The continuous metabolic syndrome score used in our study showed a good predictive power to detect carotid plaque (area under the curve 0.752). In this population, the calculated cardiovascular risk was heterogenic. The prevalence of carotid plaque was high. The Metabolic Syndrome Severity Calculator showed a good predictive power to detect carotid plaque.

  1. Bipolar disorder and metabolic syndrome: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Roger S; Danilewitz, Marlon; Liauw, Samantha S; Kemp, David E; Nguyen, Ha T T; Kahn, Linda S; Kucyi, Aaron; Soczynska, Joanna K; Woldeyohannes, Hanna O; Lachowski, Angela; Kim, Byungsu; Nathanson, Jay; Alsuwaidan, Mohammad; Taylor, Valerie H

    2010-11-01

    The ubiquity and hazards posed by abnormal body composition and metabolic parameters in the bipolar population are a priority research and clinical issue. Herein, we summarize and synthesize international studies describing the rate of US National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III [ATP III])- and International Diabetes Federation (IDF)-defined metabolic syndrome and its criterion components in individuals with bipolar disorder. We conducted a PubMed search of all English-language articles published between January 2005 and July 2009 with the following search terms: metabolic syndrome and bipolar disorder, mania and manic-depression. Articles selected for review were based on adequacy of sample size, the use of standardized experimental procedures, validated assessment measures, and overall manuscript quality. The rate of metabolic syndrome in individuals with bipolar disorder is increased relative to the general population. Disparate estimates are reported ranging from comparability to approximately twofold greater than the general population. The increased hazard for metabolic syndrome amongst bipolar individuals is now documented in twelve countries from Europe, Australia, Asia, North and South America. The co-occurrence of metabolic syndrome in the bipolar population is associated with a more complex illness presentation, less favourable response to treatment, and adverse course and outcome. The association between metabolic syndrome and bipolar disorder is mediated/moderated by both iatrogenic and non-iatrogenic factors. The increased hazard for metabolic syndrome in bipolar populations is due to the clustering of traditional (and emerging) risk factors as well as iatrogenic and health systems factors. Extant data support recommendations for prioritizing, surveillance, prevention, diagnosis and management of metabolic syndrome as routine care

  2. Dietary methyl-consuming compounds and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shi-Sheng; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Li, Da; Lun, Yong-Zhi

    2011-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities including obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Although systemic oxidative stress and aberrant methylation status are known to have important roles in the development of metabolic syndrome, how they occur remains unclear. The metabolism of methyl-consuming compounds generates reactive oxygen species and consumes labile methyl groups; therefore, a chronic increase in the levels of methyl-consuming compounds in the body can induce not only oxidative stress and subsequent tissue injury, but also methyl-group pool depletion and subsequent aberrant methylation status. In the past few decades, the intake amount of methyl-consuming compounds has substantially increased primarily due to pollution, food additives, niacin fortification and high meat consumption. Thus, increased methyl consumers might have a causal role in the development and prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its related diseases. Moreover, factors that decrease the elimination/metabolism of methyl-consuming compounds and other xenobiotics (for example, sweat gland inactivity and decreased liver function) or increase the generation of endogenous methyl-consuming compounds (for example, mental stress-induced increase in catecholamine release) may accelerate the progression of metabolic syndrome. Based on current nutrition knowledge and the available evidence from epidemiological, ecological, clinical and laboratory studies on metabolic syndrome and its related diseases, this review outlines the relationship between methyl supply-consumption imbalance and metabolic syndrome, and proposes a novel mechanism for the pathogenesis and prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its related diseases.

  3. Medicinal agents in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baños, G; Pérez-Torres, I; El Hafidi, M

    2008-10-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) has become a worldwide health problem. It is difficult for patients to follow a diet/exercise regime that would improve their symptoms, therefore the investigation of agents that may deal with its more serious aspects is an important medical field for research. The cardiovascular consequences associated with the syndrome and some of the therapeutic approaches are discussed. The different agents can be divided into several groups: Inorganic/ organic: Zinc complexes with garlic components as insulino-mimetics; Selenium as antioxidant; Copper, Zinc and Manganese as microcomponents of antioxidant enzymes. Organic: Natural or Synthetic: Glycine is effective in lowering blood pressure, TBARS, intra-abdominal fat tissue and triglycerides in sucrose-fed rats. Pharmaceutical products: Fibrates, Lipid-lowering drugs. Antidiabetics. Anti-gout agents. On the other hand there are natural products such as those of animal origin: Sex hormones (also synthetic) used in the problems of menopause and hypoandrogenism frequently found in the MS, antioxidant Omega-3-oils (fish oils) or Vegetal: for example Digitalis pupurea, century-old cardiovascular medication as well as Magnolia officinalis; Spirulina maxima with beneficial effects as antioxidant and lipid-lowering agent, among others. Prickly Pear Cacti. (Opuntia Ficus- Indica Cochlospermum vitifolium (Willd.) Spreng) whose many properties against diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have been empirically known for many years. Perezone (from Perezia plants, a.k.a. Peonia) described as an antiplatelet aggregating agent. The mixed elements in the Mediterranean diet: Fish, salads (peppers, tomatoes), olive oil, garlic, red wine which combines fish oils, garlic and avocado as well as antioxidants from the rest of its components.

  4. Metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents - criteria for diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Marcio C

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a greater concern about the presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. However, there is no consensus regarding the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. It is evident that each component of the syndrome must be identified as early as possible in order to prevent definitive lesions. The question is how to do this and which cut-offs must be adopted for this diagnosis. For a matter of convenience, the definition chosen as the most appropriate is the one proposed by the IDF, with cut-offs fixed for pressure, lipids and glycemia, and abdominal circumference points assessed by percentile. Although on the one hand this definition could fail to include some children in the diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome, on the other hand, it would be of easier acceptance as it does not use multiple tables to assess several anthropometric and metabolic criteria. PMID:19840386

  5. Metabolic syndrome and its components among university students in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mbugua, Samuel Mungai; Kimani, Samuel Thuo; Munyoki, Gilbert

    2017-11-28

    Metabolic syndrome refers to a cluster of interrelated disorders which occur together causing an increase in the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The university population is an understudied group despite the increase in the frequency of related disorders and metabolic risk factors e.g. obesity and diabetes, majorly due to the assumption that they are in their most active phase of life therefore healthy. This study looked at metabolic syndrome, the sedentary lifestyles and dietary habits present among university students attending Mount Kenya University, main campus. Stratified sampling was used to select participants. Self-administered questionnaires were issued to participants after a signed consent had been obtained following which clinical assessments and biochemical measures were performed. They included blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, anthropometric measurements; height, weight, BMI and waist circumference. Pearson's chi-square tests and non-parametric independent t-test were used to analyze the prevalence of metabolic syndrome criteria per gender, the number of metabolic syndrome criteria per BMI and prevalence of metabolic syndrome criteria per BMI category. The study established that 1.9% of the participants met the criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to HJSS criteria. Among the elements, there was statistical difference in gender BMI and waist circumference. 11.8% of subjects had two metabolic syndrome components while 3.1% had three components while none of the subjects had all six components. Elevated triglycerides was the most prevalent defining component for metabolic syndrome. There is a statistically significant relationship between sedentary lifestyle and dietary habits as risk factors to metabolic syndrome. Young adults in university have begun developing metabolic syndrome and the risk of developing the syndrome continues to increase with the

  6. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the Canadian adult population.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Natalie D; Clara, Ian

    2011-10-18

    Metabolic syndrome refers to a constellation of conditions that increases a person's risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We describe the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in relation to sociodemographic factors in the Canadian adult population. We used data from cycle 1 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey, a cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of the population. We included data for respondents aged 18 years and older for whom fasting blood samples were available; pregnant women were excluded. We calculated weighted estimates of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in relation to age, sex, education level and income. The estimated prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 19.1%. Age was the strongest predictor of the syndrome: 17.0% of participants 18-39 years old had metabolic syndrome, as compared with 39.0% of those 70-79 years. Abdominal obesity was the most common component of the syndrome (35.0%) and was more prevalent among women than among men (40.0% v. 29.1%; p=0.013). Men were more likely than women to have an elevated fasting glucose level (18.9% v. 13.6%; p=0.025) and hypertriglyceridemia (29.0% v. 20.0%; p=0.012). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher among people in households with lower education and income levels. About one in five Canadian adults had metabolic syndrome. People at increased risk were those in households with lower education and income levels. The burden of abdominal obesity, low HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol and hypertriglyceridemia among young people was especially of concern, because the risk of cardiovascular disease increases with age.

  7. Circulating Levels of Uric Acid and Risk for Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Morales-López, Herlinda; Garro-Almendaro, Ana K; Vargas-Ayala, German; Durán-Salgado, Montserrat B; Huerta-Ramírez, Saul; Lozano-Nuevo, Jose J

    2017-01-01

    Hyperuricemia leads to insulin resistance, whereas insulin resistance decreases renal excretion of uric acid, both mechanisms link elevated serum uric acid with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the probability for the development of metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults with hyperuricaemia. We evaluated 103 patients less than 40 years of age, from a low-income population, and without history of cardiovascular disease, in all of them the presence of metabolic syndrome was assessed in accordance with the International Diabetes Federation criteria. In all patients, fasting serum uric acid levels were measured; hyperuricaemia was defined as serum uric acid values 6.5 mg/dl in men and 5.1 mg/dl in women. Statistical analysis was performed with odds ratio. 83 of our patients (80.5%) suffered metabolic syndrome, the odds ratio for the presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with hyperuricaemia was 5.1 (p=0.002, I.C 1.8- 14.5). When patients were evaluated by gender a significantly association between hyperuricaemia and metabolic syndrome was found in women (odds ratio 3.6, p=0.048, C.I. 1.0-12.9), and men (odds ratio 10.2, p= 0.015, IC 1.5-13.2). When uric acid was correlated with the components of metabolic syndrome, we only found a positive correlation with waist circumference (r=0.483). Our results showed a significant association between hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults in Mexico. DR is associated with estimated risk of CVD in type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Metabolic syndrome 2 years after laparoscopic gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Guilbert, Lizbeth; Ortiz, Cristian J; Espinosa, Omar; Sepúlveda, Elisa M; Piña, Tatiana; Joo, Paul; Zerrweck, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    The latest diabetes consensus identified obesity as key component of the metabolic syndrome. The role of bariatric surgery over such syndrome has been less explored with a lack of long term studies, and especially among Mexicans. Retrospective study including patients with metabolic syndrome submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass at a single institution with complete data after 24 months. The objective was to analyze the improvement of the syndrome and each component. Demographic, anthropometric, biochemical and clinical parameters were analyzed at 12 and 24 months. Secondarily weight loss and other parameters were also analyzed. Finally, an analysis of syndrome improvement related to weight loss was performed. Sixty-three patients were included. The 2 most common components associated with obesity were reduced HDL and raised glucose or Type 2 diabetes. There was a significant improvement of metabolic syndrome and its components, as well as for the rest of the analyzed data, from the first check point and throughout follow-up. Prevalence of such syndrome was 6.3% at 12 and 24 months. Hypertension and raised glucose or Type 2 diabetes were the components with the greatest and fastest improvement; HDL levels and obesity were the least improved. There was a direct relationship between percentage of excess weight loss or percentage of excess BMI loss, and syndrome's improvement. Patients with metabolic syndrome improved after gastric bypass, with results lasting after 2 years; other metabolic parameters important for cardiovascular risk were also positively affected. There was a relationship between the amount of weight loss and improvement of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Relevance of postprandial lipemia in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2013-11-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is a complex disorder defined by the aggregation of interconnected cardiometabolic risk factors which increase the risk of diabetes mellitus type 2 and cardiovascular disease (CVD). MetS is currently a matter of concern and it will continue to be in the future, since there is likely to be a dramatic increase in its prevalence, and subjects with MetS will have an increased risk of mortality, mainly through CVD. Moreover, the implications on the global health burden and the worldwide epidemic of this complex disorder will impact greatly on socioeconomic cost. MetS is therefore a matter of serious concern and we need to understand its etiology in order to improve strategies of treatment and prevention. In this regard, postprandial lipemia has increased in importance over the last few years as it has been demonstrated to influence the development of atherosclerosis. In addition, in modern times, fasting is not the typical physiological state of humans; in fact, they spend most of the time in the postprandial state. However, although it is obvious that postprandial lipemia is present in conditions of obesity, little is known about the relevance of postprandial lipemia in MetS. In the current review, we will explore some aspects of postprandial lipemia which could be of interest for understanding the pathogenesis of this complex disorder and which may help us advance towards more personalized nutrition.

  10. Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Kari, Jameela A

    2013-03-01

    The association of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) with cardiovascular risk, mortality, type 2 diabetes mellitus, stroke, nonfatty liver disease and gout is well known. However, the association of the MetS with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is now emerging. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathology and potential mechanisms for the relationship of MetS with CKD. Studies show that patients with MetS have a 2.5-fold higher risk of developing CKD. The risk of microalbuminuria is also increased two-fold in the MetS. Renal dysfunction becomes apparent long before the appearance of hypertension or diabetes in MetS. Compared with healthy controls, patients with MetS have increased microvascular disease-tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, arterial sclerosis and global and segmental sclerosis. Studies suggest that the renal fibrosis seen in MetS might be caused by a constellation of insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemias and inflammation, and result in a heightened expression of adipocytokines, angiotensin and inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. Despite the strong association of MetS with CKD, a causal relationship has not been proven. More studies are needed to precisely elucidate the mechanisms that might lead upstream factors such as insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia and inflammation to cause renal fibrosis.

  11. [Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Castro Vilela, María Elena; Quílez Pina, Raquel María; Bonafonte Marteles, José Luis; Morlanes Navarro, Teresa; Calvo Gracia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) according to the definitions of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and its relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD) in hospitalized elderly patients. This descriptive and prospective study (February-March 2011) included 200 consecutive patients hospitalized in a Geriatric Department. Sociodemographic, clinical and biochemical data was collected. The prevalence of MS was 65% (NCEP-ATP III) and 67.5% (IDF) and was greater in women (NCEP-ATP III=72.8%, IDF=73.6%) than in men (NCEP-ATP III=50.7%; IDF=56.3%). The mean age of patients diagnosed with MS by both diagnostic criteria were similar: 84.7 years. MS was not associated with an increased prevalence of CVD. MS is highly prevalent in elderly hospitalized patients, being higher in women, with both diagnostic criteria (NCEP- ATP III and IDF). In our population the MS was not associated with an increased prevalence of CVD. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. On some physiological aspects of ethanol repercussion on neural and cardiorenal functions.

    PubMed

    Araujo Guedes, Rubem Carlos; de Alburquerque Paiva, Ana Maria; Amâncio-dos-Santos, Angela; Vieira-Filho, Leucio Duarte; Oliveira da Paixão, Ana Durce

    2009-12-01

    Chronic ethanol ingestion, mostly in young adults, constitutes a frequent drug-abuse situation, which is associated to a wide variety of pathological disturbance affecting a number of organs, including liver, kidney, heart, pancreas and brain. The ethanol effects are more prominent when occurring at the perinatal period of life, generating, among other disabilities, brain developmental and functional impairments, as well as the so-called "fetal alcoholic syndrome". However, low doses of ethanol, although not producing conspicuous signs of physiological impairment, may affect the developing organism, impairing the renal and cardiovascular system, among others. As a consequence of increased oxidative stress produced by ethanol intake and its subsequent oxidation, lipid peroxidation increases, enhancing reactive oxygen species formation, which is potentially injurious to the brain tissue. When occurring during gestation, lipid peroxidation may occur in the placenta, an event that would partially be responsible for fetal nutrition disturbance and consequently late physiological impairment. In this short review, data on ethanol effects on the nervous and cardiorenal structure and function are analyzed at the light of the most relevant hypotheses concerning ethanol mechanisms of action. Additionally, experimental data from the authors' laboratories are presented and discussed, focusing particular attention to the possibility of differential neural and cardiorenal ethanol effects as a function of the dose used in distinct experimental models.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome and Sexual Function in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Trompeter, Susan E.; Bettencourt, Ricki; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Limited literature suggests sexual dysfunction in women covaries with the metabolic syndrome. This study examined the association of sexual function with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in healthy older women. METHODS 376 postmenopausal, community-dwelling women from the Rancho Bernardo Study (mean baseline age = 73) completed a clinic visit during 1999 – 2002 and returned the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire mailed in 2002. RESULTS 39% reported being sexually active; 41.5 % met a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. The number of metabolic syndrome components was strongly associated with decreased sexual activity, desire, and low sexual satisfaction. Waist girth, diabetes, and hypertension were associated with decreased sexual activity. Elevated triglycerides were associated with low desire. Among the cardiovascular endpoints, heart attack, coronary artery bypass, and angina were associated with decreased sexual activity, but not with sexual desire or satisfaction. Past diagnosis of heart failure, poor circulation, and stroke were not associated with sexual function. Sexually active women with metabolic syndrome met criteria for sexual dysfunction in desire, arousal, orgasm, and satisfaction domains. The FSFI Total Score did not differ significantly between sexually active and inactive women. CONCLUSIONS Metabolic syndrome was associated with decreased sexual activity, desire, and satisfaction in all women and with sexual dysfunction in most domains in sexually active women. Coronary artery disease was more prevalent in women with low sexual activity. PMID:27132570

  14. What is metabolic syndrome, and why are children getting it?

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Ram; Bremer, Andrew A; Lustig, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, altered glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and abdominal obesity) that occur in obese children. However, metabolic syndrome can also occur in lean individuals, suggesting that obesity is a marker for the syndrome, not a cause. Metabolic syndrome is difficult to define, due to its nonuniform classification and reliance on hard cutoffs in the evaluation of disorders with non-Gaussian distributions. Defining the syndrome is even more difficult in children, owing to racial and pubertal differences and lack of cardiovascular events. Lipid partitioning among specific fat depots is associated with insulin resistance, which can lead to mitochondrial overload and dysfunctional subcellular energy use and drive the various elements of metabolic syndrome. Multiple environmental factors, in particular a typical Western diet, drive mitochondrial overload, while other changes in Western society, such as stress and sleep deprivation, increase insulin resistance and the propensity for food intake. These culminate in an adverse biochemical phenotype, including development of altered glucose metabolism and early atherogenesis during childhood and early adulthood. PMID:23356701

  15. Occupation-Related Differences in the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Chaparro, Miguel-Angel; Calvo-Bonacho, Eva; González-Quintela, Arturo; Fernández-Labandera, Carlos; Cabrera, Martha; Sáinz, Juan-Carlos; Fernández-Meseguer, Ana; Banegas, José R.; Ruilope, Luis-Miguel; Valdivielso, Pedro; Román-García, Javier

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the Spanish working population and determine how the prevalence varies according to occupation and sex. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This was a cross-sectional study of 259,014 workers (mean age 36.4 years, range [16–74]; 72.9% male) who underwent a routine medical checkup. The Adult Treatment Panel III (2001) definition for metabolic syndrome was used. RESULTS—The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 11.6% (95% CI 11.5–11.7) in male subjects and 4.1% (4.0–4.2) in female subjects and increased with age. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varied in the different categories of occupational activity depending on the sex considered. Among female subjects, the age-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in blue-collar than in white-collar workers, but this difference was not evident among male workers. CONCLUSIONS—The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varies in the different categories of occupational activity in the Spanish working population. This variation also depends on sex. PMID:18753667

  16. Occupation-related differences in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chaparro, Miguel-Angel; Calvo-Bonacho, Eva; González-Quintela, Arturo; Fernández-Labandera, Carlos; Cabrera, Martha; Sáinz, Juan-Carlos; Fernández-Meseguer, Ana; Banegas, José R; Ruilope, Luis-Miguel; Valdivielso, Pedro; Román-García, Javier

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the Spanish working population and determine how the prevalence varies according to occupation and sex. This was a cross-sectional study of 259,014 workers (mean age 36.4 years, range [16-74]; 72.9% male) who underwent a routine medical checkup. The Adult Treatment Panel III (2001) definition for metabolic syndrome was used. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 11.6% (95% CI 11.5-11.7) in male subjects and 4.1% (4.0-4.2) in female subjects and increased with age. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varied in the different categories of occupational activity depending on the sex considered. Among female subjects, the age-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in blue-collar than in white-collar workers, but this difference was not evident among male workers. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varies in the different categories of occupational activity in the Spanish working population. This variation also depends on sex.

  17. Metabolic Syndrome and Aggressive Prostate Cancer at Initial Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Simona; Tenaglia, Raffaele L

    2017-07-01

    Links between metabolic syndrome and prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy are emerging. The aim of the research was to investigate the association of metabolic syndrome and aggressive prostate malignancy, at initial diagnosis, without the influence of hormonal treatment. Retrospective analysis of 133 patients with prostate tumor diagnosis between 2007 and 2009 was conducted. Patients with prostate cancer were subdivided in 2 groups according to Gleason score: Gleason score≥7 as high-grade prostate tumor (Group 1) and <7 (Group 2) as low-grade prostate tumor. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to International Diabetes Federation and the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute definition. Metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with aggressive prostate cancer (OR 1.87, p<0.05) and a reduced risk of low-grade prostate cancer (OR 0.53, p<0.05) at initial diagnosis, without the influence of endocrine therapy. In our study, patients with metabolic syndrome were more likely to present with more aggressive prostate carcinoma vs. patients without metabolic syndrome. Further research should elucidate these relations in larger samples to confirm these associations and to stabilize future prevention and therapeutic strategies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Effects of head circumference and metabolic syndrome on cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Soo; Eom, Jin-Sup; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Hong, Chang Hyung

    2010-01-01

    Brain volume progressively decreases with an increase in atrophy, and the brain becomes more susceptible to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Metabolic syndrome has also been associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of head circumference and metabolic syndrome on cognitive decline. This study was part of a longitudinal study conducted on Koreans aged 60 years or older. We analyzed a final sample of 596 Korean participants with complete baseline and 2-year follow-up data. The cognitive function of the subjects was assessed using the Korean version of the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Head circumference was measured from the glabella to the occipital protuberance using a measuring tape. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the NCEP-ATP III standards. Central obesity was assessed on the basis of waist-circumference values, in accordance with the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region report on Asians. We used a longitudinal factorial design in which the MMSE score was the dependent variable, and head circumference and metabolic syndrome were considered as factors. After adjusting the results for age, gender, education, height, weight, baseline MMSE, and number of follow-up years, we observed that smaller head circumference and the presence of metabolic syndrome were independently associated with rapid cognitive decline. All these findings suggest that smaller head circumference and the presence of metabolic syndrome have additive effects on cognitive decline. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese Japanese children.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Masao; Tanaka, Satoru; Shimago, Atsushi; Sameshima, Koji; Nishi, Junichiro; Nomura, Yuichi; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Hashiguchi, Jun; Ichiki, Takeo; Shimizu, Shinichiro

    2005-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of and sex differences related to the metabolic syndrome among obese and overweight elementary school children. Subjects were 471 overweight or obese Japanese children. Children meeting at least three of the following five criteria qualified as having the metabolic syndrome: abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, high triglyceride levels, and high fasting glucose levels. Fasting insulin levels were also examined. Japanese obese children were found to have a significantly lower prevalence (17.7%) of the metabolic syndrome than U.S. obese adolescents (28.7%, p = 0.0014). However, Japanese overweight children had a similar incidence (8.7%) of the metabolic syndrome compared with U.S. overweight adolescents (6.8%). Hyperinsulinemia in girls and abdominal obesity in boys are characteristic features of individual metabolic syndrome factors in Japanese children. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is not lower in preteen Japanese overweight children than in U.S. overweight adolescents, although it is significantly lower in Japanese obese preteen children than in U.S. obese adolescents. Primary and secondary interventions are needed for overweight preteen children in Japan.

  20. Risk Factors of Non-Communicable Diseases and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Esmailnasab, N; Moradi, G; Delaveri, A

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is a common nmetabolic ndisorder, which leads to early Cardio Vascular Disease and diabetes type II. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its risk factors in Kurdistan, Iran. Method: The data was extracted from provincial section of Iranian national non-communicable surveillance survey conducted in 2005. The study was a population-based survey with multi-stage cluster sampling method. Adult Treatment Panel-III measures were used for assessing the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among residents of Kurdistan Province aged 25 to 64 yr. EPI-Info 6 was used to enter the data and the data was analyzed using SPSS 11.5. Results: Totally, 1194 participants were recruited in our survey. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 29.1%. The prevalence was 41.3% among women and 17.1% among men (P= 0.001). As we go higher among age groups, the prevalence increases. Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate the metabolic syndrome in Kurdistan and Kurd ethnicity. The high level of metabolic syndromes prevalence especially among women shows the need and importance of suitable and effective preventive programs. These preventive programs must promote changes in lifestyle, especially with respect to nutrition, physical activities, and control of blood pressure. PMID:23113214

  1. Antioxidant paraoxonase 1 activity in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sentí, Mariano; Tomás, Marta; Fitó, Montserrat; Weinbrenner, Tanja; Covas, María-Isabel; Sala, Joan; Masiá, Rafel; Marrugat, Jaume

    2003-11-01

    Paraoxonase (PON1) is an antioxidant enzyme closely associated with high-density lipoproteins. Low PON1 has been shown in oxidative stress-associated processes such as dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, advancing age, and smoking. Indeed, oxidative stress is related to the degree of insulin resistance, a key component of the metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the possible relationship between PON1 activity and the metabolic syndrome was investigated. From 1364 randomly recruited subjects, 285 were found to have the metabolic syndrome, according to the guidelines published by the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III. PON1 activity, lipid peroxides, and PON1 codon 192 genotypes, which strongly modulate PON1 activity, were determined. Serum PON1 activity levels were found to be significantly lower, and lipid peroxide concentrations significantly higher, in subjects with the metabolic syndrome compared with unaffected subjects (P = 0.033 and < 0.001, respectively). Study subjects showed a significant decreasing trend in PON1 activity levels and a significant increasing trend in lipid peroxide concentrations, with the increase in the number of metabolic disturbances. No differences in the prevalence of PON1 codon 192 genotypes were found among the categories of metabolic abnormalities. In conclusion, a greater degree of severity of the metabolic syndrome is associated with a progressively worse antioxidant/oxidant balance, which is consistent with increased oxidative stress and lower antioxidant PON1 enzymatic capacity.

  2. Increased Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Ataş, Hatice; Gönül, Müzeyyen

    2017-05-05

    Inflammatory and immune processes can be triggered in vitiligo due to a decreased number of melanocytes and their anti-inflammatory effects. Because of the systemic nature of vitiligo, metabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance and lipid profile disturbances as well as skin involvement may be observed in vitiligo. To investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and vitiligo. Case-control study. The demographic, clinical and laboratory features in the subjects were compared according to presence of vitiligo and metabolic syndrome [patients (n=63) vs. gender-age matched controls (n=65) and metabolic syndrome positive (n=38) vs. negative (n=90)]. A logistic regression analysis was also used. We identified metabolic syndrome in 24 (38.1%) subjects with vitiligo and 14 (21.5%) subjects without vitiligo (p=0.04). Active vitiligo, segmental vitiligo, an increased duration of vitiligo and an increased percentage in the affected body surface area were determined to be independent predictors of metabolic syndrome [activity of vitiligo: p=0.012, OR (95% CI)=64.4 (2.5-1672); type of vitiligo: p=0.007, OR (95% CI)=215.1 (4.3-10725.8); duration of vitiligo: p=0.03, OR (95% CI)=1.4 (1.1-2.0); percentage of affected body surface area: p=0.07, OR (95% CI)=1.2 (0.98-1.5)]. The risk of developing metabolic syndrome is increased in patients with vitiligo. The poor clinical features of vitiligo, such as active, extended and segmental vitiligo with an increased duration of time, are independent predictors for developing metabolic syndrome.

  3. Descriptive epidemiology of metabolic syndrome among obese adolescent population.

    PubMed

    Mahbuba, Sharmin; Mohsin, Fauzia; Rahat, Farhana; Nahar, Jebun; Begum, Tahmina; Nahar, Nazmun

    2018-01-04

    The study was done to assess the magnitude of problems of metabolic syndrome among obese adolescents. It was a cross-sectional study done from January 2013 to June 2014 in paediatric endocrine outpatient department in BIRDEM General Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Total 172 adolescents having exogenous obesity aged 10-18 years were included. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) were defined as per WHO criteria.The adolescents having Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥95th centile were classified as obese.Waist circumference was measured at the level midway between the lower rib margin & the iliac crest, at the level of umbilicus with the person breathing out gently in centimeter. Hip circumference was measured at the maximum width over the buttocks at the level of the greater trochanters in centimeter. Among 172 obese adolescents, metabolic syndrome was found in 66 patients (38.4%). The commonest metabolic abnormality among those having metabolic syndrome was low HDL level (77.3%) followed by high triglyceride level(71.2%). Glucose intolerance (IFG and/or IGT) was found in 16.7%, Type 2 DM in 10.6%, systolic hypertension in 10.7% and diastolic hypertension in 12.1%. Triglyceride (p = 0.042) and Cholesterol level (p = 0.016) were significantly higher and HDL-cholesterol level (p = 0.000) was significantly lower among obese adolescents having metabolic syndrome. Less physical activity (p = 0.04) was significantly related to the development of metabolic syndrome. On logistic regression analysis male sex, family history of obesity and low HDL-cholesterol correlated to metabolic syndrome. The High rate of metabolic syndrome among obese adolescents is alarming. Copyright © 2018 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Relationship between vitamin D deficiency and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    González-Molero, Inmaculada; Rojo, Gemma; Morcillo, Sonsoles; Pérez-Valero, Vidal; Rubio-Martín, Eleazara; Gutierrez-Repiso, Carolina; Soriguer, Federico

    2014-06-06

    Vitamin D deficiency and metabolic syndrome are 2 very common health problems in the Spanish population. It has been suggested that patients with metabolic syndrome may be vitamin D deficient more often than subjects without it and that low vitamin D levels may predispose to metabolic syndrome development. However, the results of prospective and intervention studies have been different and such relationship remains unclear. We assessed the relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and the prevalence and incidence of metabolic syndrome. We undertook a population-based cohort study in Spain. At baseline (1996-1998), 1,226 subjects were evaluated. Follow-up visits were performed in 2002-2004 and 2005-2007.At baseline and follow-up, participants underwent an interview and a standardized clinical examination with an oral glucose tolerance test in those subjects without known diabetes. At the second visit, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and intact parathyroid hormone levels were measured. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome at the second and third visit was 29.4 and 42.5%, respectively. Mean levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were lower in subjects with metabolic syndrome: 21.7 (6.21) vs 23.35 (6.29) ng/ml, P<.001.The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D<20 ng/ml) at the second evaluation was 34.7%, with significant differences between subjects with and without metabolic syndrome(34.6 vs 26.5%, P<.01). Men with vitamin D deficiency had more frequently hypertension and metabolic syndrome than men with normal levels. Women with vitamin D deficiency had more frequently hyperglycemia, hypertension, increased waist circumference and hypertriglyceridemia. In a prospective study, 25-hydroxyvitamin D values<20 ng/ml were not significantly associated with an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome in the next 5 years (odds ratio 0,99, 95% confidence interval 0.57-1.7, P=.97) after adjusting by sex and age. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an

  5. Epidemiological predictors of metabolic syndrome in urban West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sasthi Narayan; Roy, Sunetra Kaviraj; Rahaman, Md Abdur

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is one of the emerging health problems of the world. Its prevalence is high in urban areas. Though pathogenesis is complex, but the interaction of obesity, sedentary lifestyle, dietary, and genetic factors are known as contributing factors. Community-based studies were very few to find out the prevalence or predictors of the syndrome. To ascertain the prevalence and epidemiological predictors of metabolic syndrome. A total of 690 study subjects were chosen by 30 clusters random sampling method from 43 wards of Durgapur city. Data were analyzed in SPSS version 20 software and binary logistic regression was done to find out statistical significance of the predictors. Among 32.75% of the study population was diagnosed as metabolic syndrome according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition with a modification for Asia Pacific cut-off of waist circumference. Odds were more among females (2.43), upper social class (14.89), sedentary lifestyle (17.00), and positive family history. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was high in urban areas of Durgapur. Increased age, female gender, higher social status, sedentary lifestyle, positive family history, and higher education were the statistically significant predictors of metabolic syndrome.

  6. [The nutrition of acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Sebe, Mayu

    2016-03-01

    In this session, we describe the acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome from two sides; acute disease that occurs higher in patients with metabolic syndrome such as colonary heart disease and stroke, and acute aggravation of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. The electrolyte imbalance is frequently detected in critical ill patients. It is reported that the extreme abnormalities of ionized calcium concentrations are independent predictors of mortality. In addition, from clinical database MIMIC-Ⅱ,calcium supplementation improves clinical outcome in intensive care unit patients. Although metabolic syndrome; lifestyle-related disease, is a chronic disease, the possibility of falling into acute disease by having it becomes very high and improvement of electrolyte imbalance, especially hypocalcaemia is expected to effective on clinical outcome.

  7. Metabolic Syndrome Development During Aging with Special Reference to Obesity Without the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roos, Vendela; Elmståhl, Sölve; Ingelsson, Erik; Sundström, Johan; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic complications continue to increase worldwide. We investigated the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) during aging in relation to body mass index (BMI) and exercise habits. We assigned special emphasis to the metabolic stability in individuals with obesity, but without MetS, a condition often referred to as metabolically healthy obesity. Cross-sectional analysis was carried out in a sample of 19,129 men and women aged 45-75 years from the EpiHealth study. In addition, longitudinal analyses were carried out in the ULSAM study (2322 men at baseline followed from age 50 to age 77) and in the PIVUS study (1016 men and women at baseline followed from age 70 to age 80). Participants were categorized into six groups according to BMI category (normal weight/BMI <25 kg/m 2 , overweight/BMI 25-30 kg/m 2 , and obesity/BMI >30 kg/m 2 ) and MetS status (+/-, National Cholesterol Education Program criteria). MetS prevalence and number of MetS components increased with age in all three samples. The PIVUS study showed that high baseline BMI, low baseline physical activity, and increasing BMI during follow-up were related to increasing MetS prevalence and increasing numbers of MetS components during follow-up. One-third to half of individuals initially belonging to the obesity without MetS category acquired MetS during aging. MetS prevalence increased during aging, especially in individuals with high BMI, low level of physical activity, and weight gain. Obesity without MetS was not a stable condition over time as many of those individuals gained metabolic disturbances during aging.

  8. Positive attributes protect adolescents from risk for the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Midei, Aimee J; Matthews, Karen A

    2014-11-01

    Risk for cardiovascular disease develops as early as adolescence. The primary objective of the present study was to identify whether low levels of positive and high levels of negative emotions and attitudes are associated with the combination of cardiovascular risk factors known as the metabolic syndrome. Participants were 239 healthy adolescents (57% black; 53% female; mean age, 15.7 years) from a low-to-middle class community. They completed measures of negative and positive emotions and attitudes, which were factor analyzed and yielded two factors. Positive attributes included general positive affect, optimistic attitudes, subjective social status, and self-esteem. Negative emotions included cynical attitudes, depressive symptoms, trait anger, and general negative affect. Components of the metabolic syndrome (waist circumference, glucose, blood pressure, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) were standardized and averaged to create a metabolic syndrome composite risk score. Linear regression analyses showed that the positive attributes factor was inversely associated with metabolic syndrome composite risk score, p < .01. The relationship remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, physical activity, smoking, and body mass index percentile. The negative emotion factor was unrelated to metabolic risk score. Adolescents with more positive attributes had lower metabolic syndrome risk scores. This study emphasizes the importance of the development of psychosocial resources during the adolescent transition for potentially reducing future cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among elderly Mexicans.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, María Araceli; Yáñez-Velasco, Lucía; Carnevale, Alessandra; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Bernal, Demetrio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Rojas, Rosalba; Villa, Antonio; Tur, Josep A

    2017-11-01

    One of the most prevalent chronic diseases among elderly population is the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of MetS and associated factors among Mexican elderly people. Cross-sectional survey carried out in Mexico (2007). A random sample (n=516) of the elderly population (≥65years; 277 female, 239 male) was interviewed. Anthropometric and analytical measurements, and a general questionnaire incorporating questions related to socio-demographic and life-style factors were used. MetS definition AHA/NHLBI/IDF was applied. The prevalence of MetS in the elderly (≥65years) was of 72.9% (75.7% men; 70.4% women). Participants with values above MetS cut-off points were 92.4% (hypertension), 77.8% (hypertriglyceridemia), 77.1% (low HDL-cholesterol), 71.1% (hyperglycaemia), and 65.4% (central obesity). People with MetS showed higher values of anthropometric and biochemical variables than those without MetS, except for the height, cholesterol and creatinine. Mid-high education level (9-12 years), no smokers and former smokers, and Central-Western inhabitants of Mexico were associated with MetS components. BMI status was the main determinant of MetS prevalence and MetS components. The reported prevalence of MetS among the elderly Mexican population was higher than those previously obtained in the geographical area, showing a major public health problem in Mexican elders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Periodontal disease and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lamster, Ira B; Pagan, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a spectrum of conditions that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. The components of MetS include dysglycemia, visceral obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia (elevated triglycerides and low levels of high-density lipoprotein) and hypertension. An association of periodontal disease and MetS has been suggested. This association is believed to be the result of systemic oxidative stress and an exuberant inflammatory response. When examined individually, the components of the MetS that are most closely related to the risk of periodontitis are dysglycemia and obesity, with lesser contributions by atherogenic dyslipidemia and hypertension. Data suggest that the odds of periodontitis increase with the number of MetS components present in an individual. The direction of the relationship between MetS and periodontal disease cannot currently be determined because the majority of studies are cross-sectional. The association between MetS and periodontitis, however, suggests that improved understanding of this association could promote interprofessional practice. Evidence suggests that periodontal therapy can reduce the levels of inflammatory mediators in serum. If this finding is confirmed, periodontal treatment could become part of therapy for MetS. Oral health providers who identify patients at risk for MetS could refer them to a medical provider, and physicians could refer patients to dentists to ensure that patients with MetS receive a dental evaluation and any necessary treatment. These clinical activities would improve both oral and general health outcomes. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and rare gynecological cancers in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (Me-Can).

