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Sample records for care alpha-1 antitrypsin

  1. Alpha-1 antitrypsin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003715.htm Alpha-1 antitrypsin blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a laboratory test to measure ...

  2. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) ... develop. The most common faulty gene that can cause AAT deficiency is called PiZ. If you inherit ...

  3. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency asthma and allergy.

    PubMed

    Palma-Carlos, A G; Palma-Carlos, M L

    2007-04-01

    The biochemistry, genetics and pathology of alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency are reviewed. The geographical distribution in Europe of more current phenotypes M, SZ is discussed. Two cases of alpha-1- anti-trypsin are presented one homozygotic ZZ non-smoker without any respiratory pathology and one heterozygotic SZ heavy smoker with a severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and reversibility to Beta-2-mimetics suggesting asthma. The relationship between alpha-1-antitrypsin and asthma is discussed and general measures of treatment or prevention suggested.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetic modifiers of emphysema risk. Thorax. 2004 Mar;59(3):259-64. Review. Citation on PubMed ... alpha}1-antitrypsin deficiency. Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 23;169(6):546-50. doi: 10.1001/ ...

  5. Liver replacement for alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Charles W.; Porter, Kendrick A.; Peters, Robert L.; Ashcavai, Mary; Redeker, Allan G.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl with advanced cirrhosis and severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency of the homozygous PiZZ phenotype was treated by orthotopic liver transplantation. After replacement of the liver with a homograft from a donor with the normal PiMM phenotype, the alpha1-antitrypsin concentration in the recipient’s serum rose to normal; it had the PiMM phenotype. Two and a third years later, chronic rejection necessitated retransplantation. Insertion of a homograft from a heterozygous PiMZ donar was followed by the identification of that phenotype in the recipient’s serum. Neither liver graft developed the alpha1-antitrypsin glycoprotein deposits seen with the deficiency state. These observations confirm that this hepatic- based inborn error metabolism is metabolically cured by liver replacement. PMID:320694

  6. Severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, O J; Godden, D J; Martin, P D; Danielian, P J

    1999-06-01

    This case study describes a successful pregnancy in a 27-yr-old patient with severe emphysema, secondary to alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency, genotype PiZZ. Despite significant respiratory compromise, more severe than previously reported, no complications ensued. Maternal pulmonary function did not deteriorate significantly until the 32nd week of pregnancy, with an elective Caesarean section being performed during the 37th week. This experience suggests that even severe maternal airflow obstruction is, in itself, not an absolute contra-indication to pregnancy. Pre-pregnancy multidisciplinary counselling is likely to be helpful in these patients, including frank discussion on the risks of pregnancy, the prospects of successful completion and the mother's future prognosis in relation to caring for the child.

  7. Who Is at Risk for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency occurs in all ethnic groups. However, the ... most often in White people of European descent. AAT deficiency is an inherited condition. "Inherited" means the ...

  8. Delivery of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin to Airways.

    PubMed

    Griese, Matthias; Scheuch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with exogenous alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a potent serine protease inhibitor, was developed originally for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency; however, other lung conditions involving neutrophilic inflammation and proteolytic tissue injury related to neutrophil elastase and other serine proteases may also be considered for AAT therapy. These conditions include bronchiectasis caused by primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis, and other diseases associated with an increased free elastase activity in the airways. Inhaled AAT may be a viable option to counteract proteolytic tissue damage. This form of treatment requires efficient drug delivery to the targeted pulmonary compartment. Aerosol technology meeting this requirement is currently available and offers an alternative therapeutic approach to systemic AAT administration. To date, early studies in humans have shown biochemical efficacy and have established the safety of inhaled AAT. However, to bring aerosol AAT therapy to patients, large phase 3 protocols in carefully selected patient populations (i.e., subgroups of patients with AAT deficiency, cystic fibrosis, or other lung diseases with bronchiectasis) will be needed with clinical end points in addition to the measurement of proteolytic activity in the airway. The outcomes likely will have to include lung function, lung structure assessed by computed tomography imaging, disease exacerbations, health status, and mortality.

