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Sample records for cardiovasculares na obesidade

  1. Cardiovascular

    NASA Video Gallery

    Overview of Cardiovascular research which addresses risks of space flight, including adaptive changes to the cephalad fluid shift (such as reduced circulating blood volume), potential for heart rhy...

  2. Analysis of cardiovascular responses to the H2S donors Na2S and NaHS in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Daniel; Jupiter, Ryan C.; Pankey, Edward A.; Reddy, Vishwaradh G.; Edward, Justin A.; Swan, Kevin W.; Peak, Taylor C.; Mostany, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous molecule formed from L-cysteine in vascular tissue. In the present study, cardiovascular responses to the H2S donors Na2S and NaHS were investigated in the anesthetized rat. The intravenous injections of Na2S and NaHS 0.03–0.5 mg/kg produced dose-related decreases in systemic arterial pressure and heart rate, and at higher doses decreases in cardiac output, pulmonary arterial pressure, and systemic vascular resistance. H2S infusion studies show that decreases in systemic arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance are well-maintained, and responses to Na2S are reversible. Decreases in heart rate were not blocked by atropine, suggesting that the bradycardia was independent of parasympathetic activation and was mediated by an effect on the sinus node. The decreases in systemic arterial pressure were not attenuated by hexamethonium, glybenclamide, Nw-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, sodium meclofenamate, ODQ, miconazole, 5-hydroxydecanoate, or tetraethylammonium, suggesting that ATP-sensitive potassium channels, nitric oxide, arachidonic acid metabolites, cyclic GMP, p450 epoxygenase metabolites, or large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels are not involved in mediating hypotensive responses to the H2S donors in the rat and that responses are not centrally mediated. The present data indicate that decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to the H2S donors can be mediated by decreases in vascular resistance and cardiac output and that the donors have an effect on the sinus node independent of the parasympathetic system. The present data indicate that the mechanism of the peripherally mediated hypotensive response to the H2S donors is uncertain in the intact rat. PMID:26071540

  3. Analysis of cardiovascular responses to the H2S donors Na2S and NaHS in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Daniel; Jupiter, Ryan C; Pankey, Edward A; Reddy, Vishwaradh G; Edward, Justin A; Swan, Kevin W; Peak, Taylor C; Mostany, Ricardo; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous molecule formed from L-cysteine in vascular tissue. In the present study, cardiovascular responses to the H2S donors Na2S and NaHS were investigated in the anesthetized rat. The intravenous injections of Na2S and NaHS 0.03-0.5 mg/kg produced dose-related decreases in systemic arterial pressure and heart rate, and at higher doses decreases in cardiac output, pulmonary arterial pressure, and systemic vascular resistance. H2S infusion studies show that decreases in systemic arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance are well-maintained, and responses to Na2S are reversible. Decreases in heart rate were not blocked by atropine, suggesting that the bradycardia was independent of parasympathetic activation and was mediated by an effect on the sinus node. The decreases in systemic arterial pressure were not attenuated by hexamethonium, glybenclamide, N(w)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, sodium meclofenamate, ODQ, miconazole, 5-hydroxydecanoate, or tetraethylammonium, suggesting that ATP-sensitive potassium channels, nitric oxide, arachidonic acid metabolites, cyclic GMP, p450 epoxygenase metabolites, or large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels are not involved in mediating hypotensive responses to the H2S donors in the rat and that responses are not centrally mediated. The present data indicate that decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to the H2S donors can be mediated by decreases in vascular resistance and cardiac output and that the donors have an effect on the sinus node independent of the parasympathetic system. The present data indicate that the mechanism of the peripherally mediated hypotensive response to the H2S donors is uncertain in the intact rat.

  4. Moderate inappropriately high aldosterone/NaCl constellation in mice: cardiovascular effects and the role of cardiovascular epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Barbara; Rabe, Sindy; Winter, Sabrina; Ruhs, Stefanie; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Schneider, Bettina; Sibilia, Maria; Gotthardt, Michael; Kempe, Sabine; Mäder, Karsten; Grossmann, Claudia; Gekle, Michael

    2014-12-11

    Non-physiological activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), e.g. by aldosterone under conditions of high salt intake, contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, although beneficial effects of aldosterone also have been described. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) contributes to cardiovascular alterations and mediates part of the MR effects. Recently, we showed that EGFR is required for physiological homeostasis and function of heart and arteries in adult animals. We hypothesize that moderate high aldosterone/NaCl, at normal blood pressure, affects the cardiovascular system depending on cardiovascular EGFR. Therefore we performed an experimental series in male and female animals each, using a recently established mouse model with EGFR knockout in vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes and determined the effects of a mild-high aldosterone-to-NaCl constellation on a.o. marker gene expression, heart size, systolic blood pressure, impulse conduction and heart rate. Our data show that (i) cardiac tissue of male but not of female mice is sensitive to mild aldosterone/NaCl treatment, (ii) EGFR knockout induces stronger cardiac disturbances in male as compared to female animals and (iii) mild aldosterone/NaCl treatment requires the EGFR in order to disturb cardiac tissue homeostasis whereas beneficial effects of aldosterone seem to be independent of EGFR.

  5. Cardiovascular benefits associated with higher dietary K(+) vs. lower dietary Na(+): evidence from population and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Alicia A; Veiras, Luciana C; Guevara, Claire A; Ralph, Donna L

    2017-04-01

    The World Health Organization ranks hypertension the leading global risk factor for disease, specifically, cardiovascular disease. Blood pressure (BP) is higher in Westernized populations consuming Na(+)-rich processed foods than in isolated societies consuming K(+)-rich natural foods. Evidence suggests that lowering dietary Na(+) is particularly beneficial in hypertensive individuals who consume a high-Na(+) diet. Nonetheless, numerous population studies demonstrate a relationship between higher dietary K(+), estimated from urinary excretion or dietary recall, and lower BP, regardless of Na(+) intake. Interventional studies with K(+) supplementation suggest that it provides a direct benefit; K(+) may also be a marker for other beneficial components of a "natural" diet. Recent studies in rodent models indicate mechanisms for the K(+) benefit: the distal tubule Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) controls Na(+) delivery downstream to the collecting duct, where Na(+) reabsorbed by epithelial Na(+) channels drives K(+) secretion and excretion through K(+) channels in the same region. High dietary K(+) provokes a decrease in NCC activity to drive more K(+) secretion (and Na(+) excretion, analogous to the actions of a thiazide diuretic) whether Na(+) intake is high or low; low dietary K(+) provokes an increase in NCC activity and Na(+) retention, also independent of dietary Na(+) Together, the findings suggest that public health efforts directed toward increasing consumption of K(+)-rich natural foods would reduce BP and, thus, cardiovascular and kidney disease.

  6. Cardiovascular-sleep interaction in drug-naïve patients with essential grade I hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Daniela; Provini, Federica; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Barletta, Giorgio; Cecere, Annagrazia; Pierangeli, Giulia; Cortelli, Pietro

    2013-03-01

    Lack of nighttime blood pressure (BP) reduction by 10-20% from the mean daytime values (dipping) has been described as a distinguishing feature of essential hypertension and associated, also in normotensive subjects, with increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. Mechanisms involved in the loss of the nocturnal dip are still unclear, but involvement of autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity probably plays a crucial role. Sleep is fundamental in modulating ANS activity to maintain the physiological BP circadian rhythm, and for this reason its integrity has been widely investigated in hypertension. We investigated, under controlled conditions, the autonomic control of the CV system through an autonomic reflex screen in the awake condition and by assessment of circadian rhythm-, day-night-, time-, and state-dependent changes of BP and heart rate (HR) and associated sleep parameters in patients with a recent (≤1 yr) diagnosis of essential grade I hypertension naïve of therapy. Fourteen hypertensive patients (6 males, age: 43 ± 11 yrs; body mass index [BMI]: 24 ± 3 kg/m(2)) were compared with 28 healthy controls matched for sex, age, BMI (2 controls/patient) for cardiovascular reflex and to 8 different subjects from previous controls (6 males), comparable for age and BMI, for the day-night and nighttime CV profiles during two consecutive nights. The cardiovascular reflex screen data showed increased sympathetic effect in hypertensive patients, represented by higher overshoot of BP after Valsalva maneuver. Nighttime sleep architecture during the dark period in terms of duration, representation of sleep stages, sleep fragmentation, and incidence of arousals-periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) and PLMS arousals-was similar in patients and controls. Hypertensive patients displayed higher 24-h BP and HR values, but their sleep-related BP decrease was significantly reduced compared with controls. The circadian rhythms of BP and HR were intact and similar in

  7. Cardiovascular effects of NA+/H+ exchanger inhibition with BIIB513 following hypovolemic circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongmei; Bassuk, Jorge; Arias, Jaqueline; Doods, Henri; Adams, Jose A

    2005-03-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchange (NHE) is involved in the myocardial injury that occurs during ischemia and reperfusion. The goal of the present study was to investigate the role of NHE in hypovolemic circulatory shock by using a potent NHE-1 selective inhibitor BIIB513. Acute rapid hemorrhage was induced in 14 pigs by bleeding (30 mL/kg over 30 min). Seven pigs were used as saline control. Seven other pigs received 3 mg/kg BIIB513 at 30 min after hemorrhage. Each experiment consisted of 2 h of hypovolemia followed by 2 h of fluid resuscitation. One control animal died before the experiment was completed. Six other control animals survived the entire experiment. In contrast, all the BIIB513 treated animals survived the entire protocol. Acute rapid blood loss resulted in impaired myocardial performance as well as severe hemodynamic and metabolic alterations. NHE blockade attenuated the hypovolemic hypotension and improved myocardial performance. NHE blockade also attenuated the metabolic acidosis, improved tissue oxygen delivery, and improved cardiac function from resuscitation. The circulating levels of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and cardiac troponin-I were significantly lower in the BIIB513 treatment group. These results suggest that NHE activation plays an important pathophysiological role in hypovolemic circulatory shock, and NHE-1 blockade is a powerful intervention to improve cardiovascular outcomes of resuscitation from prolonged hypovolemic circulatory shock.

  8. [Cardiovascular risk factors in children with primary nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alegría-Torres, Gabriela Alejandra; Aguilar-Kitsu, María Alejandra; Estrada-Loza, María Jesús; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: se ha propuesto que los pacientes con síndrome nefrótico (SN) tienen con mayor frecuencia factores de riesgo cardiovascular. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la frecuencia de factores de riesgo cardiovascular en niños con SN primario. Métodos: estudio transversal, descriptivo y prospectivo. Se incluyeron 55 pacientes con SN primario. Se evaluó la presencia de sobrepeso/obesidad, hipertensión, dislipidemia, hiperglicemia, elevación de proteína C reactiva (PCR) de alta sensibilidad y el incremento en el grosor intimo-medial carotídeo (GIM). Se analizó el tipo de SN, el tiempo de evolución, el tratamiento actual y el número de recaídas. Para el análisis estadístico se utilizó chi cuadrada y rho de Spearman. Resultados: el factor de riesgo cardiovascular más frecuente fue el incremento del GIM carotídeo (98.1 %), seguido de hipertrigliceridemia (54.4 %) y de hipercolesterolemia total (40 %). Los pacientes con SN corticosensible tuvieron menor número de factores de riesgo comparados con los corticorresistentes. Además hubo una correlación positiva de mayor tiempo de evolución y número de recaídas con el incremento de factores. Conclusiones: el 98 % de los niños con SN primario tuvieron al menos un factor de riesgo cardiovascular. Ciertas características clínicas como ser corticorresistentes y el tiempo de evolución y tratamiento parecen estar relacionadas con la presencia de un mayor número de factores de riesgo.

  9. The Trade-Off between Dietary Salt and Cardiovascular Disease; A Role for Na/K-ATPase Signaling?

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Joe X.; Shapiro, Anna Pearl; Shapiro, Joseph Isaac

    2014-01-01

    It has been postulated for some time that endogenous digitalis-like substances, also called cardiotonic steroids (CTS), exist, and that these substances are involved in sodium handling. Within the past 20 years, these substances have been unequivocally identified and measurements of circulating and tissue concentrations have been made. More recently, it has been identified that CTS also mediate signal transduction through the Na/K-ATPase, and consequently been implicated in profibrotic pathways. This review will discuss the mechanism of CTS in renal sodium handling and a potential “trade-off” effect from their role in inducing tissue fibrosis. PMID:25101054

  10. [Roles of rs 6923761 gene variant in glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor on weight, cardiovascular risk factor and serum adipokine levels in morbid obese patients].

    PubMed

    de Luis, Daniel Antonio; Pacheco, David; Aller, Rocío; Izaola, Olatz; Bachiller, Rosario

    2014-04-01

    Antecedentes: Los estudios de receptor de GLP-1 se han dirigido a la identificación de polimorfismos en el gen receptor de GLP- 1 que pueden ser un factor que contribuye en la patogénesis de la diabetes mellitus y factores de riesgo cardiovascular. Sin embargo, el papel de las variantes del receptor de GLP-1 variantes en el peso corporal, factores de riesgo cardiovasculares y adipocitoquinas sigue estando poco estudiado en pacientes con obesidad morbida. Objetivo: Nuestro objetivo fue analizar los efectos del polimorfismo del receptor de GLP-1 rs6923761 sobre el peso corporal, factores de riesgo cardiovascular y los niveles de adipocitoquinas séricas en pacientes con obesidad mórbida. Diseño: Se estudió una muestra de 175 obesos mórbidos. La glucosa en ayunas, proteína C reactiva (PCR), insulina, resistencia a la insulina ( HOMA), colesterol total, LDL- colesterol, HDL- colesterol, triglicéridos y la concentración de adipoquinas se midieron. También se determinaron el peso, índice de masa corporal, circunferencia de la cintura, masa grasa a través de bioimpedancia y la presión arterial. Resultados: Un total de 87 obesos (49,7%) tenían el genotipo GG y 88 (50,3%) de los sujetos del estudio tenían los siguientes genotipos; GA (71 obesos, el 40,6%) o AA (17 sujetos del estudio, el 9,7%) ( segundo grupo) . En el grupo con genotipo GG, los niveles de glucosa (4,4 ± 2,3 mg/dl, p < 0,05), triglicéridos (6,8 ± 4,3 mg/dl , p < 0,05), insulina (4,5 ± 2,3 UI/l , p < 0,05) y HOMA (1,5 ± 0,9 unidades, p < 0,05 ) fueron mayores que en el grupo mutante. No se detectaron diferencias en el resto de parámetros analizados Conclusión: Existe una asociación entre los parámetros metabólicos y el alelo mutante (A) del polimorfismo rs6923761 del receptor de GLP- 1 en pacientes con obesidad mórbida. Los niveles de triglicéridos, insulina y resistencia a la insulina son más elevados en los sujetos portadores del alelo A.

  11. Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Wood, Margie L.; Brown, Troy E.; Fortner, G. William

    1999-01-01

    Spaceflight causes adaptive changes in cardiovascular function that may deleteriously affect crew health and safety. Over the last three decades, symptoms of cardiovascular changes have ranged from postflight orthostatic tachycardia and decreased exercise capacity to serious cardiac rhythm disturbances during extravehicular activities (EVA). The most documented symptom of cardiovascular dysfunction, postflight orthostatic intolerance, has affected a significant percentage of U.S. Space Shuttle astronauts. Problems of cardiovascular dysfunction associated with spaceflight are a concern to NASA. This has been particularly true during Shuttle flights where the primary concern is the crew's physical health, including the pilot's ability to land the Orbiter, and the crew's ability to quickly egress and move to safety should a dangerous condition arise. The study of astronauts during Shuttle activities is inherently more difficult than most human research. Consequently, sample sizes have been small and results have lacked consistency. Before the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP), there was a lack of normative data on changes in cardiovascular parameters during and after spaceflight. The EDOMP for the first time allowed studies on a large enough number of subjects to overcome some of these problems. There were three primary goals of the Cardiovascular EDOMP studies. The first was to establish, through descriptive studies, a normative data base of cardiovascular changes attributable to spaceflight. The second goal was to determine mechanisms of cardiovascular changes resulting from spaceflight (particularly orthostatic hypotension and cardiac rhythm disturbances). The third was to evaluate possible countermeasures. The Cardiovascular EDOMP studies involved parallel descriptive, mechanistic, and countermeasure evaluations.

  12. OVERWEIGHT OBESITY AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION.

    PubMed

    Villaverde Gutiérrez, Carmen; Ramírez Rodrigo, Jesús; Olmedo Alguacil, Maria Milagrosa; Sánchez Caravaca, Maria Angeles; Argente del Castillo Lechuga, Maria Josefa; Ruiz Villaverde, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Introducción: el declive hormonal característico de la menopausia, junto al aumento ponderal añadido, está considerado como un factor determinante de riesgo cardiovascular. Propósito: examinar la situación ponderal en relación con la sintomatología clínica, durante la transición menopáusica, en mujeres derivadas desde atención primaria a la especialidad de endocrinología, para describir los posibles perfiles de riesgo cardiovascular. Método: se realizó un diseño observacional, analítico, de corte transversal, con los datos registrados en las historias clínicas en el momento de la derivación. 805 mujeres con 40 y más años de edad disponían de los registros necesarios para la estimación del riesgo cardiovascular. Resultados: la agrupación jerárquica distingue cuatro grupos. La frecuencia de obesidad en todos ellos superó el 60%, observándose los mayores promedios de riesgo cardiovascular en las mujeres de mayor edad y elevada frecuencia de obesidad e hipertensión arterial. En los grupos de menor edad, la estimación del riesgo fue baja, incrementándose hasta niveles similares a los de mayor edad, al proyectarlo a 65 años. Conclusión: estos resultados sugieren la necesidad de un seguimiento preventivo y terapéutico de la obesidad y los factores de riesgo modificables durante la transición menopáusica, para reducir el riesgo atribuible a dichos factores con el paso de los años.

  13. [Evaluation of the nutritional status, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk in a population of adolescents in the cities of Granada and Almeria (Spain)].

    PubMed

    Montero Alonso, Miguel A; González-Jiménez, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Objetivos: Los objetivos de este estudio fueron evaluar el estado nutricional e índice de resistencia insulínica mediante HOMA en una población de adolescentes, así como establecer correlaciones entre el estado nutricional de los sujetos, la existencia o no de resistencia a la acción insulínica y el riesgo de padecer hipertensión arterial. Muestra y metodología: Una población de 1001 adolescentes de entre 9 y 17 años de edad, pertenecientes a 18 centros educativos de las provincias de Granada y Almería. Se realizó una valoración completa del estado nutricional de los alumnos mediante antropometría. Para el estudio metabólico, se practicó una extracción sanguínea mediante punción venosa a cada alumno, analizando glucosa basal, insulina basal, índice HOMAIR. Además, se valoró hemoglobina glicosilada (HBA1c), niveles séricos de lipoproteína (a) y ácidos grasos de cadena larga (NEFA). Para el cálculo del índice de resistencia a la insulina, se utilizó el modelo matemático propuesto por Matthews (Homeostasis Model Assessment - HOMAIR), aplicando la fórmula HOMAIR = (insulina x glucosa)/22,5. Resultados: La valoración del estado nutricional reveló un progresivo incremento en los valores de las variables antropométricas a medida que el estado nutricional de los sujetos empeoraba, describiéndose una prevalencia de normopeso del 85,01%, frente a una tasa de sobrepeso del 9,99% y de obesidad del 4,99% para ambos sexos y con independencia de la edad. El estudio metabólico evidenció niveles séricos significativamente más elevados (p < 0,0001) de HBA1c, insulina basal, glucemia basal, NEFA basal, lipoproteína (a) y HOMA IR entre adolescentes con obesidad frente a aquellos otros en situación de normopeso o sobrepeso. Conclusiones: La obesidad constituye un grave problema de salud entre la población de adolescentes estudiada, determinado el desarrollo precoz de trastornos metabólicos, hasta ahora propios de la etapa adulta circunstancia

  14. The Role of Cardiovascular Muscle Cell Na+-K+ Pump Activity in the Development and Maintenance of Reduced Renal Mass Hypertension in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-28

    experimental hypertensive reduced renal mass rats, the objectives of this study were to: 1) assay blood from these animals for presence of a U humoral...REGION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF REDUCED RENAL MASS HYPERTENSION, VASCULAR Na+-K^ PUMP ACTIVITY, AND CIRCULATING OUABAIN-LIKE FACTOR > 58 ASSAY FOR...clip or one-kidney, one wrap hypertension and bi- laterally nephrectomlzed, smaller, normotensive assay dogs to determine whether blood from the

  15. Cardiovascular pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Renier; Hochfeld, Warren E; Dodgen, Tyren M; Ker, James; Pepper, Michael S

    2012-03-01

    Human genetic variation in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as more complex structural variations such as insertions, deletions and copy number variants, is partially responsible for the clinical variation seen in response to pharmacotherapeutic drugs. This affects the likelihood of experiencing adverse drug reactions and also of achieving therapeutic success. In this paper, we review key studies in cardiovascular pharmacogenetics that reveal genetic variations underlying the outcomes of drug treatment in cardiovascular disease. Examples of genetic associations with drug efficacy and toxicity are described, including the roles of genetic variability in pharmacokinetics (e.g. drug metabolizing enzymes) and pharmacodynamics (e.g. drug targets). These findings have functional implications that could lead to the development of genetic tests aimed at minimizing drug toxicity and optimizing drug efficacy in cardiovascular medicine.

  16. Cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Rupert A

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major, growing, worldwide problem. It is important that individuals at risk of developing cardiovascular disease can be effectively identified and appropriately stratified according to risk. This review examines what we understand by the term risk, traditional and novel risk factors, clinical scoring systems, and the use of risk for informing prescribing decisions. Many different cardiovascular risk factors have been identified. Established, traditional factors such as ageing are powerful predictors of adverse outcome, and in the case of hypertension and dyslipidaemia are the major targets for therapeutic intervention. Numerous novel biomarkers have also been described, such as inflammatory and genetic markers. These have yet to be shown to be of value in improving risk prediction, but may represent potential therapeutic targets and facilitate more targeted use of existing therapies. Risk factors have been incorporated into several cardiovascular disease prediction algorithms, such as the Framingham equation, SCORE and QRISK. These have relatively poor predictive power, and uncertainties remain with regards to aspects such as choice of equation, different risk thresholds and the roles of relative risk, lifetime risk and reversible factors in identifying and treating at-risk individuals. Nonetheless, such scores provide objective and transparent means of quantifying risk and their integration into therapeutic guidelines enables equitable and cost-effective distribution of health service resources and improves the consistency and quality of clinical decision making. PMID:22348281

  17. Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly CHD (coronary heart disease) and stroke, remain the leading causes of death of women in America and most developed countries. In recent years the rate of CVD has declined in men but not in women. This is contributed to by an under-recognition of women’s C...

  18. [Cardiovascular pharmacogenomics].

    PubMed

    Scibona, Paula; Angriman, Federico; Simonovich, Ventura; Heller, Martina M; Belloso, Waldo H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current medical practice takes into account information based on population studies and benefits observed in large populations or cohorts. However, individual patients present great differences in both toxicity and clinical efficacy that can be explained by variations in adherence, unknown drug to drug interactions and genetic variability. The latter seems to explain from 20% up to 95% of patient to patient variability. Treating patients with cardiovascular disorders faces the clinician with the challenge to include genomic analysis into daily practice. There are several examples within cardiovascular disease of treatments that can vary in toxicity or clinical usefulness based on genetic changes. One of the main factors affecting the efficacy of Clopidogrel is the phenotype associated with polymorphisms in the gene CYP 2C9. Furthermore, regarding oral anticoagulants, changes in CYP2C9 and VKORC1 play an important role in changing the clinical response to anticoagulation. When analyzing statin treatment, one of their main toxicities (myopathy) can be predicted by the SLCO1B1 polymorphism. The potential for prediction of toxicity and clinical efficacy from the use of genetic analysis warrants further studies aiming towards its inclusion in daily clinical practice.

  19. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  20. Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia and Cardiovascular Changes in a Group of Obese Children.

    PubMed

    Pires, António; Martins, Paula; Pereira, Ana Margarida; Silva, Patricia Vaz; Marinho, Joana; Marques, Margarida; Castela, Eduardo; Sena, Cristina; Seiça, Raquel

    2015-01-23

    Introduction: Obesity-related comorbidities are present in young obese children, providing a platform for early adult cardiovascular disorders. Objectives: To compare and correlate markers of adiposity to metabolic disturbances, vascular and cardiac morphology in a European pediatric obese cohort. Methods: We carried out an observational and transversal analysis in a cohort consisting of 121 obese children of both sexes, between the ages of 6 and 17 years. The control group consisted of 40 children with normal body mass index within the same age range. Markers of adiposity, plasma lipids and lipoproteins, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, common carotid artery intima-media thickness and left ventricular diameters were analyzed. Results: There were statistically significant differences between the control and obese groups for the variables analyzed, all higher in the obese group, except for age, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and adiponectin, higher in the control group. In the obese group, body mass index was directly correlated to left ventricular mass (r=0.542; p=0.001), the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (r=0.378; p=<0.001) and mean common carotid artery intima-media thickness (r=0.378; p=<0.001). In that same group, insulin resistance was present in 38.1%, 12.5% had a combined dyslipidemic pattern, and eccentric hypertrophy was the most common left ventricular geometric pattern. Conclusions: These results suggest that these markers may be used in clinical practice to stratify cardiovascular risk, as well as to assess the impact of weight control programs.Fundamento: As comorbidades relacionadas com a obesidade encontram-se patentes em crianças jovens obesas e são, potencialmente, um ponto de partida para as doenças cardiovasculares em adultos jovens. Objetivos: Comparar e correlacionar marcadores de adiposidade com distúrbios metabólicos e alterações cardiovasculares numa coorte de crianças obesas europeias. M

  1. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Nov 4,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  2. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  3. Cardiovascular fitness in youth: association with obesity and metabolic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Guixeres, Jaime; Redon, Pau; Saiz, Javier; Alvarez, Julio; Torró, Maria Isabel; Cantero, Laura; Lurbe, Empar

    2014-06-01

    Las terapias que se implantan actualmente para la obesidad se centran en los aspectos nutricionales y sobre la actividad física. Con el fin de hacer que la actividad física sea una terapia positiva en vez de un desencadenador de discapacidades, es relevante evaluar de forma precisa el entrenamiento cardiovascular. Objetivo: evaluar el entrenamiento cardiovascular midiendo el consumo máximo de oxígeno y evaluar su relación con los parámetros cardiometabólicos clásicos. Métodos: se aplicó el protocolo modificado de Balke a 126 individuos caucásicos (60 % de varones), con edades entre 9 y 16 años, que se sometieron a una evaluación de obesidad. El grupo de no obesos consistía de individuos sanos, de la población general, emparejados por edad y sexo y a los que se les invitó a participar. Resultados: se observaron diferencias significativas en el consumo máximo de oxígeno entre los indiviudos obesos y no obesos. Por contra, no existían diferencias significativas entre las categorías de obesidad. Además, en los sujetos obesos, el consumo máximo de oxígeno se correlacionó de forma inversa con los parámetros de riesgo cardiometabólico, particularmente con la insulina y el índice HOMA. Además, se han desarrollado dos ecuaciones predictivas del consumo máximo de oxígeno con una R2 de 0,74 y de 0,84, respectivamente. Conclusión: el consumo máximo de oxígeno es un parámetro clínico relevante que debería incluirse en la evaluación clínica rutinaria de los sujetos obesos. Por lo tanto, es crucial hacer que las pruebas de esfuerzo sean más asequibles, que puedan alcanzarse empleando las ecuaciones predictivas.

  4. Exosomes and Cardiovascular Protection.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sean M; Takov, Kaloyan; Yellon, Derek M

    2017-02-01

    Most, if not all, cells of the cardiovascular system secrete small, lipid bilayer vesicles called exosomes. Despite technical challenges in their purification and analysis, exosomes from various sources have been shown to be powerfully cardioprotective. Indeed, it is possible that much of the so-called "paracrine" benefit in cardiovascular function obtained by stem cell therapy can be replicated by the injection of exosomes produced by stem cells. However, exosomes purified from plasma appear to be just as capable of activating cardioprotective pathways. We discuss the potential roles of endogenous exosomes in the cardiovascular system, how this is perturbed in cardiovascular disease, and evaluate their potential as therapeutic agents to protect the heart.

  5. [Psoriasis and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Torres, Tiago; Sales, Rita; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Selores, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic and systemic inflammatory disease associated with several comorbidities, such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome, but also with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, like myocardial infarction or stroke. The chronic inflammatory nature of psoriasis has been suggested to be a contributing and potentially independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular comorbidities and precocious atherosclerosis. Aiming at alerting clinicians to the need of screening and monitoring cardiovascular diseases and its risk factors in psoriatic patients, this review will focus on the range of cardiometabolic comorbidities and increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with psoriasis.

  6. ADIPOQUINAS EN EL NIÑO SANO Y AFECTO DE OBESIDAD

    PubMed Central

    Martos-Moreno, G.A.; Kopchick, J.J.; Argente, y J.

    2015-01-01

    El incremento universal de la prevalencia de obesidad en niños y adolescentes durante las últimas décadas, junto con la evidencia creciente de que el establecimiento de obesidad en etapas precoces de la vida está asociado con un incremento de la prevalencia de comorbilidades y del riesgo de muerte prematura, con gran repercusión económica en los sistemas sanitarios de los países occidentales, ha impulsado la investigación en este área. Estos estudios han remarcado la importante actividad endocrina del tejido adiposo, ejercida por medio de la síntesis y secreción de un gran número de péptidos y citoquinas, denominados adipoquinas. En esta revisión se resume el estado actual de los conocimientos, así como los estudios más relevantes, en relación con la dinámica de secreción de las principales adipoquinas en niños, centrándose en el control de la homeostasis energética, regulación metabólica (fundamentalmente, metabolismo de los hidratos de carbono) e inflamación. Asímismo, se analizan las particularidades de la síntesis, secreción y acciones de las adipoquinas desde el nacimiento hasta la adolescencia, reseñando el efecto que, sobre ellas, ejerce la instauración de la obesidad. PMID:23228441

  7. [NUTRITIONAL CONDITION OF SCHOOLCHILDREN AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH LEVELS OF FITNESS AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS].

    PubMed

    Delgado Floody, Pedro; Caamaño Navarrete, Felipe; Cresp Barría, Mauro; Osorio Poblete, Aldo; Cofré Lizama, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Antecedentes: en Chile, el incremento de la obesidad infantil ha llegado a ser un importante problema de salud pública. El objetivo del estudio es determinar y comparar los niveles de obesidad y sobrepeso de escolares, así como analizar su asociación con los niveles de condición física y predictores de riesgo cardiovascular. Pacientes y métodos: se realizó un estudio de asociación y comparación de variables por género y estado nutricional; se evaluaron 113 escolares (58 hombres y 55 mujeres) de entre 13 y 16 años de edad. Se midió el estado nutricional y el rendimiento físico a través de la batería utilizada por la Agencia de Calidad de la Educación en Chile. Resultados: el 57,5% de la muestra tuvo malnutrición por exceso. El contorno de la cintura y el porcentaje de masa grasa es mayor en las mujeres (p < 0,05). El IMC no presentó diferencias significativas. Los hombres presentaron mejor rendimiento físico, en el salto, abdominales y Test de Navette (p < 0,05). Respecto a la evaluación por estatus de peso en el rendimiento físico existieron diferencias significativas (p < 0,05) en las variables: abdominales, flexo-extensiones, Test de Navette y salto, con resultados superiores en los sujetos con normopeso. Los escolares con obesidad presentaron mayor porcentaje de masa grasa y contorno de cintura (p < 0,05). Respecto a la asociación de variables según IMC, porcentaje de masa grasa y contorno de cintura, estas presentaron asociaciones negativas con el rendimiento físico. Conclusiones: el 57,5 % de los escolares evaluados presentó sobrepeso u obesidad, asociándose estos resultados negativamente con el rendimiento físico y con niveles aumentados de masa grasa y contorno de cintura, todos ellos indicadores de salud y predictores de riesgo cardiovascular.

  8. Introduction: Cardiovascular physics.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Niels; Kurths, Jürgen; Ditto, William; Bauernschmitt, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The number of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases increases unproportionally high with the increase of the human population and aging, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, the challenge of cardiovascular physics is to develop high-sophisticated methods which are able to, on the one hand, supplement and replace expensive medical devices and, on the other hand, improve the medical diagnostics with decreasing the patient's risk. Cardiovascular physics-which interconnects medicine, physics, biology, engineering, and mathematics-is based on interdisciplinary collaboration of specialists from the above scientific fields and attempts to gain deeper insights into pathophysiology and treatment options. This paper summarizes advances in cardiovascular physics with emphasis on a workshop held in Bad Honnef, Germany, in May 2005. The meeting attracted an interdisciplinary audience and led to a number of papers covering the main research fields of cardiovascular physics, including data analysis, modeling, and medical application. The variety of problems addressed by this issue underlines the complexity of the cardiovascular system. It could be demonstrated in this Focus Issue, that data analyses and modeling methods from cardiovascular physics have the ability to lead to significant improvements in different medical fields. Consequently, this Focus Issue of Chaos is a status report that may invite all interested readers to join the community and find competent discussion and cooperation partners.

  9. Introduction: Cardiovascular physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Niels; Kurths, Jürgen; Ditto, William; Bauernschmitt, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The number of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases increases unproportionally high with the increase of the human population and aging, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, the challenge of cardiovascular physics is to develop high-sophisticated methods which are able to, on the one hand, supplement and replace expensive medical devices and, on the other hand, improve the medical diagnostics with decreasing the patient's risk. Cardiovascular physics-which interconnects medicine, physics, biology, engineering, and mathematics-is based on interdisciplinary collaboration of specialists from the above scientific fields and attempts to gain deeper insights into pathophysiology and treatment options. This paper summarizes advances in cardiovascular physics with emphasis on a workshop held in Bad Honnef, Germany, in May 2005. The meeting attracted an interdisciplinary audience and led to a number of papers covering the main research fields of cardiovascular physics, including data analysis, modeling, and medical application. The variety of problems addressed by this issue underlines the complexity of the cardiovascular system. It could be demonstrated in this Focus Issue, that data analyses and modeling methods from cardiovascular physics have the ability to lead to significant improvements in different medical fields. Consequently, this Focus Issue of Chaos is a status report that may invite all interested readers to join the community and find competent discussion and cooperation partners.

  10. Cardiovascular modeling and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system is introduced. A model exhibits a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. Potentially, a model will be incorporated into a cardiovascular diagnostic system. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the variables of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion to optimize the utilization of biomedical sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  11. Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

  12. Trending Cardiovascular Nutrition Controversies.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Andrew M; Morris, Pamela B; Barnard, Neal; Esselstyn, Caldwell B; Ros, Emilio; Agatston, Arthur; Devries, Stephen; O'Keefe, James; Miller, Michael; Ornish, Dean; Williams, Kim; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2017-03-07

    The potential cardiovascular benefits of several trending foods and dietary patterns are still incompletely understood, and nutritional science continues to evolve. However, in the meantime, a number of controversial dietary patterns, foods, and nutrients have received significant media exposure and are mired by hype. This review addresses some of the more popular foods and dietary patterns that are promoted for cardiovascular health to provide clinicians with accurate information for patient discussions in the clinical setting.

  13. Violence and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Suglia, Shakira F.; Sapra, Katherine J.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2014-01-01

    Context Violence, experienced in either childhood or adulthood, has been associated with physical health outcomes including cardiovascular disease. However, the consistency of the existing literature has not been evaluated. Evidence acquisition In 2013, the authors conducted a PubMed and Web of Science review of peer reviewed articles published prior to August 2013 on the relation between violence exposure, experienced in either childhood or adulthood, and cardiovascular outcomes. To meet inclusion criteria, articles had to present estimates for the relation between violence exposure and cardiovascular outcomes (hypertension, blood pressure, stroke, coronary disease, or myocardial infarction) adjusted for demographic factors. Articles focusing on violence from TV, video games, natural disasters, terrorism, or war were excluded. Evidence synthesis The initial search yielded 2,273 articles; after removing duplicates and applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 articles were selected for review. A consistent positive relation was noted on the association between violence experienced during childhood and cardiovascular outcomes in adulthood (i.e., hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction). Associations across genders with varying types of violence exposure were also noted. By contrast, findings were mixed on the relation between adult violence exposure and cardiovascular outcome. Conclusions Despite varying definitions of violence exposure and cardiovascular endpoints, a consistent relation exists between childhood violence exposure, largely assessed retrospectively, and cardiovascular endpoints. Findings are mixed for the adult violence–cardiovascular health relation. The cross-sectional nature of most adult studies and the reliance of self-reported outcomes can potentially be attributed to the lack of findings among adult violence exposure studies. PMID:25599905

  14. SQL based cardiovascular ultrasound image classification.

    PubMed

    Nandagopalan, S; Suryanarayana, Adiga B; Sudarshan, T S B; Chandrashekar, Dhanalakshmi; Manjunath, C N

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method to analyze and classify the cardiovascular ultrasound echocardiographic images using Naïve-Bayesian model via database OLAP-SQL. Efficient data mining algorithms based on tightly-coupled model is used to extract features. Three algorithms are proposed for classification namely Naïve-Bayesian Classifier for Discrete variables (NBCD) with SQL, NBCD with OLAP-SQL, and Naïve-Bayesian Classifier for Continuous variables (NBCC) using OLAP-SQL. The proposed model is trained with 207 patient images containing normal and abnormal categories. Out of the three proposed algorithms, a high classification accuracy of 96.59% was achieved from NBCC which is better than the earlier methods.

  15. [Vitamin D and cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Mayer, Otto

    2012-05-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease is without any doubt multifactorial, and it is generally accepted, that conventional risk factors determined only about 80% of cardiovascular risk. There is accumulating evidence that vitamin D exerts important pathophysiological effects on cardiovascular system. Low vitamin D was associated with increased cardiovascular risk in several reports. This review summarizes recent epidemiological evidence and possible pathophysiological mechanism for a role of low vitamin D in cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, available data concerning vitamin D supplementation are depicted.

  16. ADMA, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, Katarzyna; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Wolzt, Michael; Schernthaner, Guntram

    2008-12-15

    The endogenous competitive nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an emerging risk marker for future cardiovascular events. Elevated ADMA concentrations have been described in patients with an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. Recently, various studies investigated the independent role of ADMA as a cardiovascular risk predictor in several patient cohorts. In addition, ADMA might not only be a risk marker but also a causative factor for cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the literature on the relationship between ADMA, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

  17. Marathon run: cardiovascular adaptation and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Predel, Hans-Georg

    2014-11-21

    The first marathon run as an athletic event took place in the context of the Olympic Games in 1896 in Athens, Greece. Today, participation in a 'marathon run' has become a global phenomenon attracting young professional athletes as well as millions of mainly middle-aged amateur athletes worldwide each year. One of the main motives for these amateur marathon runners is the expectation that endurance exercise (EE) delivers profound beneficial health effects. However, with respect to the cardiovascular system, a controversial debate has emerged whether the marathon run itself is healthy or potentially harmful to the cardiovascular system, especially in middle-aged non-elite male amateur runners. In this cohort, exercise-induced increases in cardiac biomarkers-troponin and brain natriuretic peptide-and acute functional cardiac alterations have been observed and interpreted as potential cardiac damage. Furthermore, in the cohort of 40- to 65-year-old males engaged in intensive EE, a significant risk for the development of atrial fibrillation has been identified. Fortunately, recent studies demonstrated a normalization of the cardiac biomarkers and the functional alterations within a short time frame. Therefore, these alterations may be perceived as physiological myocardial reactions to the strenuous exercise and the term 'cardiac fatigue' has been coined. This interpretation is supported by a recent analysis of 10.9 million marathon runners demonstrating that there was no significantly increased overall risk of cardiac arrest during long-distance running races. In conclusion, intensive and long-lasting EE, e.g. running a full-distance Marathon, results in high cardiovascular strain whose clinical relevance especially for middle-aged and older athletes is unclear and remains a matter of controversy. Furthermore, there is a need for evidence-based recommendations with respect to medical screening and training strategies especially in male amateur runners over the age of

  18. Nutrition and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Berciano, Silvia; Ordovás, José M

    2014-09-01

    A multitude of studies have been published on the relationship between cardiovascular disease risk and a variety of nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns. Despite the well-accepted notion that diet has a significant influence on the development and prevention of cardiovascular disease, the foods considered healthy and harmful have varied over the years. This review aims to summarize the current scientific evidence on the cardioprotective effect of those foods and nutrients that have been considered healthy as well as those that have been deemed unhealthy at any given time in history. For this purpose, we reviewed the most recent literature using as keywords foods and nutrients (ie, meat, omega-3) and cardiovascular disease-related terms (ie, cardiovascular diseases, stroke). Emphasis has been placed on meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews. In general, there is a paucity of intervention studies with a high level of evidence supporting the benefits of healthy foods (ie, fruits and vegetables), whereas the evidence supporting the case against those foods considered less healthy (ie, saturated fat) seems to be weakened by most recent evidence. In summary, most of the evidence supporting the benefits and harms of specific foods and nutrients is based on observational epidemiological studies. The outcome of randomized clinical trials reveals a more confusing picture with most studies providing very small effects in one direction or another; the strongest evidence comes from dietary patterns. The current status of the relationship between diet and cardiovascular disease risk calls for more tailored recommendations based on genomic technologies.

  19. Cardiovascular Pharmacology of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Pacher, P.; Bátkai, S.; Kunos, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids and their synthetic and endogenous analogs affect a broad range of physiological functions, including cardiovascular variables, the most important component of their effect being profound hypotension. The mechanisms of the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids in vivo are complex and may involve modulation of autonomic outflow in both the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as direct effects on the myocardium and vasculature. Although several lines of evidence indicate that the cardiovascular depressive effects of cannabinoids are mediated by peripherally localized CB1 receptors, recent studies provide strong support for the existence of as-yet-undefined endothelial and cardiac receptor(s) that mediate certain endocannabinoid-induced cardiovascular effects. The endogenous cannabinoid system has been recently implicated in the mechanism of hypotension associated with hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and cardiogenic shock, and advanced liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, cannabinoids have been considered as novel antihypertensive agents. A protective role of endocannabinoids in myocardial ischemia has also been documented. In this chapter, we summarize current information on the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids and highlight the importance of these effects in a variety of pathophysiological conditions. PMID:16596789

  20. Diabetes Drugs and Cardiovascular Safety

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a well-known risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the beneficial effect of improved glycemic control on cardiovascular complications has been well established. However, the rosiglitazone experience aroused awareness of potential cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes drugs and prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidelines about cardiovascular risk. Through postmarketing cardiovascular safety trials, some drugs demonstrated cardiovascular benefits, while some antidiabetic drugs raised concern about a possible increased cardiovascular risk associated with drug use. With the development of new classes of drugs, treatment options became wider and the complexity of glycemic management in type 2 diabetes has increased. When choosing the appropriate treatment strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, not only the glucose-lowering effects, but also overall benefits and risks for cardiovascular disease should be taken into consideration. PMID:27302713

  1. Diabetes Drugs and Cardiovascular Safety.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Cheol

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes is a well-known risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the beneficial effect of improved glycemic control on cardiovascular complications has been well established. However, the rosiglitazone experience aroused awareness of potential cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes drugs and prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidelines about cardiovascular risk. Through postmarketing cardiovascular safety trials, some drugs demonstrated cardiovascular benefits, while some antidiabetic drugs raised concern about a possible increased cardiovascular risk associated with drug use. With the development of new classes of drugs, treatment options became wider and the complexity of glycemic management in type 2 diabetes has increased. When choosing the appropriate treatment strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, not only the glucose-lowering effects, but also overall benefits and risks for cardiovascular disease should be taken into consideration.

  2. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  3. Cardiovascular adaptation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Richard; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-01-01

    Millions of athletes train for and participate in competitive athletics each year. Many of these athletes will present to a cardiovascular specialist with signs or symptoms that might indicate heart disease and these athletes/patients will ask for advice on their ability to continue to train and compete safely. By virtue of their training, athletes׳ hearts may undergo significant structural and electrical change, presenting a special challenge for the cardiovascular specialist. It is important to understand normal adaptive changes in order to separate normal physiology from pathology.

  4. [Sugar and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Gómez Morales, Luis; Beltrán Romero, Luis Matías; García Puig, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in the Spanish population and may be a relationship between the prevalence of these and excessive sugar consumption. In recent years, researchers have focused on the properties of these nutrients. Although there are many studies examining this association, the results are not unanimous. In any case there is sufficient basis for designing public health strategies in order to reduce the consumption of sugary drinks as part of a healthy lifestyle. Therefore, the question we address is: sugar intake in abundant amounts, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease? We use as the focus of the discussion SAFO analysis model.

  5. Myeloperoxidase and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Stephen J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2005-06-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a leukocyte-derived enzyme that catalyzes the formation of a number of reactive oxidant species. In addition to being an integral component of the innate immune response, evidence has emerged that MPO-derived oxidants contribute to tissue damage during inflammation. MPO-catalyzed reactions have been attributed to potentially proatherogenic biological activities throughout the evolution of cardiovascular disease, including during initiation, propagation, and acute complication phases of the atherosclerotic process. As a result, MPO and its downstream inflammatory pathways represent attractive targets for both prognostication and therapeutic intervention in the prophylaxis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  6. Clocks and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Haines, Philip; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in central and peripheral tissues enable the temporal synchronization and organization of molecular and physiological processes of rhythmic animals, allowing optimum functioning of cells and organisms at the most appropriate time of day. Disruption of circadian rhythms, from external or internal forces, leads to widespread biological disruption and is postulated to underlie many human conditions, such as the incidence and timing of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe in vivo and in vitro methodology relevant to studying the role of circadian rhythms in cardiovascular function and dysfunction PMID:25707279

  7. Cardiovascular bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bull, Joseph L

    2005-01-01

    Gas bubbles can form in the cardiovascular system as a result of patho-physiological conditions or can be intentionally introduced for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. The dynamic behavior of these bubbles is caused by a variety of mechanisms, such as inertia, pressure, interfacial tension, viscosity, and gravity. We review recent advances in the fundamental mechanics and applications of cardiovascular bubbles, including air embolism, ultrasound contrast agents, targeted microbubbles for drug delivery and molecular imaging, cavitation-induced tissue erosion for ultrasonic surgery, microbubble-induced angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, and gas embolotherapy.

  8. Targets of oxidative stress in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, T; Ghosh, S K; Michael, J R; Batabyal, S K; Chakraborti, S

    1998-10-01

    Although oxidants such as superoxide (O2.) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) play a role in host-mediated destruction of foreign pathogens yet excessive generation of oxidants may lead to a variety of pathological complications in the cardiovascular system. An important mechanism by which oxidants cause dysfunction of the cardiovascular system appears to be due to the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. Oxidants cause cellular Ca2+ mobilization by modulating activities of a variety of regulators such as Na+/H+ and Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, Na+/K+ ATPase and Ca2+ ATPase and Ca2+ channels that are associated with Ca2+ transport in the plasma membrane and the sarco(endo)plasmic reticular membrane of myocardial cells. Recent research have suggested that the increase in Ca2+ level by oxidants plays a pivotal role in inducing several protein kinases such as protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase and mitogen activated protein kinases. Oxidant-mediated alteration of different signal transduction systems and their interations eventually regulate a variety of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, apoptosis and necrosis in the myocardium.

  9. Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite advances in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), this group of multifactorial disorders remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. CVD is associated with multiple genetic and modifiable risk factors; however, known environmental and genetic influences can only...

  10. Photonics in cardiovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, Gijs; Regar, Evelyn; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2015-10-01

    The use of photonics technology is bringing new capabilities and insights to cardiovascular medicine. Intracoronary imaging and sensing, laser ablation and optical pacing are just some of the functions being explored to help diagnose and treat conditions of the heart and arteries.

  11. Pharmacogenetics of cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julie A; Humma, Larisa M

    2002-02-01

    Pharmacogenetics is a field aimed at understanding the genetic contribution to inter-patient variability in drug efficacy and toxicity. Treatment of cardiovascular disease is, in most cases, guided by evidence from well-controlled clinical trials. Given the solid scientific basis for the treatment of most cardiovascular diseases, it is common for patients with a given disease to be treated in essentially the same manner. Thus, the clinical trials have been very informative about treating large groups of patients with a given disease, but are slightly less informative about the treatment of individual patients. Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics have the potential of taking the information derived from large clinical trials and further refining it to select the drugs with the greatest likelihood for benefit, and least likelihood for harm, in individual patients, based on their genetic make-up. In this paper, the current literature on cardiovascular pharmacogenetics is emphasised, and how the use of pharmacogenetic/pharmacogenomic information may be particularly useful in the future in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases is also highlighted.

  12. Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, C. David

    1988-01-01

    Reviews epidemiological studies of cardiovascular diseases especially coronary heart disease (CHD), to document their major public health importance, changes in mortality during this century, and international comparisons of trends. Finds major risk factors for CHD are determined in large part by psychosocial and behavioral mechanisms. Asserts…

  13. Neuropeptides in cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1984-12-01

    Neuropeptides can affect cardiovascular function in various ways. They can serve as cotransmitters in the autonomic nervous system; for example, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is released with acetylcholine and neuropeptide Y with norepinephrine from postganglionic neurons. Substance P and, presumably, other peptides can can affect cardiovascular function when released near blood vessels by antidromically conducted impulses in branches of stimulated sensory neurons. In the central nervous system, many different neuropeptides appear to function as transmitters or contransmittes in the neural pathways that regulate the cardiovascular system. In addition neuropeptides such as vasopressin and angiotensin II also circulate as hormones that are involved in cardiovascular control. Large doses of exogenous vasopressin are required to increase blood pressure in normal animals because the increase in total peripheral resistance produced by the hormones is accompanied by a decrease in cardiac output. However, studies with synthetic peptides that selectively antagonize the vasopressor action of vasopressin indicate that circulating vasopressin is important in maintaining blood pressure when animals are hypovolemic due to dehydration, haemorrhage or adrenocortical insufficiency. VIP dilates blood vessels and stimulates renin secretion by a direct action on the juxtaglomerular cells. Renin secretion is stimulated when the concentration of VIP in plasma exceeds 75 pmol/litre, and higher values are seen in a number of conditions. Neostigmine, a drug which increases the secretion of endogenous VIP, also increases renin secretion, and this increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Thus, VIP may be a physiologically significant renin stimulating hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. [Cardiovascular prevention: begin young].

    PubMed

    Visseren, Frank L J

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerotic vascular disease is rare in the young. Nevertheless, the foundations for atherosclerotic disease in later life are laid early by a harmful lifestyle including overweight and smoking. Adolescents who are overweight or have the metabolic syndrome are at increased cardiovascular risk later in life.

  15. [Cardiovascular system and aging].

    PubMed

    Saner, H

    2005-12-01

    Aging is one of the most important cardiovascular risk factors. Age-related morphologic changes in large resistance vessels include an intima-media-thickening and increased deposition of matrix substance, ultimately leading to a reduced compliance and an increased stiffness of the vessels. Aging of the heart is mainly characterized by an increase of the left ventricular mass in relation to the chamber volume and a decrease of diastolic function. There is some controversy in regard to the question if these changes in the vessel wall are the consequence of aging or if a decrease in physical activity is a major contributor of this process. With age the cardiovascular profile is changing. Whereas smoking is less prominent, arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus are more often encountered. Primary and secondary prevention through cardiovascular risk factor management is also very important in the aging population due to the increased risk of acute vascular complications with age. Preventive measures have to include life style factor interventions as well as optimized drug therapy. There is no scientific evidence that vascular aging can be prevented by administration of supplements such as antioxidant vitamins. Aspirin is effective for cardiovascular prevention up to a higher age. Betablockers and ACE-inhibitors are generally underused in older patients after myocardial infarctions. Statins are effective in reducing cardiovascular complications up to an age of 80 years. Myocardial infarction in elderly patients is often characterized by atypical symptoms and may be even silent. Interventional therapy in elderly patients is as successful as in younger patients but has an increased complication rate. Ambulatory cardiac rehabilitation in elderly patients leads to significant improvements of physical capacity, well-being and quality of life and may help to prevent social isolation.

  16. Cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews recent flight and ground-based studies of cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight. Prominent features of microgravity exposure include loss of gravitational pressures, relatively low venous pressures, headward fluid shifts, plasma volume loss, and postflight orthostatic intolerance and reduced exercise capacity. Many of these short-term responses to microgravity extend themselves during long-duration microgravity exposure and may be explained by altered pressures (blood and tissue) and fluid balance in local tissues nourished by the cardiovascular system. In this regard, it is particularly noteworthy that tissues of the lower body (e.g., foot) are well adapted to local hypertension on Earth, whereas tissues of the upper body (e.g., head) are not as well adapted to increase in local blood pressure. For these and other reasons, countermeasures for long-duration flight should include reestablishment of higher, Earth-like blood pressures in the lower body.

  17. Cardiovascular instrumentation for spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Polhemus, J. T.; Ganiaris, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The observation mechanisms dealing with pressure, flow, morphology, temperature, etc. are discussed. The approach taken in the performance of this study was to (1) review ground and space-flight data on cardiovascular function, including earlier related ground-based and space-flight animal studies, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and recent bed-rest studies, (2) review cardiovascular measurement parameters required to assess individual performance and physiological alternations during space flight, (3) perform an instrumentation survey including a literature search as well as personal contact with the applicable investigators, (4) assess instrumentation applicability with respect to the established criteria, and (5) recommend future research and development activity. It is concluded that, for the most part, the required instrumentation technology is available but that mission-peculiar criteria will require modifications to adapt the applicable instrumentation to a space-flight configuration.

  18. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaddha, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine. PMID:26170595

  19. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chaddha, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine.

  20. Cardiovascular Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Phoon, Colin K.L.; Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The mouse is the mammalian model of choice for investigating cardiovascular biology, given our ability to manipulate it by genetic, pharmacologic, mechanical, and environmental means. Imaging is an important approach to phenotyping both function and structure of cardiac and vascular components. This review details commonly used imaging approaches, with a focus on echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging and brief overviews of other imaging modalities. We also briefly outline emerging imaging approaches but caution that reliability and validity data may be lacking. PMID:26928662

  1. Adventures in cardiovascular research.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2009-07-14

    This article, derived from an invited Distinguished Scientist lecture presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in 2007, reviews 4 themes (adventures) in clinical cardiovascular research carried out over a period of 58 years. It begins with the author's introduction to cardiovascular hemodynamics during a medical school elective in 1951. The 4 adventures include valvular heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, heart failure (HF), and myocardial ischemia. In each of these adventures, the author describes briefly what was known when he entered each field, followed by the author's contribution to the field (the adventure), and ends with comments about the current status of the field. Of particular interest are the changes in the technologies used in clinical cardiovascular research over the past half century, commencing with pressure tracings in left heart chambers with the use of needle puncture in the operating room to genetic technologies designed to understand differences between drugs that inhibit platelet activation. The article ends with some general comments on conducting research and the rewards that can come with this activity.

  2. [Cardiovascular involvement in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Driazhenko, I V

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular system involvement with early development of atherosclerosis is characteristic for rheumatic diseases. Among causes of death in various rheumatic diseases cardiovascular pathology also prevails. This paper contains a review of most important studies of impairment of the heart, arterial and venous parts of cardiovascular system in patients with diffuse diseases of connective tissue, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic vasculitides. The role of immune mechanisms, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disturbances with development of myocardial and vascular remodeling in rheumatic diseases is also discussed. Major risk factors of cardiovascular pathology in rheumatic patients are presented. Treatment of a cardiovascular pathology in these patients presumes the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists and statins.

  3. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Giovannucci, Edward

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that deficient vitamin D status may increase risk of both ischemic and nonischemic cardiovascular diseases independently of established cardiovascular risk factors. The role of vitamin D in potentially regulating many functions in the cardiovascular system is just beginning to be understood. Among the potentially relevant mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases, vitamin D may influence blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin system, parathyroid hormone levels, myocardial function, inflammation, and vascular calcification. Cardiovascular risk appears especially elevated at 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels below 10 or 15 ng/mL, and optimal levels may be at least 30 ng/mL. Among individuals who are not receiving substantial exposure to sun, intakes of 1000 to 2000 IU may be needed to achieve levels of at least 30 ng/mL. Further study, including properly designed randomized control trials, is required to further establish the role of vitamin D on cardiovascular diseases.