    PubMed

    Nagel, G; Concin, H; Bjørge, T; Rapp, K; Manjer, J; Hallmans, G; Diem, G; Häggström, C; Engeland, A; Almquist, M; Jonsson, H; Selmer, R; Stocks, T; Tretli, S; Ulmer, H; Stattin, P; Lukanova, A

    2011-06-01

    Risk factors for rare gynecological cancers are largely unknown. Initial research has indicated that the metabolic syndrome (MetS) or individual components could play a role. The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project cohort includes 288,834 women. During an average follow-up of 11 years, 82 vulvar, 26 vaginal and 43 other rare gynecological cancers were identified. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated fitting Cox proportional hazards regression models for tertiles and standardized z-scores [with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation (SD) of 1] of body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and MetS. Risk estimates were corrected for random error in the measurement of metabolic factors. The MetS was associated with increased risk of vulvar [HR 1.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-2.41) and vaginal cancer (HR 1.87, 95% CI 1.07-3.25). Among separate MetS components, 1 SD increase in BMI was associated with overall risk (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.23-1.66), vulvar (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.11-1.69) and vaginal cancer (HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.30-2.46). Blood glucose and triglyceride concentrations were associated with increased risk of vulvar cancer (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.10-3.58 and HR 2.09, 95% CI 1.39-3.15, respectively). The results from this first prospective study on rare gynecological cancers suggest that the MetS and its individual components may play a role in the development of these tumors.

  12. Links between nutrition, drug abuse, and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Virmani, Ashraf; Binienda, Zbigniew; Ali, Syed; Gaetani, Franco

    2006-08-01

    Nutritional deficiency in combination with drug abuse may increase risk of developing the metabolic syndrome by augmenting cell damage, excitotoxicity, reducing energy production, and lowering the antioxidant potential of the cells. We have reviewed here the following points: effects of drugs of abuse on nutrition and brain metabolism; effects of nutrition on actions of the drugs of abuse; drug abuse and probability of developing metabolic syndrome; role of genetic vulnerability in nutrition/drug abuse and brain damage; and the role of neuroprotective supplements in drug abuse. Nutrition education is an essential component of substance abuse treatment programs and can enhance substance abuse treatment outcomes. The strategies available, in particular the nutritional approach to protect the drug abusers from the metabolic syndrome and other diseases are discussed.

  13. The metabolic syndrome and severity of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, John J; Wendel, Lucas J; Birkholz, Emily S; Vallone, John G; Coleman, Anne L; Yu, Fei; Mahajan, Vinit B

    2015-01-01

    While metabolic syndrome has been strongly implicated as a risk factor for macrovascular diseases, such as stroke and cardiovascular disease, its relationship with microvascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, has been less defined. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome and the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy. A retrospective case-control chart review at the University of Iowa ophthalmology and primary care clinics included 100 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 100 patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), 100 diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, and 100 nondiabetic patients who were randomly selected. Using the International Diabetes Foundation definition, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the number of components of metabolic syndrome were compared among these groups. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with diabetes was 69.3%, which was significantly higher than that in patients without diabetes (27%; P<0.0001) (odds ratio [OR] =6.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.76-10.49; P=0.0004). However, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome between diabetics with and without diabetic retinopathy, with rates of 67.5% and 73%, respectively (P=0.36) (OR =0.77; 95% CI: 0.45-1.32; P=0.34). In addition, there was no significant difference between the PDR and NPDR groups, with rates of 63% and 72%, respectively (P=0.23) (OR =0.70; 95% CI: 0.38-1.30; P=0.26). The metabolic syndrome was highly prevalent in patients with diabetes, but it was not associated with the presence or severity of retinopathy.

  14. Effect of metformin on exercise capacity in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Paul, Abi Albon; Dkhar, Steven Aibor; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Thabah, Molly Mary; George, Melvin; Chandrasekaran, Indumathi; Gunaseelan, Vikneswaran; Selvarajan, Sandhiya

    2017-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors with increased predilection towards occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. Currently physical exercise and management with metformin are the prevailing treatment modalities for metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome have been found to have reduced exercise capacity over a period of time. Likewise metformin has been shown to decrease exercise capacity among healthy volunteers. Hence this study aims to evaluate the effect of metformin on the exercise capacity of patients with metabolic syndrome. Prospective study with 6 weeks follow up. Newly diagnosed patients with metabolic syndrome and to be started on Table Metformin 500mg twice a day were recruited for the study after obtaining written informed consent. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing (CPET) was done at baseline before the subjects were started on metformin and after 6 weeks of treatment using cardiopulmonary exercise testing apparatus (ZAN600). Fifteen treatment naïve patients with metabolic syndrome completed six weeks of therapy with metformin. In these patients oxygen uptake [VO2] showed statistically significant decrease from 1.10±0.44 at baseline to 0.9±0.39 (l/min) after six weeks of treatment with metformin [mean difference of -0.20 (-0.31 to -0.09); P=0.001]. Similarly oxygen uptake/kg body weight [VO2/Kg] showed a significant decrease from 14.10±4.73 to 11.44±3.81 (mlkg -1 min -1 ) at the end of six weeks of treatment [mean difference of -2.66 (-4.06 to -1.26); P=0.001]. Six weeks of treatment with metformin significantly decreases exercise capacity in newly diagnosed patients with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Intranasal Insulin Restores Metabolic Parameters and Insulin Sensitivity in Rats with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Derkach, K V; Ivantsov, A O; Chistyakova, O V; Sukhov, I B; Buzanakov, D M; Kulikova, A A; Shpakov, A O

    2017-06-01

    We studied the effect of 10-week treatment with intranasal insulin (0.5 IU/day) on glucose tolerance, glucose utilization, lipid metabolism, functions of pancreatic β cells, and insulin system in the liver of rats with cafeteria diet-induced metabolic syndrome. The therapy reduced body weight and blood levels of insulin, triglycerides, and atherogenic cholesterol that are typically increased in metabolic syndrome, normalized glucose tolerance and its utilization, and increased activity of insulin signaling system in the liver, thus reducing insulin resistance. The therapy did not affect the number of pancreatic islets and β cells. The study demonstrates prospects of using intranasal insulin for correction of metabolic parameters and reduction of insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome.

  16. Application of alternative anthropometric measurements to predict metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sagun, Gul; Oguz, Aytekin; Karagoz, Engin; Filizer, Arzu Tiğli; Tamer, Gonca; Mesci, Banu

    2014-01-01

    The association between rarely used anthropometric measurements (e.g., mid-upper arm, forearm, and calf circumference) and metabolic syndrome has not been proven. The aim of this study was to assess whether mid-upper arm, forearm, calf, and waist circumferences, as well as waist/height ratio and waist-to-hip ratio, were associated with metabolic syndrome. We enrolled 387 subjects (340 women, 47 men) who were admitted to the obesity outpatient department of Istanbul Medeniyet University Goztepe Training and Research Hospital between September 2010 and December 2010. The following measurements were recorded: waist circumference, hip circumference, waist/height ratio, waist-to-hip ratio, mid-upper arm circumference, forearm circumference, calf circumference, and body composition. Fasting blood samples were collected to measure plasma glucose, lipids, uric acid, insulin, and HbA1c. The odds ratios for visceral fat (measured via bioelectric impedance), hip circumference, forearm circumference, and waist circumference/hip circumference were 2.19 (95% CI, 1.30-3.71), 1.89 (95% CI, 1.07-3.35), 2.47 (95% CI, 1.24-4.95), and 2.11(95% CI, 1.26-3.53), respectively. The bioelectric impedance-measured body fat percentage correlated with waist circumference only in subjects without metabolic syndrome; the body fat percentage was negatively correlated with waist circumference/hip circumference in the metabolic syndrome group. All measurements except for forearm circumference were equally well correlated with the bioelectric impedance-measured body fat percentages in both groups. Hip circumference was moderately correlated with bioelectric impedance-measured visceral fat in subjects without metabolic syndrome. Muscle mass (measured via bioelectric impedance) was weakly correlated with waist and forearm circumference in subjects with metabolic syndrome and with calf circumference in subjects without metabolic syndrome. Waist circumference was not linked to metabolic syndrome in

  17. Is a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome applicable to children?

    PubMed

    Pergher, Rafael Nardini Queiroz; Melo, Maria Edna de; Halpern, Alfredo; Mancini, Marcio Corrêa

    2010-01-01

    To present the components of the metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents and to discuss how they are assessed in the pediatric population in addition to presenting the major metabolic syndrome classifications for the age group. A review of literature published from 1986 to 2008 and found on MEDLINE databases. The prevalence of childhood obesity has been increasing globally over recent decades and as a result its complications, such as diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia, have also increased. The concept of metabolic syndrome, already common with adults, is now beginning to be applied to children through classifications using the criteria for adults modified for the younger age group. Notwithstanding, these classifications differ in terms of the cutoff points used and whether they employ body mass index or waist circumference to define obesity. The review presents these classifications, highlighting the points on which they differ and the debate about them. If childhood obesity goes untreated, it will have severe consequences in the future. A number of models for classifying metabolic syndrome in children have been published, but there is considerable diversions between them. The criteria for classifying metabolic syndrome in children therefore need to be standardized in order to identify those people at greatest risk of future complications.

  18. Obesity and the metabolic syndrome in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anoop; Khurana, Lokesh

    2008-11-01

    Prevalence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome is rapidly increasing in developing countries, leading to increased morbidity and mortality due to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease. Literature search was carried out using the terms obesity, insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, dyslipidemia, nutrition, physical activity, and developing countries, from PubMed from 1966 to June 2008 and from web sites and published documents of the World Health Organization and Food and Agricultural Organization. With improvement in economic situation in developing countries, increasing prevalence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome is seen in adults and particularly in children. The main causes are increasing urbanization, nutrition transition, and reduced physical activity. Furthermore, aggressive community nutrition intervention programs for undernourished children may increase obesity. Some evidence suggests that widely prevalent perinatal undernutrition and childhood catch-up obesity may play a role in adult-onset metabolic syndrome and T2DM. The economic cost of obesity and related diseases in developing countries, having meager health budgets is enormous. To prevent increasing morbidity and mortality due to obesity-related T2DM and cardiovascular disease in developing countries, there is an urgent need to initiate large-scale community intervention programs focusing on increased physical activity and healthier food options, particularly for children. International health agencies and respective government should intensively focus on primordial and primary prevention programs for obesity and the metabolic syndrome in developing countries.

  19. The metabolic vascular syndrome - guide to an individualized treatment.

    PubMed

    Hanefeld, Markolf; Pistrosch, Frank; Bornstein, Stefan R; Birkenfeld, Andreas L

    2016-03-01

    In ancient Greek medicine the concept of a distinct syndrome (going together) was used to label 'a group of signs and symptoms' that occur together and 'characterize a particular abnormality and condition'. The (dys)metabolic syndrome is a common cluster of five pre-morbid metabolic-vascular risk factors or diseases associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, fatty liver disease and risk of cancer. The risk for major complications such as cardiovascular diseases, NASH and some cancers develops along a continuum of risk factors into clinical diseases. Therefore we still include hyperglycemia, visceral obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension as diagnostic traits in the definition according to the term 'deadly quartet'. From the beginning elevated blood pressure and hyperglycemia were core traits of the metabolic syndrome associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Thus metabolic and vascular abnormalities are in extricable linked. Therefore it seems reasonable to extend the term to metabolic-vascular syndrome (MVS) to signal the clinical relevance and related risk of multimorbidity. This has important implications for integrated diagnostics and therapeutic approach. According to the definition of a syndrome the rapid global rise in the prevalence of all traits and comorbidities of the MVS is mainly caused by rapid changes in life-style and sociocultural transition resp. with over- and malnutrition, low physical activity and social stress as a common soil.

  20. Obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetic retinopathy: Beyond hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Mbata, Osinakachukwu; Abo El-Magd, Nada Fawzy; El-Remessy, Azza Bahram

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most feared ocular manifestation of diabetes. DR is characterized by progressive retinal damage that may eventually result in blindness. Clinically, this blindness is caused by progressive damage to the retinal microvasculature, which leads to ischemia, retinal swelling, and neovascularization. Retinopathy is associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with DR being the leading cause of new onset blindness in United States adults. Despite this strong association with diabetes, it must be noted that the development of retinopathy lesions is multifactorial and may occur in individuals without an established history of diabetes. Metabolic syndrome is a multifactorial condition of central obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, hypertension, fasting hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. Although several studies examined the individual components observed in the metabolic syndrome in relation to the development of DR, there is conflicting data as to the association of the metabolic syndrome with the development of retinopathy lesions in non-diabetic subjects. This review will summarize the current literature on the evidence of the metabolic syndrome on retinopathy in subjects with and without an established history of diabetes. This review will also discuss some of the mechanisms through which metabolic syndrome can contribute to the development of retinopathy. PMID:28751954

  1. [The use of various diet supplements in metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sicińska, Paulina; Pytel, Edyta; Maćczak, Aneta; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2015-01-09

    Civilization development is associated with immense progress in science and significant improvement of human living conditions but simultaneously it contributes to many health problems including metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a set of mutually associated factors including insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, lipids disorders and hypertension, which is the main cause of development of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The first line of defense against metabolic syndrome is a change of life style including body mass reduction, application of a low-calorie diet and performance of physical activity. In spite of the simplicity of therapy, long-term success of the above treatment among patients is observed seldom because it is very difficult to obey rigorous rules. Nowadays, it is considered that diet supplements including antioxidants, polyunsaturated fatty acids and mineral elements are helpful in metabolic syndrome treatment due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It is considered that a health balanced diet enriched with various diet supplements may be the best strategy in metabolic syndrome treatment.

  2. A practical "ABCDE" approach to the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blaha, Michael J; Bansal, Sandeep; Rouf, Rosanne; Golden, Sherita H; Blumenthal, Roger S; Defilippis, Andrew P

    2008-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus that are due to abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. This increasingly important proinflammatory condition remains both underrecognized and undertreated. To aid physicians in their approach to the metabolic syndrome, we assessed and synthesized the literature on cardiovascular risk assessment and early intervention for risk reduction. We performed a comprehensive search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane database for peer-reviewed clinical studies published from January 1, 1988, to December 31, 2007, augmented by consultation with content experts. We used the search terms metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, waist circumference, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, prediabetes, diabetes, treatment, prevention, aspirin, hypertension, cholesterol, atherogenic dyslipidemia, lifestyle therapy, diet, and exercise. Criteria used for study review were controlled study design, English language, relevance to clinicians, and validity based on experimental design and appropriateness of conclusions. Although growing evidence supports early intervention in patients with the metabolic syndrome, many physicians do not recognize the risk associated with this condition and fail to initiate early treatment. A comprehensive management plan can be assembled through an "ABCDE" approach: "A" for assessment of cardiovascular risk and aspirin therapy, "B" for blood pressure control, "C" for cholesterol management, "D" for diabetes prevention and diet therapy, and "E" for exercise therapy. This ABCDE approach provides a practical and systematic framework for encouraging metabolic syndrome recognition and for implementing a comprehensive, evidence-based management plan for the reduction of cardiovascular risk.

  3. [Cardiovascular risk parameters, metabolic syndrome and alcohol consumption by workers].

    PubMed

    Vicente-Herrero, María Teófila; López González, Ángel Arturo; Ramírez-Iñiguez de la Torre, María Victoria; Capdevila-García, Luisa; Terradillos-García, María Jesús; Aguilar-Jiménez, Encarna

    2015-04-01

    Prevalence of alcohol consumption is high in the general population and generates specific problems at the workplace. To establish benchmarks between levels of alcohol consumption and cardiovascular risk variables and metabolic syndrome. A cross-sectional study of 7,644 workers of Spanish companies (2,828 females and 4,816 males). Alcohol consumption and its relation to cardiovascular risk was assessed using Framingham calibrated for the Spanish population (REGICOR) and SCORE, and metabolic syndrome was assessed using modified ATPIII and IDF criteria and Castelli and atherogenic index and triglycerides/HDL ratio. A multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression and odds ratios were estimated. Statistically significant differences were seen in the mean values of the different parameters studied in prevalence of metabolic syndrome, for both sexes and with modified ATPIII, IDF and REGICOR and SCORE. The sex, age, alcohol, and smoking variables were associated to cardiovascular risk parameters and metabolic syndrome. Physical exercise and stress are only associated to with some of them. The alcohol consumption affects all cardiovascular risk parameters and metabolic syndrome, being more negative the result in high level drinkers. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. How coffee affects metabolic syndrome and its components.

    PubMed

    Baspinar, B; Eskici, G; Ozcelik, A O

    2017-06-21

    Metabolic syndrome, with its increasing prevalence, is becoming a major public health problem throughout the world. Many risk factors including nutrition play a role in the emergence of metabolic syndrome. Of the most-consumed beverages in the world, coffee contains more than 1000 components such as caffeine, chlorogenic acid, diterpenes and trigonelline. It has been proven in many studies that coffee consumption has a positive effect on chronic diseases. In this review, starting from the beneficial effects of coffee on health, the relationship between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome and its components has been investigated. There are few studies investigating the relationship between coffee and metabolic syndrome, and the existing ones put forward different findings. The factors leading to the differences are thought to stem from coffee variety, the physiological effects of coffee elements, and the nutritional ingredients (such as milk and sugar) added to coffee. It is reported that consumption of coffee in adults up to three cups a day reduces the risk of Type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  5. Justice at Work and Metabolic Syndrome: the Whitehall II Study

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, David; Tabák, Ádám G.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Shipley, Martin J.; De Vogli, Roberto; Elovainio, Marko; Vahtera, Jussi; Marmot, Michael G.; Kivimäki, Mika

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Growing evidence shows that high levels of justice are beneficial for employee health, although biological mechanisms underlying this association are yet to be clarified. We aim to test whether high justice at work protects against metabolic syndrome. Methods A prospective cohort study of 20 civil service departments in London (the Whitehall II study) including 6123 male and female British civil servants aged 35 to 55 years without prevalent CHD at baseline (1985-1990). Perceived justice at work was determined by means of questionnaire on two occasions between 1985 and 1990. Follow-up for metabolic syndrome and its components occurring from 1990 through 2004 was based on clinical assessments on three occasions over more than 18 years. Results Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, ethnicity and employment grade showed that men who experienced a high level of justice at work had a lower risk of incident metabolic syndrome than employees with a low level of justice (hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.63-0.89). There was little evidence of an association between organizational justice and metabolic syndrome or its components in women (hazard ratio 0.88; 95%CI: 0.67-1.17). Conclusions Our prospective findings provide evidence of an association between high levels of justice at work and the development of metabolic syndrome in men. PMID:19819861

  6. Metabolic syndrome and quality of life: a systematic review 1

    PubMed Central

    Saboya, Patrícia Pozas; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Zimmermann, Paulo Roberto; Gustavo, Andréia da Silva; Assumpção, Caroline Melo; Londero, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to present currently available evidence to verify the association between metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Method: Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Medline and LILACS databases were studied for all studies investigating the association with metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Two blinded reviewers extracted data and one more was chosen in case of doubt. Results: a total of 30 studies were included, considering inclusion and exclusion criteria, which involved 62.063 patients. Almost all studies suggested that metabolic syndrome is significantly associated with impaired quality of life. Some, however, found association only in women, or only if associated with depression or Body Mass Index. Merely one study did not find association after adjusted for confounding factors. Conclusion: although there are a few studies available about the relationship between metabolic syndrome and quality of life, a growing body of evidence has shown significant association between metabolic syndrome and the worsening of quality of life. However, it is necessary to carry out further longitudinal studies to confirm this association and verify whether this relationship is linear, or only an association factor. PMID:27901223

  7. Cardiorespiratory fitness and the metabolic syndrome in firefighters.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Ryan; Nelson, Tracy; Peel, Jennifer; Lipsey, Tiffany; Voyles, Wyatt; Israel, Richard Gay

    2009-10-01

    The leading cause of mortality in on-duty firefighters is sudden cardiac death. While the reason for this remains unclear, low cardiorespiratory fitness and the metabolic syndrome have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease-related events. To document the levels of cardiorespiratory fitness and the metabolic syndrome, as well as to determine if there is a relationship between these variables, in firefighters. Maximal cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed using the Bruce treadmill protocol in 214 male firefighters from Colorado. As part of a comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk evaluation, each firefighter was also screened for the metabolic syndrome using the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III) guidelines. At the time of their evaluation, 32 firefighters (15%) met the NCEP/ATP III diagnostic criteria for the metabolic syndrome, and 54 firefighters (25%) failed to achieve a generally accepted minimum cardiorespiratory fitness level of 42.0 ml/kg/min. A significant inverse trend of increasing cardiorespiratory fitness with decreasing metabolic abnormalities was found (P < 0.001). Increased levels of cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with an improved metabolic profile in male firefighters. Comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk factor management and cardiorespiratory fitness improvement are essential for firefighter health and safety.

  8. White coat hypertension in definition of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Helvaci, Mehmet Rami; Kaya, Hasan; Seyhanli, Mahmut; Yalcin, Atilla

    2008-07-01

    Although white coat hypertension (WCH) is believed to have an effect on health, there is no term defining WCH in metabolic syndrome. Consecutive patients 20 years old or older who underwent a check-up were included. The study included 1068 cases. The prevalences of hyperbetalipoproteinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and WCH were similar to excess weight in that they increased significantly until the seventh decade of life and decreased thereafter significantly (P < 0.05 in most steps). On the other hand, the prevalences of hypertension (HT), diabetes mellitus (DM), and coronary heart disease (CHD) always increased significantly with age without any decrease (P < 0.05 in most steps), indicating their irreversibility in contrast to the reversibility of excess weight, hyperbetalipoproteinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, IGT, and WCH. Metabolic syndrome is a reversible progression step between health and irreversible final diseases terminating with increased mortality and disabilities. Thus, the definition of metabolic syndrome should include reversible metabolic risk factors such as excess weight (overweight and obesity), hyperbetalipoproteinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, IGT, and WCH, instead of irrevesible diseases such as DM, HT, CHD, and stroke that have already developed and require drug therapy. After development of one of the final metabolic diseases, the term metabolic syndrome probably loses most of its significance, since from that point on, nonpharmaceutical approaches such as lifestyle changes, diet, and exercise will provide little benefit to prevent development of the others, most likely due to the cumulative effects of the risk factors on body systems over a long period of time.

  9. Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Raikou, Vaia D; Gavriil, Sotiris

    2018-01-24

    Background : The influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on kidneys is related to many complications. We aimed to assess the association between MetS and chronic renal disease defined by a poor estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and/or the presence of microalbuminuria/macroalbuminuria. 149 patients (77 males/72 females) were enrolled in the study. Chronic renal disease was defined according to KDIGO 2012 criteria based on eGFR category and classified albuminuria. MetS was studied as a dichotomous variable (0 to 5 components) including hypertension, waist circumference, low HDL-cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high glucose. Results : The association between clustering MetS and both classified eGFR and classified albuminuria (x² = 50.3, p = 0.001 and x² = 26.9, p = 0.003 respectively) was found to be significant. The MetS presence showed an odds 5.3-fold (1.6-17.8) higher for low eGFR and 3.2-fold (1.2-8.8) higher for albuminuria in combination with the presence of diabetes mellitus, which also increased the risk for albuminuria by 3.5-fold (1.1-11.3). Albuminuria was significantly associated with high triglycerides, hypertension, high glucose (x² = 11.8, p = 0.003, x² = 11.4, p = 0.003 and x² = 9.1, p = 0.01 respectively), and it was mildly associated with a low HDL-C (x² = 5.7, p = 0.06). A significant association between classified eGFR and both high triglycerides and hypertension (x² = 9.7, p = 0.04 and x² = 16.1, p = 0.003 respectively) was found. Conclusion : The clustering of MetS was significantly associated with chronic renal disease defined by both classified eGFR and albuminuria. The definition of impaired renal function by classified albuminuria was associated with more MetS components rather than the evaluation of eGFR category. MetS may contribute to the manifestation of albuminuria in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  10. ERICA: prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Brazilian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kuschnir, Maria Cristina C; Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Szklo, Moyses; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Barufaldi, Laura Augusta; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; Schaan, Beatriz; da Veiga, Gloria Valeria; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; de Vasconcellos, Maurício T L

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS We evaluated 37,504 adolescents who were participants in the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), a cross-sectional, school-based, national study. The adolescents, aged from 12 to 17 years, lived in cities with populations greater than 100,000 inhabitants. The sample was stratified and clustered into schools and classes. The criteria set out by the International Diabetes Federation were used to define metabolic syndrome. Prevalences of metabolic syndrome were estimated according to sex, age group, school type and nutritional status. RESULTS Of the 37,504 adolescents who were evaluated: 50.2% were female; 54.3% were aged from 15 to 17 years, and 73.3% were from public schools. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 2.6% (95%CI 2.3-2.9), slightly higher in males and in those aged from 15 to 17 years in most macro-regions. The prevalence was the highest in residents from the South macro-region, in the younger female adolescents and in the older male adolescents. The prevalence was higher in public schools (2.8% [95%CI 2.4-3.2]), when compared with private schools (1.9% [95%CI 1.4-2.4]) and higher in obese adolescents when compared with nonobese ones. The most common combinations of components, referring to 3/4 of combinations, were: enlarged waist circumference (WC), low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) and high blood pressure; followed by enlarged WC, low HDL-c and high triglycerides; and enlarged WC, low HDL-c, high triglycerides and blood pressure. Low HDL was the second most frequent component, but the highest prevalence of metabolic syndrome (26.8%) was observed in the presence of high triglycerides. CONCLUSIONS ERICA is the first Brazilian nation-wide study to present the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and describe the role of its components. Despite the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome being low, the high prevalences of some

  11. ERICA: prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Brazilian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kuschnir, Maria Cristina C; Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Szklo, Moyses; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Barufaldi, Laura Augusta; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; Schaan, Beatriz; da Veiga, Gloria Valeria; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; de Vasconcellos, Maurício T L; de Moraes, Ana Júlia Pantoja; Borges, Ana Luíza; de Oliveira, Ana Mayra Andrade; Tavares, Bruno Mendes; de Oliveira, Cecília Lacroix; Cunha, Cristiane de Freitas; Giannini, Denise Tavares; Belfort, Dilson Rodrigues; Santos, Eduardo Lima; de Leon, Elisa Brosina; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Oliveira, Elizabete Regina Araújo; Magliano, Erika da Silva; Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes; Azevedo, George Dantas; Brunken, Gisela Soares; Guimarães, Isabel Cristina Britto; Faria Neto, José Rocha; Oliveira, Juliana Souza; de Carvalho, Kenia Mara B; Gonçalves, Luis Gonzaga de Oliveira; Monteiro, Maria Inês; Santos, Marize M; Muniz, Pascoal Torres; Jardim, Paulo César B Veiga; Ferreira, Pedro Antônio Muniz; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz; Vianna, Rodrigo Pinheiro; Vasconcelos, Sandra Mary; Martins, Stella Maris Seixas; Goldberg, Tamara Beres Lederer

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS We evaluated 37,504 adolescents who were participants in the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), a cross-sectional, school-based, national study. The adolescents, aged from 12 to 17 years, lived in cities with populations greater than 100,000 inhabitants. The sample was stratified and clustered into schools and classes. The criteria set out by the International Diabetes Federation were used to define metabolic syndrome. Prevalences of metabolic syndrome were estimated according to sex, age group, school type and nutritional status. RESULTS Of the 37,504 adolescents who were evaluated: 50.2% were female; 54.3% were aged from 15 to 17 years, and 73.3% were from public schools. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 2.6% (95%CI 2.3-2.9), slightly higher in males and in those aged from 15 to 17 years in most macro-regions. The prevalence was the highest in residents from the South macro-region, in the younger female adolescents and in the older male adolescents. The prevalence was higher in public schools (2.8% [95%CI 2.4-3.2]), when compared with private schools (1.9% [95%CI 1.4-2.4]) and higher in obese adolescents when compared with nonobese ones. The most common combinations of components, referring to 3/4 of combinations, were: enlarged waist circumference (WC), low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) and high blood pressure; followed by enlarged WC, low HDL-c and high triglycerides; and enlarged WC, low HDL-c, high triglycerides and blood pressure. Low HDL was the second most frequent component, but the highest prevalence of metabolic syndrome (26.8%) was observed in the presence of high triglycerides. CONCLUSIONS ERICA is the first Brazilian nation-wide study to present the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and describe the role of its components. Despite the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome being low, the high prevalences of some components

  12. Fecal microbiota transplantation in metabolic syndrome: History, present and future.

    PubMed

    de Groot, P F; Frissen, M N; de Clercq, N C; Nieuwdorp, M

    2017-05-04

    The history of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) dates back even to ancient China. Recently, scientific studies have been looking into FMT as a promising treatment of various diseases, while in the process teaching us about the interaction between the human host and its resident microbial communities. Current research focuses mainly on Clostridium difficile infections, however interest is rising in other areas such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the metabolic syndrome. With regard to the latter, the intestinal microbiota might be causally related to the progression of insulin resistance and diabetes. FMT in metabolic syndrome has proven to be an intriguing method to study the role of the gut microbiota and open the way to new therapies by dissecting in whom insulin resistance is driven by microbiota. In this article we review the history of FMT, the present evidence on its role in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and its efficacy, limitations and future prospects.

  13. Hypothalamic microinflammation: a common basis of metabolic syndrome and aging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yizhe; Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Chronic microinflammation is a hallmark of many aging-related neurodegenerative diseases as well as metabolic syndrome-driven diseases. Recent research indicates that chronic caloric excess can lead to hypothalamic microinflammation, which in turn participates in the development and progression of metabolic syndrome disorders such as obesity, glucose intolerance, and hypertension. Additionally, it was recently shown that increasing age after young adulthood can cause hypothalamic microinflammation independently of nutritional status, mediating a central mechanism of systemic aging. Taken together, these findings suggest that the hypothalamus has a fundamental role, via hypothalamic microinflammation, in translating overnutrition and aging into complex outcomes. Here we summarize recent work and suggest a conceptual model in which hypothalamic microinflammation is a common mediator of metabolic syndrome and aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Todd M; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Ness, Kirsten K

    2016-04-01

    Treatment-related obesity and the metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Both conditions often begin during therapy. Preventive measures, including dietary counseling and tailored exercise, should be initiated early in the course of survivorship, with referral to specialists to optimize success. However, among adults who develop obesity or the metabolic syndrome and who do not respond to lifestyle therapy, medical intervention may be indicated to manage underlying pathology, such as growth hormone deficiency, or to mitigate risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Because no specific clinical trials have been done in this population to treat metabolic syndrome or its components, clinicians who follow adult survivors of childhood ALL should use the existing American Heart Association/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Scientific Statement to guide their approach.

  15. Comparison of metabolic syndrome with growing epidemic syndrome Z in terms of risk factors and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Meral; Davutoğlu, Vedat; Aydın, Neriman; Filiz, Ayten

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to compare metabolic syndrome with syndrome Z growing epidemic in terms of risk factors, demographic variables, and gender differences in our large cohort at southeastern area in Turkey. Data of patients admitted to sleep clinic in University of Gaziantep from January 2006 to January 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. ATP III and JNC 7 were used for defining metabolic syndrome and hypertension. Data of 761 patients were evaluated. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, pulmonary hypertension, and left ventricular hypertrophy were more common in patients with syndrome Z than in patients without metabolic syndrome. Age, waist/neck circumferences, BMI, triglyceride, glucose, and Epworth sleepiness scale score were detected higher, whereas the minimum oxygen saturation during sleep was lower in patients with syndrome Z. Metabolic syndrome was more common in sleep apneic subjects than in controls (58 versus 30 %). Female sleep apneics showed higher rate of metabolic syndrome than those of males (74 versus 52 %). Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and left ventricular hypertrophy were detected higher in males with syndrome Z than in males without metabolic syndrome. Snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness were detected higher in females with syndrome Z than in females without metabolic syndrome. Systemic/pulmonary hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and left ventricular hypertrophy were more common in females with syndrome Z than in females without metabolic syndrome. Complaints of headache and systemic/pulmonary hypertension were more common among females than males with syndrome Z. Female syndrome Z patients had lower minimum oxygen saturation than male patients with syndrome Z. Metabolic syndrome in sleep apneic patients is more prevalent than in controls. All metabolic syndrome parameters were significantly different among obstructive sleep apneic patients with respect to gender with more severe

  16. Dietary energy density and the metabolic syndrome among Iranian women.

    PubMed

    Esmaillzadeh, A; Azadbakht, L

    2011-05-01

    In a comparison of women worldwide, Iranian women were found to have the highest prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, specific characteristics of diet in Middle-Eastern countries might provide additional information on the diet-disease relations. This study was performed to assess the association between dietary energy density and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among Iranian women. Usual dietary intakes were assessed in a cross-sectional study of 486 Iranian adult women by the use of a food frequency questionnaire. Dietary energy density was calculated as each individual's reported daily energy intake (kcal/d) into total weight of foods (excluding beverages) consumed (g/d). Anthropometric measures, fasting plasma glucose, serum lipid profiles and blood pressure were evaluated. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Mean dietary energy density was 1.77 ± 0.35 kcal/g. Individuals in the top tertile of dietary energy density had 80% (odds ratio: 1.80; 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 3.15) greater odds of having the metabolic syndrome. Even after further adjustment for body mass index, this association remained significant. Higher dietary energy density was also significantly associated with greater odds of having abdominal adiposity (4.23; 2.51, 7.18), high-serum triacylglycerol concentrations (3.55; 2.31, 5.93) and low-serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (1.80; 1.13, 2.84). No overall significant associations were found between higher dietary energy density and risk of having elevated blood pressure or abnormal glucose homeostasis. Higher dietary energy density was significantly associated with a greater risk of the metabolic syndrome and most of its components. Further studies are required to focus on lowering dietary energy density as a probable strategy for preventing metabolic syndrome.

  17. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Among an Urban Population in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kaduka, Lydia U.; Kombe, Yeri; Kenya, Eucharia; Kuria, Elizabeth; Bore, John K.; Bukania, Zipporah N.; Mwangi, Moses

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Developing countries are undergoing an epidemiologic transition accompanied by increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) linked to urbanization and lifestyle modifications. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of CVD risk factors whose extent in Kenya remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and factors associated with its occurrence among an urban population in Kenya. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a household cross-sectional survey comprising 539 adults (aged ≥18 years) living in Nairobi, drawn from 30 clusters across five socioeconomic classes. Measurements included waist circumference, HDL cholesterol, triacylglycerides (TAGs), fasting glucose, and blood pressure. RESULTS The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 34.6% and was higher in women than in men (40.2 vs. 29%; P < 0.001). The most frequently observed features were raised blood pressure, a higher waist circumference, and low HDL cholesterol (men: 96.2, 80.8, and 80%; women: 89.8, 97.2, and 96.3%, respectively), whereas raised fasting glucose and TAGs were observed less frequently (men: 26.9 and 63.3%; women: 26.9 and 30.6%, respectively). The main factors associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome were increasing age, socioeconomic status, and education. CONCLUSIONS Metabolic syndrome is prevalent in this urban population, especially among women, but the incidence of individual factors suggests that poor glycemic control is not the major contributor. Longitudinal studies are required to establish true causes of metabolic syndrome in Kenya. The Kenyan government needs to create awareness, develop prevention strategies, and strengthen the health care system to accommodate screening and management of CVDs. PMID:22374643

  18. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among an urban population in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kaduka, Lydia U; Kombe, Yeri; Kenya, Eucharia; Kuria, Elizabeth; Bore, John K; Bukania, Zipporah N; Mwangi, Moses

    2012-04-01

    Developing countries are undergoing an epidemiologic transition accompanied by increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) linked to urbanization and lifestyle modifications. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of CVD risk factors whose extent in Kenya remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and factors associated with its occurrence among an urban population in Kenya. This was a household cross-sectional survey comprising 539 adults (aged ≥18 years) living in Nairobi, drawn from 30 clusters across five socioeconomic classes. Measurements included waist circumference, HDL cholesterol, triacylglycerides (TAGs), fasting glucose, and blood pressure. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 34.6% and was higher in women than in men (40.2 vs. 29%; P < 0.001). The most frequently observed features were raised blood pressure, a higher waist circumference, and low HDL cholesterol (men: 96.2, 80.8, and 80%; women: 89.8, 97.2, and 96.3%, respectively), whereas raised fasting glucose and TAGs were observed less frequently (men: 26.9 and 63.3%; women: 26.9 and 30.6%, respectively). The main factors associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome were increasing age, socioeconomic status, and education. Metabolic syndrome is prevalent in this urban population, especially among women, but the incidence of individual factors suggests that poor glycemic control is not the major contributor. Longitudinal studies are required to establish true causes of metabolic syndrome in Kenya. The Kenyan government needs to create awareness, develop prevention strategies, and strengthen the health care system to accommodate screening and management of CVDs.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and nutrition in a Granada's tropical coast population.