  9. [Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency - an update].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Nikolas; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD) and liver cirrhosis. The disease is widely underdiagnosed. The hallmarks of therapy are smoking cessation, prevention from environmental dust exposure and augmentation therapy. Findings from the recently published prospective, placebo-controlled and randomized RAPID trial proved effectiveness of AAT augmentation therapy for slowing progression of emphysema, measured by CT lung density. CT lung density may be more sensitive than forced exspiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or monoxid diffusion capacity (DLCO). The data suggest that higher therapeutic serum AAT levels lead to lower decline in lung density.

  10. Therapeutics: Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Augmentation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Campos, Michael; Lascano, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Subjects with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency who develop pulmonary disease are managed following general treatment guidelines, including disease management interventions. In addition, administration of intravenous infusions of alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (augmentation therapy) at regular schedules is a specific therapy for individuals with AATD with pulmonary involvement.This chapter summarizes the manufacturing differences of commercially available formulations and the available evidence of the effects of augmentation therapy. Biologically, there is clear evidence of in vivo local antiprotease effects in the lung and systemic immunomodulatory effects. Clinically, there is cumulative evidence of slowing lung function decline and emphysema progression. The optimal dose of augmentation therapy is being revised as well as more individualized assessment of who needs this therapy.

  11. Three cases of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Jack, C I; Evans, C C

    1991-09-01

    We report three elderly patients who presented with increasing dyspnoea on exertion and radiological evidence of basal bullous emphysema. On further investigation they were found to have alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. We emphasize that alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency can present much later than is usually the case especially if the patient is a life-long non-smoker.

  12. Therapeutics: Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gruntman, Alisha M; Flotte, Terence R

    2017-01-01

    This review seeks to give an overview of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including the different disease phenotypes that it encompasses. We then describe the different therapeutic endeavors that have been undertaken to address these different phenotypes. Lastly we discuss future potential therapeutics, such as genome editing, and how they may play a role in treating alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

  13. Laboratory diagnosis of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Scabini, Roberta; Campo, Ilaria; Ottaviani, Stefania; Zorzetto, Michele; Gorrini, Marina; Luisetti, Maurizio

    2007-11-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) has evolved over the last 40 years since the first cases of the disorder were reported. It is currently performed in specialized centers, and it requires a combination of different biochemical methods: nephelometric AAT concentration, isoelectric focusing, genotyping, and sequencing. The availability of matrices such as the dried blood spot have facilitated the implementation of laboratory analyses for AATD, but they have also challenged laboratories to develop more reliable and reproducible techniques starting from dried blood. In this article, we describe the protocols we have optimized for AATD diagnosis from dried blood spot, in an attempt to hopefully provide useful information for physicians and scientists involved in this diagnostic line. We also describe the diagnostic flowchart for AATD detection that we have developed accordingly.

  14. Interrelationships between the Human Alveolar Macrophage and Alpha-1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Allen B.

    1973-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages lavaged from human lungs contain protease activity at an optimum pH of 3.0 and possibly a lesser peak of activity at pH 5.5. Protease activity measured at pH 4.1 is inhibited by purified alpha-1-antitrypsin. Fluorescent antibody studies of human alveolar macrophages showed that alpha-1-antitrypsin is present in normal alveolar macrophages. In addition, macrophages from a patient with a homozygous deficiency of alpha-1-antitrypsin exhibited less fluorescence when incubated in autologous serum than the same macrophages incubated in normal serum. Macrophages from normal subjects showed maximal fluorescence when removed from the lung and additional incubation with serum did not increase fluorescence. These results implicate the human alveolar macrophage as a possible source of an enzyme that may cause emphysema in patients deficient in alpha-1-antitrypsin. They also show that alpha-1-antitrypsin has access to the alveolus in normal subjects. Images PMID:4201266