  4. ASICs and cardiovascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Abboud, François M; Benson, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    In this review we address primarily the role of ASICs in determining sensory signals from arterial baroreceptors, peripheral chemoreceptors, and cardiopulmonary and somatic afferents. Alterations in these sensory signals during acute cardiovascular stresses result in changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic activities that restore cardiovascular homeostasis. In pathological states, however, chronic dysfunctions of these afferents result in serious sympatho-vagal imbalances with significant increases in mortality and morbidity. We identified a role for ASIC2 in the mechano-sensitivity of aortic baroreceptors and of ASIC3 in the pH sensitivity of carotid bodies. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, we reported decreased expression of ASIC2 in nodose ganglia neurons and overexpression of ASIC3 in carotid bodies. This reciprocal expression of ASIC2 and ASIC3 results in reciprocal changes in sensory sensitivity of baro- and chemoreceptors and a consequential synergistic exaggeration sympathetic nerve activity. A similar reciprocal sensory dysautonomia prevails in heart failure and increases the risk of mortality. There is also evidence that ASIC heteromers in skeletal muscle afferents contribute significantly to the exercise pressor reflex. In cardiac muscle afferents of the dorsal root ganglia, they contribute to nociception and to the detrimental sympathetic activation during ischemia. Finally, we report that an inhibitory influence of ASIC2-mediated baroreceptor activity suppresses the sympatho-excitatory reflexes of the chemoreceptors and skeletal muscle afferents, as well as the ASIC1a-mediated excitation of central neurons during fear, threat, or panic. The translational potential of activation of ASIC2 in cardiovascular disease states may be a beneficial sympatho-inhibition and parasympathetic activation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  5. Cardiovascular Cine Film Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheid, Carl C.

    1983-12-01

    The detection of a cardiovascular stenosis involves the complex interaction of technique selection, system performance and anatomy. Technique selection for instance involves choosing the correct focal spot, pulse width, KVp, and frame rate for a given patient and projection angle. In order to provide guidance in this selection process, these variables were investigated in terms of their impact on image quality. Conclusions which were confirmed clinically are summarized in terms of recommended techniques for a range of patient sizes. The confirmation includes clinical films which demonstrates the effects of parameter changes.

  6. [Sleep rhythm and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Maemura, Koji

    2012-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common problem in general adult population. Recent evidence suggests the link between the occurrence of cardiovascular events and several sleep disturbances including sleep apnea syndrome, insomnia and periodic limb movements during sleep. Sleep duration may affect the cardiovascular outcome. Shift work also may increase the risk of ischemic heart disease. Normalization of sleep rhythm has a potential to be a therapeutic target of ischemic heart diseases, although further study is required to evaluate the preventive effect on cardiovascular events. Here we describe the current understandings regarding the roles of sleep disorders during the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events.

  7. Resveratrol and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) has stimulated research for substances that could improve cardiovascular health. Among them, resveratrol (RES), a polyphenolic compound notably present in grapes and red wine, has been involved in the “French paradox”. RES is known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and for its ability to upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). RES was able to scavenge •OH/O2•− and peroxyl radicals, which can limit the lipid peroxidation processes. Moreover, in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) under glucose-induced oxidative stress, RES restored the activity of dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), an enzyme that degrades an endogenous inhibitor of eNOS named asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). Thus, RES could improve •NO availability and decrease the endothelial dysfunction observed in diabetes. Preclinical studies have made it possible to identify molecular targets (SIRT-1, AMPK, Nrf2, NFκB…); however, there are limited human clinical trials, and difficulties in the interpretation of results arise from the use of high-dose RES supplements in research studies, whereas low RES concentrations are present in red wine. The discussions on potential beneficial effects of RES in CVDs (atherosclerosis, hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure) should compare the results of preclinical studies with those of clinical trials. PMID:27144581

  8. Cardiovascular Implications of Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Adriane; Founds, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death of women in the United States. Many healthcare providers are unaware of sex-specific factors that affect the development of CVD. Nursing care for women with a history of preeclampsia and their children is presented. Preeclampsia affects 4% to 8% of all pregnancies. Rates have increased by 25% over the past 2 decades. Research supports the link between preeclampsia and risk of future CVD in women and the children of affected pregnancies. Appropriate preconception, prenatal and postpartum education, and surveillance are necessary to improve the long-term health of both mother and infant. Currently, there are no evidence-based interventions specific to the prevention of CVD for women and their children who have been affected by preeclampsia. However, women who have had preeclampsia may require yearly risk factor assessment and education regarding cardiovascular prevention strategies such as smoking cessation, increased physical activity, importance of a healthy diet, and maintenance of a healthy weight. Preeclampsia should be acknowledged by healthcare providers as a CVD risk factor. Appropriate monitoring, education, and CVD preventive strategies need to be implemented with this population and their children.

  9. Cardiovascular Effects of Felypressin

    PubMed Central

    Cecanho, Rodrigo; De Luca, Laurival Antonio; Ranali, José

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of felypressin (FEL) were studied in Wistar rats. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure measurements were taken in awake rats treated with vasopressin (AVP), FEL, or epinephrine (EPI). Each group received either an intravenous (IV) or an intracerebroventricular V1 receptor antagonist, saline, area postrema removal, or sham surgery. Analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls (P < .05) were applied. Felypressin and AVP induced a pressor effect, and bradycardia was inhibited by IV V1 antagonist. Intracerebroventricular V1 antagonist and area postrema removal enhanced their pressor effects. Epinephrine induced a higher pressor effect and a similar bradycardia that was not affected by the treatments. It was concluded that FEL depends on V1 receptors to induce pressor and bradycardic effects, and that it produces a high relationship between bradycardia and mean arterial pressure variation depending on area postrema and central V1 receptors. These effects are potentially less harmful to the cardiovascular system than the effects of EPI. PMID:17177590

  10. Optimization in Cardiovascular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid mechanics plays a key role in the development, progression, and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Advances in imaging methods and patient-specific modeling now reveal increasingly detailed information about blood flow patterns in health and disease. Building on these tools, there is now an opportunity to couple blood flow simulation with optimization algorithms to improve the design of surgeries and devices, incorporating more information about the flow physics in the design process to augment current medical knowledge. In doing so, a major challenge is the need for efficient optimization tools that are appropriate for unsteady fluid mechanics problems, particularly for the optimization of complex patient-specific models in the presence of uncertainty. This article reviews the state of the art in optimization tools for virtual surgery, device design, and model parameter identification in cardiovascular flow and mechanobiology applications. In particular, it reviews trade-offs between traditional gradient-based methods and derivative-free approaches, as well as the need to incorporate uncertainties. Key future challenges are outlined, which extend to the incorporation of biological response and the customization of surgeries and devices for individual patients.

  11. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  12. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K

    2015-10-09

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman's physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up.

  13. The Cardiovascular Curriculum Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, R. C.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The National Heart and Blood Vessel Research and Demonstration Center has developed a program called the Cardiovascular Curriculum Education Project, designed for secondary school students, which consists of self-instructional education units on cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors. Describes its three major components and method of…

  14. Arrestins in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Bathgate, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Of the four mammalian arrestins, only the β-arrestins (βarrs; Arrestin2 and -3) are expressed throughout the cardiovascular system, where they regulate, as either desensitizers/internalizers or signal transducers, several G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) critical for cardiovascular homeostasis. The cardiovascular roles of βarrs have been delineated at an accelerated pace via a variety of techniques and tools, such as knockout mice, siRNA knockdown, artificial or naturally occurring polymorphic GPCRs, and availability of new βarr "biased" GPCR ligands. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge of cardiovascular arrestin physiology and pharmacology, addressing the individual cardiovascular receptors affected by βarrs in vivo, as well as the individual cell types, tissues, and organs of the cardiovascular system in which βarr effects are exerted; for example, cardiac myocyte or fibroblast, vascular smooth muscle, adrenal gland and platelet. In the broader scope of cardiovascular βarr pharmacology, a discussion of the βarr "bias" of certain cardiovascular GPCR ligands is also included.

  15. Cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Soubrier, Martin; Barber Chamoux, Nicolas; Tatar, Zuzana; Couderc, Marion; Dubost, Jean-Jacques; Mathieu, Sylvain

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this review are to discuss data on the cardiovascular risk increase associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the effects of RA treatments on the cardiovascular risk level, and the management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with RA. Overall, the risk of cardiovascular disease is increased 2-fold in RA patients compared to the general population, due to the combined effects of RA and conventional risk factors. There is some evidence that the cardiovascular risk increase associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy may be smaller in RA patients than in the general population. Glucocorticoid therapy increases the cardiovascular risk in proportion to both the current dose and the cumulative dose. Methotrexate and TNFα antagonists diminish cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. The management of dyslipidemia remains suboptimal. Risk equations may perform poorly in RA patients even when corrected using the multiplication factors suggested by the EUropean League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) (multiply the score by 1.5 when two of the following three criteria are met: disease duration longer than 10 years, presence of rheumatoid factor or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, and extraarticular manifestations). Doppler ultrasonography of the carotid arteries in patients at moderate cardiovascular risk may allow a more aggressive approach to dyslipidemia management via reclassification into the high-risk category of patients with an intima-media thickness greater than 0.9 mm or atheroma plaque.

  16. Hypertriglyceridemia and Cardiovascular Diseases: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Hwan; Nicholls, Stephen J; Sakuma, Ichiro; Zhao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Residual cardiovascular risk and failure of high density lipoprotein cholesterol raising treatment have refocused interest on targeting hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and remnant cholesterol have demonstrated to be important risk factors for cardiovascular disease; this has been demonstrated in experimental, genetic, and epidemiological studies. Fibrates can reduce cardiovascular event rates with or without statins. High dose omega-3 fatty acids continue to be evaluated and new specialized targeting treatment modulating triglyceride pathways, such as inhibition of apolipoprotein C-III and angiopoietin-like proteins, are being tested with regard to their effects on lipid profiles and cardiovascular outcomes. In this review, we will discuss the role of hypertriglyceridemia, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and remnant cholesterol on cardiovascular disease, and the potential implications for treatment stargeting hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:27014342

  17. Indian poverty and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ramaraj, Radhakrishnan; Alpert, Joseph Stephen

    2008-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the world's leading causes of death, and nearly 80% of deaths occur in developing countries. Cardiovascular disease is becoming a major health problem in India, where life expectancy has increased with decreases in infectious disease and childhood mortality. It is well established that this population experiences coronary artery disease at a younger age than other populations. With infectious diseases still endemic, noncommunicable diseases are a lower priority for the governments of developing countries. There is a clear progression to degenerative and lifestyle-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease as a result of current social and economic change. The lack of a public response to the increasing risk for cardiovascular disease thus far is due mostly to a perception among policy makers and the public that cardiovascular disease is largely a problem of the urban rich. In conclusion, this review addresses the imminent threats and ways to tackle the epidemic in India.

  18. Rheumatoid cachexia and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Summers, Gregory D; Metsios, Giorgos S; Stavropoulos-Kalinoglou, Antonios; Kitas, George D

    2010-08-01

    Both cachexia and cardiovascular disease are strongly associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and linked to the chronic inflammatory process. Typically, rheumatoid cachexia occurs in individuals with normal or increased BMI (reduced muscle mass and increased fat mass). Classic cachexia (reduced muscle mass and reduced fat mass) is rare in RA but is associated with high inflammatory activity and aggressive joint destruction in patients with a poor cardiovascular prognosis. Conversely, obesity is linked to hypertension and dyslipidemia but, paradoxically, lower RA disease activity and less cardiovascular disease-related mortality. Rheumatoid cachexia might represent the 'worst of both worlds' with respect to cardiovascular outcome, but until diagnostic criteria for this condition are agreed upon, its effect on cardiovascular disease risk remains controversial.

  19. [Preeclampsia as cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; Bots, Michiel L

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the primary cause of death in women. Guidelines for identifying high-risk individuals have been developed, e.g. the Dutch Guideline on Cardiovascular Risk Management. In the most recent version of this guideline, diabetes mellitus (DM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are cited as cardiovascular risk factors; therefore, individuals with these conditions are identified as being at high risk. As with DM and RA, there is strong evidence that the experience of having a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy is a cardiovascular risk factor. This is particularly the case for early preeclampsia, which constitutes a 7-fold increased risk of ischemic heart disease. However, in the Netherlands, there are no guidelines and there is no consensus on how to screen or treat these women. Trial evidence is therefore urgently needed to substantiate the value of cardiovascular risk management for those women with a history of hypertension during pregnancy.

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance artefacts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The multitude of applications offered by CMR make it an increasing popular modality to study the heart and the surrounding vessels. Nevertheless the anatomical complexity of the chest, together with cardiac and respiratory motion, and the fast flowing blood, present many challenges which can possibly translate into imaging artefacts. The literature is wide in terms of papers describing specific MR artefacts in great technical detail. In this review we attempt to summarise, in a language accessible to a clinical readership, some of the most common artefacts found in CMR applications. It begins with an introduction of the most common pulse sequences, and imaging techniques, followed by a brief section on typical cardiovascular applications. This leads to the main section on common CMR artefacts with examples, a short description of the mechanisms behind them, and possible solutions. PMID:23697969

  1. Cardiovascular preclinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Nekolla, Stephan G; Rischpler, Christoph; Paschali, Anna; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging in the form of single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT), positron-emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT), echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very useful tool for cardiovascular research as it allows assessment of biological processes in vivo. Nuclear imaging with SPECT and PET offers the advantage of high sensitivity, the potential for serial imaging, and reliable quantification. Currently a wide range of established as well as innovative agents is available and can be imaged with dedicated preclinical and clinical SPECT and PET imaging systems. These scanners can be equipped with CT and MRI components to form hybrid imaging systems. This review provides an outline on SPECT and PET as capable tools for translational research in cardiology as part of a workflow similar to the one used in clinical imaging illustrating the concept "from bench to bedside".

  2. Epigenetics in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Shirodkar, Apurva V.; Marsden, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of the biological processes implicated in chromatin-based pathways that control endothelial gene expression patterns in both health and disease and highlight how these processes are relevant to cardiovascular disease. Recent findings Epigenetics refers to chromatin-based pathways important in the regulation of gene expression and includes three distinct, but highly interrelated, mechanisms: DNA methylation, histone density and posttranslational modifications, and RNA-based mechanisms. It is of great interest that epigenetic regulation of genes enriched in the vascular endothelium is a prominent regulatory pathway. How environmental cues within the vasculature, such as hemodynamic forces or hypoxia, influence these epigenetic mechanisms will be reviewed. Summary Although a newer area for study, exciting new evidence identifies that epigenetic processes are highly dynamic and respond to a myriad of environmental stimuli. Integrating chromatin-based pathways into our understanding of gene expression offers newer insight into disease processes. PMID:21415727

  3. Na+ channel function, regulation, structure, trafficking and sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Shaw, Robin M; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Sack, Jon T; Abriel, Hugues; Aldrich, Richard W; Belardinelli, Luiz; Cannell, Mark B; Catterall, William A; Chazin, Walter J; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Deschenes, Isabelle; Grandi, Eleonora; Hund, Thomas J; Izu, Leighton T; Maier, Lars S; Maltsev, Victor A; Marionneau, Celine; Mohler, Peter J; Rajamani, Sridharan; Rasmusson, Randall L; Sobie, Eric A; Clancy, Colleen E; Bers, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second of a series of three reviews published in this issue resulting from the University of California Davis Cardiovascular Symposium 2014: Systems approach to understanding cardiac excitation–contraction coupling and arrhythmias: Na+ channel and Na+ transport. The goal of the symposium was to bring together experts in the field to discuss points of consensus and controversy on the topic of sodium in the heart. The present review focuses on Na+ channel function and regulation, Na+ channel structure and function, and Na+ channel trafficking, sequestration and complexing. PMID:25772290

  4. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  5. [ANALYSIS OF CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN YOUNG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS ACCORDING TO THEIR NUTRITIONAL STATUS].

    PubMed

    Delgado Floody, Pedro; Alarcón Hormazábal, Manuel; Caamaño Navarrete, Felipe

    2015-10-01

    Antecedentes: la obesidad es una de las enfermedades no transmisibles más graves y prevalentes en la actualidad, y se considera un factor de riesgo importante para la enfermedad cardiovascular asociándose con la resistencia a la insulina, la intolerancia a la glucosa, la hipertensión arterial y el síndrome metabólico. Objetivo: el propósito del estudio fue analizar el estado nutricional de jóvenes universitarios y su asociación con los factores de riesgo cardiovascular. Pacientes y métodos: se evaluaron 153 estudiantes universitarios, 51 hombres y 102 mujeres, de entre 17 y 33 años de edad. Se realizaron mediciones antropométricas de IMC y contorno cintura, presión arterial sistólica y diastólica, colesterol, colesterol HDL (cHDL), colesterol LDL (cLDL), triglicéridos y glicemia. Resultados: las variables cHDL (p = 0,000) y la presión sistólica (p = 0,043) presentaron diferencias significativas en la comparación por género. El 35,29 % presentó sobrepeso u obesidad. En la comparación según estado nutricional, el contorno de cintura y la presión sistólica y diastólica presentaron diferencias significativas (p < 0,05). Al relacionar el estado nutricional con las variables plasmáticas y la presión arterial, este presentó una asociación con los niveles de colesterol, cLDL, presión sistólica y diastólica (p < 0,05). El contorno de cintura presentó una asociación con la presión sistólica y diastólica (p < 0,05). Conclusiones: existe elevada prevalencia de malnutrición por exceso en la muestra de jóvenes universitarios, que además se asocia con los factores de riesgo cardiovascular, siendo los estudiantes obesos los que presentan mayor deterioro en todas las variables evaluadas.

  6. Cardiovascular risk factors in chronic treatment with antipsychotic agents used in primary care.

    PubMed

    Mundet-Tudurí, Xavier; Iglesias-Rodal, Manuel; Olmos-Domínguez, Carmen; Bernard-Antoranz, M Lluïsa; Fernández-San Martín, M Isabel; Amado-Guirado, Ester

    2013-12-01

    Objetivo. Comparar la prevalencia de factores de riesgo cardiovascular (FRCV) y eventos vasculares en pacientes tratados con antipsicoticos, comparandolos con los no tratados. Sujetos y metodos. Estudio descriptivo transversal de pacientes atendidos en atencion primaria de la ciudad de Barcelona y tratados con antipsicoticos entre el 2008 y el 2010, comparandolos con una poblacion no tratada. Se registraron las variables antropometricas y clinicas y los FRCV. Se estudio por separado a pacientes adultos y ancianos, y a los tratados con antipsicoticos tipicos y atipicos. Resultados. Un total de 14.087 pacientes habian sido tratados con antipsicoticos (63,4% atipicos). El mas prescrito fue la risperidona. Se aparejaron 13.724 pacientes de la misma edad y genero, pero no tratados (n total = 27.811). Los tratados con antipsicoticos presentaron una prevalencia superior de obesidad (16,9% frente a 10,6%), tabaquismo (22,2% frente a 11,1%), diabetes mellitus (16% frente a 11,9%) y dislipemia (32,8% frente a 25,8%) (p < 0,001). La prevalencia de accidente vascular cerebral fue significativamente superior entre los tratados, tanto en los adultos (odds ratio = 2,33) como en los ancianos (odds ratio = 1,64). La prevalencia de cardiopatia isquemica fue similar en ambos grupos (odds ratio = 0,97). No se observaron diferencias significativas entre los tratados con un antipsicotico tipico o atipico. Conclusiones. Los pacientes tratados con antipsicoticos presentaron una mayor prevalencia de FRCV (diabetes, obesidad y tabaquismo). La presencia de ictus fue superior entre los tratados con antipsicoticos. No se detectaron diferencias importantes entre los pacientes tratados con antipsicoticos tipicos y atipicos.

  7. [Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in a population of health-care workers].

    PubMed

    Orozco-González, Claudia Nelly; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura; Viera-Franco, Juan José; Ramírez-Márquez, José Juan; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el objetivo de este trabajo es determinar la prevalencia de los factores de riesgo cardiovascular (FRCV) y su asociación con actividad laboral (AL) en trabajadores de dos hospitales de enseñanza de tercer nivel de atención del IMSS. Métodos: estudio descriptivo que incluyó a trabajadores ≥ 18 años. Se realizó historia clínica, examen físico y pruebas de laboratorio para identificar FRCV y asociarlos con AL. Resultados: se estudió un total de 1089 trabajadores, con edad de 41 ± 9 años, el 76% fueron mujeres. La prevalencia de hipertensión fue de 19%, diabetes mellitus 9.6%, dislipidemia 78%, sobrepeso y obesidad 73%; síndrome metabólico (SM) 32.5%, tabaquismo 19%. El SM se asoció con el área de asistentes médicas (OR: 2.73, IC 95%: 1.31-5.69) y nutrición/dietética (OR: 2.6, IC 95%: 1.31-5.24). La obesidad con el área administrativa (OR 3.64 IC 95%: 1.40-7.46). La dislipidemia con el área de asistentes médicas (OR 2.58, IC 95%: 1.15-6.34). La probabilidad de sufrir evento vascular en 10 años fue de 10%. Conclusiones: la prevalencia de FRCV fue alta y no es diferente a la de la población general. Las actividades laborales en riesgo fueron: asistentes médicas, nutricionistas y personal administrativo. Es necesario reorientar programas de promoción de la salud en unidades médicas para mejorar el perfil epidemiológico de los trabajadores.

  8. Cardiovascular pharmacological effects of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jia-Qing

    2002-12-01

    Tetrandrine, dauricine, daurisoline and neferine are bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid derivatives isolated from Chinese traditional medicine and herbs. The cardiovascular pharmacological effects and the mechanism of actions of these compounds were reviewed. Tetrandrine isolated from Stephania tetrandra S Moore possesses antihypertensive and antiarrhythmic effects. The antihypertensive effects of tetrandrine have been demonstrated in experimental hypertensive animals and in hypertensive patients. Recent studies showed that in addition to its calcium antagonistic effect, tetrandrine interacted with M receptors. Modulation by M receptor is one of the pharmacological mechanisms of cardiovascular effects of tetrandrine. Dauricine and daurisoloine were isolated from Menispermum dauricum DC. The antiarrhythmic effects of dauricine have been verified in different experimental arrhythmic models and in cardiac arrhythmic patients. Dauricine blocked the cardiac transmembrane Na+,K+ and Ca2+ ion currents. Differing from quinidine and sotalol, which exhibited reverse use-dependent effect, dauricine prolonged APD in a normal use-dependent manner in experimental studies. The antiarrhythmic effect of daurisoline and neferine which is an alkaloid isolated from Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn, and their mechanisms of actions have also been studied. The antiarrhythmic effect of daurisoline is more potent than that of dauricine.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide in the mammalian cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Hong; Lu, Ming; Hu, Li-Fang; Wong, Peter T-H; Webb, George D; Bian, Jin-Song

    2012-07-01

    For more than a century, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) has been regarded as a toxic gas. This review surveys the growing recognition of the role of H(2)S as an endogenous signaling molecule in mammals, with emphasis on its physiological and pathological pathways in the cardiovascular system. In biological fluids, H(2)S gas is a weak acid that exists as about 15% H(2)S, 85% HS(-), and a trace of S(2-). Here, we use "H(2)S" to refer to this mixture. H(2)S has been found to influence heart contractile functions and may serve as a cardioprotectant for treating ischemic heart diseases and heart failure. Alterations of the endogenous H(2)S level have been found in animal models with various pathological conditions such as myocardial ischemia, spontaneous hypertension, and hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. In the vascular system, H(2)S exerts biphasic regulation of a vascular tone with varying effects based on its concentration and in the presence of nitric oxide. Over the past decade, several H(2)S-releasing compounds (NaHS, Na(2)S, GYY4137, etc.) have been utilized to test the effect of exogenous H(2)S under different physiological and pathological situations in vivo and in vitro. H(2)S has been found to promote angiogenesis and to protect against atherosclerosis and hypertension, while excess H(2)S may promote inflammation in septic or hemorrhagic shock. H(2)S-releasing compounds and inhibitors of H(2)S synthesis hold promise in alleviating specific disease conditions. This comprehensive review covers in detail the effects of H(2)S on the cardiovascular system, especially in disease situations, and also the various underlying mechanisms.

  10. Exercise and the cardiovascular system: clinical science and cardiovascular outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; Arena, Ross; Swift, Damon L; Johannsen, Neil M; Sui, Xuemei; Lee, Duck-Chul; Earnest, Conrad P; Church, Timothy S; O'Keefe, James H; Milani, Richard V; Blair, Steven N

    2015-07-03

    Substantial evidence has established the value of high levels of physical activity, exercise training (ET), and overall cardiorespiratory fitness in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This article reviews some basics of exercise physiology and the acute and chronic responses of ET, as well as the effect of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness on cardiovascular diseases. This review also surveys data from epidemiological and ET studies in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, particularly coronary heart disease and heart failure. These data strongly support the routine prescription of ET to all patients and referrals for patients with cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary heart disease and heart failure, to specific cardiac rehabilitation and ET programs.

  11. Undergraduates' understanding of cardiovascular phenomena.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joel A; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Modell, Harold I; Cliff, William; Horwitz, Barbara; McHale, Philip; Richardson, Daniel; Silverthorn, Dee; Williams, Stephen; Whitescarver, Shirley

    2002-12-01

    Undergraduates students in 12 courses at 8 different institutions were surveyed to determine the prevalence of 13 different misconceptions (conceptual difficulties) about cardiovascular function. The prevalence of these misconceptions ranged from 20 to 81% and, for each misconception, was consistent across the different student populations. We also obtained explanations for the students' answers either as free responses or with follow-up multiple-choice questions. These results suggest that students have a number of underlying conceptual difficulties about cardiovascular phenomena. One possible source of some misconceptions is the students' inability to apply simple general models to specific cardiovascular phenomena. Some implications of these results for teachers of physiology are discussed.

  12. [Thyroid and cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Gallowitsch, Hans-Jürgen

    2005-10-01

    The cardiocirculatory changes in hyperthyroidism seem to be an accommodation to the increased metabolic demands and lead to an increased perfusion of the peripheral tissues. Due to the influence of elevated thyroid hormone levels, contractility, stroke volume, resting heart rate, and contraction and relaxation velocity of the left ventricle increase. Caused by direct effect on the smooth vascular muscle, systemic vascular resistance is decreased with the consequence of a diminished afterload and an increased cardiac efficiency. The activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system and the increased production of erythropoietin additionally lead to an increased blood volume, which increases cardiac preload together with the increased venous backflow. Manifest hypothyroidism is characterized by bradycardia and diastolic dysfunction in rest and systolic dysfunction at stress. Despite a slight increase of diastolic blood pressure due to an increased systemic vascular resistance, blood pressure remains nearly stable because of diminished cardiac output. Hypercholesterinaemia and diastolic hypertension in hypothyroid patients can lead to the development of arteriosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). Also subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with a significantly higher risk for arteriosclerosis and CHD, whereas subclinical hyperthyroidism seems to be associated with an increased mortality for all reasons, especially for cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Epigenetics in Cardiovascular Regulation.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Claudio; Rimoldi, Stefano F; Rexhaj, Emrush; Allemann, Yves; Scherrer, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between pathologic events occurring during early life and the development of cardiovascular and metabolic disease in adulthood. These observations have led to the so-called fetal programming of adult disease hypothesis. In line with this hypothesis, short-term exposure to hypoxia after birth predisposes to exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction later in life in rats, and transient perinatal hypoxia predisposes to exaggerated pulmonary hypertension during short-term exposure to high altitude in humans. Along the same lines, in recent studies in Bolivian high-altitude dwellers, we found that preeclampsia predisposes the offspring to pulmonary and systemic endothelial dysfunction possibly related to impaired NO bioavailability and augmented oxidative stress. Very recent data from our lab suggest that assisted reproductive technologies may represent another important example consistent with this hypothesis. The mechanisms underpinning the developmental origin of this vascular dysfunction are poorly understood. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations, such as DNA methylation or histone acetylation may play a role.

  14. Depression and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Elderon, Larkin; Whooley, Mary A

    2013-01-01

    Approximately one out of every five patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) suffers from major depressive disorder (MDD). Both MDD and depressive symptoms are risk factors for CVD incidence, severity and outcomes. Great progress has been made in understanding potential mediators between MDD and CVD, particularly focusing on health behaviors. Investigators have also made considerable strides in the diagnosis and treatment of depression among patients with CVD. At the same time, many research questions remain. In what settings is depression screening most effective for patients with CVD? What is the optimal screening frequency? Which therapies are safe and effective? How can we better integrate the care of mental health conditions with that of CVD? How do we motivate depressed patients to change health behaviors? What technological tools can we use to improve care for depression? Gaining a more thorough understanding of the links between MDD and heart disease, and how best to diagnose and treat depression among these patients, has the potential to substantially reduce morbidity and mortality from CVD.

  15. Carotenoids and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Voutilainen, Sari; Nurmi, Tarja; Mursu, Jaakko; Rissanen, Tiina H

    2006-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death in Western countries. Nutrition has a significant role in the prevention of many chronic diseases such as CVD, cancers, and degenerative brain diseases. The major risk and protective factors in the diet are well recognized, but interesting new candidates continue to appear. It is well known that a greater intake of fruit and vegetables can help prevent heart diseases and mortality. Because fruit, berries, and vegetables are chemically complex foods, it is difficult to pinpoint any single nutrient that contributes the most to the cardioprotective effects. Several potential components that are found in fruit, berries, and vegetables are probably involved in the protective effects against CVD. Potential beneficial substances include antioxidant vitamins, folate, fiber, and potassium. Antioxidant compounds found in fruit and vegetables, such as vitamin C, carotenoids, and flavonoids, may influence the risk of CVD by preventing the oxidation of cholesterol in arteries. In this review, the role of main dietary carotenoids, ie, lycopene, beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin, in the prevention of heart diseases is discussed. Although it is clear that a higher intake of fruit and vegetables can help prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with heart diseases, more information is needed to ascertain the association between the intake of single nutrients, such as carotenoids, and the risk of CVD. Currently, the consumption of carotenoids in pharmaceutical forms for the treatment or prevention of heart diseases cannot be recommended.

  16. Elementary immunology: Na(+) as a regulator of immunity.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Valentin; Neubert, Patrick; Schröder, Agnes; Binger, Katrina; Gebhard, Matthias; Müller, Dominik N; Luft, Friedrich C; Titze, Jens; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    The skin can serve as an interstitial Na(+) reservoir. Local tissue Na(+) accumulation increases with age, inflammation and infection. This increased local Na(+) availability favors pro-inflammatory immune cell function and dampens their anti-inflammatory capacity. In this review, we summarize available data on how NaCl affects various immune cells. We particularly focus on how salt promotes pro-inflammatory macrophage and T cell function and simultaneously curtails their regulatory and anti-inflammatory potential. Overall, these findings demonstrate that local Na(+) availability is a promising novel regulator of immunity. Hence, the modulation of tissue Na(+) levels bears broad therapeutic potential: increasing local Na(+) availability may help in treating infections, while lowering tissue Na(+) levels may be used to treat, for example, autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Na+/Ca2+ exchange and Na+/K+-ATPase in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Shattock, Michael J; Ottolia, Michela; Bers, Donald M; Blaustein, Mordecai P; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Bossuyt, Julie; Bridge, John H B; Chen-Izu, Ye; Clancy, Colleen E; Edwards, Andrew; Goldhaber, Joshua; Kaplan, Jack; Lingrel, Jerry B; Pavlovic, Davor; Philipson, Kenneth; Sipido, Karin R; Xie, Zi-Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the third in a series of reviews published in this issue resulting from the University of California Davis Cardiovascular Symposium 2014: Systems approach to understanding cardiac excitation–contraction coupling and arrhythmias: Na+ channel and Na+ transport. The goal of the symposium was to bring together experts in the field to discuss points of consensus and controversy on the topic of sodium in the heart. The present review focuses on cardiac Na+/Ca2+ exchange (NCX) and Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA). While the relevance of Ca2+ homeostasis in cardiac function has been extensively investigated, the role of Na+ regulation in shaping heart function is often overlooked. Small changes in the cytoplasmic Na+ content have multiple effects on the heart by influencing intracellular Ca2+ and pH levels thereby modulating heart contractility. Therefore it is essential for heart cells to maintain Na+ homeostasis. Among the proteins that accomplish this task are the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) and the Na+/K+ pump (NKA). By transporting three Na+ ions into the cytoplasm in exchange for one Ca2+ moved out, NCX is one of the main Na+ influx mechanisms in cardiomyocytes. Acting in the opposite direction, NKA moves Na+ ions from the cytoplasm to the extracellular space against their gradient by utilizing the energy released from ATP hydrolysis. A fine balance between these two processes controls the net amount of intracellular Na+ and aberrations in either of these two systems can have a large impact on cardiac contractility. Due to the relevant role of these two proteins in Na+ homeostasis, the emphasis of this review is on recent developments regarding the cardiac Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX1) and Na+/K+ pump and the controversies that still persist in the field. PMID:25772291

  18. Anxiety Disorders and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Celano, Christopher M; Daunis, Daniel J; Lokko, Hermioni N; Campbell, Kirsti A; Huffman, Jeff C

    2016-11-01

    Anxiety and its associated disorders are common in patients with cardiovascular disease and may significantly influence cardiac health. Anxiety disorders are associated with the onset and progression of cardiac disease, and in many instances have been linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, including mortality. Both physiologic (autonomic dysfunction, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, changes in platelet aggregation) and health behavior mechanisms may help to explain the relationships between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease. Given the associations between anxiety disorders and poor cardiac health, the timely and accurate identification and treatment of these conditions is of the utmost importance. Fortunately, pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions for the management of anxiety disorders are generally safe and effective. Further study is needed to determine whether interventions to treat anxiety disorders ultimately impact both psychiatric and cardiovascular health.

  19. Psychosocial stress and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vale, S

    2005-01-01

    Fifty five years after the first finding relating mood disturbances and cardiovascular diseases, there is still debate on the formation of a cogent conception embracing all the fragments of insight within the various aspects relating psychosocial stress to cardiovascular diseases. The clinical comorbidity is empirically evident, but there are ambiguous research results limiting the value of the proposed pathophysiological mechanisms. Psychosocial stress represents here any event that relates psychological phenomena to the social environment and to the associated pathophysiological changes. Stress denotes the external or environmental factors to which people are exposed, as well as the behavioural or biological reaction to it (response that some authors call "distress"). Cardiovascular diseases will be considered here only when being the consequence of chronic inflammatory disease of arteries (atherosclerosis).The question is: Are there pathophysiological reliable mechanisms relating psychosocial stress to the development of cardiovascular diseases? PMID:15998817

  20. [Subclinical hypothyroidism and cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    López Rubio, María Antonia; Tárraga López, Pedro Juan; Rodríguez Montes, José Antonio; Frías López, María del Carmen; Solera Albero, Juan; Bermejo López, Pablo

    2015-05-01

    Objetivos: Valorar si el hipotiroidismo subclínico puede comportarse como un factor de riesgo cardiovascular o un modificador del mismo, identificando variables epidemiológicas y riesgo cardiovascular estimado en una muestra de sujetos diagnosticados en la provincia de Albacete. Método: Estudio observacional, descriptivo y transversal realizado en Albacete durante la primera quincena de enero de 2012 en pacientes de ambos géneros con hipotiroidismo subclínico. Se analizaron las siguientes variables: glucemia basal, colesterol total, colesterol HDL, colesterol LDL, triglicéridos, TSH, T4, peso, talla, I.M.C., tensión arterial, antecedentes de patología cardiovascular, factores de riesgo cardiovascular y riesgo cardiovascular estimado. Resultados: Se obtuvieron 326 pacientes, con predominio femenino (79,2 %), menores de 65 años en el 78% y sin factores de riesgo cardiovascular en el 48,61%. La prevalencia de los factores de riesgo cardiovascular identificados fué: tabaquismo (33,2%), diabetes mellitus (24,9%), hipertensión arterial (23,4%), alteraciones lipídicas (28,9%) y fibrilación auricular (4,9 %). No se encontró asociación entre hipotiroidismo subclínico y la mayoría de los parámetros del perfil lipídico que condicionan un perfil pro-aterogénico, salvo con la hipertrigliceridemia. Asimismo, tampoco se constató asociación con riesgo cardiovascular aumentado. Conclusiones: El perfil del paciente con hipotiroidismo subclínico es una mujer de mediana edad sin factores de riesgo cardiovascular en la mitad de casos. Se ha encontrado relación entre hipotiroidismo subclínico e hipertrigliceridemia, pero no con el resto de parámetros del perfil lipídico, otros factores de riesgo cardiovascular o con aumento de dicho riesgo. Sin embargo, un 25% de diabéticos y un 22% de no diabéticos están en situación de riesgo cardiovascular moderado-alto.

  1. Cardiovascular physiology in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Bungo, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system have been studied since the first manned flights. In several instances, the results from these investigations have directly contradicted the predictions based on established models. Results suggest associations between space flight's effects on other organ systems and those on the cardiovascular system. Such findings provide new insights into normal human physiology. They must also be considered when planning for the safety and efficiency of space flight crewmembers.

  2. Glucocorticoids and the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Julie E

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids affect the developing and mature cardiovascular system in profound and, at times, contradictory ways. The glucocorticoid receptor is ubiquitous in most cell types and conserved across species, highlighting its importance in development and homeostasis. Despite the fact that the glucocorticoid receptor is widely expressed, tissue-specific effects of glucocorticoids may have pronounced effects on whole organism phenotypes. Here we will review the interactions between glucocorticoids and the cardiovascular system.

  3. Human cardiovascular model and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, K Y; Ang, Alvin; Acharya U, Rajendra; Lim, C M

    2011-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) can be known as a class of diseases which affect different parts of the cardiovascular system such as the heart or blood vessels. Hemodynamic signals are an important tool used by doctors to diagnose the type of CVD occurred in a patient. Diagnosing the correct type of CVD in a patient early will allow the patient to have the suitable medical treatment. Some examples of CVDs include coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and peripheral arterial disease. A human cardiovascular model is developed in order to simulate different hemodynamic signals of the cardiovascular system. The hemodynamic signals include the blood pressures, flow rates and volumes in various part of the cardiovascular system. This paper presents a model which is able to simulate hemodynamic signals and they are able to represent the human arterial blood pressure accurately. Hence this model can also be used to simulate hypertensive patients in order to design control systems for regulation of blood pressure. Signal verification has been performed and the stability of the model is being investigated. Applications of the human cardiovascular model are also presented.

  4. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, P E; Powell, J T

    2014-01-17

    Vitamin D plays a classical hormonal role in skeletal health by regulating calcium and phosphorus metabolism. Vitamin D metabolites also have physiological functions in nonskeletal tissues, where local synthesis influences regulatory pathways via paracrine and autocrine mechanisms. The active metabolite of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, binds to the vitamin D receptor that regulates numerous genes involved in fundamental processes of potential relevance to cardiovascular disease, including cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis, oxidative stress, membrane transport, matrix homeostasis, and cell adhesion. Vitamin D receptors have been found in all the major cardiovascular cell types including cardiomyocytes, arterial wall cells, and immune cells. Experimental studies have established a role for vitamin D metabolites in pathways that are integral to cardiovascular function and disease, including inflammation, thrombosis, and the renin-angiotensin system. Clinical studies have generally demonstrated an independent association between vitamin D deficiency and various manifestations of degenerative cardiovascular disease including vascular calcification. However, the role of vitamin D supplementation in the management of cardiovascular disease remains to be established. This review summarizes the clinical studies showing associations between vitamin D status and cardiovascular disease and the experimental studies that explore the mechanistic basis for these associations.

  5. Osteoporosis and ischemic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Laroche, Michel; Pécourneau, Virginie; Blain, Hubert; Breuil, Véronique; Chapurlat, Roland; Cortet, Bernard; Sutter, Bruno; Degboe, Yannick

    2016-11-09

    Osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease were long viewed as independent of each other. However, numerous epidemiological studies, which are discussed in the first part of this review, have provided incontrovertible evidence of a link. Thus, the risk of coronary artery disease and stroke is higher in patients with a history of osteoporotic fracture or low bone mineral density than in non-osteoporotic patients. In the other direction, patients with cardiovascular disease are at higher risk for bone loss and osteoporotic fracture. The link between osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease is due in part to shared conventional risk factors such as estrogen deprivation in women, smoking, low physical activity, and diabetes. In addition, atheroma plaque calcification involves cytokines and growth factors that also play a role in bone turnover, including proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNFα), osteoprotegerin, sclerostin, matrix GLA protein, and FGF-23. Several recent studies have provided support for these pathophysiological hypotheses. Thus, elevation of osteoprotegerin, sclerostin, or FGF-23 levels may explain and predict the occurrence of both osteoporotic fractures and cardiovascular events. The association between osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease found in most epidemiological and pathophysiological studies suggests a need for evaluating potential benefits from routine bone absorptiometry and osteoporotic fracture detection in patients with cardiovascular disease and from exercise testing and arterial Doppler imaging in patients with osteoporosis.

  6. Cardiovascular consequences of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tune, Johnathan D; Goodwill, Adam G; Sassoon, Daniel J; Mather, Kieren J

    2017-01-09

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is defined as the concurrence of obesity-associated cardiovascular risk factors including abdominal obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, decreased HDL cholesterol, and/or hypertension. Earlier conceptualizations of the MetS focused on insulin resistance as a core feature, and it is clearly coincident with the above list of features. Each component of the MetS is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the combination of these risk factors elevates rates and severity of cardiovascular disease, related to a spectrum of cardiovascular conditions including microvascular dysfunction, coronary atherosclerosis and calcification, cardiac dysfunction, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. While advances in understanding the etiology and consequences of this complex disorder have been made, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain incompletely understood, and it is unclear how these concurrent risk factors conspire to produce the variety of obesity-associated adverse cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we highlight current knowledge regarding the pathophysiological consequences of obesity and the MetS on cardiovascular function and disease, including considerations of potential physiological and molecular mechanisms that may contribute to these adverse outcomes.

  7. Ceruloplasmin and cardiovascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, P. L.; Mazumder, B.; Ehrenwald, E.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.

    2000-01-01

    Transition metal ion-mediated oxidation is a commonly used model system for studies of the chemical, structural, and functional modifications of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The physiological relevance of studies using free metal ions is unclear and has led to an exploration of free metal ion-independent mechanisms of oxidation. We and others have investigated the role of human ceruloplasmin (Cp) in oxidative processes because it the principal copper-containing protein in serum. There is an abundance of epidemiological data that suggests that serum Cp may be an important risk factor predicting myocardial infarction and cardiovascular disease. Biochemical studies have shown that Cp is a potent catalyst of LDL oxidation in vitro. The pro-oxidant activity of Cp requires an intact structure, and a single copper atom at the surface of the protein, near His(426), is required for LDL oxidation. Under conditions where inhibitory protein (such as albumin) is present, LDL oxidation by Cp is optimal in the presence of superoxide, which reduces the surface copper atom of Cp. Cultured vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells also oxidize LDL in the presence of Cp. Superoxide release by these cells is a critical factor regulating the rate of oxidation. Cultured monocytic cells, when activated by zymosan, can oxidize LDL, but these cells are unique in their secretion of Cp. Inhibitor studies using Cp-specific antibodies and antisense oligonucleotides show that Cp is a major contributor to LDL oxidation by these cells. The role of Cp in lipoprotein oxidation and atherosclerotic lesion progression in vivo has not been directly assessed and is an important area for future studies.

  8. [Effect of gastric bypass on the cardiovascular risk and quality of life in morbid obese patients].

    PubMed

    Mateo Gavira, I; Vílchez López, F J; Cayón Blanco, M; García Valero, A; Escobar Jiménez, L; Mayo Ossorio, M A; Pacheco García, J M; Vázquez Gallego, J M; Aguilar Diosdado, M

    2014-03-01

    Objetivos: Determinar la prevalencia de las principales comorbilidades asociadas a la obesidad mórbida y evaluar el efecto del bypass gástrico sobre el estado ponderal, riesgo cardiovascular y calidad de vida en estos pacientes. Métodos: Estudio descriptivo con medidas del cambio intrasujeto (antes-después) en una muestra de 162 pacientes de los resultados del bypass gástrico sobre la evolución ponderal, comorbilidades asociadas, riesgo cardiovascular a 10 años (estimado mediante las tablas de Framingham) y calidad de vida mediante el test BAROS (Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System). Resultados: El índice de masa corporal (IMC) se reduce de 51,12 ± 7,22 kg/m2 a 29,94 ± 4,86 kg/m2 (72,85% de sobrepeso perdido) y se resuelven la hipertensión arterial (HTA), la dislipemia y la diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DMT2) en el 71,93%, 91,38% y 82,93% respectivamente (p < 0,001). El riesgo cardiovascular mayor del 10% se reduce del 25,91% al 4,32% (p < 0,001). Según la escala BAROS, el resultado de la cirugía fue favorable en el 95% de los casos. Conclusiones: La cirugía bariátrica mediante bypass gástrico demuestra ser muy efectiva para la reducción ponderal y comorbilidades asociadas, mejorando notablemente la calidad de vida.

  9. Cardiovascular Side Effects of New Antidepressants and Antipsychotics: New Drugs, old Concerns?

    PubMed Central

    Pacher, Pal; Kecskemeti, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    The cardiovascular toxicity of older generation of tricyclic antidepressants (e.g. imipramine, desipramine, amitriptyline, clomipramine) and neuroleptics (e.g. haloperidol, droperidol, thioridazine, pimozide) is well established. These drugs inhibit cardiovascular Na+, Ca2+ and K+ channels often leading to life-threatening arrhythmia. To overcome the toxicity of old generation of antidepressants and antipsychotics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs: fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram, venlafaxin) and several new antipsychotics (e.g. clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, sertindole, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, quetiapine) were introduced during the past decade. Although these new compounds are not more effective in treating psychiatric disorders than older medications, they gained incredible popularity since they have been reported to have fewer and more benign side effect profile (including cardiovascular) than predecessors. Surprisingly, an increasing number of case reports have demonstrated that the use of SSRIs and new antipsychotics (e.g. clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, sertindole, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, quetiapine) is associated with cases of arrhythmias, prolonged QTc interval on electrocardiogram (ECG) and orthostatic hypotension in patients lacking cardiovascular disorders, raising new concerns about the putative cardiovascular safety of these compounds. In agreement with these clinical reports these new compounds indeed show marked cardiovascular depressant effects in different mammalian and human cardiovascular preparations by inhibiting cardiac and vascular Na+, Ca2+ and K+ channels. Taken together, these results suggest that the new generation of antidepressants and antipsychotics also have clinically important cardiac as well as vascular effects. Clinicians should be more vigilant about these potential adverse reactions and ECG control may be suggested during therapy, especially in patients with

  10. Unravelling cardiovascular disease using four dimensional flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Vivian P; Westenberg, Jos J M; van der Palen, Roel L F; Blom, Nico A; de Roos, Albert; van der Geest, Rob; Elbaz, Mohammed S M; Roest, Arno A W

    2016-11-25

    Knowledge of normal and abnormal flow patterns in the human cardiovascular system increases our understanding of normal physiology and may help unravel the complex pathophysiological mechanisms leading to cardiovascular disease. Four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as a suitable technique that enables visualization of in vivo blood flow patterns and quantification of parameters that could potentially be of prognostic value in the disease process. In this review, current image processing tools that are used for comprehensive visualization and quantification of blood flow and energy distribution in the heart and great vessels will be discussed. Also, imaging biomarkers extracted from 4D flow CMR will be reviewed that have been shown to distinguish between normal and abnormal flow patterns. Furthermore, current applications of 4D flow CMR in the heart and great vessels will be discussed, showing its potential as an additional diagnostic modality which could aid in disease management and timing of surgical intervention.

  11. Cardiovascular Safety Pharmacology of Sibutramine

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jaesuk; Chung, Eunyong; Choi, Ki Hwan; Cho, Dae Hyun; Song, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyoung Moon; Cha, Hey Jin; Shin, Ji Soon; Seong, Won-Keun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sibutramine is an anorectic that has been banned since 2010 due to cardiovascular safety issues. However, counterfeit drugs or slimming products that include sibutramine are still available in the market. It has been reported that illegal sibutramine-contained pharmaceutical products induce cardiovascular crisis. However, the mechanism underlying sibutramine-induced cardiovascular adverse effect has not been fully evaluated yet. In this study, we performed cardiovascular safety pharmacology studies of sibutramine systemically using by hERG channel inhibition, action potential duration, and telemetry assays. Sibutramine inhibited hERG channel current of HEK293 cells with an IC50 of 3.92 μM in patch clamp assay and increased the heart rate and blood pressure (76 Δbpm in heart rate and 51 ΔmmHg in blood pressure) in beagle dogs at a dose of 30 mg/kg (per oral), while it shortened action potential duration (at 10 μM and 30 μM, resulted in 15% and 29% decreases in APD50, and 9% and 17% decreases in APD90, respectively) in the Purkinje fibers of rabbits and had no effects on the QTc interval in beagle dogs. These results suggest that sibutramine has a considerable adverse effect on the cardiovascular system and may contribute to accurate drug safety regulation. PMID:26157557

  12. [Animal models of cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Chorro, Francisco J; Such-Belenguer, Luis; López-Merino, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    The use of animal models to study cardiovascular disease has made a substantial contribution to increasing our understanding of disease pathogenesis, has led to the development of diagnostic techniques, and has made it possible to verify the effectiveness of different preventative and therapeutic approaches, whether pharmacological or interventional. The main limitations stem from differences between human and experimentally induced pathology, in terms of both genetic regulatory mechanisms and factors that influence cardiovascular function. The experimental models and preparations used in cardiovascular research include those based on isolated cells or tissues or structures immersed in organ baths. The Langendorff system enables isolated perfused hearts to be studied directly under conditions of either no load or controlled loading. In small mammals, a number of models have been developed of cardiovascular conditions that result from spontaneous genetic mutations or, alternatively, that may be induced by specific genomic modification. One of the techniques employed is gene transfer, which can involve the controlled induction of mutations that result in the expression of abnormalities associated with the development of a broad range of different types of cardiovascular disease. Larger animals are used in experimental models in which it is important that physiological regulatory and homeostatic mechanisms are present.

  13. PPARs and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Hamblin, Milton; Chang, Lin; Fan, Yanbo; Zhang, Jifeng; Chen, Y Eugene

    2009-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear hormone-receptor superfamily. Originally cloned in 1990, PPARs were found to be mediators of pharmacologic agents that induce hepatocyte peroxisome proliferation. PPARs also are expressed in cells of the cardiovascular system. PPAR gamma appears to be highly expressed during atherosclerotic lesion formation, suggesting that increased PPAR gamma expression may be a vascular compensatory response. Also, ligand-activated PPAR gamma decreases the inflammatory response in cardiovascular cells, particularly in endothelial cells. PPAR alpha, similar to PPAR gamma, also has pleiotropic effects in the cardiovascular system, including antiinflammatory and antiatherosclerotic properties. PPAR alpha activation inhibits vascular smooth muscle proinflammatory responses, attenuating the development of atherosclerosis. However, PPAR delta overexpression may lead to elevated macrophage inflammation and atherosclerosis. Conversely, PPAR delta ligands are shown to attenuate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by improving endothelial cell proliferation and survival while decreasing endothelial cell inflammation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Furthermore, the administration of PPAR ligands in the form of TZDs and fibrates has been disappointing in terms of markedly reducing cardiovascular events in the clinical setting. Therefore, a better understanding of PPAR-dependent and -independent signaling will provide the foundation for future research on the role of PPARs in human cardiovascular biology.

  14. Roadmap for cardiovascular circulation model.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Soroush; Bradley, Christopher P; Suresh, Vinod; Mithraratne, Kumar; Muller, Alexandre; Ho, Harvey; Ladd, David; Hellevik, Leif R; Omholt, Stig W; Chase, J Geoffrey; Müller, Lucas O; Watanabe, Sansuke M; Blanco, Pablo J; de Bono, Bernard; Hunter, Peter J

    2016-12-01

    Computational models of many aspects of the mammalian cardiovascular circulation have been developed. Indeed, along with orthopaedics, this area of physiology is one that has attracted much interest from engineers, presumably because the equations governing blood flow in the vascular system are well understood and can be solved with well-established numerical techniques. Unfortunately, there have been only a few attempts to create a comprehensive public domain resource for cardiovascular researchers. In this paper we propose a roadmap for developing an open source cardiovascular circulation model. The model should be registered to the musculo-skeletal system. The computational infrastructure for the cardiovascular model should provide for near real-time computation of blood flow and pressure in all parts of the body. The model should deal with vascular beds in all tissues, and the computational infrastructure for the model should provide links into CellML models of cell function and tissue function. In this work we review the literature associated with 1D blood flow modelling in the cardiovascular system, discuss model encoding standards, software and a model repository. We then describe the coordinate systems used to define the vascular geometry, derive the equations and discuss the implementation of these coupled equations in the open source computational software OpenCMISS. Finally, some preliminary results are presented and plans outlined for the next steps in the development of the model, the computational software and the graphical user interface for accessing the model.

  15. The pathophysiological profile of the acute cardiovascular toxicity of sodium fluoride.

    PubMed

    Strubelt, O; Iven, H; Younes, M

    1982-01-01

    The intravenous infusion of sodium fluoride (2 mg/kg X min) into anesthetized rats caused a progressive fall in arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate and peripheral resistance. Respiratory rate increased during the first 20 min of infusion resulting in increased oxygen and decreased carbon dioxide blood concentrations. Total body oxygen consumption decreased after 30 min of NaF infusion by 29%, whereas the respiratory quotient (RQ) increased from 0.8 to 1.06. Death occurred after a mean dose of 79.6 +/- 4.6 mg/kg NaF. The terminal cardiac event before death was atrioventricular block followed immediately by asystole. Artificial ventilation did not influence the cardiovascular and the lethal effects of fluoride infusion. The plasma concentrations of total and ionized calcium decreased upon NaF infusion. The infusion of extra calcium did not prevent NaF-induced cardiovascular failure but decreased plasma fluoride levels and increased the lethal dose of NaF by 17% (not significant). In isolated atria and perfused hearts in vitro, NaF decreased the force of contraction in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, cardiovascular failure resulting from the direct cardiodepressive and vasodilatating effects of fluoride (and not from respiratory depression or hypocalcemia) accounts for the lethal outcome of fluoride intoxication.

  16. Cardiovascular Function in Pulmonary Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Visca, Dina; Aiello, Marina; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic cardiovascular disease, such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias, have a strong influence on each other, and systemic inflammation has been considered as the main linkage between them. On the other hand, airflow limitation may markedly affect lung mechanics in terms of static and dynamic hyperinflation, especially in pulmonary emphysema, and they can in turn influence cardiac performance as well. Skeletal mass depletion, which is a common feature in COPD especially in pulmonary emphysema patients, may have also a role in cardiovascular function of these patients, irrespective of lung damage. We reviewed the emerging evidence that highlights the role of lung mechanics and muscle mass impairment on ventricular volumes, stroke volume, and stroke work at rest and on exercise in the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Patients with emphysema may differ among COPD population even in terms of cardiovascular function. PMID:24369007

  17. Ghrelin and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Isgaard, Jörgen

    2013-01-01

    Although ghrelin was initially associated with regulation of appetite, the cardiovascular system has also been recognized as a potentially important target for its effects. Moreover, experimental and a limited number of clinical studies suggest a potential role for ghrelin in the treatment of congestive heart failure. So far, reported cardiovascular effects of growth hormone secretagogues and/or ghrelin include lowering of peripheral resistance, either direct at the vascular level and/or by modulating sympathetic nervous activity. Other observed effects indicate possible improvement of contractility and cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory effects both in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, these results offer an interesting perspective on the future where further studies aiming at evaluating a role of growth hormone secretagogues and ghrelin in the treatment of cardiovascular disease are warranted.

  18. Lymphatic System in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    PubMed

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Robciuc, Marius R; Karaman, Sinem; Makinen, Taija; Alitalo, Kari

    2016-02-05

    The mammalian circulatory system comprises both the cardiovascular system and the lymphatic system. In contrast to the blood vascular circulation, the lymphatic system forms a unidirectional transit pathway from the extracellular space to the venous system. It actively regulates tissue fluid homeostasis, absorption of gastrointestinal lipids, and trafficking of antigen-presenting cells and lymphocytes to lymphoid organs and on to the systemic circulation. The cardinal manifestation of lymphatic malfunction is lymphedema. Recent research has implicated the lymphatic system in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases including obesity and metabolic disease, dyslipidemia, inflammation, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and myocardial infarction. Here, we review the most recent advances in the field of lymphatic vascular biology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease.