    PubMed

    Millán, S; Samaniego-Sánchez, C; Romero, A; Quesada-Granados, J J; López-García de la Serrana, H

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is described as an association of health problems that a given person may simultaneously or successively develop, and it is considered a serious condition because it is related to a significantly increased risk of suffering diabetes, coronary disease and brain damage. Nutrition, along with other factors such as physical activity and genetic inheritance, has an influence on preventing MS. The aim of this research is to demonstrate important aspects concerning the diagnosis, the prevalence, and the prevention of metabolic syndrome among the population of the tropical coast of Granada. 119 individuals from the tropical coast of Granada were studied to collect personal data such as their body mass index, body fat percentage, glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and food intake (through nutritional survey). As a result of this research, a metabolic syndrome prevalence of 20,2% was obtained, 58,3% of which was related to women. The results obtained show significant statistical differences between individuals having metabolic syndrome and the control group. Particularly, these differences can be noted in parameters such as the BMI or the % of body fat. Nevertheless, there are no significant differences between the two groups concerning parameters related to nutrition such as % of fat, carbohydrates, proteins and kcal/day. As a conclusion from the research, we can state that the metabolic syndrome prevalence among the population of the tropical coast of Granada is similar to the figure obtained for the population in the US and in other areas of Spain. In addition, this research shows that metabolic syndrome is more frequent among individuals whose BMI and % of body fat is higher than 30. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. The metabolic syndrome is associated with complicated gallstone disease

    PubMed Central

    Ata, Naim; Kucukazman, Metin; Yavuz, Bunyamin; Bulus, Hakan; Dal, Kursat; Ertugrul, Derun Taner; Yalcin, Ahmet Arif; Polat, Mehmet; Varol, Numan; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Karabag, Aral; Nazligul, Yasar

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gallstone disease (GD) is a common condition worldwide. Several studies demonstrated that the presence of gallstones is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. The metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent cardiovascular condition. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between complicated GD (CGD) and the metabolic syndrome or its components. METHODS: Two hundred seventeen patients with gallstones were examined. All patients underwent biliary ultrasonography after a complete medical history and laboratory examination. Data collection for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome included measurements of waist circumference, blood pressure and lipids, and biochemical tests. RESULTS: Of the 217 patients examined, 115 patients (53%) had CGD and 102 patients (47%) had uncomplicated GD (UCGD). There was a significant difference between the number of patients with large gallstones in the CGD and UCGD groups (n=14 [12%] versus n=2 [2%], respectively; P=0.004). Metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus and large waist circumference were more prevalent in the CGD group than in the UCGD group. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance scores were higher in the CGD group than in UCGD group (2.51 [95% CI 0.57 to 23.90] versus 2.20 [95% CI 0.09 to 8.87], respectively; P=0.032). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of metabolic syndrome (OR 1.434; 95% CI 1.222 to 1.846, P=0.014), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.493; 95% CI 1.255 to 1.953; P=0.035) and large gallstones (OR 1.153; 95% CI 1.033 to 1.714; P=0.017) were independent predictors of CGD. CONCLUSION: Results of the present study demonstrated that metabolic syndrome, diabetes and gallstone size were associated with CGD. Further prospective studies are needed to understand the clinical importance of this association. PMID:21647463

  1. [Association between metabolic syndrome and its components with presbycusis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Zhang, Mengsi; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jiarui; Wang, Ningning; Yang, Xiaoshan

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effect of metabolic syndrome and its components on presbycusis. Total of 165 cases and 202 controls were continuously collected in Harbin Ninth Hospital from June 2013 to August 2014, these subjects were investigated and received anthropometry and received biochemical test in hospital laboratory. Statistics analysis was adopted by χ2 test, t test and logistic regression model. Only triglyceride abnormal proportion of case group was higher than that of control group among components of metabolic syndrome, and it were associated with age-related hearing loss whether before adjustment or not after adjustment, OR (95% CI) were 1.69 (1.09-2.63) and 1.96 (1.08-3.54) respectively, and others were not associated with presbycusis. In addition, among all of the various combinations of the components of the metabolic syndrome, combination of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein, combination of triglycerides and blood glucose, combination of triglycerides and blood pressure were associated with age-related hearing loss before adjustment and after adjustment, OR were 5.31 (95% CI 1.63-17.27), 2.66 (95% CI 1.04-6.85) and 2.09 (95% CI 1.04-4.18) respectively. Further more, the metabolic syndrome was not statistically associated with presbycusis, OR were 1.27 (95% CI 0.83-1.94) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.54-1.57) respectively before adjustment and after adjustment. In addition, stratified by age, the metabolic syndrome was still not statistically associated with presbycusis in each stratification, OR were 0.89 (95% CI 0.44-1.82) and 1.49 (95% CI 0.67-3.30) respectively. The triglyceride was associated with presbycusis. Among all of combinations of the components of the metabolic syndrome, combination of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein, combination of triglycerides and blood glucose, combination of triglycerides and blood pressure were associated with age-related hearing loss.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and the risk of adverse cardiovascular events after an acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Ilaria; Cannon, Christopher P; Braunwald, Eugene; Goodrich, Erica L; Im, KyungAh; Lukas, Mary Ann; O'Donoghue, Michelle L

    2018-01-01

    Background The incremental prognostic value of assessing the metabolic syndrome has been disputed. Little is known regarding its prognostic value in patients after an acute coronary syndrome. Design and methods The presence of metabolic syndrome (2005 International Diabetes Federation) was assessed at baseline in SOLID-TIMI 52, a trial of patients within 30 days of acute coronary syndrome (median follow-up 2.5 years). The primary endpoint was major coronary events (coronary heart disease death, myocardial infarction or urgent coronary revascularization). Results At baseline, 61.6% ( n = 7537) of patients met the definition of metabolic syndrome, 34.7% (n = 4247) had diabetes and 29.3% had both ( n = 3584). The presence of metabolic syndrome was associated with increased risk of major coronary events (adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR) 1.29, p < 0.0001) and recurrent myocardial infarction (adjHR 1.30, p < 0.0001). Of the individual components of the definition, only diabetes (adjHR 1.48, p < 0.0001) or impaired fasting glucose (adjHR 1.21, p = 0.002) and hypertension (adjHR 1.46, p < 0.0001) were associated with the risk of major coronary events. In patients without diabetes, metabolic syndrome was numerically but not significantly associated with the risk of major coronary events (adjHR 1.13, p = 0.06). Conversely, diabetes was a strong independent predictor of major coronary events in the absence of metabolic syndrome (adjHR 1.57, p < 0.0001). The presence of both diabetes and metabolic syndrome identified patients at highest risk of adverse outcomes but the incremental value of metabolic syndrome was not significant relative to diabetes alone (adjHR 1.07, p = 0.54). Conclusions After acute coronary syndrome, diabetes is a strong and independent predictor of adverse outcomes. Assessment of the metabolic syndrome provides only marginal incremental value once the presence or absence of diabetes is established.

  3. Thyroid functions and serum lipid profile in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gutch, Manish; Rungta, Sumit; Kumar, Sukriti; Agarwal, Avinash; Bhattacharya, Annesh; Razi, Syed Mohd

    2017-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are known to affect energy metabolism. Many patients of metabolic syndrome have subclinical or clinical hypothyroidism and vice versa. To study the correlation of thyroid profile and serum lipid profile with metabolic syndrome. It is a hospital based cross sectional case-control study carried out in tertiary care health center, we studied thyroid functions test and serum lipid profile in 100 metabolic syndrome patients according to IDF criteria and a similar number of age, gender and ethnicity matched healthy controls. We found that serum HDL was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in cases (41.28 ± 8.81) as compared to controls (54.00 ± 6.31). It was also found that serum LDL, VLDL, triglyceride levels and total cholesterol were found to be significantly higher (p < 0.001) in cases than controls. Serum TSH levels of subjects in cases group (3.33 ± 0.78) were significantly higher (p < 0.001) than that of controls (2.30 ± 0.91) and significantly lower levels of T 4 (p < 0.001) in the patients of metabolic syndrome (117.45) than in controls (134.64) while higher levels of T 3 , although statistically insignificant in the patients of metabolic syndrome. Thyroid hormones up-regulate metabolic pathways relevant to resting energy expenditure, hence, obesity and thyroid functions are often correlated. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pre-diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Scott M

    2012-02-14

    Pre-diabetes represents an elevation of plasma glucose above the normal range but below that of clinical diabetes. Pre-diabetes can be identified as either impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The latter is detected by oral glucose tolerance testing. Both IFG and IGT are risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and risk is even greater when IFG and IGT occur together. Pre-diabetes commonly associates with the metabolic syndrome. Both in turn are closely associated with obesity. The mechanisms whereby obesity predisposes to pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome are incompletely understood but likely have a common metabolic soil. Insulin resistance is a common factor; systemic inflammation engendered by obesity may be another. Pre-diabetes has only a minor impact on microvascular disease; glucose-lowering drugs can delay conversion to diabetes, but whether in the long run the drug approach will delay development of microvascular disease is in dispute. To date, the drug approach to prevention of microvascular disease starting with pre-diabetes has not been evaluated. Pre-diabetes carries some predictive power for macrovascular disease, but most of this association appears to be mediated through the metabolic syndrome. The preferred clinical approach to cardiovascular prevention is to treat all the metabolic risk factors. For both pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome, the desirable approach is lifestyle intervention, especially weight reduction and physical activity. When drug therapy is contemplated and when the metabolic syndrome is present, the primary consideration is prevention of cardiovascular disease. The major targets are elevations of cholesterol and blood pressure. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Epigenomics, gestational programming and risk of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, M; Jellyman, J K; Ross, M G

    2015-04-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are emerging as mediators linking early environmental exposures during pregnancy with programmed changes in gene expression that alter offspring growth and development. There is irrefutable evidence from human and animal studies that nutrient and environmental agent exposures (for example, endocrine disruptors) during pregnancy may affect fetal/newborn development resulting in offspring obesity and obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities (metabolic syndrome). This concept of 'gestational programming' is associated with alterations to the epigenome (nongenomic) rather than changes in the DNA sequence (genomic). Epigenetic alterations induced by suboptimal maternal nutrition/endocrine factors include DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and/or regulatory feedback by microRNAs, all of which have the ability to modulate gene expression and promote the metabolic syndrome phenotype. Recent studies have shown tissue-specific transcriptome patterns and phenotypes not only in the exposed individual, but also in subsequent progeny. Notably, the transmission of gestational programming effects to subsequent generations occurs in the absence of continued adverse environmental exposures, thus propagating the cycle of obesity and metabolic syndrome. This phenomenon may be attributed to an extrinsic process resulting from the maternal phenotype and the associated nutrient alterations occurring within each pregnancy. In addition, epigenetic inheritance may occur through somatic cells or through the germ line involving both maternal and paternal lineages. Since epigenetic gene modifications may be reversible, understanding how epigenetic mechanisms contribute to transgenerational transmission of obesity and metabolic dysfunction is crucial for the development of novel early detection and prevention strategies for programmed metabolic syndrome. In this review we discuss the evidence in human and animal studies for the role of

  6. Endocrine and metabolic aspects of the Wolfram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boutzios, Georgios; Livadas, Sarantis; Marinakis, Evangelos; Opie, Nicole; Economou, Frangiskos; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2011-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness), is a neurodegenerative disease with autosomal recessive inheritance with incomplete penetrance. DIDMOAD is a very rare disease with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 770,000 and it is believed to occur in 1 of 150 patients with juvenile-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Additionally, WS may also present with different endocrine and metabolic abnormalities such as anterior and posterior pituitary gland dysfunction. This mini-review summarizes the variable presentation of WS and the need of screening for other metabolic and hormonal abnormalities, coexisting in this rare syndrome.

  7. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in South Asians

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Danny; Kalra, Girish L; Merchant, Nadya; Arora, Anjali; Khan, Bobby V

    2009-01-01

    This review discusses the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in the South Asian population, evaluates conventional and emerging risk factors, and reinforces the need for ethnic-specific redefinition of guidelines used to diagnose metabolic syndrome. We reviewed recent and past literature using Ovid Medline and PubMed databases. South Asians represent one of the largest and fastest growing ethnic groups in the world. With this growth, a dramatic rise in the rates of acute myocardial infarction and diabetes is being seen in this population. Potential etiologies for this phenomenon include dietary westernization, poor lifestyle measures, adverse body fat patterning, and genetics. While traditional risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease should not be overlooked, early metabolic syndrome has now been shown in the South Asian pediatric population, suggesting that “metabolic programming” and perinatal influences may likely play a substantial role. Health care practitioners must be aware that current guidelines used to identify individuals with metabolic syndrome are underestimating South Asian individuals at risk. New ethnic-specific guidelines and prevention strategies are discussed in this review and should be applied by clinicians to their South Asian patients. PMID:19756165

  8. Type 1 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Chillarón, Juan J; Flores Le-Roux, Juana A; Benaiges, David; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2014-02-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) traditionally had a low body mass index and microangiopathic complications were common, while macroangiopathy and the metabolic syndrome were exceptional. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, published in 1993, demonstrated that therapy aimed at maintaining HbA1c levels as close to normal as feasible reduced the incidence of microangiopathy. Since then, the use of intensive insulin therapy to optimize metabolic control became generalized. Improved glycemic control resulted in a lower incidence of microangiopathy; however, its side effects included a higher rate of severe hypoglycemia and increased weight gain. Approximately 50% of patients with T1DM are currently obese or overweight, and between 8% and 40% meet the metabolic syndrome criteria. The components of the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance have been linked to chronic T1DM complications, and cardiovascular disease is now the leading cause of death in these patients. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are required in T1DM subjects, not only to intensively lower glycemia, but to control all associated metabolic syndrome traits. © 2013.

  9. [Nutritional evaluation in Mexican postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Balas Nakash, Margie; Perichart Perera, Otilia; Pantoja de Anda, Lorena; Rodríguez Cano, Ameyalli; Ortiz Luna, Guillermo

    2007-09-01

    The posmenopausal women has higher cardiovascular risks, since their concentrations of glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triacilglycerides and lipoproteins are bigger, while their HDL-cholesterol decreases; this factors increases the risk of suffering metabolic syndrome. To describe the nutritional status and cardiovascular risk of Mexican posmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed the nutritional status and cardiovascular risk factors of Mexican women (n = 93) with overweight or obesity and metabolic syndrome. The three most frequent met criteria for metabolic syndrome were abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol levels. Without considering abdominal obesity, the most common alterations during initial assessment were high LDL cholesterol levels, low HDL cholesterol levels and hypertriglyceridemia. Women with a body mass index up to 35 did not appear to have higher values than overweight and obese grade I women. We did not find differences in metabolic variables among older women or in those using hormone therapy. A high carbohydrate and saturated fat intake was observed, as well as high fat dairy and frequent non healthy cooking methods. On the other hand, intake of fruits, vegetables, and high fiber carbohydrates was low. Average physical activity was reported to be only 30 minutes a week. The observed dietary pattern in these women, and their inactivity level could be exacerbating their cardiovascular risk factors. The promotion of a cardioprotective dietary pattern in these women is essential and urgent.

  10. Development of Metabolic Syndrome Associated to Cancer Therapy: Review.

    PubMed

    Casco, Stephania; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Long-term childhood cancer survivors are at great risk of developing late adverse effects after treatment, such as, reduced growth, obesity, decreased fertility, high blood pressure, cardiovascular diseases, impaired glucose, another form of cancer, among others organ dysfunctions, some of them are part of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome and cancer connection is still not entirely understood, but there are some notions about it. Metabolic alterations produced during childhood cancer are more likely determined by treatments like radiotherapy, chemotherapy, glucocorticoids therapy, and surgery. Cancer treatment is associated to vascular alterations, hormone deficiencies, changes in insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism, and inflammatory mediators. Obesity has been considered a crucial component in metabolic syndrome; obesity risk factors during childhood cancer include cranial radiation, female gender, and exposure to glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone. In addition, local radiotherapy or surgery may cause endocrine deficiencies, depends on the directly damage of endocrine organs. Patients who received some types of cancer treatment should be evaluated periodically to early diagnostic metabolic disorders associated to antineoplastic therapy.

  11. The Definition and Prevalence of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    Increase in prevalence of obesity has become a worldwide major health problem in adults, as well as among children and adolescents. Furthermore, total adiposity and truncal subcutaneous fat accumulation during adolescence are positively and independently associated with atherosclerosis at adult ages. Centrally accumulation of body fat is associated with insulin resistance, whereas distribution of body fat in a peripheral pattern is metabolically less important. Obesity is associated with a large decrease in life expectancy. The effect of extreme obesity on mortality is greater among younger than older adults. In this respect, obesity is also associated with increased risk of several cancer types. However, up to 30% of obese patients are metabolically healthy with insulin sensitivity similar to healthy normal weight individuals, lower visceral fat content, and lower intima media thickness of the carotid artery than the majority of metabolically "unhealthy" obese patients.Abdominal obesity is the most frequently observed component of metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome; clustering of abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension, is a major public health challenge. The average prevalence of metabolic syndrome is 31%, and is associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of all-cause mortality.

  12. Selenium, Vanadium, and Chromium as Micronutrients to Improve Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Sunil K; Wanyonyi, Stephen; Brown, Lindsay

    2017-03-01

    Trace metals play an important role in the proper functioning of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Some of the trace metals are thus essential for maintaining homeostasis, while deficiency of these trace metals can cause disorders with metabolic and physiological imbalances. This article concentrates on three trace metals (selenium, vanadium, and chromium) that may play crucial roles in controlling blood glucose concentrations possibly through their insulin-mimetic effects. For these trace metals, the level of evidence available for their health effects as supplements is weak. Thus, their potential is not fully exploited for the target of metabolic syndrome, a constellation that increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Given that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome is increasing throughout the world, a simpler option of interventions with food supplemented with well-studied trace metals could serve as an answer to this problem. The oxidation state and coordination chemistry play crucial roles in defining the responses to these trace metals, so further research is warranted to understand fully their metabolic and cardiovascular effects in human metabolic syndrome.

  13. Metabolic syndrome: what is it and what are the implications?

    PubMed

    Shaw, D I; Hall, W L; Williams, C M

    2005-08-01

    Obesity and overweight are linked with a cluster of metabolic and vascular disorders that have been termed the metabolic syndrome. Although there is not yet a universally-accepted set of diagnostic criteria, most expert groups agree that the syndrome is characterised by impaired insulin sensitivity and hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia (elevated blood triacyglycerols with depressed HDL-cholesterol), abdominal obesity and hypertension. Based on existing published criteria estimates suggest that the syndrome affects a substantial percentage of the middle-aged and elderly populations of most European countries (10-20%) and confers increased risk of type 2 diabetes (2-8.8-fold) and CVD (1.5-6-fold), as well as having a marked effect on morbidity. Although the pathophysiology is incompletely understood, insulin resistance and abdominal obesity are central to subsequent abnormalities in circulating glucose and lipoproteins, and vascular function that lead to type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis and CVD. The link between metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD, as well as inability to reverse the present rising rates of obesity, will lead to economically-unsustainable costs of health care in the next 10-20 years. Preventative strategies for metabolic syndrome are required to slow rates of progression and to reduce dependence on costly medical management. A notable development is recent evidence that shows that diet and exercise are more effective than drug treatment in preventing the development of type-2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. The LIPGENE project will investigate dietary fat quality as a strategy for the prevention of metabolic syndrome and identify food chain approaches that can support consumer attempts to alter their dietary patterns.

  14. Effect of Mediterranean diet with and without weight loss on apolipoprotein B100 metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) with and without weight loss (WL) on apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) metabolism in men with metabolic syndrome. The diet of 19 men with metabolic syndrome (age, 24–62 years) was first standardized to a North America...

  15. A Clinical Pharmacist's Role in Screening for Metabolic Syndrome in a Rural Pediatric Ambulatory Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavides, Sandra; Kohler, Lisa A.; Souffrant, Garry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the pediatric population is increasing. Barriers, including the lack of consensus of a definition for metabolic syndrome and time constraints for the pediatrician, may limit the identification and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the role…

  16. A clustering analysis of lipoprotein diameters in the metabolic syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The presence of smaller low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been associated with atherosclerosis risk, and the insulin resistance (IR) underlying the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In addition, some research has supported the association of very low-, low- and high-density lipoprotein (VLDL HDL) particle...

  17. Metabolic Syndrome in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahi, Gita; LeBlanc, Paul J.; Hay, John A.; Faught, Brent E.; O'Leary, Debra; Cairney, John

    2011-01-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have higher rates of obesity compared to children with typical motor development, and, as a result may be at increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome (MetS). The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of MetS and its components among children with and without DCD. This…

  18. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Individual Criteria in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, Jill; Lofgren, Ingrid E.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is present in young adults and because coronary heart disease (CHD) is likely, screening to determine MetS prevalence and its criteria is critical. Objective: To determine MetS prevalence and most prevalent criteria in a sample of first-year college students. Participants: First-year college students between 18 and 24…

  19. Physical Activity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Overweight in Rural Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Justin B.; Davis, Catherine L.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Lewis, Richard D.; Yin, Zenong

    2008-01-01

    Background: Research suggests significant health differences between rural dwelling youth and their urban counterparts with relation to cardiovascular risk factors. This study was conducted to (1) determine relationships between physical activity and markers of metabolic syndrome, and (2) to explore factors relating to physical activity in a…

  20. Division IAA Football Players and Risk Factors for Metabolic Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repovich, Wendy E. S.; Babcock, Garth J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if body composition and blood pressure (BP), two markers for Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), were correlated in college football players. Height, weight, BMI, systolic (SBP) and Diastolic (DBP) blood pressure and body composition (three measures) were assessed in a Division IAA football team (N = 55). Data…

  1. Targeting SREBPs for treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soyal, Selma M; Nofziger, Charity; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus; Patsch, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Over the past few decades, mortality resulting from cardiovascular disease (CVD) steadily decreased in western countries; however, in recent years, the decline has become offset by the increase in obesity. Obesity is strongly associated with the metabolic syndrome and its atherogenic dyslipidemia resulting from insulin resistance. While lifestyle treatment would be effective, drugs targeting individual risk factors are often required. Such treatment may result in polypharmacy. Novel approaches are directed towards the treatment of several risk factors with one drug. Studies in animal models and humans suggest a central role for sterol regulatory-element binding proteins (SREBPs) in the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome. Four recent studies targeting the maturation or transcriptional activities of SREBPs provide proof of concept for the efficacy of SREBP inhibition in this syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biochemistry, Therapeutics, and Biomarker Implications of Neprilysin in Cardiorenal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Burnett, John C

    2017-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is a membrane-bound neutral endopeptidase that degrades a variety of bioactive peptides. The substrates include natriuretic peptides (NPs), which are important regulating mediators for cardiovascular and renal biology. Inhibition of NEP activity and exogenous NP administration thus have emerged as potential therapeutic strategies for treating cardiorenal diseases. More recently, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal-proBNP (NT-proBNP), 3'-5' cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and soluble NEP as biomarkers have also been investigated in heart failure (HF) trials and their predictive value are beginning to be recognized. The biological functions of NEP and NPs are discussed. Enhancing NPs through NEP inhibition combined with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) antagonism has proved to be successful in HF treatment, although future surveillance studies will be required. Direct NP enhancement through peptide delivery may have fewer potentially hazardous effects compared to NEP inhibition. Strategies of combined inhibition on NEP with other cardiorenal pathophysiological pathways are promising. Finally, monitoring BNP/NT-proBNP/cGMP concentrations during NEP inhibition treatment may provide supplemental benefits to conventional biomarkers, and the identification of soluble NEP as a novel biomarker for HF needs further investigation. In this review, the biology of NEP is summarized, with a focus on NP regulation. The degradation of NPs by NEP provides the rationale for NEP inhibition as a strategy for cardiorenal disease treatment. We also describe the current therapeutic strategies of NEP inhibition and NP therapeutics in cardiorenal diseases. Moreover, the discovery of its circulating form, soluble NEP, as a biomarker is also discussed. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  3. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Iran: A 2011 update.

    PubMed

    Noshad, Sina; Abbasi, Mehrshad; Etemad, Koorosh; Meysamie, Alipasha; Afarideh, Mohsen; Khajeh, Elias; Asgari, Fereshteh; Mousavizadeh, Mostafa; Rafei, Ali; Neishaboury, Mohamadreza; Ghajar, Alireza; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Esteghamati, Alireza

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its individual components among the Iranian adult population in 2011 and to investigate changes between 2007 and 2011. Data from two rounds of the Surveillance of Risk Factors of Non-communicable Diseases national surveys conducted in 2007 and 2011 were pooled. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to International Diabetes Federation criteria. In 2007, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among adults aged 25-64 years was 35.95 (95% confidence interval [CI] 34.27-37.63), which decreased to 32.96 (95% CI 30.73-35.18) in 2011 (P = 0.0108). Despite this overall decline, the prevalence of central obesity (P = 0.1383), raised triglycerides (P = 0.3058), and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; P = 0.5595) remained constant. There was a trend towards a decline in the proportion of individuals with increased blood pressure (P = 0.0978), and the proportion of adults with increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG) increased (P < 0.0001). In 2011, the prevalence of central obesity, raised triglycerides, reduced HDL-C, increased blood pressure and increased FPG was 51.88 (95% CI 48.97-54.79), 36.99 (95% CI 34.52-39.45), 54.72 (95% CI 50.87-58.57), 38.92 (95% CI 36.19-41.64), and 24.97 (95% CI 22.02-27.93) respectively. Over the period 2007-11, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome has decreased slightly in Iran, although prevalence of increased FPG has increased significantly. One-third of the Iranian adult population is diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Chronic Idiopathic Axonal Polyneuropathy Is Associated With the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Nora A.; Vrancken, Alexander F.J.E.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Notermans, Nicolette C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to investigate the association between chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathy (CIAP) and the metabolic syndrome or its individual components. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 249 patients with CIAP and 709 controls underwent fasting laboratory studies, and blood pressure and waist circumference were measured. The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed if three or more of the following Adult Treatment Panel III criteria were present: impaired fasting glucose, hypertension, abdominal obesity, reduced HDL cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia. Subgroup analysis was performed for patients with a painful predominantly sensory CIAP, because this phenotype is most similar to diabetic polyneuropathy. Statistical analysis was performed with adjustment for age and gender. RESULTS Fifty-five percent of all patients fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria compared with 34% of controls (odds ratio 2.2 [95% CI 1.7–3.0]). Multivariate analysis shows hypertension (2.9 [1.7–4.9]) and abdominal obesity (3.3 [2.4–4.6]) to be significantly more prevalent in patients than in controls. Of the patients classified as having a painful predominantly sensory CIAP, 62% fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (3.1 [2.0–4.8]). In this subgroup, hypertension and abdominal obesity also were significantly more prevalent compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS Abdominal obesity and hypertension seem to be the most consistent contributing components of the metabolic syndrome in patients with CIAP. Evaluation and appropriate treatment of these risk factors in patients with CIAP would be advocated. PMID:23204246

  5. The association of metabolic syndrome markers with adhesive capsulitis.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel C; Gans, Itai; Park, Min Jung; Carey, James L; Kelly, John D

    2014-07-01

    Research has associated adhesive capsulitis with diabetes mellitus but suggests that glucose-mediated injury may begin before diabetes is diagnosed. The period preceding diabetes is often marked by metabolic syndrome. We investigated the relationship between metabolic syndrome components (insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity) and the development of adhesive capsulitis using a case-control study. We retrospectively reviewed 150 consecutive adhesive capsulitis patient charts to determine the prevalence of obesity and of medications used for treating metabolic syndrome elements and compared these with previously reported nationwide values. The prevalence of anti-hyperglycemia medications in the adhesive capsulitis cohort was 18.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.9%-25.7%), twice the national rate of diagnosed diabetes of 7.6% (95% CI, 6.7%-8.5%). In the 20- to 39-year-old group, the prevalence of anti-hyperglycemic medications, 26.3% (95% CI, 11.8%-48.8%), was over 10 times the nationwide rate. The overall prevalence of hypertensive medication use in the adhesive capsulitis group, 33.1% (95% CI, 25.9%-41.2%), was notably higher than the nationwide rate, 21.6% (95% CI, 19.8%-23.4%). In the 40- to 64-year-old group, the prevalence of hypertensive medication use, 36.8% (95% CI, 28.6%-46.0%), was notably higher than the nationwide rate of 24.5% (95% CI, 22.2%-27.0%). The prevalence of anti-lipid medications and obesity was similar between the groups. The relationship between adhesive capsulitis and metabolic syndrome remains unclear. Our results confirm previous work associating hyperglycemia with adhesive capsulitis. We have also shown a possible association of hypertension, part of metabolic syndrome and a proinflammatory condition, with adhesive capsulitis, which has not been previously described. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dietary patterns are associated with metabolic syndrome in adult Samoans.

    PubMed

    DiBello, Julia R; McGarvey, Stephen T; Kraft, Peter; Goldberg, Robert; Campos, Hannia; Quested, Christine; Laumoli, Tuiasina Salamo; Baylin, Ana

    2009-10-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has reached epidemic levels in the Samoan Islands. In this cross-sectional study conducted in 2002-2003, dietary patterns were described among American Samoan (n = 723) and Samoan (n = 785) adults (> or =18 y) to identify neo-traditional and modern eating patterns and to relate these patterns to the presence of metabolic syndrome using Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. The neo-traditional dietary pattern, similar across both polities, was characterized by high intake of local foods, including crab/lobster, coconut products, and taro, and low intake of processed foods, including potato chips and soda. The modern pattern, also similar across both polities, was characterized by high intake of processed foods such as rice, potato chips, cake, and pancakes and low intake of local foods. The neo-traditional dietary pattern was associated with significantly higher serum HDL-cholesterol in American Samoa (P-trend = 0.05) and a decrease in abdominal circumference in American Samoa and Samoa (P-trend = 0.004 and 0.01, respectively). An inverse association was found with metabolic syndrome, although it did not reach significance (P = 0.23 in American Samoa; P = 0.13 in Samoa). The modern pattern was significantly positively associated with metabolic syndrome in Samoa (prevalence ratio = 1.21 for the fifth compared with first quintile; 95% CI: 0.93.1.57; P-trend = 0.05) and with increased serum triglyceride levels in both polities (P < 0.05). Reduced intake of processed foods high in refined grains and adherence to a neo-traditional eating pattern characterized by plant-based fiber, seafood, and coconut products may help to prevent growth in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the Samoan islands.

  7. Reducing Metabolic Syndrome Risk Using a Personalized Wellness Program.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Gregory; Scott, Adam; Honcz, Joseph; Spettell, Claire; Pradhan, Susil

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a targeted, personalized wellness program on reducing employees' future risk of metabolic syndrome. Aetna piloted a year-long program that included a limited genetic profile, a traditional psychosocial assessment, and high-intensity coaching in a randomized controlled study of Aetna employees with an increased risk for metabolic syndrome. Sustained employee engagement of 50% over the course of 1 year; 76% of participating employees lost an average of 10 pounds (4.5 kg) (P < 0.001 vs baseline weight), and there were trends in improved clinical outcomes relative to three of five metabolic factors. Average health care costs were reduced by $122 per participant per month, resulting in a positive return on investment in the program's first year. At scale, such programs would be expected to lead to significant downstream reduction in major clinical events and costs.

  8. Activity syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alexander D. M.; Szekeres, Petra; Violich, Mackellar; Gutowsky, Lee F. G.; Eliason, Erika J.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-03-01

    Despite growing interest, the behavioural ecology of deep-sea organisms is largely unknown. Much of this scarcity in knowledge can be attributed to deepwater animals being secretive or comparatively 'rare', as well as technical difficulties associated with accessing such remote habitats. Here we tested whether two species of giant marine isopod (Bathynomus giganteus, Booralana tricarinata) captured from 653 to 875 m in the Caribbean Sea near Eleuthera, The Bahamas, exhibited an activity behavioural syndrome across two environmental contexts (presence/absence of food stimulus) and further whether this syndrome carried over consistently between sexes. We also measured routine metabolic rate and oxygen consumption in response to a food stimulus in B. giganteus to assess whether these variables are related to individual differences in personality. We found that both species show an activity syndrome across environmental contexts, but the underlying mechanistic basis of this syndrome, particularly in B. giganteus, is unclear. Contrary to our initial predictions, neither B. giganteus nor B. tricarinata showed any differences between mean expression of behavioural traits between sexes. Both sexes of B. tricarinata showed strong evidence of an activity syndrome underlying movement and foraging ecology, whereas only male B. giganteus showed evidence of an activity syndrome. Generally, individuals that were more active and bolder, in a standard open arena test were also more active when a food stimulus was present. Interestingly, individual differences in metabolism were not related to individual differences in behaviour based on present data. Our study provides the first measurements of behavioural syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods.

  9. Epigenetic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and dietary management.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nidhi; Nakka, Kiran Kumar; Maulik, Nilanjana; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2012-07-15

    Metabolic syndrome constitutes a group of disorders such as insulin resistance, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia, predisposing an individual to risk factors such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia. A majority of these diseases are influenced by the environmental factors, nutrient uptake, and genetic profile of an individual that together dysregulate gene function. These genetic and nongenetic factors are reported to introduce epigenetic cues that modulate the gene function which is inherited by the offspring. Considering the epigenetic modulation of the metabolic disorders, nutrigenomics has been distinctly categorized as a branch that deals with modulatory effect of nutrients on metabolic disorders and disease progression by supplementing the individuals with key nutrient-enriched diets which are derived from plant and animal sources. Nutritional components of the diet regulate the metabolic health of an individual either by controlling the expression of some key genes related to metabolic pathways or by modulating the epigenetic events on such genes. The present article discusses various metabolic disorders in detail and the effect of nutrients on the specific genes causing those disorders. We also highlight the molecular mechanisms of some metabolic disorders through epigenetic modifications and possible therapeutic interventions. With the advent of high-throughput technologies and epigenetic modulation of the metabolic disorders, an altered epigenetic code that is programmed due to improper nutrients can be reverted back by supplementing the diet with various plant-derived compounds. The implication of small molecular drugs is also of utmost significance for challenging the metabolic disorders.

  10. Klinefelter syndrome, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes: review of literature and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Salzano, Andrea; D'Assante, Roberta; Heaney, Liam M; Monaco, Federica; Rengo, Giuseppe; Valente, Pietro; Pasquali, Daniela; Bossone, Eduardo; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Lenzi, Andrea; Cittadini, Antonio; Marra, Alberto M; Napoli, Raffaele

    2018-03-23

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS), the most frequent chromosomic abnormality in males, is associated with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The mechanisms involved in increasing risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are not completely understood. This review summarises the current understandings of the complex relationship between KS, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk in order to plan future studies and improve current strategies to reduce mortality in this high-risk population. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus for manuscripts published prior to November 2017 using key words "Klinefelter syndrome" AND "insulin resistance" OR "metabolic syndrome" OR "diabetes mellitus" OR "cardiovascular disease" OR "testosterone". Manuscripts were collated, studied and carried forward for discussion where appropriate. Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes are more frequently diagnosed in KS than in the general population; however, the contribution of hypogonadism to metabolic derangement is highly controversial. Whether this dangerous combination of risk factors fully explains the CVD burden of KS patients remains unclear. In addition, testosterone replacement therapy only exerts a marginal action on the CVD system. Since fat accumulation and distribution seem to play a relevant role in triggering metabolic abnormalities, an early diagnosis and a tailored intervention strategy with drugs aimed at targeting excessive visceral fat deposition appear necessary in patients with KS.

  11. Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeater, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the scope of the problem of obesity in the United States, noting the health risks associated with being overweight or obese (e.g., gallstones, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, and colon cancer); discussing the association of type-II diabetes mellitus with obesity; examining the effects of exercise on metabolic disease; and looking at…

  12. Physical activity in obesity and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Biological aging is typically associated with a progressive increase in body fat mass and a loss of lean body mass. Owing to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevalence of metabolic disorders. Lifestyle modification, specifically changes in diet, physical activity, and exercise, is considered the cornerstone of obesity management. However, for most overweight people it is difficult to lose weight permanently through diet or exercise. Thus, prevention of weight gain is thought to be more effective than weight loss in reducing obesity rates. A key question is whether physical activity can extenuate age-related weight gain and promote metabolic health in adults. Current guidelines suggest that adults should accumulate about 60 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity daily to prevent unhealthy weight gain. Because evidence suggests that resistance training may promote a negative energy balance and may change body fat distribution, it is possible that an increase in muscle mass after resistance training may be a key mediator leading to better metabolic control. PMID:23167451

  13. Association of Metabolic Syndrome With Kidney Function and Histology in Living Kidney Donors

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Y.; Thomas, G.; Nurko, S.; Stephany, B.; Fatica, R.; Chiesa, A.; Rule, A. D.; Srinivas, T.; Schold, J. D.; Navaneethan, S. D.; Poggio, E. D.