  15. Treatment of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Strange, Charlie; Beiko, Tatsiana

    2015-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disease that creates multiple unique phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. While bronchospasm, cough, dyspnea, and sputum production all occur with AATD, the phenotypic differences require a computed tomographic (CT) scan to decipher. The availability of augmentation therapy in the United States since 1989 has generated both controversy and evidence that informs the science of usual chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because of the predominance of emphysema in AATD, much of the best evidence concerning biomarkers of emphysema progression comes from this population. Imaging measurement of emphysema progression, impact of emphysema phenotypes on hyperinflation and dynamic hyperinflation, and correlation with traditional spirometric measures of COPD progression are required to understand the impact of AAT therapies. These studies are important for better understanding of usual COPD pathogenesis. Significantly, there are no adequately powered research studies to determine if augmentation therapy is helpful for the non-emphysema phenotypes of AATD. Specifically, phenotypes of chronic bronchitis, asthma predominant disease, and bronchiectasis will require targeted research studies to define optimal therapy.

  16. Augmentation therapy of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency associated emphysema.

    PubMed

    Traclet, J; Delaval, P; Terrioux, P; Mornex, J-F

    2015-04-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin, secreted by the liver, inhibits neutrophil elastase. Its deficiency favours the development of emphysema. Restoring a "protective" serum level in deficient patients should make it possible to inhibit the development of emphysema. Human plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin is a blood-derived drug sold in France under the name Alfalastin(®). The recommended posology is an I.V. administration of 60 mg/kg once a week. Human plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin restores anti-elastase protection in the lower lung and prevents experimental emphysema induced by the elastasis of human neutrophils in hamster. The low number of patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is one of the difficulties to perform sufficiently powerful randomised studies. However, randomised studies have reported the efficacy of human plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin perfusions on mortality, FEV1 decline and the frequency of exacerbations. Randomised control trials have demonstrated the efficacy of human plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin perfusions on the loss of lung density assessed by CT scan. Augmentation therapy is simple in its conception and implementation, but it is expensive. However, there are currently no other solutions. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Hereditary fructose intolerance and alpha(1) antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, G; Schneppenheim, R; Oldigs, H D; Santer, R

    2000-07-01

    A patient with coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) and alpha(1) antitrypsin deficiency (alpha(1)ATD) is described. Protease inhibitor typing was not conclusive, presumably because of impaired N-glycosylation secondary to HFI. The case underlines the diagnostic role of molecular genetic techniques in inborn errors of metabolism.

  18. [Detection of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: A study on patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary health care].

    PubMed

    García-Palenzuela, R; Timiraos Carrasco, R; Gómez-Besteiro, M I; Lavia, G; Lago Pose, M; Lara, B

    2016-06-25

    The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Spain is 10.2%. Although tobacco is the main aetiological factor, biomass smoke exposure and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) have also been related to its development. AATD is a genetic condition which could be causing 2-3% of COPD cases. The aim of this cross-sectional descriptive study was to exclude the existence of AATD in a population of COPD patients from CS Culleredo, A Coruña. The thick blood drop test on blotting paper, as well as the analysis of the mutations PI*S and PI*Z of the gene SERPINA 1 by the analysis of denaturing gradients after simultaneous amplification related to PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The study population included 80 patients between 40-80 years old, of whom 30% were carriers of a deficient allele (heterozygous), and 80% of them were the allele PiS. Only one PiSZ (1.25%) individual and no PiZZ was detected. This represents an allelic frequency of 3.1% (PiZ), and 13.1% (PiS). The detected allelic frequencies are higher than previously reported in the Spanish population. Severe AATD has been excluded in 98.75% of the study population. The Pi*SZ patient has been diagnosed in an early stage of the disease. We have also achieved one of the quality indicators recommended by GesEPOC. Our area has shown a high PiS and PiZ frequency, thus our study could be used as a reference for further research in the Galician population.