  19. Multimodality nanotracers for cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Willem J M; Cormode, David P; Hak, Sjoerd; Lobatto, Mark E; Silvera, Stephane; Fayad, Zahi A

    2008-08-01

    Targeted imaging and therapeutics is becoming a field of prime importance in the study and treatment of cardiovascular disease; it promises to enable early diagnosis, promote improved understanding of pathology, and offer a way to improve therapeutic efficacy. Agents, particularly for cardiovascular disease, have been reported to permit the in vivo imaging, by multiple modalities, of macrophages, vascular targets such as vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and markers for angiogenesis such as alpha(v)beta(3) integrin. In this Article, we first discuss the general concept of multimodality nanoparticles and then focus in greater depth on their clinical application for molecular imaging and therapy. Lastly, several examples of cardiovascular applications are discussed, including combined imaging and therapy approaches.

  20. HIV and General Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Capili, Bernadette; Anastasi, Joyce K.; Ogedegbe, Olugbenga

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing in HIV-infected people. Risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance have become common. CVD in HIV may also be related to non-traditional risk factors including accumulation of visceral fat, inflammation secondary to HIV, and effects of some antiretroviral drugs. This cross-sectional study described the CVD risk factors of 123 adults living with HIV and calculated the 10-year estimate for general cardiovascular risk score. Results showed that approximately 25% of the participants were considered to be at high risk for developing CVD in the next 10 years. Increased waist circumference and longer duration of smoking habit were associated with elevated general cardiovascular risk scores. Similar to the general population, most of the identified risks could be modified through lifestyle management. PMID:21277230

  1. Electrocardiographic Predictors of Cardiovascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Mozos, Ioana; Caraba, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality. Sudden cardiac death may also appear in athletes, due to underlying congenital or inherited cardiac abnormalities. The electrocardiogram is used in clinical practice and clinical trials, as a valid, reliable, accessible, inexpensive method. The aim of the present paper was to review electrocardiographic (ECG) signs associated with cardiovascular mortality and the mechanisms underlying those associations, providing a brief description of the main studies in this area, and consider their implication for clinical practice in the general population and athletes. The main ECG parameters associated with cardiovascular mortality in the present paper are the P wave (duration, interatrial block, and deep terminal negativity of the P wave in V1), prolonged QT and Tpeak-Tend intervals, QRS duration and fragmentation, bundle branch block, ST segment depression and elevation, T waves (inverted, T wave axes), spatial angles between QRS and T vectors, premature ventricular contractions, and ECG hypertrophy criteria. PMID:26257460

  2. Social factors and cardiovascular morbidity.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Eric John

    2017-03-01

    Recent progress in population health at aggregate level, measured by life expectancy, has been accompanied by lack of progress in reducing the difference in health prospects between groups defined by social status. Cardiovascular disease is an important contributor to this undesirable situation. The stepwise gradient of higher risk with lower status is accounted for partly by social gradients in health behaviors. The psychosocial hypothesis provides a stronger explanation, based on social patterning of living and working environments and psychological assets that individuals develop during childhood. Three decades of research based on Whitehall II and other cohort studies provide evidence for psychosocial pathways leading to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Job stress is a useful paradigm because exposure is long term and depends on occupational status. Studies of social-biological translation implicate autonomic and neuroendocrine function among the biological systems that mediate between chronic adverse psychosocial exposures and increased cardiometabolic risk and cardiovascular disease incidence.

  3. Mitochondrial cytopathies and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Dominic, Elizabeth A; Ramezani, Ali; Anker, Stefan D; Verma, Mukesh; Mehta, Nehal; Rao, Madhumathi

    2014-04-01

    The global epidemic of cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA and across the world. Functional and structural integrity of mitochondria are essential for the physiological function of the cardiovascular system. The metabolic adaptation observed in normal heart is lost in the failing myocardium, which becomes progressively energy depleted leading to impaired myocardial contraction and relaxation. Uncoupling of electron transfer from ATP synthesis leads to excess generation of reactive species, leading to widespread cellular injury and cardiovascular disease. Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutation has been linked to ischaemic heart disease, cardiomyopathy and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Mitochondria are known to regulate apoptotic and autophagic pathways that have been shown to play an important role in the development of cardiomyopathy and atherosclerosis. A number of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options have been explored in the management of mitochondrial diseases with variable success.

  4. Gold nanoparticles in cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Varna, Mariana; Xuan, Hoa V; Fort, Emmanuel

    2017-04-06

    Although originally applied in the field of oncology, recent results have illustrated the considerable potential of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the imaging of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). CVDs represent the leading cause of mortality and disability in the world. The principal cause underpinning CVDs is atherosclerosis, which develops into mid and large blood vessels, often leading to severe complications. Thanks to their unique physicochemical properties, GNPs have drawn much attention from the research community in cardiovascular imaging. Thus, the optical properties of GNPs have led to their utilization as contrast agents for optical or X-ray imaging modalities allowing the detection of atherosclerotic plaques, intravascular thrombus, or fibrotic tissue. In this study, we detail the most promising preclinical scientific progresses based on the use of GNPs for imaging in cardiovascular field and their improvements for a potential clinical application. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  5. Cardiovascular function in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Visca, Dina; Aiello, Marina; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic cardiovascular disease, such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias, have a strong influence on each other, and systemic inflammation has been considered as the main linkage between them. On the other hand, airflow limitation may markedly affect lung mechanics in terms of static and dynamic hyperinflation, especially in pulmonary emphysema, and they can in turn influence cardiac performance as well. Skeletal mass depletion, which is a common feature in COPD especially in pulmonary emphysema patients, may have also a role in cardiovascular function of these patients, irrespective of lung damage. We reviewed the emerging evidence that highlights the role of lung mechanics and muscle mass impairment on ventricular volumes, stroke volume, and stroke work at rest and on exercise in the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Patients with emphysema may differ among COPD population even in terms of cardiovascular function.

  6. [Cardiovascular manifestations of human toxocariasis].

    PubMed

    Bolívar-Mejía, Adrián; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto E; Delgado, Olinda

    2013-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a parasitic infection produced by helminths that cannot reach their adult stage in humans. For their etiological species (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), man is a paratenic host. Infection by such helminths can produce a variety of clinical manifestations, such as: visceral larvae migrans syndrome, ocular larvae migrans syndrome and covert toxocariasis. In the visceral larvae migrans syndrome, the organs that are mainly involved include liver, lungs, skin, nervous system, muscles, kidneys and the heart. Regarding the latter, the importance of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, as well as its clinical relevance, has increasingly begun to be recognized. The current article is based on a systematic information search, focused mainly on the clinical and pathological aspects of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, including its pathophysiology, laboratory findings, diagnosis and therapeutical options, with the objective of highlighting its importance as a zoonosis and its relevance to the fields of cardiovascular medicine in adults and children.

  7. Cardiovascular risks of antiretroviral therapies.

    PubMed

    Mondy, Kristin; Tebas, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in sustained reductions in mortality from HIV infection. In recent years, HAART has also been associated with metabolic complications that may increase patients' cardiovascular disease risk. Recent studies have begun to support a more complex interaction between HAART, HIV infection itself, and other traditional social and immunologic factors that may predispose patients to premature cardiovascular disease. Substantial progress has been made in the development of newer antiretroviral therapies that have a better metabolic profile with respect to dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and lipodystrophy. Optimal selection of metabolically neutral antiretroviral therapies, together with aggressive management of other modifiable coronary risk factors, may improve cardiovascular disease risk in the long term.

  8. Cardiovascular Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, Peter; Schneider, Sue

    1999-01-01

    It was apparent that the bed-rest and spaceflight data indicated that decreases in plasma volume and cardiac atrophy along with cardiac remodeling were fundamental changes which predisposed many astronauts to post flight orthostatic intolerance. Despite the recently acquired in-flight and post-flight muscle sympathetic nerve activity findings suggesting that the sympathetic nerve responses were appropriate there remains significant contrary data from bed-rest studies, post- flight stand tests and hind-limb unweighted rat studies that suggest that the vasoconstrictive responses were compromised at least insufficient in susceptible individuals. The key issues raised is whether a diminished increase in sympathetic activity from baseline without changes in 254 First Biennial Space Biomedical Investigators'Workshop Cardiovascular peak response or receptor adaptations is an abnormal response or is an individual variance of response to the accentuated decrease in stroke volume. Data relating autonomic neural control of heart rate were presented to suggest that the vagal and sympathetic control of heart rate was attenuated. Also, bed-rest and space flight induced attenuated baroreflex control of heart rate was shown to be restored to pre-bedrest function by one bout of maximal dynamic exercise. However, these data were confounded by relying on the use of R-R interval as a measure of efferent responses of the baroreflex during a condition in which the baseline heart rate was changed. Clearly the idea that the autonomic control of heart rate may be changed by microgravity needs further investigation. This direction is suggested despite the fact that in the triple product (HR x SV x TPR = MAP) assessment of the regulation of arterial blood pressure during orthostasis the role of the HR reflex may be less influential than that associated. with cardiac atrophy (SV changes) and aberrant sympathetic vasoconstriction (resistance) changes. Although sympathetic nerve activity

  9. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  10. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  11. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Atiye; Sahinarslan, Asife

    2006-12-01

    Endothelium has many important functions including the control of blood-tissue permeability and vascular tonus, regulation of vascular surface properties for homeostasis and inflammation. Nitric oxide is the chief molecule in regulation of endothelial functions. Nitric oxide deficiency, which is also known as endothelial dysfunction, is the first step for the occurrence of many disease states in cardiovascular system including heart failure, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia and smoking. This review deals with the importance of nitric oxide for cardiovascular system. It also includes the latest improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  12. Organosulfur compounds and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Prieto, Marcela A; Miatello, Roberto M

    2010-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relationship between consumption of fruits and vegetables and the risk of cardiovascular disease. Phytochemicals are non-nutritional chemical compounds found in small quantities in fruits and vegetables with known health benefits. Among them, organosulfides are present mainly in garlic and onion characterized by their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and isothiocyanates in cruciferous vegetables have anticarcinogenic effects in experimental models. In this review, we are focusing on the main biological studies regarding the beneficial effect of organosulfur compounds on their protection against cardiovascular disease.

  13. Semaphorin signaling in cardiovascular development.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Jonathan A; Aghajanian, Haig; Singh, Manvendra K

    2015-02-03

    Semaphorins were originally identified as neuronal guidance molecules mediating their attractive or repulsive signals by forming complexes with plexin and neuropilin receptors. Subsequent research has identified functions for semaphorin signaling in many organs and tissues outside of the nervous system. Vital roles for semaphorin signaling in vascular patterning and cardiac morphogenesis have been demonstrated, and impaired semaphorin signaling has been associated with various human cardiovascular disorders, including persistent truncus arteriosus, sinus bradycardia and anomalous pulmonary venous connections. Here, we review the functions of semaphorins and their receptors in cardiovascular development and disease and highlight important recent discoveries in the field.

  14. Fetal origins of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Barker, D J

    1999-04-01

    Low birthweight, thinness and short body length at birth are now known to be associated with increased rates of cardiovascular disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes in adult life. The fetal origins hypothesis proposes that these diseases originate through adaptations which the fetus makes when it is undernourished. These adaptations may be cardiovascular, metabolic or endocrine. They permanently change the structure and function of the body. Prevention of the diseases may depend on prevention of imbalances in fetal growth or imbalances between prenatal and postnatal growth, or imbalances in nutrient supply to the fetus.

  15. Protective effects of grape seed proanthocyanidins on cardiovascular remodeling in DOCA-salt hypertension rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling-ling; Pan, Chen; Wang, Li; Ding, Ling; Guo, Kun; Wang, Hong-zhi; Xu, A-Man; Gao, Shan

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular remodeling, as a hallmark of hypertension-induced pathophysiology, causes substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. There is increasing evidence that has demonstrated a broad spectrum of pharmacological and therapeutic benefits of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSP) against oxidative stress and cardiovascular diseases. In this study, 180- to 200-g SD rats treated with DOCA (120 mg/week sc with 1% NaCl and 0.2% KCl in drinking water) and GSP (150, 240, 384 mg/kg) or amlodipine (ALM) (5 mg/kg) for 4 weeks were recruited. The protective effects of GSP on blood pressure and cardiovascular remodeling in rats with DOCA-salt-induced hypertension were investigated. Our results indicated that DOCA-salt could induce hypertension, cardiovascular remodeling and dysfunction, oxidative stress and the release of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and could increase JNK1/2 and p38MAPK phosphorylation. GSP or ALM treatments significantly improved hypertension, cardiovascular remodeling and dysfunction and oxidative stress, restrained the release of ET-1 and down-regulated the JNK1/2 and p38MAPK phosphorylation. These findings demonstrate that GSP has protective effects against increase of blood pressure induced by DOCA-salt hypertension and cardiovascular remodeling by inhibiting the reactive oxygen species/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway via restraining the release of ET-1.

  16. Down Syndrome: A Cardiovascular Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vis, J. C.; Duffels, M. G. J.; Winter, M. M.; Weijerman, M. E.; Cobben, J. M.; Huisman, S. A.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the heart and vascular system in patients with Down syndrome. A clear knowledge on the wide spectrum of various abnormalities associated with this syndrome is essential for skillful management of cardiac problems in patients with Down syndrome. Epidemiology of congenital heart defects, cardiovascular aspects and…

  17. Dietary nitrate and cardiovascular health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahluwalia, A.; Gladwin, M.T.; Harman, Jane L.; Ward, M.H.; Nolan, Bernard T.

    2014-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened this workshop to discuss the results of recent research on the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on the cardiovascular system, possible long term effects of these compounds in the diet and drinking water, and future research needs including population-wide effects examined through epidemiological studies.

  18. Ghrelin and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenj

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide that was originally isolated from the stomach. It exerts potent growth hormone (GH)-releasing and orexigenic activities. Several studies have highlighted the therapeutic benefits of ghrelin for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. In animal models of chronic heart failure, the administration of ghrelin improved cardiac function and remodeling; these findings were replicated in human patients with heart failure. Moreover, in an animal study, ghrelin administration effectively reduced pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia. In addition, repeated administration of ghrelin to cachectic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had positive effects on overall body function, including muscle wasting, functional capacity and sympathetic activity. The administration of ghrelin early after myocardial infarction (MI) reduced fatal arrhythmia and related mortality. In ghrelin-deficient mice, both exogenous and endogenous ghrelin were protective against fatal arrhythmia and promoted remodeling after MI. Although the mechanisms underlying the effects of ghrelin on the cardiovascular system remain unclear, there are indications that its beneficial effects are mediated through both direct physiological actions, including increased GH levels, improved energy balance and direct actions on cardiovascular cells, and regulation of autonomic nervous system activity. Therefore, ghrelin is a promising novel therapeutic agent for cardiovascular disease.

  19. Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A great numbers of cardiovascular disease patients all over the world are suffering in the poor outcomes. Under this situation, cardiac regeneration therapy to reorganize the postnatal heart that is defined as a terminal differentiated-organ is a very important theme and mission for human beings. However, the temporary success of several clinical trials using usual cell types with uncertain cell numbers has provided the transient effect of cell therapy to these patients. We therefore should redevelop the evidence of cell-based cardiovascular regeneration therapy, focusing on targets (disease, patient’s status, cardiac function), materials (cells, cytokines, genes), and methodology (transplantation route, implantation technology, tissue engineering). Meanwhile, establishment of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is an extremely innovative technology which should be proposed as embryonic stem (ES) cellularization of post natal somatic cells, and this application have also showed the milestones of the direct conversion to reconstruct cardiomyocyte from the various somatic cells, which does not need the acquisition of the re-pluripotency. This review discusses the new advance in cardiovascular regeneration therapy from cardiac regeneration to cardiac re-organization, which is involved in recent progress of on-going clinical trials, basic research in cardiovascular regeneration, and the possibility of tissue engineering technology. PMID:23825492

  20. Bioengineering and the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Nerem, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    The development of the modern era of bioengineering and the advances in our understanding of the cardiovascular system have been intertwined over the past one-half century. This is true of bioengineering as an area for research in universities. Bioengineering is ultimately the beginning of a new engineering discipline, as well as a new discipline in the medical device industry. PMID:24688999

  1. Animal models of cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Carlos; Gomez-Guerrero, Carmen; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis; Blanco-Colio, Luis; Lavin, Begoña; Mallavia, Beñat; Tarin, Carlos; Mas, Sebastian; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the first leading cause of death and morbidity in developed countries. The use of animal models have contributed to increase our knowledge, providing new approaches focused to improve the diagnostic and the treatment of these pathologies. Several models have been developed to address cardiovascular complications, including atherothrombotic and cardiac diseases, and the same pathology have been successfully recreated in different species, including small and big animal models of disease. However, genetic and environmental factors play a significant role in cardiovascular pathophysiology, making difficult to match a particular disease, with a single experimental model. Therefore, no exclusive method perfectly recreates the human complication, and depending on the model, additional considerations of cost, infrastructure, and the requirement for specialized personnel, should also have in mind. Considering all these facts, and depending on the budgets available, models should be selected that best reproduce the disease being investigated. Here we will describe models of atherothrombotic diseases, including expanding and occlusive animal models, as well as models of heart failure. Given the wide range of models available, today it is possible to devise the best strategy, which may help us to find more efficient and reliable solutions against human cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Cardiovascular disease and environmental exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, K D

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews the possible association between cardiovascular disease and occupational and environmental agents. The effects of carbon monoxide, fibrogenic dusts, carbon disulphide, heavy metals, noise, radiation, heat, cold, solvents and fluorocarbons are discussed. New directions for investigation are suggested. PMID:465378

  3. Laser therapy in cardiovascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindge, David

    2009-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide. It is broadly defined to include anything which adversely affects the heart or blood vessels. One-third of Americans have one or more forms of it. By one estimate, average human life expectancy would increase by seven years if it were eliminated. The mainstream medical model seeks mostly to "manage" cardiovascular disease with pharmaceuticals or to surgically bypass or reopen blocked vessels via angioplasty. These methods have proven highly useful and saved countless lives. Yet drug therapy may be costly and ongoing, and it carries the risk of side effects while often doing little or nothing to improve underlying health concerns. Similarly, angioplasty or surgery are invasive methods which entail risk. Laser therapy1 regenerates tissue, stimulates biological function, reduces inflammation and alleviates pain. Its efficacy and safety have been increasingly well documented in cardiovascular disease of many kinds. In this article we will explore the effects of laser therapy in angina, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, myocardial infarction, stroke and other conditions. The clinical application of various methods of laser therapy, including laserpuncture and transcutaneous, supravascular and intravenous irradiation of blood will be discussed. Implementing laser therapy in the treatment of cardiovascular disease offers the possibility of increasing the health and wellbeing of patients while reducing the costs and enhancing safety of medical care.

  4. Olive oil and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Covas, María-Isabel; Konstantinidou, Valentini; Fitó, Montserrat

    2009-12-01

    The Mediterranean diet, in which olive oil is the primary source of fat, is associated with a low mortality for cardiovascular disease. Data concerning olive oil consumption and primary end points for cardiovascular disease are scarce. However, a large body of knowledge exists providing evidence of the benefits of olive oil consumption on secondary end points for the disease. Besides the classical benefits on the lipid profile provided by olive oil consumption compared with that of saturated fat, a broad spectrum of benefits on cardiovascular risk factors is now emerging associated with olive oil consumption. We review the state of the art concerning the knowledge of the most important biological and clinical effects related to olive oil and its minor components. The recent advances in human nutrigenomics associated with olive oil consumption will also be assessed. The wide range of benefits associated with olive oil consumption could contribute to explaining the low rate of cardiovascular mortality found in southern European-Mediterranean countries, in comparison with other westernized countries, despite a high prevalence of coronary heart disease risk factors.

  5. Specificity of Cardiovascular Endurance Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Calberth B., Jr.; Johnson, James H.

    This study determined the specificity of cardiovascular endurance training on a bicycle ergometer. Eighteen male subjects were tested on a heart rate response test of 150 beats per minute on a bicycle ergometer at the pace of 50 revolutions per minute (rpm) and at 160 beats per minute at 60 and 80 rpm, with the resistance equal to the force of…

  6. Genome editing in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Strong, Alanna; Musunuru, Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Genome-editing tools, which include zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) systems, have emerged as an invaluable technology to achieve somatic and germline genomic manipulation in cells and model organisms for multiple applications, including the creation of knockout alleles, introducing desired mutations into genomic DNA, and inserting novel transgenes. Genome editing is being rapidly adopted into all fields of biomedical research, including the cardiovascular field, where it has facilitated a greater understanding of lipid metabolism, electrophysiology, cardiomyopathies, and other cardiovascular disorders, has helped to create a wider variety of cellular and animal models, and has opened the door to a new class of therapies. In this Review, we discuss the applications of genome-editing technology throughout cardiovascular disease research and the prospect of in vivo genome-editing therapies in the future. We also describe some of the existing limitations of genome-editing tools that will need to be addressed if cardiovascular genome editing is to achieve its full scientific and therapeutic potential.

  7. Cardiovascular Fitness Levels among American Workers

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John E.; Clark, John D.; LeBlanc, William G.; Fleming, Lora E.; Cabán-Martinez, Alberto J.; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Tannenbaum, Stacey L.; Ocasio, Manuel A.; Davila, Evelyn P.; Kachan, Diana; McCollister, Kathryn; Dietz, Noella; Bandiera, Frank C.; Clarke, Tainya C.; Lee, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore cardiovascular fitness in 40 occupations using a nationally-representative 3 sample of the U.S. population. Methods Respondents aged 18–49 (n=3,354) from the 1999–2004 NHANES were evaluated for 5 cardiovascular fitness and classified into low, moderate, and high levels. Comparisons were 6 made among occupations. Results Of all U.S. workers, 16% had low, 36% moderate, and 48% high cardiovascular 8 fitness. Administrators, Health occupations, Wait staff, Personal services, and Agricultural 9 occupations had a lesser percentage of workers with low cardiovascular fitness compared to all 10 others. Sales workers, Administrative support, and Food preparers had a higher percentage of 11 workers with low cardiovascular fitness compared to all others. Conclusions Cardiovascular fitness varies significantly across occupations, and those with limited physical activity have higher percentages of low cardiovascular fitness. Workplace strategies are needed to promote cardiovascular fitness among high-risk occupations. PMID:21915067

  8. Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

    MedlinePlus

    ... jointly produced, collaborated with, or endorsed by the Society of Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. Press & News » Review ... SCAI Member? Create an Account Advertisement Advertisement The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Foundation, 1100 17th ...

  9. Lifetime Risks of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jarett D.; Dyer, Alan; Cai, Xuan; Garside, Daniel B.; Ning, Hongyan; Thomas, Avis; Greenland, Philip; Van Horn, Linda; Tracy, Russell P.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease have not been reported across the age spectrum in black adults and white adults. METHODS We conducted a meta-analysis at the individual level using data from 18 cohort studies involving a total of 257,384 black men and women and white men and women whose risk factors for cardiovascular disease were measured at the ages of 45, 55, 65, and 75 years. Blood pressure, cholesterol level, smoking status, and diabetes status were used to stratify participants according to risk factors into five mutually exclusive categories. The remaining lifetime risks of cardiovascular events were estimated for participants in each category at each age, with death free of cardiovascular disease treated as a competing event. RESULTS We observed marked differences in the lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease across risk-factor strata. Among participants who were 55 years of age, those with an optimal risk-factor profile (total cholesterol level, <180 mg per deciliter [4.7 mmol per liter]; blood pressure, <120 mm Hg systolic and 80 mm Hg diastolic; nonsmoking status; and nondiabetic status) had substantially lower risks of death from cardiovascular disease through the age of 80 years than participants with two or more major risk factors (4.7% vs. 29.6% among men, 6.4% vs. 20.5% among women). Those with an optimal risk-factor profile also had lower lifetime risks of fatal coronary heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction (3.6% vs. 37.5% among men, <1% vs. 18.3% among women) and fatal or nonfatal stroke (2.3% vs. 8.3% among men, 5.3% vs. 10.7% among women). Similar trends within risk-factor strata were observed among blacks and whites and across diverse birth cohorts. CONCLUSIONS Differences in risk-factor burden translate into marked differences in the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease, and these differences are consistent across race and birth cohorts. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.) PMID

  10. Does bicarbonate prevent contrast-induced nephropathy in cardiovascular patients undergoing contrast imaging?

    PubMed

    Dabare, Dilan; Banihani, Mohammed; Gibbs, Paul; Grewal, Perbinder

    2013-12-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiovascular surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether administering sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) prevents contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in cardiovascular patients undergoing contrast imaging. In total, 266 papers were found using the reported search, 16 of which represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. CIN is thought to occur as a result of ischaemic or oxidative injury to the kidney. It is postulated that NaHCO3attenuates this renal damage by alkanizing renal tubular fluid thus reducing the generation of contrast-induced free radicals, which damage the kidney. Of the 16 trials, 15 recruited patients with various degrees of renal dysfunction at baseline. The benefit of using NaHCO3 was demonstrated at all stages of chronic kidney disease. Apart from four studies, 12 studies used low toxicity, low-osmolar contrast. Merten et al. published the first trial of NaHCO3 vs (saline) NaCl in preventing CIN, demonstrated a significantly lower rate in the NaHCO3 group and advocated its widespread use. Subsequent trials using the same regimen have collaborated these results. However, more recently, Gomes et al. concluded that NaHCO3 is not superior to saline-based hydration. Similarly, Brar et al. randomized 323 patients with moderate-to-severe renal insufficiency to receive either an NaHCO3 or an NaCl infusion and observed no difference in CIN rates. Two studies investigated the effects of rapid urine alkanization with bolus injections of NaHCO3 prior to contrast and found significant reductions in CIN rates compared with NaCl-treated groups. One study observed that NaCl is superior to NaHCO3, while all other studies showed a beneficial effect or no difference between NaCl- and NaHCO3-based hydration. The most recent meta

  11. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zittermann, Armin

    2014-09-01

    It has long been known from case series that vitamin D excess can lead to atherosclerosis and vascular calcification in humans. In the 1980s, ecological studies provided data that deficient human vitamin D status may also increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). The assumption of a biphasic vitamin D effect on CVD is supported by experimental studies: Numerous studies have demonstrated positive effects of the vitamin D hormone (1,25-dihydroxyviramin D) on the cardiovascular system. However, the effects and mechanisms that lead to vascular calcification by vitamin D excess could also be confirmed. Large prospective observational studies support the hypothesis of a U-shaped association between vitamin D and CVD. These studies indicate that deficient circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (<30 nmol/l) are independently-associated with increased CVD morbidity and mortality. They also suggest that those circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, which have long been considered to be safe (100-150 nmol/l), are associated with an increased CVD risk. Meanwhile, numerous randomized controlled trials have investigated the effects of vitamin D supplements or ultraviolet B radiation on biochemical cardiovascular risk markers, cardiovascular physiology, and cardiovascular outcomes. Overall, results are mixed with the majority of studies reporting neither beneficial nor adverse vitamin D effects. Several limitations in the study design, which may have prevented beneficial vitamin D effects, are discussed. In conclusion, it must be stated that the role of vitamin D in the prevention and management of CVD as well as the dose-response relationship of potentially harmful effects still remain to be established.

  12. Sodium intake and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martin; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-03-13

    Sodium is an essential nutrient. Increasing sodium intake is associated with increasing blood pressure, whereas low sodium intake results in increased renin and aldosterone levels. Randomized controlled trials have reported reductions in blood pressure with reductions in sodium intake, to levels of sodium intake <1.5 g/d, and form the evidentiary basis for current population-wide guidelines recommending low sodium intake. Although low sodium intake (<2.0 g/d) has been achieved in short-term feeding clinical trials, sustained low sodium intake has not been achieved by any of the longer term clinical trials (>6-month duration). It is assumed that the blood pressure-lowering effects of reducing sodium intake to low levels will result in large reductions in cardiovascular disease globally. However, current evidence from prospective cohort studies suggests a J-shaped association between sodium intake and cardiovascular events, based on studies from >300 000 people, and suggests that the lowest risk of cardiovascular events and death occurs in populations consuming an average sodium intake range (3-5 g/d). The increased risk of cardiovascular events associated with higher sodium intake (>5 g/d) is most prominent in those with hypertension. A major deficit in the field is the absence of large randomized controlled trials to provide definitive evidence on optimal sodium intake for preventing cardiovascular events. Pending such trials, current evidence would suggest a recommendation for moderate sodium intake in the general population (3-5 g/d), with targeting the lower end of the moderate range among those with hypertension.

  13. Anabolic steroids and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Angell, Peter; Chester, Neil; Green, Danny; Somauroo, John; Whyte, Greg; George, Keith

    2012-02-01

    Recent reports from needle exchange programmes and other public health initiatives have suggested growing use of anabolic steroids (AS) in the UK and other countries. Data indicate that AS use is not confined to body-builders or high-level sportsmen. Use has spread to professionals working in emergency services, casual fitness enthusiasts and subelite sportsmen and women. Although the precise health consequences of AS use is largely undefined, AS use represents a growing public health concern. Data regarding the consequences of AS use on cardiovascular health are limited to case studies and a modest number of small cohort studies. Numerous case studies have linked AS use with a variety of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events or endpoints, including myocardial infarction, stroke and death. Large-scale epidemiological studies to support these links are absent. Consequently, the impact of AS use upon known CVD risk factors has been studied in relatively small, case-series studies. Data relating AS use to elevated blood pressure, altered lipid profiles and ECG abnormalities have been reported, but are often limited in scope, and other studies have often produced equivocal outcomes. The use of AS has been linked to the appearance of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy as well as endothelial dysfunction but the data again remains controversial. The mechanisms responsible for the negative effect of AS on cardiovascular health are poorly understood, especially in humans. Possibilities include direct effects on myocytes and endothelial cells, reduced intracellular Ca2+ levels, increased release of apoptogenic factors, as well as increased collagen crosslinks between myocytes. New data relating AS use to cardiovascular health risks are emerging, as novel technologies are developed (especially in non-invasive imaging) that can assess physiological structure and function. Continued efforts to fully document the cardiovascular health consequences of AS use is important to

  14. The medial amygdaloid nucleus is involved in the cardiovascular pathway activated by noradrenaline into the lateral septal area of rats.

    PubMed

    Scopinho, América A; Fortaleza, Eduardo A T; Corrêa, Fernando M A

    2012-10-01

    We have previously reported that noradrenaline (NA) microinjected into the lateral septal area (LSA) caused pressor and bradicardic responses that were mediated by vasopressin release into the circulation through the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN). Although PVN is the final structure involved in the cardiovascular responses caused by NA in the LSA, there is no evidence of direct connections between these areas, suggesting that some structures could be links in this pathway. In the present study, we verified the effect of reversible synaptic inactivation of the medial amygdaloid nucleus (MeA), bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) or diagonal band of Broca (DBB) with Cobalt Chloride (CoCl(2) ) on the cardiovascular response to NA microinjection into the LSA of unanesthetized rats. Male Wistar rats had guide cannulae implanted into the LSA and the MeA, BNST or DBB for drug administration, and a femoral catheter for blood pressure and heart rate recordings. Local microinjection of CoCl(2) (1 mm in 100 nL) into the MeA significantly reduced the pressor and bradycardic responses caused by NA microinjection (21 nmol in 200 nL) into the LSA. In contrast, microinjection of CoCl(2) into the BNST or DBB did not change the cardiovascular responses to NA into the LSA. The results indicate that synapses within the MeA, but not in BNST or DBB, are involved in the cardiovascular pathway activated by NA microinjection into the LSA.

  15. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an overview of Marfan syndrome with an emphasis on cardiovascular complications and cardiovascular imaging. Both pre- and post-operative imaging is addressed with an explanation of surgical management. All relevant imaging modalities are discussed with a particular focus on cardiovascular MR. PMID:23587220

  16. Cardiovascular complications of pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is a leading cause of death in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD), with exceptionally high rates in young adults, according to the Task Force on Cardiovascular Disease. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular complications are already present in children with CKD. This review summarizes the current literature on cardiac risk factors, mortality and morbidity in children with CKD. PMID:17120060

  17. [Cardiovascular risk in children from 6 to 15 years with exogenous obesity].

    PubMed

    Escudero-Lourdes, Gabriela Virginia; Morales-Romero, Luz Viridiana; Valverde-Ocaña, Concepción; Velasco-Chávez, José Fernando

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: el riesgo cardiovascular (RCV) es una epidemia creciente relacionada con hábitos alimentarios y estilo de vida que tiene como uno de sus grupos de riesgo a los niños obesos. El objetivo de este estudio es evaluar el RCV en la población infantil obesa, en un hospital de segundo nivel del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social en San Luis Potosí, México. MÉTODOS: estudio analítico con diseño transversal. Se incluyeron todos los niños obesos atendidos en el servicio de endocrinología durante un año. Se utilizó la escala Alústiza para medir el RCV. Las variables de estudio fueron: edad, sexo, índice de masa corporal, historia familiar de diabetes, obesidad, toxicomanías, presión arterial y colesterol. El RCV se correlacionó con los valores de colesterol HDL y glucosa por medio de chi cuadrada.

  18. Improving cardiovascular protection: focus on a cardiovascular polypill.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Vivencio; Escobar, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Lack of adherence may explain, at least in part, the poor cardiovascular risk factors control observed in patients with ischemic heart disease, increasing the risk of developing new events. Polypill improves medication adherence, which may actually reduce blood pressure and LDL cholesterol compared with the drugs given separately. The fixed combination of acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg + ramipril 2.5, 5, or 10 mg + either simvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 20 mg is the unique cardiovascular polypill that has been registered in 22 countries worldwide. The polypill-containing simvastatin has been specifically tested in a clinical trial including only patients with ischemic heart disease. The FOCUS study showed that patients treated with the polypill showed a higher adherence compared with those receiving separate medications.

  19. The aged cardiovascular risk patient.

    PubMed

    Priebe, H J

    2000-11-01

    It is mostly acknowledged that 'normal' or 'healthy' ageing of the cardiovascular system is distinct from the increasing incidence and severity of cardiovascular disease with advancing age (e.g. hypertension, ischaemic heart disease and congestive heart failure). It is also recognized that chronological and biological age may differ considerably. Nevertheless, even in the absence of overt coexisting disease, advanced age is always accompanied by a general decline in organ function, and specifically by alterations in structure and function of the heart and vasculature that will ultimately affect cardiovascular performance. Actual biological age is thus the net result of the interaction between age-related and concomitant disease-associated changes in organ function. As cardiovascular performance at a given moment is the net result of interactions between heart rate, intrinsic contractility, diastolic and systolic function, ventricular afterload and coronary perfusion, it is important to be aware of the age-related changes in each of these variables, independent of disease, as they determine cardiac performance at rest and its response to stress in the elderly. The most relevant age-related changes in cardiovascular performance for perioperative management are the stiffened myocardium and vasculature, blunted beta-adrenoceptor responsiveness and impaired autonomic reflex control of heart rate. These changes are of little clinical relevance at rest, but may have considerable consequences during superimposed cardiovascular stress. Such stress can take the form of increased flow demand (as in exercise or postoperatively), demand for acute autonomic reflex control (as in change of posture) or severe disease (as during myocardial ischaemia, tachyarrhythmias or uncontrolled hypertension). It may interfere with diastolic relaxation (i.e. ventricular filling), systolic contraction (i.e. ventricular emptying) and vasomotor control (i.e. arterial pressure homeostasis). Three

  20. [METABOLIC SYNDROME AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA, BIPOLAR DISORDER AND SCHIZOAFFECTIVE DISORDER].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Calero Franco, Paloma; Sánchez Sánchez, Blanca; Rodríguez Criado, Natalia; Pinilla Santos, Berta; Bravo Herrero, Sandra; Cruz Fourcade, José Fernando; Martín Aragón, Rubén

    2015-12-01

    Introducción: los pacientes con patologías mentales graves como la esquizofrenia, el trastorno esquizoafectivo y el trastorno bipolar fallecen de media 20 años antes que la población general. La muerte por problemas cardiovasculares es la primera causa de fallecimiento, a pesar de la introducción de estrategias para el control de dichos factores de riesgo. Objetivos: analizar el porcentaje de pacientes con índice de masa corporal elevado, síndrome metabólico y riesgo cardiovascular diagnosticados según los criterios diagnósticos DSM-IV de esquizofrenia, trastorno bipolar y trastorno esquizoafectivo ingresados en la Unidad de Hospitalización Breve del Hospital Universitario de Móstoles de noviembre de 2014 a junio de 2015 por descompensación de su patología. Metodología: en 53 pacientes, 34 con diagnóstico de esquizofrenia, 16 con diagnóstico de trastorno bipolar y 3 con diagnóstico de trastorno esquizoafectivo se tomaron mediciones de peso, talla, perímetro abdominal y tensión arterial. Se realizó también analítica de ingreso, se incluyó determinación de glucosa en ayunas, triglicéridos, colesterol total y colesterol HDL. Se utilizó también la historia clínica para conocer los hábitos tóxicos de los pacientes y su estilo de vida, y se calculó el índice de masa corporal de los pacientes. Posteriormente fueron utilizados los criterios ATP III para síndrome metabólico y los de Framingham para calcular el riesgo cardiovascular a los diez años de los pacientes. Resultados: la muestra está compuesta por un 51% de varones y un 49% de mujeres, con una mediana de edad de 40 años. El 38% de los pacientes presentaron sobrepeso, el 22 % obesidad y el 4% obesidad mórbida. En cuanto a la presencia de síndrome metabólico, el 26% de los pacientes lo presentan según los criterios APT III; la mayoría de estos presentaban años de evolución de enfermedad y de tratamiento con psicofármacos. El 11% de los pacientes presenta un riesgo

  1. [Cardiovascular monitoring of psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Momomura, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that a variety of cardiovascular side effects are induced by drugs, including psychotropic drugs. Among them, myocarditis/cardiomyopathy and long QT syndrome are addressed in this article. Myocarditis is due to inflammation of the myocardium, and the pericardium is also often involved. In that case, it is called myopericarditis. Myocarditis is caused by a variety of etiologies, including viruses, bacteria, inflammatory diseases, and drugs. Psychotropic drugs such as clozapine have been reported to induce myocarditis. In critical cases, the hemodynamics deteriorate due to cardiac insufficiency, which can be fatal. The principal of treatment of drug-induced myocarditis is, of course, cessation of the causative drug. Cardio-circulatory support including inotropes and, in severe cases, mechanical support, are also necessary. Cardiomyopathy can also be induced by drugs. Drug-induced cardiomyopathy usually presents as dilated cardiomyopathy, characterized by left ventricular dilatation and reduced contraction. Anthracyclin is well-known as a cause of drug-induced cardiomyopathy. The treatment of drug-induced cardiomyopathy is in accordance with chronic heart failure. Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is also a relatively common manifestation of the cardiovascular side effects of drugs. Especially, many psychotropic drugs can induce LQTS. LQTS does not simply mean prolongation of the QT interval in electrocardiography, but it includes life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia derived from QT prolongation. Torsade de Pointes is a common ventricular arrhythmia accompanying LQTS. To avoid or detect the occurrence of these serious cardiovascular side effects in time, careful monitoring based on ECG, symptoms, and blood tests is recommended when a drug reported to induce such side effects must be used. ECG must be routinely taken before the drug is initiated. In 2 to 4 weeks after initiation, ECG may be taken regardless of the cardiovascular symptoms. If any ECG

  2. PET Radiotracers of the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Gropler, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular PET provides exquisite measurements of key aspects of the cardiovascular system and as a consequence it plays central role in cardiovascular investigation. Moreover, PET is now playing an ever increasing role in the management of the cardiac patient. Central to the success of PET is the development and use of novel radiotracers that permit measurements of key aspects of cardiovascular health such as myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and neuronal function. Moreover, the development of molecular imaging radiotracers is now permitting the interrogation of cellular and sub cellular processes. This article highlights these various radiotracers and their role in both cardiovascular research and potential clinical applications.

  3. Proteomic analysis in cardiovascular research.

    PubMed

    Oda, Teiji; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2016-03-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry technology and bioinformatics using clinical human samples have expanded quantitative proteomics in cardiovascular research. There are two major proteomic strategies: namely, "gel-based" or "gel-free" proteomics coupled with either "top-down" or "bottom-up" mass spectrometry. Both are introduced into the proteomic analysis using plasma or serum sample targeting 'biomarker" searches of aortic aneurysm and tissue samples, such as from the aneurysmal wall, calcific aortic valve, or myocardial tissue, investigating pathophysiological protein interactions and post-translational modifications. We summarize the proteomic studies that analyzed human samples taken during cardiovascular surgery to investigate disease processes, in order to better understand the system-wide changes behind known molecular factors and specific signaling pathways.

  4. Exercise and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    There are alarming increases in the incidence of obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The risk of these diseases is significantly reduced by appropriate lifestyle modifications such as increased physical activity. However, the exact mechanisms by which exercise influences the development and progression of cardiovascular disease are unclear. In this paper we review some important exercise-induced changes in cardiac, vascular, and blood tissues and discuss recent clinical trials related to the benefits of exercise. We also discuss the roles of boosting antioxidant levels, consequences of epicardial fat reduction, increases in expression of heat shock proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, mitochondrial adaptation, and the role of sarcolemmal and mitochondrial potassium channels in the contributing to the cardioprotection offered by exercise. In terms of vascular benefits, the main effects discussed are changes in exercise-induced vascular remodeling and endothelial function. Exercise-induced fibrinolytic and rheological changes also underlie the hematological benefits of exercise.

  5. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Vivian Cristina; Martini, Lígia Araújo

    2010-04-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency has been observed worldwide at all stages of life. It has been characterized as a public health problem, since low concentrations of this vitamin have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases. Several studies have suggested that vitamin D is involved in cardiovascular diseases and have provided evidence that it has a role in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. It may be involved in regulation of gene expression through the presence of vitamin D receptors in various cells, regulation of blood pressure (through renin-angiotensin system), and modulation of cell growth and proliferation including vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Identifying correct mechanisms and relationships between vitamin D and such diseases could be important in relation to patient care and healthcare policies.

  6. Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is best known for its influence on skeletal health. There is growing recognition, however, that vitamin D has nonskeletal actions, which could have important implications for understanding the consequences of vitamin D deficiency. In epidemiologic studies, vitamin D deficiency has been consistently associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Disruption of vitamin D signaling in animal models promotes hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and atherosclerosis. This evidence has led to the initiation of prospective randomized trials of vitamin D supplementation in individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease. The results of these trials should help to guide strategies for screening and management of vitamin D deficiency in the clinic and at the population level.

  7. Cardiovascular stress of photochemotherapy (PUVA)

    SciTech Connect

    Ciafone, R.A.; Rhodes, A.R.; Audley, M.; Freedberg, I.M.; Abelmann, W.H.

    1980-11-01

    The recently devised therapy for psoriasis and related skin diseases, consisting of long-wave ultraviolet light and oral 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA), was investigated for its cardiovascular effects. In seventeen patients, long-wave ultraviolet light therapy in a treatment enclosure (mean duration, 19.3 minutes) resulted in ambient temperatures of 39.2 degrees C +/- 2.1 degrees C (SD) and skin temperatures of 38.2 degrees C +/- 1.4 degrees C. In upright subjects, heart rate rose 30.8% to 114.4 +/- 25.2 beats per minute (bpm). Intensive room air conditioning, outside of the treatment enclosure, although significantly lowering skin and ambient temperatures, did not affect the heart rates significantly. PUVA therapy is associated with a definite cardiovascular stress when the box type of therapeutic unit is used. Possible modifications are discussed.

  8. Cardiovascular adaptations to resistance training.

    PubMed

    Fleck, S J

    1988-10-01

    The cross-sectional and longitudinal data available indicate that the following conclusions are warranted concerning the effects of resistance training on the cardiovascular system. Resistance training causes increased absolute left ventricular wall thickness and left ventricular mass. These increases are not as evident when expressed relative to body surface area or lean body mass. There is little or no change in left ventricular internal dimensions, in absolute terms or relative to body surface area, resting heart rate, resting blood pressure, and diastolic function of the left ventricle due to resistance training. No change or slight positive effects are noted in systolic function of the left ventricle with training. During resistance training exercises, a large pressor response occurs and is attenuated in resistance trained athletes as compared to control subjects. Resistance training does result in adaptations of the cardiovascular system, with further research needed to elucidate its nature.

  9. Statistical Methods for Cardiovascular Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Moyé, Lem

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Biostatistics continues to play an essential role in contemporary cardiovascular investigations, but successful implementation of biostatistical methods can be complex. Objective To present the rationale behind statistical applications and to review useful tools for cardiology research. Methods and Results Prospective declaration of the research question, clear methodology, and study execution that adheres to the protocol together serve as the critical foundation of a research endeavor. Both parametric and distribution-free measures of central tendency and dispersion are presented. T-testing, analysis of variance, and regression analyses are reviewed. Survival analysis, logistic regression, and interim monitoring are also discussed. Finally, common weaknesses in statistical analyses are considered. Conclusion Biostatistics can be productively applied to cardiovascular research if investigators 1) develop and rely on a well-written protocol and analysis plan, 2) consult with a biostatistician when necessary, and 3) write results clearly, differentiating confirmatory from exploratory findings. PMID:26846639

  10. Erectile dysfunction in the cardiovascular patient.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Jackson, Graham; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Montorsi, Piero

    2013-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction is common in the patient with cardiovascular disease. It is an important component of the quality of life and it also confers an independent risk for future cardiovascular events. The usual 3-year time period between the onset of erectile dysfunction symptoms and a cardiovascular event offers an opportunity for risk mitigation. Thus, sexual function should be incorporated into cardiovascular disease risk assessment for all men. A comprehensive approach to cardiovascular risk reduction (comprising of both lifestyle changes and pharmacological treatment) improves overall vascular health, including sexual function. Proper sexual counselling improves the quality of life and increases adherence to medication. This review explores the critical connection between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease and evaluates how this relationship may influence clinical practice. Algorithms for the management of patient with erectile dysfunction according to the risk for sexual activity and future cardiovascular events are proposed.

  11. Erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The link between erectile dysfunction (ED) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is reviewed by assessing original papers, current consensus, previous reviews and meta-analyses. The link between these conditions is confirmed, and the evaluation and assessment summarised with a new evidence-based algorithm. ED, especially in younger men, is a marker of an increased risk of CVD, and ED needs to be incorporated into all risk-screening programmes. PMID:26558084

  12. Vitamin E and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Saremi, Adonis; Arora, Rohit

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review the role of vitamin E in cardiovascular disease. We begin by describing the general characteristics and metabolism of vitamin E and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis as it relates to oxidation. We also discuss key in vitro studies, animal studies, observational studies, and clinical trials regarding the potentially cardioprotective effect of vitamin E. Lastly, we outline the current recommendations regarding vitamin E in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease as stated by the American Heart Association. Vitamin E is a fat-soluble antioxidant vitamin and alpha-tocopherol is its most naturally abundant and active form. Oxidation is a key step in atherogenesis. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein stimulates endothelial cells to produce inflammatory markers, is involved in foam cell formation, has cytotoxic effects on endothelial cells, inhibits the motility of tissue macrophages, and inhibits nitric oxide-induced vasodilatation. Vitamin E has been shown to increase oxidative resistance in vitro and prevent atherosclerotic plaque formation in mouse models. Consumption of foods rich in vitamin E has been associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease in middle-aged to older men and women. Clinical studies at large have not demonstrated a benefit of vitamin E in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin E supplementation might be associated with an increase in total mortality, heart failure, and hemorrhagic stroke. The American Heart Association does not support the use of vitamin E supplements to prevent cardiovascular disease, but does recommend the consumption of foods abundant in antioxidant vitamins and other nutrients.

  13. NAD(+), sirtuins, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent disease worldwide and there is intense interest in pharmaceutical approaches to reduce the burden of this chronic, aging-related condition. The sirtuin (SIRT) family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases have emerged as exciting targets for CVD management that can impact the cardiovascular system both directly and indirectly, the latter by modulating whole body metabolism. SIRT1-4 regulate the activities of a variety of transcription factors, coregulators, and enzymes that improve metabolic control in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and pancreas, particularly during obesity and aging. SIRT1 and 7 can control myocardial development and resist stress- and aging-associated myocardial dysfunction through the deacetylation of p53 and forkhead box O1 (FoxO1). By modulating the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), FoxO1, and p53, and the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), SIRT1 also promotes vasodilatory and regenerative functions in endothelial and smooth muscle cells of the vascular wall. Given the array of potentially beneficial effects of SIRT activation on cardiovascular health, interest in developing specific SIRT agonists is well-substantiated. Because SIRT activity depends on cellular NAD+ availability, enzymes involved in NAD+ biosynthesis, including nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), may also be valuable pharmaceutical targets for managing CVD. Herein we review the actions of the SIRT proteins on the cardiovascular system and consider the potential of modulating SIRT activity and NAD+ availability to control CVD.

  14. What's new in cardiovascular prevention?

    PubMed

    Brohet, C R

    2007-01-01

    This review is essentially a summary of the 2007 version of the European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice recently published by the 4th JointTask Force. New data from the guidelines in the fields of the general objectives in lifestyle modifications and drug therapies are emphasised. Recent studies on antioxydant vitamins, homocysteine-lowering vitamins and HDL-Cholesterol raising drugs are also being discussed.

  15. Fetal Programming and Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Barbara T.; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2016-01-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25880521

  16. Cardiovascular complications of radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Finch, William; Shamsa, Kamran; Lee, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular sequelae of radiation exposure are an important cause of morbidity and mortality following radiation therapy for cancer, as well as after exposure to radiation after atomic bombs or nuclear accidents. In the United States, most of the data on radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) come from patients treated with radiation therapy for Hodgkin disease and breast cancer. Additionally, people exposed to radiation from the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, and the Chernobyl, Ukraine, nuclear accident have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The total dose of radiation, as well as the fractionation of the dose, plays an important role in the development of RIHD. All parts of the heart are affected, including the pericardium, vasculature, myocardium, valves, and conduction system. The mechanism of injury is complex, but one major mechanism is injury to endothelium in both the microvasculature and coronary arteries. This likely also contributes to damage and fibrosis within the myocardium. Additionally, various inflammatory and profibrotic cytokines contribute to injury. Diagnosis and treatment are not significantly different from those for conventional cardiovascular disease; however, screening for heart disease and lifelong cardiology follow-up is essential in patients with past radiation exposure.

  17. Cocoa, chocolate, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Galleano, Monica; Oteiza, Patricia I; Fraga, Cesar G

    2009-12-01

    A significant body of evidence demonstrates that diets rich in fruits and vegetables promote health and attenuate, or delay, the onset of various diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, certain cancers, and several other age-related degenerative disorders. The concept that moderate chocolate consumption could be part of a healthy diet has gained acceptance in past years based on the health benefits ascribed to selected cocoa components. Specifically, cocoa as a plant and chocolate as food contain a series of chemicals that can interact with cell and tissue components, providing protection against the development and amelioration of pathological conditions. The most relevant effects of cocoa and chocolate have been related to cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms behind these effects are still under investigation. However, the maintenance or restoration of vascular NO production and bioavailability and the antioxidant effects are the mechanisms most consistently supported by experimental data. This review will summarize the most recent research on the cardiovascular effects of cocoa flavanols and related compounds.

  18. Recent advances in cardiovascular proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parveen; Cosme, Jake; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2013-04-09

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the major source of global morbidity and death and more people die annually from CVDs than from any other cause. These diseases can occur quickly, as seen in acute myocardial infarction (AMI), or progress slowly over years as with chronic heart failure. Advances in mass spectrometry detection and analysis, together with improved isolation and enrichment techniques allowing for the separation of organelles and membrane proteins, now allow for the indepth analysis of the cardiac proteome. Here we outline current insights that have been provided through cardiovascular proteomics, and discuss studies that have developed innovative technologies which permit the examination of the protein complement in specific organelles including exosomes and secreted proteins. We highlight these foundational studies and illustrate how they are providing the technologies and tools which are now being applied to further study cardiovascular disease; provide new diagnostic markers and potentially new methods of cardiac patient management with identification of novel drug targets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From protein structures to clinical applications.

  19. Cardiovascular physiology - Effects of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments during spaceflight and its groundbase analog, bedrest, provide consistent data which demonstrate that numerous changes in cardiovascular function occur as part of the physiological adaptation process to the microgravity environment. These include elevated heart rate and venous compliance, lowered blood volume, central venous pressure and stroke volume, and attenuated autonomic reflex functions. Although most of these adaptations are not functionally apparent during microgravity exposure, they manifest themselves during the return to the gravitational challenge of earth's terrestrial environment as orthostatic hypotension and instability, a condition which could compromise safety, health and productivity. Development and application of effective and efficient countermeasures such as saline "loading," intermittent venous pooling, pharmacological treatments, and exercise have become primary emphases of the space life sciences research effort with only limited success. Successful development of countermeasures will require knowledge of the physiological mechanisms underlying cardiovascular adaptation to microgravity which can be obtained only through controlled, parallel groundbased research to complement carefully designed flight experiments. Continued research will provide benefits for both space and clinical applications as well as enhance the basic understanding of cardiovascular homeostasis in humans.

  20. Cardiovascular news 2013/2014.

    PubMed

    Cuende, J I; Lahoz, C; Armario, P; García-Alegría, J; Ena, J; García de Casasola, G; Mostaza, J M

    2015-01-01

    During 2013 and the first months of 2014, numerous studies have been published in the cardiovascular field. New guidelines have appeared for managing arterial hypertension and reducing cardiovascular risk by lowering cholesterol levels. New data have emerged on the considerable lipid-lowering efficacy of monoclonal antibodies against PCSK-9, in contrast, however, to the clinical trials directed towards raising HDL-cholesterol with nicotinic acid, which have not shown a reduction in the rate of cardiovascular complications. In the field of hypertension, neither stent placement in patients with renovascular hypertension nor sympathetic denervation in patients with resistant hypertension has been shown to be effective in reducing blood pressure. In terms of antithrombotic treatment, the pharmacogenetic tests do not seem useful for maintaining patients anticoagulated with warfarin within the therapeutic range for longer periods. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that, for patients with coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation, antiplatelet therapy adds no benefit to anticoagulation therapy and is associated with a greater risk of bleeding. Lastly, a Mediterranean diet could prevent the onset of diabetes, while bariatric surgery could be a reasonable option for improving the disease in patients with obesity. Many of these studies have immediate practice applications in daily clinical practice.

  1. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Krone, Wilhelm; Berthold, Heiner K

    2009-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently vitamin D deficiency has been identified as a potential risk factor for many diseases not traditionally associated with vitamin D, such as cancer and CVD. This review discusses the evidence suggesting an association between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and CVD and the possible mechanisms mediating it. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with CVD risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus, with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis such as intima-media thickness and coronary calcification as well as with cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke as well as congestive heart failure. It could be suggested that vitamin D deficiency contributes to the development of CVD through its association with risk factors, such as diabetes and hypertension. However, direct effects of vitamin D on the cardiovascular system may also be involved. Vitamin D receptors are expressed in a variety of tissues, including cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells and vitamin D has been shown to affect inflammation and cell proliferation and differentiation. While much evidence supports a potential antiatherosclerotic effect of vitamin D, prospective, placebo-controlled randomized as well as mechanistic studies are needed to confirm this association. Since vitamin D deficiency is easy to screen for and treat, the confirmation of such an association could have important implications for both, patient care and health policy.

  2. Cardiovascular effects of calcium supplements.

    PubMed

    Reid, Ian R

    2013-07-05

    Calcium supplements reduce bone turnover and slow the rate of bone loss. However, few studies have demonstrated reduced fracture incidence with calcium supplements, and meta-analyses show only a 10% decrease in fractures, which is of borderline statistical and clinical significance. Trials in normal older women and in patients with renal impairment suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. To further assess their safety, we recently conducted a meta-analysis of trials of calcium supplements, and found a 27%-31% increase in risk of myocardial infarction, and a 12%-20% increase in risk of stroke. These findings are robust because they are based on pre-specified analyses of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and are consistent across the trials. Co-administration of vitamin D with calcium does not lessen these adverse effects. The increased cardiovascular risk with calcium supplements is consistent with epidemiological data relating higher circulating calcium concentrations to cardiovascular disease in normal populations. There are several possible pathophysiological mechanisms for these effects, including effects on vascular calcification, vascular cells, blood coagulation and calcium-sensing receptors. Thus, the non-skeletal risks of calcium supplements appear to outweigh any skeletal benefits, and are they appear to be unnecessary for the efficacy of other osteoporosis treatments.