    2013-01-01

    The selection of living kidney donors is based on a formal evaluation of the state of health. However, this spectrum of health includes subtle metabolic derangements that can cluster as metabolic syndrome. We studied the association of metabolic syndrome with kidney function and histology in 410 donors from 2005 to 2012, of whom 178 donors were systematically followed after donation since 2009. Metabolic syndrome was defined as per the NCEP ATPIII criteria, but using a BMI > 25 kg/m2 instead of waist circumference. Following donation, donors received counseling on lifestyle modification. Metabolic syndrome was present in 50 (12.2%) donors. Donors with metabolic syndrome were more likely to have chronic histological changes on implant biopsies than donors with no metabolic syndrome (29.0% vs. 9.3%, p < 0.001). This finding was associated with impaired kidney function recovery following donation. At last follow-up, reversal of metabolic syndrome was observed in 57.1% of donors with predonation metabolic syndrome, while only 10.8% of donors developed de novo metabolic syndrome (p < 0.001). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome in donors is associated with chronic histological changes, and nephrectomy in these donors was associated with subsequent protracted recovery of kidney function. Importantly, weight loss led to improvement of most abnormalities that define metabolic syndrome. PMID:23865821

  14. Association of sleep quality components and wake time with metabolic syndrome: The Qazvin Metabolic Diseases Study (QMDS), Iran.

    PubMed

    Zohal, Mohammadali; Ghorbani, Azam; Esmailzadehha, Neda; Ziaee, Amir; Mohammadi, Zahrasadat

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association of sleep quality and sleep quantity with metabolic syndrome in Qazvin, Iran. this cross sectional study was conducted in 1079 residents of Qazvin selected by multistage cluster random sampling method in 2011. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria proposed by the national cholesterol education program third Adult treatment panel. Sleep was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI). A logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of sleep status and metabolic syndrome. Mean age was 40.08±10.33years. Of 1079, 578 (52.2%) were female, and 30.6% had metabolic syndrome. The total global PSQI score in the subjects with metabolic syndrome was significantly higher than subjects without metabolic syndrome (6.30±3.20 vs. 5.83±2.76, P=0.013). In logistic regression analysis, sleep disturbances was associated with 1.388 fold increased risk of metabolic syndrome after adjustment for age, gender, and body mass index. Sleep disturbances component was a predictor of metabolic syndrome in the present study. More longitudinal studies are necessary to understand the association of sleep quality and its components with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New targets to treat obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kathleen A; Mani, Mitra V; Mani, Arya

    2015-09-15

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster ofassociated metabolic traits that collectively confer unsurpassed risk for development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes compared to any single CVD risk factor. Truncal obesity plays an exceptionally critical role among all metabolic traits of the MetS. Consequently, the prevalence of the MetS has steadily increased with the growing epidemic of obesity. Pharmacotherapy has been available for obesity for more than one decade, but with little success in improving the metabolic profiles. The serotonergic drugs and inhibitors of pancreatic lipases were among the few drugs that were initially approved to treat obesity. At the present time, only the pancreatic lipase inhibitor orlistat is approved for long-term treatment of obesity. New classes of anti-diabetic drugs, including glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists and Dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors, are currently being evaluated for their effects on obesity and metabolic traits. The genetic studies of obesity and metabolic syndrome have identified novel molecules acting on the hunger and satiety peptidergic signaling of the gut-hypothalamus axis or the melanocortin system of the brain and are promising targets for future drug development. The goal is to develop drugs that not only treat obesity, but also favorably impact its associated traits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency protects from metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choe, Chi-un; Nabuurs, Christine; Stockebrand, Malte C; Neu, Axel; Nunes, Patricia; Morellini, Fabio; Sauter, Kathrin; Schillemeit, Stefan; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Marescau, Bart; Heerschap, Arend; Isbrandt, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated creatine (Cr) serves as an energy buffer for ATP replenishment in organs with highly fluctuating energy demand. The central role of Cr in the brain and muscle is emphasized by severe neurometabolic disorders caused by Cr deficiency. Common symptoms of inborn errors of creatine synthesis or distribution include mental retardation and muscular weakness. Human mutations in l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT), the first enzyme of Cr synthesis, lead to severely reduced Cr and guanidinoacetate (GuA) levels. Here, we report the generation and metabolic characterization of AGAT-deficient mice that are devoid of Cr and its precursor GuA. AGAT-deficient mice exhibited decreased fat deposition, attenuated gluconeogenesis, reduced cholesterol levels and enhanced glucose tolerance. Furthermore, Cr deficiency completely protected from the development of metabolic syndrome caused by diet-induced obesity. Biochemical analyses revealed the chronic Cr-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which stimulates catabolic pathways in metabolically relevant tissues such as the brain, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and liver, suggesting a mechanism underlying the metabolic phenotype. In summary, our results show marked metabolic effects of Cr deficiency via the chronic activation of AMPK in a first animal model of AGAT deficiency. In addition to insights into metabolic changes in Cr deficiency syndromes, our genetic model reveals a novel mechanism as a potential treatment option for obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with alcoholic Korsakoff's syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Parker, E.S.; Clark, C.M.

    1985-05-01

    Seven alcoholic male subjects diagnosed as having Korsakoff's syndrome and eight age-matched male normal volunteers were studied with /sup 18/F 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2/sup 18/FDG). All subjects were examined at rest with eyes covered in a quiet, darkened room. Serial plasma samples were obtained following injection of 4 to 5 mCi of 2/sup 18/FDG. Tomographic slices spaced at 10mm axial increments were obtained (in-plane resolution = 1.75 cm, axial resolution = 1.78 cm). Four planes were selected from each subject, and a total of 46 regions of interest were sampled and glucose metabolic rates for each region calculated. The mean glucose metalbolicmore » rate for the 46 regions in the Korsakoff subjects was significantly lower than that in the normal controls (5.17 +- .43 versus 6.6 +- 1.31). A Q-component analysis, which examined each subject's regional rates relative to his mean rate, revealed two distinct patterns in the Korsakoff group. Glucose metabolism was significantly reduced in 37 of the 46 regions sampled. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism in a nondemented group of subjects has not previously been reported. The reduction in cortical metabolism may be the result of damage to sub-cortical projecting systems. The differing patterns of cerebral metabolism in Korsakoff's syndrome suggests subgroups with differing neuropathology. Regions implicated in memory function, medial temporal, thalamic and medial prefrontal were among the regions reduced in metabolism.« less

  18. Metabolic syndrome criteria as predictors of insulin resistance, inflammation and mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Barbara Perez; Souza, Priscilla L; Minicucci, Marcos Ferreira; Martin, Luis Cuadrado; Barretti, Pasqual; Caramori, Jacqueline Teixeira

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic syndrome are characterized by overlapping disorders, including glucose intolerance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and, in some cases, obesity. However, there are no specific criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in CKD. Metabolic syndrome can also be associated with increased risk of mortality. Some traditional risk factors may protect dialysis patients from mortality, known as "reverse epidemiology." Metabolic syndrome might undergo reverse epidemiology. The objectives were to detect differences in frequency and metabolic characteristics associated with three sets of diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome, to evaluate the accuracy of insulin resistance (IR) and inflammation to identify patients with metabolic syndrome, and to investigate the effects of metabolic syndrome by three sets of diagnostic criteria on mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients. An observational study was conducted. Diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome proposed by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome (HMetS) statement were applied to 98 hemodialysis patients. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 51%, 66.3%, and 75.3% according to NCEP ATP III, IDF, and HMetS criteria, respectively. Diagnosis of metabolic syndrome by HMetS was simultaneously capable of revealing both inflammation and IR, whereas NCEP ATP III and IDF criteria were only able to identify IR. Mortality risk increased in the presence of metabolic syndrome regardless of the criteria used. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis varies according to the diagnostic criteria used. IR and inflammation predict metabolic syndrome only when diagnosed by HMetS criteria. HMetS was the diagnostic criteria that can predict the highest risk of mortality.

  19. Impact of Mediterranean diet on metabolic syndrome, cancer and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Noce, Annalisa; Vidiri, Maria Francesca; Moriconi, Eleonora; Marrone, Giulia; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; D’Urso, Gabriele; Tesauro, Manfredi; Rovella, Valentina; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Obesity symbolizes a major public health problem. Overweight and obesity are associated to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome and to adipose tissue dysfunction. The adipose tissue is metabolically active and an endocrine organ, whose dysregulation causes a low-grade inflammatory state and ectopic fat depositions. The Mediterranean Diet represents a possible therapy for metabolic syndrome, preventing adiposopathy or “sick fat” formation. The Mediterranean Diet exerts protective effects in elderly subjects with and without baseline of chronic diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between cancer and obesity. In the US, diet represents amount 30-35% of death causes related to cancer. Currently, the cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases worldwide. Furthermore, populations living in the Mediterranean area have a decreased incidence of cancer compared with populations living in Northern Europe or the US, likely due to healthier dietary habits. The bioactive food components have a potential preventive action on cancer. The aims of this review are to evaluate the impact of Mediterranean Diet on onset, progression and regression of metabolic syndrome, cancer and on longevity. PMID:27894098

  20. Impact of Mediterranean diet on metabolic syndrome, cancer and longevity.

    PubMed

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Noce, Annalisa; Vidiri, Maria Francesca; Moriconi, Eleonora; Marrone, Giulia; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; D'Urso, Gabriele; Tesauro, Manfredi; Rovella, Valentina; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2017-01-31

    Obesity symbolizes a major public health problem. Overweight and obesity are associated to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome and to adipose tissue dysfunction. The adipose tissue is metabolically active and an endocrine organ, whose dysregulation causes a low-grade inflammatory state and ectopic fat depositions. The Mediterranean Diet represents a possible therapy for metabolic syndrome, preventing adiposopathy or "sick fat" formation.The Mediterranean Diet exerts protective effects in elderly subjects with and without baseline of chronic diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between cancer and obesity. In the US, diet represents amount 30-35% of death causes related to cancer. Currently, the cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases worldwide. Furthermore, populations living in the Mediterranean area have a decreased incidence of cancer compared with populations living in Northern Europe or the US, likely due to healthier dietary habits. The bioactive food components have a potential preventive action on cancer. The aims of this review are to evaluate the impact of Mediterranean Diet on onset, progression and regression of metabolic syndrome, cancer and on longevity.

  1. Association of metabolic risk factors with uncontrolled hypertension: comparison of the several definitions of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cortez-Dias, Nuno; Martins, Susana R; Belo, Adriana; Fiuza, Manuela

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of metabolic syndrome in the effectiveness of antihypertensive treatment and to compare it using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) (2001 and 2004), International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (AHA-NHLBI) definitions. The VALSIM (Estudo de Prevalência da Síndrome Metabólica) survey was designed as an observational cross-sectional study performed in a primary healthcare setting in Portugal. The first two adult patients scheduled for an appointment on a given day were invited to participate. The treatment effectiveness was evaluated by the occurrence of uncontrolled hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) in patients taking antihypertensive drugs. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between uncontrolled hypertension and metabolic risk factors, with adjustments for age, sex, and pattern of antihypertensive treatment. Among the 16,856 individuals evaluated, 8925-treated hypertensive patients were identified. Only 35.8% of them had controlled hypertension. The risk of poor blood pressure control increased with age, waist circumference, serum levels of triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol. Among treatable risk factors, metabolic syndrome as defined by NCEP-ATP III 2001 diagnostic criteria was the strongest independent predictor of uncontrolled hypertension (odds ratio: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.08-1.41; P=0.002). In opposition, the IDF or AHA-NHLBI definitions of metabolic syndrome failed to identify patients at risk of poor blood pressure control. Metabolic syndrome is associated with lower effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy and the NCEP-ATP III 2001 definition of metabolic syndrome is the one that better identifies patients at risk of poor blood pressure control.

  2. Shift Work Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Young Female Korean Workers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyoung Hwa; Yi, Yu Hyeon; Kim, Yun Jin; Cho, Byung Mann; Lee, Sang Yeoup; Lee, Jeong Gyu; Jeong, Dong Wook; Ji, So Yeon

    2017-03-01

    Shift work is associated with health problems, including metabolic syndrome. This study investigated the association between shift work and metabolic syndrome in young workers. A total of 3,317 subjects aged 20-40 years enrolled in the 2011-2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were divided into shift and day workers. We conducted a cross-sectional study and calculated odds ratios using multivariate logistic regression analysis in order to examine the association between shift work and metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 14.3% and 7.1% among male and female shift workers, respectively. After adjusting for confounding factors, shift work was associated with metabolic syndrome in female workers (odds ratio, 2.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 5.70). Shift work was associated with metabolic syndrome in young women. Timely efforts are necessary to manage metabolic syndrome in the workplace.

  3. Developmental programming of the metabolic syndrome - critical windows for intervention

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Mark H

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic disease results from a complex interaction of many factors, including genetic, physiological, behavioral and environmental influences. The recent rate at which these diseases have increased suggests that environmental and behavioral influences, rather than genetic causes, are fuelling the present epidemic. In this context, the developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis has highlighted the link between the periconceptual, fetal and early infant phases of life and the subsequent development of adult obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Although the mechanisms are yet to be fully elucidated, this programming was generally considered an irreversible change in developmental trajectory. Recent work in animal models suggests that developmental programming of metabolic disorders is potentially reversible by nutritional or targeted therapeutic interventions during the period of developmental plasticity. This review will discuss critical windows of developmental plasticity and possible avenues to ameliorate the development of postnatal metabolic disorders following an adverse early life environment. PMID:21954418

  4. Defining metabolic syndrome and factors associated with metabolic syndrome in a poly-pharmaceutical population.

    PubMed

    McStea, Megan; McGeechan, Kevin; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Rajasuriar, Reena; Tan, Maw Pin

    2016-11-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (METs) definitions vary and diagnosis takes into account consumption of medications commonly prescribed for conditions defining METs. This paper evaluates the potential differences in population characteristics using two different methods of defining METs, with and without the adjustment of the effects of pharmacotherapy on biochemical and blood pressure (BP) measurements Methods: This was a cross-sectional study utilizing the Malaysian Elders Longitudinal Research (MELoR) cohort comprising urban community-dwellers aged ≥55 years. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire during home visits where medications were reviewed. Health impacts assessed included heart disease, stroke, body mass index (BMI), peptic ulcers, arthritis, and number of medications and comorbidities. Risk factors and health impacts associated with METs were determined by Poisson multivariate regression models using a binary and count dependent variables. A total of 891 participants with a mean (SD) age of 68.6 (7.3) years were included. The prevalence of METs vary from 52.7% to 35.1% depending upon the definition used. The risk factors associated with METs were increasing age, ethnicity, lower education levels, BMI, stroke and medication use. Male gender was considered a risk factor following modification for medication usage using a count model. The drug-modified model removed marginal candidates prescribed medications used for specific conditions which defined METs who did not meet the criteria once their BP or biochemical parameters were modified for the effects of medication-use. The IDF definition for METs that makes allowance for treatment for each specific condition can lead to an overestimation in the prevalence of METs in population studies. Not including those medicated with normal results conversely underestimates the prevalence of METs. We have therefore proposed adjustments to BP and lipid measurements based on pooled mean effects from

  5. Prostate-specific antigen lowering effect of metabolic syndrome is influenced by prostate volume.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Suk; Heo, Nam Ju; Paick, Jae-Seung; Son, Hwancheol

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on prostate-specific antigen levels by considering prostate volume and plasma volume. We retrospectively analyzed 4111 men who underwent routine check-ups including prostate-specific antigen and transrectal ultrasonography. The definition of metabolic syndrome was based on the modified Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Prostate-specific antigen mass density (prostate-specific antigen × plasma volume / prostate volume) was calculated for adjusting plasma volume and prostate volume. We compared prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific antigen mass density levels of participants with metabolic syndrome (metabolic syndrome group, n = 1242) and without metabolic syndrome (non-prostate-specific antigen metabolic syndrome group, n = 2869). To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on prostate-specific antigen, linear regression analysis for the natural logarithm of prostate-specific antigen was used. Patients in the metabolic syndrome group had significantly older age (P < 0.001), larger prostate volume (P < 0.001), higher plasma volume (P < 0.001) and lower mean serum prostate-specific antigen (non-metabolic syndrome group vs metabolic syndrome group; 1.22 ± 0.91 vs 1.15 ± 0.76 ng/mL, P = 0.006). Prostate-specific antigen mass density in the metabolic syndrome group was still significantly lower than that in the metabolic syndrome group (0.124 ± 0.084 vs 0.115 ± 0.071 μg/mL, P = 0.001). After adjusting for age, prostate volume and plasma volume using linear regression model, the presence of metabolic syndrome was a significant independent factor for lower prostate-specific antigen (prostate-specific antigen decrease by 4.1%, P = 0.046). Prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with metabolic syndrome seem to be lower, and this finding might be affected by the prostate volume. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. [Metabolic syndrome and bipolar disorder: Is sleep the missing link?

    PubMed

    Brochard, H; Boudebesse, C; Henry, C; Godin, O; Leboyer, M; Étain, B

    2016-12-01

    To examine the pathophysiologic mechanisms that may link circadian disorder and metabolic syndrome in bipolar disorder (BP). A systematic review of the literature was conducted from January 2013 to January 2015, using the Medline and Cochrane databases, using the keywords "metabolic syndrome", "obesity", "leptin" and "circadian disorders", "sleeping disorders" and cross-referencing them with "bipolar disorder". The following types of publications were candidates for review: (i) clinical trials; (ii) studies involving patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder; (iii) studies involving patients with sleeping disorder; or (iv) data about metabolic syndrome. Forty articles were selected. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in BP was significantly higher compared to the general population (from 36 to 49% in the USA [Vancampfort, 2013]), and could be explained by several factors including reduced exercise and poor diet, genetic vulnerability, frequent depressive episodes, psychiatric comorbidity and psychotropic treatment. This high frequency of metabolic syndrome worsens the prognosis of these patients, increasing morbidity and mortality. Secondly, patients with BP experienced circadian and sleep disturbance, including modification in melatonin secretion. These perturbations are known to persist in periods of mood stabilization and are found in patients' relatives. Circadian disturbances are factors of relapse in bipolar patients, and they may also have a role in the metabolic comorbidities of these patients. Recent studies show that in populations of patients with bipolar disorder, a correlation between circadian disturbance and metabolic parameters are found. To identify the pathophysiological pathway connecting both could lead to a better comprehension of the disease and new therapeutics. In the overall population, mechanisms have been identified linking circadian and metabolic disorder involving hormones like leptin and ghrelin. These hormones are keys to

  7. Fructokinase, Fructans, Intestinal Permeability, and Metabolic Syndrome: An Equine Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Otabachian-Smith, Silvia; Ishimoto, Takuji; Cicerchi, Christina; Cheeke, Peter R.; MacIntosh, Bridgett; Hess, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Fructose is a simple sugar present in honey and fruit, but can also exist as a polymer (fructans) in pasture grasses. Mammals are unable to metabolize fructans, but certain gram positive bacteria contain fructanases and can convert fructans to fructose in the gut. Recent studies suggest that fructose generated from bacteria, or directly obtained from the diet, can induce both increased intestinal permeability and features of metabolic syndrome, especially the development of insulin resistance. The development of insulin resistance is driven in part by the metabolism of fructose by fructokinase C in the liver, which results in oxidative stress in the hepatocyte. Similarly, the metabolism of fructose in the small bowel by intestinal fructokinase may lead to increased intestinal permeability and endotoxemia. While speculative, these observations raise the possibility that the mechanism by which fructans induce laminitis could involve intestinal and hepatic fructokinase. Further studies are indicated to determine the role of fructanases, fructose and fructokinase in equine metabolic syndrome and laminitis. PMID:23439477

  8. Is a unified definition of metabolic syndrome needed? Comparison of three definitions of metabolic syndrome in 60-year-old men and women.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Axel C; Wändell, Per E; Halldin, Mats; de Faire, Ulf; Hellénius, Mai-Lis

    2009-06-01

    There are three commonly used definitions of the metabolic syndrome, making scientific studies hard to compare. The aim of this study was to investigate agreement in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome defined by three different definitions and to analyze definition and gender differences. A population-based, cross-sectional study of a total of 4232 participants--2039 men and 2193 women, aged 60 years--was employed. Three different metabolic syndrome definitions were compared: European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance (EGIR), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III). Medical history, socioeconomic information, and lifestyle data were collected by a questionnaire. A medical examination including laboratory tests was performed. Significant factors for the metabolic syndrome were calculated by multivariate logistic regression. Forty five percent of men and 30% of women met the criteria for the metabolic syndrome by any definition, but only 17% of men and 9% of women met the criteria of all three definitions. The highest agreement was found between IDF and NCEP ATP III definition. Two significant associations were identified in both men and women by the three metabolic syndrome definitions; former smokers were highly associated with the metabolic syndrome (odds ratio [OR] congruent with 1.5), and regular physical activity (OR congruent with 0.6) was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome. Depending on the definition used, different individuals were identified as having the metabolic syndrome, which affects the reliability of interpretations to be made from scientific studies of the metabolic syndrome. Unified criteria are warranted. Physicians facing a physically inactive former smoker may consider diagnosing metabolic syndrome.

  9. Role of sleep quality in the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Dorit; Dumin, Magdalena; Gozal, David

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has assigned an important role to sleep as a modulator of metabolic homeostasis. The impact of variations in sleep duration, sleep-disordered breathing, and chronotype to cardiometabolic function encompasses a wide array of perturbations spanning from obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, the metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease risk and mortality in both adults and children. Here, we critically and extensively review the published literature on such important issues and provide a comprehensive overview of the most salient pathophysiologic pathways underlying the links between sleep, sleep disorders, and cardiometabolic functioning. PMID:27601926

  10. Prevalence and clinical correlates of metabolic syndrome in Nigerians living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ayodele, Olugbenga Edward; Akinboro, Adeolu Oludayo; Akinyemi, Suliat Omolola; Adepeju, Akinlawon Adetiloye; Akinremi, Oluwaseun Akinsanmi; Alao, Christiana Adeola; Popoola, Adetoun Adedayo

    2012-10-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa bears an inordinate burden of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Reports have shown increased prevalence of clustering of cardiovascular risk factors referred to as metabolic syndrome in treatment-naïve patients and patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In view of the fact that metabolic syndrome is a heterogeneous disorder with substantial variability in the prevalence and component traits within and across populations and the dearth of publications on the prevalence and clinical correlates of metabolic syndrome in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Nigeria, this study was carried out to determine the prevalence and clinical correlates of metabolic syndrome among an HIV-infected outpatient population using the National Cholesterol Education Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and the Joint Interim Statement (JIS) definitions. We also sought to determine if HAART use and CD4 count level were associated with metabolic syndrome. This cross-sectional study involved 291 (95 men, 196 women) consecutive PLWHA. Anthropometry, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and lipid profile values were determined. The prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome according to the ATP III, IDF, and JIS criteria were 12.7%, 17.2%, and 21.0%, respectively. Metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with female gender (all definitions), body mass index (all definitions), increasing age, and CD4 count (IDF definition). There was no significant association between metabolic syndrome and HAART. The concordance [kappa coefficient (κ)] between the definitions of metabolic syndrome varied between 0.583 and 0.878. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome varied with the criteria used and metabolic syndrome correlates with traditional cardiovascular risk factors rather than HAART-related factors.

  11. Metabolic syndrome in non-obese Taiwanese: new definition of metabolically obese, normal-weight individual.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-huang

    2009-11-05

    Not only the obese, but also the non-obese adults have the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the upper normal weight. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome and its individual components in non-obese adult Taiwanese (body mass index (BMI) metabolic syndrome, defined by the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (2005), were analyzed in the BMI category according to 2.0 unit increments, in individuals seeking a health examination. The higher the BMI categories, the more prevalent the metabolic syndrome was in women and in men (P < 0.001). Compared with those women with a BMI metabolic syndrome in women were 1.3 (95%CI: 0.5 - 3.2) with BMI 21.0 - 22.9 kg/m(2), 3.0 (1.3 - 7.1) with BMI 23.0 - 24.9 kg/m(2), and 8.6 (3.6 - 20.8) for women with BMI 25.0 - 26.9 kg/m(2), after controlling for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, betel nut chewing, blood routine, biochemical data, hepatitis B virus surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus. The corresponding odds ratios in men were 1.6 (0.6 - 4.2), 3.7 (1.6 - 8.8), and 9.9 (4.2 - 23.2). Individuals in the upper normal weight and slightly overweight BMI range have relatively high prevalence and increased risk of having metabolic syndrome. Therefore, physicians should screen metabolic syndrome in not only obese but also non-obese individuals for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  12. Possible mechanism of the cardio-renal protective effects of AVE-0991, a non-peptide Mas-receptor agonist, in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kulwinder; Sharma, Kuldeepak; Singh, Manjeet; Sharma, P L

    2012-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the cardio-renal protective effect of AVE-0991, a non-peptide Mas-receptor agonist, and A-779, a Mas-receptor antagonist, in diabetic rats. Wistar rats treated with streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p., once), developed diabetes mellitus after 1 week. After 8 weeks, myocardial functions were assessed by measuring left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), rate of left ventricular pressure development (dp/dt (max)), rate of left ventricular pressure decay (dp/dt (min)) and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) on an isolated Langendorff's heart preparation. Further, mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was measured by using the tail-cuff method. Assessment of renal functions and lipid profile was carried out using a spectrophotometer. The administration of streptozotocin to rats produced persistent hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia and hypertension which consequently produced cardiac and renal dysfunction in 8 weeks. AVE0991 treatment produced cardio-renal protective effects, as evidenced by a significant increase in LVDP, dp/dt (max), dp/dt (min) and a significant decrease in LVEDP, BUN, and protein urea. Further, AVE-0991 treatment for the first time has been shown to reduce dyslipidaemia and produced antihyperglycaemic activity in streptozotocin-treated rats. However, MABP and creatinine clearance remained unaffected with AVE-0991 treatment. AVE-0991 produced cardio-renal protection possibly by improving glucose and lipid metabolism in diabetic rats, independent of its blood pressure lowering action.

  13. Insulin Resistance, Prediabetes, Metabolic Syndrome: What Should Every Pediatrician Know?

    PubMed Central

    Ighbariya, Ahmad; Weiss, Ram

    2017-01-01

    The Metabolic syndrome describes a clustering of typical cardiovascular risk factors. The syndrome is also known as “Insulin Resistance syndrome” as a substantial part of the pathophysiology is driven by resistance to the metabolic effects of insulin. The major cause of insulin resistance in childhood is a typical lipid partitioning pattern characterized by increased deposition of lipids within insulin responsive tissues, such as the liver and skeletal muscle and within the viscera. This lipid deposition pattern is also associated with infiltration of intra-abdominal tissues with cells of the immune system, inducing systemic, low-grade inflammation typically observed in insulin resistant obese children and adolescents. Several clues derived from a careful history and physical examination, along with a basic laboratory workup, provide clues in regards to risk stratification in obese children. PMID:29280741

  14. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome: Improving outcome with lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Westerink, N L; Nuver, J; Lefrandt, J D; Vrieling, A H; Gietema, J A; Walenkamp, A M E

    2016-12-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but effective treatment and prevention methods are probably similar. In this review, we summarize the potential mechanisms leading to the development of CTIMetS after various types of cancer treatment. Furthermore, we propose a safe and accessible method to treat or prevent CTIMetS through lifestyle change. In particular, we suggest that a lifestyle intervention and optimization of energy balance can prevent or mitigate the development of CTIMetS, which may contribute to optimal survivorship care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Adipocytokines and metabolic syndrome--molecular mechanism and clinical implication].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Morihiro; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2004-06-01

    Recent progress in adipocyte-biology shows that adipocytes are not merely fat-storing cells but that they secrete a variety of hormones, cytekines, growth factors and other bioactive substabces, conceptualized as adipocytokines. These include plasminogen activator inhibitor 1(PAI-1), tumor necrosis factor(TNF-alpha), leptin and adiponectin. Dysregulated productions of these adipocytekines participate in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated metabolic syndrome such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and vascular diseases. Increased productions of PAI-1 and TNF-alpha from accumulated fat contribute to the formation of thrombosis and insulin resistance in obesity, respectively. Lack of leptin causes metabolic syndrome. Adiponectin exerts insulin-sensitizing and anti-atherogenic effects, hence decrease of plasma adiponectin is causative for insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in obesity.

  16. Metabolic syndrome and periodontitis: is oxidative stress a common link?

    PubMed

    Bullon, P; Morillo, J M; Ramirez-Tortosa, M C; Quiles, J L; Newman, H N; Battino, M

    2009-06-01

    A review of pathological mechanisms that can explain the relationship between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is necessary to improve the management of both conditions. Metabolic syndrome is a combination of obesity, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia. All these have been examined in recent years in terms of their relationship to periodontitis. Reviewed data indicate an association between some of them (body mass index, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [HDL-C], triglycerides, high blood pressure, among others) and periodontitis. Oxidative stress may act as a potential common link to explain relationships between each component of metabolic syndrome and periodontitis. Both conditions show increased serum levels of products derived from oxidative damage, with a pro-inflammatory state likely influencing each other bidirectionally. Adipocytokines might modulate the oxidant/anti-oxidant balance in this relationship.

  17. Inhibition is associated with metabolic syndrome and depression through inflammation.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Kyle W; LeRoy, Angie S; Fagundes, Christopher P

    2018-03-30

    Inhibition is the ability to stop one's self from responding, or paying attention, to tempting/distracting stimuli or thoughts. Those with poor inhibition are at greater risk of depression and a variety of diseases of older adulthood than those with better inhibition. Inflammation may be a mechanism underlying these links. A total of 840 participants from the Midlife in the United States study completed a neuropsychological measure of inhibition, a self-report measure of depressive symptoms, and a blood draw. Results indicated that poor inhibition was associated with high interleukin-6 (IL-6). Inhibition was indirectly associated with metabolic syndrome incidence and depressive symptoms through IL-6. Findings suggest that IL-6 may be a mechanism linking inhibition with metabolic syndrome and depression. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Menopause, the metabolic syndrome, and mind-body therapies

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kim E.; Selfe, Terry Kit; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk rises sharply with menopause, likely due to the coincident increase in insulin resistance and related atherogenic changes that together comprise the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome, a cluster of metabolic and hemodynamic abnormalities strongly implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease. A growing body of research suggests that traditional mind-body practices such as yoga, tai chi, and qigong may offer safe and cost-effective strategies for reducing insulin resistance syndrome-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease in older populations, including postmenopausal women. Current evidence suggests that these practices may reduce insulin resistance and related physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease; improve mood, well-being, and sleep; decrease sympathetic activation; and enhance cardiovagal function. However, additional rigorous studies are needed to confirm existing findings and to examine long-term effects on cardiovascular health. PMID:18779682

  19. Beta Glucan: Health Benefits in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, D.; Cuda, C.; Luhovyy, B. L.; Anderson, G. H.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the lack of international agreement regarding the definition and classification of fiber, there is established evidence on the role of dietary fibers in obesity and metabolic syndrome. Beta glucan (β-glucan) is a soluble fiber readily available from oat and barley grains that has been gaining interest due to its multiple functional and bioactive properties. Its beneficial role in insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity is being continuously documented. The fermentability of β-glucans and their ability to form highly viscous solutions in the human gut may constitute the basis of their health benefits. Consequently, the applicability of β-glucan as a food ingredient is being widely considered with the dual purposes of increasing the fiber content of food products and enhancing their health properties. Therefore, this paper explores the role of β-glucans in the prevention and treatment of characteristics of the metabolic syndrome, their underlying mechanisms of action, and their potential in food applications. PMID:22187640

  20. [ASSOCIATION OF AGE OBESITY AND METABOLIC SYNDROME IN MEN].

    PubMed

    Pinkhasov, B B; Selyatitskaya, V G; Karapetyan, A R; Lutov, Yu V

    2016-01-01

    The study included 253 men aged 22 to 74 years. Was shown that at the end of the first period of middle age the accumulation of adipose tissue was enhanced that was associated with the change of dominance from the gynoid to the android type of obesity. The most pronounced increase in the frequency of occurrence of individual components and the overall metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in men in the second period of middle age with a following decrease in the frequency such components as hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglycemia in elderly age. In the all three age groups the value of the index of visceral obesity was significantly higher in men with android type of obesity compared with gynoid. Thus, the men with gynoid compared with android type of obesity have a lower risk of development metabolic syndrome in all age groups.

  1. Canagliflozin improves risk factors of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Merton, Katherine W; Vijapurkar, Ujjwala; Balis, Dainius A; Desai, Mehul

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome refers to a collection of risk factors associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, improves glycemic control and reduces body weight and blood pressure (BP) in a broad range of patients with T2DM. This post hoc analysis assessed the effects of canagliflozin on the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with T2DM and metabolic syndrome. This analysis was based on data from 2 head-to-head studies of canagliflozin in patients with T2DM on background metformin versus glimepiride (study 1) and background metformin plus sulfonylurea versus sitagliptin 100 mg (study 2). Changes from baseline in glycemic efficacy, anthropometric measures, BP, and lipids were evaluated with canagliflozin versus glimepiride and sitagliptin at week 52 in patients who met ≥2 of the criteria for metabolic syndrome (in addition to T2DM): triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) <1.0 mmol/L (men) or <1.3 mmol/L (women); waist circumference ≥102 cm (non-Asian men), ≥88 cm (non-Asian women), >90 cm (Asian men), or >80 cm (Asian women); diagnosis of hypertension or meeting BP-related criteria (systolic BP ≥130 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥85 mmHg). Safety was assessed based on adverse event reports. In study 1, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg provided similar and greater HbA1c reductions versus glimepiride, respectively. In study 2, canagliflozin 300 mg provided greater HbA1c lowering versus sitagliptin 100 mg. Canagliflozin also reduced fasting plasma glucose, body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, BP, and triglycerides, and increased HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol versus glimepiride and sitagliptin. Canagliflozin was generally well tolerated in each study. Canagliflozin was associated with improvements in all components of metabolic syndrome in patients with T2DM and metabolic syndrome, whereas

  2. [Effect of "Pintes" white wine on metabolic parameters in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Abel, Tatjána; Blázovics, Anna; Wimmer, Alexandra; Bekő, Gabriella; Gaál, Balázs; Blazics, Balázs; Gamal Eldin, Mohamed; Fehér, János; Lengyel, Gabriella

    2012-06-03

    Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with decreased cardiovascular mortality in the general population. Relatively few studies have been conducted to evaluate the effect of white wine on insulin sensitivity. The authors studied the impact of moderate Pintes white wine consumption on insulin sensitivity and other metabolic parameters. The prospective study involved 18 patients with metabolic syndrome. The patients consumed Pintes white wine for 4 weeks, and parameters were measured before and after consumption. The HOMA-IR decreased significantly after white wine consumption (2.28±2.04 vs 1.08±0.6; p = 0.002). There were no changes in serum cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and fasting plasma glucose levels. White wine consumption improved insulin sensitivity in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  3. Dual probiotic strains suppress high fructose-induced metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Do-Young; Ahn, Young-Tae; Huh, Chul-Sung; McGregor, Robin A; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2013-01-14

    To investigate the effect of novel probiotics on the clinical characteristics of high-fructose induced metabolic syndrome. Male Wistar rats aged 4 wk were fed a 70% w/w high-fructose diet (n = 27) or chow diet (n = 9) for 3 wk to induce metabolic syndrome, the rats were then randomized into groups and administered probiotic [Lactobacillus curvatus (L. curvatus) HY7601 and Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) KY1032] at 10(9) cfu/d or 10(10) cfu/d or placebo by oral gavage for 3 wk. Food intake and body weight were measured once a week. After 6 wk, the rats were fasted for 12 h, then anesthetized with diethyl ether and sacrificed. Blood samples were taken from the inferior vena cava for plasma analysis of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, total-cholesterol, triglycerides and thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed using mouse-specific Taqman probe sets to assess genes related to fatty acid β-oxidation, lipogenesis and cholesterol metabolism in the liver. Target gene expression was normalized to the housekeeping gene, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Rodents fed a high-fructose diet developed clinical characteristics of the metabolic syndrome including increased plasma glucose, insulin, triglycerides, total cholesterol and oxidative stress levels, as well as increased liver mass and liver lipids compared to chow fed controls. Probiotic treatment (L. curvatus HY7601 and L. plantarum KY1032) at high (10(10) cfu/d) or low dosage (10(9) cfu/d) lowered plasma glucose, insulin, triglycerides and oxidative stress levels. Only high-dose probiotic treatment reduced liver mass and liver cholesterol. Probiotic treatment reduced lipogenesis via down-regulation of SREBP1, FAS and SCD1 mRNA levels and increased β-oxidation via up-regulation of PPARα and CPT2 mRNA levels. Probiotic L. curvatus HY7601 and L. plantarum KY1032 combined suppressed the clinical characteristics of high-fructose-induced metabolic syndrome

  4. Metabolic syndrome in school children of Dera Ismail Khan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, Muhammad; Ali, Irshad; Ramzan, Faiqah; Ramzan, Faiza; Ramzan, Muhammad Haris

    2010-01-01

    Childhood obesity has increased considerably in many regions of the world including Pakistan. The recent phenomenon of 'nutritional transition' with a westernisation of food so prevalent in developing countries, has caused a significant rise in obesity among population that were unaware of this problem in the recent past. The aim of this study was to find out the frequency of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors in obese school children (6-11 years) in Dera Ismail Khan. Eighty-six children were included in this study with 61 (70.94%) obese and 25 (29.06%) normal weight children. Obese children comprised of 34 (39.53%) boys and 27 (31.40%) girls. Normal weight children included 15 (17.44%) boys and 10 (11.63%) girls. They were selected among 1.336 children from 8 primary schools of Dera Ismail Khan city. Anthropometric parameters of each subject were recorded, BMI determined and body mass status calculated. Children were categorized by the presence or absence of Obesity. Blood Pressure was also measured. Non-fasting venous blood samples were taken, analysed for lipids; Triglycerides (TG), Cholesterol (TC); Lipoproteins: High and Low Density Lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-C) and Plasma Glucose Concentration (PGC). Metabolic syndrome was identified in the presence of > or = 3 of the followings with cut-off values: TG > 170 mg/dl, HDL-C < 35 mg/dl, WC > 71 cm, BP >120/80 mm Hg, PGC > 200 mg/dl. Metabolic syndrome was identified in 22.95% of the obese children. It was 19.67% and 3.27% in obese boys and girls respectively. Metabolic syndrome was not found in normal weight children. Clustering of cardiovascular factors was abundantly present in obese and rare in normal weight children.