  19. Deficiency Mutations of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin. Effects on Folding, Function, and Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haq, Imran; Irving, James A; Saleh, Aarash D; Dron, Louis; Regan-Mochrie, Gemma L; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Hurst, John R; Gooptu, Bibek; Lomas, David A

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding, polymerization, and defective secretion of functional alpha-1 antitrypsin underlies the predisposition to severe liver and lung disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. We have identified a novel (Ala336Pro, Baghdad) deficiency variant and characterized it relative to the wild-type (M) and Glu342Lys (Z) alleles. The index case is a homozygous individual of consanguineous parentage, with levels of circulating alpha-1 antitrypsin in the moderate deficiency range, but is a biochemical phenotype that could not be classified by standard methods. The majority of the protein was present as functionally inactive polymer, and the remaining monomer was 37% active relative to the wild-type protein. These factors combined indicate an 85 to 95% functional deficiency, similar to that seen with ZZ homozygotes. Biochemical, biophysical, and computational studies further defined the molecular basis of this deficiency. These studies demonstrated that native Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin could populate the polymerogenic intermediate-and therefore polymerize-more readily than either wild-type alpha-1 antitrypsin or the Z variant. In contrast, folding was far less impaired in Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin than in the Z variant. The data are consistent with a disparate contribution by the "breach" region and "shutter" region of strand 5A to folding and polymerization mechanisms. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that, in these variants, folding efficiency does not correlate directly with the tendency to polymerize in vitro or in vivo. They therefore differentiate generalized misfolding from polymerization tendencies in missense variants of alpha-1 antitrypsin. Clinically, they further support the need to quantify loss-of-function in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency to individualize patient care.

  20. Deficiency Mutations of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin. Effects on Folding, Function, and Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Imran; Saleh, Aarash D.; Dron, Louis; Regan-Mochrie, Gemma L.; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Hurst, John R.; Gooptu, Bibek

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding, polymerization, and defective secretion of functional alpha-1 antitrypsin underlies the predisposition to severe liver and lung disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. We have identified a novel (Ala336Pro, Baghdad) deficiency variant and characterized it relative to the wild-type (M) and Glu342Lys (Z) alleles. The index case is a homozygous individual of consanguineous parentage, with levels of circulating alpha-1 antitrypsin in the moderate deficiency range, but is a biochemical phenotype that could not be classified by standard methods. The majority of the protein was present as functionally inactive polymer, and the remaining monomer was 37% active relative to the wild-type protein. These factors combined indicate an 85 to 95% functional deficiency, similar to that seen with ZZ homozygotes. Biochemical, biophysical, and computational studies further defined the molecular basis of this deficiency. These studies demonstrated that native Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin could populate the polymerogenic intermediate—and therefore polymerize—more readily than either wild-type alpha-1 antitrypsin or the Z variant. In contrast, folding was far less impaired in Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin than in the Z variant. The data are consistent with a disparate contribution by the “breach” region and “shutter” region of strand 5A to folding and polymerization mechanisms. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that, in these variants, folding efficiency does not correlate directly with the tendency to polymerize in vitro or in vivo. They therefore differentiate generalized misfolding from polymerization tendencies in missense variants of alpha-1 antitrypsin. Clinically, they further support the need to quantify loss-of-function in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency to individualize patient care. PMID:26091018

  1. Neutrophil Fates in Bronchiectasis and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Russell, Derek W; Gaggar, Amit; Solomon, George M

    2016-04-01

    The neutrophil is a powerful cellular defender of the vulnerable interface between the environment and pulmonary tissues. This cell's potent weapons are carefully calibrated in the healthy state to maximize effectiveness in fighting pathogens while minimizing tissue damage and allowing for repair of what damage does occur. The three related chronic airway disorders of cystic fibrosis, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency all demonstrate significant derangements of this homeostatic system that result in their respective pathologies. An important shared feature among them is the inefficient resolution of chronic inflammation that serves as a central means for neutrophil-driven lung damage resulting in disease progression. Examining the commonalities and divergences between these diseases in the light of their immunopathology is informative and may help guide us toward future therapeutics designed to modulate the neutrophil's interplay with the pulmonary environment.