  3. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nemerovski, Carrie W; Dorsch, Michael P; Simpson, Robert U; Bone, Henry G; Aaronson, Keith D; Bleske, Barry E

    2009-06-01

    The hormonal derivative of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH](2)D) or calcitriol, has been implicated in many physiologic processes beyond calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, and likely plays a role in several chronic disease states, in particular, cardiovascular disease. Experimental data suggest that 1,25(OH)(2)D affects cardiac muscle directly, controls parathyroid hormone secretion, regulates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and modulates the immune system. Because of these biologic effects, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with hypertension, several types of vascular diseases, and heart failure. We conducted a MEDLINE search of the English-language literature (1950-2008) to identify studies that examined these relationships; additional citations were obtained from the articles retrieved from the literature search. Treatment with vitamin D lowered blood pressure in patients with hypertension and modified the cytokine profile in patients with heart failure. Measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration usually provides the best assessment of an individual's vitamin D status. Serum levels below 20 ng/ml represent vitamin D deficiency, and levels above 30 ng/ml are considered optimal. Although the observational data linking vitamin D status to cardiovascular disease appear robust, vitamin D supplementation is not recommended as routine treatment for heart disease until definitive prospective, randomized trials can be carried out to assess its effects. However, such supplementation is often appropriate for other reasons and may be beneficial to cardiovascular health in certain patients.

  4. Clinical application of cardiovascular pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Voora, Deepak; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2012-07-03

    Pharmacogenetics primarily uses genetic variation to identify subgroups of patients who may respond differently to a certain medication. Since its first description, the field of pharmacogenetics has expanded to study a broad range of cardiovascular drugs and has become a mainstream research discipline. Three principle classes of pharmacogenetic markers have emerged: 1) pharmacokinetic; 2) pharmacodynamic; and 3) underlying disease mechanism. In the realm of cardiovascular pharmacogenetics, significant advances have identified markers in each class for a variety of therapeutics, some with a potential for improving patient outcomes. While ongoing clinical trials will determine if routine use of pharmacogenetic testing may be beneficial, the data today support pharmacogenetic testing for certain variants on an individualized, case-by-case basis. Our primary goal is to review the association data for the major pharmacogenetic variants associated with commonly used cardiovascular medications: antiplatelet agents, warfarin, statins, beta-blockers, diuretics, and antiarrhythmic drugs. In addition, we highlight which variants and in which contexts pharmacogenetic testing can be implemented by practicing clinicians. The pace of genetic discovery has outstripped the generation of the evidence justifying its clinical adoption. Until the evidentiary gaps are filled, however, clinicians may choose to target therapeutics to individual patients whose genetic background indicates that they stand to benefit the most from pharmacogenetic testing.

  5. [Practicality of cardiovascular risk functions].

    PubMed

    Marrugat, Jaume; Elosua, Roberto; Icaza, Gloria; Morales-Salinas, Alberto; Dégano, Irene R

    2016-12-13

    Cardiovascular diseases prevention strategies require refinement because their incidence decreases very slowly. Risk functions were developed by including classical cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, and basic lipid profile) in cohorts followed more than 10 years. They are reasonably precise for population screening of, principally, coronary artery disease risk, required in all cardiovascular primary prevention clinical guidelines. Coronary artery disease risk functions classify patients in risk strata to concentrate the maximum therapeutic and life style effort in the highest risk groups, in which the number needed to treat and cost-effectiveness are optimal. By communicating the relative risk and vascular age to patients, increased motivation to comply with the proposed drug and life-style modifications can be achieved. Approximately 20% of the population 35 to 74 years old has an intermediate risk that requires reclassification into high or low risk because they concentrate 35% of population coronary artery disease events. Several biomarkers (biochemical, genetic or imaging) are being tested to improve coronary artery disease risk functions precision. Computerized systems of health facilities should incorporate, automated risk calculation in order to support the preventive task of health care providers.

  6. Coffee Consumption and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2015-09-01

    Coffee is the most widely consumed beverage worldwide and is only second to water drinking and is consumed by 83% of adults in the United States. The long-held controversy regarding the association of coffee consumption with an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and hypertension has been reversed by several recent prospective cohort studies and meta-analyses, which have demonstrated that coffee consumption is not associated with increased incidence of CVDs and hypertension and instead it could have a beneficial effect. To get a better understanding of the effects of coffee consumption on cardiovascular health, a Medline search of the English language literature was conducted from 2010 to early 2015 and 25 pertinent reports with information on the effects of coffee drinking, the incidence of CVDs, and hypertension and its mechanism of action were selected for inclusion in this commentary. These studies have shown either a neutral or beneficial effect of coffee on cardiovascular health. In conclusion, coffee is safe to drink by both normal subjects and by those with preexisting CVDs and hypertension.

  7. Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Janić, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Šabovič, Mišo

    2014-01-01

    The world population is aging and the number of old people is continuously increasing. Arterial structure and function change with age, progressively leading to arterial stiffening. Arterial stiffness is best characterized by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is its surrogate marker. It has been shown that PWV could improve cardiovascular event prediction in models that included standard risk factors. Consequently, it might therefore enable better identification of populations at high-risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present review is focused on a survey of different pharmacological therapeutic options for decreasing arterial stiffness. The influence of several groups of drugs is described: antihypertensive drugs (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and nitrates), statins, peroral antidiabetics, advanced glycation end-products (AGE) cross-link breakers, anti-inflammatory drugs, endothelin-A receptor antagonists, and vasopeptidase inhibitors. All of these have shown some effect in decreasing arterial stiffness. Nevertheless, further studies are needed which should address the influence of arterial stiffness diminishment on major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). PMID:25170513

  8. Detection of Cardiovascular Disease Risk's Level for Adults Using Naive Bayes Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eka; Amelga, Alowisius Y.; Maribondang, Marco M.; Salim, Mulyadi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The number of deaths caused by cardiovascular disease and stroke is predicted to reach 23.3 million in 2030. As a contribution to support prevention of this phenomenon, this paper proposes a mining model using a naïve Bayes classifier that could detect cardiovascular disease and identify its risk level for adults. Methods The process of designing the method began by identifying the knowledge related to the cardiovascular disease profile and the level of cardiovascular disease risk factors for adults based on the medical record, and designing a mining technique model using a naïve Bayes classifier. Evaluation of this research employed two methods: accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity calculation as well as an evaluation session with cardiologists and internists. The characteristics of cardiovascular disease are identified by its primary risk factors. Those factors are diabetes mellitus, the level of lipids in the blood, coronary artery function, and kidney function. Class labels were assigned according to the values of these factors: risk level 1, risk level 2 and risk level 3. Results The evaluation of the classifier performance (accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity) in this research showed that the proposed model predicted the class label of tuples correctly (above 80%). More than eighty percent of respondents (including cardiologists and internists) who participated in the evaluation session agree till strongly agreed that this research followed medical procedures and that the result can support medical analysis related to cardiovascular disease. Conclusions The research showed that the proposed model achieves good performance for risk level detection of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27525161

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide in the RVLM and PVN has No Effect on Cardiovascular Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, Eloise; Al-Magableh, Mohammad; Hart, Joanne Louise; Badoer, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as an important signaling molecule and has been shown to have vasodilator and cardio-protectant effects. More recently it has been suggested that H2S may also act within the brain to reduce blood pressure (BP). In the present study we have demonstrated the presence of the H2S-producing enzyme, cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), brain regions with key cardiovascular regulatory functions. The cardiovascular role of H2S was investigated by determining the BP, heart rate (HR), and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) responses elicited by a H2S donor sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS) or inhibitors of CBS, microinjected into the RVLM and PVN. In anesthetized Wistar Kyoto rats bilateral microinjections of NaHS (0.2–2000 pmol/side) into the RVLM did not significantly affect BP, HR, or LSNA, compared to vehicle. Similarly, when the CBS inhibitors, amino-oxyacetate (AOA; 0.1–1.0 nmol/side) or hydroxylamine (HA; 0.2–2.0 nmol/side), were administered into the RVLM, there were no significant effects on the cardiovascular variables compared to vehicle. Microinjections into the PVN of NaHS, HA, and AOA had no consistent significant effects on BP, HR, or LSNA compared to vehicle. We also investigated the cardiovascular responses to NaHS microinjected into the RVLM and PVN in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Again, there were no significant effects on BP, HR, and LSNA. Together, these results suggest that H2S in the RVLM and PVN does not have a major role in cardiovascular regulation. PMID:21941511

  10. Cardiovascular response to thermoregulatory challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuiqing; Yavar, Zubin

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of extreme climate events are occurring in the setting of ongoing climate change, with an increase in both the intensity and frequency. It has been shown that ambient temperature challenges have a direct and highly varied impact on cardiovascular health. With a rapidly growing amount of literature on this issue, we aim to review the recent publications regarding the impact of cold and heat on human populations with regard to cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality/morbidity while also examining lag effects, vulnerable subgroups, and relevant mechanisms. Although the relative risk of morbidity/mortality associated with extreme temperature varied greatly across different studies, both cold and hot temperatures were associated with a positive mean excess of cardiovascular deaths or hospital admissions. Cause-specific study of CVD morbidity/mortality indicated that the sensitivity to temperature was disease-specific, with different patterns for acute and chronic ischemic heart disease. Vulnerability to temperature-related mortality was associated with some characteristics of the populations, including sex, age, location, socioeconomic condition, and comorbidities such as cardiac diseases, kidney diseases, diabetes, and hypertension. Temperature-induced damage is thought to be related to enhanced sympathetic reactivity followed by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin system, as well as dehydration and a systemic inflammatory response. Future research should focus on multidisciplinary adaptation strategies that incorporate epidemiology, climatology, indoor/building environments, energy usage, labor legislative perfection, and human thermal comfort models. Studies on the underlying mechanism by which temperature challenge induces pathophysiological response and CVD await profound and lasting investigation. PMID:26432837

  11. Cardiovascular response to thermoregulatory challenges.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuiqing; Yavar, Zubin; Sun, Qinghua

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of extreme climate events are occurring in the setting of ongoing climate change, with an increase in both the intensity and frequency. It has been shown that ambient temperature challenges have a direct and highly varied impact on cardiovascular health. With a rapidly growing amount of literature on this issue, we aim to review the recent publications regarding the impact of cold and heat on human populations with regard to cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality/morbidity while also examining lag effects, vulnerable subgroups, and relevant mechanisms. Although the relative risk of morbidity/mortality associated with extreme temperature varied greatly across different studies, both cold and hot temperatures were associated with a positive mean excess of cardiovascular deaths or hospital admissions. Cause-specific study of CVD morbidity/mortality indicated that the sensitivity to temperature was disease-specific, with different patterns for acute and chronic ischemic heart disease. Vulnerability to temperature-related mortality was associated with some characteristics of the populations, including sex, age, location, socioeconomic condition, and comorbidities such as cardiac diseases, kidney diseases, diabetes, and hypertension. Temperature-induced damage is thought to be related to enhanced sympathetic reactivity followed by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin system, as well as dehydration and a systemic inflammatory response. Future research should focus on multidisciplinary adaptation strategies that incorporate epidemiology, climatology, indoor/building environments, energy usage, labor legislative perfection, and human thermal comfort models. Studies on the underlying mechanism by which temperature challenge induces pathophysiological response and CVD await profound and lasting investigation.

  12. Radionuclide Imaging of Cardiovascular Infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Fozia Zahir; James, Jackie; Memmott, Matthew J; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2016-02-01

    Owing to expanding clinical indications, cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are being increasingly used. Despite improved surgical techniques and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy, the rate of CIED-related infection is also increasing. Infection is a potentially serious complication, with clinical manifestations ranging from surgical site infection and local symptoms in the region of the generator pocket to fulminant endocarditis. The utility of radionuclide imaging as a stand-alone noninvasive diagnostic imaging test in patients with suspected endocarditis has been less frequently examined. This article summarizes the recent advances in radionuclide imaging for evaluation of patients with suspected cardiovascular infections.

  13. Cardiovascular responses to hypogravic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, H.

    1983-01-01

    The cardiovascular deconditioning observed during and after space flight is characterized in a review of human space and simulation studies and animal simulations. The various simulation techniques (horizontal bed rest, head-down tilt, and water immersion in man, and immobilization of animals) are examined, and sample results are presented in graphs. Countermeasures such as exercise regimens, fluid replacement, drugs, venous pooling, G-suits, oscillating beds, electrostimulation of muscles, lower-body negative pressure, body-surface cooling, and hypoxia are reviewed and found to be generally ineffective or unreliable. The need for future space experimentation in both humans and animals is indicated.

  14. [Cardiovascular risk factors in women].

    PubMed

    Cengel, Atiye

    2010-03-01

    It is estimated that at least 80% of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) have conventional risk factors and optimization of these risk factors can reduce morbidity and mortality due to this disease considerably. Contemporary women have increased burden of some of these risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and smoking. Turkish women have a worse CV risk profile than Turkish men in some aspects. Risk stratification systems such as Framingham have a tendency of underestimating the risk in women. Coronary artery disease remains in vessel wall for a longer period of time in women; therefore obstructive disease appear later in their lifespan necessitating risk stratification systems for estimating their lifetime risk.

  15. Cardiovascular manifestations of autonomic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2006-02-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic manifestations of seizures occur frequently in the epileptic population. Common manifestations include alterations in heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure, ECG changes and chest pain. The neuroanatomical and neurophysiological underpinnings of these autonomic manifestations are not been fully elucidated. Diagnostic confusion may arise when ictal symptoms are confined to the autonomic nervous system; conversely, such symptoms in association with convulsions or altered consciousness are more readily recognized as concomitant ictal features. Awareness of the diverse autonomic manifestations of epilepsy will enhance diagnosis and lead to more effective therapy of these patients.

  16. Therapeutic angiogenesis in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Al Sabti, Hilal

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerotic disease of the arteries is a major cause of coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease and stroke. Some patients are however not candidate for the standard treatment of angioplasty or bypass surgery. Hence there is tremendous enthusiasm for the utilization of angiogenesis as a therapeutic modality for atherosclerotic arterial disease. This augmentation of physiological neo-vascularization in cardiovascular disease can be achieved through different pathways. In this article we are reviewing the Use of Gene therapy, Protein therapy and cellular therapy. PMID:18021404

  17. Estrogen actions in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, M E

    2009-01-01

    This brief review summarizes the current state of the field for estrogen receptor actions in the cardiovascular system and the cardiovascular effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). It is organized into three parts: a short Introduction and overview of the current view of how estrogen works on blood vessels; a summary of the current status of clinical information regarding HRT and cardiovascular effects; and an update on state-of-the-art mouse models of estrogen action using estrogen receptor knockout mice.

  18. Periodontal management of patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    2002-08-01

    Periodontists are often called upon to provide periodontal therapy for patients with a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Safe and effective periodontal treatment requires a general understanding of the underlying cardiovascular diseases, their medical management, and necessary modifications to dental/periodontal therapy that may be required. In this informational paper more common cardiovascular disorders will be discussed and dental management considerations briefly described. This paper is intended for the use of periodontists and members of the dental profession.

  19. Vitamin D and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, L A; Witham, M D

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin D, a secosteroid hormone, affects multiple biological pathways via both genomic and nongenomic signalling. Several pathways have potential benefit to cardiovascular health, including effects on parathyroid hormone, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, vascular endothelial growth factor and cytokine production, as well as direct effects on endothelial cell function and myocyte calcium influx. Observational data supports a link between low vitamin D metabolite levels and cardiovascular health. Cross-sectional data shows associations between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and stroke, myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart failure. Longitudinal data also suggests a relationship with incident hypertension and new cardiovascular events. However, these associations are potentially confounded by reverse causality and by the effects that other cardiovascular risk factors have on vitamin D metabolite levels. Intervention studies to date suggest a modest antihypertensive effect of vitamin D, no effect on serum lipids, a small positive effect on insulin resistance and fasting glucose, and equivocal actions on arterial stiffness and endothelial function. Analysis of cardiovascular event data collected from osteoporosis trials does not currently show a clear signal for reduced cardiovascular events with vitamin D supplementation, but results may be confounded by the coadministration of calcium, and by the secondary nature of the analyses. Despite mechanistic and observational data that suggest a protective role for vitamin D in cardiovascular disease, intervention studies to date are less promising. Large trials using cardiovascular events as a primary outcome are needed before vitamin D can be recommended as a therapy for cardiovascular disease.

  20. Proceedings of a conference on Cardiovascular Bioinstrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Fuller, Charles A.; Mains, Richard; Finger, Herbert J.

    1988-01-01

    The Ames Research Center (ARC) has a long history in the development of cardiovascular (CV) instrumentation for human and animal research. The ARC Cardiovascular Research Lab under the Space Physiology Branch, Space Research Directorate, supports both ground-based and space-based animal and human research goals. The Cardiovascular Research Laboratory was established at ARC in the mid 1960's to conduct ground-based animal research and support development of advanced cardiovascular instrumentation applicable to spaceflight. The ARC Biomedical Research Program also conducts human studies with a CV instrumentation focus.

  1. Cardiovascular Adaptations to Exercise Training.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Ylva; Nyberg, Michael

    2015-12-15

    Aerobic exercise training leads to cardiovascular changes that markedly increase aerobic power and lead to improved endurance performance. The functionally most important adaptation is the improvement in maximal cardiac output which is the result of an enlargement in cardiac dimension, improved contractility, and an increase in blood volume, allowing for greater filling of the ventricles and a consequent larger stroke volume. In parallel with the greater maximal cardiac output, the perfusion capacity of the muscle is increased, permitting for greater oxygen delivery. To accommodate the higher aerobic demands and perfusion levels, arteries, arterioles, and capillaries adapt in structure and number. The diameters of the larger conduit and resistance arteries are increased minimizing resistance to flow as the cardiac output is distributed in the body and the wall thickness of the conduit and resistance arteries is reduced, a factor contributing to increased arterial compliance. Endurance training may also induce alterations in the vasodilator capacity, although such adaptations are more pronounced in individuals with reduced vascular function. The microvascular net increases in size within the muscle allowing for an improved capacity for oxygen extraction by the muscle through a greater area for diffusion, a shorter diffusion distance, and a longer mean transit time for the erythrocyte to pass through the smallest blood vessels. The present article addresses the effect of endurance training on systemic and peripheral cardiovascular adaptations with a focus on humans, but also covers animal data.

  2. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  3. Fabry disease and cardiovascular involvement.

    PubMed

    Anastasakis, Aris; Papatheodorou, Efstathios; Steriotis, Alexandros Klavdios

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD, OMIM 301500) is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder of the glycosphigolipid metabolism caused by total or partial deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (α-gal A). Progressive intralysosomal accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids in a variety of cell types triggers a cascade of pathophysiological events including cellular death, compromised energy metabolism, small vessel injury, K(Ca)3.1 channel dysfunction in endothelial cells, oxidative stress, impaired autophagosome maturation, tissue ischemia and, importantly, development of irreversible cardiac and renal tissue fibrosis, leading to major multisystemic manifestations. Cardiovascular complications of the disease are very frequent and contribute substantially to disease-related morbidity and mortality in men. Cardiovascular involvement is the leading cause of premature death in heterozygous female patients with FD. Left ventricular hypertrophy is the most prominent cardiac manifestation followed by conduction system disease, valve dysfunction, arrhythmias, vessel disease and coronary microvascular dysfunction. The diagnosis of subclinical forms of the disease, before the development of cardiac hypertrophy, using newer techniques (tissue doppler imaging, strain rate and cardiac magnetic resonance) is crucial to the early initation of the treatment. Greatest benefit of the enzyme replacement treatment is achieved when started at an early stage of the disease before extensive fibrosis or other irreversible tissue damage takes place. Fabry disease should be included in the differential diagnosis algorithm of idiopathic hypertrophy. Determination of Alpha-Gal A activity on plasma and peripheral leukocytes in males and genetic testing in females are the diagnostic gold-standards.

  4. Marijuana Use and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Franz, Christopher A; Frishman, William H

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana is currently the most used illicit substance in the world. With the current trend of decriminalization and legalization of marijuana in the US, physicians in the US will encounter more patients using marijuana recreationally over a diverse range of ages and health states. Therefore, it is relevant to review marijuana's effects on human cardiovascular physiology and disease. Compared with placebo, marijuana cigarettes cause increases in heart rate, supine systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and forearm blood flow via increased sympathetic nervous system activity. These actions increase myocardial oxygen demand to a degree that they can decrease the time to exercise-induced angina in patients with a history of stable angina. In addition, marijuana has been associated with triggering myocardial infarctions (MIs) in young male patients. Smoking marijuana has been shown to increase the risk of MI onset by a factor of 4.8 for the 60 minutes after marijuana consumption, and to increase the annual risk of MI in the daily cannabis user from 1.5% to 3% per year. Human and animal models suggest that this effect may be due to coronary arterial vasospasm. However, longitudinal studies have indicated that marijuana use may not have a significant effect on long-term mortality. While further research is required to definitively determine the impact of marijuana on cardiovascular disease, it is reasonable to recommend against recreational marijuana use, especially in individuals with a history of coronary artery disorders.

  5. Personalized medicine in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moo-Sik; Flammer, Andreas J; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2012-09-01

    Personalized medicine is a novel medical model with all decisions and practices being tailored to individual patients in whatever ways possible. In the era of genomics, personalized medicine combines the genetic information for additional benefit in preventive and therapeutic strategies. Personalized medicine may allow the physician to provide a better therapy for patients in terms of efficiency, safety and treatment length to reduce the associated costs. There was a remarkable growth in scientific publication on personalized medicine within the past few years in the cardiovascular field. However, so far, only very few cardiologists in the USA are incorporating personalized medicine into clinical treatment. We review the concepts, strengths, limitations and challenges of personalized medicine with a particular focus on cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). There are many challenges from both scientific and policy perspectives to personalized medicine, which can overcome them by comprehensive concept and understanding, clinical application, and evidence based practices. Individualized medicine serves a pivotal role in the evolution of national and global healthcare reform, especially, in the CVDs fields. Ultimately, personalized medicine will affect the entire landscape of health care system in the near future.

  6. [Alcohol and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Frenzel, H; Roth, H; Schwartzkopff, B

    1988-10-01

    Because of the high frequency of cardiovascular diseases and a steadily increasing consumption of alcohol the potentially causal relationship between alcohol and cardiovascular diseases gains great interest for public health policy. Alcohol and its metabolites induce a toxic damage of myocardial metabolism with an injury of electromechanic coupling. As a consequence of acute alcoholic intake cardiac arrhythmias and a reduced contractility of the myocardium are found not only for chronic alcoholics but also in healthy non-drinkers. Chronic abuse of alcoholic beverages for many years can be the cause of alcoholic cardiomyopathy in a small percentage of patients, who have a bad prognosis. Atria and ventricles are dilated, light and electron microscopic changes of the myocardium are unspecific. The pathogenesis of alcoholic cardiomyopathy is unknown, modulations of cardiomyocytic membranes are discussed in the course of a toxic damage. In the genesis of atherosclerosis alcohol can approach from different sites: Changings on thrombocytes and an increase of HDL-cholesterin can be protective, however an increase in blood pressure support the process of atherosclerosis. In numerous investigations a smaller degree of atherosclerosis was found for little or moderate alcohol intake, while in chronic heavy abuse of alcohol a higher extent of atherosclerosis was observed. As the amount of alcohol, assumed to be protective against the development of atherosclerosis, is consumed already by the majority of the population, there is no reason to propagate a regulate consume of moderate amount of alcoholic beverages.

  7. Cardiovascular studies in the mucopolysaccharidoses.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, J; Shields, M D; Mulholland, H C

    1990-01-01

    Cardiovascular studies were performed on 22 patients with mucopolysaccharidosis ascertained from an epidemiological study on the mucopolysaccharidoses in Northern Ireland. None of the patients had attended a cardiologist before the study. The main echocardiographical findings were thickening of the interventricular septum and left ventricular posterior wall in the absence of ECG evidence of ventricular hypertrophy. Moreover, reduced QRS voltages were present in the majority of the patients (77%) and some had reduced shortening fraction (33%). These findings suggest an infiltrative cardiomyopathy owing to mucopolysaccharide deposition as a cause of the cardiac thickening rather than true ventricular hypertrophy. Thickening of the mitral valve was present in one case and thickening of the aortic valve in two cases. Involvement of the other heart valves was minimal and aortic valve disease was not found in any of the cases of Morquio's disease type A. In conclusion, the clinical, ECG, and chest x ray findings and echocardiographical evidence for valvular involvement were significantly less than in other studies. Hence, the incidence of clinically significant cardiovascular disease in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis has probably been overestimated. PMID:2108248

  8. Exercise and the Cardiovascular System: Clinical Science and Cardiovascular Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, Carl J.; Arena, Ross; Swift, Damon L.; Johannsen, Neil M.; Sui, Xuemei; Lee, Duck-chul; Earnest, Conrad P.; Church, Timothy S.; O’Keefe, James H.; Milani, Richard V.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence has established the value of high levels of physical activity (PA), exercise training (ET), and overall cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This paper reviews some basics of exercise physiology and the acute and chronic responses of ET, as well as the impact of PA and CRF on CVD. This review also surveys data from epidemiologic and ET studies in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD, particularly coronary heart disease (CHD) and heart failure (HF). These data strongly support the routine prescription of ET to all patients and referrals for patients with CVD, especially CHD and HF, to specific cardiac rehabilitation and ET programs. PMID:26139859

  9. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Mild and Advanced Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Lee, Si-Hoon; Oh, Yoon-Sang; Park, Jeong-Wook; An, Jae-Young; Park, Sung-Kyung; Han, Si-Ryung; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to investigate cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) with mild to severe stages of motor symptoms and to compare cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction between drug-naïve and dopaminergic drug-treated groups. Methods This study included 188 PD patients and 25 age-matched healthy controls who underwent head-up tilt-testing, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and 24-h Holter monitoring. Autonomic function test results were evaluated among groups categorized by motor symptom severities (mild vs. moderate vs. severe) and treatment (drug-naïve or dopaminergic drug treatment). Results Orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension were more frequent in patients with PD than in healthy controls. The frequencies of orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping were not different among groups. Additionally, no significant differences were detected in supine BP, orthostatic BP change, nighttime BP, nocturnal BP dipping, or heart rate variabilities among groups. Conclusions Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is not confined to moderate to severe PD patients, and starts early in the course of the disease in a high proportion of PD patients. In addition, dopaminergic drug treatments do not affect cardiovascular autonomic function. PMID:27020456

  10. Cardiovascular and other effects of salt consumption

    PubMed Central

    Cappuccio, Francesco P

    2013-01-01

    Salt is one of the most important determinants of high blood pressure and increased cardiovascular risk worldwide. However, a high salt intake has other adverse effects beyond those involving the cardiovascular system, so that there is renewed interest in the relationships between high salt intake and other diseases. PMID:25019010

  11. Non-cardiovascular effects associated with statins

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Seth S; Blumenthal, Roger S

    2014-01-01

    Statins form the pharmacologic cornerstone of the primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. In addition to beneficial cardiovascular effects, statins seem to have multiple non-cardiovascular effects. Although early concerns about statin induced hepatotoxicity and cancer have subsided owing to reassuring evidence, two of the most common concerns that clinicians have are myopathy and diabetes. Randomized controlled trials suggest that statins are associated with a modest increase in the risk of myositis but not the risk of myalgia. Severe myopathy (rhabdomyolysis) is rare and often linked to a statin regimen that is no longer recommended (simvastatin 80 mg). Randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses suggest an increase in the risk of diabetes with statins, particularly with higher intensity regimens in people with two or more components of the metabolic syndrome. Other non-cardiovascular effects covered in this review are contrast induced nephropathy, cognition, cataracts, erectile dysfunction, and venous thromboembolism. Currently, systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines indicate that the cardiovascular benefits of statins generally outweigh non-cardiovascular harms in patients above a certain threshold of cardiovascular risk. Literature is also accumulating on the potential non-cardiovascular benefits of statins, which could lead to novel applications of this class of drug in the future. PMID:25035309

  12. Smart strategic planning for cardiovascular services.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Karen

    2005-12-01

    Strategic planning for cardiovascular services should include formation of a cardiovascular advisory committee composed of key stakeholders. The strategic plan should include an internal assessment, external market analysis, review of operations, development of strategies and initiatives, and a financial analysis. The organization's mission and vision, as well as its financial situation, need to be considered in formulating strategies.

  13. Asian & Pacific Islanders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Cardiovascular Diseases Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) (ICD 10 codes I00-I99, Q20-Q28) (ICD 9 codes 390-459, 745-747) & Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) (ICD 10 codes I20-I25) (ICD 9 codes 410-414, 429. ...

  14. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  15. Hepatitis C virus and cardiovascular: A review.

    PubMed

    Petta, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a systemic disease that leads to increased risks of cirrhosis and its complications, as well as extrahepatic disturbances, including immune-related disorders and metabolic alterations such as insulin resistance and steatosis. Recent accumulating evidence suggests that HCV infection can increase cardiovascular risk, and that viral eradication can improve cardiovascular outcomes in the clinical setting. These data are strengthened by evidence identifying potential mechanisms (in)directly linking HCV infection to vascular damage. However, the high prevalence of both HCV infection and cardiovascular alterations, as well as the presence of contrasting results not identifying any association between HCV infection and cardiovascular dysfunction, provides uncertainty about a direct association of HCV infection with cardiovascular risk. Further studies are needed to clarify definitively the role of HCV infection in cardiovascular alterations, as well as the impact of viral eradication on cardiovascular outcomes. These features are now more attractive, considering the availability of new, safe, and very effective interferon-free antiviral agents for the treatment of HCV infection. This review aims to discuss carefully available data on the relationship between HCV infection and cardiovascular risk.

  16. Unmet Needs for Cardiovascular Care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Maharani, Asri; Tampubolon, Gindo

    2014-01-01

    Background In the past twenty years the heaviest burden of cardiovascular diseases has begun to shift from developed to developing countries. However, little is known about the real needs for cardiovascular care in these countries and how well those needs are being met. This study aims to investigate the prevalence and determinants of unmet needs for cardiovascular care based on objective assessment. Methods and Findings Multilevel analysis is used to analyse the determinants of met needs and multilevel multiple imputation is applied to manage missing data. The 2008 Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS4) survey is the source of the household data used in this study, while district data is sourced from the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Finance. The data shows that nearly 70% of respondents with moderate to high cardiovascular risk failed to receive cardiovascular care. Higher income, possession of health insurance and residence in urban areas are significantly associated with met needs for cardiovascular care, while health facility density and physician density show no association with them. Conclusions The prevalence of unmet needs for cardiovascular care is considerable in Indonesia. Inequality persists as a factor in meeting needs for cardiovascular care as the needs of people with higher incomes and those living in urban areas are more likely to be met. Alleviation of poverty, provision of health care insurance for the poor, and improvement in the quality of healthcare providers are recommended in order to meet this ever-increasing need. PMID:25148389

  17. Optimizing cardiovascular outcomes in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Burton E

    2007-09-01

    This article presents a series of take-home statements, compiled by a multidisciplinary steering committee, concerning significant aspects of macrovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus, including the extent of risk, pathogenetic mechanisms, and optimal management for risk reduction. The discussion focuses in particular on the impact of diabetes medications beyond blood glucose control. In summary, these statements are as follows: (1) Patients with diabetes have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease that contributes to decreased life expectancy; (2) prognosis after a cardiovascular event is poorer in patients with diabetes; (3) pathogenetic mechanisms include insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, chronic inflammation, procoagulability, and impaired fibrinolysis; (4) management of established cardiovascular risk factors, for example with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) and antihypertensive therapy, reduces cardiovascular event rates in diabetes; (5) correction of hyperglycemia can reduce macrovascular event rates, but the coupling to hyperglycemia is less tight for macrovascular events than it is for reduction of microvascular complications; (6) patients with diabetes should be screened for additional cardiovascular risk factors and appropriate interventions should be initiated; (7) results of observational and interventional studies have indicated that some insulin sensitizers appear to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events and improve survival; (8) thiazolidinediones have beneficial effects on metabolism that may improve cardiovascular risk, and a randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced atherosclerosis indicates that addition of pioglitazone to therapy for hyperglycemia may reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke.

  18. Dioxins and Cardiovascular Mortality: A Review (EHP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In spite of its large public health burden, the risk factors for cardiovascular disease remain incompletely understood. Here we review the association of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality with exposure to dioxin, a pollutant resulting from the production and combustion of ch...

  19. Cardiovascular effects of microgravity: evolution of understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, H. D.

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of cardiovascular effects of spaceflight has evolved throughout the course of the American manned spaceflight program. Originally descriptive in nature, the present understanding is based on empiric measurements of vascular volume, cardiac output, vascular reflexes, and peripheral and central autonomic control. More detailed understanding of cardiovascular effects has allowed us to separate those symptoms from symptoms caused by musculoskeletal or neurovestibular abnormalities.

  20. Erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ophuis, A.J.M. Oude; Nijeholt, A.A.B. Lycklama à

    2006-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a highly prevalent disease, especially in cardiovascular-compromised men. Many of the well-established risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also risk factors for erectile dysfunction. A correlation between erectile dysfunction and endothelial dysfunction is well established. It is postulated that erectile dysfunction with an arteriovascular aetiology can predate and be an indicator of potential coronary artery disease. In this paper we will attempt to increase awareness among cardiologists for the predictive value of erectile dysfunction for future cardiovascular disease in order to optimise cardiovascular risk management. The treatment of erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular interactions is also discussed in detail. ImagesFigure 1AFigure 1B PMID:25696612

  1. Racism and cardiovascular disease: implications for nursing.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jennifer; McGibbon, Elizabeth; Waldron, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The social determinants of health (SDH) are recognized as a prominent influence on health outcomes across the lifespan. Racism is identified as a key SDH. In this article, the authors describe the concept of racism as an SDH, its impact in discriminatory actions and inactions, and the implications for cardiovascular nurses. Although research in Canada on the links among racism, stress, and cardiovascular disease is limited, there is growing evidence about the stress of racism and its long-term impact on cardiovascular health. The authors discuss how cardiovascular nursing could be enhanced through an understanding of racism-related stress, and race-based differences in cardiovascular care. The authors conclude with strategies for action to address this nursing concern.

  2. Global health and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Bruno R; Brant, Luisa C C; Moraes, Diego N; Ribeiro, Antonio L P

    2014-11-01

    The modern definition of Global Health has expanded its scope beyond neglected diseases and low-income and underdeveloped countries. The current initiatives focus on improvement of health, reduction of disparities and protection against global threats, seeking for interaction with health practices, policies and systems. There has been a growing interest on Global Health research, given the epidemiological transition currently underway in low and mid-income countries and the increasing epidemiological importance of cardiovascular and other non-communicable diseases, to the detriment of infectious diseases and nutritional deficiencies. Various aspects-formerly neglected-of these diseases, such as epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and therapy, have been addressed in Global Health publications, leading to a better understanding of the importance of health as a public good, beyond borders. Scientific evidence supports broader initiatives in which governments, foundations and the civil society must share responsibilities and funding to achieve health equity, the main goal of Global Health.

  3. [Physical activity and cardiovascular health].

    PubMed

    Temporelli, Pier Luigi

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that regular moderate physical activity, in the context of a healthy lifestyle, significantly reduces the likelihood of cardiovascular events, both in primary and secondary prevention. In addition, it is scientifically proven that exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes, osteoporosis, depression, breast cancer and colon cancer. Despite this strong evidence, sedentary lifestyle remains a widespread habit in the western world. Even in Italy the adult population has a poor attitude to regular physical activity. It is therefore necessary, as continuously recommended by the World Health Organization, to motivate people to "move" since the transition from inactivity to regular light to moderate physical activity has a huge impact on health, resulting in significant savings of resources. We do not need to be athletes to exercise - it should be part of all our daily routines.

  4. Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increased in winter and in cold regions of the world. Cold temperatures make hypertension worse and trigger cardiovascular complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, etc.). Chronic or intermittent exposure to cold causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in animals. The purpose of this review is to provide the recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Cold temperatures increase the activities of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The SNS initiates CIH via the RAS. Cold exposure suppresses the expression of eNOS and formation of NO, increases the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), up-regulates ETA receptors, but down-regulates ETB receptors. The roles of these factors and their relations in CIH will be reviewed.

  5. Polyphenols, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tangney, Christy; Rasmussen, Heather E.

    2013-01-01

    Polyphenols are compounds found in foods such as tea, coffee, cocoa, olive oil, and red wine and have been studied to determine if their intake may modify cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Historically, biologic actions of polyphenols have been attributed to antioxidant activities, but recent evidence suggests that immunomodulatory and vasodilatory properties of polyphenols may also contribute to CVD risk reduction. These properties will be discussed, and recent epidemiological evidence and intervention trials will be reviewed. Further identification of polyphenols in foods and accurate assessment of exposures through measurement of biomarkers (i.e., polyphenol metabolites) could provide the needed impetus to examine the impact of polyphenol-rich foods on CVD intermediate outcomes (especially those signifying chronic inflammation) and hard endpoints among high risk patients. Although we have mechanistic insight into how polyphenols may function in CVD risk reduction, further research is needed before definitive recommendations for consumption can be made. PMID:23512608

  6. Cardiovascular therapy of neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Armin

    2007-12-01

    The causes of postoperative cardiovascular disturbances in neurosurgical patients include direct cardiac neurogenic effects, clinical situations where brain tissue is underperfused, and hyperdynamic states. EKG and echographic abnormalities are common in subarachnoid hemorrhage where cardiac troponin I is the most useful predictor of cardiac risk after SAH. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is short lived and often resolves with resolution of the neurologic problem. In traumatic brain injury, where areas of ischemia co-exist with luxury perfusion, advanced hemodynamic monitoring and prevention of jugular venous desaturation best avoid secondary brain injury and achieve optimal neurologic outcome. Induced hypertension improves blood flow through vessels compromised by cerebral stenting, angioplasty, microcatheters, thrombolysis, carotid clamping, intracranial bypass and cerebral vasospasm. Hyperdynamic lesions include vascular breakthrough after elimination of cerebral arteriovenous malformations, but also emergence hypertension and hyperemia. Pharmacologic agents and adjunctive measures are effective in controlling both the systemic and the cerebral circulation.

  7. Nanomedical Theranostics in Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E; Read, Joanna C; Mieszawska, Aneta J; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. New diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are needed to mitigate this public health issue. Advances in nanotechnology have generated innovative strategies for diagnosis and therapy in a variety of diseases, foremost in cancer. Based on these studies, a novel concept referred to as nanomedical theranostics, or the combinatory application of nanoparticulate agents to allow diagnostic therapy, is being explored to enable image-guided, personalized, or targeted treatment. Preclinically, theranostics have been gradually applied to CVD with several interesting and encouraging findings. This article summarizes studies and challenges of nanotheranostic strategies in CVD. It also evaluates nanotheranostic strategies that may potentially be utilized to benefit patients.

  8. The rise of cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2012-04-01

    Modern cardiology was born at the turn of the nineteenth to twentieth centuries with three great discoveries: the X ray, the sphygmomanometer, and the electrocardiograph. This was followed by cardiac catheterization, which led to coronary angiography and to percutaneous coronary intervention. The coronary care units and early reperfusion reduced the early mortality owing to acute myocardial infarction, and the discovery of coronary risk factors led to the development of Preventive Cardiology. Other major advances include several cardiac imaging techniques, the birth and development of cardiac surgery, and the control of cardiac arrhythmias. The treatment of heart failure, although greatly improved, remains a challenge. Current cardiology practice is evidence-based and global in scope. Research and practice are increasingly conducted in cardiovascular centres and institutes. It is likely that in the future, a greater emphasis will be placed on prevention, which will be enhanced by genetic information.

  9. Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increased in winter and in cold regions of the world. Cold temperatures make hypertension worse and trigger cardiovascular complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, etc.). Chronic or intermittent exposure to cold causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in animals. The purpose of this review is to provide the recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Cold temperatures increase the activities of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The SNS initiates CIH via the RAS. Cold exposure suppresses the expression of eNOS and formation of NO, increases the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), up-regulates ETA receptors, but down-regulates ETB receptors. The roles of these factors and their relations in CIH will be reviewed. PMID:20036896

  10. Understanding changes in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Chummun, Harry

    Cardiovascular pathophysiological changes, such as hypertension and enlarged ventricles, reflect the altered functions of the heart and its circulation during ill-health. This article examines the normal and altered anatomy of the cardiac valves, the contractile elements and enzymes of the myocardium, the significance of the different factors associated with cardiac output, and the role of the autonomic nervous system in the heart beat. It also explores how certain diseases alter these functions and result in cardiac symptoms. Nurses can benefit from knowledge of these specific changes, for example, by being able to ask relevant questions in order to ascertain the nature of a patients condition, by being able to take an effective patient history and by being able to read diagnostic results, such as electrocardiograms and cardiac enzyme results. All this will help nurses to promote sound cardiac care based on a physiological rationale.

  11. Drinking water and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Sauvant, M P; Pepin, D

    2002-10-01

    A link between cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and the hardness of drinking water (DW) is suggested by about 30 epidemiological studies performed worldwide in the general population since 1957. This review examines the main ecological studies, case-control studies and cohort studies, published between 1960 and 2000. Attention is paid to the problem of interpretation of this typical result of environmental epidemiology. Some studies focused on the role played by inorganic elements known as DW contaminants (mainly, As, Pb) and above all on the role of the magnesium content of DW and its cardioprotective effects. To date, it would be impossible to understand this environmental findings without large intervention studies performed in well-controlled public health programs.

  12. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  13. Cardiovascular Adjustments to Gravitational Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. Gunnar; Stone, H. Lowell

    1991-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the cardiovascular system must be taken into account whenever a hemodynamic assessment is made. All intravascular pressure have a gravity-dependent hydrostatic component. The interaction between the gravitational field, the position of the body, and the functional characteristics of the blood vessels determines the distribution of intravascular volume. In turn this distribution largely determines cardiac pump function. Multiple control mechanisms are activated to preserve optimal tissue perfusion when the magnitude of the gravitational field or its direction relative to the body changes. Humans are particularly sensitive to such changes because of the combination of their normally erect posture and the large body mass and blood volume below the level of the heart. Current aerospace technology also exposes human subjects to extreme variations in the gravitational forces that range from zero during space travel to as much an nine-times normal during operation of high-performance military aircraft. This chapter therefore emphasizes human physiology.

  14. Egg Phospholipids and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Blesso, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Eggs are a major source of phospholipids (PL) in the Western diet. Dietary PL have emerged as a potential source of bioactive lipids that may have widespread effects on pathways related to inflammation, cholesterol metabolism, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function. Based on pre-clinical studies, egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin appear to regulate cholesterol absorption and inflammation. In clinical studies, egg PL intake is associated with beneficial changes in biomarkers related to HDL reverse cholesterol transport. Recently, egg PC was shown to be a substrate for the generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a gut microbe-dependent metabolite associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. More research is warranted to examine potential serum TMAO responses with chronic egg ingestion and in different populations, such as diabetics. In this review, the recent basic science, clinical, and epidemiological findings examining egg PL intake and risk of CVD are summarized. PMID:25871489

  15. Physiological Changes to the Cardiovascular System at High Altitude and Its Effects on Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Riley, Callum James; Gavin, Matthew

    2017-03-15

    Riley, Callum James, and Matthew Gavin. Physiological changes to the cardiovascular system at high altitude and its effects on cardiovascular disease. High Alt Med Biol. 00:000-000, 2017.-The physiological changes to the cardiovascular system in response to the high altitude environment are well understood. More recently, we have begun to understand how these changes may affect and cause detriment to cardiovascular disease. In addition to this, the increasing availability of altitude simulation has dramatically improved our understanding of the physiology of high altitude. This has allowed further study on the effect of altitude in those with cardiovascular disease in a safe and controlled environment as well as in healthy individuals. Using a thorough PubMed search, this review aims to integrate recent advances in cardiovascular physiology at altitude with previous understanding, as well as its potential implications on cardiovascular disease. Altogether, it was found that the changes at altitude to cardiovascular physiology are profound enough to have a noteworthy effect on many forms of cardiovascular disease. While often asymptomatic, there is some risk in high altitude exposure for individuals with certain cardiovascular diseases. Although controlled research in patients with cardiovascular disease was largely lacking, meaning firm conclusions cannot be drawn, these risks should be a consideration to both the individual and their physician.

  16. [Cardiovascular alterations associated with doping].

    PubMed

    Thieme, D; Büttner, A

    2015-05-01

    Doping -the abuse of anabolic-androgenic steroids in particular- is widespread in amateur and recreational sports and does not solely represent a problem of professional sports. Excessive overdose of anabolic steroids is well documented in bodybuilding or powerlifting leading to significant side effects. Cardiovascular damages are most relevant next to adverse endocrine effects.Clinical cases as well as forensic investigations of fatalities or steroid consumption in connection with trafficking of doping agents provide only anecdotal evidence of correlations between side effects and substance abuse. Analytical verification and self-declarations of steroid users have repeatedly confirmed the presumption of weekly dosages between 300 and 2000 mg, extra to the fact that co-administration of therapeutics to treat side-effects represent a routine procedure. Beside the most frequent use of medications used to treat erectile dysfunction or estrogenic side-effects, a substantial number of antihypertensive drugs of various classes, i.e. beta-blockers, diuretics, angiotensin II receptor antagonists, calcium channel blockers, as well as ACE inhibitors were recently confiscated in relevant doping cases. The presumptive correlation between misuse of anabolic steroids and self-treatment of cardiovascular side effects was explicitly confirmed by detailed user statements.Two representative fatalities of bodybuilders were introduced to outline characteristic, often lethal side effects of excessive steroid abuse. Moreover, illustrative autopsy findings of steroid acne, thrombotic occlusion of Ramus interventricularis anterior and signs of cardiac infarctions are presented.A potential steroid abuse should be carefully considered in cases of medical consultations of patients exhibiting apparent constitutional modifications and corresponding adverse effects. Moreover, common self-medications -as frequently applied by steroid consumers- should be taken into therapeutic considerations.

  17. Rodent Studies of Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoukas, Artin A.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in blood pressure can occur for two reasons: 1) A decrease in cardiac output resulting from the altered contractility of the heart or through changes in venous filling pressure via the Frank Starling mechanism or; 2) A change in systemic vascular resistance. The observed changes in cardiac output and blood pressure after long term space flight cannot be entirely explained through changes in contractility or heart rate alone. Therefore, alterations in filling pressure mediated through changes in systemic venous capacitance and arterial resistance function may be important determinants of cardiac output and blood pressure after long term space flight. Our laboratory and previous studies have shown the importance of veno-constriction mediated by the carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex system on overall circulatory homeostasis and in the regulation of cardiac output. Our proposed experiments test the overall hypothesis that alterations in venous capacitance function and arterial resistance by the carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex system are an important determinant of the cardiac output and blood pressure response seen in astronauts after returning to earth from long term exposure to microgravity. This hypothesis is important to our overall understanding of circulatory adjustments made during long term space flight. It also provides a framework for investigating counter measures to reduce the incidence of orthostatic hypotension caused by an attenuation of cardiac output. We continue to use hind limb unweighted (HLU) rat model to simulate the patho physiological effects as they relate to cardiovascular deconditioning in microgravity. We have used this model to address the hypothesis that microgravity induced cardiovascular deconditioning results in impaired vascular responses and that these impaired vascular responses result from abnormal alpha-1 AR signaling. The impaired vascular reactivity results in attenuated blood pressure and cardiac output responses to an

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of cardiovascular ageing

    PubMed Central

    Shiogai, Y.; Stefanovska, A.; McClintock, P.V.E.

    2010-01-01

    The application of methods drawn from nonlinear and stochastic dynamics to the analysis of cardiovascular time series is reviewed, with particular reference to the identification of changes associated with ageing. The natural variability of the heart rate (HRV) is considered in detail, including the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) corresponding to modulation of the instantaneous cardiac frequency by the rhythm of respiration. HRV has been intensively studied using traditional spectral analyses, e.g. by Fourier transform or autoregressive methods, and, because of its complexity, has been used as a paradigm for testing several proposed new methods of complexity analysis. These methods are reviewed. The application of time–frequency methods to HRV is considered, including in particular the wavelet transform which can resolve the time-dependent spectral content of HRV. Attention is focused on the cardio-respiratory interaction by introduction of the respiratory frequency variability signal (RFV), which can be acquired simultaneously with HRV by use of a respiratory effort transducer. Current methods for the analysis of interacting oscillators are reviewed and applied to cardio-respiratory data, including those for the quantification of synchronization and direction of coupling. These reveal the effect of ageing on the cardio-respiratory interaction through changes in the mutual modulation of the instantaneous cardiac and respiratory frequencies. Analyses of blood flow signals recorded with laser Doppler flowmetry are reviewed and related to the current understanding of how endothelial-dependent oscillations evolve with age: the inner lining of the vessels (the endothelium) is shown to be of crucial importance to the emerging picture. It is concluded that analyses of the complex and nonlinear dynamics of the cardiovascular system can illuminate the mechanisms of blood circulation, and that the heart, the lungs and the vascular system function as a single entity in

  19. [HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL EXERCISE THERAPY TO REDUCE CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN PEOPLE WITH THE METABOLIC SYNDROME; SYSTEMATIC REVIEW WITH META-ANALYSIS].

    PubMed

    Aguilera Eguía, Raúl; Vergara Miranda, Camila; Quezada Donoso, Romina; Sepúlveda Silva, Mabel; Coccio, Nicol; Cortés, Patricio; Delarze, Carlos; Flores, Cherie

    2015-12-01

    El síndrome metabólico es una agrupación de factores de riesgo cardiovascular que incluyen obesidad central, presión sanguínea elevada, resistencia a la insulina y dislipidemias. Objetivo: determinar el efecto del ejercicio intervalado de alta intensidad sobre los factores de riesgo cardiovascular en personas con síndrome metabólico. Materiales y métodos: se buscó en la base de datos WOS, Medline, Lilacs, PEDro y en los metabuscadores Epistemonikos y Trip Database. Se realizó una búsqueda manual, se hizo seguimiento de referencias relevantes, se buscaron protocolos de ECAs y se contactó con expertos en esta área. Resultados: la búsqueda preliminar arrojó un total de 239 artículos potencialmente elegibles; según los criterios de elegibilidad solo incluimos tres revisiones sistemáticas. Conclusión: no hay grandes diferencias en relación al índice de masa corporal, circunferencia de cintura, glucosa en ayunas, lipoproteínas de alta densidad y triglicéridos. En relación a la presión arterial, fue superior el ejercicio continuo de moderada intensidad. Al comparar el ejercicio intervalado de alta intensidad versus control, el primero resultó ser superior en todos los resultados analizados.

  20. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Drug-Induced Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Dong-Woo; Oh, Ju-Hee; Lee, Yang-Hyun; Park, Sung-Jin; Jeon, Kipyung; Lee, Jong-Yun; Ho, Seong Hee; So, Jungmin; Im, Jin Hee; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recent studies have shown that several nonmotor symptoms differ between Parkinson's disease (PD) and drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP). However, there have been no reports on cardiovascular autonomic function in DIP, and so this study investigated whether cardiovascular autonomic function differs between PD and DIP patients. Methods This study consecutively enrolled 20 DIP patients, 99 drug-naïve PD patients, and 25 age-matched healthy controls who underwent head-up tilt-table testing and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Results Orthostatic hypotension was more frequent in patients with PD or DIP than in healthy controls. In DIP, orthostatic hypotension was associated with the underlying psychiatric diseases and neuroleptics use, whereas prokinetics were not related to orthostatic hypotension. The supine blood pressure, nighttime blood pressure, and nocturnal blood pressure dipping did not differ significantly between the DIP and control groups. Supine hypertension and nocturnal hypertension were more frequent in PD patients than in controls. Conclusions The included DIP patients frequently exhibited orthostatic hypotension that was associated with the underlying diseases as well as the nature of and exposure time to the offending drugs. Clinicians should individualize the manifestations of DIP according to underlying diseases as well as the action mechanism of and exposure time to each offending drug. PMID:27730767

  1. Cocoa, blood pressure, and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovambattista; Ferri, Livia; Proietti, Ilenia; Di Agostino, Stefania; Martella, Letizia; Mai, Francesca; Di Giosia, Paolo; Grassi, Davide

    2015-11-18

    High blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular events worldwide. Clinical and epidemiological studies suggest that cocoa-rich products reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. According to this, cocoa has a high content in polyphenols, especially flavanols. Flavanols have been described to exert favorable effects on endothelium-derived vasodilation via the stimulation of nitric oxide-synthase, the increased availability of l-arginine, and the decreased degradation of NO. Cocoa may also have a beneficial effect by protecting against oxidative stress alterations and via decreased platelet aggregation, decreased lipid oxidation, and insulin resistance. These effects are associated with a decrease of blood pressure and a favorable trend toward a reduction in cardiovascular events and strokes. Previous meta-analyses have shown that cocoa-rich foods may reduce blood pressure. Long-term trials investigating the effect of cocoa products are needed to determine whether or not blood pressure is reduced on a chronic basis by daily ingestion of cocoa. Furthermore, long-term trials investigating the effect of cocoa on clinical outcomes are also needed to assess whether cocoa has an effect on cardiovascular events. A 3 mmHg systolic blood pressure reduction has been estimated to decrease the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. This paper summarizes new findings concerning cocoa effects on blood pressure and cardiovascular health, focusing on putative mechanisms of action and "nutraceutical " viewpoints.

  2. Biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk in women.

    PubMed

    Manson, JoAnn E; Bassuk, Shari S

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including coronary heart disease and stroke, is the leading cause of death among U.S. women and men. Established cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, hypertension, and elevated total cholesterol, and risk prediction models based on such factors, perform well but do not perfectly predict future risk of CVD. Thus, there has been much recent interest among cardiovascular researchers in identifying novel biomarkers to aid in risk prediction. Such markers include alternative lipids, B-type natriuretic peptides, high-sensitivity troponin, coronary artery calcium, and genetic markers. This article reviews the role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, risk prediction tools, and selected novel biomarkers and other exposures in predicting risk of developing CVD in women. The predictive role of novel cardiovascular biomarkers for women in primary prevention settings requires additional study, as does the diagnostic and prognostic utility of cardiac troponins for acute coronary syndromes in clinical settings. Sex differences in the clinical expression and physiology of metabolic syndrome may have implications for cardiovascular outcomes. Consideration of exposures that are unique to, or more prevalent in, women may also help to refine cardiovascular risk estimates in this group.

  3. Statins: pleiotropic regulators of cardiovascular redox state.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Charalambos; Channon, Keith M

    2014-03-10

    Lipid-lowering treatment with statins is one of the most effective therapeutic strategies in cardiovascular medicine because they reduce cardiovascular risk in both primary and secondary prevention. Despite the well-established links between low-density lipoprotein and cardiovascular risk, the clinical benefit from statin treatment is not fully explained by their lipid-lowering potential. A number of pleiotropic effects of statins have been described over the past decade, and their ability to suppress global oxidative stress is probably one of the most important mechanisms by which they exert their beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In this Forum, there are review articles discussing the molecular mechanisms by which statins modify redox signaling in the vasculature and the heart. They exert direct effects on the vascular wall and the myocardium or indirect by targeting the interactions between the cardiovascular system and adipose tissue or circulating cell types. The review articles in this Forum follow a translational approach and link the molecular mechanisms by which statins modify cardiovascular redox signaling with their clinical benefit in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Cardiovascular risk factor investigation: a pediatric issue

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anabel N; Abreu, Glaucia R; Resende, Rogério S; Goncalves, Washington LS; Gouvea, Sonia Alves

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To correlate cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, sedentariness) in childhood and adolescence with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Sources A systematic review of books and selected articles from PubMed, SciELO and Cochrane from 1992 to 2012. Summary of findings Risk factors for atherosclerosis are present in childhood, although cardiovascular disease arises during adulthood. This article presents the main studies that describe the importance of investigating the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in childhood and their associations. Significant rates of hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and sedentariness occur in children and adolescents. Blood pressure needs to be measured in childhood. An increase in arterial blood pressure in young people predicts hypertension in adulthood. The death rate from cardiovascular disease is lowest in children with lower cholesterol levels and in individuals who exercise regularly. In addition, there is a high prevalence of sedentariness in children and adolescents. Conclusions Studies involving the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors should always report the prevalence of these factors and their correlations during childhood because these factors are indispensable for identifying an at-risk population. The identification of risk factors in asymptomatic children could contribute to a decrease in cardiovascular disease, preventing such diseases as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia from becoming the epidemics of this century. PMID:23515212

  5. [Cooperative Cardiovascular Disease Research Network (RECAVA)].