  5. The metabolic syndrome: a concept hard to define.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Rojas, Rosalba; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J; Mehta, Roopa; Franco, Aurora; Olaiz, Gustavo; Rull, Juan A

    2005-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome integrates, in a single diagnosis, the manifestations of insulin resistance that may lead to increased cardiovascular morbidity and precedes type 2 diabetes. Here we discuss the strengths and limitations of the definitions of the metabolic syndrome and the epidemiology of the syndrome including information from non-Caucasian populations. The definitions proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) are the most frequently used. The relative risk of having long-term complications is greater for the WHO definition; this is explained by the inclusion of the insulin resistance criteria. The cut-off points used in these definitions should be, but are not, adjusted for ethnicity; as a result, in non-Caucasian subjects, there is lack of agreement among these criteria. In a Mexican population-based survey the prevalence was 13.61% using the WHO definition and 26.6% using the NCEP-III criteria. Cases identified by the WHO criteria had a more severe form of the disease. We propose that the metabolic syndrome should be viewed as a progressive long-term process that leads to major complications. Its definition should reflect the continuous nature of the disease; the categorical approach of the current criteria oversimplifies the complexity of the syndrome. The threshold for defining abnormality should be based on the associated risk of the identified phenotype. Refinement of the definition of both affected and nonaffected subjects is required. The available definitions include, in each of these categories, heterogeneous groups with a broad range of risk of future complications.

  6. Association between late-onset hypogonadism syndrome plus metabolic syndrome and prostate cancer and its aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Pastor, J; Pellejero, P; Ortiz, I; Ramírez-Backhaus, M; de Gracia, A; Marrugo, C; Gomez-Ferrer, A; Calatrava, A; Rubio-Briones, J; Rodriguez-Torreblanca, C; Solsona-Narbón, E

    2016-09-01

    To assess the relationship between prostate cancer (PC) and the presence of metabolic syndrome and late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) syndrome. A retrospective study was conducted on 686 patients who underwent prostate biopsy. We analysed the demographic variables, clinical data and biopsy results. To diagnose metabolic syndrome, we employed the criteria of the American Heart Association. For the diagnosis of LOH syndrome, we employed the Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male questionnaire and testosterone levels (TT). We evaluated the relationship between free testosterone (FT) and bioavailable testosterone (BT) on one hand and PC and its aggressiveness on the other, as well as the usefulness of the TT to prostate specific antigen (TT/PSA) ratio in the PC diagnosis. The patient's median age was 65 years. Metabolic syndrome is not associated with PC (39.4% vs. 35%; P=.1) but is associated with a PC Gleason score >7 (50.4% vs. 29.44%; P=.002). LOH, low FT and low BT are associated with an increased presence of PC (51% vs. 35%, P=.02; 44.86% vs. 33.33%, P=.03; and 46.46% vs. 33.08%, P=.01, respectively) and with an increased probability of a PC Gleason score >7 (61.54% vs. 37.5%, P=.02; 54.17% vs. 34.12%, P=.02; 54.35% vs. 34.48%, P=.02, respectively). Additionally, the median TT/PSA ratio was significantly lower in patients with positive biopsies (P=.022). Metabolic syndrome was not associated with the probability of having PC but was associated with a PC Gleason score >7. Moreover, LOH syndrome had a higher percentage of PC and a greater presence of PC Gleason scores >7, as did low levels of FT and low levels of BT. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Its Relation to Metabolic Syndrome in Patients With Schizophrenia: An Egyptian Study.

    PubMed

    Aly El-Gabry, Dina M; Abdel Aziz, Karim; Okasha, Tarek; Azzam, Hanan; Okasha, Ahmed

    2018-02-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between antipsychotic polypharmacy and metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia. Some studies suggest that antipsychotic polypharmacy may be associated with greater metabolic risk, whereas other studies suggest that this is uncertain. To date, there have been no studies in Egypt or the Arab world that have investigated this relationship. We sought to compare subjects with schizophrenia receiving antipsychotic polypharmacy and monotherapy as regards metabolic outcomes and to investigate medication-related factors associated with metabolic syndrome. We recruited 118 subjects with schizophrenia and compared between those receiving antipsychotic polypharmacy (86 subjects) and monotherapy (32 subjects) as regards demographic, clinical, metabolic, and antipsychotic medication characteristics. We examined the effect of antipsychotic-related factors an outcome of metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our sample was 38.1%. Except for gender, there was no statistically significant difference as regards demographic and clinical characteristics, rates of metabolic syndrome, or for individual metabolic parameters. We found a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between the 2 groups as regards the number, dose, and duration of intake and for the number of subjects receiving typical antipsychotics (oral and depot) and a number of individual antipsychotic medications. Using logistic regression, receiving haloperidol depot was the only antipsychotic-related factor predictive for metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome does not differ in schizophrenia whether patients are receiving polypharmacy and monotherapy nor do they differ for individual metabolic parameters. Most antipsychotic-related characteristics did not predict for metabolic syndrome.

  8. Role of oxidative stress in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, Soleiman; Masrour-Roudsari, Jila

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) recognized as a major cause of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, has become one of the major public health challenges worldwide. The pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome is multiple and still poorly understood. No single factor has yet been identified as an underlying causal factor. There is a growing belief, however, that obesity, especially visceral obesity, may play an important role in the development of the syndrome. Visceral adiposity seems to be an independent predictor of insulin sensitivity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and elevated blood pressure. An increasing number of studies confirm that oxidative stress, chronic inflammation and angiogenesis all play important roles in the pathogenesis of MS. Chronic hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress in tissues prone to complications in patients with diabetes. Oxidative stress occurs in a cellular system when the production of free radical moieties exceeds the antioxidant capacity of that system. If cellular antioxidants do not remove free radicals, radicals attack and damage proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. The oxidized or nitrosylated products of free radical attack have decreased biological activity, leading to loss of energy metabolism, cell signaling, transport, and other major functions. These altered products are also targeted for proteosome degradation, further decreasing cellular function. Accumulation of such injury ultimately leads a cell to die through necrotic or apoptotic mechanisms. In conclusion, a puzzle of many pieces of evidence suggests that free radical overgeneration may be considered the key in the generation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26557292

  9. Metabolic syndrome and atypical antipsychotics: Possibility of prediction and control.

    PubMed

    Franch Pato, Clara M; Molina Rodríguez, Vicente; Franch Valverde, Juan I

    Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders are associated with high morbidity and mortality, due to inherent health factors, genetic factors, and factors related to psychopharmacological treatment. Antipsychotics, like other drugs, have side-effects that can substantially affect the physical health of patients, with substantive differences in the side-effect profile and in the patients in which these side-effects occur. To understand and identify these risk groups could help to prevent the occurrence of the undesired effects. A prospective study, with 24 months follow-up, was conducted in order to analyse the physical health of severe mental patients under maintenance treatment with atypical antipsychotics, as well as to determine any predictive parameters at anthropometric and/or analytical level for good/bad outcome of metabolic syndrome in these patients. There were no significant changes in the physical and biochemical parameters individually analysed throughout the different visits. The baseline abdominal circumference (lambda Wilks P=.013) and baseline HDL-cholesterol levels (lambda Wilks P=.000) were the parameters that seem to be more relevant above the rest of the metabolic syndrome constituents diagnosis criteria as predictors in the long-term. In the search for predictive factors of metabolic syndrome, HDL-cholesterol and abdominal circumference at the time of inclusion were selected, as such that the worst the baseline results were, the higher probability of long-term improvement. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among college football linemen.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Kerry; Blackburn, David; Arnold, Bart; Arnason, Terra

    2011-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Canadian amateur football players. University football players from Saskatchewan were invited to participate in this study. Each subject underwent screening for blood pressure using a BpTRU monitor, and serum cholesterol and fasting blood glucose using a Cholestech LDX analyzer. Waist circumference was recorded and body composition was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. RESULTS were compared between linemen and non-linemen using independent sample t-tests for continuous data and chi-square for dichotomous variables. Out of 39 players who consented to participate, 14% of linemen (3/21) and no non-linemen satisfied metabolic syndrome criteria. Compared to non-linemen, linemen had a higher waist circumference (108.0 vs. 82.9 cm; p<0.001), higher total body fat composition (26.4% vs. 11.2%; p<0.001), lower mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (0.93, vs. 1.12 mmol/L; p=0.021) and higher fasting blood glucose (5.22 vs. 4.77 mmol/L; p<0.001). Despite their young age and participation in an elite-level athletic program, many collegiate-level football linemen had features of metabolic syndrome. Although our study focused on a single team, we suspect these trends may be consistent across the country. 2011.

  11. Improvement of metabolic syndrome markers through altitude specific hiking vacations.

    PubMed

    Greie, S; Humpeler, E; Gunga, H C; Koralewski, E; Klingler, A; Mittermayr, M; Fries, D; Lechleitner, M; Hoertnagl, H; Hoffmann, G; Strauss-Blasche, G; Schobersberger, W

    2006-06-01

    To study the influence of a 3-week hiking vacation at moderate (1700 m) and low altitude (LA) (200 m) on key-markers of the metabolic syndrome, 71 male volunteers (age 36-66 yr old) with the metabolic syndrome [according to the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) - or World Health Organization (WHO) - definition] participated in the study and were randomly assigned into a moderate altitude (MA) group (1700 m, no. 36) and a low altitude (LA) group (200 m, no. 35). The 3-week vacation program included 12 moderate- intensity guided hiking tours [4 times/week, 55-65% heart rate maximum (HRmax)] with a total exercise time of 29 h plus moderate recreational activities. Both study groups had a comparable and balanced nutrition with no specific dietary restrictions. Anthropometric, metabolic and cardiovascular parameters were measured 10-14 days before vacation, several times during the 3-week vacation, 7-10 days and 6-8 weeks after return. All participants tolerated the vacation without any adverse effects. Body weight, body fat, waist-circumference, fasting glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), plasma fibrinogen, resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly decreased over time in both study groups. In the LA group, fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-index were significantly decreased one week after return. Relative cycle ergometry performance was significantly increased after return compared to baseline. In both study groups, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides remained unchanged. The 3-week vacation intervention at moderate and LA had a positive influence on all key-markers of the metabolic syndrome. No clinically relevant differences could be detected between the study groups. A hiking vacation at moderate and LA can be recommended for people with stable, controlled metabolic and cardiovascular

  12. Prevalence and Influencing Factors of Metabolic Syndrome Among Persons with Physical Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jeonghee; Yu, Jungok

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an important cluster of coronary heart disease risk factors. However, it remains unclear to what extent metabolic syndrome is associated with demographic and potentially modifiable lifestyle factors among Korean persons with physical disabilities. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and influencing factors of metabolic syndrome among persons with physical disabilities using the Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort. The Adult Treatment Panel III criteria were used to define metabolic syndrome influencing factors and prevalence, which were evaluated in a representative sample from the 2013 Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort database. Characteristics were compared based on frequency using the χ 2 test. The associations between metabolic syndrome and its risk factors were estimated using logistic multivariable regression analysis. Metabolic syndrome was detected in 31.5% of the surveyed persons with physical disabilities. Female sex, age of ≥65 years, smoking, greater alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, higher body mass index, and a family history of diabetes were associated with increased risks of metabolic syndrome. The major risk factors for metabolic syndrome among persons with physical disabilities were obesity and older age. Performing physical activity was associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, we recommend using a continuous obesity management program and physical activity to prevent metabolic syndrome among persons with physical disabilities. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its individual components in Brazilian college students.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Roberto Wagner F; de Araújo, Márcio Flávio M; Marinho, Niciane Bandeira P; de Vasconcelos, Hérica Cristina A; Lima, Adman Câmara S; Pereira, Dayse Christina R; Almeida, Paulo César; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; Damasceno, Marta Maria C

    2013-05-01

    To identify the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its individual components in a population of college students at a public higher education institution in Fortaleza, Brazil. Scientific evidence has demonstrated the ascent of the metabolic syndrome in the young population. Cross-sectional study of 702 Brazilian college students between January-July 2011. Socio-demographic indicators, life habits and the components of the metabolic syndrome were assessed. anova statistical tests were used to associate gender with the metabolic syndrome components, and the chi-square test to associate the number of metabolic syndrome components with gender and body mass index. High fasting venous glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol and LDL-C levels were found in 12·3, 23·0, 9·7 and 5·9% of the sample, respectively. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome amounted to 1·7%. Nevertheless, 30·4% of students manifested at least one and 12·4% at least two individual components. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was higher in men (58·3%) and in people who were overweight (33·3%) and obese (41·7%). It is important to implement public health policies to reduce college students' vulnerability to the metabolic syndrome. Most college students who displayed ≥3 metabolic syndrome components were men and already indicated being overweight and/or obesity. It is important that nurses assess the frequency of metabolic syndrome in college students as a predictor of cardiovascular health. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Hormonal contraception in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Skouby, Sven O

    2010-09-01

    The rate of obesity worldwide is currently at epidemic proportions. As part of obesity, the metabolic syndrome describes a clustering of metabolic abnormalities that increase the cardiovascular and diabetes risk. In particular, women from developing countries have diabetes in the reproductive age resulting in more pregnancies where both the mother and the fetus are at high risk. Consequently, use of safe and effective contraceptive methods is of paramount importance. Paradoxically, both obese and diabetic women are less likely to use contraception as compared to women of normal weight. Modern types of hormonal contraceptives are safe and provide important noncontraceptive benefits. The impact of obesity on drug pharmacokinetics may result in lower blood levels of steroid contraceptives that reduce their ability to prevent pregnancy, but the actual change is probably minimal. In women with uncomplicated diabetes, hormonal contraception should therefore be part of the highly needed preconception care and metabolic control. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Role of Sirtuins in Linking Metabolic Syndrome with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juhyun; Kim, Jongpil

    2016-01-01

    Depression is now widely regarded as a common disabling disorder that affects negatively the social functioning all over the world. Depression is associated with diverse phenomenon in brain such as neuroinflammation, synaptic dysfunction, and cognitive deficit. Recent studies reported that depression occurs by various metabolic changes, leading to metabolic syndrome. Sirtuins (SIRTs) are NAD+-dependent class III histone deacetylases, known to regulate diverse biological mechanism such as longevity, genomic stability, and inflammation. The modulation of sirtuin activity has been highlighted as a promising approach to reduce neurodegenerative processes. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries regarding the potential relationship between SIRTs and depression caused by metabolic disorders (Mets). Ultimately, we suggest the possibility that SIRTs will be novel targets to alleviate neuropathogenesis induced by depression. PMID:27065808

  16. Effects of laparoscopic ovarian drilling in treating infertile anovulatory polycystic ovarian syndrome patients with and without metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kong, G W S; Cheung, L P; Lok, I H

    2011-02-01

    To compare the effects of laparoscopic ovarian drilling in treating infertile polycystic ovarian syndrome in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. Retrospective review. A university-affiliated hospital in Hong Kong. A total of 89 infertile anovulatory polycystic ovarian syndrome patients, who underwent laparoscopic ovarian drilling with completed metabolic screening and seen over a 5-year period from 2002 to 2007. The clinical, hormonal, and metabolic characteristics as well as spontaneous ovulation rates, reproductive outcomes, and diabetes risks during pregnancy observed after laparoscopic ovarian drilling. Approximately one fifth (21%) of polycystic ovarian syndrome patients had the metabolic syndrome. There were no differences in spontaneous ovulation rates (68% vs 61%, P=0.76), cumulative pregnancy rates (68% vs 61%, P=0.77), and diabetes risks during pregnancy (64% vs 42%, P=0.13) between patients with and without metabolic syndrome. Laparoscopic ovarian drilling was equally effective in inducing ovulation in polycystic ovarian syndrome patients with metabolic syndrome. Thus, patients with metabolic syndrome should not be precluded from laparoscopic ovarian drilling, which has the additional advantage of enabling full tubo-peritoneal assessment at the same time.

  17. Is Metabolic Syndrome On the Radar? Improving Real-Time Detection of Metabolic Syndrome and Physician Response by Computerized Scan of the Electronic Medical Record

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Kingwai; Randhawa, Gagandeep; Totten, Vicken; Smith, Adam E.; Raese, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Metabolic syndrome is a common underdiagnosed condition among psychiatric patients exacerbated by second-generation antipsychotics, with the exception of aripiprazole and ziprasidone. This study evaluated the prescribing and treating behavior with regard to antipsychotics and metabolic syndrome of psychiatrists before and after implementation of a mandatory admission order set and electronic notification of results. Method: Baseline data from 9,100 consecutive psychiatric admissions to a mental health hospital (July 2013–July 2014) were compared to postintervention data (July 2014–January 2015), which included 1,499 consecutive patient records. The intervention initiated standardized admission testing with electronic notification to psychiatrists when patients met metabolic syndrome criteria (according to Axis III of the DSM-IV). Charts were examined for inclusion of this diagnosis at discharge and for treatment changes. Results: At baseline, only 2.4% of patients (n = 214) were evaluated for metabolic syndrome. Of these, 34.5% (0.8% of the total sample) met metabolic syndrome criteria. Only 15 patients (0.16%) were comprehensively treated. No chart listed metabolic syndrome under Axis III of the DSM-IV. After the intervention, the diagnosis of patients meeting the criteria for metabolic syndrome increased from 0% to 29.3%. Less than 3% of patients were switched to drugs with a more benign metabolic profile. All patients who continued on second-generation antipsychotics had metabolic retesting. Thirty-eight experienced a significant and rapid increase in triglyceride levels after only 3 to 17 days. Conclusions: Mandatory intake testing increases the number of patients evaluated for metabolic syndrome. Electronic alerts increase the inclusion of metabolic syndrome among discharge diagnoses but rarely affect prescribing practices. PMID:27247842

  18. Metabolic syndrome risk factors and dry eye syndrome: a Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ye-Lei; Cheng, Ya-Lan; Ren, Yu-Ping; Yu, Xiao-Ning; Shentu, Xing-Chao

    2016-01-01

    To explore the relationship between metabolic risk factors and dry eye syndrome (DES). Retrieved studies on the association of metabolic syndrome risk factors (hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity, and hyperlipidemia) and DES were collected from PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library in December 2015. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were pooled to evaluate the final relationship. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to diagnostic criteria of DES. Nine cross-sectional studies and three case-control studies were included in this Meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that people with hypertension, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia had a higher risk of suffering from DES (P<0.05), especially the typical DES symptoms. On the other hand, obesity did not increase the risk of DES. The present Meta-analysis suggests that all metabolic risk factors except obesity were risk factors for DES.

  19. FREQUENCY OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN TYPE-2 DIABETES MELLITUS.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Ismaa Ghazanfar; Khan, Adil Naseer; Yasir, Saadia; Baluch, Urooj Taheed

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of coronary risk factors such as diabetes and pre-diabetes, abdominal obesity, high triglyceride (TG), low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and high blood pressure (BP). It is estimated that around a quarter of the world's adult population have MetS and they are twice as likely to die from it and three times as likely to have a coronary event or stroke compared with people without the syndrome. This observational descriptive study was conducted at the Department of General Medicine, Federal Government Polyclinic Islamabad. All type-2 diabetics presenting in the outpatient and inpatient department during 11 months between the ages of 30-80 were enrolled. They were interviewed; blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, and lipid profiles were checked. Of the 300 patients 165 (55%) were females and 135 (45%) were males with mean age 52.47 ± 11.24 years. The mean duration of Diabetes Mellitus was 7.38 ± 3.85 years. Metabolic Syndrome was present in 83% of the study population, 129 (43%) were male and 171 (57%) were female. The p-value was statistically significant on comparing the presence of the Metabolic Syndrome with waist circumference, serum triglyceride levels, and blood pressure as it was < 0.05. The most commonly occurring finding was a decreased HDL-cholesterol in both genders. The MetS was present in 83% of the diabetic population, mostly in females with decreased HDL-cholesterol being the most common in both genders.

  20. Effect of Gastrointestinal Surgical Manipulation on Metabolic Syndrome: A Focus on Metabolic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rizzello, Mario; De Angelis, Francesco; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Silecchia, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is strictly associated with morbid obesity and leads to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and related mortality. Bariatric surgery is considered an effective option for the management of these patients. We searched MEDLINE, Current Contents, and the Cochrane Library for papers published on bariatric surgery outcomes in English from 1 January 1990 to 20 July 2012. We reported the effect of gastrointestinal manipulation on metabolic syndrome after bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery determines an important resolution rate of major obesity-related comorbidities. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion appear to be more effective than adjustable gastric banding in terms of weight loss and comorbidities resolution. However, the results obtained in terms of weight loss and resolution of comorbidities after a “new bariatric procedure” (sleeve gastrectomy) encouraged and stimulated the diffusion of this operation. PMID:23133447

  1. Does measurement site for visceral and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue alter associations with the metabolic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kuk, Jennifer L; Church, Timothy S; Blair, Steven N; Ross, Robert

    2006-03-01

    To determine whether the associations between visceral adipose tissue (VAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASAT), and the metabolic syndrome are altered depending on measurement site for VAT and ASAT and the definition used to identify the metabolic syndrome. Total VAT and ASAT volume was derived using approximately 37 contiguous computed tomography (CT) images from T10-T11 to L5-S1 in 85 men. CT images obtained at eight intervertebral locations (e.g., L4-L5, L3-L4, etc.) were used to determine the associations between partial volumes (single images) and metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) per SD increase in adipose tissue. For total and all partial volumes, VAT was more strongly associated with metabolic syndrome than ASAT independent of metabolic syndrome criteria. The OR (per SD) for NCEP metabolic syndrome was higher for total VAT volume (OR = 7.26) and for the partial volumes at T12-L1 (7.46) and L1-L2 (8.77) than those at the L4-L5 level (3.94). The OR for metabolic syndrome ( approximately 2.6) was not substantially different among the ASAT measures. A similar pattern of association was observed using the IDF metabolic syndrome criteria. The measurement site for VAT, but not for ASAT, has a substantial influence on the magnitude of the association with both metabolic syndrome definitions. However, because VAT remained significantly associated with metabolic syndrome regardless of measurement site, the clinical interpretation was unaltered by measurement protocol or metabolic syndrome definition.

  2. The Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome and Osteoporosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sok Kuan; Chin, Kok-Yong; Suhaimi, Farihah Hj; Ahmad, Fairus; Ima-Nirwana, Soelaiman

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and osteoporosis are two major healthcare problems worldwide. Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of medical conditions consisting of central obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, in which each acts on bone tissue in different ways. The growing prevalence of MetS and osteoporosis in the population along with the controversial findings on the relationship between both conditions suggest the importance for further investigation and discussion on this topic. This review aims to assess the available evidence on the effects of each component of MetS on bone metabolism from the conventional to the contemporary. Previous studies suggested that the two conditions shared some common underlying pathways, which include regulation of calcium homeostasis, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)/receptor activator of the NF-κB (RANK)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) and Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathways. In conclusion, we suggest that MetS may have a potential role in developing osteoporosis and more studies are necessary to further prove this hypothesis. PMID:27338453

  3. Metabolic syndrome in youth: current issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Huang, Terry T-K; Ball, Geoff D C; Franks, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    The current paper reviews the important issues and challenges facing children and adolescents with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Studies suggest that the MetS and its risk components may be on the rise in children along with rising rates of obesity; however, further study remains warranted. The topics reviewed encompass the definition of the syndrome, its prevalence, clustering and tracking of metabolic risk factors, the role of physical activity and diet in the development of the MetS, criticisms and utility of the MetS definition, and special considerations needed in the pediatric population. Physical activity and diet may play important roles in the MetS; however, research with precise measurements of activity, diet, and metabolic outcomes is needed. The paper concludes by emphasizing that regardless of one's position in the ongoing debate about the MetS, the long-term risks attributable to each individual risk component are real. The abnormality of one component should automatically prompt the screening of other components. Among children and adolescents, lifestyle modification should always serve as the frontline strategy. Prevention during childhood is key to the largest possible impact on adult health at the population level.

  4. Rett syndrome: a neurological disorder with metabolic components.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Stephanie M; Vashi, Neeti; Justice, Monica J

    2018-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurological disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 ( MECP2 ), a ubiquitously expressed transcriptional regulator. Despite remarkable scientific progress since its discovery, the mechanism by which MECP2 mutations cause RTT symptoms is largely unknown. Consequently, treatment options for patients are currently limited and centred on symptom relief. Thought to be an entirely neurological disorder, RTT research has focused on the role of MECP2 in the central nervous system. However, the variety of phenotypes identified in Mecp2 mutant mouse models and RTT patients implicate important roles for MeCP2 in peripheral systems. Here, we review the history of RTT, highlighting breakthroughs in the field that have led us to present day. We explore the current evidence supporting metabolic dysfunction as a component of RTT, presenting recent studies that have revealed perturbed lipid metabolism in the brain and peripheral tissues of mouse models and patients. Such findings may have an impact on the quality of life of RTT patients as both dietary and drug intervention can alter lipid metabolism. Ultimately, we conclude that a thorough knowledge of MeCP2's varied functional targets in the brain and body will be required to treat this complex syndrome. © 2018 The Authors.

  5. Rett syndrome: a neurological disorder with metabolic components

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Stephanie M.

    2018-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurological disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), a ubiquitously expressed transcriptional regulator. Despite remarkable scientific progress since its discovery, the mechanism by which MECP2 mutations cause RTT symptoms is largely unknown. Consequently, treatment options for patients are currently limited and centred on symptom relief. Thought to be an entirely neurological disorder, RTT research has focused on the role of MECP2 in the central nervous system. However, the variety of phenotypes identified in Mecp2 mutant mouse models and RTT patients implicate important roles for MeCP2 in peripheral systems. Here, we review the history of RTT, highlighting breakthroughs in the field that have led us to present day. We explore the current evidence supporting metabolic dysfunction as a component of RTT, presenting recent studies that have revealed perturbed lipid metabolism in the brain and peripheral tissues of mouse models and patients. Such findings may have an impact on the quality of life of RTT patients as both dietary and drug intervention can alter lipid metabolism. Ultimately, we conclude that a thorough knowledge of MeCP2's varied functional targets in the brain and body will be required to treat this complex syndrome. PMID:29445033

  6. Chronic inflammation in obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rosário; Azevedo, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The increasing incidence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome is disturbing. The activation of inflammatory pathways, used normally as host defence, reminds the seriousness of this condition. There is probably more than one cause for activation of inflammation. Apparently, metabolic overload evokes stress reactions, such as oxidative, inflammatory, organelle and cell hypertrophy, generating vicious cycles. Adipocyte hypertrophy, through physical reasons, facilitates cell rupture, what will evoke an inflammatory reaction. Inability of adipose tissue development to engulf incoming fat leads to deposition in other organs, mainly in the liver, with consequences on insulin resistance. The oxidative stress which accompanies feeding, particularly when there is excessive ingestion of fat and/or other macronutrients without concomitant ingestion of antioxidant-rich foods/beverages, may contribute to inflammation attributed to obesity. Moreover, data on the interaction of microbiota with food and obesity brought new hypothesis for the obesity/fat diet relationship with inflammation. Beyond these, other phenomena, for instance psychological and/or circadian rhythm disturbances, may likewise contribute to oxidative/inflammatory status. The difficulty in the management of obesity/metabolic syndrome is linked to their multifactorial nature where environmental, genetic and psychosocial factors interact through complex networks.

  7. Metabolic syndrome pathophysiology: the role of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Laclaustra, Martin; Corella, Dolores; Ordovas, José M

    2007-02-01

    Several pathophysiological explanations for the metabolic syndrome have been proposed involving insulin resistance, chronic inflammation and ectopic fat accumulation following adipose tissue saturation. However, current concepts create several paradoxes, including limited cardiovascular risk reduction with intensive glucose control in diabetics, therapies that result in weight gain (PPAR agonists), and presence of some of the metabolic traits among some lipodystrophies. We propose the functional failure of an organ, in this case, the adipose tissue as a model to interpret its manifestations and to reconcile some of the apparent paradox. A cornerstone of this model is the failure of the adipose tissue to buffer postprandial lipids. In addition, homeostatic feedback loops guide physiological and pathological adipose tissue activities. Fat turnover is determined by a complex equilibrium in which insulin is a main factor but not the only one. Chronically inadequate energy balance may be a key factor, stressing the system. In this situation, an adipose tissue functional failure occurs resulting in changes in systemic energy delivery, impaired glucose consumption and activation of self-regulatory mechanisms that extend their influence to whole body homeostasis system. These include changes in adipokines secretion and vascular effects. The functional capacity of the adipose tissue varies among subjects explaining the incomplete overlapping among the metabolic syndrome and obesity. Variations at multiple gene loci will be partially responsible for these interindividual differences. Two of those candidate genes, the adiponectin (APM1) and the perilipin (PLIN) genes, are discussed in more detail.

  8. Metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Kanufre, Viviane C; Soares, Rosângelis D L; Alves, Michelle Rosa A; Aguiar, Marcos J B; Starling, Ana Lúcia P; Norton, Rocksane C

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify markers of metabolic syndrome (MS) in patients with phenylketonuria (PKU). This was a cross-sectional study consisting of 58 PKU patients (ages of 4-15 years): 29 patients with excess weight, and 29 with normal weight. The biochemical variables assessed were phenylalanine (phe), total cholesterol, HDL-c, triglycerides, glucose, and basal insulin. The patients had Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) and waist circumference assessed. No inter-group difference was found for phe. Overweight patients had higher levels of triglycerides, basal insulin, and HOMA, but lower concentrations of HDL-cholesterol, when compared to the eutrophic patients. Total cholesterol/HDL-c was significantly higher in the overweight group. A positive correlation between basal insulin level and HOMA with waist circumference was found only in the overweight group. The results of this study suggest that patients with PKU and excess weight are potentially vulnerable to the development of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct clinical and laboratory monitoring, aiming to prevent metabolic changes, as well as excessive weight gain and its consequences, particularly cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolic syndrome in childhood from impaired carbohydrate metabolism to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Manco, Melania

    2011-10-01

    Compelling evidence supports the concept that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the hepatic component of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Intrahepatic fat seems to predict more strongly than does visceral adiposity an individual's cardiovascular risk and the likelihood that metabolic abnormalities are present in youth. Young individuals with fatty liver are more insulin resistant and present with a higher prevalence of metabolic abnormalities than do individuals without intrahepatic fat accumulation. They also present with a certain endothelial dysfunction and greater carotid intima-media thickness. Conversely, youth with MetS seem to have an increased risk of developing liver inflammation, a condition termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and fibrosis. In the context of MetS, the liver is central in that it can drive both hepatic and systemic insulin resistance, trigger low-grade inflammation, and promote atherogenic processes. In the context of MetS, NAFLD and altered carbohydrate metabolism track from childhood to adulthood. Thus, prevention, recognition, and effective treatment of these two abnormalities may limit the burden of morbidity and mortality associated with obesity and may delay onset of cardiovascular disease in early adulthood. The present review aims at systematically presenting evidence of the critical interplay of fatty liver and altered glucose metabolism in youth. It attempts to provide pathogenetic explanations for such an association and the rationale for its treatment, with particular regard to nutritional interventions. Key teaching points: Overweight and obese youth should be screened for fatty liver disease once after puberty by liver function tests and ultrasonography. Screening for fatty liver should be accurately performed in young patients with features of metabolic syndrome. Obese patients with fatty liver are at increased risk for altered glucose metabolism, thus they should undergo an oral glucose tolerance test

  10. Clinical characteristics of metabolic syndrome in Korea, and its comparison with other Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Hong, A Ram; Lim, Soo

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is referred to as syndrome X or insulin resistance syndrome, and is primarily composed of abdominal obesity, diabetes, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. Asians have a lower frequency of obesity than Caucasians, but have an increasing tendency toward metabolic syndrome. Thus, metabolic syndrome poses a major challenge for public health professionals, and is set to become a social and economic problem in Asian populations. Most data on metabolic syndrome are based on studies from Western countries with only limited information derived from Asian populations. Recently, several studies were carried out on a large scale that represents the general Korean population. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults has varied depending on the study designs and different criteria, but shows a distinct increasing trend of metabolic syndrome driven by an increase in abdominal obesity and dyslipidemia. Given the rapid economic progression of Korea over the past 30 years along with a rise of the aged population, it is expected that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome will further increase. Therefore, a proactive strategy at the governmental level for metabolic syndrome prevention should be implemented, reducing abdominal obesity and dyslipidemia. Healthy dietary habits and regular exercise should be emphasized as a part of such a strategy. PMID:26417407

  11. β-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    PubMed Central

    Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Aims The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS) or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects. Material and methods This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study) with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1) control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2) group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out. Results Average age of the subjects in the control group (n = 254) was 35.7 ± 11.5 years and 42.0 ± 10.7 years for subjects in the metabolic syndrome group (n = 190). Subjects at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome showed decreased IS, increased insulin resistance (IR), and altered β-cell function. Individuals with metabolic syndrome showed a high prevalence (P ≤ 0.05) of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This group also showed a significant metabolic imbalance with glucose and insulin levels and lipid profile outside the ranges considered safe to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and T2D. Conclusion The main finding in this study was the detection of altered β-cell function, decreased IS, an increased IR in subjects at metabolic balance, and the progressive deterioration of β-cell function and IS in subjects with metabolic syndrome as the number of features of metabolic syndrome increases

  12. Modifiable Lifestyle Behaviors Are Associated With Metabolic Syndrome in a Taiwanese Population.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuei-Man; Chiou, Jeng-Yuan; Ko, Shu-Hua; Tan, Jung-Ying; Huang, Chien-Ning; Liao, Wen-Chun

    2015-11-01

    To explore associations between metabolic syndrome and modifiable lifestyle behaviors among the adult population in Taiwan. This cross-sectional study analyzed data from a nationally representative sample that participated in the 2005-2008 Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan. The sample (2,337 participants older than 19 years) provided data on demographic characteristics, modifiable lifestyle behaviors, anthropometric measurements, and blood chemistry panel. These data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, univariate logistic regression, and multivariate logistic regression to determine factors associated with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome had a prevalence of 25.2%, and this prevalence increased with age. In univariate regression analysis, metabolic syndrome was associated with age, living with family members, educational level, and modifiable lifestyle behaviors (smoking, drinking, betel quid chewing, and physical activity). Individuals with a smoking history and currently chewing betel quid had the highest risk for metabolic syndrome. The risk for metabolic syndrome might be reduced by public health campaigns to encourage people to quit smoking cigarettes and chewing betel quid. Implementing more modifiable lifestyle behaviors in daily life will decrease metabolic syndrome in Taiwan. Considering that betel quid chewing and tobacco smoking interact to adversely affect metabolic syndrome risk, public health campaigns against both behaviors seem to be a cost-effective and efficient health promotion strategy to reduce the prevalence rate of metabolic syndrome. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Relationship Between Vitamin D Deficiency and Markers of Metabolic Syndrome Among Overweight and Obese Adults.

    PubMed

    Kaseb, Fatemeh; Haghighyfard, Kimia; Salami, Maryam-Sadat; Ghadiri-Anari, Akram

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease has had a tremendous elevation growth. Many studies have demonstrated negative correlation between vitamin D deficiency and indexes of metabolic syndrome in obese patients. This study was designed to find the relation between vitamin D deficiency and markers of metabolic syndrome among overweight and obese adults referred to obesity center of Shahid Sadoughi hospital in 2014. Eighty-nine overweight and obese adults (79 women and 10 men), who 13 subjects were overweight and 76 subjects were obese were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, plasma glucose and vitamin D were measured. IDF criteria were used for identifying subjects with metabolic syndrome. Demographic questionnaire was completed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0. Fisher exact test, logistic regression, and Spearman correlation coefficient were used. The frequency of vitamin D deficiency was 93.2%. According to IDF criteria, the frequency of metabolic syndrome was 36%. There was no significant relationship between vitamin D deficiency and metabolic syndrome. Among metabolic syndrome indicators, there was a significant direct relationship between vitamin D level with FBS (P=0.013) and SBP (P=0.023). There was no significant relationship between vitamin D deficiency and metabolic syndrome. Due to the lack of relationship between vitamin D deficiency and metabolic syndrome, small number of participants in this study and very low case of normal vitamin D level, further studies are needed.