  2. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  3. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  4. Alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes in adult liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Alempijevic, Tamara; Milutinovic, Aleksandra Sokic; Kovacevic, Nada

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is an important serine protease inhibitor in humans. Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) affects lungs and liver. Liver disease caused by AATD in paediatric patients has been previously well documented. However, the association of liver disease with alpha-1-antitrypsin gene polymorphisms in adults is less clear. Therefore, we aimed to study AAT polymorphisms in adults with liver disease. We performed a case-control study. AAT polymorphisms were investigated by isoelectric focusing in 61 patients with liver cirrhosis and 9 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The control group consisted of 218 healthy blood donors. A significant deviation of observed and expected frequency of AAT phenotypes from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (chi-square = 34.77, df 11, P = 0.000) in the patient group was caused by a higher than expected frequency of Pi ZZ homozygotes (f = 0.0143 and f = 0.0005, respectively, P = 0.000). In addition, Pi M homozygotes were more frequent in patients than in controls (63% and 46%, respectively, P = 0.025). Our study results show that Pi ZZ homozygosity in adults could be associated with severe liver disease. Presence of Pi M homozygosity could be associated with liver disease via some mechanism different from Z allele-induced liver damage through accumulation of AAT polymers. PMID:19961268

  5. Structural heterogeneity of faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin shown by immunoblot analysis in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Boege, F; Fischbach, W

    1991-01-01

    Faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin was determined in 34 patients with Crohn's disease and in 19 healthy subjects by immune nephelometry. A structural analysis of faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin was carried out using immunoblot analysis under non-reducing conditions. Native serum alpha 1 antitrypsin migrated with an apparent molecular weight of 45 kDa. Proteolytic alpha 1 antitrypsin fragments (5-42 kDa) were specifically immunostained in 13/19 and 22/34 stool samples from control subjects and from patients with Crohn's disease respectively. There was a weak correlation (r = 0.47; p less than 0.02) between the molecular weight of fragmented alpha 1 antitrypsin and the faecal concentration in both groups, indicating that alpha 1 antitrypsin inhibits its own proteolysis by intestinal proteases in a dose dependent way. The incidence of polymeric forms (greater than 45 kDa) was similar in patients (10/34) and control subjects (5/19). In only one case in each group was the native serum form of alpha 1 antitrypsin found in faeces. We conclude that faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin differs structurally from the native serum form. Immunochemical measurements, therefore, reflect rather than represent faecal concentrations of alpha 1 antitrypsin. The controversial results in published reports may be partly explained by these findings. The molecular heterogeneity of faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin is not specifically associated with Crohn's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2040471

  6. Molecular basis of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and emphysema associated with the alpha 1-antitrypsin Mmineral springs allele.

    PubMed Central

    Curiel, D T; Vogelmeier, C; Hubbard, R C; Stier, L E; Crystal, R G

    1990-01-01

    The Mmineral springs alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) allele, causing alpha 1AT deficiency and emphysema, is unique among the alpha 1AT-deficiency alleles in that it was observed in a black family, whereas most mutations causing alpha 1AT deficiency are confined to Caucasian populations of European descent. Immobilized pH gradient analysis of serum demonstrated that alpha 1AT Mmineral springs migrated cathodal to the normal M2 allele. Evaluation of Mmineral springs alpha 1AT as an inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, its natural substrate, demonstrated markedly lower than normal function. Characterization of the alpha 1AT Mmineral springs gene demonstrated that it differed from the common normal M1(Ala213) allele by a single-base substitution causing the amino acid substitution Gly-67 (GGG)----Glu-67 (GAG). Capitalizing on the fact that this mutation creates a polymorphism for the restriction endonuclease AvaII, family analysis demonstrated that the Mmineral springs alpha 1AT allele was transmitted in an autosomal-codominant fashion. Evaluation of genomic DNA showed that the index case was homozygous for the alpha 1AT Mmineral springs allele. Cytoplasmic blot analysis of blood monocytes of the Mmineral springs homozygote demonstrated levels of alpha 1AT mRNA transcripts comparable to those in cells of a normal M1 (Val213) homozygote control. Evaluation of in vitro translation of Mmineral springs alpha 1AT mRNA transcripts demonstrated a normal capacity to direct the translation of alpha 1AT. Evaluation of secretion of alpha 1AT by the blood monocytes by pulse-chase labeling with [35S]methionine, however, demonstrated less secretion by the Mmineral springs cells than normal cells. To characterize the posttranslational events causing the alpha 1AT-secretory defect associated with the alpha 1AT Mmineral springs gene, retroviral gene transfer was used to establish polyclonal populations of murine fibroblasts containing either a normal human M1 alpha 1AT cDNA or an Mmineral