    PubMed

    García-Dorado, David; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso; Díez, Javier; Gabriel, Rafael; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R; Ortiz de Landázuri, Manuel; Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Today, cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of death and hospitalization in Spain, and accounts for an annual healthcare budget of more than 4000 million euros. Consequently, early diagnosis, effective prevention, and the optimum treatment of cardiovascular disease present a significant social and healthcare challenge for the country. In this context, combining all available resources to increase the efficacy and healthcare benefits of scientific research is a priority. This rationale prompted the establishment of the Spanish Cooperative Cardiovascular Disease Research Network, or RECAVA (Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Enfermedades Cardiovasculares), 5 years ago. Since its foundation, RECAVA's activities have focused on achieving four objectives: a) to facilitate contacts between basic, clinical and epidemiological researchers; b) to promote the shared use of advanced technological facilities; c) to apply research results to clinical practice, and d) to train a new generation of translational cardiovascular researchers in Spain. At present, RECAVA consists of 41 research groups and seven shared technological facilities. RECAVA's research strategy is based on a scientific design matrix centered on the most important cardiovascular processes. The level of RECAVA's research activity is reflected in the fact that 28 co-authored articles were published in international journals during the first six months of 2007, with each involving contributions from at least two groups in the network. Finally, RECAVA also participates in the work of the Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research, or CNIC (Centro Nacional de Investigación Cardiovascular), and some established Biomedical Research Network Centers, or CIBER (Centros de Investigación Biomédica en RED), with the aim of consolidating the development of a dynamic multidisciplinary research framework that is capable of meeting the growing challenge that cardiovascular disease will present

  6. Antioxidants, inflammation and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Mangge, Harald; Becker, Kathrin; Fuchs, Dietmar; Gostner, Johanna M

    2014-06-26

    Multiple factors are involved in the etiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Pathological changes occur in a variety of cell types long before symptoms become apparent and diagnosis is made. Dysregulation of physiological functions are associated with the activation of immune cells, leading to local and finally systemic inflammation that is characterized by production of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Patients suffering from inflammatory diseases often present with diminished levels of antioxidants either due to insufficient dietary intake or, and even more likely, due to increased demand in situations of overwhelming ROS production by activated immune effector cells like macrophages. Antioxidants are suggested to beneficially interfere with diseases-related oxidative stress, however the interplay of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants with the overall redox system is complex. Moreover, molecular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress in CVD are not fully elucidated. Metabolic dybalances are suggested to play a major role in disease onset and progression. Several central signaling pathways involved in the regulation of immunological, metabolic and endothelial function are regulated in a redox-sensitive manner. During cellular immune response, interferon γ-dependent pathways are activated such as tryptophan breakdown by the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in monocyte-derived macrophages, fibroblasts, endothelial and epithelial cells. Neopterin, a marker of oxidative stress and immune activation is produced by GTP-cyclohydrolase I in macrophages and dendritic cells. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is induced in several cell types to generate nitric oxide (NO). NO, despite its low reactivity, is a potent antioxidant involved in the regulation of the vasomotor tone and of immunomodulatory signaling pathways. NO inhibits the expression and function of IDO. Function of NOS requires the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), which is produced in

  7. Thyroid disease and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormones, specifically triiodothyronine (T3), have significant effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, subclinical thyroid disease, and low T3 syndrome each cause cardiac and cardiovascular abnormalities through both genomic and nongenomic effects on cardiac myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. In compromised health, such as occurs in heart disease, alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism may further impair cardiac and cardiovascular function. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease may benefit from including analysis of thyroid hormone status, including serum total T3 levels.

  8. Geochemical environments, trace elements, and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Masironi, R.; Miesch, A. T.; Crawford, M. D.; Hamilton, E. I.

    1972-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are often found to be associated with certain physicochemical characteristics of the environment—namely, the hardness of the water and the types of rock and soil underlying the area. Areas supplied with soft water usually have higher cardiovascular death rates than do areas supplied with hard water. Evidence linking cardiovascular diseases with the geochemistry of rocks and soils is more limited. The nature of these associations is still speculative but it is possible that certain trace elements are involved, some being beneficial and others harmful. Further epidemiological studies to identify these various trace elements are desirable. PMID:4539410

  9. Cardiovascular physiology and diseases of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Heinz-Taheny, Kathleen M

    2009-01-01

    The class Amphibia includes three orders of amphibians: the anurans (frogs and toads), urodeles (salamanders, axolotls, and newts), and caecilians. The diversity of lifestyles across these three orders has accompanying differences in the cardiovascular anatomy and physiology allowing for adaptations to aquatic or terrestrial habitats, pulmonic or gill respiration, hibernation, and body elongation (in the caecilian). This article provides a review of amphibian cardiovascular anatomy and physiology with discussion of unique species adaptations. In addition, amphibians as cardiovascular animal models and commonly encountered natural diseases are covered.

  10. Seasonal Influenza Infections and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Wan; Ito, Kazuhiko; Matte, Thomas D.; Shaman, Jeffrey; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cardiovascular deaths and influenza epidemics peak during winter in temperate regions. OBJECTIVES To quantify the temporal association between population increases in seasonal influenza infections and mortality due to cardiovascular causes and to test if influenza incidence indicators are predictive of cardiovascular mortality during the influenza season. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Time-series analysis of vital statistics records and emergency department visits in New York City, among cardiovascular deaths that occurred during influenza seasons between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012. The 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic period was excluded from temporal analyses. EXPOSURES Emergency department visits for influenza-like illness, grouped by age (≥0 years and ≥65 years) and scaled by laboratory surveillance data for viral types and subtypes, in the previous 28 days. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Mortality due to cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction. RESULTS Among adults 65 years and older, who accounted for 83.0% (73 363 deaths) of nonpandemic cardiovascular mortality during influenza seasons, seasonal average influenza incidence was correlated year to year with excess cardiovascular mortality (Pearson correlation coefficients ≥0.75, P≤.05 for 4 different influenza indicators). In daily time-series analyses using 4 different influenza metrics, interquartile range increases in influenza incidence during the previous 21 days were associated with an increase between 2.3% (95% CI, 0.7%–3.9%) and 6.3% (95% CI, 3.7%–8.9%) for cardiovascular disease mortality and between 2.4% (95% CI, 1.1%–3.6%) and 6.9% (95% CI, 4.0%–9.9%) for ischemic heart disease mortality among adults 65 years and older. The associations were most acute and strongest for myocardial infarction mortality, with each interquartile range increase in influenza incidence during the previous 14 days associated with mortality

  11. Polypill treatments for cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Webster, Ruth; Rodgers, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality globally. Effective CVD preventive medications are available including statin, blood pressure-lowering and antiplatelet medications; however most people do not take these drugs long term. Fixed-dose combination pills ("polypills") have been shown, in several clinical trials, to improve adherence to these recommended medications, with corresponding improvements in risk factors such as blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol. In patients not taking all modalities of recommended CVD preventive therapies, polypill-based strategies could importantly contribute to global CVD control strategies. The largest benefits are seen in those who are under-treated at baseline, rather than those who are already taking the individual components separately: simplified step-up is more important than pill count reduction. Despite the potential benefits for patients and payers, only a few polypills are available due to market failure in the funding of research and development for affordable non-communicable disease medicines. Regulatory paradigms have focused on substitution indications among patients already taking component medications; however, this is the population that is likely to receive the least benefit from a polypill-based strategy. Greater health impact is likely if focus is given to patients who have indications for all polypill components, but currently do not receive the benefits of recommended medicines long term.

  12. Cardiovascular failure and cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankitkumar K; Hollenberg, Steven M

    2011-10-01

    Cardiovascular system failure is commonly faced by the intensivist. Heart failure can occur due to a host of predisposing cardiac disorders or as secondary effects of systemic illness. When the heart is unable to provide an adequate cardiac output to maintain adequate tissue perfusion, cardiogenic shock ensues. Without prompt diagnosis and appropriate management, these patients have significant morbidity and mortality, with in-hospital mortality approaching 60% for all age groups. Accurate and rapid identification of cardiogenic shock as a medical emergency, with expeditious implementation of appropriate therapy, can lead to improved clinical outcomes. In this review, we discuss optimal strategies for diagnosis and monitoring of cardiogenic shock. We discuss the diverse therapeutic strategies employed for cardiogenic shock, including pharmacological (e.g., vasoactive agents, fibrinolytic agents), mechanical (e.g., intraaortic balloon pumps, left ventricular assist devices, percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI]), and surgical approaches such as coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), valvular repair or replacement (e.g., for acute mitral regurgitation, ventricular septal rupture, or free wall rupture).

  13. [Serotoninergic receptors and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Hong, E; Castillo, C; Flores, E; Mercedes, F

    1994-01-01

    The seronin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is a biogenic amine involved in diverse physiologic and physiopathological processes in the cardiovascular system. 5-HT may lower the arterial blood pressure by an action on central 5-HT1A receptors, or may increase it by stimulation of 5-HT2 receptors located in vascular smooth muscle. It has been postulated that hypofunction of 5-HT1A receptors, or the exaggerated stimulation of 5-HT2 receptor may be associated with arterial hypertension and that agonists of the first type (indorenate or 8-OH-DPAT) or antagonists of the second type (ketanserin or pelanserin) allow the control of arterial hypertension. On the other land, ketanserin and pelanserin attenuated the hemodynamic manifestations in an experimental model of thromboembolism, suggesting that 5-HT is involved in such phenomenon. Finally, 5-HT could be related with the presence of angor pectoris during hypertension or atherosclerosis, diseases that are associated with a lesional of the vascular endothelium, a condition that favors the 5-HT induced vasoconstriction in coronary arteries.

  14. Cardiovascular control in Antarctic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egginton, Stuart; Campbell, Hamish; Davison, William

    2006-04-01

    The capacity for synthesis and plasma levels of stress hormones in species with a range of activity patterns suggest that depressed catecholamine synthesis is typical of notothenioid fishes regardless of life style, although they are able to release extensive stores under conditions of extreme trauma. Cortisol does not appear to be an important primary stress hormone in these species. In general, vascular reactivity shows a modest α and β adrenergic tonus, but with greater potency for cholinergic and serotonergic vasoconstrictor agonists, although a dominance of vasodilatation over vasoconstriction is observed in one species. Vasomotor control mechanisms appear to be primarily a consequence of evolutionary lineage rather than low environmental temperature, but the pattern may be modified according to functional demand. These and other data confirm the cardiovascular system is dominated by cholinergic control: the heart apparently lacks adrenergic innervation, but receives inhibitory parasympathetic input that regulates heart rate (HR) by setting a resting vagal tonus. Oxygen consumption (MO 2) determined at rest and varied via specific dynamic action, in intact fish and fish that had undergone bilateral sectioning of the vagus nerve, show that HR is a good predictor of MO 2, and that the major influence on HR is the degree of vagal tone—these fish work by removing the brake rather than applying the accelerator. However, whether these traits actually represent adaptation to the Antarctic environment or merely represent ancestral characteristics and their relative phylogenetic position is at present unclear.

  15. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  16. Cardiovascular benefits of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Satija, Ambika; Hu, Frank B

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between dietary fiber and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been extensively studied. There is considerable epidemiological evidence indicating an inverse association between dietary fiber intake and CVD risk. The association has been found to be stronger for cereal fiber than for fruit or vegetable fiber, and several studies have also found increased whole grain consumption to be associated with CVD risk reduction. In light of this evidence, recent US dietary guidelines have endorsed increased consumption of fiber rich whole grains. Regular consumption of dietary fiber, particularly fiber from cereal sources, may improve CVD health through multiple mechanisms including lipid reduction, body weight regulation, improved glucose metabolism, blood pressure control, and reduction of chronic inflammation. Future research should focus on various food sources of fiber, including different types of whole grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and nuts, as well as resistant starch in relation to CVD risk and weight control; explore the biological mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effect of fiber-rich diets; and study different ethnic groups and populations with varying sources of dietary fiber.

  17. Imaging Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinnan; Balu, Niranjan; Canton, Gador; Yuan, Chun

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current clinical techniques that rely on stenosis measurement alone appear to be insufficient for risk prediction in atherosclerosis patients. Many novel imaging methods have been developed to study atherosclerosis progression and to identify new features that can predict future clinical risk. MRI of atherosclerotic vessel walls is one such method. It has the ability to non-invasively evaluate multiple biomarkers of the disease such as luminal stenosis, plaque burden, tissue composition and plaque activity. In addition, the accuracy of in vivo MRI has been validated against histology with high reproducibility, thus paving the way for application to epidemiological studies of disease pathogenesis and, by serial MRI, in monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this review, we describe the various MR techniques used to evaluate aspects of plaque progression, discuss imaging based measurements (imaging biomarkers), and also detail their validation. The application of plaque MRI in clinical trials as well as emerging imaging techniques used to evaluate plaque compositional features and biological activities are also discussed. PMID:20815049

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crowson, Cynthia S; Liao, Katherine P; Davis, John M; Solomon, Daniel H; Matteson, Eric L; Knutson, Keith L; Hlatky, Mark A; Gabriel, Sherine E

    2014-01-01

    Background Rheumatic disease and heart disease share common underpinnings involving inflammation. The high levels of inflammation that characterize rheumatic diseases provide a “natural experiment” to help elucidate the mechanisms by which inflammation accelerates heart disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common of the rheumatic diseases and has the best studied relationships with heart disease. Methods Review of current literature on heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis Results Patients with RA have an increased risk of developing heart disease that is not fully explained by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Therapies used to treat RA may also affect the development of heart disease; by suppressing inflammation, they may also reduce the risk of heart disease. However, their other effects, as in the case of steroids, may increase heart disease risk. Conclusions Investigations of the innate and adaptive immune responses occurring in RA may delineate novel mechanisms in the pathogenesis of heart disease, and help identify novel therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of heart disease. PMID:24093840

  19. [Altitude and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    A stay at high altitude exposes an individual to various environmental changes (cold, exercise, isolation) but the most stressful for the body is hypoxia. However, the cardiovascular system yields some efficient mechanisms of acclimatization to oxygen lack. Hypoxia activates the adrenergic system and induces a tachycardia that decreases during a prolonged stay at altitude. The desensitization of the adrenergic system leads to a decrease in maximal heart rate and a protection of the myocardium against an energy disequilibrium that could be potentially harmful for the heart. Hypoxia induces a peripheral vasodilation and a pulmonary vasoconstriction, leading to few changes in systemic blood pressure and an increase in pulmonary blood pressure (PHT) that can contribute to a high altitude pulmonary edema. Advice to a cardiac patient who plans to go to high altitude should take into account that all diseases aggravated by increased adrenergic activity or associated with a PHT or a hypoxemia (right-to-left shunt) will be aggravated at high altitude. As altitude increases, a patient with a coronary disease will present an ischemic threshold for a lower power output during an EKG exercise test. The only test allowing predicting the tolerance to high altitude is the hypoxia exercise test realized at 30% of maxVO(2)and at an equivalent altitude of 4,800m.

  20. Globalization, Work, and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Schnall, Peter L; Dobson, Marnie; Landsbergis, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), a global epidemic, is responsible for about 30% of all deaths worldwide. While mortality rates from CVD have been mostly declining in the advanced industrialized nations, CVD risk factors, including hypertension, obesity, and diabetes, have been on the increase everywhere. Researchers investigating the social causes of CVD have produced a robust body of evidence documenting the relationships between the work environment and CVD, including through the mechanisms of psychosocial work stressors. We review the empirical evidence linking work, psychosocial stressors, and CVD. These work stressors can produce chronic biologic arousal and promote unhealthy behaviors and thus, increased CVD risk. We offer a theoretical model that illustrates how economic globalization influences the labor market and work organization in high-income countries, which, in turn, exacerbates job characteristics, such as demands, low job control, effort-reward imbalance, job insecurity, and long work hours. There is also a growing interest in "upstream" factors among work stress researchers, including precarious employment, downsizing/restructuring, privatization, and lean production. We conclude with suggestions for future epidemiologic research on the role of work in the development of CVD, as well as policy recommendations for prevention of work-related CVD.

  1. Immunity, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory condition with immune competent cells in lesions producing mainly pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dead cells and oxidized forms of low density lipoproteins (oxLDL) are abundant. The major direct cause of CVD appears to be rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. oxLDL has proinflammatory and immune-stimulatory properties, causes cell death at higher concentrations and contains inflammatory phospholipids with phosphorylcholine (PC) as an interesting epitope. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) may be atheroprotective, one mechanism being anti-inflammatory. Bacteria and virus have been discussed, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence, and antibiotic trials have not been successful. Heat shock proteins could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid mediators. To prove that inflammation is a cause of atherosclerosis and CVD, clinical studies with anti-inflammatory and/or immune-modulatory treatment are needed. The potential causes of immune reactions and inflammation in atherosclerosis and how inflammation can be targeted therapeutically to provide novel treatments for CVD are reviewed. PMID:23635324

  2. Dietary sodium and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Andrew; O'Donnell, Martin; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-06-01

    Although an essential nutrient, higher sodium intake is associated with increasing blood pressure (BP), forming the basis for current population-wide sodium restriction guidelines. While short-term clinical trials have achieved low intake (<2.0 g/day), this has not been reproduced in long-term trials (>6 months). Guidelines assume that low sodium intake will reduce BP and reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD), compared to moderate intake. However, current observational evidence suggests a J-shaped association between sodium intake and CVD; the lowest risks observed with 3-5 g/day but higher risk with <3 g/day. Importantly, these observational data also confirm the association between higher intake (>5 g/day) and increased risk of CVD. Although lower intake may reduce BP, this may be offset by marked increases in neurohormones and other adverse effects which may paradoxically be adverse. Large randomised clinical trials with sufficient follow-up are required to provide robust data on the long-term effects of sodium reduction on CVD incidence. Until such trials are completed, current evidence suggests that moderate sodium intake for the general population (3-5 g/day) is likely the optimum range for CVD prevention.

  3. Multifactorial Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Hypertension: the Cardiovascular Polypill.

    PubMed

    Lafeber, M; Spiering, W; Visseren, F L J; Grobbee, D E

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension is a major, if not the most important, contributor to the disease burden and premature death globally which is largely related to cardiovascular disease. In both the primary and the secondary preventions of cardiovascular disease, blood pressure (BP) targets are often not achieved which is similar to achievement of cholesterol goals. Combining aspirin, cholesterol and blood pressure-lowering agents into a fixed-dose combination pill called the cardiovascular polypill has been proposed as complementary care in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases in both the primary and secondary preventions of cardiovascular disease. This review article focuses on the potential role of fixed-dose combination therapy in the treatment of hypertension, outlines the pros and cons of combination therapy and emphasizes the rationale for trialling their use. Current and planned future cardiovascular polypill trials are summarized, and the prerequisites for implementation of the polypill strategy are described.

  4. Cardiovascular Diseases in HIV-infected Subjects (HIV-HEART Study)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-05-07

    Detection of Frequency, Severity and Progression of Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients With HIV-infection.; Effect on Cardiovascular Risk and Life Quality by Age, Gender, Classic Cardiovascular Risk Factors,; HIV-specific Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Cardiovascular Medication, Antiretroviral Medication

  5. Potassium in hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Castro, Hector; Raij, Leopoldo

    2013-05-01

    The increased prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in industrialized societies undoubtedly is associated with the modern high-sodium/low-potassium diet. Extensive experimental and clinical data strongly link potassium intake to cardiovascular outcome. Most studies suggest that the sodium-to-potassium intake ratio is a better predictor of cardiovascular outcome than either nutrient individually. A high-sodium/low-potassium environment results in significant abnormalities in central hemodynamics, leading to potential target organ damage. Altered renal sodium handling, impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, and increased oxidative stress are important mediators of this effect. It remains of paramount importance to reinforce consumption of a low-sodium/high-potassium diet as a critical strategy for prevention and treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  6. Relationship Between Sedentary Behavior and Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Same, Robert V; Feldman, David I; Shah, Nishant; Martin, Seth S; Al Rifai, Mahmoud; Blaha, Michael J; Graham, Garth; Ahmed, Haitham M

    2016-01-01

    The majority of adults do not meet current guideline recommendations for moderate to vigorous physical activity. Recent research has linked a high amount of sedentary behavior with an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and death. This correlation with sedentary behavior even extends to individuals who meet recommended physical activity goals during the remainder of their day, which implies that sedentary behavior may represent a distinct cardiovascular risk factor that is independent of the overall amount of physical activity. During the past several years, there has been significant interest in identifying and understanding the mechanisms through which sedentary behavior affects cardiovascular health. In this review, we critically evaluate the literature pertaining to sedentary behavior and cardiovascular risk with an emphasis on studies published over the past year, and we suggest possible interventions that may help reduce sedentary behavior time.

  7. Endothelin ETA receptor antagonism in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Suzanne A; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2014-08-15

    Since the discovery of the endothelin system in 1988, it has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological phenomena. In the cardiovascular system, endothelin-1 (ET-1) acts through intracellular pathways of two endothelin receptors (ETA and ETB) located mainly on smooth muscle and endothelial cells to regulate vascular tone and provoke mitogenic and proinflammatory reactions. The endothelin ETA receptor is believed to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular disease including systemic hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), dilated cardiomyopathy, and diabetic microvascular dysfunction. Growing evidence from recent experimental and clinical studies indicates that the blockade of endothelin receptors, particularly the ETA subtype, grasps promise in the treatment of major cardiovascular pathologies. The simultaneous blockade of endothelin ETB receptors might not be advantageous, leading possibly to vasoconstriction and salt and water retentions. This review summarizes the role of ET-1 in cardiovascular modulation and the therapeutic potential of endothelin receptor antagonism.

  8. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity.

  9. Discontinued drugs in 2012: cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Min; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2013-11-01

    The continued high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has attracted wide concern and great attention of pharmaceutical industry. In order to reduce the attrition of cardiovascular drug R&D, it might be helpful recapitulating previous failures and identifying the potential factors to success. This perspective mainly analyses the 30 cardiovascular drugs dropped from clinical development in 2012. Reasons causing the termination of the cardiovascular drugs in the past 5 years are also tabulated and analysed. The analysis shows that the attrition is highest in Phase II trials and financial and strategic factors and lack of clinical efficacy are the principal reasons for these disappointments. To solve the four problems (The 'better than the Beatles' problem, the 'cautious regulator' problem, the 'throw money at it' tendency and the 'basic researchbrute force' bias) is recommended as the main measure to increase the number and quality of approvable products.

  10. Research opportunities in cardiovascular deconditioning, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, M. N. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The deconditioning of the cardiovascular system that occurs during spaceflight, NASA's current and projected research program, and the conclusions and suggestions of the ad hoc Working Group are summarized.

  11. Evaluation of a Cardiovascular Education Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Wei Li

    1980-01-01

    A Virginia elementary-secondary school blood pressure education program is described and evaluated. Evidence presented indicates that participants' cardiovascular knowledge levels increased significantly as a result of program participation. (JMF)

  12. Notch signaling in the developing cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Kyle; Karsan, Aly

    2007-07-01

    The Notch proteins encompass a family of transmembrane receptors that have been highly conserved through evolution as mediators of cell fate. Recent findings have demonstrated a critical role of Notch in the developing cardiovascular system. Notch signaling has been implicated in the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition during development of the heart valves, in arterial-venous differentiation, and in remodeling of the primitive vascular plexus. Mutations of Notch pathway components in humans are associated with congenital defects of the cardiovascular system such as Alagille syndrome, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), and bicuspid aortic valves. This article focuses on the role of the Notch pathway in the developing cardiovascular system and congenital human cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Physics of the human cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanovska, Aneta

    1999-01-01

    Contemporary measurement techniques permit the non-invasive observation of several cardiovascular functions, both from the central and peripheral points of view. We show that, within one cycle of blood through the cardiovascular system, the same dynamics characterizes heart function as well as blood flow in the capillary bed where cells exchange energy and matter. Analyses of several quite different signals derived from respiration, cardiac function and blood flow, all reveal the existence of five almost periodic frequency components. This result is interpreted as evidence that cardiovascular dynamics is governed by five coupled oscillators. The couplings provide co-ordination among the physiological processes involved, and are essential for efficient cardiovascular function. Understanding the dynamics of a system of five coupled oscillators not only represents a theoretical challenge, but also carries practical implications for diagnosis and for predicting the future behaviour of this life giving system.

  14. Subclinical hypothyroidism, lipid metabolism and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Delitala, Alessandro P; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Maioli, Margherita; Delitala, Giuseppe

    2017-03-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism is defined by elevated serum thyrotropin in presence of normal free thyroid hormones. Lipid metabolism is influenced by thyroid hormone and many reports showed that lipids status worsen along with TSH level. Subclinical hypothyroidism has been also linked to other cardiovascular risk factors such as alteration in blood pressure and increased atherosclerosis. Further evidences suggested that mild dysfunction of thyroid gland is associated with metabolic syndrome and heart failure. Thyrotropin level seems the best predictor of cardiovascular disease, in particular when its levels are above 10mU/L. However, despite these observations, there is no clear evidence that levothyroxine therapy in subjects with milder form of subclinical hypothyroidism could improve lipid status and the other cardiovascular risk factors. In this review, we address the effect of thyroid hormone and cardiovascular risk, with a focus on lipid metabolism.

  15. Cardiovascular assessment in the orthopaedic practice setting.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Susan A; Noteboom, J Timothy; Flynn, Timothy W

    2005-11-01

    As consumer access to physical therapy practice expands, it is important that physical therapists are familiar with and implementing accepted methods of identifying the cardiovascular status of their clients. Established guidelines for assessing cardiovascular risk prior to initiating aerobic exercise programs are available and can be readily adopted by physical therapists in diverse clinical settings. We have provided a process for integrating existing guidelines into clinical practice. Because little evidence exists regarding the clinical behaviors and knowledge of orthopedic physical therapists in the area of cardiovascular risk, we conducted a survey to assess current practice patterns. The results suggest that orthopedic physical therapists are performing cardiovascular screening at frequencies similar to other components of the history and systems review, but that monitoring baseline or exercising vital signs does not occur with every exercise session.

  16. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to inves...

  17. Herbal Medications in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    PubMed

    Liperoti, Rosa; Vetrano, Davide L; Bernabei, Roberto; Onder, Graziano

    2017-03-07

    Herbal medications are commonly used for clinical purposes, including the treatment of cardiovascular conditions. Compared with conventional medications, herbal medications do not require clinical studies before their marketing or formal approval from regulatory agencies, and for this reason their efficacy and safety are rarely proven. In this review, we summarize available evidence on herbal medications mostly used in cardiovascular medicine. We show that the use of these medications for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases is often not supported by scientific evidence. Despite most of these herbs showing an effect on biological mechanisms related to the cardiovascular system, data on their clinical effects are lacking. Potential relevant side effects, including increased risk of drug interactions, are described, and the possibility of contamination or substitution with other medications represents a concern. Physicians should always assess the use of herbal medications with patients and discuss the possible benefits and side effects with them.

  18. Cardiovascular dynamics during space sickness and deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Rigney, David R.

    1991-01-01

    We are currently funded by NASA for the project, 'Cardiovascular Dynamics During Space Sickness and Deconditioning.' NASA has given priority to the investigation of two problems encountered in the long-term space flights currently being planned: (1) space motion sickness; and (2) cardiovascular deconditioning. We have proposed to use spectral and nonlinear dynamical analysis of heart rate data to quantify the presence of these problems and to evaluate countermeasures against them.

  19. Vitamin D and cardiovascular diseases: Causality.

    PubMed

    Wimalawansa, Sunil J

    2016-12-24

    Vitamin D regulates blood pressure, cardiac functions, and endothelial and smooth muscle cell functions, thus, playing an important role in cardiovascular health. Observational studies report associations between vitamin D deficiency with hypertension and cardiovascular-related deaths. Peer-reviewed papers were examined in several research databases as per the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews, using key words that address the relationship between vitamin D and cardiovascular disease. Correlations and interpretations were made considering the risks-benefits, broader evidence, and implications. This review analyzed current knowledge regarding the effects of vitamin D on the cardiovascular system. 1,25(OH)2D and related epigenetic modifications subdue cellular inflammation, improve overall endothelial functions, reduce age-related systolic hypertension and vascular rigidity, and attenuate the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Most observational and ecological studies support 25(OH)vitamin D having protective effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the association of vitamin D deficiency with cardiovascular diseases is based primarily on observational and ecological studies and thus, is a matter of controversy. Adequately powered, randomized controlled clinical trial data are not available to confirm these associations. Thus, to test the hypothesis that correction of vitamin D deficiency protects the cardiovascular system, well-designed, statistically powered, longer-term clinical trials are needed in persons with vitamin D deficiency. Nevertheless, the available data support that adequate vitamin D supplementation and/or sensible sunlight exposure to achieve optimal vitamin D status are important in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases.

  20. Gravitational Force and the Cardiovascular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, D. R.; Olszowka, A. J.; Rokitka, M. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to changes in gravitational force are considered. Man is ideally suited to his 1-g environment. Although cardiovascular adjustments are required to accommodate to postural changes and exercise, these are fully accomplished for short periods (min). More challenging stresses are those of short-term microgravity (h) and long-term microgravity (days) and of gravitational forces greater than that of Earth. The latter can be simulated in the laboratory and quantitative studies can be conducted.

  1. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance: still tantalizing

    PubMed Central

    Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Faranesh, Anthony Z; Guttman, Michael A; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Saikus, Christina E; Lederman, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    The often touted advantages of MR guidance remain largely unrealized for cardiovascular interventional procedures in patients. Many procedures have been simulated in animal models. We argue these opportunities for clinical interventional MR will be met in the near future. This paper reviews technical and clinical considerations and offers advice on how to implement a clinical-grade interventional cardiovascular MR (iCMR) laboratory. We caution that this reflects our personal view of the "state of the art." PMID:19114017

  2. Space radiation and cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Boerma, Marjan; Nelson, Gregory A; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Koturbash, Igor; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-12-26

    Future long-distance space missions will be associated with significant exposures to ionizing radiation, and the health risks of these radiation exposures during manned missions need to be assessed. Recent Earth-based epidemiological studies in survivors of atomic bombs and after occupational and medical low dose radiation exposures have indicated that the cardiovascular system may be more sensitive to ionizing radiation than was previously thought. This has raised the concern of a cardiovascular disease risk from exposure to space radiation during long-distance space travel. Ground-based studies with animal and cell culture models play an important role in estimating health risks from space radiation exposure. Charged particle space radiation has dense ionization characteristics and may induce unique biological responses, appropriate simulation of the space radiation environment and careful consideration of the choice of the experimental model are critical. Recent studies have addressed cardiovascular effects of space radiation using such models and provided first results that aid in estimating cardiovascular disease risk, and several other studies are ongoing. Moreover, astronauts could potentially be administered pharmacological countermeasures against adverse effects of space radiation, and research is focused on the development of such compounds. Because the cardiovascular response to space radiation has not yet been clearly defined, the identification of potential pharmacological countermeasures against cardiovascular effects is still in its infancy.

  3. Space radiation and cardiovascular disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, Marjan; Nelson, Gregory A; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Koturbash, Igor; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Future long-distance space missions will be associated with significant exposures to ionizing radiation, and the health risks of these radiation exposures during manned missions need to be assessed. Recent Earth-based epidemiological studies in survivors of atomic bombs and after occupational and medical low dose radiation exposures have indicated that the cardiovascular system may be more sensitive to ionizing radiation than was previously thought. This has raised the concern of a cardiovascular disease risk from exposure to space radiation during long-distance space travel. Ground-based studies with animal and cell culture models play an important role in estimating health risks from space radiation exposure. Charged particle space radiation has dense ionization characteristics and may induce unique biological responses, appropriate simulation of the space radiation environment and careful consideration of the choice of the experimental model are critical. Recent studies have addressed cardiovascular effects of space radiation using such models and provided first results that aid in estimating cardiovascular disease risk, and several other studies are ongoing. Moreover, astronauts could potentially be administered pharmacological countermeasures against adverse effects of space radiation, and research is focused on the development of such compounds. Because the cardiovascular response to space radiation has not yet been clearly defined, the identification of potential pharmacological countermeasures against cardiovascular effects is still in its infancy. PMID:26730293

  4. Methods for identifying cardiovascular agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Tulis, David Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Basic and clinical investigation into many of the diverse aspects of cardiovascular drug discovery employs varied approaches aimed at determining physiologic and pathophysiologic efficacy of candidate agents for therapeutic utility with the ultimate hope of identifying those agents capable of exerting salutary influence upon cardiac and vascular tissues. Promising compounds may then be used for prophylactic cardiovascular protection and for the treatment of various disorders including hypertension, cardiomyopathy, occlusive vascular disease, and heart failure. The invention disclosed in Methods for identifying cardiovascular agents [1] provides screening methods which can be used to identify certain suspected cardiovascular agents that inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) activation and/or proliferation, functional adaptations inherent in the responses to disease or injury, or those that enhance vascular endothelial cell (VEC) activation and/or proliferation, processes thought to provide protection to jeopardized blood vessels. Additionally, these screening assays include agents that activate estrogen responsive genes in vascular cells, considering that estrogen signaling is generally suggested to serve pivotal functions in preventing many of the pathologic mechanisms contributing to occlusive vascular complications. The findings of this primary patent are directly relevant for discoveries in related inventions that disclose various provisions for cardiovascular drug discovery. This review will provide detailed synopses of these function-based screening methods capable of identifying cardiovascular protective agents for use in basic science research and clinical drug discovery.

  5. Protein Carbamylation and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, Frederik H.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2015-01-01

    Carbamylation constitutes a posttranslational modification of proteins or amino acids and results from different pathways in vivo. First is the non-enzymatic reaction between isocyanic acid, a decomposition product of urea, and either the N-terminus or ε-amino group of lysine residues. Isocyanic acid levels, while low in vivo, are in equilibrium with urea, and are thus increased in chronic and end-stage renal diseases. An alternative pathway involves the leukocyte haem protein myeloperoxidase, which catalyses the oxidation of thiocyanate in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, producing isocyanate at inflammation sites. Notably, plasma thiocyanate levels are increased in smokers, and leukocyte-driven protein carbamylation occurs both within human and animal atherosclerotic plaques, as well as on plasma proteins. Protein carbamylation is considered a hallmark of molecular aging and is implicated in many pathological conditions. Recently, it has been shown that carbamylated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) induces endothelial dysfunction via lectin-like-oxidized LDL receptor-1 activation and increased reactive oxygen species production, leading to endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. Moreover, carbamylated LDL harbours atherogenic activities, including both binding to macrophage scavenger receptors inducing cholesterol accumulation and foam cell formation, as well as promoting vascular smooth muscle proliferation. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein loses its anti-apoptotic activity after carbamylation, contributing to endothelial cell death. In addition to involvement in atherogenesis, protein carbamylation levels have emerged as a particularly strong predictor of both prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease risk. Recent studies also suggest that protein carbamylation may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of atherosclerotic heart disease. PMID:26061545

  6. Human Cardiovascular Adaptation to Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norsk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Entering weightlessness (0 G) induces immediately a shift of blood and fluid from the lower to the upper parts of the body inducing expansion of the cardiac chambers (Bungo et al. 1986; Charles & Lathers 1991; Videbaek & Norsk 1997). For many years the effects of sudden 0 G on central venous pressure (CVP) was discussed, and it puzzled researchers that CVP compared to the 1-G supine position decreased during the initial hours of spaceflight, when at the same time left atrial diameter increased (Buckey et al. 1996). By measuring esophageal pressure as an estimate of inter-pleural pressure, it was later shown that this pressure decreases more than CVP does during 0 G induced by parabolic flights (Videbaek & Norsk 1997). Thus, transmural CVP is increased, which distends the cardiac chambers. This unique lung-heart interaction whereby 1) inter-pleural pressure decreases and 2) central blood volume is expanded is unique for 0 G. Because transmural CVP is increased, stroke volume increases according to the law of Frank-Starling leading to an increase in cardiac output, which is maintained increased during months of 0 G in space to levels of some 25% above that of the 1-G seated position (Norsk unpublished). Simultaneously, sympathetic nervous activity is at the level of the upright 1-G posture, which is difficult to explain based on the high stroke volume and decreased blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. This paradox should be explored and the mechanisms revealed, because it might have implications for estimating the cardiovascular risk of travelling in space.

  7. Anthocyanins in Cardiovascular Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Taylor C.

    2011-01-01

    Anthocyanins are a group of abundant and widely consumed flavonoid constituents that occur ubiquitously in the plant kingdom, providing the bright red-orange to blue-violet colors present in many fruit- and vegetable-based food products. Their intake has been estimated to be up to 9-fold higher than that of other dietary flavonoids. Anthocyanins have become increasingly important to the food industry as their use as natural alternatives to artificial colors has become widespread and knowledge of their health-promoting properties has become more evident. Epidemiological studies suggest that increased consumption of anthocyanins lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the most common cause of mortality among men and women. Anthocyanins frequently interact with other phytochemicals, exhibiting synergistic biological effects but making contributions from individual components difficult to decipher. Over the past 2 decades, many peer-reviewed publications have demonstrated that in addition to their noted in vitro antioxidant activity, anthocyanins may regulate different signaling pathways involved in the development of CVD. This review summarizes the latest developments on the bioavailability/bioactivity and CVD preventative activities of anthocyanins, including results from in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model systems as related to their multiple proposed mechanisms of action. Limited yet promising data from epidemiological studies and human clinical trials are also presented. Future studies aimed at enhancing the absorption of anthocyanins and characterizing their metabolic and/or breakdown products are necessary to ultimately evaluate their use for protection/prevention against the development of CVD. PMID:22211184

  8. Abacavir and cardiovascular disease: A critical look at the data.

    PubMed

    Llibre, Josep M; Hill, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Most HIV-infected subjects will receive a treatment regimen including abacavir or tenofovir. Therefore, clarifying if there is an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among those exposed to abacavir is of the utmost importance. Due to the low frequency of AMI in this young population (2-5 per 1000 patients/year), efforts to clarify this have been quite controversial. While some observational cohorts have found a statistically significant association, others have not. Meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials offering the highest scientific evidence found no association at all, but with a limited statistical power to definitely rule out a small effect. A channelling or selection bias has been demonstrated in cohort studies, favouring the prescription of abacavir to subjects with or at risk for chronic kidney disease, and therefore, with an intrinsic increased cardiovascular risk. The recent NA-ACCORD cohort study does not identify an increased risk for AMI associated with recent abacavir use in a fully adjusted model (HR 1.33; 95%CI:0.96, 1.88). However, it does find an association in a second analysis restricted to treatment-naïve persons, with higher differences in baseline characteristics among compared arms. A critical review of the compiled available evidence is therefore mandatory, particularly in light of the first single-tablet regimen to receive approval that does contain abacavir.

  9. Sodium, potassium, blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Whelton, Paul K

    2014-08-01

    The scientific underpinning for recommended levels of dietary sodium and potassium intake is of great importance to healthcare providers and policy decision-makers. Recent clinical trials and meta-analyses confirm the capacity of dietary sodium reduction and potassium supplementation to reduce blood pressure with no harmful effects on blood lipid levels in customary clinical settings. Blood pressure is thought to be a good surrogate for cardiovascular disease events and the most important preventable risk factor for mortality and disability-adjusted life years. Cohort analyses and related pooling studies that have been used to explore the relationship between dietary Na and CVD were all based on secondary analyses of datasets that were not designed for this purpose. Most are of insufficient quality to provide dependable information. The limited information available from clinical trial experience and cohort studies of higher quality suggests a reduction in dietary Na decreases CVD morbidity and mortality. Modeling studies suggest that a small reduction in dietary sodium would result in a sizable general population health benefit. Some countries have experienced a progressive decline in average dietary sodium consumption. However, there is no evidence of a corresponding trend in the United States, and almost the entire population is failing to meet dietary sodium and potassium guideline recommendations.

  10. Effects of Tetrodotoxin on the Mammalian Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The human genome encodes nine functional voltage-gated Na+ channels. Three of them, namely Nav1.5, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9, are resistant to nanomolar concentrations of tetrodotoxin (TTX; IC50 ≥ 1 μM). The other isoforms, which are predominantly expressed in the skeletal muscle and nervous system, are highly sensitive to TTX (IC50 ~ 10 nM). During the last two decades, it has become evident that in addition to the major cardiac isoform Nav1.5, several of those TTX sensitive isoforms are expressed in the mammalian heart. Whereas immunohistochemical and electrophysiological methods demonstrated functional expression in various heart regions, the physiological importance of those isoforms for cardiac excitation in higher mammals is still debated. This review summarizes our knowledge on the systemic cardiovascular effects of TTX in animals and humans, with a special focus on cardiac excitation and performance at lower concentrations of this marine drug. Altogether, these data strongly suggest that TTX sensitive Na+ channels, detected more recently in various heart tissues, are not involved in excitation phenomena in the healthy adult heart of higher mammals. PMID:20411124

  11. Basic mechanisms for adverse cardiovascular events associated with air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is a significant cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although the epidemiologic association between air pollution exposures and exacerbation of cardiovascular disease is well established, the mechanisms by which these exposures promote cardiovascular disease are incompletely understood. In this review I will give an overview of the components of air pollution, an overview of the cardiovascular effects of air pollution exposure and a review of the basic mechanisms that are activated by exposure to promote cardiovascular disease. PMID:25552258

  12. Framingham Risk Score underestimates cardiovascular disease risk in severe psoriatic patients: implications in cardiovascular risk factors management and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Tiago; Sales, Rita; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Martins da Silva, Berta; Selores, Manuela

    2013-11-01

    Severe psoriasis has been associated with increase cardiovascular mortality, due to a higher prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and premature atherosclerosis, as a consequence of its systemic inflammation. Recently, it has been estimated that severe psoriasis may confer an increased 6.2% on long-term risk of cardiovascular disease based on Framingham Risk Score, which can have practical implications in the treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, as treatment guidelines account for the risk of cardiovascular disease in treatment goals. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the attributable risk of severe psoriasis on long-term risk of cardiovascular disease and its implication on the correct treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease on a real-world cohort of patients. One hundred severe psoriasis patients without psoriatic arthritis or previous cardiovascular disease were evaluated and it was found that more than half of the patients were reclassified to a higher cardiovascular risk category with important clinical implications on the correct management of their cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, as a considerable proportion of patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and coronary heart disease equivalent risk were not being correctly managed.

  13. School-Based Cardiovascular Health Promotion: The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Cheryl L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes objectives of the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health multisite intervention study which develops behavioral school health education plans. It targets third through fifth graders, stressing cardiovascular health behaviors (e.g., eating habits, physical activity, and smoking). Curricula, school environmental change, and…

  14. Design and baseline characteristics of the CARdiovascular Outcome Trial of LINAgliptin Versus Glimepiride in Type 2 Diabetes (CAROLINA®).

    PubMed

    Marx, Nikolaus; Rosenstock, Julio; Kahn, Steven E; Zinman, Bernard; Kastelein, John J; Lachin, John M; Espeland, Mark A; Bluhmki, Erich; Mattheus, Michaela; Ryckaert, Bart; Patel, Sanjay; Johansen, Odd Erik; Woerle, Hans-Juergen

    2015-05-01

    CARdiovascular Outcome Trial of LINAgliptin Versus Glimepiride in Type 2 Diabetes (NCT01243424) is an ongoing, randomized trial in subjects with early type 2 diabetes and increased cardiovascular risk or established complications that will determine the long-term cardiovascular impact of linagliptin versus the sulphonylurea glimepiride. Eligible patients were sulphonylurea-naïve with HbA1c 6.5%-8.5% or previously exposed to sulphonylurea (in monotherapy or in a combination regimen <5 years) with HbA1c 6.5%-7.5%. Primary outcome is time to first occurrence of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke or hospitalization for unstable angina. A total of 631 patients with primary outcome events will be required to provide 91% power to demonstrate non-inferiority in cardiovascular safety by comparing the upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval as being below 1.3 for a given hazard ratio. Hierarchical testing for superiority will follow, and the trial has 80% power to demonstrate a 20% relative cardiovascular risk reduction. A total of 6041 patients were treated with median type 2 diabetes duration 6.2 years, 40.0% female, mean HbA1c 7.2%, 66% on 1 and 24% on 2 glucose-lowering agents and 34.5% had previous cardiovascular complications. The results of CARdiovascular Outcome Trial of LINAgliptin Versus Glimepiride in Type 2 Diabetes may influence the decision-making process for selecting a second glucose-lowering agent after metformin in type 2 diabetes.

  15. Acute effects of tianeptine on circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters.

    PubMed

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Hernández, Gerardo; Orozco, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Simon; Baez, Scarlet

    2006-03-01

    Tianeptine is a serotonin-uptake enhancer drug whose antidepressant effectiveness is based on its ability to reduce rather than increase serotonin availability at the synaptic cleft. This paradoxical neuropharmacological mechanism has raised doubt among neuropharmacologists and psychiatrists as to the role of tianeptine as a trusty-reliable antidepressant drug. This controversial issue led us to investigate the acute effects of a single, oral dose (12.5 mg) of this drug on circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters in 50 healthy subjects. The drug provoked a striking and significant reduction of plasma noradrenaline (NA) and plasma serotonin (f-5-HT) while it increased plasma dopamine (DA) and platelet serotonin (p-5-HT) concentrations within the 4-h study period. No adrenaline (Ad) changes were registered. The NA/Ad ratio and the f-5-HT/p-5-HT ratio showed significant reduction throughout the test. Finally, although diastolic blood pressure (DBP) showed significant decrease, neither systolic blood pressure (SBP) nor heart rate (HR) showed significant change. These findings are consistent with the postulation that tianeptine reduces both neural sympathetic activity and parasympathetic activity without affecting adrenal sympathetic activity, enabling us to discuss the possible mechanisms involved in the antidepressant effects of tianeptine. The well-known fact that major depressed patients always show raised NA plus lower than normal p-5-HT levels, both disorders which are normalized by tianeptine, gives neurochemical support to the clinical improvement triggered by the drug in these patients. Summarizing, the results presented in this study demonstrate that tianeptine triggers significant reduction of circulating noradrenaline and plasma serotonin while increasing circulating dopamine and platelet serotonin. Other possible neuropharmacological effects are also discussed.

  16. Mortality of mothers from cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes following pregnancy complications in first delivery.

    PubMed

    Lykke, Jacob A; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Lockwood, Charles J; Triche, Elizabeth W; Paidas, Michael J

    2010-07-01

    The combined effects of preterm delivery, small-for-gestational-age offspring, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, placental abruption and stillbirth on early maternal death from cardiovascular causes have not previously been described in a large cohort. We investigated the effects of pregnancy complications on early maternal death in a registry-based retrospective cohort study of 782 287 women with a first singleton delivery in Denmark 1978-2007, followed for a median of 14.8 years (range 0.25-30.2) accruing 11.6 million person-years. We employed Cox proportional hazard models of early death from cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes following preterm delivery, small-for-gestational-age offspring and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. We found that preterm delivery and small-for-gestational-age were both associated with subsequent death of mothers from cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes. Severe pre-eclampsia was associated with death from cardiovascular causes only. There was a less than additive effect on cardiovascular mortality hazard ratios with increasing number of pregnancy complications: preterm delivery 1.90 [95% confidence intervals 1.49, 2.43]; preterm delivery and small-for-gestational-age offspring 3.30 [2.25, 4.84]; preterm delivery, small-for-gestational-age offspring and pre-eclampsia 3.85 [2.07, 7.19]. Thus, we conclude that, separately and combined, preterm delivery and small-for-gestational-age are strong markers of early maternal death from both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes, while hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are markers of early death of mothers from cardiovascular causes.

  17. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Thomas, Merlin C.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARα agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARγ agonists, and more recently dual PPARα/γ coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARγ receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:18288280

  18. Telomeres and Telomerase in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jih-Kai; Wang, Chao-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are tandem repeat DNA sequences present at the ends of each eukaryotic chromosome to stabilize the genome structure integrity. Telomere lengths progressively shorten with each cell division. Inflammation and oxidative stress, which are implicated as major mechanisms underlying cardiovascular diseases, increase the rate of telomere shortening and lead to cellular senescence. In clinical studies, cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and hypertension have been associated with short leukocyte telomere length. In addition, low telomerase activity and short leukocyte telomere length have been observed in atherosclerotic plaque and associated with plaque instability, thus stroke or acute myocardial infarction. The aging myocardium with telomere shortening and accumulation of senescent cells limits the tissue regenerative capacity, contributing to systolic or diastolic heart failure. In addition, patients with ion-channel defects might have genetic imbalance caused by oxidative stress-related accelerated telomere shortening, which may subsequently cause sudden cardiac death. Telomere length can serve as a marker for the biological status of previous cell divisions and DNA damage with inflammation and oxidative stress. It can be integrated into current risk prediction and stratification models for cardiovascular diseases and can be used in precise personalized treatments. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of telomeres and telomerase in the aging process and their association with cardiovascular diseases. In addition, we discuss therapeutic interventions targeting the telomere system in cardiovascular disease treatments. PMID:27598203

  19. Acute pneumonia and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Medina, Vicente F; Musher, Daniel M; Shachkina, Svetlana; Chirinos, Julio A

    2013-02-09

    Although traditionally regarded as a disease confined to the lungs, acute pneumonia has important effects on the cardiovascular system at all severities of infection. Pneumonia tends to affect individuals who are also at high cardiovascular risk. Results of recent studies show that about a quarter of adults admitted to hospital with pneumonia develop a major acute cardiac complication during their hospital stay, which is associated with a 60% increase in short-term mortality. These findings suggest that outcomes of patients with pneumonia can be improved by prevention of the development and progression of associated cardiac complications. Before this hypothesis can be tested, however, an adequate mechanistic understanding of the cardiovascular changes that occur during pneumonia, and their role in the trigger of various cardiac complications, is needed. In this Review, we summarise knowledge about the burden of cardiac complications in adults with acute pneumonia, the cardiovascular response to this infection, the potential effects of commonly used cardiovascular and anti-infective drugs on these associations, and possible directions for future research.

  20. Sex hormones in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Roger Lyrio; da Silva, Fabrício Bragança; Ribeiro, Rogério Faustino; Stefanon, Ivanita

    2014-05-01

    Gender-associated differences in the development of cardiovascular diseases have been described in humans and animals. These differences could explain the low incidence of cardiovascular disease in women in the reproductive period, such as stroke, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. The cardiovascular protection observed in females has been attributed to the beneficial effects of estrogen on endothelial function. Besides estrogen, sex hormones are able to modulate blood pressure by acting on important systems as cardiovascular, renal, and neural. They can have complementary or antagonistic actions. For example, testosterone can raise blood pressure by stimulating the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, whereas estrogen alone or combined with progesterone has been associated with decreased blood pressure. The effects of testosterone in the development of cardiovascular disease are contradictory. Although some researchers suggest a positive effect, others indicate negative actions of testosterone. Estrogens physiologically stimulate the release of endothelium-derived vasodilator factors and inhibit the renin-angiotensin system. Although the cardioprotective effects of estrogen are widely appreciated, little is known about the effects of progesterone, which is commonly used in hormone replacement therapy. Progesterone has both vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive effects in the vasculature, depending on the location of the vessel and the level of exposure. Nevertheless, the mechanisms through which sex hormones modulate blood pressure have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the characterization of those could lead to a better understanding of hypertension in women and men and perhaps to improved forms of therapy.

  1. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-09

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate.

  2. Vitamin B6 and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Friso, Simonetta; Lotto, V; Corrocher, R; Choi, Sang Woon

    2012-01-01

    While overt vitamin B6 deficiency is not a frequent finding nowadays in medical practice, evidence suggests that insufficiency of this vitamin is rather widespread in a quite large portion of the population such as the elderly or in not unusual conditions such as that of alcohol addiction. Moreover, a mild deficiency in B6 vitamin is a state that may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic evidence from case control and prospective studies have suggested that low dietary intake or reduced blood concentrations of vitamin B6 is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, although most recent trials demonstrated the ineffectiveness of vitamin B6 supplementation on the prevention of cardiovascular events recurrence. Due to limited and somewhat inconsistent data together with the ample variety of critical functions in which vitamin B6 is involved in the human body, it is very challenging to attempt at establishing a cause and effect relationship between vitamin B6 and risk of cardiovascular disease as it is to delineate the exact mechanism(s) by which vitamin B6 may modulate such risk. In the present chapter we review the currently available knowledge deriving from both epidemiological and mechanistic studies designed to define potential candidate mechanisms for the association of vitamin B6 impairment and risk of cardiovascular disease development.

  3. Astaxanthin in cardiovascular health and disease.

    PubMed

    Fassett, Robert G; Coombes, Jeff S

    2012-02-20

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are established processes contributing to cardiovascular disease caused by atherosclerosis. However, antioxidant therapies tested in cardiovascular disease such as vitamin E, C and β-carotene have proved unsuccessful at reducing cardiovascular events and mortality. Although these outcomes may reflect limitations in trial design, new, more potent antioxidant therapies are being pursued. Astaxanthin, a carotenoid found in microalgae, fungi, complex plants, seafood, flamingos and quail is one such agent. It has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Limited, short duration and small sample size studies have assessed the effects of astaxanthin on oxidative stress and inflammation biomarkers and have investigated bioavailability and safety. So far no significant adverse events have been observed and biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation are attenuated with astaxanthin supplementation. Experimental investigations in a range of species using a cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion model demonstrated cardiac muscle preservation when astaxanthin is administered either orally or intravenously prior to the induction of ischaemia. Human clinical cardiovascular studies using astaxanthin therapy have not yet been reported. On the basis of the promising results of experimental cardiovascular studies and the physicochemical and antioxidant properties and safety profile of astaxanthin, clinical trials should be undertaken.

  4. Best practices for developing cardiovascular quality indicators.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jack V; Abrahamyan, Lusine; Donovan, Linda R; Boom, Nicole

    2013-11-01

    The Canadian Heart Health Strategy and Action Plan recommended that the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) lead the development of pan-Canadian data definitions and quality indicators (QIs) for evaluating cardiovascular care in Canada. In response to this recommendation, the CCS developed and adopted a standardized QI development methodology. This report provides a brief overview of the CCS "Best Practices" for developing pan-Canadian cardiovascular QIs. A more detailed description is available in Supplemental Material. The CCS Best Practices QI development methodology consists of 3 phases: phase I, plan and organize the QI development initiative; phase II, develop and select QIs; and phase III, operationalize the QIs. Phase I includes identifying the cardiovascular focus or content area, determining the objective and/or purpose of the initiative, the target users of, and the target population for, the QIs, and selection of a QI working group. Phase II involves formulating the QIs including generating a preliminary set of QIs and draft definitions, followed by an indicator rating and ranking process based on the CCS QI rating criteria. Phase III involves finalizing technical specifications and pilot testing the QIs. It also describes the CCS QI approval process and addresses knowledge translation. Adoption of a standardized methodology for QI development will improve the quality, completeness, acceptability, and usability of pan-Canadian cardiovascular QIs developed by the CCS. Public release of the QI definitions and related performance data might help improve patient care quality and outcomes.

  5. Cardiovascular Nursing: From Florence to Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David R

    2016-08-01

    This paper, based on the 2015 CSANZ Cardiovascular Nursing Lecture, takes its title from the invitation to give this lecture in Melbourne being received when the author was visiting Florence, after whom Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing, is named. Her work has indirectly shaped and influenced cardiovascular nursing, which has developed over the past 50 years. Despite its relatively short history, cardiovascular nursing has made a major contribution to improving the cardiovascular health and well-being of patients and families through health promotion, risk reduction and disease prevention. Examples include cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention and chronic heart failure disease management. Challenges, however, remain, including nurses practising to the full extent of their education and training, working as full partners with physicians and other health professionals in redesigning healthcare, ensuring better data collection and being more active in advocacy and policy initiatives. Cardiovascular nursing has a strong record of innovation but should always remember that it is there to serve the public and, bearing in mind the risk of potential harm versus benefit, be mindful of Florence Nightingale's wise counsel, "First, do no harm".

  6. [Sitting and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality].

    PubMed

    Shiyovich, Arthur; Shlyakhover, Vladimir; Katz, Amos

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged sitting and sedentary behavior comprises a major part of the modern lifestyle: at work, leisure (watching television, Internet) and commuting/traveling. Studies have shown that adults spend about half of their time at work and even more sitting. Similarly, a significant part of the leisure time is spent doing sedentary activities usually in front of a screen (TV or a computer). However, current recommendations focus on increasing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity with almost no recommendations relating to sedentary activities. Recent evidence from several research papers showed deleterious relationships of sedentary behavior with cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and waist circumference). Furthermore, consistent independent associations have been observed between sitting time/sedentary behaviors and elevated all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality risk. Generally, these associations have persisted following adjustment for physical activity. Recent emerging findings have shown that breaking up sedentary time potentially has a beneficial impact on cardiovascular health (independent of total sedentary time and moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity). In this article, we review the association between the time spent in various sedentary activities (occupational, leisure and commuting/transportation) and cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In addition, we review the suggested mechanisms that explain the empiric associations.