  14. Association between Nutrient Intake and Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee-Sook; Shin, Eung-Jin; Yeom, Jeong-Won; Park, Yoon-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of nutritional status according to metabolic syndrome in colorectal cancer patients. The subjects were divided into 2 groups (metabolic syndrome group and normal group) according to the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome in 143 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and their lifestyle and nutritional status were analyzed. Recall method was used for the dietary survey, and metabolic syndrome was defined as the presence of 3 or more of waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and blood pressure. This study showed that the metabolic syndrome group had a low age, a high body mass index (BMI), and a high drinking rate. The intake of energy, protein, fat, calcium, and phosphorus was significantly higher in the metabolic syndrome group than in the normal group, and the intake of β-carotene, vitamin C, and folic acid was significantly low. The intake of cholesterol, fatty acid, saturated fatty acid, and polyunsaturated fatty acid was also higher in the metabolic syndrome group. Higher BMI, alcohol consumption, intake of fat, total fatty acid or saturated fatty acid increased the risk of metabolic syndrome, but fiber, vitamin C, or folic acid intake lowered the risk.Weight management and balanced nutritional intake should be emphasized to prevent metabolic syndrome and to improve the condition in patients with colorectal cancer.

  15. Ozone (O3): A Potential Contributor to Metabolic Syndrome through Altered Insulin Signaling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutants have been associated with diabetes and metabolic syndrome, but the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We hypothesized that acute O3 exposure will produce metabolic impairments through endoplasmic reticular stress (ER) stress and altered insulin signaling in liver,...

  16. Redox-inflammatory synergy in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Sean; Baregzay, Boran; Spicer, Drew; Singal, Pawan K; Khaper, Neelam

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) comprises interrelated disease states including obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2DM), dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Essential to normal physiological function, and yet massively damaging in excess, oxidative stress and inflammation are pivotal common threads among the pathologies of MetS. Increasing evidence indicates that redox and inflammatory dysregulation parallels the syndrome's physiological, biochemical, and anthropometric features, leading many to consider the pro-oxidative, pro-inflammatory milieu an unofficial criterion in itself. Left unchecked, cross-promotion of oxidative stress and inflammation creates a feed-forward cycle that can initiate and advance disease progression. Such redox-inflammatory integration is evident in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance and T2DM, atherogenic dyslipidemia, and hypertension, and is thus hypothesized to be the "common soil" from which they develop. The present review highlights the synergistic contributions of redox-inflammatory processes to each of the components of the MetS.

  17. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  18. Facial Acanthosis Nigricans: A Morphological Marker of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Saumya; Das, Anupam; Lahiri, Koushik; Chatterjee, Manas; Padhi, Tanmay; Rathi, Sanjay; Dhar, Sandipan; Sarma, Nilendu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a frequently encountered entity. Facial AN (FAN) is a subset of AN which is being increasingly recognized. Recently, reports hypothesizing the association of FAN with features of metabolic syndrome have been published. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to study the clinicodemographic profile of patients with FAN, and to assess the correlation of hypertension, increased waist–hip ratio (WHR), increased body mass index (BMI), type 2 diabetes mellitus, deranged lipid profile, serum insulin, and impaired oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (parameters of metabolic syndrome) in these patients, as well as to determine the most significant predictor (highest relative risk) of development of FAN. Methods: A multicentric case–control study was conducted (123 cases in each group) over a period of 2 years. Data were obtained on the basis of history, examination, and relevant laboratory investigations. Statistical analysis was done using Statistica version 6 (StatSoft Inc., 2001, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA), SPSS statistics version 17 (SPSS Inc., 2008, Illinois, Chicago, USA), and GraphPad Prism version 5 (GraphPad Software Inc., 2007, San Diego, California, USA). Results: Mean age of the patients with FAN was 38.83 ± 8.62 years. Mean age of onset of the disease was 30.93 ± 8.18 years. The most common site of face involved was the forehead and temporal region. The most common pigmentation was brown-black. Male sex, positive OGTT, increased WHR, and increased BMI were most significantly related to FAN. Smoking was found to have a protective effect against the development of FAN. Conclusion: Here, we document a significant association between male patients with positive OGTT, increased WHR, and BMI and FAN. Thus, we propose that FAN could be considered a morphological marker of metabolic syndrome. PMID:29263532

  19. Metabolic Syndrome among Emirati Adolescents: A School-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehairi, Aaesha E.; Khouri, Aysha A.; Naqbi, Muna M.; Muhairi, Shamma J.; Maskari, Fatima A.; Nagelkerke, Nico; Shah, Syed M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Population-based data on metabolic syndrome (MetS) among children is lacking in the United Arab Emirates which has among the highest rates of diabetes in the world. In this study we determined the prevalence of MetS and its correlates in a sample of adolescents. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional school-based study was conducted on 1,018 adolescents (48.4% girls) aged 12–18 years from Al Ain Abu Dhabi Emirates. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess socio-demographic characteristics, physical activity and dietary habits. Blood pressure, height, weight, waist circumference, fasting glucose, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were measured. MetS was defined using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Results The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 13%. Boys compared to girls were more likely to have MetS (21% vs. 4%, odds ratio [OR]: 6.57, 95%CI: 4.01 to 10.75). The prevalence of MetS increased with increase in body mass index and reached 59 percent in obese boys. After multivariable adjustment boys who were overweight (adjusted OR: 2.72 [1.37 to 5.35]), or obese (AOR: 12.70 [7.31 to 22.05]), or spent two or more than two hours on screen in a day (AOR: 1.65 [1.01 to 2.69) were more likely to have MetS. Girls who were overweight (AOR: 4.23 [1.32 to 13.62]) or obese (AOR: 8.32 [2.73 to 25.32]) were more likely to have MetS. Conclusions The prevalence of MetS is high among UAE boys. Population-based strategies are needed to address the high burden of metabolic syndrome targeted at the identified risk factors. PMID:23418529

  20. Metabolic syndrome and gender differences in postprandial lipaemia.

    PubMed

    Kolovou, Genovefa D; Anagnostopoulou, Katherine K; Pavlidis, Antonis N; Salpea, Klelia D; Iraklianou, Stella A; Hoursalas, Ioannis S; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Cokkinos, Dennis V

    2006-08-01

    Postprandial hyperlipidaemia may be a predictor of vascular risk. We evaluated postprandial lipaemia after an oral fat tolerance test (OFTT) in men (n=41) and women (n=21) with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Triglyceride (TG) levels were measured before and 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after the fat load. Men showed a greater plasma TG response 8 h after the fat load (284+/-117 versus 224+/-126 mg/dl, P=0.029). Only fasting TG levels significantly predicted the TG area under the curve (AUC) and incremental AUC. Men had a more pronounced postprandial hypertriglyceridaemia and seem to have delayed TG clearance.

  1. [Prescription of Jingdan Yimin for treatment of metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jin-Ying; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Ling; Li, Xiu-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Han, Jing; Liu, Qian; Yang, Ya-Nan; Feng, Zi-Ming; Zhang, Pei-Cheng; Ye, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine, modern methods for drug investigation such as molecular targets in vitro and effects in vivo were used to study the prescription of Jingdan Yimin(JD), including selection of raw materials, composition, proportion, and effective dose of the compounds for treatment of metabolic syndrome. The IRF mice models, characterized by insulin resistance and hypercholesterolemia, were induced by high fat diet. The insulin sensitivity was estimated with insulin tolerance test(ITT) and glucose tolerance test(GTT); the levels of blood glucose and total cholesterol(TC), and the activities of α-glucosidase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B(PTP1B), and fructose phosphate amide transferase(GFAT)were measured with biochemical methods, respectively. The sample H13(h) extracted from Rhodiola crenulata, Y12(y) from Cordyceps militaris, and D(d) from Rheum palmatum were selected according to the inhibition activity on both PTP1B and α-glucosidase in vitro, regulation on hypercholesterolemia in IRF mice, and effects on GFAT activity, respectively; their synergistic effects on the treatment of metabolic syndrome were determined in IRF mice; composition proportion of h∶y∶d was measured in accordance with the results of L8(27) orthogonal experiments targeting on the inhibition of both PTP1B and α-glucosidase; finally, the effective dose was assessed based on the effects on IGT and hypercholesterolemia, respectively, in IRF mice. In conclusion, the prescription JD is composed by R. crenulata, C. militaris, and R. palmatum with the rate of 20∶1∶1, and its effective oral dose is 200 mg•kg⁻¹ for treatment of metabolic syndrome; its main mechanism is to inhibit the targets PTP1B and α-glucosidase. Monarch drug, R. crenulata, can clear away the lung-heat, tonify Qi, resolve stasis and nourish the heart. Adjuvant drug, C. militaris, can tonify the lung Qi and the kidney essence, strengthen waist and knee, accompanied with R

  2. Male partial hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism with gynaecomastia and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Tasnim; Banu, Zeenat

    2012-02-01

    The causal association of childhood obesity and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism needs to be studied to unravel the cause and effect relationship between the two conditions. The relationship of hypogonadism to the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) remains valid even when using different definitions of MetS, and following the patients prospectively for over 10 years. This is a case of 19 years male who presented with micropenis, marked gynaecomastia and weight gain. Childhood obesity and family history of diabetes predisposed him to future MetS. Presence of micropenis reflects intrauterine hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Both entities exacerbated each other.

  3. Clock genes are implicated in the human metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Abellán, P; Hernández-Morante, J J; Luján, J A; Madrid, J A; Garaulet, M

    2008-01-01

    Clock genes play a role in adipose tissue (AT) in animal experimental models. However, it remains to be elucidated whether these genes are expressed in human AT. We investigated the expression of several clock genes, Bmal1, Per2 and Cry1, in human AT from visceral and subcutaneous abdominal depots. A second objective was to elucidate whether these clock genes expressions were related to the metabolic syndrome features. Visceral and subcutaneous AT samples were obtained from morbid obese men (n=8), age: 42+/-13 years and body mass index>/=40 kg/m(2), undergoing laparoscopic surgery due to obesity. Biopsies were taken as paired samples at the beginning of the surgical process (1100 hour). Metabolic syndrome features such as waist circumference, plasma glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were also studied. Homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance was also calculated. The expression of the different clock genes, hBmal1, hPer2 and hCry1, was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Clock genes were expressed in both human AT depots. hBmal1 expression was significantly lower than hPer2 and hCry1 in both AT (P<0.001). All genes were highly correlated to one another in the subcutaneous fat, while no correlation was found between Bmal1 and Per2 in the visceral AT. Clock genes AT expression was associated with the metabolic syndrome parameters: hPer2 expression level from visceral depot was inversely correlated to waist circumference (P<0.01), while the three clock genes studied were significantly and negatively correlated to total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol (P<0.01). We have demonstrated for the first time in humans that clock genes are expressed in both subcutaneous and visceral fat. Their association with abdominal fat content and cardiovascular risk factors may be an indicator of the potential role of these clock genes in the metabolic syndrome disturbances.

  4. [Pathogenesis of lipodystrophy and metabolic syndromes associated with HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sanz, Agustín; Rodríguez-Vidigal, Francisco F; Domingo, Pere

    2006-09-30

    Lipodystrophy, and the metabolic alterations (dislipemia, insulin-resistance) associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, is a multifactorial syndrome due to the interaction of host related factors (cellular immune status, diet, gene mutations), viral factors (cytokine synthesis, polyunsaturated fatty acid or PUFA depletion), and pharmacological effects (mitochondrial DNA-polymerase inhibition, lipolysis inhibition, adiponectin synthesis reduction). HIV probably modifies the adipocyte differentiation and the lipid metabolism. This retroviral effect is mediated by proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor) and the participation of other factors (drugs, diet), all in the context of a particular host genetic setting. The adipocyte (and several cellular receptors, fatty acids, membrane proteins, and cytokines) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated lipodystrophy.

  5. The Renin Angiotensin System and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Kloet, Annette D.; Krause, Eric G.; Woods, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS; most well-known for its critical roles in the regulation of cardiovascular function and hydromineral balance) has regained the spotlight for its potential roles in various aspects of the metabolic syndrome. It may serve as a causal link among obesity and several co-morbidities. Drugs that reduce the synthesis or action of angiotensin-II (A-II; the primary effector peptide of the RAS) have been used to treat hypertension for decades and, more recently, clinical trials have determined the utility of these pharmacological agents to prevent insulin resistance. Moreover, there is evidence that the RAS contributes to body weight regulation by acting in various tissues. This review summarizes what is known of the actions of the RAS in the brain and throughout the body to influence various metabolic disorders. Special emphasis is given to the role of the RAS in body weight regulation. PMID:20381510

  6. An approach to the etiology of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya Berrío, Gabriel; Velásquez R, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    Increased prevalence of obesity in the world, especially accumulation of abnormal amounts of visceral fat predisposes to insulin resistance, which is the central role of metabolic syndrome (MS). Obesity can deregulate the intracellular signaling of insulin due to the production of inflammatory substances, chemoattractant proteins, adipokines and molecules that trigger hormonal mediator potentials for destabilization of signal transduction, leading to metabolic disorders such as hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The complexity of the MS and of the genetic mechanisms involved in its etiology derives from the combination of variants on genes involved and environmental factors that predispose it. The purpose of this paper is to review the effects of obesity in molecular and biochemical responses that trigger insulin resistance and its relation to some candidate genes and the ancestral component of the population. PMID:24892324

  7. Metabolic syndrome: from global epidemiology to individualized medicine.

    PubMed

    Batsis, J A; Nieto-Martinez, R E; Lopez-Jimenez, F

    2007-11-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) encompasses a constellation of metabolic abnormalities that are thought to place patients at higher risk for the development of diabetes and cardiovascular (CV) disease. The underlying pathophysiology is still a point of contention among various professional organizations leading to inconsistencies in the manner in which MetS is defined. Each definition has its advantages and disadvantages. Nonetheless, there is an agreement that insulin resistance and obesity are likely the central contributing factors. Because the prevalence of obesity has been increasing at a frightening rate in the past few decades, MetS represents a major public health problem that should be identified clinically in individual patients. This review describes the changing epidemiology of obesity and of MetS and discusses its importance in CV disease. We outline the existing controversies that surround MetS and discuss the role of lifestyle, pharmacological, surgical, and novel approaches in its management.

  8. Alterations of intestinal lipoprotein metabolism in diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arca, Marcello

    2015-02-01

    Diabetes and metabolic syndrome are associated with abnormal postprandial lipoprotein metabolism, with a significant delay in the clearance of many lipid parameters, including triglycerides and chylomicrons. Abnormal concentrations of plasma lipids can result from changes in the production, conversion, or catabolism of lipoprotein particles. Whereas the liver is involved in controlling serum lipid levels through synthesis of liver derived triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and low-density lipoprotein metabolism, the intestine also has a major role in lipoprotein production. Postprandial lipemia results from increases in apoB-48 availability, lipogenesis, and the synthesis and absorption of cholesterol in the enterocytes. Increased intestinal lipoprotein production prolongs postprandial lipemia in patients with diabetes and MetS, and may contribute directly to atherogenesis in these patients. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Estradiol to testosterone ratio in metabolic syndrome men aged started 40 years above

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuma, R.; Siregar, Y.; Mardianto

    2018-03-01

    Disruption of adipose tissue, an endocrine organ, could turn out into the so-called metabolic syndrome. Aging men with lowering testosterone were related to metabolic syndrome and excessive aromatase activity in adipose tissue would increase estradiol level. This study hypothesized that estradiol to testosterone ratio is increasedin aging, metabolic syndrome men. A total of 52 men were randomly recruited for this study. A blood samplewas drawn before 11.00 AM after 10 hoursof overnight fasting, then aliquot serum kept in -20°C pending the research. Subjects were divided evenly into the metabolic syndrome and nonmetabolicsyndrome group. The hormonal assaywas measured on the day of research. Then examined with student t-test. Estradiol level in metabolic syndrome group was increased, but insignificant differ to the other group. Testosterone level decreased and significantly different between groups. In conclusion, estradiol to testosterone ratio was increased in themetabolic syndrome group but insignificant.

  10. Association between Metabolite Profiles, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity Status

    PubMed Central

    Allam-Ndoul, Bénédicte; Guénard, Frédéric; Garneau, Véronique; Cormier, Hubert; Barbier, Olivier; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms associated with the development of abnormal metabolic phenotypes among obese individuals are not yet clear. Our aim is to investigate differences in plasma metabolomics profiles between normal weight (NW) and overweight/obese (Ov/Ob) individuals, with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling was used to compare metabolite levels between each group. Three main principal components factors explaining a maximum of variance were retained. Factor 1’s (long chain glycerophospholipids) metabolite profile score was higher among Ov/Ob with MetS than among Ov/Ob and NW participants without MetS. This factor was positively correlated to plasma total cholesterol (total-C) and triglyceride levels in the three groups, to high density lipoprotein -cholesterol (HDL-C) among participants without MetS. Factor 2 (amino acids and short to long chain acylcarnitine) was positively correlated to HDL-C and negatively correlated with insulin levels among NW participants. Factor 3’s (medium chain acylcarnitines) metabolite profile scores were higher among NW participants than among Ov/Ob with or without MetS. Factor 3 was negatively associated with glucose levels among the Ov/Ob with MetS. Factor 1 seems to be associated with a deteriorated metabolic profile that corresponds to obesity, whereas Factors 2 and 3 seem to be rather associated with a healthy metabolic profile. PMID:27240400

  11. Postprandial metabolism in adults with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Purtell, Louise; Viardot, Alexander; Sze, Lisa; Loughnan, Georgina; Steinbeck, Katharine; Sainsbury, Amanda; Herzog, Herbert; Smith, Arabella; Campbell, Lesley V

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are commonly restricted to 60-75% of height-appropriate calorie intake because they rapidly become obese on a normal diet. This study measured changes in energy expenditure, glucose and lipid homeostasis, and metabolic flexibility in response to a meal in PWS adults. 11 adults with PWS were compared with 12 adiposity-matched and 10 lean subjects. Indirect calorimetry was conducted at baseline and 210 min after a standardized 600 kCal breakfast to assess energy expenditure and substrate utilization. Circulating glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, nonesterified fatty acids, and triglycerides were measured up to 240 min. Insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion rate were assessed by HOMA-IR and C-peptide deconvolution, respectively. Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The PWS group had lower lean mass than the obesity control group. Corrected for lean mass, there were no differences between the PWS and obesity groups in resting metabolic rate or metabolic flexibility. Total and abdominal fat mass, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion rate were also similar between these groups. This study did not detect an intrinsic metabolic defect in individuals with PWS. Rather, lower lean mass, combined with lower physical activity, may contribute to weight gain on an apparent weight-maintenance diet. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  12. Novel nutraceutic therapies for the treatment of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Méndez-del Villar, Miriam; Pérez-Rubio, Karina G; Zuñiga, Laura Y; Cortez-Navarrete, Marisol; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Alejandra; González-Ortiz, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutraceutic therapies such as berberine, bitter melon, Gymnema sylvestre, Irvingia gabonensis, resveratrol and ursolic acid have been shown to help control metabolic syndrome (MetS). The effect of berberine on glucose and lipid metabolism, hypertension, obesity and MetS has been evaluated in animal models and humans. Most clinical trials involving bitter melon have been conducted to evaluate its effect on glucose metabolism; nevertheless, some studies have reported favorable effects on lipids and blood pressure although there is little information about its effect on body weight. Gymnema sylvestre helps to decrease body weight and blood sugar levels; however, there is limited information on dyslipidemia and hypertension. Clinical trials of Irvingia gabonensis have shown important effects decreasing glucose and cholesterol concentrations as well decreasing body weight. Resveratrol acts through different mechanisms to decrease blood pressure, lipids, glucose and weight, showing its effects on the population with MetS. Finally, there is evidence of positive effects with ursolic acid in in vitro and in vivo studies on glucose and lipid metabolism and on body weight and visceral fat. Therefore, a review of the beneficial effects and limitations of the above-mentioned nutraceutic therapies is presented. PMID:27076875

  13. Physical activity, body composition and metabolic syndrome in young adults.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Minna K; Wasenius, Niko; Kajantie, Eero; Lano, Aulikki; Lahti, Jari; Heinonen, Kati; Räikkönen, Katri; Eriksson, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Low physical activity (PA) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in all age groups. We measured intensity and volume of PA and examined the associations between PA and the metabolic syndrome (MS), its components and body composition among young Finnish adults. The study comprises 991 men and women born 1985-86, who participated in a clinical study during the years 2009-11 which included assessments of metabolism, body composition and PA. Objectively measured (SenseWear Armband) five-day PA data was available from 737 participants and was expressed in metabolic equivalents of task (MET). The prevalence of MS ranged between 8-10%. Higher total mean volume (MET-hours) or intensity (MET) were negatively associated with the risk of MS and separate components of MS, while the time spent at sedentary level of PA was positively associated with MS. MS was prevalent in approximately every tenth of the young adults at the age of 24 years. Higher total mean intensity and volume rates as well as longer duration spent at moderate and vigorous PA level had a beneficial impact on the risk of MS. Longer time spent at the sedentary level of PA increased the risk of MS.

  14. Polycystic ovary syndrome: a common reproductive syndrome with long-term metabolic consequences.

    PubMed

    Yau, T Tl; Ng, N Yh; Cheung, L P; Ma, R Cw

    2017-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common endocrine disorder among women of reproductive age. Although traditionally viewed as a reproductive disorder, there is increasing appreciation that it is associated with significantly increased risk of cardiometabolic disorders. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome may present to clinicians via a variety of different routes and symptoms. Although the impact on reproduction predominates during the reproductive years, the increased cardiometabolic problems are likely to become more important at later stages of the life course. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome have an approximately 2- to 5-fold increased risk of dysglycaemia or type 2 diabetes, and hence regular screening with oral glucose tolerance test is warranted. Although the diagnostic criteria for polycystic ovary syndrome are still evolving and are undergoing revision, the diagnosis is increasingly focused on the presence of hyperandrogenism, with the significance of polycystic ovarian morphology in the absence of associated hyperandrogenism or anovulation remaining uncertain. The management of women with polycystic ovary syndrome should focus on the specific needs of the individual, and may change according to different stages of the life course. In view of the clinical manifestations of the condition, there is recent debate about whether the current name is misleading, and whether the condition should be renamed as metabolic reproductive syndrome.

  15. Associations Between Adiposity and Metabolic Syndrome Over Time: The Healthy Twin Study.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun-Mi; Sung, Joohon; Lee, Kayoung

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated the association between changes in adiposity traits including anthropometric and fat mass indicators and changes in metabolic syndrome traits including metabolic syndrome clustering and individual components over time. We also assessed the shared genetic and environmental correlations between the two traits. Participants were 284 South Korean twin individuals and 279 nontwin family members had complete data for changes in adiposity traits and metabolic syndrome traits of the Healthy Twin study. Mixed linear model and bivariate variance-component analysis were applied. Over a period of 3.1 ± 0.6 years of study, changes in adiposity traits [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, total fat mass, and fat mass to lean mass ratio] had significant associations with changes in metabolic syndrome clustering [high blood pressure, high serum glucose, high triglycerides (TG), and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol] after adjusting for intra-familial and sibling correlations, age, sex, baseline metabolic syndrome clustering, and socioeconomic factors and health behaviors at follow-up. Change in BMI associated significantly with changes in individual metabolic syndrome components compared to other adiposity traits. Change in metabolic syndrome component TG was a better predictor of changes in adiposity traits compared to changes in other metabolic components. These associations were explained by significant environmental correlations but not by genetic correlations. Changes in anthropometric and fat mass indicators were positively associated with changes in metabolic syndrome clustering and those associations appeared to be regulated by environmental influences.

  16. Association of Metabolic Syndrome with the Cardioankle Vascular Index in Asymptomatic Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Nam, Su-Hyun; Kang, Sung-Goo; Lee, Yun-Ah; Song, Sang-Wook; Rho, Jun-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a cluster of atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk factors. The cardioankle vascular index (CAVI) reflects arterial stiffness and may be used as an indicator of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. In this study, we investigated the association of CAVI with metabolic syndrome. A total of 1,144 adults were included in this study. We measured CAVIs and examined blood samples to identify metabolic syndrome according to WHO Asia Pacific criteria and NCEP-ATPIII criteria. AST, ALT, r-GTP, BUN, creatinine, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and uric acid were also measured. CAVI values were significantly higher in subjects with metabolic syndrome than those without metabolic syndrome and increased according to the number of metabolic syndrome components present. Subjects with high fasting blood sugar levels or high blood pressure showed high CAVI values. Multiple regression analysis showed that age, sex, diastolic blood pressure, and uric acid were independent predictors of CAVI. Subjects with metabolic syndrome had high CAVIs, which indicated arterial stiffness, and were closely associated with an increase in the number of metabolic risk factors. The individual risk factors for metabolic syndrome have the synergistic effect of elevating arterial stiffness in asymptomatic Korean population.

  17. Cardiorespiratory fitness and incident metabolic syndrome in middle-aged Korean men.

    PubMed

    Jae, Sae Young; Heffernan, Kevin S; Kim, Do-Kyung; Park, Won Hah; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Kim, Seol Hyang

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) with incident metabolic syndrome in 810 middle aged Korean men. All subjects were free of metabolic syndrome at baseline examination. The metabolic syndrome was defined by NCEP criteria and CRF was directly measured by peak oxygen uptake during a treadmill test. During an average of 3.3 years of follow-up, 155 (19.1%) men developed the metabolic syndrome. The incidence of metabolic syndrome was inversely associated with CRF quartiles (p < 0.05). The relative risk (RR) of incident metabolic syndrome in the lowest CRF quartile vs the highest CRF quartile was 1.67 (95% CI = 1.07-2.60) after adjustment for covariates. Each metabolic equivalent (MET) increment in peak oxygen consumption was associated with a 17% (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.73-0.94) lower incidence of metabolic syndrome. These results demonstrate that cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with the incidence of metabolic syndrome independent of covariates in middle aged Korean men.

  18. The criteria for metabolic syndrome and the national health screening and education system in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2017-01-01

    Two major definitions of metabolic syndrome have been proposed. One focuses on the accumulation of risk factors, a measure used by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); the other focuses on abdominal obesity, a measure used by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the Japanese government. The latter definition takes waist circumference (WC) into consideration as an obligatory component, whereas the former does not. In 2009, the IDF, NHLBI, AHA, and other organizations attempted to unify these criteria; as a result, WC is no longer an obligatory component of those systems, while it remains obligatory in the Japanese criteria. In 2008, a new Japanese cardiovascular screening and education system focused on metabolic syndrome was launched. People undergoing screening are classified into three groups according to the presence of abdominal obesity and the number of metabolic risk factors, and receive health educational support from insurers. This system has yielded several beneficial outcomes: the visibility of metabolic syndrome at the population level has drastically improved; preventive measures have been directed toward metabolic syndrome, which is expected to become more prevalent in future generations; and a post-screening education system has been established. However, several problems with the current system have been identified and are under debate. In this review, we discuss topics related to metabolic syndrome, including (1) the Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome; (2) metabolic syndrome and the universal health screening and education system; and (3) recent debates about Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome.

  19. Cigarette smoking, nicotine levels and increased risk for metabolic syndrome in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Cindy Ta; Keefe, Candace C.; Welt, Corrine K.

    2014-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at risk for metabolic syndrome, which may be exacerbated by smoking. We hypothesized that smoking worsens androgen levels and the metabolic profile in women with PCOS. PCOS smokers (n = 47) and non-smokers (n = 64) and control smokers (n = 30) and non-smokers (n = 28), aged 18–45 years, underwent anthropomorphic measurements, pelvic ultrasound and blood sampling. Smokers had higher cotinine (801 ± 83 versus <11 nmol/L; smokers versus non-smokers, respectively; p < 0.001) and nicotine levels (37 ± 4 versus <12 µmol/L; p < 0.001). Triglyceride levels were higher in women with PCOS who smoked compared to non-smokers (1.55 ± 0.18 versus 0.95 ± 0.08 mmol/L; p < 0.001), even when adjusted for BMI. Metabolic syndrome was more common in smokers with PCOS compared to non-smokers with PCOS and smokers who were controls (28.6 versus 3.6%; p = 0.02). There were no differences in reproductive parameters including androgen levels. Cotinine (r = 0.3; p < 0.001) and nicotine levels (r = 0.2; p = 0.005) correlated with triglycerides. Nicotine levels also correlated with pulse rate (r = 0.2; p = 0.02) and waist:hip ratio (WHR; r = 0.2; p = 0.02). Taken together, smoking may worsen the already high risk for metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. PMID:23656383

  20. The Metabolic Syndrome and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Hess, Paul L; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R; Friedman, Daniel J; Mulder, Hillary; Kucharska-Newton, Anna; Rosamond, Wayne R; Lopes, Renato D; Gersh, Bernard J; Mark, Daniel B; Curtis, Lesley H; Post, Wendy S; Prineas, Ronald J; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Al-Khatib, Sana M

    2017-08-23

    Prior studies have demonstrated a link between the metabolic syndrome and increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Whether the metabolic syndrome is associated with sudden cardiac death is uncertain. We characterized the relationship between sudden cardiac death and metabolic syndrome status among participants of the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Study (1987-2012) free of prevalent coronary heart disease or heart failure. Among 13 168 participants, 357 (2.7%) sudden cardiac deaths occurred during a median follow-up of 23.6 years. Participants with the metabolic syndrome (n=4444) had a higher cumulative incidence of sudden cardiac death than those without it (n=8724) (4.1% versus 2.3%, P <0.001). After adjustment for participant demographics and clinical factors other than components of the metabolic syndrome, the metabolic syndrome was independently associated with sudden cardiac death (hazard ratio, 1.70, 95% confidence interval, 1.37-2.12, P <0.001). This relationship was not modified by sex (interaction P =0.10) or race (interaction P =0.62) and was mediated by the metabolic syndrome criteria components. The risk of sudden cardiac death varied according to the number of metabolic syndrome components (hazard ratio 1.31 per additional component of the metabolic syndrome, 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.44, P <0.001). Of the 5 components, elevated blood pressure, impaired fasting glucose, and low high-density lipoprotein were independently associated with sudden cardiac death. We observed that the metabolic syndrome was associated with a significantly increased risk of sudden cardiac death irrespective of sex or race. The risk of sudden cardiac death was proportional to the number of metabolic syndrome components. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  1. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Associated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome among People in Rural China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Shen, Chong; Chu, Min J; Gao, Yue X; Xu, Guang F; Huang, Jian P; Xu, Qiong Q; Cai, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is prevalent worldwide and its prevalence is related to physical activity, race, and lifestyle. Little data is available for people living in rural areas of China. In this study we examined associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviors with metabolic syndrome components among people in rural China. The Nantong Metabolic Syndrome Study recruited 13,505 female and 6,997 male participants between 2007 and 2008. Data of socio-demographic characteristics and lifestyle were collected. The associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviors with metabolic syndrome components were analyzed. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 21.6%. It was significantly lower in men than in women. Low risks of metabolic syndrome were observed in those who did less sitting and engaged in more vigorous physical activity. The highest tertile of vigorous physical activity was associated with 15-40% decreased odds of metabolic syndrome and all of its components, except for low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in men. Women with the highest tertile of moderate physical activity had 15-30% lower odds of central obesity, high glucose, and high triglycerides compared with those in the lowest tertile. Sitting time >42 hours per week had a 4%-12% attributable risk of metabolic syndrome, central obesity, and high triglycerides in both genders, and abnormal glucose and diastolic blood pressure in women. Sleeping for more than 8 hours per day was associated with risk of high serum glucose and lipids. Our data suggested that physical activity has a preventive effect against metabolic syndrome and all its abnormal components, and that longer sitting time and sleep duration are associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome components, including central obesity and high triglycerides, glucose, and diastolic blood pressure. This study could provide information for future investigation into these associations. Also, recommendations are developed to reduce

  2. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Associated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome among People in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jing; Shen, Chong; Chu, Min J.; Gao, Yue X.; Xu, Guang F.; Huang, Jian P.; Xu, Qiong Q.; Cai, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is prevalent worldwide and its prevalence is related to physical activity, race, and lifestyle. Little data is available for people living in rural areas of China. In this study we examined associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviors with metabolic syndrome components among people in rural China. Methods The Nantong Metabolic Syndrome Study recruited 13,505 female and 6,997 male participants between 2007 and 2008. Data of socio-demographic characteristics and lifestyle were collected. The associations of physical activity and sedentary behaviors with metabolic syndrome components were analyzed. Results Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 21.6%. It was significantly lower in men than in women. Low risks of metabolic syndrome were observed in those who did less sitting and engaged in more vigorous physical activity. The highest tertile of vigorous physical activity was associated with 15–40% decreased odds of metabolic syndrome and all of its components, except for low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in men. Women with the highest tertile of moderate physical activity had 15–30% lower odds of central obesity, high glucose, and high triglycerides compared with those in the lowest tertile. Sitting time >42 hours per week had a 4%-12% attributable risk of metabolic syndrome, central obesity, and high triglycerides in both genders, and abnormal glucose and diastolic blood pressure in women. Sleeping for more than 8 hours per day was associated with risk of high serum glucose and lipids. Conclusions Our data suggested that physical activity has a preventive effect against metabolic syndrome and all its abnormal components, and that longer sitting time and sleep duration are associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome components, including central obesity and high triglycerides, glucose, and diastolic blood pressure. This study could provide information for future investigation into these associations. Also

  3. The relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo Kyung; Larson, Janet L

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has been reported to be 20% to 50% in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because such people are sedentary and physically inactive, they are at risk of metabolic syndrome. The extent of this problem, however, is not fully understood. This study examined the relationship of sedentary time and physical activity to metabolic syndrome and the components of metabolic syndrome in a population-based sample of people with COPD. This was a secondary analysis of existing cross-sectional data. Subjects with COPD (n = 223) were drawn from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data set (2003-2006). Physical activity was measured by accelerometry. Waist circumference, triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, blood pressure, and fasting glucose level were used to describe metabolic syndrome. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for analysis. Fifty-five percent of the sample had metabolic syndrome. No significant differences in sedentary time and level of physical activity were found in people with COPD and metabolic syndrome and people with COPD only. However, those with a mean activity count of greater than 240 counts per minute had a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Waist circumference and glucose level were significantly associated with the time spent in sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous physical activity. Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in people with COPD, and greater physical activity and less sedentary time are associated with lower rates of metabolic syndrome. This suggests that interventions to decrease the risk of metabolic syndrome in people with COPD should include both reducing sedentary time and increasing the time and intensity of physical activity.

  4. The Relationship Between Physical Activity and Metabolic Syndrome in People With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo Kyung; Larson, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has been reported to be 20% to 50% in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because such people are sedentary and physically inactive, they are at risk of metabolic syndrome. The extent of this problem, however, is not fully understood. Objectives This study examined the relationship of sedentary time and physical activity to metabolic syndrome and the components of metabolic syndrome in a population-based sample of people with COPD. Methods This was a secondary analysis of existing cross-sectional data. Subjects with COPD (n = 223) were drawn from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data set (2003–2006). Physical activity was measured by accelerometry. Waist circumference, triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, blood pressure, and fasting glucose level were used to describe metabolic syndrome. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for analysis. Results Fifty-five percent of the sample had metabolic syndrome. No significant differences in sedentary time and level of physical activity were found in people with COPD and metabolic syndrome and people with COPD only. However, those with a mean activity count of greater than 240 counts per minute had a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Waist circumference and glucose level were significantly associated with the time spent in sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous physical activity. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in people with COPD, and greater physical activity and less sedentary time are associated with lower rates of metabolic syndrome. This suggests that interventions to decrease the risk of metabolic syndrome in people with COPD should include both reducing sedentary time and increasing the time and intensity of physical activity. PMID:24165700

  5. Aerobic exercise training induces metabolic benefits in rats with metabolic syndrome independent of dietary changes.

    PubMed

    Caponi, Paula Wesendonck; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado; Pinto, Graziela Hünning; Borges, Júlia; Markoski, Melissa; Machado, Ubiratan F; Schaan, Beatriz D'Agord

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of aerobic exercise training without dietary changes on cardiovascular and metabolic variables and on the expression of glucose transporter Type 4 in rats with metabolic syndrome. Twenty male spontaneously hypertensive rats received monosodium glutamate during the neonatal period. The animals were allocated to the following groups: MS (sedentary metabolic syndrome), MS-T (trained on a treadmill for 1 hour/day, 5 days/week for 10 weeks), H (sedentary spontaneously hypertensive rats) and H-T (trained spontaneously hypertensive rats). The Lee index, blood pressure (tail-cuff system), insulin sensitivity (insulin tolerance test) and functional capacity were evaluated before and after 10 weeks of training. Glucose transporter Type 4 expression was analyzed using Western blotting. The data were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) (p<0.05). At baseline, the MS rats exhibited lower insulin sensitivity and increased Lee index compared with the H rats. Training decreased the body weight and Lee index of the MS rats (MS-T vs. MS), but not of the H rats (H-T vs. H). There were no differences in food intake between the groups. At the end of the experiments, the systolic blood pressure was lower in the two trained groups than in their sedentary controls. Whole-body insulin sensitivity increased in the trained groups. Glucose transporter Type 4 content increased in the heart, white adipose tissue and gastrocnemius muscle of the trained groups relative to their respective untrained groups. In conclusion, the present study shows that an isolated aerobic exercise training intervention is an efficient means of improving several components of metabolic syndrome, that is, training reduces obesity and hypertension and increases insulin sensitivity.

  6. Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Obese Youth.