  7. Secretion of alpha 1-antitrypsin by alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Venembre, P; Boutten, A; Seta, N; Dehoux, M S; Crestani, B; Aubier, M; Durand, G

    1994-06-13

    We have investigated the ability of alveolar epithelial cells (human A549 cell line and rat type-II pneumocytes) to produce alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT). Northern blot analysis demonstrated the presence of an AAT-specific mRNA transcript in A549 cells. Unstimulated A549 cells secreted immunoreactive AAT at a rate of 0.51 +/- 0.04 ng/10(6) cells/h, with a modified glycosylation compared to serum AAT. AAT formed a complex with neutrophil elastase. Rat type-II pneumocytes secreted immunoreactive AAT. Our results suggest that alveolar epithelial cells could participate in antiprotease defense within the lung through local AAT production.

  8. Novel therapeutic uses of alpha-1 antitrypsin: a window to the future.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Adam; Arce, Adriana De; Pardee, Erin

    2012-12-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin, a potent serine protease inhibitor, has been used as augmentation therapy in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency for many years. Recent research into the diverse anti-inflammatory, immune-modulatory and tissue-protective actions of alpha-1 antitrypsin has raised the possibility of broadening the therapeutic spectrum of alpha-1 antitrypsin to include diseases other than alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. The purpose of the workshop was to summarize the results of basic investigations and, if available, clinical studies in which the effects of alpha-1 antitrypsin were explored in relation to clinical conditions that are not associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Included among these are type 1 diabetes, cell/organ rejection, viral infection, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis/COPD, heart failure, Crohn's disease and connective tissue diseases. Although the therapeutic utility of alpha-1 antitrypsin in these conditions remains to be established, the existing data suggest that this protein eventually will become a treatment option in several diseases some of which are not rare. At present, only human plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin is available for clinical use. Given the limited supply and the potential for extended use of this product, there will be a need for new formulations of alpha-1 antitrypsin in the future. Therefore, the prospect of finding new sources and airway delivery methods of alpha-1 antitrypsin were also discussed. The presentations at the meeting addressed the scientific basis for new clinical applications of alpha-1 antitrypsin and the regulatory requirements needed to bring this therapeutic protein to a wider range of patient populations.

  9. Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, also known as alpha 1-antiprotease inhibitor deficiency, is a disease caused by genetically determined AAT deficiency. It occurs as a result of inheritance of two protease inhibitor (PI) deficiency alleles from the AAT gene locus (designated PI) on chromosomal segment 14q32.1. The most common deficiency allele is PI*Z and a large majority of individuals with severe AAT deficiency are PI type ZZ. The disease occurs predominantly in white persons of European origin and its frequency in Europe and North America is comparable to that of cystic fibrosis (1 in 2000 to 1 in 7000.) Persons with AAT deficiency may have no clinical manifestations. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a high frequency of panacinar emphysema is the most prevalent clinical disorder associated with AAT deficiency and the most frequent cause of disability and death. Tobacco smoking is the major risk factor for developing COPD, which generally begins by the third decade of life, much earlier than "usual" COPD that occurs in AAT-replete individuals. Liver disease, the second most frequent clinical manifestation of AAT deficiency, typically presents as cholestasis in infancy but is usually not severe and generally remits by adolescence. Chronic liver disease develops infrequently, although AAT deficiency is the commonest cause of chronic liver disease in childhood. Cirrhosis and carcinoma of the liver affect at least 25% of AAT-deficient adults over the age of 50 years. AAT deficiency appears to be widely underdiagnosed and based on predicted gene frequencies even in the most intensely studied populations, only a small proportion of those predicted to have AAT deficiency have been diagnosed. Human AAT is available in limited quantity for augmentation therapy. This Memorandum summarizes the discussions and recommendations made by participants at a WHO meeting held in Geneva on 18-20 March 1996 to review existing knowledge about this highly prevalent