  7. Impact of defensive hostility in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Cristina; Palmero, Francesc

    2010-01-01

    Among the psychosocial factors that may influence the development, maintenance, and progression of cardiovascular disease, defensive hostility as a possible risk factor has received substantial empirical support in recent years. The aim of our study was to analyze the relationship between defensive hostility and cardiovascular response to stress situations, as a better predictor of cardiovascular functioning than hostility alone. The sample was composed of 130 female university students. The Cook-Medley Hostility Inventory (Ho) and the Spanish version (CRP) of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MC) were used to measure defensive hostility. We used the registration system MP150 (Biopac) to measure the physiological variables throughout the 3 experimental phases (adaptation, task, and recovery). The stress task was a real exam. We expected cardiovascular responses, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure to be higher in subjects with high hostility and high defensiveness in all 3 phases. The results reflect that individuals with high hostility and high defensiveness present the highest values in the physiological variables, thus supporting the hypothesis that defensive hostility shows the greatest predictive power in relation to cardiovascular functioning in stressful situations.

  8. Adult ADHD Medications and Their Cardiovascular Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, O.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic neurobiological disorder exhibited by difficulty maintaining attention, as well as hyperactivity and impulsive behavior. Central nervous system (CNS) stimulants are the first line of treatment for ADHD. With the increase in number of adults on CNS stimulants, the question that arises is how well do we understand the long-term cardiovascular effects of these drugs. There has been increasing concern that adults with ADHD are at greater risk for developing adverse cardiovascular events such as sudden death, myocardial infarction, and stroke as compared to pediatric population. Cardiovascular response attributed to ADHD medication has mainly been observed in heart rate and blood pressure elevations, while less is known about the etiology of rare cardiovascular events like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), arrhythmia, and cardiomyopathy and its long-term sequelae. We present a unique case of AMI in an adult taking Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts) and briefly discuss the literature relevant to the cardiovascular safety of CNS stimulants for adult ADHD. PMID:27579185

  9. Can nocturnal hypertension predict cardiovascular risk?

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Oded; Logan, Alexander G

    2009-01-01

    Nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping of blood pressure during sleep are distinct entities that often occur together and are regarded as important harbingers of poor cardiovascular prognosis. This review addresses several aspects related to these blood pressure abnormalities including definitions, diagnostic limitations, pathogenesis and associated patient profiles, prognostic significance, and therapeutic strategies. Taken together, persistent nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping blood pressure pattern, perhaps secondary to abnormal renal sodium handling and/or altered nocturnal sympathovagal balance, are strongly associated with deaths, cardiovascular events, and progressive loss of renal function, independent of daytime and 24-hour blood pressure. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches may restore nocturnal blood pressure and circadian blood pressure rhythm to normal; however, whether this translates to a clinically meaningful reduction in unfavorable cardiovascular and renal consequences remains to be seen. PMID:21949613

  10. PPAR-γ in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Sheng Zhong; Ivashchenko, Christine Y.; Usher, Michael G.; Mortensen, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), an essential transcriptional mediator of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis, is increasingly recognized as a key player in inflammatory cells and in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) such as hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, congestive heart failure, and atherosclerosis. PPAR-γ agonists, the thiazolidinediones (TZDs), increase insulin sensitivity, lower blood glucose, decrease circulating free fatty acids and triglycerides, lower blood pressure, reduce inflammatory markers, and reduce atherosclerosis in insulin-resistant patients and animal models. Human genetic studies on PPAR-γ have revealed that functional changes in this nuclear receptor are associated with CVD. Recent controversial clinical studies raise the question of deleterious action of PPAR-γ agonists on the cardiovascular system. These complex interactions of metabolic responsive factors and cardiovascular disease promise to be important areas of focus for the future. PMID:18288291

  11. PPARγ and Its Role in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Mini

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor Gamma (PPARγ), a ligand-activated transcription factor, has a role in various cellular functions as well as glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and prevention of oxidative stress. The activators of PPARγ are already widely used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The cardioprotective effect of PPARγ activation has been studied extensively over the years making them potential therapeutic targets in diseases associated with cardiovascular disorders. However, they are also associated with adverse cardiovascular events such as congestive heart failure and myocardial infarction. This review aims to discuss the role of PPARγ in the various cardiovascular diseases and summarize the current knowledge on PPARγ agonists from multiple clinical trials. Finally, we also review the new PPARγ agonists under development as potential therapeutics with reduced or no adverse effects. PMID:28243251

  12. Cardiovascular and affective recovery from anticipatory threat

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Christian E.; Panage, Sommer; Mendes, Wendy Berry; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2010-01-01

    Anticipating a stressor elicits robust cardiovascular and affective responses. Despite the possibility that recovery from these responses may have implications for physical and mental well-being, little research has examined this issue. In this study, participants either gave a public speech or anticipated giving a speech. Compared with speech-givers, participants who anticipated giving a speech, on average, exhibited similar cardiovascular recovery (decreased heart rate [HR] and increased respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]), and reported lower negative affect during recovery. Only in the anticipation condition, however, were cardiovascular recovery and affective recovery associated: poor affective recovery predicted incomplete HR recovery and decreased RSA. These are the first data to compare explicitly recovery from anticipation of a stressor with recovery from the stressor itself. These findings suggest that failing to recover from anticipation has unique physiological costs that, in turn, may contribute to mental and physical illness. PMID:20096747

  13. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Sahar

    2016-04-01

    As testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has emerged as a commonly prescribed therapy for symptomatic low testosterone, conflicting data have been reported in terms of both its efficacy and potential adverse outcomes. One of the most controversial associations has been that of TRT and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review briefly provides background on the history of TRT, the indications for TRT, and the data behind TRT for symptomatic low testosterone. It then specifically delves into the rather limited data for cardiovascular outcomes of those with low endogenous testosterone and those who receive TRT. The available body of literature strongly suggests that more work, by way of clinical trials, needs to be done to better understand the impact of testosterone and TRT on the cardiovascular system.

  14. The cardiovascular exosome: current perspectives and potential.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Jake; Liu, Peter P; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2013-05-01

    The exosome is a secreted microvesicle that has been shown to contain genetic material and proteins and is involved in multiple levels of cellular communication. The cardiovascular exosome proteome is a promising subproteome that warrants investigation since a detailed understanding of its role in the heart should improve our comprehension of intercellular communication in the heart, and may even assist in biomarker discovery. Indeed, uncovering the role of the exosome in cardiovascular physiology could be accomplished with the application of scientific approaches and insights gained from studies of exosomes in other fields, such as cancer biology and immunology, where much of the established knowledge of the exosome has been generated. In the present review, we discuss the relevant literature and examine areas of investigation that would bring the cardiovascular exosome to the forefront of intercellular communication in the heart.

  15. [Cardiovascular disease prevention and life style modifications].

    PubMed

    Baudet, M; Daugareil, C; Ferrieres, J

    2012-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are mainly caused by atherosclerosis, the development of which is highly dependent on our Western lifestyle. Slowing this pathology depends on the reduction of risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, high blood pressure, smoking, lack of physical activity, excess weight and diabetes. Drug treatment exists and is very effective, but too often they treat the immediate abnormality such as diabetes, high blood pressure and hypercholesterolemia and not the underlying causes: poor eating habits, lack of physical activity and excess weight. These have a negative impact on endothelial function, oxidative stress, and can trigger inflammation, arrythmias and thrombosis. Cardiovascular prevention must therefore target sedentary lifestyle, excess weight, and favor low-calorie, low-salt food and Mediterranean diet. The way this diet works begins to be understood and goes beyond simple cardiovascular prevention. Therapeutic education holds a growing and complementary role in the Public Health system which should call upon the strengths of all healthcare professionals.

  16. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies.

  17. Epigenetics and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Fakhro, Khalid; Rafii, Arash; Abi Khalil, Charbel

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes has become a major health issue worldwide. Chronic hyperglycemia induces a low-grade inflammation that, on top of other mechanisms, leads to endothelial dysfunction. Mounting evidence suggests that DNA methylation, post-translational modifications of histones, and long non-coding RNAs play an important role in the initiation, maintenance, and progression of both macro- and micro-vascular complications of diabetes. Long-term exposure to hyperglycemia induces epigenetic changes that could become irreversible, a phenomenon known as the 'metabolic memory.' Whether epigenetic-based therapies could be used to slow or limit the progression of cardiovascular disease remains unclear. While non-coding RNAs are currently investigated as potential biomarkers that predict diabetic cardiovascular disease incidence and progression, their therapeutic role is only hypothetical. In this review, we highlight the latest findings in experimental and clinical studies relevant to epigenetics and cardiovascular disease in diabetes.

  18. Platelet miRNAs and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván; Alarcón, Marcelo

    2015-07-15

    Activated platelets play a critical role in the acute complications of atherosclerosis that cause life-threatening ischemic events at late stages of the disease. The miRNAs are a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that play a significant role in both inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. The miRNAs are known to be present in platelets and exert important regulatory functions. Here we systematically examine the genes that are regulated by platelet miRNAs (miRNA-223,miRNA-126,miRNA-21, miRNA-24 and miRNA-197) and the association with cardiovascular disease risks. Platelet-secreted miRNAs could be novel biomarkers associated with cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Microparticles as Potential Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    França, Carolina Nunes; Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira; do Amaral, Jônatas Bussador; Tegani, Daniela Melo; Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein

    2015-01-01

    Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is a choice of great relevance because of its impact on health. Some biomarkers, such as microparticles derived from different cell populations, have been considered useful in the assessment of cardiovascular disease. Microparticles are released by the membrane structures of different cell types upon activation or apoptosis, and are present in the plasma of healthy individuals (in levels considered physiological) and in patients with different pathologies. Many studies have suggested an association between microparticles and different pathological conditions, mainly the relationship with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, the effects of different lipid-lowering therapies have been described in regard to measurement of microparticles. The studies are still controversial regarding the levels of microparticles that can be considered pathological. In addition, the methodologies used still vary, suggesting the need for standardization of the different protocols applied, aiming at using microparticles as biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:25626759

  20. Cardiovascular KATP channels and advanced aging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua-Qian; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Coetzee, William A.

    2016-01-01

    With advanced aging, there is a decline in innate cardiovascular function. This decline is not general in nature. Instead, specific changes occur that impact the basic cardiovascular function, which include alterations in biochemical pathways and ion channel function. This review focuses on a particular ion channel that couple the latter two processes, namely the KATP channel, which opening is promoted by alterations in intracellular energy metabolism. We show that the intrinsic properties of the KATP channel changes with advanced aging and argue that the channel can be further modulated by biochemical changes. The importance is widespread, given the ubiquitous nature of the KATP channel in the cardiovascular system where it can regulate processes as diverse as cardiac function, blood flow and protection mechanisms against superimposed stress, such as cardiac ischemia. We highlight questions that remain to be answered before the KATP channel can be considered as a viable target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27733235

  1. [Vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Zito, Annapaola; Dentamaro, Ilaria; Vestito, Domenico; Scicchitano, Pietro; Iacoviello, Massimo; De Pergola, Giovanni; Devito, Fiorella

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a condition that affects a high percentage of individuals of all ages. Considerable attention has been paid recently to the possible role of deficiency of this vitamin in the development of several chronic diseases, including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. In particular, vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increase in conditions such as obesity, insulin-resistance, hypertension, diabetes, and an increased risk of death from these pathologies. There is also a significant correlation with mortality for major cardiovascular events such as heart failure, myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, stroke, atrial fibrillation, and peripheral vascular disease. The pathophysiological mechanisms of these correlations are yet to be determined, but hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system seems to play a leading role. The role of therapy with vitamin D supplements in improving cardiovascular outcome in patients with low levels of vitamin D remains to be determined.

  2. Mechanisms of Lipotoxicity in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Wende, Adam R.; Symons, J. David; Abel, E. Dale

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases account for approximately one third of all deaths globally. Obese and diabetic patients have a high likelihood of dying from complications associated with cardiovascular dysfunction. Obesity and diabetes increase circulating lipids that upon tissue uptake, may be stored as triglyceride, or may be metabolized in other pathways, leading to the generation of toxic intermediates. Excess lipid utilization or activation of signaling pathways by lipid metabolites may disrupt cellular homeostasis and contribute to cell death, defining the concept of lipotoxicity. Lipotoxicity occurs in multiple organs, including cardiac and vascular tissues, and a number of specific mechanisms have been proposed to explain lipotoxic tissue injury. In addition, recent data suggests that increased tissue lipids may also be protective in certain contexts. This review will highlight recent progress toward elucidating the relationship between nutrient oversupply, lipotoxicity, and cardiovascular dysfunction. The review will focus in two sections on the vasculature and cardiomyocytes respectively. PMID:23054891

  3. Metabolic biomarkers for predicting cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Jana E; Brown, Jeremiah R

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac and peripheral vascular biomarkers are increasingly becoming targets of both research and clinical practice. As of 2008, cardiovascular-related medical care accounts for greater than 20% of all the economic costs of illness in the United States. In the age of burgeoning financial pressures on the entire health care system, never has it been more important to try to understand who is at risk for cardiovascular disease in order to prevent new events. In this paper, we will discuss the cost of cardiovascular disease to society, clarify the definition of and need for biomarkers, offer an example of a current biomarker, namely high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and finally examine the approval process for utilizing these in clinical practice. PMID:23386789

  4. MicroRNAs and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Koh; Kuwabara, Yasuhide; Han, Jiahuai

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that have gained status as important regulators of gene expression. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are aberrantly expressed in the cardiovascular system under some pathological conditions. Gain- and loss-of-function studies using in vitro and in vivo models have revealed distinct roles for specific miRNAs in cardiovascular development and physiological function. The implications of miRNAs in cardiovascular disease have recently been recognized, representing the most rapidly evolving research field. In the present article, the currently relevant findings on the role of miRNAs in cardiac diseases will be updated and the target genes of these miRNAs are summarized. PMID:21395978

  5. Endothelial progenitor cells in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Poay Sian Sabrina; Poh, Kian Keong

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Adult endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are derived from hematopoietic stem cells and are capable of forming new blood vessels through a process of vasculogenesis. There are studies which report correlations between circulating EPCs and cardiovascular risk factors. There are also studies on how pharmacotherapies may influence levels of circulating EPCs. In this review, we discuss the potential role of endothelial progenitor cells as both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In addition, we look at the interaction between cardiovascular pharmacotherapies and endothelial progenitor cells. We also discuss how EPCs can be used directly and indirectly as a therapeutic agent. Finally, we evaluate the challenges facing EPC research and how these may be overcome. PMID:25126384

  6. Autophagy and oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yu; Thompson, Melissa D.; Cohen, Richard A.; Tong, XiaoYong

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation process by which intracellular components, including soluble macromolecules (e.g. nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids) and dysfunctional organelles (e.g. mitochondria, ribosomes, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum) are degraded by the lysosome. Autophagy is orchestrated by the autophagy related protein (Atg) composed protein complexes to form autophagosomes, which fuse with lysosomes to generate autolysosomes where the contents are degraded to provide energy for cell survival in response to environmental and cellular stress. Autophagy is an important player in cardiovascular disease development such as atherosclerosis, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion, cardiomyopathy, heart failure and hypertension. Autophagy in particular contributes to cardiac ischemia, hypertension and diabetes by interaction with reactive oxygen species generated in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. This review highlights the dual role of autophagy in cardiovascular disease development. Full recognition of autophagy as an adaptive or maladaptive response would provide potential new strategies for cardiovascular disease prevention and management. PMID:24834848

  7. Nanomedicine applied to cardiovascular diseases: latest developments.

    PubMed

    Martín Giménez, Virna Margarita; Kassuha, Diego E; Manucha, Walter

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of disability and they are currently responsible for a significant number of deaths in a large percentage of the world population. A large number of therapeutic options have been developed for the management of cardiovascular diseases. However, they are insufficient to stop or significantly reduce the progression of these diseases, and may produce unpleasant side effects. In this situation, the need arises to continue exploring new technologies and strategies in order to overcome the disadvantages and limitations of conventional therapeutic options. Thus, treatment of cardiovascular diseases has become one of the major focuses of scientific and technological development in recent times. More specifically, there have been important advances in the area of nanotechnology and the controlled release of drugs, destined to circumvent many limitations of conventional therapies for the treatment of diseases such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke and thrombosis.

  8. Social networks in cardiovascular disease management.

    PubMed

    Shaya, Fadia T; Yan, Xia; Farshid, Maryam; Barakat, Samer; Jung, Miah; Low, Sara; Fedder, Donald

    2010-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA. Social networks have a positive association with obesity, smoking cessation and weight loss. This article summarizes studies evaluating the impact of social networks on the management of cardiovascular disease. The 35 studies included in the article describe the impact of social networks on a decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease, depression and mortality. In addition, having a large-sized social network is also associated with better outcomes and improved health. The role of pharmacists is beginning to play an important role in the patient-centered medical home, which needs to be incorporated into social networks. The patient-centered medical home can serve as an adaptive source for social network evolvement.

  9. The effect of adrenal demedullation on cardiovascular responses to environmental stimulation in conscious rats.

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, K. R.; Kelly, E.

    1986-01-01

    Circulating plasma adrenaline has been implicated in the facilitation of neurogenic pressor responses and development of hypertension. Bilateral adrenal demedullation in rats did not affect body weight, urine output, urinary electrolyte (Na+, K+ and Cl-) excretion, nor plasma corticosterone concentration, indicating the selective nature of the demedullation procedure. Adrenal demedullation did induce significant reductions in adrenal catecholamine content, plasma adrenaline levels, resting blood pressure and heart rate in conscious rats, but did not affect alerting-induced increases in blood pressure. The adrenal medulla and circulating plasma adrenaline appear to contribute to the maintenance of resting cardiovascular parameters, but would not appear to be involved in nor facilitate the cardiovascular responses to environmental stimulation. PMID:3742165

  10. Vitamin D, cardiovascular disease and mortality.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; März, Winfried; Drechsler, Christiane; Ritz, Eberhard; Zittermann, Armin; Cavalier, Etienne; Pieber, Thomas R; Lappe, Joan M; Grant, William B; Holick, Michael F; Dekker, Jacqueline M

    2011-11-01

    A poor vitamin D status, i.e. low serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], is common in the general population. This finding is of concern not only because of the classic vitamin D effects on musculoskeletal outcomes, but also because expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes in the heart and blood vessels suggests a role of vitamin D in the cardiovascular system. VDR-knockout mice suffer from cardiovascular disease (CVD), and various experimental studies suggest cardiovascular protection by vitamin D, including antiatherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory and direct cardio-protective actions, beneficial effects on classic cardiovascular risk factors as well as suppression of parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. In epidemiological studies, low levels of 25(OH)D are associated with increased risk of CVD and mortality. Data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are sparse and have partially, but not consistently, shown some beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation on cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. arterial hypertension). We have insufficient data on vitamin D effects on cardiovascular events, but meta-analyses of RCTs indicate that vitamin D may modestly reduce all-cause mortality. Despite accumulating data suggesting that a sufficient vitamin D status may protect against CVD, we still must wait for results of large-scale RCTs before raising general recommendations for vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of CVD. In current clinical practice, the overall risks and costs of vitamin D supplementation should be weighed against the potential adverse consequences of untreated vitamin D deficiency.

  11. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  12. Modulation of the cardiovascular system by leptin.

    PubMed

    Abel, E Dale; Sweeney, Gary

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that individuals with the metabolic syndrome have a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and much effort has been expended to elicit the underlying mechanisms. Various studies have proposed that excessive or deficient physiological effects mediated by leptin make an important contribution, yet many paradoxical observations often preclude a clear definition of the role of leptin. This review article will briefly discuss principal and most recent evidence on direct and indirect regulation of the cardiovascular system by leptin, focusing on cardiac structural and functional as well as vascular effects.

  13. Barriers to women's cardiovascular risk knowledge.

    PubMed

    Liewer, Linda; Mains, Douglas A; Lykens, Kristine; René, Antonio A

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death for women in the United States, resulting in a greater emphasis on research and methods for addressing issues relating to this health problem both nationally and worldwide. The authors' purpose was to identify barriers to women's cardiovascular risk knowledge, both personal and organizational, through key informant interviews of health leaders at 10 community health organizations. Analysis showed an overall lack of awareness of CVD risk for women. Culture, finance, and lack of awareness and easily accessible programs implicated the importance of physicians as health care providers and educators for women patients.

  14. The paleopathology of the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, M R

    1993-01-01

    Paleopathology, the study of disease in ancient remains, adds the dimension of time to our study of health and disease. The oldest preserved heart is from a mummified rabbit of the Pleistocene epoch, over 20,000 years old. Cardiovascular disease has been identified in human mummies from Alaska and Egypt, covering a time span ranging from approximately 3,000 to 300 years ago. An experimental study suggests that the potential exists for identifying a wide range of cardiovascular pathologic conditions in mummified remains. The antiquity and ubiquity of arteriosclerotic heart disease is considered in terms of pathogenesis. Images PMID:8298320

  15. [Cardiovascular disease and systemic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Cuende, José I; Pérez de Diego, Ignacio J; Godoy, Diego

    2016-01-01

    More than a century of research has shown that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process more than an infiltrative or thrombogenic process. It has been demonstrated epidemiologically and by imaging techniques, that systemic inflammatory diseases (in particular, but not exclusively, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus) increase the atherosclerotic process, and has a demonstrated pathophysiological basis. Furthermore, treatments to control inflammatory diseases can modify the course of the atherosclerotic process. Although there are no specific scales for assessing cardiovascular risk in patients with these diseases, cardiovascular risk is high. A number of specific risk scales are being developed, that take into account specific factors such as the degree of inflammatory activity.

  16. Exosome and its roles in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wang; Zheng, Xi-Long; Zhao, Shui-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Exosomes are nanosized vesicles secreted by cells, which are capable of carrying signaling molecules in the forms of protein, mRNA and miRNA to serve as the platforms for complex intercellular communications. During the past few years, increasing efforts have been devoted to exosome research, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of identifying the molecular composition, elucidating the mechanisms and regulations of biogenesis and characterizing the functions in a variety of physiological and pathological settings including cardiovascular diseases, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in modern society. This review provides an update on exosome research and summarizes the roles of exosomes in cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Recent advancements in the cardiovascular drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljeet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the disease that affects the cardiovascular system, vascular diseases of the brain and kidney, and peripheral arterial disease. Despite of all advances in pharmacological and clinical treatment, heart failure is a leading cause of morbidness and mortality worldwide. Many new therapeutic advance strategies, including cell transplantation, gene delivery or therapy, and cytokines or other small molecules, have been research to treat heart failure. The main aim of this review article is to focus on nano carriers advancement and addressing the problems associated with old and modern therapeutics such as nonspecific effects and poor stability.

  18. iPSCs in Cardiovascular Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Mercola, Mark; Colas, Alexandre; Willems, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The unexpected discovery that somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state yielding induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has made it possible to produce cardiovascular cells exhibiting inherited traits and disorders. Use of these cells in high throughput analyses should broaden our insight into fundamental disease mechanisms and provide many benefits for patients, including new therapeutics and individually tailored therapies. Here we review recent progress in generating iPSC-based models of cardiovascular disease and their multiple applications in drug development. PMID:23371902

  19. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of anomalous coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anitha; Keegan, Jennifer; Pennell, Dudley J

    2005-09-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of anomalous coronary arteries is a class I indication. The term anomalous coronary artery encompasses those with an abnormal origin (from the incorrect sinus, too-high or too-low from the correct sinus, or from the pulmonary artery) and/or number of ostia. Their clinical significance results from the increased risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death associated with those traversing an interarterial course between the aorta and main pulmonary artery/right ventricular outflow tract. In this article, we review the role and practice of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in this field.

  20. Cardiovascular pharmacogenomics: current status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Roden, Dan M

    2016-01-01

    Drugs are widely used and highly effective in the treatment of heart disease. Nevertheless, in some instances, even drugs effective in a population display lack of efficacy or adverse drug reactions in individual patients, often in an apparently unpredictable fashion. This review summarizes the genomic factors now known to influence variability in responses to widely used cardiovascular drugs such as clopidogrel, warfarin, heparin and statins. Genomic approaches being used to discover new pathways in common cardiovascular diseases and thus potential new targets for drug development are described. Finally, the way in which this new information is likely to be used in an electronic medical record environment is discussed. PMID:26178435

  1. In utero programming of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Barker, D J

    2000-01-15

    Low birth weight, thinness and short body length at birth are now known to be associated with increased rates of cardiovascular disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes in adult life. The fetal origins hypothesis proposes that these diseases originate through adaptations which the fetus makes when it is undernourished. These adaptations may be cardiovascular, metabolic or endocrine. They permanently change the structure and function of the body. Prevention of the diseases may depend on prevention of imbalances in fetal growth or imbalances between pre- and post-natal growth, or imbalances in nutrient supply to the fetus.

  2. Investigating the transcriptional control of cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Kathiriya, Irfan S.; Nora, Elphege P.; Bruneau, Benoit G.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of thousands of genes instructs complex morphogenetic and molecular events for heart development. Cardiac transcription factors (TFs) choreograph gene expression at each stage of differentiation by interacting with co-factors, including chromatin-modifying enzymes, and by binding to a constellation of regulatory DNA elements. Here, we present salient examples relevant to cardiovascular development and heart disease and review techniques that can sharpen our understanding of cardiovascular biology. We discuss the interplay between cardiac TFs, cis-regulatory elements and chromatin as dynamic regulatory networks, to orchestrate sequential deployment of the cardiac gene expression program. PMID:25677518

  3. Testing Na+ in blood

    PubMed Central

    Lava, Sebastiano A.G.; Bianchetti, Mario G.; Milani, Gregorio P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Both direct potentiometry and indirect potentiometry are currently used for Na+ testing in blood. These measurement techniques show good agreement as long as protein and lipid concentrations in blood remain normal. In severely ill patients, indirect potentiometry commonly leads to relevant errors in Na+ estimation: 25% of specimens show a disagreement between direct and indirect potentiometry, which is ≥4 mmol/L (mostly spuriously elevated Na+ level due to low circulating albumin concentration). There is a need for increased awareness of the poor performance of indirect potentiometry in some clinical settings.

  4. [New populations at increased cardiovascular risk: Cardiovascular disease in dermatological diseases].

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gijón, Elena; Meseguer-Yebra, Carmen; Palacio-Aller, Lucía; Godoy-Rocati, Diego Vicente; Lahoz-Rallo, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The increased cardiovascular risk in some dermatological diseases has been demonstrated in recent decades. Diseases such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus are currently included in the guidelines for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Other diseases such as androgenic alopecia, polycystic ovary syndrome, hidradenitis suppurativa or lichen planus have numerous studies that point to an increased risk, however, they have not been included in these guidelines. In this article we review the evidence supporting this association, in order to alert the clinician to the need for greater control in cardiovascular risk factors in these patients.

  5. Management of Hypogonadism in Cardiovascular Patients: What Are the Implications of Testosterone Therapy on Cardiovascular Morbidity?

    PubMed

    Tanna, Monique S; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Berger, Jeffery S; Underberg, James; Gianos, Eugenia; Weintraub, Howard S

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy is recommended for men with clinical androgen deficiency with decades of evidence supporting its use for treatment of sexual, physical, and psychological consequences of male hypogonadism. In this updated review, the authors discuss the implications of testosterone deficiency and conflicting evidence regarding testosterone replacement therapy and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Based on mounting evidence, the authors conclude that testosterone therapy can be safely considered in men with appropriately diagnosed clinical androgen deficiency and concurrent cardiovascular risk factors and even manifest cardiovascular disease after a thorough discussion of potential risks and with guideline-recommended safety monitoring.

  6. Correlation between thoracic aorta 18F-natrium fluoride uptake and cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Fiz, Francesco; Morbelli, Silvia; Bauckneht, Matteo; Piccardo, Arnoldo; Ferrarazzo, Giulia; Nieri, Alberto; Artom, Nathan; Cabria, Manlio; Marini, Cecilia; Canepa, Marco; Sambuceti, Gianmario

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigating the relationship between thoracic and cardiac 18F-Natrium-Fluoride (18F-NaF) uptake, as a marker of ongoing calcification and cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS: Seventy-eight patients (44 females, mean age 63, range 44-83) underwent whole body 18F-NaF positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Cardiovascular risk (CVR) was used to divide these patients in three categories: Low (LR), medium (MR) and high risk (HR). 18F-NaF uptake was measured by manually drawing volumes of interest on the ascending aorta, on the aortic arch, on the descending aorta and on the myocardium; average standardized uptake value was normalized for blood-pool, to obtain target-to-background ratio (TBR). Values from the three aortic segments were then averaged to obtain an index of the whole thoracic aorta. RESULTS: A significant difference in whole thoracic aorta TBR was detected between HR and LR (1.84 ± 0.76 vs 1.07 ± 0.3, P < 0.001), but also between MR and HR-LR (1.4 ± 0.4, P < 0.02 and P < 0.01, respectively). Significance of this TBR stratification strongly varied among thoracic aorta subsegments and the lowest P values were reached in the descending aorta (P < 0.01). Myocardial uptake provided an effective CVR classes stratification (P < 0.001).Correlation between TBR and CVR was appreciable when the whole thoracic aorta was considered (R = 0.67), but it peaked when correlating the descending thoracic segment (R = 0.75), in comparison with the aortic arch and the ascending segment (R = 0.55 and 0.53, respectively). CONCLUSION: Fluoride uptake within the thoracic aorta wall effectively depicts patients’ risk class and correlates with cardiovascular risk. Descending aorta is the most effective in CVR determination. PMID:26834946

  7. Teaching Cardiovascular Integrations with Computer Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Nils S.; Campbell, Kenneth B.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a computer-based instructional unit in cardiovascular physiology. The program (which employs simulated laboratory experimental techniques with a problem-solving format is designed to supplement an animal laboratory and to offer students an integrative approach to physiology through use of microcomputers. Also presents an overview of the…

  8. Genetic basis of congenital cardiovascular malformations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the la...

  9. Heat waves, aging, and human cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Kenney, W Larry; Craighead, Daniel H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2014-10-01

    This brief review is based on a President's Lecture presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in 2013. The purpose of this review was to assess the effects of climate change and consequent increases in environmental heat stress on the aging cardiovascular system. The earth's average global temperature is slowly but consistently increasing, and along with mean temperature changes come increases in heat wave frequency and severity. Extreme passive thermal stress resulting from prolonged elevations in ambient temperature and prolonged physical activity in hot environments creates a high demand on the left ventricle to pump blood to the skin to dissipate heat. Even healthy aging is accompanied by altered cardiovascular function, which limits the extent to which older individuals can maintain stroke volume, increase cardiac output, and increase skin blood flow when exposed to environmental extremes. In the elderly, the increased cardiovascular demand during heat waves is often fatal because of increased strain on an already compromised left ventricle. Not surprisingly, excess deaths during heat waves 1) occur predominantly in older individuals and 2) are overwhelmingly cardiovascular in origin. Increasing frequency and severity of heat waves coupled with a rapidly growing at-risk population dramatically increase the extent of future untoward health outcomes.

  10. Human Cardiovascular Responses to Passive Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Craig G.; Wilson, Thad E.

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress increases human morbidity and mortality compared to normothermic conditions. Many occupations, disease states, as well as stages of life are especially vulnerable to the stress imposed on the cardiovascular system during exposure to hot ambient conditions. This review focuses on the cardiovascular responses to heat stress that are necessary for heat dissipation. To accomplish this regulatory feat requires complex autonomic nervous system control of the heart and various vascular beds. For example, during heat stress cardiac output increases up to twofold, by increases in heart rate and an active maintenance of stroke volume via increases in inotropy in the presence of decreases in cardiac preload. Baroreflexes retain the ability to regulate blood pressure in many, but not all, heat stress conditions. Central hypovolemia is another cardiovascular challenge brought about by heat stress, which if added to a subsequent central volumetric stress, such as hemorrhage, can be problematic and potentially dangerous, as syncope and cardiovascular collapse may ensue. These combined stresses can compromise blood flow and oxygenation to important tissues such as the brain. It is notable that this compromised condition can occur at cardiac outputs that are adequate during normothermic conditions but are inadequate in heat because of the increased systemic vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. Understanding the mechanisms within this complex regulatory system will allow for the development of treatment recommendations and countermeasures to reduce risks during the ever-increasing frequency of severe heat events that are predicted to occur. PMID:25589263

  11. Polychlorinated biphenyls and links to cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Jordan T; Petriello, Michael C; Newsome, Bradley J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2016-02-01

    The pathology of cardiovascular disease is multi-faceted, with links to many modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Epidemiological evidence now implicates exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), with an increased risk of developing diabetes, hypertension, and obesity; all of which are clinically relevant to the onset and progression of cardiovascular disease. PCBs exert their cardiovascular toxicity either directly or indirectly via multiple mechanisms, which are highly dependent on the type and concentration of PCBs present. However, many PCBs may modulate cellular signaling pathways leading to common detrimental outcomes including induction of chronic oxidative stress, inflammation, and endocrine disruption. With the abundance of potential toxic pollutants increasing globally, it is critical to identify sensible means of decreasing associated disease risks. Emerging evidence now implicates a protective role of lifestyle modifications such as increased exercise and/or nutritional modulation via anti-inflammatory foods, which may help to decrease the vascular toxicity of PCBs. This review will outline the current state of knowledge linking coplanar and non-coplanar PCBs to cardiovascular disease and describe the possible molecular mechanism of this association.

  12. Tetrahydrobiopterin in Cardiovascular Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bendall, Jennifer K.; Douglas, Gillian; McNeill, Eileen; Channon, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) functions as a cofactor for several important enzyme systems, and considerable evidence implicates BH4 as a key regulator of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the setting of cardiovascular health and disease. BH4 bioavailability is determined by a balance of enzymatic de novo synthesis and recycling, versus degradation in the setting of oxidative stress. Augmenting vascular BH4 levels by pharmacological supplementation has been shown in experimental studies to enhance NO bioavailability. However, it has become more apparent that the role of BH4 in other enzymatic pathways, including other NOS isoforms and the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases, may have a bearing on important aspects of vascular homeostasis, inflammation, and cardiac function. This article reviews the role of BH4 in cardiovascular development and homeostasis, as well as in pathophysiological processes such as endothelial and vascular dysfunction, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cardiac hypertrophy. We discuss the therapeutic potential of BH4 in cardiovascular disease states and attempt to address how this modulator of intracellular NO-redox balance may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many cardiovascular diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 3040–3077. PMID:24294830

  13. Tracking stem cells in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Chemaly, Elie R; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; Frangioni, John V; Hajjar, Roger J

    2005-11-01

    Stem cells are a promising approach to cardiovascular therapeutics. Animal experiments have assessed the fate of injected stem cells through ex vivo methods on sacrificed animals. Approaches are needed for in vivo tracking of stem cells. Various imaging techniques and contrast agents for stem cell tracking will be reviewed.

  14. Cardiovascular-Active Venom Toxins: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Rebello Horta, Carolina Campolina; Chatzaki, Maria; Rezende, Bruno Almeida; Magalhães, Bárbara de Freitas; Duarte, Clara Guerra; Felicori, Liza Figueiredo; Ribeiro Oliveira-Mendes, Bárbara Bruna; do Carmo, Anderson Oliveira; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2016-01-01

    Animal venoms are a mixture of bioactive compounds produced as weapons and used primarily to immobilize and kill preys. As a result of the high potency and specificity for various physiological targets, many toxins from animal venoms have emerged as possible drugs for the medication of diverse disorders, including cardiovascular diseases. Captopril, which inhibits the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), was the first successful venom-based drug and a notable example of rational drug design. Since captopril was developed, many studies have discovered novel bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs) with actions on the cardiovascular system. Natriuretic peptides (NPs) have also been found in animal venoms and used as template to design new drugs with applications in cardiovascular diseases. Among the anti-arrhythmic peptides, GsMTx-4 was discovered to be a toxin that selectively inhibits the stretch-activated cation channels (SACs), which are involved in atrial fibrillation. The present review describes the main components isolated from animal venoms that act on the cardiovascular system and presents a brief summary of venomous animals and their venom apparatuses.

  15. Arsenic exposure and cardiovascular disorders: an overview.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2009-12-01

    The incidence of arsenic toxicity has been observed in various countries including Taiwan, Bangladesh, India, Argentina, Australia, Chile, China, Hungary, Peru, Thailand, Mexico and United States of America. Arsenic is a ubiquitous element present in drinking water, and its exposure is associated with various cardiovascular disorders. Arsenic exposure plays a key role in the pathogenesis of vascular endothelial dysfunction as it inactivates endothelial nitric oxide synthase, leading to reduction in the generation and bioavailability of nitric oxide. In addition, the chronic arsenic exposure induces high oxidative stress, which may affect the structure and function of cardiovascular system. Further, the arsenic exposure has been noted to induce atherosclerosis by increasing the platelet aggregation and reducing fibrinolysis. Moreover, arsenic exposure may cause arrhythmia by increasing the QT interval and accelerating the cellular calcium overload. The chronic exposure to arsenic upregulates the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule and vascular endothelial growth factor to induce cardiovascular pathogenesis. The present review critically discussed the detrimental role of arsenic in the cardiovascular system.

  16. Iron hypothesis of cardiovascular disease: still controversial.

    PubMed

    Aursulesei, Viviana; Cozma, A; Krasniqi, A

    2014-01-01

    Iron hypothesis has been a controversial subject for over 30 years as many studies support its role as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, while other studies found no evidence to support it. The conflicting results are accounted for by the non-homogeneity of trial design in terms of population inclusion criteria and different endpoints, non-uniform use of parameters for assessing iron role, and incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of action. The nature of iron is dual, being of crucial importance for the human body, but also toxic as "free iron" induces oxidative stress. Under physiological conditions, there are efficient and complex mechanisms against iron-induced oxidative stress, which could be reproduced for creating new, intelligent antioxidants. Iron depletion improves the cardiovascular prognosis only if serum concentration is at the lowest limit of normal ranges. However, low iron levels and the type of dietary iron intake correlate with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, influence the ischemic endpoints in the elderly, and exert negative impact on heart failure prognosis. So far, the causal relation and involved mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Iron overload is a difficult and frequent condition, involving the cardiovascular system by specific pathogenic pathways, therefore determining a particular form of restrictive cardiomyopathy and vaso-occlusive arterial damage.

  17. Cardiovascular remodeling and the peripheral serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Ayme-Dietrich, Estelle; Aubertin-Kirch, Gaëlle; Maroteaux, Luc; Monassier, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Plasma 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin), released from blood platelets, plays a major role in the human cardiovascular system. Besides the effect of endogenous serotonin, many drugs targeting serotonergic receptors are widely used in the general population (antiobesity agents, antidepressants, antipsychotics, antimigraine agents), and may enhance the cardiovascular risk. Depending on the type of serotonin receptor activated and its location, the use of these compounds triggers acute and chronic effects. The acute cardiovascular response to 5-HT, named the Bezold-Jarish reflex, leads to intense bradycardia associated with atrioventricular block, and involves 5-HT3, 5-HT1B/1D, 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A/2B receptors. The chronic contribution of 5-HT and its receptors (5-HT4 and 5-HT2A/2B) in cardiovascular tissue remodeling, with a particular emphasis on cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and valve degeneration, will be explored in this review. Finally, through the analysis of the effects of sarpogrelate, some new aspects of 5-HT2A receptor pharmacology in vasomotor tone regulation and the interaction between endothelial and smooth muscle cells will also be discussed. The aim of this review is to emphasize the cardiac side effects caused by serotonin receptor activation, and to highlight their possible prevention by the development of new drugs targeting this system.

  18. Targeting resveratrol to mitochondria for cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Fan, Enguo; Zhang, Kai

    2010-06-01

    Resveratrol, a naturally occurring phytopolyphenol compound, has attracted extensive interest in recent years because of its diverse pharmacological characteristics. Considering the central role of mitochondria in cell signaling, growth and death, in the present paper we have tried to summarize the present data including patents and discuss the beneficial effects of resveratrol on cardiovascular diseases from the mitochondria perspective.

  19. Cardiovascular tissues contain independent circadian clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, A. J.; London, B.; Block, G. D.; Menaker, M.

    2005-01-01

    Acute cardiovascular events exhibit a circadian rhythm in the frequency of occurrence. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not yet fully understood, but they may be due to rhythmicity inherent in the cardiovascular system. We have begun to characterize rhythmicity of the clock gene mPer1 in the rat cardiovascular system. Luciferase activity driven by the mPer1 gene promoter is rhythmic in vitro in heart tissue explants and a wide variety of veins and arteries cultured from the transgenic Per1-luc rat. The tissues showed between 3 and 12 circadian cycles of gene expression in vitro before damping. Whereas peak per1-driven bioluminescence consistently occurred during the late night in the heart and all arteries sampled, the phases of the rhythms in veins varied significantly by anatomical location. Varying the time of the culture procedure relative to the donor animal's light:dark cycle revealed that, unlike some other rat tissues such as liver, the phases of in vitro rhythms of arteries, veins, and heart explants were affected by culture time. However, phase relationships among tissues were consistent across culture times; this suggests diversity in circadian regulation among components of the cardiovascular system.

  20. The Current Status of Children's Cardiovascular Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taubert, Kathryn A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease may be modified in childhood. The paper discusses high blood cholesterol, obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, and high blood pressure, noting that risk factor education and modification can occur at home, school, or the doctor's office. (Author/SM)

  1. Polychlorinated Biphenyls and links to Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Jordan T.; Petriello, Michael C.; Newsome, Bradley J.; Hennig, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The pathology of cardiovascular disease is multi-faceted, with links to many modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Epidemiological evidence now implicates exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), with an increased risk of developing diabetes, hypertension, and obesity; all of which are clinically relevant to the onset and progression of cardiovascular disease. PCBs exert their cardiovascular toxicity either directly or indirectly via multiple mechanisms, which are highly dependent on the type and concentration of PCBs present. However, many PCBs may modulate cellular signaling pathways leading to common detrimental outcomes including induction of chronic oxidative stress, inflammation, and endocrine disruption. With the abundance of potential toxic pollutants increasing globally, it is critical to identify sensible means of decreasing associated disease risks. Emerging evidence now implicates a protective role of lifestyle modifications such as increased exercise and/or nutritional modulation via anti-inflammatory foods, which may help to decrease the vascular toxicity of PCBs. This review will outline the current state of knowledge linking coplanar and non-coplanar PCBs to cardiovascular disease and describe the possible molecular mechanism of this association. PMID:25877901

  2. Marketing cardiovascular services: the new paradigms.

    PubMed

    Pittam, D C

    1995-01-01

    In this first of three articles dealing with how to market cardiovascular services in today's healthcare environment, the groundwork is laid for understanding what those changes are, what effects they can have on how those services should be marketed, and the market strategy planning process.

  3. Cardiovascular Simulator for the Undergraduate Physics Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruner, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a cardiovascular simulator which illustrates the use of a catheter-coupled external transducer for dynamic pressure measurements in the circulatory system. With the simulator, students can observe the effects of stroke volume and rate upon maximum, minimum, and mean arterial pressure. (Author/GA)

  4. Long noncoding RNAs in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shizuka; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2015-02-13

    In recent year, increasing evidence suggests that noncoding RNAs play important roles in the regulation of tissue homeostasis and pathophysiological conditions. Besides small noncoding RNAs (eg, microRNAs), >200-nucleotide long transcripts, namely long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), can interfere with gene expressions and signaling pathways at various stages. In the cardiovascular system, studies have detected and characterized the expression of lncRNAs under normal physiological condition and in disease states. Several lncRNAs are regulated during acute myocardial infarction (eg, Novlnc6) and heart failure (eg, Mhrt), whereas others control hypertrophy, mitochondrial function and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. In the vascular system, the endothelial-expressed lncRNAs (eg, MALAT1 and Tie-1-AS) can regulate vessel growth and function, whereas the smooth-muscle-expressed lncRNA smooth muscle and endothelial cell-enriched migration/differentiation-associated long noncoding RNA was recently shown to control the contractile phenotype of smooth muscle cells. This review article summarizes the data on lncRNA expressions in mouse and human and highlights identified cardiovascular lncRNAs that might play a role in cardiovascular diseases. Although our understanding of lncRNAs is still in its infancy, these examples may provide helpful insights how lncRNAs interfere with cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Cardiovascular studies using the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinds, J. E.; Cothran, L. N.; Hawthorne, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    Despite the phylogenetic similarities between chimpanzees and man, there exists a paucity of reliable data on normal cardiovascular function and the physiological responses of the system to standard interventions. Totally implanted biotelemetry systems or hardwire analog techniques were used to examine the maximum number of cardiovascular variables which could be simultaneously monitored without significantly altering the system's performance. This was performed in order to acquire base-line data not previously obtained in this species, to determine cardiovascular response to specific forcing functions such as ventricular pacing, drug infusions, and lower body negative pressure. A cardiovascular function profile protocol was developed in order to adjust independently the three major factors which modify ventricular performance, namely, left ventricular performance, left ventricular preload, afterload, and contractility. Cardiac pacing at three levels above the ambient rate was used to adjust end diastolic volume (preload). Three concentrations of angiotensin were infused continuously to evaluate afterload in a stepwide fashion. A continuous infusion of dobutamine was administered to raise the manifest contractile state of the heart.

  6. Evidence relating dietary sodium to cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Michael H

    2006-06-01

    The expectation that dietary sodium intake might influence cardiovascular disease occurrence has been based upon its impact on blood pressure (BP). Solid experimental data confirms the ability of large (75-100 mmols/24 hours) changes in dietary sodium to reduce pressure by, on average, mid-low single digits. However, there is substantial inter-individual variation in BP response. In addition, sodium restriction generates other, sometimes undesirable effects, including increased insulin resistance, activation of the renin-angiotensin system, and increased sympathetic nerve activity. The health effects of salt restriction are, therefore, the sum of these recognized, and probably other unrecognized, intermediate effects. Ideally, salt restriction would be tested in a randomized clinical trial. In its absence, there are 9 observational studies linking baseline sodium intake, estimated by either 24 hour urine or dietary intake, to morbidity and mortality. The results have been inconsistent. The only study in hypertensive patients, there was an inverse relation of sodium to cardiovascular outcome. In a Japanese study, stroke incidence was increased among males with the highest salt intake. Two studies found a direct relation of sodium intake to cardiovascular mortality in an obese minority of the group studied. Taken together, these results suggest, not surprisingly given the genetic, behavioral, and environmental variety of humankind, that heterogeneity best describes the relation of sodium intake to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In short, the available data provides no support for any universal recommendation of a particular level of dietary sodium.

  7. Cardiovascular diseases in dental practice. Practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Margaix Muñoz, María; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda; Poveda Roda, Rafael; Sarrión, Gracia

    2008-05-01

    Coronary heart disease is the principal cause of death in the industrialized world. Its most serious expression, acute myocardial infarction, causes 7.2 million deaths each year worldwide, and it is estimated that 20% of all people will suffer heart failure in the course of their lifetime. The control of risk cardiovascular factors, including arterial hypertension, obesity and diabetes mellitus is the best way to prevent such diseases. The most frequent and serious cardiovascular emergencies that can manifest during dental treatment are chest pain (as a symptom of underlying disease) and acute lung edema. Due to the high prevalence and seriousness of these problems, the dental surgeon must be aware of them and should be able to act quickly and effectively in the case of an acute cardiovascular event. In patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, attention must center on the control of pain, the reduction of stress, and the use or avoidance of a vasoconstrictor in dental anesthesia. In turn, caution is required in relation to the antiplatelet, anticoagulant and antihypertensive medication typically used by such patients.

  8. Cardiovascular Risk in Women With PCOS

    PubMed Central

    Scicchitano, Pietro; Dentamaro, Ilaria; Carbonara, Rosa; Bulzis, Gabriella; Dachille, Annamaria; Caputo, Paola; Riccardi, Roberta; Locorotondo, Manuela; Mandurino, Cosimo; Matteo Ciccone, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), or Stein-Leventhal syndrome, is a common endocrine disorder defined by two of the three following features: i) oligoovulation or anovulation, ii) clinical and/or biochemical signs of hyperandrogenism, or iii) polycystic ovaries, once the related endocrinological and gynaecological disorders have been excluded. PCOS does not exclusively involve the reproductive apparatus , it has a complex number of systemic relevancy symptoms. It leads to Metabolic Syndrome, with severe consequences on the cardiovascular apparatus. Many clinical studies have underlined the connection between PCOS and the cardiovascular risk profile of such female patients, due to a lipid/glucose altered metabolism, hypertension, systemic inflammatory condition (assessable by markers such as VES, TNF-alfa, citokines and C-reactive protein (hsPCR) levels), and vascular injuries. Considering the early onset of the disease, PCOS could be considered as a real cardiovascular risk factor which affects the quality of life seriously. The current review aimed to point out the main connections between PCOS and cardiovascular risk factors according to the latest findings coming from literature data analysis, and try to depict the great influences that such a common disease can have on the patients’ health integrity. PMID:23843832

  9. Water chemistry and cardiovascular disease risk

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Zeighami, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The evidence linking cardiovascular disease risk and water quality parameters was weighed and analyzed to identify major gaps in understanding reasons for the regional differences in cardiovascular disease mortality in the United States. Epidemiologic studies evaluating occupational and public health exposure to nitrates, carbon monoxide, carbon disulfide, fibrogenic dusts, heavy metals and trace elements, chlorides, and hydro- and fluorocarbons were analyzed. Intake of cholesterol, calcium, and magnesium from food items, cooking water enhancement, and drinking water were also appraised. Based on the current state of knowledge, it is our judgment that the drinking water characteristics of highest priority from the standpoint of cardiovascular disease risks are calcium/magnesium content and chlorine treatment. The potential importance of cadmium, lead, nitrate(s), and chloride/sodium concentrations also needs to be considered. We present working hypotheses to evaluate the role(s) of these parameters and a discussion of variables that should be considered in any study design addressing the association between cardiovascular disease risk and water quality. Important variables are sample size, biological endpoint events (mortality, incidence, clinical determination), population characteristics, drinking water parameters, and dietary intake estimates. 207 references, 6 figures, 17 tables.

  10. CARDIOVASCULAR EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS (SHR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Epidemiological evidence suggests that ultrafine particles are associated with adverse cardiovascular effects, specifically in elderly individuals with preexisting cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was (i) to assess cardiopulmonary responses in adult ...

  11. The Fuster-CNIC-Ferrer Cardiovascular Polypill: a polypill for secondary cardiovascular prevention.

    PubMed

    Tamargo, Juan; Castellano, José M; Fuster, Valentín

    2015-12-01

    During the last decade, there has been a tremendous effort to develop different cardiovascular polypills in response to the upsurge in global cardiovascular disease worldwide. The pharmacological development of such a strategy has proven to be extremely complex from a formulation standpoint. Not all drugs are suitable for use in a polypill because of potential drug incompatibilities between them. Candidate agents must be safe, well tolerated, effective, guideline recommended and physiochemically compatible with the other components of the pill. The Fuster-CNIC-Ferrer cardiovascular (CV) polypill has been found to be the first-in-class polypill to be approved and commercialized in Europe and Latinamerican Countries. In this article, we review the pharmacological properties of its three components, including the clinical evidence supporting their use in patients with established cardiovascular disease, their pharmacokinetic properties, adverse effects, drug interactions and contraindications.

  12. [Ankylosing spondylitis is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality].

    PubMed

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2011-05-23

    Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the axial skeleton. The disease is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Structural changes in the heart, and arteriosclerosis secondary to inflammation may be of importance. The role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and of anti-inflammatory treatment is unclear. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors seem to increase cholesterol levels. Evaluation of the cardiovascular risk in these patients should be considered. Cardiovascular risk factors should be managed according to ordinary guidelines.

  13. Advanced Tracers in PET Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Hua; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers by positron emission tomography (PET) allows for the noninvasive detection and characterization of biological changes at the molecular level, leading to earlier disease detection, objective monitoring of therapies, and better prognostication of cardiovascular diseases progression. Here we review, the current role of PET in cardiovascular disease, with emphasize on tracers developed for PET imaging of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25389529

  14. Cardiovascular state changes in simulated work environments

    PubMed Central

    Stuiver, Arjan; Mulder, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness of cardiovascular measures as indicators of changes in cognitive workload has been addressed in several studies. In this paper the question is explored whether cardiovascular patterns in heart rate, blood pressure, baroreflex sensitivity and HRV that are found are consistent within and between two simulated working environments. Two studies, were performed, both with 21 participants: one in an ambulance dispatch simulation and one in a driving simulator. In the ambulance dispatcher task an initial strong increase in blood pressure is followed by a moderate on-going increase in blood pressure during the next hour of task performance. This pattern is accompanied by a strong increase in baroreflex sensitivity while heart rate decreases. In the driving simulator study, blood pressure initially increases but decreases almost to baseline level in the next hour. This pattern is accompanied by a decrease in baroreflex sensitivity, while heart rate decreases. Results of both studies are interpreted in terms of autonomic control (related to both sympathetic and para-sympathetic effects), using a simplified simulation of a baroreflex regulation model. Interpretation of the results leads to the conclusion that the cardiovascular response patterns in both tasks are a combination of an initial defensive reaction, in combination with compensatory blood pressure control. The level of compensatory blood pressure control, however, is quite different for the two tasks. This helps to understand the differences in response patterns between the two studies in this paper and may be helpful as well for understanding differences in cardiovascular response patterns in general. A substantial part of the effects observed during task performance are regulatory effects and are not always directly related to workload manipulations. Making this distinction may also contribute to the understanding of differences in cardiovascular response patterns during cognitive workload. PMID

  15. Increased cardiovascular mortality following early bilateral oophorectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Cathleen M.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Brown, Robert D.; Roger, Véronique L.; Melton, L. Joseph; Rocca, Walter A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases and the effect of estrogen treatment in women who underwent unilateral or bilateral oophorectomy before menopause. Design We conducted a cohort study with long-term follow-up of women in Olmsted County, MN, who underwent either unilateral or bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause from 1950 through 1987. Each member of the oophorectomy cohort was matched by age to a referent woman from the same population who had not undergone any oophorectomy. We studied the mortality associated with cardiovascular disease in a total of 1,274 women with unilateral oophorectomy, 1,091 women with bilateral oophorectomy, and 2,383 referent women. Results Women who underwent unilateral oophorectomy experienced a reduced mortality associated with cardiovascular disease compared with referent women (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67–0.99; P = 0.04). By contrast, women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before age 45 years experienced an increased mortality associated with cardiovascular disease compared with referent women (HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.01–2.05; P = 0.04). Within this age stratum, the HR for mortality was significantly elevated in women who were not treated with estrogen through age 45 years or longer (HR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.27–2.68; P = 0.001) but not in women treated (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.30–1.41; P = 0.28; test of interaction, P = 0.01). Mortality was further increased after excluding deaths associated with cerebrovascular causes. Conclusions Bilateral oophorectomy performed before age 45 years is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality, especially with cardiac mortality. However, estrogen treatment may reduce this risk. PMID:19034050

  16. Cardiovascular disease mortality in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, E S; Peruga, A; Restrepo, H E

    1993-01-01

    Despite subregional differences, mortality profiles have undergone major changes in most countries of the Americas. While the proportion of deaths caused by noncommunicable diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases, has increased, overall age-adjusted mortality rates attributable to all cardiovascular disease are declining in 13 of the 15 countries selected for the present study. About half the countries showed decreasing mortality rates for ischaemic heart disease; the other half had increasing rates. The mortality rates for cerebrovascular disease and hypertensive disease declined in all but four countries. The ischaemic heart disease/cerebrovascular disease mortality ratio increased as a consequence of a greater decline in deaths due to cerebrovascular disease, except in two countries that exhibited a greater decline for ischaemic heart disease. With few exceptions the male-to-female mortality ratios increased for all cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, reflecting a greater decline in female mortality. In general there was a decline in all cardiovascular disease mortality for almost every age group in the North American, Southern Cone, English-speaking Caribbean, and Andean subregions, while there were increases in the Central American and Latin Caribbean subregions. The magnitude of the changes was related to the initial level of mortality and the date of onset of the decline. Change began earlier and the declines were largest in the countries with the highest initial mortality levels, whereas in the countries that initially had comparatively low values the mortality rates are still increasing. Insufficient information is available to permit elucidation of the determinants of the changes reported. There has been speculation about the possible role of factors such as demographic and sociocultural changes, changes in lifestyle and subsequently in the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and the

  17. [Elevated blood pressure as cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Wiesław; Hebel, Kazimiera

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases for decades have been and still are the main and current health problem of the Polish society and there are many reasons for these diseases. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease. The factors significantly increasing risk the of cardiovascular disease are in addition to high blood pressure, smoking (also passive), high blood fats (cholesterol and its HDL, LDL fractions as well as triglyceride levels, obesity, lack of exercise, diabetes and hereditary features. Other important factors which play an important role are external factors such as e.g. environmental pollution, lifestyle, stress. Prediction of cardiovascular disease should start from the evaluation of the fetal period because low birth weight may be a risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, obesity or diabetes in adulthood. The authors of the referred tests showed that the level of blood pressure observed during childhood is closely associated with the level of blood pressure in adults and is also dependent on the body weight. Since the issue of the effects of high pressure on the cardiovascular system is inherent in the issue of the metabolic syndrome, it should be mentioned also that another causative factor may be an irregularity in the removal of urine from the body and the amount of insulin. The control of hypertension is a complex problem, at least in view of the wide range of adverse factors affecting the human body: hypertension is often either a constituent of other lesions. Therefore, it is difficult to treat high blood pressure in the strict sense; more often it is a combination therapy based on pharmacology caused for other reasons.