    PubMed

    Platt, Adrienne M

    2015-07-01

    School nurses are well aware of the childhood obesity epidemic in the United States, as one in three youth are overweight or obese. Co-morbidities found in overweight or obese adults were not commonly found in youth three decades ago but are now increasingly "normal" as the obesity epidemic continues to evolve. This article is the second of six related articles discussing the co-morbidities of childhood obesity and discusses the complex association between obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Insulin resistance increases up to 50% during puberty, which may help to explain why youth are more likely to develop co-morbidities as teens. Treatment of these disorders is focused on changing lifestyle habits, as a child cannot change his or her pubertal progression, ethnicity, or family history. School nurses and other personnel can assist youth with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome by supporting their efforts to make changes, reinforcing that insulin resistance is not necessarily type 2 diabetes even if the child is taking medication, and intervening with negative peer pressure. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Metabolic and inflammatory profiles of biomarkers in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes in a Mediterranean population. DARIOS Inflammatory study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bergés, Daniel; Consuegra-Sánchez, Luciano; Peñafiel, Judith; Cabrera de León, Antonio; Vila, Joan; Félix-Redondo, Francisco Javier; Segura-Fragoso, Antonio; Lapetra, José; Guembe, María Jesús; Vega, Tomás; Fitó, Montse; Elosua, Roberto; Díaz, Oscar; Marrugat, Jaume

    2014-08-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the differences in the biomarker profiles of patients with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus as compared to a healthy, normal weight population. We aimed to study the biomarker profile of the metabolic risk continuum defined by the transition from normal weight to obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. We performed a pooled analysis of data from 7 cross-sectional Spanish population-based surveys. An extensive panel comprising 20 biomarkers related to carbohydrate metabolism, lipids, inflammation, coagulation, oxidation, hemodynamics, and myocardial damage was analyzed. We employed age- and sex-adjusted multinomial logistic regression models for the identification of those biomarkers associated with the metabolic risk continuum phenotypes: obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. A total of 2851 subjects were included for analyses. The mean age was 57.4 (8.8) years, 1269 were men (44.5%), and 464 participants were obese, 443 had metabolic syndrome, 473 had diabetes mellitus, and 1471 had a normal weight (healthy individuals). High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein B100, leptin, and insulin were positively associated with at least one of the phenotypes of interest. Apolipoprotein A1 and adiponectin were negatively associated. There are differences between the population with normal weight and that having metabolic syndrome or diabetes with respect to certain biomarkers related to the metabolic, inflammatory, and lipid profiles. The results of this study support the relevance of these mechanisms in the metabolic risk continuum. When metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are compared, these differences are less marked. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Gemigliptin ameliorates Western-diet-induced metabolic syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hee; Leem, Jaechan; Park, Sungmi; Lee, Chong-Kee; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2017-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are widely used antihyperglycemic agents for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recently, increasing attention has been focused on the pleiotropic actions of DPP-4 inhibitors. The aim of the present study was to examine whether gemigliptin, a recently developed DPP-4 inhibitor, could ameliorate features of metabolic syndrome. Mice were fed a Western diet (WD) for 12 weeks and were subsequently divided into 2 groups: mice fed a WD diet alone or mice fed a WD diet supplemented with gemigliptin for an additional 4 weeks. Gemigliptin treatment attenuated WD-induced body mass gain, hypercholesterolemia, adipocyte hypertrophy, and macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue, which were accompanied by an increased expression of uncoupling protein 1 in subcutaneous fat. These events contributed to improved insulin sensitivity, as assessed by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test. Furthermore, gemigliptin reduced WD-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation via inhibition of de novo lipogenesis and activation of fatty acid oxidation, which was accompanied by AMP-dependent protein kinase activation. Gemigliptin ameliorated WD-induced hepatic inflammation and fibrosis through suppression of oxidative stress. These results suggest that DPP-4 inhibitors may represent promising therapeutic agents for metabolic syndrome beyond their current role as antihyperglycemic agents.

  9. Thrombotic Markers in Metabolic Syndrome Subjects Exposed to Diesel Exhaust

    PubMed Central

    Carlsten, C.; Kaufman, J. D.; Trenga, C. A.; Allen, J.; Peretz, A.; Sullivan, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Traffic-derived particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the mechanism of this association is unclear. Prothrombotic processes have been linked to PM in epidemiological and animal models, but have not been consistently implicated in controlled human models. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major contributor to PM. We conducted a controlled human exposure of DE in subjects with metabolic syndrome. The study objective was to evaluate DE exposure effects on prothrombotic markers in a population vulnerable to cardiovascular disease. A randomized, crossover, double-blinded design was used: 16 subjects with metabolic syndrome exposed on 3 different days (≥2 wk washout) to DE at 0 (filtered air, FA), 100 μg PM2.5/m3 (DE100) and 200 μg PM2.5/m3 (DE200). We assessed DE-associated changes in D-dimer, von Willebrand factor (VWF), and plasmin activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) at 3, 7, and 22 h after exposure initiation. A DE200-attributable decrease (1.17-fold; CI 1.04 to 1.34) in VWF was noted at 7 h. Significant changes did not occur in other primary endpoints. As previously noted with healthy subjects, strong diurnal patterns in PAI-1 were observed. Thus, in a novel study, we were unable to demonstrate a prothrombotic effect of moderate-dose diesel exhaust exposure in a population at risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:18668408

  10. Diabetes, Insulin Resistance, and Metabolic Syndrome in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip J.; Wiedmeyer, Charles E.; LaCarrubba, Alison; Ganjam, V. K. (Seshu); Messer, Nat T.

    2012-01-01

    Analogous to the situation in human medicine, contemporary practices in horse management, which incorporate lengthy periods of physical inactivity coupled with provision of nutritional rations characterized by inappropriately high sugar and starch, have led to obesity being more commonly recognized by practitioners of equine veterinary practice. In many of these cases, obesity is associated with insulin resistance (IR) and glucose intolerance. An equine metabolic syndrome (MS) has been described that is similar to the human MS in that both IR and aspects of obesity represent cornerstones of its definition. Unlike its human counterpart, identification of the equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) portends greater risk for development of laminitis, a chronic, crippling affliction of the equine hoof. When severe, laminitis sometimes necessitates euthanasia. Unlike the human condition, the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and many other chronic conditions, for which the risk is recognized as increased in the face of MS, is less likely in horses. The equine veterinary literature has been replete with reports of scientific investigations regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of EMS. PMID:22768883

  11. Nutraceuticals for metabolic syndrome management: from laboratory to benchside.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Arrigo F; Tartagni, Elisa; Ertek, Sibel

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a world-wide epidemic disease associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Treatment strategies include pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic methods, with varying degrees of success rate all over the world. Pharmaceutical interest in this field is growing, together with patients' requests for supplementary (or "alternative") treatments. The knowledge of nutraceuticals beneficial effects in subjects with the MetS could help us to better define the appropriate treatment for these subjects, in particular those with contraindications for commonly used drugs, or to achieve guidelines suggested targets. On the other side, it could be not convenient to use a nutraceutical to treat each metabolic syndrome component (i.e. from 3 to 5) in each affected subjects. Thus, this review tries to focus on widely marketed nutraceuticals with clinically demonstrated effects on more than one component of the MetS, namely omega-3 fatty acids, berberine, psyllium and other soluble fibers, cinnamon, chromium picolinate, banaba, and bitter gourd.

  12. [Metabolic syndrome prevalence and clinical features in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Cruz del Castillo, Aaron H; García Fierro, Rafael; Hess Moreno, María I; Vigil Pérez, Claudia A; Córdova Fernández, José A; Chuck Santiago, Marco P; Domínguez Moreno, Rogelio

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) including obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, etc.. is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It was reported that 15.9% of blood donors showed changes in fasting plasma glucose. To determine the prevalence of MS in a population of healthy donors in a secondary hospital. A cross-sectional study, included 726 healthy donors who attended the blood bank HGZ36. The SM was identified with at least 3 of 5 criteria of the NCEP ATPIII, we applied a structured questionnaire. We determined HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose Abnormal Fasting (GAA), hypertension (SAH), body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (NCC). Plan Analysis: prevalence, t student, Chi2. Of the 726 donors, 85.1% were male, according to the ATPIII criteria, 54.8% (398) had a GAA, 63.2% (458) had hypertriglyceridemia, almost 17% (121) presented HDL hypocholesterolemia, 44.1% (320) were overweight by BMI, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 54.4%, in comparison by gender, men had a statistically significant difference compared to women, showing an OR = 2.27 (p = 0.0001, 95% CI 1.44-3.60). MS is highly prevalent in this population, which involves implementing preventive measures, changes in lifestyles and identify risk factors to be free from diseases like diabetes, hypertension, obesity and MS itself.

  13. Metabolic syndrome and risk of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ghaem Maralani, Haleh; Tai, Bee Choo; Wong, Tien Y; Tai, E Shyong; Li, Jialiang; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components with the risk of early- and late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A prospective cohort of individuals aged older than or equal to 49 years were followed up over a period of 10 years in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, Australia. MetS components were measured at baseline (1992-1994), 5-year (1997-1999), and 10-year (2002-2004) follow-ups. Incident cases of early and late AMD were diagnosed using standard photographic grading of retinal images of 2,218 participants at risk. Mixed-effect logistic regression was conducted to explore the relationship between MetS (and its components) with subsequent development of early/late AMD. Over the 10-year follow-up, early AMD developed in 12% and late AMD in 3% of participants at risk. Amongst subjects aged younger than or equal to 70 years, MetS was associated with the incidence of late AMD. Of the five MetS components, obesity, high glucose, and high triglyceride were associated with the increased incidence of late AMD during the 10-year follow-up. There was no evidence of effect of MetS and its components on the risk of early AMD. Metabolic syndrome, obesity, high glucose, and high triglycerides were predictors of progression to late AMD. These data provide additional insights into the pathogenesis of AMD.

  14. [Study of the metabolic syndrome and obesity in hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Quero Alfonso, Angel I; Fernández Gallegos, Ruth; Fernández Castillo, Rafael; Gomez Jimenez, Francisco Javier; García Rios, María Del Carmen; García García, Inmaculada

    2014-10-23

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) consists of a set of clinical and biochemical changes. It is very common among chronic hemodialysis patients, being the leading cause of death in these patients, 44% of all patients undergoing this therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MS and risk factors associated with its development, as well as the prevalence of obesity in HD patients. This study has followed 90 patients of both sexes with chronic renal failure (CRF) who were treated with hemodialysis periodically in our unit for ten years. All patients were performed quarterly measurements of plasma albumin (A1b) and other biochemical analysis; besides, they underwent some anthropometric measurements like weight, height and body mass index (BMI). This was calculated using weight / size2 formula and grouped in BMI values according to WHO criteria. The data concerning hypertension and glucose were also considered. The prevalence of MS was 25% and obesity was presented as follows: 45% with type I overweight; 30.8% with type II overweight and 12 patients (2%) were obese. Being statistically significant as risk factors, BMI, overweight, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol as well as hypertension and elevated glucose levels were obtained. The metabolic syndrome compromises the patient survival causing a high prevalence in these patients. The principal risk factors in MS are monitoring weight, BMI, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, hypertension and diabetes. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Brazilian adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a complex of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This syndrome increases the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. It has been demonstrated that the prevalence of MS is increasing worldwide. Despite the importance of MS in the context of metabolic and cardiovascular disease, few studies have described the prevalence of MS and its determinants in Latin America. The present study aims to assess studies describing the prevalence of MS in Brazil in order to determine the global prevalence of the syndrome and its components. Methods Systematic review. Searches were carried out in PubMed and Scielo from the earliest available online indexing year through May 2013. There were no restrictions on language. The search terms used to describe MS were taken from the PubMed (MeSH) dictionary: “metabolic syndrome x”, “prevalence” and “Brazil”. Studies were included if they were cross-sectional, described the prevalence of MS and were conducted in apparently healthy subjects, from the general population, 19-64 years old (adult and middle aged) of both genders. The titles and abstracts of all the articles identified were screened for eligibility. Results Ten cross-sectional studies were selected. The weighted mean for general prevalence of MS in Brazil was 29.6% (range: 14.9%-65.3%). Half of the studies used the criteria for clinical diagnosis of MS proposed by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) (2001). The highest prevalence of MS (65.3%) was found in a study conducted in an indigenous population, whereas the lowest prevalence of MS (14.9%) was reported in a rural area. The most frequent MS components were low HDL-cholesterol (59.3%) and hypertension (52.5%). Conclusions Despite methodological differences among the studies selected, our findings suggested a high prevalence of MS in the Brazilian adult population. PMID:24350922

  16. Metabolic syndrome and vascular risk in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Vlek, Anne L M; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Sluman, Maayke A; Moll, Frans L; Visseren, Frank L J

    2009-07-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is associated with a high risk of cardiovascular events. The metabolic syndrome is a frequent condition among patients with manifest vascular disease, but the influence of the metabolic syndrome on cardiovascular events in patients with PAOD is unknown. Also, progression and regression of the metabolic syndrome after follow-up are not extensively studied. The study population consisted of 461 patients with symptomatic PAOD from the Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease study (SMART). Patients underwent vascular screening at baseline and after a mean follow-up of 5.5 +/- 1.3 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) for vascular events according to metabolic syndrome status (updated National Cholesterol Education Program [NCEP] criteria) were calculated using Cox regression analysis. The course of the metabolic syndrome during follow-up and the influence of body mass index (BMI) on development or disappearance of the syndrome were assessed. During follow-up, 91 first vascular events were recorded. Cumulative 3-year survival free from vascular events was 84.7% in metabolic syndrome patients compared to 92.1% in participants without the syndrome. The metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of vascular events (HR 1.51; 1.01-2.30, age- and gender-adjusted). During follow-up, 128 patients died or were lost to follow-up, and of 333 remaining patients, 221 participated in follow-up measurements. The metabolic syndrome disappeared in 16% of patients and was incident in 14% of patients during follow-up. Waist circumference increased with 10 +/- 8 cm in those developing the syndrome. A BMI decrease of 1 kg/m(2) significantly decreased the risk of metabolic syndrome development by 23% (odds ratio [OR] 0.77; 0.62-0.96), and increased the chance to revert to a non-metabolic syndrome state by 32% (OR 1.32; 1.03-1.71). The metabolic syndrome is associated with a 1.5-fold increase in risk of vascular events in PAOD patients. Weight

  17. Metabolic syndrome: aggression control mechanisms gone out of control.

    PubMed

    Belsare, Prajakta V; Watve, Milind G; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S; Bhat, Dattatraya S; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Jog, Maithili

    2010-03-01

    An upcoming hypothesis about the evolutionary origins of metabolic syndrome is that of a 'soldier' to 'diplomat' transition in behaviour and the accompanying metabolic adaptations. Theoretical as well as empirical studies have shown that similar to the soldier and diplomat dichotomy, physically aggressive and non-aggressive strategists coexist in animal societies with negative frequency dependent selection. Although dominant individuals have a higher reproductive success obtained through means such as greater access to females, subordinate individuals have alternative means such as sneak-mating for gaining a substantial reproductive success. The alternative behavioural strategies are associated with different neurophysiologic and metabolic states. Subordinate individuals typically have low testosterone, high plasma cholesterol and glucocorticoids and elevated serotonin signalling whereas dominant ones are characterized by high testosterone, low brain serotonin and lower plasma cholesterol. Food and sex are the main natural causes of aggression. However, since aggression increases the risk of injury, aggression control is equally crucial. Therefore chronic satiety in the form of fat should induce aggression control. It is not surprising that the satiety hormone serotonin has a major role in aggression control. Further chronically elevated serotonin signalling in the hypothalamus induces peripheral insulin resistance. Meta-analysis shows that most of the anti-aggression signal molecules are pro-obesity and pro-insulin-resistance. Physical aggression is known to increase secretion of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in anticipation of injuries and EGF is important in pancreatic beta cell regeneration too. In anticipation of injuries aggression related hormones also facilitate angiogenesis and angiogenesis dysfunction is the root cause of a number of co-morbidities of insulin resistance syndrome. Reduced injury proneness typical of 'diplomat' life style would also

  18. Fermented Red Ginseng Potentiates Improvement of Metabolic Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Min Chul; Lee, Yun Jung; Park, Ji Hun; Kim, Hye Yoom; Yoon, Jung Joo; Ahn, You Mee; Tan, Rui; Park, Min Cheol; Cha, Jeong Dan; Choi, Kyung Min; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome including obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension is a cluster of risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Fermentation of medicinal herbs improves their pharmacological efficacy. Red ginseng (RG), a widely used traditional herbal medicine, was reported with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activity. Aim in the present study was to investigate that the effects of fermented red ginseng (FRG) on a high-fructose (HF) diet induced metabolic disorders, and those effects were compared to RG and losartan. Animals were divided into four groups: a control group fed a regular diet and tap water, and fructose groups that were fed a 60% high-fructose (HF) diet with/without RG 250 mg/kg/day or FRG 250 mg/kg/day for eight weeks, respectively. Treatment with FRG significantly suppressed the increments of body weight, liver weight, epididymal fat weight and adipocyte size. Moreover, FRG significantly prevented the development of metabolic disturbances such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Staining with Oil-red-o demonstrated a marked increase of hepatic accumulation of triglycerides, and this increase was prevented by FRG. FRG ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by downregulation of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and adhesion molecules in the aorta. In addition, FRG induced markedly upregulation of Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4) in the muscle. These results indicate that FRG ameliorates obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and fatty liver in HF diet rats. More favorable pharmacological effects on HF diet induced metabolic disorders were observed with FRG, compared to an equal dose of RG. These results showed that the pharmacological activity of RG was enhanced by fermentation. Taken together, fermentated red ginseng might be a beneficial therapeutic approach for metabolic syndrome. PMID:27322312

  19. Targeted High Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolomics differentiates metabolic syndrome from obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Fanyi; Xu, Mengyang; Bruno, Richard S; Ballard, Kevin D; Zhu, Jiangjiang

    2017-04-01

    Both obesity and the metabolic syndrome are risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Identification of novel biomarkers are needed to distinguish metabolic syndrome from equally obese individuals in order to direct them to early interventions that reduce their risk of developing further health problems. We utilized mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolic profiling of 221 metabolites to evaluate the associations between metabolite profiles and established metabolic syndrome criteria (i.e. elevated waist circumference, hypertension, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) in plasma samples from obese men ( n = 29; BMI = 35.5 ± 5.2 kg/m 2 ) and women ( n = 40; 34.9 ± 6.7 kg/m 2 ), of which 26 met the criteria for metabolic syndrome (17 men and 9 women). Compared to obese individuals without metabolic syndrome, univariate statistical analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis showed that a specific group of metabolites from multiple metabolic pathways (i.e. purine metabolism, valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation, and tryptophan metabolism) were associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Receiver operating characteristic curves generated based on the PLS-DA models showed excellent areas under the curve (0.85 and 0.96, for metabolites only model and enhanced metabolites model, respectively), high specificities (0.86 and 0.93), and good sensitivities (0.71 and 0.91). Moreover, principal component analysis revealed that metabolic profiles can be used to further differentiate metabolic syndrome with 3 versus 4-5 metabolic syndrome criteria. Collectively, these findings support targeted metabolomics approaches to distinguish metabolic syndrome from obesity alone, and to stratify metabolic syndrome status based on the number of criteria met. Impact statement We utilized mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolic profiling of 221 metabolites to

  20. A traditional rice and beans pattern is associated with metabolic syndrome in Puerto Rican older adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was approximately 50% for Puerto Rican elders living in Massachusetts. Diet is known to be associated with metabolic syndrome. Little information exists regarding the dietary intakes of Puerto Ricans. We aimed to characterize the dietary patterns of 1167 Puerto...

  1. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Chinese psoriasis patients: A hospital-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xin-Yu; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Jin, Hong-Zhong; Zuo, Ya-Gang; Wu, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Psoriasis, a chronic autoimmune skin disorder, is believed to contribute to cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome. Psoriasis's association with the components of metabolic syndrome has been reported previously. However, large-scale cross-sectional studies about psoriasis and metabolic syndrome are rare in China. We assessed the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Chinese psoriasis patients and controls. A total of 859 psoriasis patients and 1,718 controls were recruited in an age- and sex-matched cross-sectional study. Metabolic syndrome occurred in 14.3% of the psoriasis patients as opposed to 10.0% of the control participants (P = 0.001). Psoriasis patients had a higher prevalence of overweight/obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia when compared with controls. Meanwhile, psoriasis patients with metabolic syndrome were older, and had an older age of onset and a longer disease duration when compared with those without metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is higher in the Chinese psoriatic population, which can favor cardiovascular events. The present study strengthens the value of treating psoriasis patients not only dealing with the skin lesions, and we suggest appropriate screening and relevant health education be carried out in the treatment of psoriasis patients. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. [Cardiovascular risk in subjects with high probability of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. DESIRE study].

    PubMed

    Goday, A; Gabriel, R; Ascaso, J F; Franch, J; Ortega, R; Martínez, O; Lerones, N

    2008-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome is an association of closely related alterations. The main objective of this study is to know the frequency of the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, and their role as cardiovascular risk indicators in an adult population assigned to Primary Care centers in Spain. Subjects > or = 45 years with basal glycemia > or = 90 mg/dl and abdominal circumference > or = 94 cm (men) or > or = 80 cm (women). ATP III modified-criteria were used for the metabolic syndrome and HOMA index > 3.29 was used for insulin resistance. Cardiovascular risk was estimated by the Framingham and SCORE models. A total of 2,341 subjects (62 +/- 10 years; 44.6% males) were included. Frequency of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance was 54.6% (52.5; 56.8) and 56.6% (54.5; 58.7) respectively. Metabolic syndrome was associated to a higher cardiovascular risk score with both Framingham (16 [15; 16] vs 11 [11; 12] p < 0.0001) and SCORE (2.7 [2.4; 3] vs 2.4 [2.1; 2.8]; p = 0.006) models. The results were similar for the presence of insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance are cardiovascular risk predictors. Early identification of metabolic syndrome by the use of simple clinical measures (basal glycemia and waist circumference) would make the intervention on the different disorders of metabolic syndrome possible.

  3. Heart rate variability and the metabolic syndrome: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Melanie I; Tulppo, Mikko P; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Petrella, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    A number of cross-sectional studies have examined associations between heart rate variability and metabolic syndrome, but differences in study populations, data collection and analysis methodologies make synthesis difficult. The purpose of this study was to systematically review published primary research examining associations between heart rate variability and metabolic syndrome or its individual risk factors. A systematic literature search of PubMed and EMBASE was conducted to identify relevant articles published from January 1999 to December 2012. Studies were included if they examined associations between heart rate variability analysed by standard protocols and metabolic syndrome risk factors according to published definitions. All papers were scored with a modified Downs and Black instrument, and data were extracted. Fourteen studies were included. Heart rate variability generally was reduced in women with metabolic syndrome compared to those without, while results in men were inconsistent. Time and frequency domain heart rate variability parameters were associated with individual metabolic syndrome risk factors, though sex differences exist. Only two studies considered nonlinear and Poincaré plot heart rate variability parameters, which were reduced in metabolic syndrome. Heart rate variability is altered differently in men and women with metabolic syndrome. Future studies should follow consistent heart rate variability analysis protocols and metabolic syndrome definitions and include more comprehensive analyses to investigate potential mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Hyperuricemia in obese children and adolescents: the relationship with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Li; Kubota, Masaru; Nagai, Ayako; Mamemoto, Kimiyo; Tokuda, Masakuni

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hyperuricemia in obese children and adolescents and its association with metabolic syndrome are largely unknown. The objective of our study was to characterize hyperuricemia in relation to metabolic syndrome in Japanese children and adolescents with obesity. Between 2005 and 2008, we performed a cross-sectional study of 1,027 obese children and adolescents aged 6–14 years. Based on the reference value of serum uric acid we had established previously, hyperuricemia was defined as one standard deviation over the mean value at each age. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was made based on the Japanese criteria for children. A total of 213 children and adolescents (20.7%) was found to have hyperuricemia. The prevalence of hyperuricemia was significantly higher in the male gender and older age group. Sixty-five out of 213 subjects with hyperuricemia (30.5%) had metabolic syndrome, whereas 111 out of 814 subjects without hyperuricemia (13.6%) had metabolic syndrome. The most common abnormal component of metabolic syndrome was triglyceride, followed by diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and HDL-cholesterol. Such a tendency was almost identical between the two groups. We concluded that considering the association between hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome in obese Japanese children and adolescents, the role of hyperuricemia in metabolic syndrome should receive more attention, beginning in early childhood. PMID:21589837

  5. Obesity, but not Metabolic Syndrome, Negatively Affects Outcome in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Susan L; Kemp, David E; Friedman, Edward S; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Sylvia, Louisa G; Calabrese, Joseph R; Rabideau, Dustin J; Ketter, Terence A; Thase, Michael E; Singh, Vivek; Tohen, Mauricio; Bowden, Charles L; Bernstein, Emily E; Brody, Benjamin D; Deckersbach, Thilo; Kocsis, James H; Kinrys, Gustavo; Bobo, William V; Kamali, Masoud; McInnis, Melvin G; Leon, Andrew C.; Faraone, Stephen; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Shelton, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Objective Examine the effects of obesity and metabolic syndrome on outcome in bipolar disorder. Method The Comparative Effectiveness of a Second Generation Antipsychotic Mood Stabilizer and a Classic Mood Stabilizer for Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar CHOICE) study randomized 482 participants with bipolar disorder in a six-month trial comparing lithium- and quetiapine-based treatment. Baseline variables were compared between groups with and without obesity, with and without abdominal obesity, and with and without metabolic syndrome, respectively. The effects of baseline obesity, abdominal obesity, and metabolic syndrome on outcomes were examined using mixed effects linear regression models. Results At baseline, 44.4% of participants had obesity, 48.0% had abdominal obesity, and 27.3% had metabolic syndrome; neither obesity, nor abdominal obesity, nor metabolic syndrome were associated with increased global severity, mood symptoms, or suicidality, or with poorer functioning or life satisfaction. Treatment groups did not differ on prevalence of obesity, abdominal obesity, or metabolic syndrome. By contrast, among the entire cohort, obesity was associated with less global improvement and less improvement in total mood and depressive symptoms, suicidality, functioning, and life satisfaction after six months of treatment. Abdominal obesity was associated with similar findings. Metabolic syndrome had no effect on outcome. Conclusion Obesity and abdominal obesity, but not metabolic syndrome, were associated with less improvement after six months of lithium- or quetiapine-based treatment. PMID:26114830

  6. Use of the metabolic syndrome in pediatrics: a blessing and a curse.

    PubMed

    Battista, Michelle; Murray, Robert D; Daniels, Stephen R

    2009-08-01

    The clustering of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors is known as the metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome was first characterized as a distinct entity by Dr. Gerald Reaven in 1988. The intent was to identify individuals at greatest risk for cardiovascular disease mortality and those in urgent need of lifestyle intervention. Since then the metabolic syndrome has evolved into a diagnosable entity recognized by the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III, World Health Organization, and the International Diabetes Foundation. However, the metabolic syndrome as a diagnosis faces considerable controversy, particularly when applied to the pediatric population. Due to the changes in growth and development, the adult criteria for the metabolic syndrome cannot be applied to children and adolescents. In fact, currently no all-inclusive definition for the metabolic syndrome exists for pediatrics. Despite its controversies, the identification of the metabolic syndrome and its component disorders in childhood and adolescence offers important information about risk for cardiovascular disease. Emerging evidence points to the presence of early functional and morphologic changes to the heart and blood vessels among obese children with the metabolic syndrome phenotype. Yet, the plasticity of the cardiovascular system during childhood and adolescence allows for the reversal of cardiovascular damage, but only if risks are identified early and treated aggressively. Recent national recommendations and screening directives offer pediatricians a comprehensive guide to risk prevention, assessment, and treatment.

  7. The relationship between physical activity levels and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kwang-Jun; Kim, Eon-Ho; Baek, Un-Hyo; Gang, Zhao; Kang, Seol-Jung

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity is important for preventing and managing metabolic syndrome. White-collar workers can be inherently predisposed to chronic diseases, as their jobs are primarily sedentary. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers. [Subjects and Methods] Physical activity and metabolic syndrome factors were measured in 331 male public office workers. Physical activity was classified as high (N=101), moderate (N=115), or low (N=111) using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. To diagnose metabolic syndrome, the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program's standard was used. [Results] Waist circumference and triglyceride levels, factors of metabolic syndrome, were significantly higher in the low physical activity group than in the moderate or high activity group. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly lower in the low physical activity group than in the moderate or high activity group. Waist circumference and fasting glucose were negatively correlated with physical activity level, and HDL cholesterol showed a positive correlation with waist circumference. The odds ratios for metabolic syndrome were 2.03 times higher (95% confidence interval, 1.01-4.09) in the low physical activity group than in the high physical activity group. [Conclusion] Low physical activity was a risk factor for metabolic syndrome in white-collar workers. Therefore, increasing physical activity in daily life may prevent metabolic syndrome in white-collar workers.

  8. The association between metabolic syndrome and prostate cancer: Effect on its aggressiveness and progression.

    PubMed

    Sanchís-Bonet, A; Ortiz-Vico, F; Morales-Palacios, N; Sánchez-Chapado, M

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome and its individual components on prostate biopsy findings, the radical prostatectomy specimen and on biochemical recurrence. An observational study was conducted of 1319 men who underwent prostate biopsy between January 2007 and December 2011. The impact on the biopsy findings, the radical prostatectomy specimen and biochemical recurrence was evaluated using logistic regression and Cox regression. Of the 1319 patients, 275 (21%) had metabolic syndrome, and 517 prostate cancers were diagnosed. A greater percentage of metabolic syndrome was found among patients with prostate cancer than among patients without prostate cancer (25% vs. 18%; P=.002). Poorer results were found in the radical prostatectomy specimens (Gleason score ≥ 7, P<.001; stage ≥ T2c, P<.001; positive surgical margins, P<.001), and there was a greater percentage of biochemical recurrence in patients with metabolic syndrome than in those without metabolic syndrome (24% vs. 13%; P=.003). Metabolic syndrome behaved as an independent predictive factor of finding a Gleason score ≥ 7 for the specimen, as well as for finding a specimen stage ≥ T2c. Metabolic syndrome was also able to independently predict a greater rate of biochemical recurrence (OR: 3.6, P<.001; OR: 3.2, P=.03; HR: 1.7; respectively). Metabolic syndrome is associated with poorer findings in the radical prostatectomy specimens and is an independent prognostic factor of biochemical recurrence. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Review of the pathophysiological aspects involved in urological disease associated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sáenz Medina, J; Carballido Rodríguez, J

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of disorders that includes insulin resistance, central obesity, arterial hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. These disorders can have implications for the genitourinary apparatus. To conduct a review on the pathophysiological aspects that explain the relationship between metabolic syndrome and sexual dysfunction, lower urinary tract syndrome, prostate cancer and stone disease. We performed a qualitative, narrative literature review through a literature search on PubMed of articles published between 1997 and 2015, using the terms pathophysiology, metabolic syndrome, endothelial dysfunction, lipotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, kidney stones, hypogonadism, erectile dysfunction, lower urinary tract syndrome and prostate cancer. Metabolic syndrome constitutes an established complex of symptoms, defined as the presence of insulin resistance, central obesity, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. Endothelial dysfunction secondary to lipotoxicity generates an inflammatory state, which involves renal cell metabolism, vascularisation of the pelvis and androgen production. These facts explain the relationship between metabolic syndrome, nephrolithiasis, lower urinary tract syndrome, hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction in men. Strategies such as proper diet, regular exercise, insulin treatment, testosterone-replacement therapy, therapy with antioxidants and free-radical inhibitors and urological treatments classically used for lower urinary tract syndrome have shown promising results in this syndrome. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Caffeine attenuates metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Sunil K; Wong, Weng-Yew; Kauter, Kate; Ward, Leigh C; Brown, Lindsay

    2012-10-01

    Caffeine is a constituent of many non-alcoholic beverages. Pharmacological actions of caffeine include the antagonism of adenosine receptors and the inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity. The A₁ adenosine receptors present on adipocytes are involved in the control of fatty acid uptake and lipolysis. In this study, the effects of caffeine were characterized in a diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats. Rats were given a high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet (mainly containing fructose and beef tallow) for 16 wk. The control rats were given a corn starch diet. Treatment groups were given caffeine 0.5 g/kg of food for the last 8 wk of the 16-wk protocol. The structure and function of the heart and the liver were investigated in addition to the metabolic parameters including the plasma lipid components. The high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet induced symptoms of metabolic syndrome, including obesity, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, decreased insulin sensitivity, and increased systolic blood pressure, associated with the development of cardiovascular remodeling and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The treatment with caffeine in the rats fed the high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet decreased body fat and systolic blood pressure, improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and attenuated cardiovascular and hepatic abnormalities, although the plasma lipid concentrations were further increased. Decreased total body fat, concurrent with increased plasma lipid concentrations, reflects the lipolytic effects of caffeine in adipocytes, likely owing to the caffeine antagonism of A₁ adenosine receptors on adipocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of metabolic syndrome in adults of Talca city, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Mujica, Veronica; Leiva, Elba; Icaza, Gloria; Diaz, Nora; Arredondo, Miguel; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Orrego, Roxana; Vásquez, Marcela; Palomo, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Objective- Insulin resistance (IR) is an important risk factor for type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM2) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Metabolic Syndrome (MS) is a clustering of metabolic alterations associated to IR; however, there is no international consensus for defining its diagnosis. Our objective was to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of MS identified by the ATP III and IDF criteria in adults from Talca city. Research and methods- We studied 1007 individuals, aged 18–74, and residents from Talca. MS subjects were defined according to ATP III (three altered factors) and IDF criteria (patients with waist circumference >80/90 cm (W/M) and two others altered factors). Results- The prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to the IDF and ATP III criteria was 36.4% and 29.5%, respectively after adjustment for age and sex. The agreement for both criteria was 89%. The prevalence in men was higher than in women for both MS definitions, although not significant. MS probability increased with age, and the highest risk was in the 57–68 age group (ATP-MS) and 53–72 age group (IDF-MS). Hypertension, high triglycerides and abdominal obesity are the most frequent alterations in MS. Conclusion- MS prevalence in adults was higher when diagnosed with IDF than with ATP criterion; in both, age is directly related with the MS presence. The MS subjects showed higher levels of blood pressure, waist circumference and plasma triglycerides. Considering our results, it is worrisome that one third of our population has a high risk of developing DM2 and CVD in the future. PMID:18482457

  12. Stress and obesity/metabolic syndrome in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Pervanidou, Panagiota; Chrousos, George P

    2011-09-01

    Chronic distress contributes to the development of obesity and comorbid states. Stress is the disturbance of the complex dynamic equilibrium that all organisms must maintain, and is associated with activation of the Stress system comprising of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the arousal/sympathetic nervous systems. The stress system functions in a baseline circadian fashion and interacts with other systems of the organism to regulate a variety of behavioral, endocrine, metabolic, immune and cardiovascular functions. The experience of perceived or real uncontrollable intense and/or chronic stress (distress) may lead to several psychopathologic conditions, including anxiety, depressive and psychosomatic disorders, substance abuse, obesity and the metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis, as well as impaired reproductive and immune functions. Developing children and adolescents are particularly vulnerable to the effects of chronic stress. Both behavioral and biological pathways are involved in the connection between chronic stress and obesity in adults and children. Emotional "comfort" eating, lack of sleep, impulsive behaviours and selection of specific foods often characterize stressed individuals. In addition to specific behaviours, dysregulation of the stress system through increased secretion of cortisol and catecholamines, especially in the evening hours, and in concert with concurrently elevated insulin concentrations, leads to development of central obesity, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. In children, chronic alterations in cortisol secretion may have additional effects on cognitive and emotional development, timing of puberty and final stature. Obese children and adolescents are frequently entangled in a vicious cycle between distress, impairing self-image and distorted self-image, maintaining and worsening distress.