  10. Alpha1-antitrypsin inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hanhua; Campbell, Steven C; Nelius, Thomas; Bedford, Dhugal F; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bouck, Noel P; Volpert, Olga V

    2004-12-20

    Disturbances of the ratio between angiogenic inducers and inhibitors in tumor microenvironment are the driving force behind angiogenic switch critical for tumor progression. Angiogenic inhibitors may vary depending on organismal age and the tissue of origin. We showed that alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT), a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) is an inhibitor of angiogenesis, which induced apoptosis and inhibited chemotaxis of endothelial cells. S- and Z-type mutations that cause abnormal folding and defective serpin activity abrogated AAT antiangiogenic activity. Removal of the C-terminal reactive site loop had no effect on its angiostatic activity. Both native AAT and AAT truncated on C-terminus (AATDelta) inhibited neovascularization in the rat cornea and delayed the growth of subcutaneous tumors in mice. Treatment with native AAT and truncated AATDelta, but not control vehicle reduced tumor microvessel density, while increasing apoptosis within tumor endothelium. Comparative analysis of the human tumors and normal tissues of origin showed correlation between reduced local alpha(1)-antitrypsin expression and more aggressive tumor growth.

  11. Challenges and Prospects for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Joanna; Wandtke, Tomasz; Kopinski, Piotr; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin family. A number of identified mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding this protein result in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). A decrease in AAT serum concentration or reduced biological activity causes considerable risk of chronic respiratory and liver disorders. As a monogenic disease, AATD appears to be an attractive target for gene therapy, particularly for patients with pulmonary dysfunction, where augmentation of functional AAT levels in plasma might slow down respiratory disease development. The short AAT coding sequence and its activity in the extracellular matrix would enable an increase in systemic serum AAT production by cellular secretion. In vitro and in vivo experimental AAT gene transfer with gamma-retroviral, lentiviral, adenoviral, and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has resulted in enhanced AAT serum levels and a promising safety profile. Human clinical trials using intramuscular viral transfer with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors of the AAT gene demonstrated its safety, but did not achieve a protective level of AAT >11 μM in serum. This review provides an in-depth critical analysis of current progress in AATD gene therapy based on viral gene transfer. The factors affecting transgene expression levels, such as site of administration, dose and type of vector, and activity of the immune system, are discussed further as crucial variables for optimizing the clinical effectiveness of gene therapy in AATD subjects. PMID:26413996

  12. Challenges and Prospects for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Joanna; Wandtke, Tomasz; Kopinski, Piotr; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin family. A number of identified mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding this protein result in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). A decrease in AAT serum concentration or reduced biological activity causes considerable risk of chronic respiratory and liver disorders. As a monogenic disease, AATD appears to be an attractive target for gene therapy, particularly for patients with pulmonary dysfunction, where augmentation of functional AAT levels in plasma might slow down respiratory disease development. The short AAT coding sequence and its activity in the extracellular matrix would enable an increase in systemic serum AAT production by cellular secretion. In vitro and in vivo experimental AAT gene transfer with gamma-retroviral, lentiviral, adenoviral, and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has resulted in enhanced AAT serum levels and a promising safety profile. Human clinical trials using intramuscular viral transfer with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors of the AAT gene demonstrated its safety, but did not achieve a protective level of AAT >11 μM in serum. This review provides an in-depth critical analysis of current progress in AATD gene therapy based on viral gene transfer. The factors affecting transgene expression levels, such as site of administration, dose and type of vector, and activity of the immune system, are discussed further as crucial variables for optimizing the clinical effectiveness of gene therapy in AATD subjects.