  18. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  19. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  20. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  1. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  2. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  3. Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk in Collegiate Football Players and Nonathletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrosielski, Devon A.; Rosenbaum, Daryl; Wooster, Benjamin M.; Merrill, Michael; Swanson, John; Moore, J. Brian; Brubaker, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Collegiate American football players may be at risk for cardiovascular disease. Objective: To compare cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular structure and function parameters of football players, stratified by position, to a group of sedentary, nonathletes. Participants: Twenty-six collegiate football players and 13 nonathletes…

  4. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375 Section 870.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices §...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375 Section 870.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices §...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  11. Cardiovascular effects of variations in habitual levels of physical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. G.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in human cardiovascular adaption to stress, particularly adaption to different levels of physical activity are determined along with quantitative noninvasive methods for evaluation of cardiovascular function during stess in normal subjects and in individuals with latent or manifest cardiovascular disease. Results are summarized.

  12. Preeclampsia: exposing future cardiovascular risk in mothers and their children.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cindy M

    2007-01-01

    There is an increased risk for future cardiovascular disease in women who have had preeclampsia. In infants born to mothers with preeclampsia, there is growing evidence of increased risk for both cardiovascular disease and preeclampsia. Epidemiologic and experimental data provide a strong link between intrauterine exposure to preeclampsia and subsequent risk for the development of cardiovascular disease in women.

  13. [Active interventions in hypercholesteroloemia patients with high cardiovascular risk in primary care; estudio ESPROCOL].

    PubMed

    Tárraga López, Pedro J; García-Norro Herreros, F J; Tárraga Marcos, Loreto; Solera Albero, Juan; González López, Esteban; Ruiz García, Antonio; Pallarés Carratalá, Vicente; Castro Navarro, José Luis; Alins Presas, Josep; Panisello Royo, Josefa María

    2015-06-01

    Introducción: la hipercolesterolemia es uno de los principales factores de riesgo modificables de la enfermedad cardiovascular (ECV). Su reducción disminuye la morbimortalidad por cardiopatía isquémica y ECV en general, en prevención primaria y, especialmente, en prevención secundaria. Objetivo: comprobar si una práctica clínica protocolizada e intensiva permite vencer la inercia y alcanzar el objetivo terapéutico (OT) de c-LDL < 100 mg/dL en pacientes de alto riesgo asistidos en Atención Primaria (AP) de nuestro país. Metodología: estudio epidemiológico, prospectivo, multicentrico, realizado en centros de AP de diferentes CC. AA. Mediante muestreo consecutivo se incluyeron 310 pacientes de alto riesgo cardiovascular (diabéticos o con ECV establecida), tratados previamente con estatinas, que no alcanzaban el OT de c-LDL. Resultados: los sujetos del estudio tenían una edad media de 65,2 años, de los que el 60,32 % eran varones. El 41,64 % presentaban un EVC previo, infarto agudo de miocardio (20,33 %), angina (16,07 %), ictus/AIT (9,19 %), artropatía (5,25 %), diabetes (70,87 %), hipertensión (71,01 %) y obesidad abdominal (69,62 %). El 43,57 % (IC95 %: 37,21; 50,08) de los pacientes que realizaron la segunda visita (241) consiguieron el OT. El 62,50 % (IC95 %: 55,68; 68,98) de los que realizaron la tercera (216) consiguieron el OT. Finalmente, el 77,56 % (IC95 %: 72,13; 83,08) de los pacientes que realizaron la última visita (205) consiguieron el OT. A lo largo del estudio hubo una reducción de los niveles de c-LDL desde los 135,6 mg/dL en la visita basal, 107,4 mg/dL en la segunda visita, 97,3 mg/dL en la tercera visita, hasta los 90,7 mg/dL en la visita final (p < 0,0001). El incremento de c-HDL entre la visita basal (50,9 mg/dL) y la final (53,6 mg/dL) también fue significativo (p = 0,013). Conclusiones: la reevaluación e intensificación del tratamiento en pacientes de alto riesgo cardiovascular atendidos en Atención Primaria, aplicando

  14. P2X7 Receptors in Neurological and Cardiovascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Skaper, Stephen D.; Debetto, Patrizia; Giusti, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    P2X receptors are ATP-gated cation channels that mediate fast excitatory transmission in diverse regions of the brain and spinal cord. Several P2X receptor subtypes, including P2X7, have the unusual property of changing their ion selectivity during prolonged exposure to ATP, which results in a channel pore permeable to molecules as large as 900 daltons. The P2X7 receptor was originally described in cells of hematopoietic origin, and mediates the influx of Ca2+ and Na+ and Ca2+ and Na+ ions as well as the release of proinflammatory cytokines. P2X7 receptors may affect neuronal cell death through their ability to regulate the processing and release of interleukin-1β, a key mediator in neurodegeneration, chronic inflammation, and chronic pain. Activation of P2X7, a key mediator in neurodegeneration, chronic inflammation, and chronic pain. Activation of P2X7 receptors provides an inflammatory stimulus, and P2X7 receptor-deficient mice have substantially attenuated inflammatory responses, including models of neuropathic and chronic inflammatory pain. Moreover, P2X7 receptor activity, by regulating the release of proinflammatory cytokines, may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Apoptotic cell death occurs in a number of vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and hypertension, and may be linked to the release of ATP from endothelial cells, P2X7 receptor activation, proinflammatory cytokine production, and endothelial cell apoptosis. In this context, the P2X7 receptor may be viewed as a gateway of communication between the nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems. PMID:20029634

  15. Protein kinase C isoenzymes in rat and human cardiovascular tissues

    PubMed Central

    Erdbrügger, W; Keffel, J; Knocks, M; Otto, T; Philipp, T; Michel, M C

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) activity and immuno-detectable isoenzymes in cytosolic and membrane extracts of rat and human cardiovascular tissues (heart, kidney, aorta, saphenous vein). Experiments were performed in raw extracts and upon combined diethylaminoethylcellulose (DEAE) and phenylsepharose column chromatography. PKC activity that bound to DEAE mostly eluted with 200 mM NaCl. DEAE-purified PKC from all tissues except rat kidney bound almost quantitatively to phenylsepharose and eluted with 0.5–0 M NaCl. Immunoblots with an antibody against classical PKCs and the activator profile for phosphatidylserine, diolein and Ca2+ revealed that the PKC from rat kidney, which did not bind to phenylsepharose, was most probably due to a proteolytically-generated, constitutively active PKC which is not under the control of a regulatory subunit. Studies in the reference tissue, rat brain, demonstrated that all PKC isoenzymes investigated (classical PKCs α, β, γ, new PKCs δ, ε, ζ, θ, and atypial PKCs ζ, λ, ι) have similar DEAE and phenylsepharose chromatography elution profiles. In the functional assay an inhibitor of all known PKC isoenzymes, bisindolylmaleimide, and a specific inhibitor of classical PKCs, Gö 6976, both inhibited PKC from rat brain completely and with high potency indicating that the functional assay preferentially detects classical PKC isoenzymes. Each PKC isoenzyme had a tissue-specific expression profile which was similar in rat and man. The classical PKCα, the new PKCs δ and ε and all atypical PKCs were detectable in most tissues, whereas the PKCβ and PKCγ were not detected in any pheripheral tissue; PKCζ and PKCθ were found in some tissues. We conclude that combined DEAE and phenylsepharose chromatography is useful to enrich and detect PKC isoenzymes; no major species differences in tissues-specific expression patterns appear to exist between rat and man. PMID:9117107

  16. Paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus mediate cardiovascular responses evoked by the microinjection of noradrenaline into the medial amygdaloid nucleus of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fortaleza, E A T; Scopinho, A A; Corrêa, F M A

    2012-09-06

    The medial amygdaloid nucleus (MeA) is a part of the limbic system and is involved in cardiovascular modulation. We previously reported that microinjection of noradrenaline (NA) into the MeA of unanesthetized rats caused pressor and bradycardiac responses, which were mediated by acute vasopressin release into the systemic circulation. In the present study, we tested the possible involvement of magnocellular neurons of the paraventricular (PVN) and/or supraoptic (SON) of the hypothalamus that synthesize vasopressin in the cardiovascular pathway activated by the microinjection of NA into the MeA. Pressor and bradycardiac responses to the microinjection of NA (27 nmol/100 nL) into the MeA were blocked by pretreatment of either the PVN or the SON with cobalt chloride (CoCl(2), 1 mM/100 nL), thus indicating that both hypothalamic nuclei mediate the cardiovascular responses evoked by microinjection of NA into the MeA. Our results suggest that the pressor and bradycardiac response caused by the microinjection of NA into the MeA is mediated by magnocellular neurons in both the PVN and SON.

  17. Managing cardiovascular risk in patients with inflammatory arthritis: practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Tournadre, Anne; Mathieu, Sylvain; Soubrier, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis, have higher rates of cardiovascular mortality. While the increased cardiovascular risk is only explained to some extent, a lot of research is currently conducted to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis, risk stratification, and optimal cardiovascular risk management. This review sought to report epidemiological data pertaining to the cardiovascular disease burden in patients with inflammatory arthritis, underlying mechanisms accounting for excessive cardiovascular risk, along with recommendations regarding risk assessment and management in this patient population. PMID:27721904

  18. Central autonomic network mediates cardiovascular responses to acute inflammation: Relevance to increased cardiovascular risk in depression?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Neil A.; Cooper, Ella; Voon, Valerie; Miles, Ken; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a risk factor for both depression and cardiovascular disease. Depressed mood is also a cardiovascular risk factor. To date, research into mechanisms through which inflammation impacts cardiovascular health rarely takes into account central effects on autonomic cardiovascular control, instead emphasizing direct effects of peripheral inflammatory responses on endothelial reactivity and myocardial function. However, brain responses to inflammation engage neural systems for motivational and homeostatic control and are expressed through depressed mood state and changes in autonomic cardiovascular regulation. Here we combined an inflammatory challenge, known to evoke an acute reduction in mood, with neuroimaging to identify the functional brain substrates underlying potentially detrimental changes in autonomic cardiovascular control. We first demonstrated that alterations in the balance of low to high frequency (LF/HF) changes in heart rate variability (a measure of baroreflex sensitivity) could account for some of the inflammation-evoked changes in diastolic blood pressure, indicating a central (rather than solely local endothelial) origin. Accompanying alterations in regional brain metabolism (measured using 18FDG-PET) were analysed to localise central mechanisms of inflammation-induced changes in cardiovascular state: three discrete regions previously implicated in stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity, the dorsal anterior and posterior cingulate and pons, strongly mediated the relationship between inflammation and blood pressure. Moreover, activity changes within each region predicted the inflammation-induced shift in LF/HF balance. These data are consistent with a centrally-driven component originating within brain areas supporting stressor evoked blood pressure reactivity. Together our findings highlight mechanisms binding psychological and physiological well-being and their perturbation by peripheral inflammation. PMID:23416033

  19. Soy, soy phytoestrogens and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Thomas B

    2002-03-01

    Dietary soy protein has been shown to have several beneficial effects on cardiovascular health. The best-documented effect is on plasma lipid and lipoprotein concentrations, with reductions of approximately 10% in LDL cholesterol concentrations (somewhat greater for individuals with high pretreatment LDL cholesterol concentrations) and small increases in HDL cholesterol concentrations. Dietary soy protein improves flow-mediated arterial dilation of postmenopausal women but worsens that of men. Soy isoflavone extracts improve systemic arterial compliance, an indicator of atherosclerosis extent. Complete soy protein but not alcohol-washed soy protein reduces atherosclerosis of postmenopausal monkeys. No definite experimental evidence exists currently to establish that the cardiovascular benefits of soy protein are accounted for by its isoflavones.

  20. Targeted Probes for Cardiovascular MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Ritika; Caravan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in studying molecular and cellular processes associated with heart disease. Targeted probes that recognize important biomarkers of atherosclerosis, apoptosis, necrosis, angiogenesis, thrombosis and inflammation have been developed. Discussion This review discusses properties of chemically different types of contrast agents including iron oxide nanoparticles, gadolinium based nanoparticles or micelles, discrete peptide conjugates and activatable probes. Numerous examples of contrast agents based on these approaches have been used in preclinical MR imaging of cardiovascular diseases. Clinical applications are still under investigation for some selected agents with highly promising initial results. Conclusion Molecular MR imaging shows great potential for the detection, characterization of a wide range of cardiovascular diseases and for monitoring response to therapy. PMID:20539821

  1. Mental stress and human cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray

    2017-03-01

    The London physician and neuroanatomist Thomas Willis in the 17th century correctly attributed the source of emotions to the brain, not the heart as believed in antiquity. Contemporary research documents the phenomenon of "triggered" heart disease, when the autonomic nervous system control of the heart by the brain goes awry, producing heart disease of sudden onset, precipitated by acute emotional upheaval. This can take the form of, variously, cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and sudden death. Chronic psychological distress also can have adverse cardiovascular consequences, in the causal linkage of depressive illness to heart disease, and in the probable causation of atherosclerosis and hypertension by chronic mental stress. In patients with essential hypertension, stress biomarkers are present. The sympathetic nervous system is the usual mediator between these acute and chronic psychological substrates and cardiovascular disease.

  2. KATP Channels in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Foster, Monique N; Coetzee, William A

    2016-01-01

    KATP channels are integral to the functions of many cells and tissues. The use of electrophysiological methods has allowed for a detailed characterization of KATP channels in terms of their biophysical properties, nucleotide sensitivities, and modification by pharmacological compounds. However, even though they were first described almost 25 years ago (Noma 1983, Trube and Hescheler 1984), the physiological and pathophysiological roles of these channels, and their regulation by complex biological systems, are only now emerging for many tissues. Even in tissues where their roles have been best defined, there are still many unanswered questions. This review aims to summarize the properties, molecular composition, and pharmacology of KATP channels in various cardiovascular components (atria, specialized conduction system, ventricles, smooth muscle, endothelium, and mitochondria). We will summarize the lessons learned from available genetic mouse models and address the known roles of KATP channels in cardiovascular pathologies and how genetic variation in KATP channel genes contribute to human disease.

  3. Breast-feeding and maternal cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Mezzacappa, E S; Kelsey, R M; Myers, M M; Katkin, E S

    2001-11-01

    Two studies examined the effects of breast-feeding on maternal cardiovascular function. In the first experiment, groups of breast-feeding and bottle-feeding women were compared on preejection period (PEP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) recorded for 1-min periods before and during standard laboratory stressors. Compared with bottle-feeders, breast-feeders had higher CO throughout the session, and greater decreases in CO and increases in TPR during cold pressor. In the second experiment, HR and blood pressure (BP) were compared before and after one breast-feeding and one bottle-feeding session in a within-subjects design. Both feeding methods increased BP but decreased HR, and systolic BP was higher for the breast-feeding than the bottle-feeding condition. Both studies support the notion that breast-feeding alters maternal cardiovascular function, possibly through the actions of oxytocin.

  4. Role of genomics in cardiovascular medicine

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, Giuseppe; Predazzi, Irene M; Mango, Ruggiero; Romeo, Francesco; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2010-01-01

    As all branches of science grow and new experimental techniques become readily accessible, our knowledge of medicine is likely to increase exponentially in the coming years. Recently developed technologies have revolutionized our analytical capacities, leading to vast knowledge of many genes or genomic regions involved in the pathogenesis of congenital heart diseases, which are often associated with other genetic syndromes, coronary artery disease and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies and channelopathies. The knowledge-base of the genesis of cardiovascular diseases is likely going to be further revolutionized in this new era of genomic medicine. Here, we review the advances that have been made over the last several years in this field and discuss different genetic mechanisms that have been shown to underlie a variety of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21191544

  5. Cardiovascular Regenerative Technologies: Update and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Mallone, Anna; Weber, Benedikt; Hoerstrup, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    In the effort of improving treatment for cardiovascular disease (CVD), scientists struggle with the lack of the regenerative capacities of finally differentiated cardiovascular tissues. In this context, the advancements in regenerative medicine contributed to the development of cell-based therapies as well as macro- and micro-scale tissue-engineering technologies. The current experimental approaches focus on different regenerative strategies including a broad spectrum of techniques such as paracrine-based stimulation of autologous cardiac stem cells, mesenchymal cell injections, 3D microtissue culture techniques and vascular tissue-engineering methods. These potential next-generation strategies are leading the way to a revolution in addressing CVD, and numerous studies are now undertaken to assess their therapeutic value. With this review, we provide an update on the current research directions, on their major challenges, limitations, and achievements. PMID:27721705

  6. Class 3 semaphorins in cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Valdembri, Donatella; Regano, Donatella; Maione, Federica; Giraudo, Enrico; Serini, Guido

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Secreted class 3 semaphorins (Sema3), which signal through holoreceptor complexes that are formed by different subunits, such as neuropilins (Nrps), proteoglycans, and plexins, were initially characterized as fundamental regulators of axon guidance during embryogenesis. Subsequently, Sema3A, Sema3C, Sema3D, and Sema3E were discovered to play crucial roles in cardiovascular development, mainly acting through Nrp1 and Plexin D1, which funnels the signal of multiple Sema3 in vascular endothelial cells. Mechanistically, Sema3 proteins control cardiovascular patterning through the enzymatic GTPase-activating-protein activity of the cytodomain of Plexin D1, which negatively regulates the function of Rap1, a small GTPase that is well-known for its ability to drive vascular morphogenesis and to elicit the conformational activation of integrin adhesion receptors. PMID:27439112

  7. Clinical models of cardiovascular regulation after weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Jacob, G.; Ertl, A.; Shannon, J.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1996-01-01

    After several days in microgravity, return to earth is attended by alterations in cardiovascular function. The mechanisms underlying these effects are inadequately understood. Three clinical disorders of autonomic function represent possible models of this abnormal cardiovascular function after spaceflight. They are pure autonomic failure, baroreflex failure, and orthostatic intolerance. In pure autonomic failure, virtually complete loss of sympathetic and parasympathetic function occurs along with profound and immediate orthostatic hypotension. In baroreflex failure, various degrees of debuffering of blood pressure occur. In acute and complete baroreflex failure, there is usually severe hypertension and tachycardia, while with less complete and more chronic baroreflex impairment, orthostatic abnormalities may be more apparent. In orthostatic intolerance, blood pressure fall is minor, but orthostatic symptoms are prominent and tachycardia frequently occurs. Only careful autonomic studies of human subjects in the microgravity environment will permit us to determine which of these models most closely reflects the pathophysiology brought on by a period of time in the microgravity environment.

  8. [Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. Risks and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Voigt, N; Heijman, J; Dobrev, D

    2014-03-01

    Adverse side effects of drugs are a significantly underestimated problem in modern medicine. In this review article, we summarize common adverse side effects of cardiovascular drugs. In particular, we highlight the factors promoting these adverse side effects in patients, including reduced hepatic or renal clearance in elderly patients that often requires dosage adjustment. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs (e.g. through the cytochrome P450 system or P-glycoproteins) can modify the plasma concentration of many compounds, thereby also increasing the likelihood of unwanted side effects. The most prominent cardiac side effects include arrhythmias, e.g. atrioventricular (AV) block, drug-induced long-QT syndrome and torsade de pointes and altered inotropy. Non-cardiac side effects are subsequently discussed grouped by drug class. A better understanding of the risks and side effects of cardiovascular drugs is expected to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with adverse side effects.

  9. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    McGrath, K-C Y; McRobb, L S; Heather, A K

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen use and abuse is increasing in our society, the alternate view that androgens may promote CVD in men is assuming increasing importance. Whether androgens adversely affect CVD in either men or women remains a contentious issue within both the cardiovascular and endocrinological fraternities. This review draws from basic science, animal and clinical studies to outline our current understanding regarding androgen effects on atherosclerosis, the major CVD, and asks where future directions of atherosclerosis-related androgen research may lie.

  10. Cardiovascular system simulation in biomedical engineering education.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rideout, V. C.

    1972-01-01

    Use of complex cardiovascular system models, in conjunction with a large hybrid computer, in biomedical engineering courses. A cardiovascular blood pressure-flow model, driving a compartment model for the study of dye transport, was set up on the computer for use as a laboratory exercise by students who did not have the computer experience or skill to be able to easily set up such a simulation involving some 27 differential equations running at 'real time' rate. The students were given detailed instructions regarding the model, and were then able to study effects such as those due to septal and valve defects upon the pressure, flow, and dye dilution curves. The success of this experiment in the use of involved models in engineering courses was such that it seems that this type of laboratory exercise might be considered for use in physiology courses as an adjunct to animal experiments.

  11. KATP Channels in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Monique N.; Coetzee, William A.

    2015-01-01

    KATP channels are integral to the functions of many cells and tissues. The use of electrophysiological methods has allowed for a detailed characterization of KATP channels in terms of their biophysical properties, nucleotide sensitivities, and modification by pharmacological compounds. However, even though they were first described almost 25 years ago (Noma 1983, Trube and Hescheler 1984), the physiological and pathophysiological roles of these channels, and their regulation by complex biological systems, are only now emerging for many tissues. Even in tissues where their roles have been best defined, there are still many unanswered questions. This review aims to summarize the properties, molecular composition, and pharmacology of KATP channels in various cardiovascular components (atria, specialized conduction system, ventricles, smooth muscle, endothelium, and mitochondria). We will summarize the lessons learned from available genetic mouse models and address the known roles of KATP channels in cardiovascular pathologies and how genetic variation in KATP channel genes contribute to human disease. PMID:26660852

  12. [Burnout syndrome: a "true" cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Cursoux, Pauline; Lehucher-Michel, Marie-Pascale; Marchetti, Hélène; Chaumet, Guillaume; Delliaux, Stéphane

    2012-11-01

    The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment in individuals professionally involved with others. The burnout syndrome is poorly recognized, particularly in France, as a distinct nosology from adaptation troubles, stress, depression, or anxiety. Several tools quantifying burnout and emotional exhaustion exist, the most spread is the questionnaire called Maslach Burnout Inventory. The burnout syndrome alters cardiovascular function and its neuroregulation by autonomic nervous system and is associated with: increased sympathetic tone to heart and vessels after mental stress, lowered physiological post-stress vagal rebound to heart, and lowered arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Job strain as burnout syndrome seems to be a real independent cardiovascular risk factor. Oppositely, training to manage emotions could increase vagal tone to heart and should be cardio-protective.

  13. Cardiovascular and Ventilatory Consequences of Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Tamara M; Giraud, George D; Togioka, Brandon M; Jones, Daniel B; Cigarroa, Joaquin E

    2017-02-14

    Although laparoscopic surgery accounts for >2 million surgical procedures every year, the current preoperative risk scores and guidelines do not adequately assess the risks of laparoscopy. In general, laparoscopic procedures have a lower risk of morbidity and mortality compared with operations requiring a midline laparotomy. During laparoscopic surgery, carbon dioxide insufflation may produce significant hemodynamic and ventilatory consequences such as increased intraabdominal pressure and hypercarbia. Hemodynamic insults secondary to increased intraabdominal pressure include increased afterload and preload and decreased cardiac output, whereas ventilatory consequences include increased airway pressures, hypercarbia, and decreased pulmonary compliance. Hemodynamic effects are accentuated in patients with cardiovascular disease such as congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, and congenital heart disease. Prevention of cardiovascular complications may be accomplished through a sound understanding of the hemodynamic and physiological consequences of laparoscopic surgery as well as a defined operative plan generated by a multidisciplinary team involving the preoperative consultant, anesthesiologist, and surgeon.

  14. Lipid screening and cardiovascular health in childhood.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stephen R; Greer, Frank R

    2008-07-01

    This clinical report replaces the 1998 policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics on cholesterol in childhood, which has been retired. This report has taken on new urgency given the current epidemic of childhood obesity with the subsequent increasing risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in older children and adults. The approach to screening children and adolescents with a fasting lipid profile remains a targeted approach. Overweight children belong to a special risk category of children and are in need of cholesterol screening regardless of family history or other risk factors. This report reemphasizes the need for prevention of cardiovascular disease by following Dietary Guidelines for Americans and increasing physical activity and also includes a review of the pharmacologic agents and indications for treating dyslipidemia in children.

  15. Chromium in metabolic and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hummel, M; Standl, E; Schnell, O

    2007-10-01

    Chromium is an essential mineral that appears to have a beneficial role in the regulation of insulin action, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. There is growing evidence that chromium may facilitate insulin signaling and chromium supplementation therefore may improve systemic insulin sensitivity. Tissue chromium levels of subjects with diabetes are lower than those of normal control subjects, and a correlation exists between low circulating levels of chromium and the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Controversy still exists as to the need for chromium supplementation. However, supplementation with chromium picolinate, a stable and highly bioavailable form of chromium, has been shown to reduce insulin resistance and to help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Since chromium supplementation is a safe treatment, further research is necessary to resolve the confounding data. The existing data suggest to concentrate future studies on certain forms as chromium picolinate and doses as at least 200 mcg per day.

  16. The brain norepinephrine system, stress and cardiovascular vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Wood, Susan K; Valentino, Rita J

    2017-03-01

    Chronic exposure to psychosocial stress has adverse effects on cardiovascular health, however the stress-sensitive neurocircuitry involved remains to be elucidated. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system position it to contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular disease. This review focuses on cardiovascular dysfunction produced by social stress and a major theme highlighted is that differences in coping strategy determine individual differences in social stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. The establishment of different coping strategies and cardiovascular vulnerability during repeated social stress has recently been shown to parallel a unique plasticity in LC afferent regulation, resulting in either excitatory or inhibitory input to the LC. This contrasting regulation of the LC would translate to differences in cardiovascular regulation and may serve as the basis for individual differences in the cardiopathological consequences of social stress. The advances described suggest new directions for developing treatments and/or strategies for decreasing stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

  17. Vasculopathy of Aging and the Revised Cardiovascular Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-A; Park, Jeong Bae; O'Rourke, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    There have been attempts to explain the process of developments in overt cardiovascular disease, resulting in the presentation of the classic cardiovascular disease continuum and the aging cardiovascular continuum. Although the starting points of these two continua are different, they meet in the midstream of the cycle and reach a consensus at the end of the process. The announcement of the aging cardiovascular continuum made both continua complete, explaining the cardiovascular events in patients without atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease with aging. Impairment of the vascular structure by pulse wave and reflected wave is considered the cause of aortic damage, which influences the development of ischemic heart disease and the development of overt renal disease or cerebrovascular disease. The pathophysiology of vascular aging through pulse wave and its effect on other organs was discussed with Prof. Michael F. O'Rourke who devised the aging cardiovascular continuum. PMID:26587463

  18. The Supply and Demand of the Cardiovascular Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Akhil; Sinha, Shashank S.; Rajagopalan, Bharath; Ijioma, Nkechinyere N.; Jayaram, Natalie; Kithcart, Aaron P.; Tanguturi, Varsha K.; Cullen, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    As the burden of cardiovascular disease in the United States continues to increase, uncertainty remains on how well-equipped the cardiovascular workforce is to meet the challenges that lie ahead. In a time when health care is rapidly shifting, numerous factors affect the supply and demand of the cardiovascular workforce. This Council Commentary critically examines several factors that influence the cardiovascular workforce. These include current workforce demographics and projections, evolving health care and practice environments, and the increasing burden of cardiovascular disease. Finally, we propose 3 strategies to optimize the workforce. These focus on cardiovascular disease prevention, the effective utilization of the cardiovascular care team, and alterations to the training pathway for cardiologists. PMID:27712782

  19. Role of nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic neurons in post-stress cardiovascular and hormonal control in male rats.

    PubMed

    Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Ghosal, Sriparna; Packard, Benjamin A; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Herman, James P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress causes hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and cardiovascular dyshomeostasis. Noradrenergic (NA) neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) are considered to play a role in these changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that NTS NA A2 neurons are required for cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to both acute and chronic stress. Adult male rats received bilateral microinjection into the NTS of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to lesion A2 neurons [cardiovascular study, n = 5; HPA study, n = 5] or vehicle [cardiovascular study, n = 6; HPA study, n = 4]. Rats were exposed to acute restraint stress followed by 14 d of chronic variable stress (CVS). On the last day of testing, rats were placed in a novel elevated plus maze (EPM) to test post-CVS stress responses. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced the tachycardic response to acute restraint, confirming that A2 neurons promote sympathetic activation following acute stress. In addition, CVS increased the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power for heart rate variability, indicative of sympathovagal imbalance, and this effect was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA lesion. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced acute restraint-induced corticosterone secretion, but did not affect the corticosterone response to the EPM, indicating that A2 neurons promote acute HPA axis responses, but are not involved in CVS-mediated HPA axis sensitization. Collectively, these data indicate that A2 neurons promote both cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to acute stress. Moreover, A2 catecholaminergic neurons may contribute to the potentially deleterious enhancement of sympathetic drive following chronic stress.

  20. The Middle Ages Contributions to Cardiovascular Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ranhel, André Silva; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco

    2016-04-01

    The historical period called the Middle Ages, a long interval between the 5th and the 15th centuries, is still commonly known as the Dark Ages, especially in the area of health sciences. In the last decades, this "classic" view of the Middle Ages has been gradually modified with advances in historiographical studies and the history of science. During that period in Western Europe, knowledge about the human body suffered a regression in terms of anatomy and physiology, with the predominance of religious conceptions mainly about diseases and their treatments. Knowledge on the cardiovascular system and heart diseases has been classically described as a repetition of the concepts developed by Galen from the dissection of animals and his keen sense of observation. However, the Middle East, especially Persia, was the birth place of a lot of intellectuals who preserved the ancient knowledge of the Greeks while building new knowledge and practices, especially from the 8th to the 13th century. The invasion of the Arabs in North of Africa and the Iberian Peninsula and the eclosion of the Crusades resulted in a greater contact between the East and the West, which in turn brought on the arrival of the Arab medical knowledge, among others, to 12th century Europe. Such fact contributed to an extremely important change in the scientific medical knowledge in the West, leading to the incorporation of different concepts and practices in the field of cardiovascular Medicine. The new way of teaching and practicing Medicine of the great Arab doctors, together with the teaching hospitals and foundations in the Koran, transformed the Medicine practiced in Europe definitely. The objective of this paper is to describe the knowledge drawn up from the Middle Ages about the cardiovascular system, its understanding and therapeutic approach to cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons.

  1. Current status of cardiovascular laser therapy, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Isner, J.M.; Steg, P.G.; Clarke, R.H.

    1987-10-01

    Percutaneous laser angioplasty has now become a clinical reality, consisting chiefly of applications of thermal angioplasty in conjunction with balloon angioplasty for the recanalization of peripheral vascular obstructions. In conjunction with this development, various aspects of laser-tissue interactions, fiber optic transmission, and delivery catheter design pertinent to the cardiovascular system have come under closer scrutiny. This paper examines certain noteworthy concepts that have emerged from the investigations.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards ‘digital patient’ or ‘virtual physiological human’ representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. PMID:26512019

  3. The cardiovascular response to the AGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardus, David; Mctaggart, Wesley G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results of experiments on human subjects conducted to study the cardiovascular response to various g-levels and exposure times using an artificial gravity simulator (AGS). The AGS is a short arm centrifuge consisting of a turntable, a traction system, a platform and four beds. Data collection hardware is part of the communication system. The AGS provides a steep acceleration gradient in subjects in the supine position.

  4. Vitamin D and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Artaza, Jorge N; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Norris, Keith C

    2009-09-01

    Several epidemiologic and clinical studies have suggested that there is a strong association between hypovitaminosis D and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Hypovitaminosis D was reported as a risk factor for increased cardiovascular events among 1739 adult participants in the Framingham Offspring Study. Analysis of more than 13,000 adults in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) showed that even though hypovitaminosis D is associated with an increased prevalence of CVD risk factors, its association with all-cause mortality is independent of these risk factors. Importantly, epidemiologic studies suggested that patients who had chronic kidney disease and were treated with activated vitamin D had a survival advantage when compared with those who did not receive treatment with these agents. Mechanistically, emerging data have linked vitamin D administration with improved cardiac function and reduced proteinuria, and hypovitaminosis D is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and systemic inflammation. Preliminary studies suggested that activated vitamin D inhibits the proliferation of cardiomyoblasts by promoting cell-cycle arrest and enhances the formation of cardiomyotubes without inducing apoptosis. Activated vitamin D has also been shown to attenuate left ventricular dysfunction in animal models and humans. In summary, emerging studies suggest that hypovitaminosis D has emerged as an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, reinforcing its importance as a public health problem. There is a need to advance our understanding of the biologic pathways through which vitamin D affects cardiovascular health and to conduct prospective clinical interventions to define precisely the cardioprotective effects of nutritional vitamin D repletion.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges.

  6. Mechanisms by which diabetes increases cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleissner, Christian A.; Galkina, Elena; Nadler, Jerry L.; Ley, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease which is the leading cause of death in the U.S. Increasing prevalence of diabetes and diabetic atherosclerosis makes identification of molecular mechanisms by which diabetes promotes atherogenesis an important task. Targeting common pathways may ameliorate both diseases. This review focuses on well known as well as newly discovered mechanisms which may represent promising therapeutic targets. PMID:18695749

  7. Molecular and Clinical Based Cardiovascular Care Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    pathogenesis of coronary artery, peripheral vascular , and cerebrovascular disease . Impairment of endothelial function has been demonstrated after high...cardio’Va~ ct•b.r disease , Subsequently, ultrnlow-fat diets (:;;1.0% of totlll caloric intake as fat), emphasi?.in,g the amount ra.thcr th<•.o the...cardiovascular disease at the molecular disease stage and identify biomarkers predictive of sub- clinical CVD; and 3) Relate genomic/proteomic changes to the

  8. The Middle Ages Contributions to Cardiovascular Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ranhel, André Silva; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco

    2016-01-01

    The historical period called the Middle Ages, a long interval between the 5th and the 15th centuries, is still commonly known as the Dark Ages, especially in the area of health sciences. In the last decades, this "classic" view of the Middle Ages has been gradually modified with advances in historiographical studies and the history of science. During that period in Western Europe, knowledge about the human body suffered a regression in terms of anatomy and physiology, with the predominance of religious conceptions mainly about diseases and their treatments. Knowledge on the cardiovascular system and heart diseases has been classically described as a repetition of the concepts developed by Galen from the dissection of animals and his keen sense of observation. However, the Middle East, especially Persia, was the birth place of a lot of intellectuals who preserved the ancient knowledge of the Greeks while building new knowledge and practices, especially from the 8th to the 13th century. The invasion of the Arabs in North of Africa and the Iberian Peninsula and the eclosion of the Crusades resulted in a greater contact between the East and the West, which in turn brought on the arrival of the Arab medical knowledge, among others, to 12th century Europe. Such fact contributed to an extremely important change in the scientific medical knowledge in the West, leading to the incorporation of different concepts and practices in the field of cardiovascular Medicine. The new way of teaching and practicing Medicine of the great Arab doctors, together with the teaching hospitals and foundations in the Koran, transformed the Medicine practiced in Europe definitely. The objective of this paper is to describe the knowledge drawn up from the Middle Ages about the cardiovascular system, its understanding and therapeutic approach to cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons. PMID:27556317

  9. Role of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor-2 in the Cerebellar Cortex in Cardiovascular Modulation in Anaesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzheng; Sun, Tingzhe; Zhou, Peiling; Zhu, Qingfeng; Zhang, Liefeng

    2016-04-01

    Our previous investigations have demonstrated that microinjection of acetylcholine (ACh) or muscarinic ACh receptor activation in the cerebellar cortex induces a systemic blood pressure depressor response. This study aimed to determine the role of muscarinic ACh receptor-2 (M2 receptor) in the cerebellar cortex in cardiovascular function regulation in rats. A nonselective muscarinic receptor agonist (oxotremorine M, OXO; 30 mM), a selective M2 receptor agonist (arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate, ABET; 3, 10, and 30 mM), 30 mM OXO mixed with a selective M2 receptor antagonist (methoctramine hydrate, MCT; 0.3, 1, and 3 mM), and normal saline (0.9 % NaCl) were separately microinjected (0.5 µl/5 s) into the cerebellar cortex (lobule VI) of anaesthetized rats. We measured the mean arterial pressure (MAP), maximum change in MAP, and reactive time (RT; the duration required for the blood pressure to return to basal levels), heart rate (HR) and the maximum change in HR during the RT in response to drug activation. The results demonstrated that ABET dose-dependently decreased MAP and HR, increased the maximum change in MAP and the maximum change in HR, and prolonged the RT. Furthermore, MCT dose-dependently blocked the OXO-mediated cardiovascular depressor response. This study provides the first evidence that M2 receptors in the cerebellar cortex are involved in cardiovascular regulation, the activation of which evokes significant depressor and bradycardic responses.

  10. Cardiovascular fitness, cortical plasticity, and aging.

    PubMed

    Colcombe, Stanley J; Kramer, Arthur F; Erickson, Kirk I; Scalf, Paige; McAuley, Edward; Cohen, Neal J; Webb, Andrew; Jerome, Gerry J; Marquez, David X; Elavsky, Steriani

    2004-03-02

    Cardiovascular fitness is thought to offset declines in cognitive performance, but little is known about the cortical mechanisms that underlie these changes in humans. Research using animal models shows that aerobic training increases cortical capillary supplies, the number of synaptic connections, and the development of new neurons. The end result is a brain that is more efficient, plastic, and adaptive, which translates into better performance in aging animals. Here, in two separate experiments, we demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge, in humans that increases in cardiovascular fitness results in increased functioning of key aspects of the attentional network of the brain during a cognitively challenging task. Specifically, highly fit (Study 1) or aerobically trained (Study 2) persons show greater task-related activity in regions of the prefrontal and parietal cortices that are involved in spatial selection and inhibitory functioning, when compared with low-fit (Study 1) or nonaerobic control (Study 2) participants. Additionally, in both studies there exist groupwise differences in activation of the anterior cingulate cortex, which is thought to monitor for conflict in the attentional system, and signal the need for adaptation in the attentional network. These data suggest that increased cardiovascular fitness can affect improvements in the plasticity of the aging human brain, and may serve to reduce both biological and cognitive senescence in humans.

  11. Glia, sympathetic activity and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Teschemacher, Anja G.; Kasparov, Sergey; Gourine, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? In this review, we discuss recent findings that provide a novel insight into the mechanisms that link glial cell function with the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, including systemic arterial hypertension and chronic heart failure. What advances does it highlight? We discuss how glial cells may influence central presympathetic circuits, leading to maladaptive and detrimental increases in sympathetic activity and contributing to the development and progression of cardiovascular disease. Increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and may contribute to its progression. Vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic activities are generated by the neuronal circuits located in the hypothalamus and the brainstem. These neuronal networks receive multiple inputs from the periphery and other parts of the CNS and, at a local level, may be influenced by their non‐neuronal neighbours, in particular glial cells. In this review, we discuss recent experimental evidence suggesting that astrocytes and microglial cells are able to modulate the activity of sympathoexcitatory neural networks in disparate physiological and pathophysiological conditions. We focus on the chemosensory properties of astrocytes residing in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata and discuss signalling mechanisms leading to glial activation during brain hypoxia and inflammation. Alterations in these mechanisms may lead to heightened activity of sympathoexcitatory CNS circuits and contribute to maladaptive and detrimental increases in sympathetic tone associated with systemic arterial hypertension and chronic heart failure. PMID:26988631

  12. Translational In Vivo Models for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Fliegner, Daniela; Gerdes, Christoph; Meding, Jörg; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the first leading cause of death and morbidity in developed countries. Experimental cardiology research and preclinical drug development in cardiology call for appropriate and especially clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo studies. The use of animal models has contributed to expand our knowledge and our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and accordingly provided new approaches focused on the improvement of diagnostic and treatment strategies of various cardiac pathologies.Numerous animal models in different species as well as in small and large animals have been developed to address cardiovascular complications, including heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, and thrombotic diseases. However, a perfect model of heart failure or other indications that reproduces every aspect of the natural disease does not exist. The complexity and heterogeneity of cardiac diseases plus the influence of genetic and environmental factors limit to mirror a particular disease with a single experimental model.Thus, drug development in the field of cardiology is not only very challenging but also inspiring; therefore animal models should be selected that reflect as best as possible the disease being investigated. Given the wide range of animal models, reflecting critical features of the human pathophysiology available nowadays increases the likelihood of the translation to the patients. Furthermore, this knowledge and the increase of the predictive value of preclinical models help us to find more efficient and reliable solutions as well as better and innovative treatment strategies for cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Klinefelter syndrome: cardiovascular abnormalities and metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Calogero, A E; Giagulli, V A; Mongioì, L M; Triggiani, V; Radicioni, A F; Jannini, E A; Pasquali, D

    2017-03-03

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is one of the most common genetic causes of male infertility. This condition is associated with much comorbidity and with a lower life expectancy. The aim of this review is to explore more in depth cardiovascular and metabolic disorders associated to KS. KS patients have an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease (standardized mortality ratio, SMR, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.6-3.0), but it is not clear whether the cause of the death is of thrombotic or hemorrhagic nature. Cardiovascular congenital anomalies (SMR, 7.3; 95% CI, 2.4-17.1) and the development of thrombosis or leg ulcers (SMR, 7.9; 95% CI, 2.9-17.2) are also more frequent in these subjects. Moreover, cardiovascular abnormalities may be at least partially reversed by testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). KS patients have also an increased probability of endocrine and/or metabolic disease, especially obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The effects of TRT on these abnormalities are not entirely clear.

  14. Promethazine affects autonomic cardiovascular mechanisms minimally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. E.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Promethazine hydrochloride, Phenergan, is a phenothiazine derivative with antihistaminic (H1), sedative, antiemetic, anticholinergic, and antimotion sickness properties. These properties have made promethazine a candidate for use in environments such as microgravity, which provoke emesis and motion sickness. Recently, we evaluated carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses during two Space Shuttle missions 18 to 20 hr after the 50 mg intramuscular administration of promethazine. Because the effects of promethazine on autonomic cardiovascular mechanisms in general and baroreflex function in particular were not known, we were unable to exclude a possible influence of promethazine on our results. Our purpose was to determine the ground-based effects of promethazine on autonomic cardiovascular control. Because of promethazine's antihistaminic and anticholinergic properties, we expected that a 50-mg intramuscular injection of promethazine would affect sympathetically and vagally mediated cardiovascular mechanisms. Eight healthy young subjects, five men and three women, were studied at rest in recumbency. All reported drowsiness as a result of the promethazine injection; most also reported nervous excitation, dry mouth, and fatigue. Three subjects had significant reactions: two reported excessive anxiety and one reported dizziness. Measurements were performed immediately prior to injection and 3.1 +/- 0.1 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 hr postinjection. We found no significant effect of promethazine on resting mean R-R interval, arterial pressure, R-R interval power spectra, carotid baroreflex function, and venous plasma catecholamine levels.

  15. MicroRNAs in cardiovascular ageing.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Timon; Boon, Reinier A

    2016-04-15

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have emerged as potent regulators of pathways in physiological and disease contexts. This review focuses on the role of miRs in ageing of the cardiovascular system. Several miRs have been described to be regulated during ageing and some of these miRs are involved in the regulation of ageing-related processes. We discuss the roles of miR-34, miR-217 and miR-29, which are induced during ageing in the vasculature. The roles of miR-34, miR-29 (age-induced) and miR-18/19, which are decreased during ageing in the heart, are discussed as well. Furthermore, numerous miRs that play a role in diseases associated with ageing, like diabetes, atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and atrial fibrillation, are also briefly discussed. miRs also serve as circulating biomarkers for cardiovascular ageing or ageing-associated diseases. Finally, pharmacological modulation of ageing-related miRs might become a promising strategy to combat cardiovascular ageing in a clinical setting.

  16. The impact of chocolate on cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murga, L; Tarín, J J; García-Perez, M A; Cano, A

    2011-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading determinant of mortality and morbidity in women. Functional foods are attracting interest as potential regulators of the susceptibility to disease. Supported by epidemiological evidence, chocolate has emerged as a possible modulator of cardiovascular risk. Chocolate, or cocoa as the natural source, contains flavanols, a subclass of flavonoids. The latter years have witnessed an increasing number of experimental and clinical studies that suggest a protective effect of chocolate against atherogenesis. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial function define three biological mechanisms that have shown sensitivity to chocolate. Moreover, the consumption of chocolate has been involved in the protective modulation of blood pressure, the lipid profile, the activation of platelets, and the sensitivity to insulin. Dark chocolate seems more protective than milk or white chocolate. Despite this array of benefits, there is a lack of well designed clinical studies demonstrating cardiovascular benefit of chocolate. The high caloric content of chocolate, particularly of some less pure forms, imposes caution before recommending uncontrolled consumption.

  17. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    PubMed Central

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD. PMID:25660385

  18. [Soya isoflavones and evidences on cardiovascular protection].

    PubMed

    González Cañete, Natalia; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2014-06-01

    Soya isoflavones represent a group of non-nutritive, bioactive compounds, of non-steroidal phenolic nature that are present in soy bean and derived foods. They share with other compounds the capacity of binding to estrogenic receptors from different cells and tissues so that they may act as phytoestrogens. The current interest in these compounds comes from the knowledge that in Asian populations with high levels of their consumption the prevalence of cancer and cardiovascular disease is lower, as compared to the Western countries populations. This cardiovascular benefit would be the result not only of the modulation of plasma lipids, which is a widely studied mechanism. This paper reviews the published evidence about the beneficial effects of soya isoflavones and the different mechanisms of action that would benefit cardiovascular health and that surpass the mechanisms traditionally approached such as the modulation of plasma lipids, and that implicate the regulation of cellular and enzymatic functions in situations such as inflammation, thrombosis, and atherosclerotic progression.

  19. Heme Oxygenases in Cardiovascular Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Anita; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Agarwal, Anupam; Stocker, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Heme oxygenases are composed of two isozymes, Hmox1 and Hmox2, that catalyze the degradation of heme to carbon monoxide (CO), ferrous iron, and biliverdin, the latter of which is subsequently converted to bilirubin. While initially considered to be waste products, CO and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown over the last 20 years to modulate key cellular processes, such as inflammation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, as well as antioxidant defense. This shift in paradigm has led to the importance of heme oxygenases and their products in cell physiology now being well accepted. The identification of the two human cases thus far of heme oxygenase deficiency and the generation of mice deficient in Hmox1 or Hmox2 have reiterated a role for these enzymes in both normal cell function and disease pathogenesis, especially in the context of cardiovascular disease. This review covers the current knowledge on the function of both Hmox1 and Hmox2 at both a cellular and tissue level in the cardiovascular system. Initially, the roles of heme oxygenases in vascular health and the regulation of processes central to vascular diseases are outlined, followed by an evaluation of the role(s) of Hmox1 and Hmox2 in various diseases such as atherosclerosis, intimal hyperplasia, myocardial infarction, and angiogenesis. Finally, the therapeutic potential of heme oxygenases and their products are examined in a cardiovascular disease context, with a focus on how the knowledge we have gained on these enzymes may be capitalized in future clinical studies.

  20. Yoga and meditation in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, S C; Madan, Kushal

    2014-09-01

    Yoga is a holistic mind-body intervention aimed at physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well being. Several studies have shown that yoga and/or meditation can control risk factors for cardiovascular disease like hypertension, type II diabetes and insulin resistance, obesity, lipid profile, psychosocial stress and smoking. Some randomized studies suggest that yoga/meditation could retard or even regress early and advanced coronary atherosclerosis. A recent study suggests that transcendental meditation may be extremely useful in secondary prevention of coronary heart disease and may reduce cardiovascular events by 48% over a 5-year period. Another small study suggests that yoga may be helpful in prevention of atrial fibrillation. However, most studies have several limitations like lack of adequate controls, small sample size, inconsistencies in baseline and different methodologies, etc. and therefore large trials with improved methodologies are required to confirm these findings. However, in view of the existing knowledge and yoga being a cost-effective technique without side effects, it appears appropriate to incorporate yoga/meditation for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  1. Drug releasing systems in cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Spadaccio, Cristiano; Chello, Massimo; Trombetta, Marcella; Rainer, Alberto; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Genovese, Jorge A

    2009-03-01

    Heart disease and atherosclerosis are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The lack of suitable autologous grafts has produced a need for artificial grafts; however, current artificial grafts carry significant limitations, including thrombosis, infection, limited durability and the inability to grow. Tissue engineering of blood vessels, cardiovascular structures and whole organs is a promising approach for creating replacement tissues to repair congenital defects and/or diseased tissues. In an attempt to surmount the shortcomings of artificial grafts, tissue-engineered cardiovascular graft (TECVG), constructs obtained using cultured autologous vascular cells seeded onto a synthetic biodegradable polymer scaffold, have been developed. Autologous TECVGs have the potential advantages of growth, durability, resistance to infection, and freedom from problems of rejection, thrombogenicity and donor scarcity. Moreover polymers engrafted with growth factors, cytokines, drugs have been developed allowing drug-releasing systems capable of focused and localized delivery of molecules depending on the environmental requirements and the milieu in which the scaffold is placed. A broad range of applications for compound-releasing, tissue-engineered grafts have been suggested ranging from drug delivery to gene therapy. This review will describe advances in the development of drug-delivery systems for cardiovascular applications focusing on the manufacturing techniques and on the compounds delivered by these systems to date.

  2. Drug releasing systems in cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Spadaccio, Cristiano; Chello, Massimo; Trombetta, Marcella; Rainer, Alberto; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Genovese, Jorge A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Heart disease and atherosclerosis are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The lack of suitable autologous grafts has produced a need for artificial grafts; however, current artificial grafts carry significant limitations, including thrombosis, infection, limited durability and the inability to grow. Tissue engineering of blood vessels, cardiovascular structures and whole organs is a promising approach for creating replacement tissues to repair congenital defects and/or diseased tissues. In an attempt to surmount the shortcomings of artificial grafts, tissue-engineered cardiovascular graft (TECVG), constructs obtained using cultured autologous vascular cells seeded onto a synthetic biodegradable polymer scaffold, have been developed. Autologous TECVGs have the potential advantages of growth, durability, resistance to infection, and freedom from problems of rejection, thrombogenicity and donor scarcity. Moreover polymers engrafted with growth factors, cytokines, drugs have been developed allowing drug-releasing systems capable of focused and localized delivery of molecules depending on the environmental requirements and the milieu in which the scaffold is placed. A broad range of applications for compound-releasing, tissue-engineered grafts have been suggested ranging from drug delivery to gene therapy. This review will describe advances in the development of drug-delivery systems for cardiovascular applications focusing on the manufacturing techniques and on the compounds delivered by these systems to date. PMID:19379142

  3. Free radical biology of the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alex F; Chen, Dan-Dan; Daiber, Andreas; Faraci, Frank M; Li, Huige; Rembold, Christopher M; Laher, Ismail

    2012-07-01

    Most cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), as well as age-related cardiovascular alterations, are accompanied by increases in oxidative stress, usually due to increased generation and/or decreased metabolism of ROS (reactive oxygen species; for example superoxide radicals) and RNS (reactive nitrogen species; for example peroxynitrite). The superoxide anion is generated by several enzymatic reactions, including a variety of NADPH oxidases and uncoupled eNOS (endothelial NO synthase). To relieve the burden caused by this generation of free radicals, which also occurs as part of normal physiological processes, such as mitochondrial respiratory chain activity, mammalian systems have developed endogenous antioxidant enzymes. There is an increased usage of exogenous antioxidants such as vitamins C and E by many patients and the general public, ostensibly in an attempt to supplement intrinsic antioxidant activity. Unfortunately, the results of large-scale trails do not generate much enthusiasm for the continued use of antioxidants to mitigate free-radical-induced changes in the cardiovascular system. In the present paper, we review the clinical use of antioxidants by providing the rationale for their use and describe the outcomes of several large-scale trails that largely display negative outcomes. We also describe the emerging understanding of the detailed regulation of superoxide generation by an uncoupled eNOS and efforts to reverse eNOS uncoupling. SIRT1 (sirtuin 1), which regulates the expression and activity of multiple pro- and anti-oxidant enzymes, could be considered a candidate molecule for a 'molecular switch'.

  4. Computational biology for cardiovascular biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Azuaje, Francisco; Devaux, Yvan; Wagner, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Computational biology is essential in the process of translating biological knowledge into clinical practice, as well as in the understanding of biological phenomena based on the resources and technologies originating from the clinical environment. One such key contribution of computational biology is the discovery of biomarkers for predicting clinical outcomes using 'omic' information. This process involves the predictive modelling and integration of different types of data and knowledge for screening, diagnostic or prognostic purposes. Moreover, this requires the design and combination of different methodologies based on statistical analysis and machine learning. This article introduces key computational approaches and applications to biomarker discovery based on different types of 'omic' data. Although we emphasize applications in cardiovascular research, the computational requirements and advances discussed here are also relevant to other domains. We will start by introducing some of the contributions of computational biology to translational research, followed by an overview of methods and technologies used for the identification of biomarkers with predictive or classification value. The main types of 'omic' approaches to biomarker discovery will be presented with specific examples from cardiovascular research. This will include a review of computational methodologies for single-source and integrative data applications. Major computational methods for model evaluation will be described together with recommendations for reporting models and results. We will present recent advances in cardiovascular biomarker discovery based on the combination of gene expression and functional network analyses. The review will conclude with a discussion of key challenges for computational biology, including perspectives from the biosciences and clinical areas.

  5. Circulating microRNAs in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Orlicka-Płocka, Marta; Gurda, Dorota; Fedoruk-Wyszomirska, Agnieszka; Smolarek, Iwona; Wyszko, Eliza

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CD) are currently one of the most common causes of death. Because heart related deaths occur on such an enormous scale this phenomenon is referred to as an epidemic. Chronic and acute injury of the heart could be an effect of cardiac remodeling, which is a result of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes, influenced by hemodynamic load or neurohormonal activation (Cohn et al., 2000). These small deviations in cardiac activity and morphology may lead to an enormous negative effect. Despite a significant progress, knowledge of standard risk factors for cardiovascular diseases has become less and less effective, which is why predicting and seeking an appropriate treatment is very challenging. As a result, there is a growing interest in finding new markers of the CD. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), are short, non-coding RNAs responsible for regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Among them that have the greatest potential are microRNA molecules that circulate in the blood plasma or serum, that are related to direct activation of signaling pathways, implicated in the aging process and thus for the development of cardiovascular disease. This paper is a summary of the current state of knowledge on miRNAs, their biogenesis and potential role as biomarkers to diagnose heart disease.

  6. Hyperthyroidism and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Osman, Faizel; Gammage, Michael D; Franklyn, Jayne A

    2002-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a common disorder affecting multiple systems in the body. The cardiovascular effects are among the most striking. The availability of effective treatments for hyperthyroidism has led to the widespread perception that it is a reversible disorder without any long-term consequences. Recent evidence suggests, however, that there may be adverse outcomes. Long-term follow-up studies have revealed increased mortality from cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease in those with a past history of overt hyperthyroidism treated with radioiodine, as well as those with subclinical hyperthyroidism. Thyroid hormones are known to exert direct effects on the myocardium, as well as the systemic vasculature and predispose to dysrhythmias, especially supraventricular. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a recognized complication of overt hyperthyroidism, and subclinical hyperthyroidism is also known to be a risk factor for development of AF. Supraventricular dysrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation, in older patients may account for some of the excess cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality described, especially because AF is known to predispose to embolic phenomena.

  7. Nitric oxide donors for cardiovascular implant applications.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, Noora; de Mel, Achala; Alavijeh, Omid Sadeghi; Cousins, Brian G; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2013-01-14

    In an era of increased cardiovascular disease burden in the ageing population, there is great demand for devices that come in to contact with the blood such as heart valves, stents, and bypass grafts that offer life saving treatments. Nitric oxide (NO) elution from healthy endothelial tissue that lines the vessels maintains haemostasis throughout the vasculature. Surgical devices that release NO are desirable treatment options and N-diazeniumdiolates and S-nitrosothiols are recognized as preferred donor molecules. There is a keen interest to investigate newer methods by which NO donors can be retained within biomaterials so that their release and kinetic profiles can be optimized. A range of polymeric scaffolds incorporating microparticles and nanomaterials are presenting solutions to current challenges, and have been investigated in a range of clinical applications. This review outlines the application of NO donors for cardiovascular therapy using biomaterials that release NO locally to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia (IH) and enhance endothelialization in the fabrication of next generation cardiovascular device technology.