  13. Anthropometric Indicators Predict Metabolic Syndrome Diagnosis in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Barbara Perez; Ponce, Daniela; Caramori, Jacqueline Costa Teixeira

    2016-06-01

    Obesity has been considered the key in metabolic syndrome (MetS) development, and fat accumulation may be responsible for the occurrence of metabolic abnormalities in hemodialysis patients. The use of gold-standard methods to evaluate obesity is limited, and anthropometric measures may be the simplest methods. However, no study has investigated the association between anthropometric indexes and MetS in these patients. Therefore, the aim was to determine which anthropometric indexes had the best association and prediction for MetS in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Cross-sectional study that included patients older than 18 years, undergoing hemodialysis for at least 3 months. Patients with liver disease and cancer or those receiving corticosteroids or antiretroviral therapy were excluded. Diagnostic criteria from Harmonizing Metabolic Syndrome were used for the diagnosis of MetS. Anthropometric indexes evaluated were body mass index (BMI); percent standard of triceps skinfold thickness and of middle arm muscle circumference; waist circumference (WC); sagittal abdominal diameter; neck circumference; waist-to-hip, waist-to-thigh, and waist-to-height ratios; sagittal index; conicity index; and body fat percentage. Ninety-eight patients were included, 54.1% male, and mean age was 57.8 ± 12.9 years. The prevalence of MetS was 74.5%. Individuals with MetS had increased accumulation of abdominal fat and general obesity. Waist-to-height ratio was the variable independently associated with MetS diagnosis (odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.34; P < .01) and that better predicts MetS, followed by WC and BMI (area under the curve of 0.840, 0.836, and 0.798, respectively, P < .01). Waist-to-height ratio was the best anthropometric predictor of MetS in maintenance hemodialysis patients. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  14. An animal model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome: Nile grass rat

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Kousuke; Melhorn, Mark I.; Zandi, Souska; Frimmel, Sonja; Tayyari, Faryan; Hisatomi, Toshio; Almulki, Lama; Pronczuk, Andrzej; Hayes, K. C.; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a prevalent and complex disease, characterized by the variable coexistence of obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinaemia, and hypertension. The alarming rise in the prevalence of metabolic disorders makes it imperative to innovate preventive or therapeutic measures for MetS and its complications. However, the elucidation of the pathogenesis of MetS has been hampered by the lack of realistic models. For example, the existing animal models of MetS, i.e., genetically engineered rodents, imitate certain aspects of the disease, while lacking other important components. Defining the natural course of MetS in a spontaneous animal model of the disease would be desirable. Here, we introduce the Nile grass rat (NGR), Arvicanthis niloticus, as a novel model of MetS. Studies of over 1100 NGRs in captivity, fed normal chow, revealed that most of these animals spontaneously develop dyslipidemia (P<0.01), and hyperglycemia (P<0.01) by 1 yr of age. Further characterization showed that the diabetic rats develop liver steatosis, abdominal fat accumulation, nephropathy, atrophy of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, fatty streaks in the aorta, and hypertension (P<0.01). Diabetic NGRs in the early phase of the disease develop hyperinsulinemia, and show a strong inverse correlation between plasma adiponectin and HbA1c levels (P<0.01). These data indicate that the NGR is a valuable, spontaneous model for exploring the etiology and pathophysiology of MetS as well as its various complications.—Noda, K., Melhorn, M. I., Zandi, S., Frimmel, S., Tayyari, F., Hisatomi, T., Almulki, L., Pronczuk, A., Hayes, K. C., Hafezi-Moghadam, A. An animal model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome: Nile grass rat. PMID:20335226

  15. The effect of combined inositol supplementation on maternal metabolic profile in pregnancies complicated by metabolic syndrome and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Francesca; Facchinetti, Fabio; Ontiveros, Alejandra E; Roberts, Robyn P; Saade, Mia M; Blackwell, Sean C; Sibai, Baha M; Refuerzo, Jerrie S; Longo, Monica

    2016-10-01

    Myoinositol and D-chiroinositol improve insulin resistance in women with obesity and gestational diabetes and in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome. We previously reported that offspring born to hypertensive dams lacking endothelial nitric oxide synthase and fed a high-fat diet develop metabolic-like syndrome phenotype. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of a mixture of myoinositol/D-chiroinositol supplementation during pregnancy on the maternal metabolic profile in pregnancies complicated by the metabolic-like syndrome and obesity using a pregnant mouse model. Female heterozygous endothelial nitric oxide synthase(-/+) mice with moderate hypertension were placed on a high-fat diet for 4 weeks to induce a metabolic-like syndrome phenotype. Similarly, wild-type C57BL/6 mice were placed on a high-fat diet for 4 weeks to induce a murine obesity model. Mice were then bred with wild-type males. On gestational day 1, dams were randomly allocated to receive either a mixture of myoinositol/D-chiroinositol in water (7.2/0.18 mg/mL, respectively) or water as control (placebo). At term (gestational day 18), maternal weights, systolic blood pressure, and a glucose tolerance test were obtained. Dams were then killed; pups and placentas were weighed and maternal blood collected. Serum levels of metabolic biomarkers relevant to diabetes and obesity (ghrelin, gastric inhibitory peptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, glucagon, insulin, leptin, resistin) were measured by a multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Analysis was done comparing metabolic-like syndrome-myoinositol/D-chiroinositol-treated vs metabolic-like syndrome-nontreated mice and obese-myoinositol/D-chiroinositol-treated vs obese nontreated mice. Mean systolic blood pressure was lower in metabolic-like syndrome pregnant mice treated with myoinositol/D-chiroinositol compared with placebo (P = .04), whereas there was no difference in systolic blood pressure between treated and placebo

  16. Metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer undergoing intermittent androgen-deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammadali Mohammadzadeh; Rezaei, Mohammadhadi Mohammadzadeh; Ghoreifi, Alireza; Kerigh, Behzad Feyzzadeh

    2016-01-01

    The presence of metabolic syndrome in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), especially intermittent type, has not been completely evaluated. The aim of this study is to evaluate metabolic syndrome in men with PCa undergoing intermittent ADT. In this longitudinal study, we studied the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in 190 patients who were undergoing intermittent ADT. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. All metabolic parameters, including lipid profile, blood glucose, blood pressures, and waist circumferences of the patients were measured six and 12 months after treatment. Mean age of the patients was 67.5 ± 6.74 years. The incidence of metabolic syndrome after six and 12 months was 6.8% and 14.7%, respectively. Analysis of various components of the metabolic syndrome revealed that patients had significantly higher overall prevalence of hyperglycemia, abdominal obesity, and hypertriglyceridemia in their six- and 12-month followups, but blood pressure has not been changed in the same period except for diastolic blood pressure after six months. Although there was an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in patients receiving intermittent ADT, it was lower than other studies that treated the same patients with continuous ADT. Also it seems that intermittent ADT has less metabolic complications than continuous ADT and could be used as a safe alternative in patients with advanced and metastatic PCa.

  17. The relationship between childhood parental loss and metabolic syndrome in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Alciati, Alessandra; Gesuele, Felice; Casazza, Giovanni; Foschi, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The increasing global trend of obesity is a fundamental contributor to the growing prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of medical abnormalities including impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, obesity and hypertension. Results from animal and human investigations have shown that early life stress can result in weight gain and metabolic changes. Our aim is to investigate whether a particular type of an early adverse event, i.e. parental loss during childhood, is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in severely obese subjects. One hundred thirty-five consecutive obese patients who were seeking bariatric surgery were assessed for metabolic syndrome according to the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III criteria. Information regarding the experience of parental separation or bereavement before the age of 17 was collected with the use of a semi-structured interview. In our population, 31.1% of the subjects met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. No significant differences in demographic factors, health habits or psychiatric diagnosis were found between patients with and without coexisting metabolic syndrome. After adjusting for age and gender, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that both childhood loss of a parent and a body mass index (BMI) value greater than 50 were significant predictors of metabolic syndrome. This study provides preliminary evidence linking childhood parental loss to risk factors for the development of metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotic medication.

    PubMed

    De Hert, Marc A; van Winkel, Ruud; Van Eyck, Dominique; Hanssens, Linda; Wampers, Martien; Scheen, Andre; Peuskens, Joseph

    2006-03-01

    The presence of the metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. There are limited data on the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in European patients suffering from schizophrenia. All consecutive patients with schizophrenia at our university psychiatric hospital and affiliate services were entered in an extensive prospective metabolic study including an oral glucose tolerance test. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was assessed based on the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria (NCEP, Adult Treatment Protocol, ATP-III), adapted ATP-III criteria using a fasting glucose threshold of 100 mg/dl (AHA) and on the recently proposed criteria from the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). The analysis of 430 patients showed a prevalence of the metabolic syndrome of 28.4% (ATP-III), 32.3% (ATP-III A) and 36% (IDF), respectively. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in our sample of patients with schizophrenia is at least twice as high compared to an age-adjusted community sample in Belgium. The metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent among treated patients with schizophrenia. It represents an important risk for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Assessment of the presence and monitoring of the associated risks of the metabolic syndrome should be part of the clinical management of patients treated with antipsychotics.

  19. Endotoxemia of metabolic syndrome: a pivotal mediator of meta-inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jialal, Ishwarlal; Rajamani, Uthra

    2014-11-01

    Endotoxemia, which is now emerging as a feature of metabolic syndrome, is believed to contribute to the chronic low-grade inflammatory status and insulin resistance of the syndrome. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), or endotoxins, bind to LPS-binding protein and activate pattern recognition receptors, classically Toll-like receptor-4, mediating inflammation. Increased gut permeability and changes in composition and diversity of gut microbiome have been proposed as possible mechanisms to explain increased circulating endotoxins in metabolic syndrome. Endotoxins are also believed to be delivered into the circulation by chylomicrons. Weight loss and probiotic and prebiotic therapeutic strategies can reduce endotoxemia, inflammation, and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome.

  20. [Cerebrovascular complications in metabolic syndrome: possible approaches to decrease risk].

    PubMed

    Chazova, I E; Mychka, V B; Mamyrbaeva, K M; Gornostaev, V V; Dvoskina, I M; Sergienko, V B

    2004-01-01

    To compare brain perfusion in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) or metabolic (MS) syndrome and hypertensive patients without clinicobiochemical signs of DM2 or MS; to study enoxaparin effects on brain perfusion in DM2 and arterial hypertension (AH). Seventy patients included in the study were divided into three groups: 30 patients with DM2 and AH (group 1), 30 patients with MS and AH (group 2) and 10 AH patients without manifestations of MS or DM2 (group 3). All the patients have undergone single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were examined. Deterioration of brain perfusion was more prominent in DM2 and MS patients with AH than in hypertensive patients with normal metabolism. Stress test with acetasolamide revealed defective autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in hypertensive patients with DM2. A 6-week therapy with enoxaparin significantly improved brain perfusion in hypertensive patients with DM2. Enoxaparin treatment of hypertensive DM2 and MS patients with abnormal perfusion of the brain can be used for prevention of cerebrovascular complications.

  1. Pathophysiology and therapeutics of cardiovascular disease in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yabin; Yu, Qiujun; Chen, Yundai; Cao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterized by a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, including central obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension, which are highly associated with increased morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The association between these metabolic disorders and the development of CVD is believed to be multifactorial, where insulin resistance, oxidative stress, low-grade inflammation and vascular maladaptation act as the major contributors. Therefore, multipronged therapeutic strategies should be taken for the management of patients with MetS. Lifestyle changes including weight control, healthy heart diet and regular exercises have been proposed as first line treatment to decrease CVD risks in MetS individuals. In addition, improving insulin resistance and glucose metabolism, controlling blood pressure as well as modulating dyslipidemia can also delay or reverse the progression of CVD in MetS. This review will first address the complicated interactions between MetS and CVD¸ followed by discussion about the optimal strategy in the prevention and treatment of CVD in MetS patients and the updated results from newly released clinical trials.

  2. The potential role of antioxidants in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gregório, Bianca Martins; De Souza, Diogo Benchimol; de Morais Nascimento, Fernanda Amorim; Pereira, Leonardo Matta; Fernandes-Santos, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of risk factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as obesity. The clustering of metabolic abnormality is closely related to oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as the progression of atherosclerosis. Antioxidants are reducing agents which inhibit the oxidation of other molecules and can be used not only to prevent but also to treat health complications of MS and atherosclerosis. They can be ingested in the normal diet, since they are found in many food sources, or in supplement formulations. Herein, we aim to review the literature concerning the effect of antioxidants on MS. We focus on antioxidants with some evidence of action on this condition, like flavonoids, arginine, vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoids, resveratrol and selenium. Experimental and clinical studies show that most of the above-mentioned antioxidants exhibit a wide range of effects in protecting the human body, especially in MS patients. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated for most of these compounds. Also, some of them should be used with caution because their excess can be toxic to the body. In general, antioxidants (especially those present in foods) can be used by MS individuals because of their direct effect on oxidative stress. Additionally, they should be encouraged as part of a nutritional lifestyle change, since this is part of the therapy for all diseases involved in metabolic disorders.

  3. The metabolic syndrome: definition, global impact, and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Matthew V; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic derangements that are associated with primary disturbances in adipose tissue. Abnormal visceral fat accumulates from physical inactivity and excess calories in genetically susceptible individuals. This increased adipocyte mass acts as an endocrine organ and communicates with other organ systems via increases in inflammatory cytokines. The resulting disorders define MS as increased waist circumference, decreased serum high-density lipoprotein, and increased serum triglyceride levels, hypertension, and insulin resistance. MS accounts for the majority of cardiovascular disease risk in the U.S. population. Dietary interventions, such as the Mediterranean diet, have been shown to improve these metabolic derangements. Many substances found in these diets are being investigated as specific therapies for MS, and when scientific substantiation is lacking, they may be considered as part of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, as scientific evidence accumulates, these CAM treatments may become part of conventional medicine. This review will scrutinize the emerging evidence behind many, though not all, CAM treatments currently thought to target the various derangements found in MS.

  4. Variations of Lipoprotein(a) Levels in the Metabolic Syndrome: A Report from the Maracaibo City Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Rojas, Joselyn; Salazar, Juan; Bello, Luis; Áñez, Roberto; Toledo, Alexandra; Chacín, Maricarmen; Aguirre, Miguel; Villalobos, Marjorie; Chávez, Mervin; Martínez, María Sofía; Torres, Wheeler; Torres, Yaquelin; Mejías, José; Mengual, Edgardo; Rojas, Liliana; Sánchez de Rosales, Milagro; Quevedo, Ana; Cano, Raquel; Cabrera, Mayela; París, Rafael; Lubo, Adonías; Montiel, María; Cano, Climaco

    2013-01-01

    Background. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, yet its influence on metabolic syndrome (MS) is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact generated by this diagnosis in serum Lp(a) concentrations. Materials and Methods. A total of 1807 subjects of both genders (55.3% women and 44.7% men) belonging to the Maracaibo City Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence Study were evaluated. Results were expressed as Mean ± SD, determining differences through Student's t-test and One-Way ANOVA test. Multiple logistic regression models were utilized for analyzing factors associated with elevated serum Lp(a) levels and MS. Total cholesterol and LDL-C were corrected according to Lp(a)-Cholesterol when necessary. Results. No differences were found in Lp(a) values between genders; P = 0,292. The association between MS and the classification of Lp(a) was statistically significant (χ 2 = 28.33; P < 0,0001), with greater levels in subjects with this diagnosis. In the univariate analysis, subjects with each of the separate diagnostic criteria showed higher serum Lp(a) concentrations, except for hyperglycemia. Conclusions. Lp(a) values exhibit important variations regarding MS and each of its components. Impaired fasting glucose appeared as a protecting factor against elevated Lp(a) concentrations, whereas its association with LDL-C and hs-CRP suggests a potential pro-inflammatory role. PMID:23710466

  5. HOMA1-IR and HOMA2-IR indexes in identifying insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome: Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study (BRAMS).

    PubMed

    Geloneze, Bruno; Vasques, Ana Carolina Junqueira; Stabe, Christiane França Camargo; Pareja, José Carlos; Rosado, Lina Enriqueta Frandsen Paez de Lima; Queiroz, Elaine Cristina de; Tambascia, Marcos Antonio

    2009-03-01

    To investigate cut-off values for HOMA1-IR and HOMA2-IR to identify insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic syndrome (MS), and to assess the association of the indexes with components of the MS. Nondiabetic subjects from the Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study were studied (n = 1,203, 18 to 78 years). The cut-off values for IR were determined from the 90th percentile in the healthy group (n = 297) and, for MS, a ROC curve was generated for the total sample. In the healthy group, HOMA-IR indexes were associated with central obesity, triglycerides and total cholesterol (p < 0.001). The cut-off values for IR were: HOMA1-IR > 2.7 and HOMA2-IR > 1.8; and, for MS were: HOMA1-IR > 2.3 (sensitivity: 76.8%; specificity: 66.7%) and HOMA2-IR > 1.4 (sensitivity: 79.2%; specificity: 61.2%). The cut-off values identified for HOMA1-IR and HOMA2-IR indexes have a clinical and epidemiological application for identifying IR and MS in Westernized admixtured multi-ethnic populations.

  6. The association between gender difference with metabolic syndrome, metabolic syndrome score and serum vitamin D levels in Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun; Jeong, Dae Keun; Park, Chang Eun; Oh, Hye Jong; Kim, Sung Gil

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed the association between gender difference with metabolic syndrome (MetS), metabolic syndrome score (MSS) and serum vitamin D levels in Korean adults. Analyses were restricted to 5147 adults (2162 men; 2985 women) aged 20 and older, using the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data. In the non-adjusted model, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels were inversely associated with MetS (p = .001) and MSS (p = .009) in men, but positively associated with MetS (p = .002) and MSS (p < .001) in women. However, when adjusted for related variables (including age), serum 25(OH)D levels were inversely associated with MetS (p < .001) and MSS (p < .001) in men, but were not associated with MetS (p = .200) and MSS (p = .541) in women. In conclusion, increases in MetS and its components were inversely associated with the serum vitamin D concentration in men.

  7. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Schizophrenia Referred to Farabi Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shakeri, Jalal; Karimi, Kamyar; Farnia, Vahid; Golshani, Senobar; Alikhani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our study was conducted to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia. Methods The study population included all patients with schizophrenia who were referred to Farabi Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, between March 2014 and March 2015. A total of 280 subjects who met the study criteria were selected according to the census sampling method. Results The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 30.4% (20.7% in men and 51.5% in women). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was greater in patients > 40 years than patients aged 20–40 years. There was a significant relationship between marital status and number of hospitalizations with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Conclusions Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia, healthcare professionals should take measures to identify the risk factors and timely treatment of affected patients, thereby improving the patient’s quality of life and reducing health costs. PMID:27403239

  8. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Schizophrenia Referred to Farabi Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Jalal; Karimi, Kamyar; Farnia, Vahid; Golshani, Senobar; Alikhani, Mostafa

    2016-07-01

    Our study was conducted to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia. The study population included all patients with schizophrenia who were referred to Farabi Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, between March 2014 and March 2015. A total of 280 subjects who met the study criteria were selected according to the census sampling method. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 30.4% (20.7% in men and 51.5% in women). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was greater in patients > 40 years than patients aged 20-40 years. There was a significant relationship between marital status and number of hospitalizations with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia, healthcare professionals should take measures to identify the risk factors and timely treatment of affected patients, thereby improving the patient's quality of life and reducing health costs.

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the metabolic syndrome: Consequences of a dual threat

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Dukhabandhu; Joshi, Anjali; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil; Thomas, Nihal

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is found to be more frequent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The presence of inflammatory markers in circulation, sputum, and broncho-alveolar fluid suggest systemic inflammation is one of the potential mechanisms responsible for both COPD and metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity, skeletal muscle dysfunction, hypogonadism, and steroid use are also important causes of the metabolic syndrome in COPD. Obesity and insulin resistance is found to be more common in mild to moderate stages (I and II) of COPD. Patients with COPD and the metabolic syndrome have increase risk of morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease. This review describes in details the various components of metabolic syndrome and its impact on long outcomes in COPD patients. PMID:25285275

  10. Frequency of the metabolic syndrome in screened South African corporate executives.

    PubMed

    Ker, J; Rheeder, P; Van Tonder, R

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of the metabolic syndrome in a specific group of people. The ATP III criteria were used to identify the metabolic syndrome in a group of 1,410 corporate executives belonging to a specialist health and fitness company in South Africa. Using three criteria as specified by the ATP III panel, 31% of this group of corporate executives fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome. In a small subset of black executives, a similar finding was obtained. Another one-third of the executives had two criteria of the metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome was common in a group of corporate executives.

  11. Abnormal glucose metabolism and features of the metabolic syndrome are common in patients presenting for elective cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Harding, S A; Anscombe, R; Weatherall, M; Prasad, S; Lever, N; Krebs, J

    2006-12-01

    Abnormalities of glucose metabolism and the metabolic syndrome, including excess bodyweight, are potentially modifiable risk factors for cardiac morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of these in a group of patients presenting for elective cardiac catheterization or percutaneous intervention. Data were prospectively collected on 297 consecutive patients presenting for elective cardiac catheterization or percutaneous intervention at a single tertiary referral centre. Demographic data, risk factors, medications and coronary angiogram results were recorded. Fasting lipids, fasting glucose, HbA1c levels were measured and if necessary an oral glucose tolerance test was carried out. Logistic regression and contingency table analysis examined associations of these with ethnicity. Impaired glucose metabolism (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose) was present in 46.1% with our screening programme detecting previously unknown impaired glucose metabolism in 22.9%. Impaired glucose metabolism was strongly associated with non-European ethnicity (P < 0.0001). The metabolic syndrome was present in 49.2%. When defined by ethnic specific cut-offs, overweight or obesity was present in >80% of patients in all ethnic groups. There is a very high prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism and the metabolic syndrome in patients presenting for cardiac catheterization. Impaired glucose metabolism is particularly prevalent in the Polynesian and the Indian and the Sri Lankan ethnic groups. Screening of patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization identifies a significant number of patients with undiagnosed impaired glucose metabolism and should be carried out routinely.

  12. Metabolic syndrome in the non-pregnant state is associated with the development of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Geum Joon; Park, Jong Heon; Shin, Soon-Ae; Oh, Min-Jeong; Seo, Hong Seog

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome in the non-pregnant state and the development of preeclampsia. We enrolled 212,463 Korean women who had their first delivery between January, 2011 and December, 2012 and had undergone a national health screening examination through the National Health Insurance during the 1-2 years before their first delivery. Women who had hypertension in the non-pregnant state were excluded. The presence of metabolic syndrome was defined using the modified criteria published in National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in non-pregnant state was 1.2%. Preeclampsia developed in 3.1% and its prevalence among women with and without metabolic syndrome was 7.3% and 3.0%, respectively. The pre-pregnancy prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in women who developed preeclampsia compared to that in those who had a normal pregnancy (1.1% vs. 2.8%; p<0.001). On multivariate regression analysis, women with metabolic syndrome had an increased risk of developing preeclampsia (odds ratio: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.26 to 1.74) compared to that in those without metabolic syndrome, after adjusting for age, family history of hypertension, smoking status, and pre-pregnancy body mass index. The risk of preeclampsia increased with a rise in the number of components of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome in the non-pregnant state was associated with the development of preeclampsia. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether early intervention for metabolic syndrome before pregnancy can decrease the risk of developing preeclampsia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DAILY AMBULATION IN CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS, AND YOUNG ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Parker, Donald E.; Krishnan, Sowmya; Chalmers, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Purposes To compare daily ambulatory measures in children, adolescents, and young adults with and without metabolic syndrome, and to assess which metabolic syndrome components, demographic measures, and body composition measures are associated with daily ambulatory measures. Methods Two-hundred fifty subjects between the ages of 10 and 30 years were assessed on metabolic syndrome components, demographic and clinical measures, body fat percentage, and daily ambulatory strides, durations, and cadences during seven consecutive days. Forty-five of the 250 subjects had metabolic syndrome, as defined by the International Diabetes Federation. Results Subjects with metabolic syndrome ambulated at a slower daily average cadence than those without metabolic syndrome (13.6 ± 2.2 strides/min vs. 14.9 ± 3.2 strides/min; p=0.012), and they had slower cadences for continuous durations of 60 minutes (p=0.006), 30 minutes (p=0.005), 20 minutes (p=0.003), 5 minutes (p=0.002), and 1 minute (p=0.001). However, the total amount of time spent ambulating each day was not different (p=0.077). After adjustment for metabolic syndrome status, average cadence is linearly associated with body fat percentage (p<0.001) and fat mass (p<0.01). Group difference in average cadence was no longer significant after adjusting for body fat percentage (p=0.683) and fat mass (p=0.973). Conclusion Children, adolescents, and young adults with metabolic syndrome ambulate more slowly and take fewer strides throughout the day than those without metabolic syndrome, even though the total amount of time spent ambulating is not different. Furthermore, the detrimental influence of metabolic syndrome on ambulatory cadence is primarily a function of body fatness. PMID:22811038

  14. Metabolic Syndrome Among Adults in China: The 2010 China Noncommunicable Disease Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jieli; Wang, Limin; Li, Mian; Xu, Yu; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Weiqing; Li, Jianhong; Mi, Shengquan; Zhang, Mei; Li, Yichong; Wang, Tiange; Xu, Min; Zhao, Zhiyun; Dai, Meng; Lai, Shenghan; Zhao, Wenhua; Wang, Linhong; Bi, Yufang; Ning, Guang

    2017-02-01

    In China, data on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome have been rare recently. The objective of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in 2010. The study covered all 31 provinces of mainland China and consisted of a nationally representative population sample of 98,658 Chinese adults aged ≥18 years. Of these, 97,098 participants were eligible for the data analysis reported here. Estimates of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components were calculated. To further explore whether metabolic syndrome is associated with the 10-year coronary heart disease risk, sex-stratified logistic regression models were used. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 33.9% (31.0% in men and 36.8% in women), which indicates that metabolic syndrome affects approximately 454 million adults in China. More than half of total adult population was suffering from low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and nearly half of participants had high blood pressure. Abdominal obesity and low HDL-C were more prevalent in women than in men, whereas high blood pressure, high blood glucose, and high triglycerides were more common in men. Metabolic syndrome was associated with a higher 10-year coronary heart disease risk after adjustment for potential risk factors and each component of metabolic syndrome as continuous variables. Our results showed a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in the general adult population in mainland China. Metabolic syndrome was independently associated with a higher 10-year risk of developing coronary heart disease. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  15. Metabolic syndrome, adiponectin, and cardiovascular risk in Spain (the Segovia study): impact of consensus societies criteria.

    PubMed

    Corbatón-Anchuelo, Arturo; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; Fernández-Pérez, Cristina; Vega-Quiroga, Saturio; Ibarra-Rueda, José María; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in rural and urban areas in the province of Segovia, Spain, and its relationship to lifestyle habits, cardiovascular risk, and serum adiponectin concentrations. The study had a cross-sectional design and included 888 individual residents in the province of Segovia, Autonomous Community of Castilla-León. The age/sex standardized prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was by: (1) American Heart Association/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute criteria (AHA/NHLBI), 17%; (2) International Diabetes Federation (IDF), 24.3%; and (3) Consensus Societies/Joint Interim Statement (CS), 27.8%. A high correlation was found between the different criteria. No formal education [odds ratio (OR) 6.9 (2.4-20.2)] and primary education [6.7 (2.8-15.9)] were independently associated with metabolic syndrome. An inverse association with metabolic syndrome was found for subjects doing a high level of exercise during work [0.4 (0.2-0.7)] as well as those who were mild drinkers [alcohol intake of less than 15 grams/daily, 0.4 (0.3-0.8)]. Among subjects with low estimated cardiovascular risk, adiponectin levels are higher in those who do not meet criteria of metabolic syndrome. A total of 29.7% of subjects meeting CS criteria had >20% 10-year predicted risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) by the Framingham risk score criteria [4.5 (2.4-8.5)]. Our results show: (1) A higher estimated prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to IDF and CS criteria. (2) Low educational level was independently associated with metabolic syndrome. A high level of physical activity and a daily alcohol intake of less than 15 grams/day were inversely associated with metabolic syndrome. (3) Metabolic syndrome increases the predicted CVD risk. (4) Adiponectin levels are not inversely related to insulin resistance in subjects with high cardiovascular risk and metabolic syndrome.

  16. Elevated oxidized low-density lipoprotein concentrations in postmenopausal women with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hee; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Jong Ho; Park, Hyun-Young

    2011-02-20

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) are probably associated with atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The influence of LDL-C and ox-LDL on metabolic syndrome among healthy, postmenopausal women has not been well studied. The aim of this study was to assess the association between LDL-C, ox-LDL, and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. The study design was a cross-sectional study. A total of 1309 postmenopausal women (355 with metabolic syndrome and 954 without metabolic syndrome) aged 60-79 years were included. Lipid profiles, glucose, ox-LDL, adiponectin, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α concentrations were measured. Plasma ox-LDL levels were higher in subjects with metabolic syndrome, when compared without metabolic syndrome subjects. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed that ox-LDL was significantly associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, LDL-C, triglycerides, and adiponectin. After a multivariable adjustment, the odds ratios for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of ox-LDL in metabolic syndrome compared with the lowest quartile were 1.76 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-2.70), 2.45 (95% CI, 1.58-3.79), and 3.98 (95% CI, 2.52-6.28), respectively. LDL levels were not significantly associated with metabolic syndrome. Ox-LDL concentration was associated with metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. These findings suggest that high ox-LDL levels are associated with high cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of PREMIER lifestyle modifications on participants with and without the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lien, Lillian F; Brown, Ann J; Ard, Jamy D; Loria, Catherine; Erlinger, Thomas P; Feldstein, Adrianne C; Lin, Pao-Hwa; Champagne, Catherine M; King, Abby C; McGuire, Heather L; Stevens, Victor J; Brantley, Phillip J; Harsha, David W; McBurnie, Mary Ann; Appel, Lawrence J; Svetkey, Laura P

    2007-10-01

    Lifestyle modification can reduce blood pressure and lower cardiovascular risk. Established recommendations include weight loss, sodium reduction, and increased physical activity. PREMIER studied the effects of lifestyle interventions based on established recommendations alone and with the addition of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern. This analysis aimed to assess the interventions' impact on cardiometabolic variables in participants with, compared with those without, metabolic syndrome. The primary outcome was 6-month change in systolic blood pressure. Participants with prehypertension or stage-1 hypertension were randomly assigned to an advice only control group, a 6-month intensive behavioral intervention group of established recommendations (EST), or an established recommendations plus DASH group (EST+DASH). Metabolic syndrome was defined per National Cholesterol and Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. We used general linear models to test intervention effects on change in blood pressure, lipids, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment), in subgroups defined by the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome. Of 796 participants, 399 had metabolic syndrome. Both EST and EST+DASH reduced the primary outcome variable, systolic blood pressure. Within the EST+DASH group, those with and without metabolic syndrome responded similarly (P=0.231). However, within EST, those with metabolic syndrome had a poorer response, with a decrease in systolic blood pressure of 8.4 mm Hg versus 12.0 mm Hg in those without metabolic syndrome (P=0.002). Thus, metabolic syndrome attenuated the systolic blood pressure reduction of EST, but this attenuation was overcome in EST+DASH. Finally, diastolic blood pressure, lipids, and homeostasis model assessment responded similarly to both interventions regardless of metabolic syndrome status. Our data suggest that strategies for lowering BP in individuals with metabolic syndrome may be

  18. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in secondary school adolescents in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Qun; Ji, Cheng-Ye

    2008-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence and distribution of the metabolic syndrome and to determine the risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome in secondary school adolescents. In 2006, we conducted a school-based survey in Beijing, China. Questionnaire data, anthropometric, blood pressure, and biochemical measurements were available for 2020 adolescents aged 14-16 years. The metabolic syndrome was assessed using the National Cholesterol Education Program's (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) criteria modified for age. The overall prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among adolescents was 3.3%. In Beijing, 4.2% of boys and 2.5% of girls were affected (p<0.05). The syndrome was present in 28.1% of obese adolescents compared with 6.0% of overweight and 0.2% of normal status (p<0.001). Abdominal obesity and elevated blood pressure were the most common components of the metabolic syndrome in boys, and elevated triglyceride (TG) and abdominal obesity were the most common in girls. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was influenced by body mass index (BMI) status, father's educational degree and pubertal development. The metabolic syndrome and its components are frequent in overweight and obese adolescents in Beijing. Early identification and treatment of these risk factors may help target intervention to improve future cardiovascular health.

  19. Comparison of metabolic syndrome prevalence in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Nayerifard, Razieh; Bureng, Majid Akbari; Zahiroddin, Alireza; Namjoo, Massood; Rajezi, Sepideh

    2017-11-01

    Research has shown that the metabolic syndrome is more prevalent among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder. Given the scarcity of research on the disorders, this paper aims to compare the prevalence of the syndrome among the two groups of patients. A total of 120 individuals participated in this cross sectional study: 60 patients with schizophrenia (26 males and 34 females) and 60 patients with bipolar I disorder (32 males and 28 females). The psychological disorders were diagnosed by some experienced psychiatrists according to the DSM-V. Furthermore, metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to ATP III guidelines. Metabolic syndrome prevalence among schizophrenic and bipolar I patients was 28 and 36 percent, respectively; the disparity in prevalence is not significant. According to the results, compared to their male counterparts, females were more prone significant to metabolic syndrome. Moreover, diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher among bipolar I patients. On the other hand, schizophrenic males were observed to have higher fasting blood sugar levels in comparison to bipolar I males patients. Age, consumption of second generation antipsychotics or antidepressants, and the duration of the disorder were found to be related to metabolic syndrome. This study showed that metabolic syndrome is not more prevalent among bipolar I patients, compared to those with schizophrenia. Also, women are more likely to be affected by the syndrome. A number of factors such as age, consumption of medication, and duration of the disorder are associated with the likelihood of the syndrome. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Pepsin Egg White Hydrolysate Improves Glucose Metabolism Complications Related to Metabolic Syndrome in Zucker Fatty Rats.

    PubMed

    Garcés-Rimón, Marta; González, Cristina; Vera, Gema; Uranga, José-A; López-Fandiño, Rosina; López-Miranda, Visitación; Miguel, Marta

    2018-04-03

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the administration of two egg white hydrolysates on glucose metabolism complications related to Metabolic Syndrome (MS) in Zucker fatty rats (ZFR). ZFR were given 750 mg/kg/day of egg white hydrolyzed with pepsin (HEW1) or with aminopeptidase (HEW2) for 12 weeks in their drinking water or just water. Zucker lean rats (ZLR), which received water, were used as a control. The presence of tactile allodynia, which is a sign of peripheral neuropathy, was assessed. Blood samples and pancreas were collected to determine the effect of the hydrolysates on glucose metabolism. The intake of HEW1 significantly lowered plasma insulin levels and improved the quantitative indexes of insulin resistance, insulin sensitivity, and pancreatic β-cell functionality (HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, and QUICKI, respectively), but non-significant changes were observed in group treated with HEW2. Compared to ZLR, ZFR showed tactile allodynia, but the consumption of both hydrolysates significantly increased mechanical sensitivity in ZFR. In conclusion, HEW1 pepsin could improve the glucose metabolism abnormalities associated with MS in obese Zucker rats.

  1. Low central nervous system serotonergic responsivity is associated with the metabolic syndrome and physical inactivity.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Matthew F; Mackey, Rachel H; Williams, Katherine V; Korytkowski, Mary T; Flory, Janine D; Manuck, Stephen B

    2004-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome, recognized by the co-occurrence of general or abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and dysglycemia, appears to involve disturbances in metabolism, autonomic function, and health-related behaviors. However, physiological processes linking the components of the metabolic syndrome remain obscure. The current study examined associations of central nervous system serotonergic function with each metabolic syndrome risk variable, the metabolic syndrome, and physical activity. The subjects were 270 adult volunteers who participated in a study of cardiovascular disease risk factors and neurobehavioral functioning. Central serotonergic responsivity was indexed as the prolactin (PRL) response evoked by the serotonin-releasing agent, fenfluramine. Across the sample, low PRL response was associated with greater body mass index, higher concentrations of triglycerides, glucose, and insulin, higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, greater insulin resistance, and less physical activity (P < 0.03-0.001). There also existed an inverse linear relationship between PRL response and the number of metabolic syndrome risk factors individuals possessed (P for trend = 0.002). Finally, a 1 SD decline in PRL response was associated with an odds ratio for the metabolic syndrome of 2.05 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.83; P = 0.002) and 5.70 (95% confidence interval, 1.69-19.25; P = 0.005), according to the definitions of the National Cholesterol Education Program and the World Health Organization, respectively. These findings reveal a heretofore unrecognized association between reduced central serotonergic responsivity and the metabolic syndrome.

  2. Ethnic disparities in metabolic syndrome in malaysia: an analysis by risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew K G; Dunn, Richard A; Yen, Steven T

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates ethnic disparities in metabolic syndrome in Malaysia. Data were obtained from the Malaysia Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance-1 (2005/2006). Logistic regressions of metabolic syndrome health risks on sociodemographic and health-lifestyle factors were conducted using a multiracial (Malay, Chinese, and Indian and other ethnic groups) sample of 2,366 individuals. Among both males and females, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome amongst Indians was larger compared to both Malays and Chinese because Indians are more likely to exhibit central obesity, elevated fasting blood glucose, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. We also found that Indians tend to engage in less physical activity and consume fewer fruits and vegetables than Malays and Chinese. Although education and family history of chronic disease are associated with metabolic syndrome status, differences in socioeconomic attributes do not explain ethnic disparities in metabolic syndrome incidence. The difference in metabolic syndrome prevalence between Chinese and Malays was not statistically significant. Whereas both groups exhibited similar obesity rates, ethnic Chinese were less likely to suffer from high fasting blood glucose. Metabolic syndrome disproportionately affects Indians in Malaysia. Additionally, fasting blood glucose rates differ dramatically amongst ethnic groups. Attempts to decrease health disparities among ethnic groups in Malaysia will require greater attention to improving the metabolic health of Malays, especially Indians, by encouraging healthful lifestyle changes.

  3. Ethnic Disparities in Metabolic Syndrome in Malaysia: An Analysis by Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Richard A.; Yen, Steven T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigates ethnic disparities in metabolic syndrome in Malaysia. Methods Data were obtained from the Malaysia Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance-1 (2005/2006). Logistic regressions of metabolic syndrome health risks on sociodemographic and health–lifestyle factors were conducted using a multiracial (Malay, Chinese, and Indian and other ethnic groups) sample of 2,366 individuals. Results Among both males and females, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome amongst Indians was larger compared to both Malays and Chinese because Indians are more likely to exhibit central obesity, elevated fasting blood glucose, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. We also found that Indians tend to engage in less physical activity and consume fewer fruits and vegetables than Malays and Chinese. Although education and family history of chronic disease are associated with metabolic syndrome status, differences in socioeconomic attributes do not explain ethnic disparities in metabolic syndrome incidence. The difference in metabolic syndrome prevalence between Chinese and Malays was not statistically significant. Whereas both groups exhibited similar obesity rates, ethnic Chinese were less likely to suffer from high fasting blood glucose. Conclusions Met