  8. Vitamin d therapy and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Judd, Suzanne E; Tangpricha, Vin

    2011-06-01

    Vitamin D belongs to the family of nuclear steroid hormones, which has pleiotropic effects on several organ systems. Different vitamin D compounds have been studied as potential cardioprotective agents over the past 20 years. The results of these clinical studies vary based on the form and dosage of vitamin D administered during the trial. In the past 5 years, many have described an association of vitamin D compounds and cardiovascular health through reduction in blood pressure, reduction in inflammatory biomarkers, improved insulin sensitivity, and reduction in cardiovascular disease complications and death. Because there are several vitamin D compounds, it is important to consider the full breadth of the literature when examining vitamin D and cardiovascular health, to assist in hypothesis generation and understanding of the current state of the science. Although a growing body of evidence suggests that nutritional vitamin D supplementation and potentially even treatment with synthetic analogues of vitamin D may be cardioprotective, relatively few studies have examined either of these compounds in a randomized, controlled fashion. Studies examining the benefit of vitamin D supplementation are now beginning, but future studies considering calcitriol and analogue therapy also seem warranted.

  9. [Vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Mascitelli, Luca; Goldstein, Mark R; Pezzetta, Francesca

    2010-05-01

    The increasing worldwide displacement from the natural outdoor environment of human beings to an indoor sedentary lifestyle, along with the recommendation to avoid any direct sun exposure because of the risk of skin cancer, has resulted in a global pandemic of vitamin D insufficiency. Traditionally, vitamin D has been associated primarily with bone health. However, it has become evident that adequate vitamin D status is important for optimal function of many organs and tissues throughout the body, including the cardiovascular system. Vitamin D insufficiency seems to predispose to hypertension, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, and chronic vascular inflammation. The relationship between baseline vitamin D status, dose of vitamin D supplements, and cardiovascular events remains to be investigated by ongoing randomized trials; however increasing evidence suggests that the provision of a simple, well-tolerated, and inexpensive correction of vitamin D insufficiency favourably affects the morbility and mortality of cardiovascular disease along with the prevention of the most common chronic degenerative diseases.

  10. T cell senescence and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hee Tae; Park, Sungha; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, Won-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Age-related changes in the immune system, commonly termed "immunosenescence," contribute to deterioration of the immune response and fundamentally impact the health and survival of elderly individuals. Immunosenescence affects both the innate and adaptive immune systems; however, the most notable changes are in T cell immunity and include thymic involution, the collapse of T cell receptor (TCR) diversity, an imbalance in T cell populations, and the clonal expansion of senescent T cells. Senescent T cells have the ability to produce large quantities of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic mediators; thus, they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. Recently, an increasing body of evidence has suggested that senescent T cells also have pathogenic potential in cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction, underscoring the detrimental roles of these cells in various chronic inflammatory responses. Given that cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, there is great interest in understanding the contribution of age-related immunological changes to its pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss general features of age-related alterations in T cell immunity and the possible roles of senescent T cells in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

  11. Cardiovascular dysfunction in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Fede, Giuseppe; Privitera, Graziella; Tomaselli, Tania; Spadaro, Luisa; Purrello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Hyperdynamic syndrome is a well-known clinical condition found in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension, characterized by increased heart rate and cardiac output, and reduced systemic vascular resistance and arterial blood pressure. The leading cause of hyperdynamic circulation in cirrhotic patients is peripheral and splanchnic vasodilatation, due to an increased production/activity of vasodilator factors and decreased vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors. The term “cirrhotic cardiomyopathy” describes impaired contractile responsiveness to stress, diastolic dysfunction and electrophysiological abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis without known cardiac disease. Underlying circulatory and cardiac dysfunctions are the main determinant in the development of hepatorenal syndrome in advanced cirrhosis. Moreover, the clinical consequences of cirrhosis-related cardiovascular dysfunction are evident during and after liver transplantation, and after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt insertion. Cardiovascular complications following these procedures are common, with pulmonary edema being the most common complication. Other complications include overt heart failure, arrhythmia, pulmonary hypertension, pericardial effusion, and cardiac thrombus formation. This review discusses the circulatory and cardiovascular dysfunctions in cirrhosis, examining the pathophysiologic and clinical implications in light of the most recent published literature. PMID:25608575

  12. Mineral metabolism and cardiovascular disease in CKD.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hideki; Joki, Nobuhiko

    2017-03-01

    The mineral bone disorder of CKD, called Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD), has a major role in the etiology and progression of cardiovascular disease in CKD patients. Since the main emphasis in CKD-MBD is on three categories (bone abnormalities, laboratory abnormalities, and vascular calcifications), we have routinely accepted ectopic cardiovascular calcifications as a central risk factor in the pathophysiology of CKD-MBD for cardiac events. However, recent compelling evidence suggests that some CKD-MBD-specific factors other than vascular calcification might contribute to the onset of cardiovascular disease. Most notable is fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), which is thought to be independently associated with cardiac remodeling. Slow progression of cardiac disorders, such as vascular calcification and cardiac remodeling, characterizes cardiac disease due to CKD-MBD. In contrast, fatal arrhythmia may be induced when QT prolongation occurs with CKD-MBD treatment, such as with lower Ca dialysate or the use of calcimimetics. Sudden onset of fatal cardiac events, such as heart failure and sudden cardiac death, due to fatal arrhythmia would be another distinctive phenomenon of CKD-MBD. This may be defined as CKD-MBD-specific cardiac complex syndrome.

  13. Genetic Variation in Cardiomyopathy and Cardiovascular Disorders.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    With the wider deployment of massively-parallel, next-generation sequencing, it is now possible to survey human genome data for research and clinical purposes. The reduced cost of producing short-read sequencing has now shifted the burden to data analysis. Analysis of genome sequencing remains challenged by the complexity of the human genome, including redundancy and the repetitive nature of genome elements and the large amount of variation in individual genomes. Public databases of human genome sequences greatly facilitate interpretation of common and rare genetic variation, although linking database sequence information to detailed clinical information is limited by privacy and practical issues. Genetic variation is a rich source of knowledge for cardiovascular disease because many, if not all, cardiovascular disorders are highly heritable. The role of rare genetic variation in predicting risk and complications of cardiovascular diseases has been well established for hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, where the number of genes that are linked to these disorders is growing. Bolstered by family data, where genetic variants segregate with disease, rare variation can be linked to specific genetic variation that offers profound diagnostic information. Understanding genetic variation in cardiomyopathy is likely to help stratify forms of heart failure and guide therapy. Ultimately, genetic variation may be amenable to gene correction and gene editing strategies.

  14. Heavy Metal Poisoning and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alissa, Eman M.; Ferns, Gordon A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an increasing world health problem. Traditional risk factors fail to account for all deaths from CVD. It is mainly the environmental, dietary and lifestyle behavioral factors that are the control keys in the progress of this disease. The potential association between chronic heavy metal exposure, like arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, and CVD has been less well defined. The mechanism through which heavy metals act to increase cardiovascular risk factors may act still remains unknown, although impaired antioxidants metabolism and oxidative stress may play a role. However, the exact mechanism of CVD induced by heavy metals deserves further investigation either through animal experiments or through molecular and cellular studies. Furthermore, large-scale prospective studies with follow up on general populations using appropriate biomarkers and cardiovascular endpoints might be recommended to identify the factors that predispose to heavy metals toxicity in CVD. In this review, we will give a brief summary of heavy metals homeostasis, followed by a description of the available evidence for their link with CVD and the proposed mechanisms of action by which their toxic effects might be explained. Finally, suspected interactions between genetic, nutritional and environmental factors are discussed. PMID:21912545

  15. The Finnish Cardiovascular Study (FINCAVAS): characterising patients with high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Tuomo; Lehtinen, Rami; Viik, Jari; Lehtimäki, Terho; Niemelä, Kari; Nikus, Kjell; Niemi, Mari; Kallio, Janne; Kööbi, Tiit; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Kähönen, Mika

    2006-01-01

    Background The purpose of the Finnish Cardiovascular Study (FINCAVAS) is to construct a risk profile – using genetic, haemodynamic and electrocardiographic (ECG) markers – of individuals at high risk of cardiovascular diseases, events and deaths. Methods and design All patients scheduled for an exercise stress test at Tampere University Hospital and willing to participate have been and will be recruited between October 2001 and December 2007. The final number of participants is estimated to reach 5,000. Technically successful data on exercise tests using a bicycle ergometer have been collected of 2,212 patients (1,400 men and 812 women) by the end of 2004. In addition to repeated measurement of heart rate and blood pressure, digital high-resolution ECG at 500 Hz is recorded continuously during the entire exercise test, including the resting and recovery phases. About 20% of the patients are examined with coronary angiography. Genetic variations known or suspected to alter cardiovascular function or pathophysiology are analysed to elucidate the effects and interactions of these candidate genes, exercise and commonly used cardiovascular medications. Discussion FINCAVAS compiles an extensive set of data on patient history, genetic variation, cardiovascular parameters, ECG markers as well as follow-up data on clinical events, hospitalisations and deaths. The data enables the development of new diagnostic and prognostic tools as well as assessments of the importance of existing markers. PMID:16515696

  16. Cardiovascular complications of radiation therapy for thoracic malignancies: the role for non-invasive imaging for detection of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Groarke, John D.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Nohria, Anju; Ferrari, Roberto; Cheng, Susan; Moslehi, Javid

    2014-01-01

    Radiation exposure to the thorax is associated with substantial risk for the subsequent development of cardiovascular disease. Thus, the increasing role of radiation therapy in the contemporary treatment of cancer, combined with improving survival rates of patients undergoing this therapy, contributes to a growing population at risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Associated cardiovascular injuries include pericardial disease, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, conduction disease, cardiomyopathy, and medium and large vessel vasculopathy—any of which can occur at varying intervals following irradiation. Higher radiation doses, younger age at the time of irradiation, longer intervals from the time of radiation, and coexisting cardiovascular risk factors all predispose to these injuries. The true incidence of radiation-related cardiovascular disease remains uncertain due to lack of large multicentre studies with a sufficient duration of cardiovascular follow-up. There are currently no consensus guidelines available to inform the optimal approach to cardiovascular surveillance of recipients of thoracic radiation. Therefore, we review the cardiovascular consequences of radiation therapy and focus on the potential role of non-invasive cardiovascular imaging in the assessment and management of radiation-related cardiovascular disease. In doing so, we highlight characteristics that can be used to identify individuals at risk for developing post-radiation cardiovascular disease and propose an imaging-based algorithm for their clinical surveillance. PMID:23666251

  17. The effect of tanshinone IIA on the cardiovascular system in ovine fetus in utero.

    PubMed

    Mao, Caiping; Zhang, Yifan; Zhang, Yuying; Cao, Li; Shao, Huan; Wang, Liping; Zhu, Liyan; Xu, Zhice

    2009-01-01

    This was the first study to determine the effect of tanshinone IIA (an active ingredient in herb Danshen) on fetuses in utero under unstressed condition. Tanshinone IIA or 0.9% NaCl as control was intravenously (i.v.) administrated into pregnant ewes. Both maternal and fetal blood were analyzed for PO(2), PCO(2), SO(2)%, hemoglobin, hemotecrit, glucose, lactic acid, Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) concentrations. Maternal and fetal heart functions were assessed by examining cardiac enzymes and cardiovascular responses. The results showed that tanshinone IIA did not alter the blood values in ewes and fetuses. Cardiac enzyme activities related to the heart remained unchanged. In cardiovascular experiments, no alternation in maternal blood pressure by tanshinone IIA was observed. However, fetal systolic pressure was slightly and significantly increased following i.v. tanshinone IIA into the mothers, while fetal diastolic pressure, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate were not changed. The results demonstrated that tanshinone IIA used during the last third of gestation did not cause the biochemical changes related to cardiac functions in both maternal and fetal sheep. Fetal oxygen metabolism remained stable in utero, providing new information for clinical use of the herb in pregnancy. That tanshinone IIA increased fetal systolic pressure may open new opportunities to study the herb in fetal medicine.

  18. Periplogenin, isolated from Lagenaria siceraria, ameliorates L-T₄-induced hyperthyroidism and associated cardiovascular problems.

    PubMed

    Panda, S; Kar, A

    2011-03-01

    The importance of glycoside in the regulation of thyroid dysfunction is not well understood. In the present investigation, effects of periplogenin-3- O-D-glucopyranosyl (1→6)(1→4)-D-cymaropyranoside, isolated from the vegetable, LAGENARIA SICERARIA, in L-thyroxine (L-T₄)-induced hyperthyroidism and in related cardiovascular abnormalities have been revealed in Wistar albino rats. L-T₄ (500 μg/kg, s. c./d) administration for 12 days significantly increased serum concentrations of thyroxine (T₄), triidothyronine (T₃), and hepatic 5'-deiodinase I (5'-DI) activity with a parallel increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) in different organs such as heart, liver and kidney; serum glucose and insulin concentrations and a decrease in cardiac Na (+)-K (+)-ATPase activity as well as serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. Most of these adverse effects were reversed following the administration of isolated periplogenin. However, out of its 3 different concentrations (5.0, 10, and 25 mg/kg), 5 mg/kg appeared to be the most effective one as it could nearly normalize the level of T₃, glucose, insulin, Na (+)-K (+)-ATPase activity, tissue LPO and different serum lipids suggesting the protective role of periplogenin against thyrotoxicosis and associated cardiovascular problems. It appears that the periplogenin actions are mediated through its direct antithyroidal and/or LPO inhibiting properties.

  19. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS IN ADOLESCENTS.

    PubMed

    do Prado Junior, Pedro Paulo; de Faria, Franciane Rocha; de Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2015-08-01

    Introducción: los cambios en el estilo de vida están relacionados con la exposición temprana de los adolescentes a las comorbilidades asociadas a la enfermedad cardiovascular. Estas condiciones pueden tener consecuencias en la edad adulta. Objetivo: determinar la prevalencia de riesgo cardiovascular y factores asociados en las tres fases de la adolescencia. Métodos: estudio transversal que incluye a adolescentes de 10-19 años en la ciudad de Viçosa, distribuidos en tres fases. Se evaluaron las pruebas de laboratorio, el índice de masa corporal clasificadas en Z-score, según el sexo y la edad, y el porcentaje de grasa corporal, clasificados por sexo. Se utilizó la prueba de chi-cuadrado, la partición de chi-cuadrado con corrección de Bonferroni y la regresión de Poisson. El nivel de significación fue < 0,05. El proyecto fue aprobado por el Comité de Ética en Investigación de la UFV en humanos. Resultados: el sobrepeso, la grasa corporal, el perfil lipídico, el comportamiento sedentario y la historia de enfermedades cardiovasculares en la familia fueron los factores de riesgo cardiovascular más prevalentes entre los adolescentes. Los adolescentes tenían tasas más altas de sobrepeso y grasa. En cuanto a las etapas, la inicial mostró un mayor porcentaje de individuos con comportamiento sedentario, sobrepeso y colesterol total y LDL en comparación con otras fases. Los individuos con cambios en el estado nutricional eran más propensos a desarrollar hipertensión, cambios en el colesterol total, LDL, triglicéridos, insulina, HOMA y HDL bajo, en comparación con los individuos sanos. Conclusiones: los factores de riesgo cardiovascular se han observado en personas cada vez más jóvenes y son factores importantes para identificar una población en riesgo.

  20. Cardiovascular pharmacogenetics in the SNP era.

    PubMed

    Mooser, V; Waterworth, D M; Isenhour, T; Middleton, L

    2003-07-01

    In the past pharmacological agents have contributed to a significant reduction in age-adjusted incidence of cardiovascular events. However, not all patients treated with these agents respond favorably, and some individuals may develop side-effects. With aging of the population and the growing prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors worldwide, it is expected that the demand for cardiovascular drugs will increase in the future. Accordingly, there is a growing need to identify the 'good' responders as well as the persons at risk for developing adverse events. Evidence is accumulating to indicate that responses to drugs are at least partly under genetic control. As such, pharmacogenetics - the study of variability in drug responses attributed to hereditary factors in different populations - may significantly assist in providing answers toward meeting this challenge. Pharmacogenetics mostly relies on associations between a specific genetic marker like single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), either alone or arranged in a specific linear order on a certain chromosomal region (haplotypes), and a particular response to drugs. Numerous associations have been reported between selected genotypes and specific responses to cardiovascular drugs. Recently, for instance, associations have been reported between specific alleles of the apoE gene and the lipid-lowering response to statins, or the lipid-elevating effect of isotretinoin. Thus far, these types of studies have been mostly limited to a priori selected candidate genes due to restricted genotyping and analytical capacities. Thanks to the large number of SNPs now available in the public domain through the SNP Consortium and the newly developed technologies (high throughput genotyping, bioinformatics software), it is now possible to interrogate more than 200,000 SNPs distributed over the entire human genome. One pharmacogenetic study using this approach has been launched by GlaxoSmithKline to identify the approximately 4% of

  1. Homocysteine lowering interventions for preventing cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan; Lathyris, Dimitrios; Salanti, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease such as coronary artery disease, stroke and congestive heart failure, is a leading cause of death worldwide. A postulated risk factor is elevated circulating total homocysteine (tHcy) levels which is influenced mainly by blood levels of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12), folic acid (vitamin B9) and pyridoxine (vitamin B6). There is uncertainty regarding the strength of association between tHcy and the risk of cardiovascular disease. Objectives To assess the clinical effectiveness of homocysteine-lowering interventions (HLI) in people with or without pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library (issue 3 2008), MEDLINE (1950 to August 2008), EMBASE (1988 to August 2008), and LILACS (1982 to September 2, 2008). We also searched in Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED; 1985 to August 2008), ISI Web of Science (1993 to August 2008), and the Cochrane Stroke Group Specialised Register (April 2007). We hand searched pertinent journals and the reference lists of included papers. We also contacted researchers in the field. There was no language restriction in the search. Selection criteria We included randomised clinical trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of HLI for preventing cardiovascular events with a follow-up period of 1 year or longer. We considered myocardial infarction and stroke as the primary outcomes. We excluded studies in patients with end-stage renal disease. Data collection and analysis We independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We estimated relative risks (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. We measured statistical heterogeneity using I2. We used a random-effects model to synthesise the findings. Main results We included eight RCTs involving 24,210 participants with a low risk of bias in general terms. HLI did not reduce the risk of non-fatal or fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, or

  2. Leukocytes Link Local and Systemic Inflammation in Ischemic Cardiovascular Disease: An Expanded “Cardiovascular Continuum”

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Peter; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K.

    2016-01-01

    We have traditionally viewed ischemic heart disease in a cardiocentric manner: plaques grow in arteries until they block blood flow, causing acute coronary and other ischemic syndromes. Recent research provides new insight into the integrative biology of inflammation as it contributes to ischemic cardiovascular disease. These results have revealed hitherto unsuspected inflammatory signaling networks at work in these disorders that link the brain, autonomic nervous system, bone marrow, and spleen to the atherosclerotic plaque and to the infarcting myocardium. A burgeoning clinical literature indicates that such inflammatory networks—far from a mere laboratory curiosity—operate in our patients and can influence aspects of ischemic cardiovascular disease that determine decisively clinical outcomes. These new findings enlarge the circle of the traditional “cardiovascular continuum” beyond the heart and vessels to include the nervous system, the spleen, and the bone marrow. PMID:26940931

  3. Applications of 3D printing in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Mitsouras, Dimitris; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Liu, Peter P; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Rybicki, Frank J

    2016-12-01

    3D-printed models fabricated from CT, MRI, or echocardiography data provide the advantage of haptic feedback, direct manipulation, and enhanced understanding of cardiovascular anatomy and underlying pathologies. Reported applications of cardiovascular 3D printing span from diagnostic assistance and optimization of management algorithms in complex cardiovascular diseases, to planning and simulating surgical and interventional procedures. The technology has been used in practically the entire range of structural, valvular, and congenital heart diseases, and the added-value of 3D printing is established. Patient-specific implants and custom-made devices can be designed, produced, and tested, thus opening new horizons in personalized patient care and cardiovascular research. Physicians and trainees can better elucidate anatomical abnormalities with the use of 3D-printed models, and communication with patients is markedly improved. Cardiovascular 3D bioprinting and molecular 3D printing, although currently not translated into clinical practice, hold revolutionary potential. 3D printing is expected to have a broad influence in cardiovascular care, and will prove pivotal for the future generation of cardiovascular imagers and care providers. In this Review, we summarize the cardiovascular 3D printing workflow, from image acquisition to the generation of a hand-held model, and discuss the cardiovascular applications and the current status and future perspectives of cardiovascular 3D printing.

  4. Investigating the potential role of TRPA1 in locomotion and cardiovascular control during hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bodkin, Jennifer V; Thakore, Pratish; Aubdool, Aisah A; Liang, Lihuan; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Nandi, Manasi; Spina, Domenico; Clark, James E; Aaronson, Philip I; Shattock, Michael J; Brain, Susan D

    2014-01-01

    Radiotelemetry was used to investigate the in vivo cardiovascular and activity phenotype of both TRPA1 (transient receptor potential ankyrin 1) wild-type (WT) and TRPA1 knockout (KO) mice. After baseline recording, experimental hypertension was induced using angiotensin II infusion (1.1 mg−1 kg−1 a day, for 14 days). TRPA1 WT and KO mice showed similar morphological and functional cardiovascular parameters, including similar basal blood pressure (BP), heart rate, size, and function. Similar hypertension was also displayed in response to angiotensin II (156 ± 7 and 165 ± 11 mmHg, systolic BP ± SEM, n = 5–6). TRPA1 KO mice showed increased hypertensive hypertrophy (heart weight:tibia length: 7.3 ± 1.6 mg mm−1 vs. 8.8 ± 1.7 mg mm−1) and presented with blunted interleukin 6 (IL-6) production compared with hypertensive WT mice (151 ± 24 vs. 89 ± 16 pg mL−1). TRPA1 expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones was upregulated during hypertension (163% of baseline expression). Investigations utilizing the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde (CA) on mesenteric arterioles isolated from näive mice suggested a lack of TRPA1-dependent vasoreactivity in this vascular bed; a site with notable ability to alter total peripheral resistance. However, mesenteric arterioles isolated from TRPA1 KO hypertensive mice displayed significantly reduced ability to relax in response to nitric oxide (NO) (P < 0.05). Unexpectedly, naïve TRPA1 KO mice also displayed physical hyperactivity traits at baseline, which was exacerbated during hypertension. In conclusion, our study provides a novel cardiovascular characterization of TRPA1 KO mice in a model of hypertension. Results suggest that TRPA1 has a limited role in global cardiovascular control, but we demonstrate an unexpected capacity for TRPA1 to regulate physical activity. PMID:25505598

  5. Investigating the potential role of TRPA1 in locomotion and cardiovascular control during hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bodkin, Jennifer V; Thakore, Pratish; Aubdool, Aisah A; Liang, Lihuan; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Nandi, Manasi; Spina, Domenico; Clark, James E; Aaronson, Philip I; Shattock, Michael J; Brain, Susan D

    2014-08-01

    Radiotelemetry was used to investigate the in vivo cardiovascular and activity phenotype of both TRPA1 (transient receptor potential ankyrin 1) wild-type (WT) and TRPA1 knockout (KO) mice. After baseline recording, experimental hypertension was induced using angiotensin II infusion (1.1 mg(-1) kg(-1) a day, for 14 days). TRPA1 WT and KO mice showed similar morphological and functional cardiovascular parameters, including similar basal blood pressure (BP), heart rate, size, and function. Similar hypertension was also displayed in response to angiotensin II (156 ± 7 and 165 ± 11 mmHg, systolic BP ± SEM, n = 5-6). TRPA1 KO mice showed increased hypertensive hypertrophy (heart weight:tibia length: 7.3 ± 1.6 mg mm(-1) vs. 8.8 ± 1.7 mg mm(-1)) and presented with blunted interleukin 6 (IL-6) production compared with hypertensive WT mice (151 ± 24 vs. 89 ± 16 pg mL(-1)). TRPA1 expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones was upregulated during hypertension (163% of baseline expression). Investigations utilizing the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde (CA) on mesenteric arterioles isolated from näive mice suggested a lack of TRPA1-dependent vasoreactivity in this vascular bed; a site with notable ability to alter total peripheral resistance. However, mesenteric arterioles isolated from TRPA1 KO hypertensive mice displayed significantly reduced ability to relax in response to nitric oxide (NO) (P < 0.05). Unexpectedly, naïve TRPA1 KO mice also displayed physical hyperactivity traits at baseline, which was exacerbated during hypertension. In conclusion, our study provides a novel cardiovascular characterization of TRPA1 KO mice in a model of hypertension. Results suggest that TRPA1 has a limited role in global cardiovascular control, but we demonstrate an unexpected capacity for TRPA1 to regulate physical activity.

  6. Cardiovascular nursing on human genomics: what do cardiovascular nurses need to know about congestive heart failure?

    PubMed

    Frazier, Lorraine; Wung, Shu-Fen; Sparks, Elizabeth; Eastwood, Cathy

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents the main causes of heart failure (HF) and an update on the genetics studies on each cause. The review includes a delineation of the etiology and fundamental pathophysiology of HF and provides rational for treatment for the patient and family. Various cardiomyopathies are discussed, including primary cardiomyopathies, mixed cardiomyopathies, cardiomyopathies that involve altered cardiac muscle along with generalized multiorgan disorders, and various cardiovascular conditions, such as coronary artery disease (ischemic cardiomyopathy) and hypertension (hypertensive cardiomyopathy). A brief review of pharmacogenetics and HF is presented. The application of the genetic components of cardiomyopathy and pharmacogenetics is included to enhance cardiovascular nursing care.

  7. Potential cardiovascular implications of Sea Buckthorn berry consumption in humans.

    PubMed

    Sayegh, Marietta; Miglio, Cristiana; Ray, Sumantra

    2014-08-01

    Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been correlated with decreased risks of cardiovascular disease. Particularly, berry consumption has been associated with reductions in cardiovascular risk. Despite the range of potentially beneficial phytochemical components (vitamins, polyphenols, carotenoids, and fatty acids), there is little evidence underpinning the cardiovascular effects of sea buckthorn (SB) berries. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the benefits of SB consumption on cardiovascular health in human trials. Only six human studies were found, which examine the effect of SB berries on cardiovascular outcomes (i.e., lipid metabolism, platelet aggregation, and inflammation). Although there appears to be an inverse association between SB consumption and cardiovascular risk factors, the evidence is still scarce and the results are inconsistent. In addition, limitations in study design made it difficult to form firm conclusions. More "high-quality" human clinical trials are needed in order to establish the cardio-protective benefits of SB berries.

  8. Spectroscopy to improve identification of vulnerable plaques in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, Janneke L M; Meerwaldt, Robbert; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Lefrandt, Joop D; Slart, Riemer H J A; Tio, René A; Smit, Andries J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2010-01-01

    Many apparent healthy persons die from cardiovascular disease, despite major advances in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors are able to predict cardiovascular events in the long run, but fail to assess current disease activity or nearby cardiovascular events. There is a clear relation between the occurrence of cardiovascular events and the presence of so-called vulnerable plaques. These vulnerable plaques are characterized by active inflammation, a thin cap and a large lipid pool. Spectroscopy is an optical imaging technique which depicts the interaction between light and tissues, and thereby shows the biochemical composition of tissues. In recent years, impressive advances have been made in spectroscopy technology and intravascular spectroscopy is able to assess the composition of plaques of interest and thereby to identify and actually quantify plaque vulnerability. This review summarizes the current evidence for spectroscopy as a measure of plaque vulnerability and discusses the potential role of intravascular spectroscopic imaging techniques.

  9. Adherence to Cardiovascular Medications: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kronish, Ian M; Ye, Siqin

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with cardiovascular disease and/or its major risk factors have poor adherence to their prescribed medications. Finding novel methods to help patients improve their adherence to existing evidence-based cardiovascular drug therapies has enormous potential to improve health outcomes while potentially reducing health care costs. The goal of this report is to provide a review of the current understanding of adherence to cardiovascular medications from the point of view of prescribing clinicians and cardiovascular researchers. Key topics addressed include: 1) definitions of medication adherence; 2) prevalence and impact of non-adherence; 3) methods for assessing medication adherence; 4) reasons for poor adherence; and 5) approaches to improving adherence to cardiovascular medications. For each of these topics, the report seeks to identify important gaps in knowledge and opportunities for advancing the field of cardiovascular adherence research. PMID:23621969

  10. Beat to beat variability in cardiovascular variables: noise or music?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, M. L.; Berger, R. D.; Saul, J. P.; Smith, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Cardiovascular variables such as heart rate, arterial blood pressure, stroke volume and the shape of electrocardiographic complexes all fluctuate on a beat to beat basis. These fluctuations have traditionally been ignored or, at best, treated as noise to be averaged out. The variability in cardiovascular signals reflects the homeodynamic interplay between perturbations to cardiovascular function and the dynamic response of the cardiovascular regulatory systems. Modern signal processing techniques provide a means of analyzing beat to beat fluctuations in cardiovascular signals, so as to permit a quantitative, noninvasive or minimally invasive method of assessing closed loop hemodynamic regulation and cardiac electrical stability. This method promises to provide a new approach to the clinical diagnosis and management of alterations in cardiovascular regulation and stability.

  11. S-nitrosylation: integrator of cardiovascular performance and oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Saptarsi M; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of oxygen to tissues is the primary function of the cardiovascular system. NO, a gasotransmitter that signals predominantly through protein S-nitrosylation to form S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) in target proteins, operates coordinately with oxygen in mammalian cellular systems. From this perspective, SNO-based signaling may have evolved as a major transducer of the cellular oxygen-sensing machinery that underlies global cardiovascular function. Here we review mechanisms that regulate S-nitrosylation in the context of its essential role in "systems-level" control of oxygen sensing, delivery, and utilization in the cardiovascular system, and we highlight examples of aberrant S-nitrosylation that may lead to altered oxygen homeostasis in cardiovascular diseases. Thus, through a bird's-eye view of S-nitrosylation in the cardiovascular system, we provide a conceptual framework that may be broadly applicable to the functioning of other cellular systems and physiological processes and that illuminates new therapeutic promise in cardiovascular medicine.

  12. Gut Microbiota in Cardiovascular Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, W H Wilson; Kitai, Takeshi; Hazen, Stanley L

    2017-03-31

    Significant interest in recent years has focused on gut microbiota-host interaction because accumulating evidence has revealed that intestinal microbiota play an important role in human health and disease, including cardiovascular diseases. Changes in the composition of gut microbiota associated with disease, referred to as dysbiosis, have been linked to pathologies such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition to alterations in gut microbiota composition, the metabolic potential of gut microbiota has been identified as a contributing factor in the development of diseases. Recent studies revealed that gut microbiota can elicit a variety of effects on the host. Indeed, the gut microbiome functions like an endocrine organ, generating bioactive metabolites, that can impact host physiology. Microbiota interact with the host through many pathways, including the trimethylamine/trimethylamine N-oxide pathway, short-chain fatty acids pathway, and primary and secondary bile acids pathways. In addition to these metabolism-dependent pathways, metabolism-independent processes are suggested to also potentially contribute to cardiovascular disease pathogenesis. For example, heart failure-associated splanchnic circulation congestion, bowel wall edema, and impaired intestinal barrier function are thought to result in bacterial translocation, the presence of bacterial products in the systemic circulation and heightened inflammatory state. These are thought to also contribute to further progression of heart failure and atherosclerosis. The purpose of the current review is to highlight the complex interplay between microbiota, their metabolites, and the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We will also discuss the roles of gut microbiota in normal physiology and the potential of modulating intestinal microbial inhabitants as novel therapeutic targets.

  13. Mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez‐Trincado, César; García‐Carvajal, Ivonne; Pennanen, Christian; Parra, Valentina; Hill, Joseph A.; Rothermel, Beverly A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac hypertrophy is often initiated as an adaptive response to haemodynamic stress or myocardial injury, and allows the heart to meet an increased demand for oxygen. Although initially beneficial, hypertrophy can ultimately contribute to the progression of cardiac disease, leading to an increase in interstitial fibrosis and a decrease in ventricular function. Metabolic changes have emerged as key mechanisms involved in the development and progression of pathological remodelling. As the myocardium is a highly oxidative tissue, mitochondria play a central role in maintaining optimal performance of the heart. ‘Mitochondrial dynamics’, the processes of mitochondrial fusion, fission, biogenesis and mitophagy that determine mitochondrial morphology, quality and abundance have recently been implicated in cardiovascular disease. Studies link mitochondrial dynamics to the balance between energy demand and nutrient supply, suggesting that changes in mitochondrial morphology may act as a mechanism for bioenergetic adaptation during cardiac pathological remodelling. Another critical function of mitochondrial dynamics is the removal of damaged and dysfunctional mitochondria through mitophagy, which is dependent on the fission/fusion cycle. In this article, we discuss the latest findings regarding the impact of mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy on the development and progression of cardiovascular pathologies, including diabetic cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis, damage from ischaemia–reperfusion, cardiac hypertrophy and decompensated heart failure. We will address the ability of mitochondrial fusion and fission to impact all cell types within the myocardium, including cardiac myocytes, cardiac fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells. Finally, we will discuss how these findings can be applied to improve the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26537557

  14. mHealth in Cardiovascular Health Care.

    PubMed

    Chow, Clara K; Ariyarathna, Nilshan; Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Redfern, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) has been defined as medical and public health practice supported by mobile devices, such as mobile phones, patient monitoring devices and personal digital assistants. Cardiovascular mHealth is, arguably, leading the mHealth space, through innovation, research and implementation, and especially in the areas of prevention, cardiac rehabilitation and education. mHealth includes simple strategies, such as the use of short message service (SMS) or text messages in successful short-term smoking-cessation, weight loss and diabetes management programs. The recent Australian Tobacco, Exercise and Diet Messages (TEXT ME) randomised clinical trial addressed multiple cardiovascular risk factors. mHealth can also involve more complex strategies, such as smart phone applications (apps), global positioning systems (GPS) and Bluetooth technologies. Although many apps could be considered suitable for primary prevention, they are largely unregulated and most are not evidence-based. Some have been well-developed, such as the Food Switch app and an iPhone electrocardiogram (ECG) system. The "explosion" of apps has driven initiatives such as the Mobile Applications Rating Scale (MARS). More recently, the use of sensors to monitor and provide feedback to patients and healthcare providers is being explored. With almost two billion people currently owning a Smartphone, and 50% of adults (globally) predicted to own one by 2018, mHealth provides the prospect of delivering efficient, affordable healthcare services to widespread populations both locally and globally. In particular, it has the potential to reduce socioeconomic disparity and alleviate the burden of cardiovascular disease. There is now a need to rethink traditional health service structures and bioengineering capacity, to ensure mHealth systems are also safe, secure and robust.

  15. Modelling the cardiovascular effects of ephedrine

    PubMed Central

    Persky, Adam M; Berry, N Seth; Pollack, Gary M; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2004-01-01

    Aims Recent reports have called into question the safety of ephedra supplements especially with regards to their cardiovascular effects. The purpose of this analysis was to characterize, via pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling, the cardiovascular effects of ephedrine, the main active ingredient of ephedra, in apparently healthy, overweight volunteers. Methods In a randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study, eight subjects received either placebo, 0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 mg kg−1 ephedrine sulphate by mouth with a 7-day washout between treatments. Plasma ephedrine concentrations, heart rate and blood pressure were determined for 8 h postdose. Results The pharmacokinetics of ephedrine were best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The percentage change in heart rate was described by a linear model with a resulting slope of 0.14%·l µg−1 (CV = 59%). The percentage change in systolic blood pressure demonstrated clockwise hysteresis, and a sigmoidal tolerance model was used to describe the data. The mean maximum predicted effect (Emax) was 53.7% (CV = 41%) with an EC50 of 107 µg·l−1 (CV = 65%) and an inhibitory maximum (Imax) of 39.8% (CV = 60%). Tolerance developed with a mean half-life of 15 min (range 6–140 min). Conclusions This is the first study to apply a comprehensive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model to the cardiovascular effects of orally administered ephedrine. Although systolic blood pressure increases quickly after administration, the increase is nearly abolished by compensatory mechanisms. PMID:15089807

  16. Cardiovascular and nervous system changes during meditation

    PubMed Central

    Steinhubl, Steven R.; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Patel, Sheila; Boeldt, Debra L.; Mackellar, Geoffrey; Porter, Valencia; Redmond, Jacob T.; Muse, Evan D.; Nicholson, Laura; Chopra, Deepak; Topol, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of benefits have been described for the long-term practice of meditation, yet little is known regarding the immediate neurological and cardiovascular responses to meditation. Wireless sensor technology allows, for the first time, multi-parameter and quantitative monitoring of an individual's responses during meditation. The present study examined inter-individual variations to meditation through continuous monitoring of EEG, blood pressure, heart rate and its variability (HRV) in novice and experienced meditators. Methods: Participants were 20 experienced and 20 novice meditators involved in a week-long wellness retreat. Monitoring took place during meditation sessions on the first and last full days of the retreat. All participants wore a patch that continuously streamed ECG data, while half of them also wore a wireless EEG headset plus a non-invasive continuous blood pressure monitor. Results: Meditation produced variable but characteristic EEG changes, significantly different from baseline, even among novice meditators on the first day. In addition, although participants were predominately normotensive, the mean arterial blood pressure fell a small (2–3 mmHg) but significant (p < 0.0001) amount during meditation. The effect of meditation on HRV was less clear and influenced by calculation technique and respiration. No clear relationship between EEG changes, HRV alterations, or mean blood pressure during meditation was found. Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate neurological and cardiovascular responses during meditation in both novice and experienced meditators using novel, wearable, wireless devices. Meditation produced varied inter-individual physiologic responses. These results support the need for further investigation of the short- and long-term cardiovascular effects of mental calm and individualized ways to achieve it. PMID:25852526

  17. Cardiovascular responses of snakes to hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillywhite, H. B.; Ballard, R. E.; Hargens, A. R.; Rosenberg, H. I.

    1997-01-01

    Snakes have provided useful vertebrate models for understanding circulatory adaptation to gravity, attributable to their elongate body shape and evolutionary diversificaton in terms of ecology and behavior. Recently we have studied cardiovascular responses of snakes to hypergravic acceleration forces produced acutely in the head-to-tail direction (+Gz) on a short-arm centrifuge. Snakes were held in a nearly straight position within a horizontal plastic tube and subjected to a linear force gradient during acceleration. Carotid blood flow provided an integrated measure of cardiovascular performance. Thus, cardiovascular tolerance of snakes to stepwise increments of Gz was measured as the caudal Gz force at which carotid blood flow ceased. Tolerance to increasing Gz varies according to adaptive evolutionary history inferred from the ecology and behavior of species. With respect to data for six species we investigated, multiple regression analysis demonstrates that Gz tolerance correlates with gravitational habitat, independently of body length. Relative to aquatic and non-climbing species, carotid blood flow is better maintained in arboreal or scansorial species, which tolerate hypergravic forces of +2 to +3.5 Gz. Additionally, semi-arboreal rat snakes (Elaphe obsoleta) exhibit plasticity of responses to long-term, intermittent +1.5 Gz stress. Compared to non-acclimated controls, acclimated snakes show greater increases of heart rate during head-up tilt or acceleration, greater sensitivity of arterial pressure to circulating catecholamines, higher blood levels of prostaglandin ratios favorable to maintenance of arterial blood pressure, and medial hypertrophy in major arteries and veins. As in other vertebrates, Gz tolerance of snakes is enhanced by acclimation, high arterial pressure, comparatively large blood volume, and body movements. Vascular studies of snakes suggest the importance to acclimation of local responses involving vascular tissue, in addition to

  18. Are cardiovascular diseases bad for economic growth?

    PubMed

    Suhrcke, Marc; Urban, Dieter

    2010-12-01

    We assess the impact of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality on economic growth, using a dynamic panel growth regression framework taking into account potential endogeneity problems. In the worldwide sample we detect a non-linear influence of working age CVD mortality rates on growth across the per capita income scale. Splitting the sample (according to the resulting income threshold) into low- and middle-income countries, and high-income countries, we find a robust negative contribution of increasing CVD mortality rates on subsequent five-year growth rates in the latter sample. Not too surprisingly, we find no significant impact in the low- and middle-income country sample.

  19. Bioreactor Technology in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertsching, H.; Hansmann, J.

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering is a fast evolving field of biomedical science and technology to manufacture viable blood vessels, heart valves, myocar-dial substitutes and vascularised complex tissues. In consideration of the specific role of the haemodynamics of human circulation, bioreactors are a fundamental of this field. The development of perfusion bioreactor technology is a consequence of successes in extracorporeal circulation techniques, to provide an in vitro environment mimicking in vivo conditions. The bioreactor system should enable an automatic hydrodynamic regime control. Furthermore, the systematic studies regarding the cellular responses to various mechanical and biochemical cues guarantee the viability, bio-monitoring, testing, storage and transportation of the growing tissue.

  20. Radiation Toxicity to the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Finch, William; Tsitlakidou, Despina; Josephs, Tyler; Iliescu, Cezar; Best, John F; Yang, Eric H

    2016-03-01

    Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer treatment, and today, it is applied to approximately 50% of malignancies, including valvular, myocardial, pericardial, coronary or peripheral vascular disease, and arrhythmias. An increased clinical suspicion and knowledge of those mechanisms is important to initiate appropriate screening for the optimal diagnosis and treatment. As the number of cancer survivors has been steadily increasing over the last decades, cardio-oncology, an evolving subspecialty of cardiology, will soon play a pivotal role in raising awareness of the increased cardiovascular risk and formulate strategies to optimally manage patients in this unique population.

  1. Distribution of nitric oxide in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mesáros, S; Grunfeld, S

    1997-01-01

    We report here the in vitro measurements of nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system using a porphyrinic sensor specific for NO. Nitric oxide concentrations were measured directly in different parts of the heart and also in different arteries and veins, ranging from 100 microm to 5 mm in diameter. Highest NO. concentrations were found in the heart and particularly in the areas of aortic and pulmonary valves. The NO. concentration in the arteries was higher than in the veins. A clearcut positive correlation was obtained by plotting the vessel diameter and production of nitric oxide.

  2. Aging and the complexity of cardiovascular dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, D. T.; Furman, M. I.; Pincus, S. M.; Ryan, S. M.; Lipsitz, L. A.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    Biomedical signals often vary in a complex and irregular manner. Analysis of variability in such signals generally does not address directly their complexity, and so may miss potentially useful information. We analyze the complexity of heart rate and beat-to-beat blood pressure using two methods motivated by nonlinear dynamics (chaos theory). A comparison of a group of healthy elderly subjects with healthy young adults indicates that the complexity of cardiovascular dynamics is reduced with aging. This suggests that complexity of variability may be a useful physiological marker.

  3. [Anaphylaxis to protamine during cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Madani, H; Sadiki, E O; Bouziane, M; Amaarouch, S; Madani, M; Khatouf, M

    2014-05-01

    Protamine is a polypeptide with low molecular weights that is used widely to reverse heparin anticoagulation during cardiac surgery. Protamine, efficient and relatively sure, can produce multiple adverse reactions after intravenous administration, including pulmonary hypertension, or systemic hypotension leading at times to cardiovascular collapse and death. Physiopathologic mechanisms, underlying these reactions, are not clear. Immunologic and non-immunologic pathways are suggested. Some risk factors expose to protamine's adverse reactions. Preoperative identification of these factors should prompt specific preventive measures. The anesthesiologist and the cardiac surgeon must be vigilant when administrating protamine. Reheparinization and reinstitution of cardiopulmonary bypass should be considered in patients with refractory shock.

  4. Cardiovascular pharmacogenomics and individualized drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Naveen L.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of individualized drug therapy requires physicians to be able to accurately predict an individual’s response to a drug. Both genetic and environmental factors are known to influence drug response. ‘Pharmacogenetics’ is the study of the role of inheritance in variation in drug response phenotypes. Pharmacogenetics is now moving genome-wide to become ‘pharmacogenomics’, resulting in the recognition of novel biomarkers for individual variation in drug response. This article reviews the development, promise and challenges facing pharmacogenomics, using examples of drugs used to treat or prevent cardiovascular disease. PMID:19707183

  5. Cardiovascular abnormalities with single dose of tapentadol.

    PubMed

    Vachhani, A; Barvaliya, M; Naik, V; Tripathi, C B

    2014-01-01

    This case represents the development of dizziness, palpitation, tightness in chest, flushing, and tremor on consumption of a single dose of tapentadol (100 mg) for acute lower back pain. The patient was admitted in the intensive cardiac care unit for continuous monitoring. At admission, electrocardiogram showed tachycardia (140/min) along with ST segment elevation in second chest lead (V2). The patient was monitored and advised not to take further doses of tapentadol. He was discharged after 36 hours of admission. Tapentadol should be used cautiously in patients with cardiovascular diseases and receiving sympathomimetic drugs.

  6. [Cardiovascular risk factors in Tlemcen (Algeria)].

    PubMed

    Latifa, Boukli Hacène; Kaouel, Meguenni

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors were studied in a random representative sample of the urban community of Tlemcen, aged 20 years or older. The study included 805 subjects (participation rate: 72%). This study showed a high prevalence of hypertension (32.7%), diabetes (16.1%), cigarette smoking (17.1%, but 36.8% among men), blood cholesterol levels > 6.2 mmol/L (6.3%) and obesity (19.2% and significantly higher in women than in men: 27.9% vs 10.5%). These results show that the prevalence of hypertension is very high among women, reaching levels observed in industrialized countries.

  7. Hyperuricemia as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease: clinical review.

    PubMed

    Gudiño Gomezjurado, Álvaro

    2016-11-15

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Several risk factors have been associated with the development of these pathologies. However, there is controversy about whether hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease. To answer this question, we performed a recent literature review of relevant published material to assess the association of hyperuricemia with four major cardiovascular diseases: hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation.

  8. How May Proton Pump Inhibitors Impair Cardiovascular Health?

    PubMed

    Sukhovershin, Roman A; Cooke, John P

    2016-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most widely used drugs worldwide. They are used to treat a number of gastroesophageal disorders and are usually prescribed as a long-term medication or even taken without a prescription. There are a number of clinical studies that associate PPI use with an increased cardiovascular risk. In this article, we review the clinical evidence for adverse cardiovascular effects of PPIs, and we discuss possible biological mechanisms by which PPIs can impair cardiovascular health.

  9. QRAR models for cardiovascular system drugs using biopartitioning micellar chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sumin; Yang, Gengliang; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Haiyan; Li, Zhiwei

    2007-02-01

    The capability of biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) to describe and estimate pharmacological parameters of cardiovascular system drugs has been studied. The retention of cardiovascular system drugs was studied using different pH of Brij-35 as micellar mobile phase in modified C(18) stationary phase. Quantitative retention-activity relationships (QRAR) in BMC were investigated for these compounds. An adequate correlation between the retention factors (log k) and the toxicity (LD(50)) of cardiovascular system drugs was obtained.

  10. Hostility and Anger Expression: Behavioral and Cardiovascular Responses to Mental Stress Among Cardiovascular Disease Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    among cardiovascular disease patients (e.g. Everson, Goldberg, Kaplan, Julkunen, & Salonen, 1998; Porter, Stone & Schwartz, 1999; Arrighi et al...harassment intervention. Psychosomatic Medicine, 21, 568 (Abstract). Arrighi , J.A., Burg, M., Cohen, I.S., Kao, A.H., Pfau, S., Caulin-Glaser, T

  11. Childhood cardiovascular risk factors in South Asians: A cause of concern for adult cardiovascular disease epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Duggirala Sivaram; Kabir, Zubair; Dash, Ashok Kumar; Das, Bhagabati Charan

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors in children are increasing at an alarming rate in the western world. However, there is limited information regarding these in the South Asian children. This review attempts at summarizing such evidence. South Asians are remarkable for the earlier onset of adult cardiovascular disease (CVD) by almost a decade compared to the Caucasians. We identified published literature, mainly on PubMed, Embase and Cochrane library using specific search terms such as lipid abnormalities, high blood pressure, hyperglycemia, tobacco use, obesity, physical inactivity, and unhealthy dietary practices. Atherosclerotic CVD processes begin early in childhood and are influenced over the life course by genetic and potentially modifiable risk factors and environmental exposure. 80% of adult CVD burden will fall on the developing nations by 2020. The concept of primordial prevention is fast emerging as a necessary prevention tool to curb adult CVD epidemic. Established guidelines and proven preventive strategies on cardiovascular health exist; however, are always implemented half-heartedly. Composite screening and prediction tools for adults can be adapted and validated in children tailored to South Asian population. South Asian children could be at a greater risk of developing cardiovascular risk factors at an earlier stage, thus, timely interventions are imperative. PMID:21976880

  12. Introduction to the Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team's (CCORT) Canadian Cardiovascular Atlas project.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jack V; Brien, Susan E; Kennedy, Courtney C; Pilote, Louise; Ghali, William A

    2003-03-15

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team's (CCORT) Canadian Cardiovascular Atlas project was developed to provide Canadians with a national report on the state of cardiovascular health and health services in Canada. Written by a group of Canada's leading experts in cardiovascular outcomes research, the CCORT cardiac Atlas will cover a wide variety of topics ranging from cardiac risk factors and cardiac mortality rates to the treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure and the outcomes of invasive cardiac procedures across Canada. Data in the Atlas will be presented at a national, provincial and health region level. The Atlas will be published as a series of 20 articles and chapters in future issues of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology and on CCORT's web site (www.ccort.ca). The journal version of the Atlas chapters will be written for a clinical audience and will include editorials written by invited experts, whereas the web-based version of each chapter will be written for a more general audience and will include additional supplemental information (for example, interactive colour maps and tables) that cannot be included in the journal version. Material from the Journal and the web will eventually be compiled into a book that will be distributed across Canada. This article serves as an introduction to the Atlas project and describes the rationale for and objectives of the CCORT national cardiac Atlas project.

  13. Cardiovascular genetic medicine: evolving concepts, rationale, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Ray E

    2008-06-01

    Cardiovascular genetic medicine is devoted to the identification and understanding of cardiac conditions resulting from genetic and genomic mechanisms and to the development and validation of diagnostic and treatment algorithms and guidelines. Cardiovascular genetic medicine clinics now provide expert cardiovascular subspecialty care, genetic counseling and clinical genetic testing, and will eventually provide disease-specific gene or genetic therapies. Currently, the most tractable diagnoses for cardiovascular genetic medicine are the single-gene disorders: the cardiomyopathies, the channelopathies, and others. The recent explosion of genetic knowledge within the single-gene disorders and consequent rapid proliferation of genetic testing enables far greater numbers of individuals to directly benefit from this progress. A compelling rationale exists for this approach: cardiovascular single-gene diseases commonly present with life-threatening events (e.g., sudden cardiac death, heart failure, stroke, etc.), but identification, evaluation, and treatment of individuals with presymptomatic genetic risk has the promise to prevent or ameliorate cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cardiovascular genetic medicine programs also anchor training and research, thereby enabling the next generation of academic specialists in cardiovascular genetic medicine to continue to improve cardiovascular health.

  14. Regulation of chromatin structure in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    It has been appreciated for some time that cardiovascular disease involves large-scale transcriptional changes in various cell types. What has become increasingly clear only in the past few years, however, is the role of chromatin remodeling in cardiovascular phenotypes in normal physiology, as well as in development and disease. This review summarizes the state of the chromatin field in terms of distinct mechanisms to regulate chromatin structure in vivo, identifying when these modes of regulation have been demonstrated in cardiovascular tissues. We describe areas in which a better understanding of chromatin structure is leading to new insights into the fundamental biology of cardiovascular disease. 

  15. BIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES WITH PREVENTIVE EFFECT IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Mulero, Juana; Abellán, José; Zafrilla, Pilar; Amores, Diego; Hernández Sánchez, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    The effect of diet on cardiovascular disease prevention has been widely studied for many years. Numerous studies have confirmed that diets rich in fruits and vegetables (Mediterranean diet) are beneficial to the cardiovascular system and various bioactive food components have preventive effect on chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this paper we review the effect of bioactive substances included in the group of flavonoids (catechins and proanthocyanidins, anthocyanins and isoflavones), stilbenes such as resveratrol, bioactive peptides, plant sterols and polyunsaturated fatty acids omega- 3 on the cardiovascular system.

  16. Incidence of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Mexican Americans

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Angina Pectoris; Death, Sudden, Cardiac; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Peripheral Vascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Diabetes Mellitus, Non-insulin Dependent; Diabetes Mellitus

  17. Cardiovascular adaptation and cardiac disease in the elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Del Río-santiago, Valentín; Santiago Trinidad, Ricardo; Vicenty Rivera, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are uncommon among trained athletes. Their occurrences mostly depend on the individual's age and fitness levels. Adequate understanding of the cardiovascular adaptations undergone by the competitive athletes' heart is of paramount importance in order to differentiate them from serious cardiovascular conditions. Diagnosing these abnormalities early may prevent rare but devastating potential complications associated with athletic activities and defines appropriate activity restrictions to minimize the risk of sudden cardiac death. This article will review concerns related to competitive athlete's cardiovascular adaptations and diseases, in light of specific recommendations presented in the 36th Bethesda Conference guidelines.

  18. Blueprint of the certification examination in cardiovascular computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Min, James K; Abbara, Suhny; Berman, Daniel S; Edgertond, Dawn M; Gerson, Myron C; Halliburton, Sandra; Hines, Jerome L; Hodgson, John M; Lesser, John R; Lennond, Lorraine; Taylor, Allen J; Wann, L Samuel; Ziffer, Jack A; Cerqueira, Manuel D

    2008-01-01

    Physician certification is critical in all areas of cardiovascular imaging to assure optimal performance and interpretation of quality studies for patient diagnosis and management. This is especially important in the field of cardiovascular computed tomography where practitioners have varied training and expertise that may not cover the full range of skills in the technical, image interpretative and clinical application of the results for patient management. The Certification Board of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography was developed to test the minimal level of competence of physicians performing cardiovascular computed tomography. In this article, the process of defining the content areas, determining candidate eligibility and the process of examination development and testing will be defined.

  19. [Assessing the cardiovascular risk in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Arnaud, L; Mathian, A; Bruckert, E; Amoura, Z

    2014-11-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Among these are the so-called classical cardiovascular risk factors, the disease itself through its activity, treatments, and complications, and the thrombotic risk due to antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Observational studies suggest that most classical cardiovascular risk factors are observed more frequently in SLE patients than in the general population, and that these are insufficient to explain the increased cardiovascular risk observed in most studies. Given this high risk, adequate management of cardiovascular risk factors should be recommended in SLE patients. Paradoxically, the benefit due to the anti-inflammatory properties of treatments such as corticosteroids may exceed, in certain cases, their pro-atherogenic effect. Importantly, the tools that were developed for the estimation of cardiovascular risk at the individual level among the general population cannot be used reliably in SLE patients, as these tools appear to underestimate the true cardiovascular risk. The adequate indications and targets of cardiovascular treatments are therefore not fully known in SLE. A better understanding of the determinants of the cardiovascular risk in SLE will allow the identification and more tailored management of these high-risk patients.

  20. Cardiovascular risk, lipids and pregnancy: preeclampsia and the risk of later life cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Francesca; Tooher, Jane; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Hennessy, Annemarie

    2014-03-01

    It has been widely thought that the effects of hypertension in pregnancy reversed after delivery and hypertension values returned to their pre-pregnancy level as it was seen as a disease of short duration in otherwise healthy young women. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the principal underlying abnormality, endothelial dysfunction, remains in women who had preeclampsia and that it is this damage that increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in later life. The contributions of hypertension and dyslipidaemia before and during the pregnancy are also important and contribute to future risk. Serum lipids are complex and change dramatically in pregnancy. In general there is an increase in most plasma lipid components, notably triglycerides, total cholesterol and the major particles of HDL and LDL. Aberrations or exaggerations in this shift (i.e. decrease HDL and a greater increase in LDL) are associated with poor outcomes of pregnancy such as preeclampsia. Long term cardiovascular disease is influenced by preeclampsia and in part potentially by the lipid changes which escalate late in disease. Whether we can influence the risk of preeclampsia by controlling cardiovascular risk factors preceding or during preeclampsia, or cardiovascular disease after preeclampsia is yet to be determined. Ultimately, strategies to control lipid concentrations will only be viable when we understand the safety to the mother at the time of the pregnancy, and to the foetus both immediately and in the very long term. Strategies to control blood pressure are well established in the non-pregnant population, and previous preeclampsia and gestational hypertension should be considered in any cardiovascular risk profile. Whether control of blood pressure in the pregnancy per se is of any longer term benefit is also yet to be determined.