  13. Differential interactions of human kallikrein-binding protein and alpha 1-antitrypsin with human tissue kallikrein.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L M; Chao, L; Mayfield, R K; Chao, J

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of a new kallikrein-binding protein in human serum and its activities were studied. Both the kallikrein-binding protein and alpha 1-antitrypsin form 92 kDa SDS-stable and heat-stable complexes with human tissue kallikrein. In non-SDS/PAGE, the mobility of these complexes differ. Complex-formation between kallikrein and the binding protein is inhibited by heparin, whereas that between kallikrein and alpha 1-antitrypsin is heparin-resistant. In normal or alpha 1-antitrypsin-deficient-serum, the amount of 92 kDa SDS-stable complex formed upon addition of kallikrein is not related to serum alpha 1-antitrypsin levels. The rate of complex-formation between kallikrein and the binding protein is 12 times higher than that between kallikrein and alpha 1-antitrypsin. Purified alpha 1-antitrypsin, which exhibits normal elastase binding, has a kallikrein-binding activity less than 5% of that of serum. Binding of tissue kallikrein in serum is not inhibited by increasing elastase concentrations, and elastase binding in serum is not inhibited by excess tissue kallikrein. A specific monoclonal antibody to human alpha 1-antitrypsin does not bind to either 92 kDa endogenous or exogenous kallikrein complexes isolated from human serum. The studies demonstrate a new tissue kallikrein-binding protein, distinct from alpha 1-antitrypsin, is present in human serum. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2327990

  14. Alpha 1-antitrypsin activity is markedly decreased in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Mota, Ali; Sahebghadam Lotfi, Abbas; Jamshidi, Ahmad-Reza; Najavand, Saeed

    2014-04-01

    Alpha 1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is the most abundant proteinase inhibitor in plasma and the main inhibitor of Proteinase 3, the target antigen of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) that predominant in Wegeners' granulomatosis. Α1AT deficiency correlated with ANCA-associated vasculitis. This study explores the trypsin inhibitory capacity (TIC), specific activity, and phenotypic deficiency of Α1AT in Wegener's granulomatosis. Twenty-seven WG patients were studied. ANCA was tested by IIF and ELISA. Serum a1-anti-trypsin levels were quantified in WG patients and healthy controls by immunoturbidimetric assay. Serum TIC was assessed by the enzymatic colorimetric assay. Phenotypes of A1AT were detected by Isoelectric Focusing. A1AT concentration was equivalent in patients and controls; however, serum TIC (P = 0.001) and specific activity of A1AT (P = 0.001) were dramatically lower in WG patients. Five patients had deficient phenotypes of A1AT: MZ (n = 3), MS (n = 1) and SS (n = 1). This was correlated with an increase in the prevalence of deficient phenotypes of A1AT in WG (P = 0.01). Trypsin inhibitory capacity and specific activity of A1AT were decreased in WG patients and may be involve in disease pathogenesis and can worsen the clinical manifestations. This A1AT deficiency probably resulted from oxidative inactivation and/or enzymatic degradation of A1AT. This could result in localized deficiency of A1AT in vessel wall interfaces and lead to severe disease.

  15. Immune-modulating effects of alpha-1 antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Mario R

    2014-10-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a circulating serine protease inhibitor (serpin) that inhibits neutrophil elastase in the lung, and AAT deficiency is associated with early-onset emphysema. AAT is also a liver-derived acute-phase protein that, in vitro and in vivo, reduces production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, inhibits apoptosis, blocks leukocyte degranulation and migration, and modulates local and systemic inflammatory responses. In monocytes, AAT has been shown to increase intracellular cAMP, regulate expression of CD14, and suppress NFκB nuclear translocation. These effects may be mediated by AAT's serpin activity or by other protein-binding activities. In preclinical models of autoimmunity and transplantation, AAT therapy prevents or reverses autoimmune disease and graft loss, and these effects are accompanied by tolerogenic changes in cytokine and transcriptional profiles and T cell subsets. This review highlights advances in our understanding of the immune-modulating effects of AAT and their potential therapeutic utility.

  16. Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, characterized by low plasma levels of the serine protease inhibitor AAT, is associated with emphysema secondary to insufficient protection of the lung from neutrophil proteases. Although AAT augmentation therapy with purified AAT protein is efficacious, it requires weekly to monthly intravenous infusion of AAT purified from pooled human plasma, has the risk of viral contamination and allergic reactions, and is costly. As an alternative, gene therapy offers the advantage of single administration, eliminating the burden of protein infusion, and reduced risks and costs. The focus of this review is to describe the various strategies for AAT gene therapy for the pulmonary manifestations of AAT deficiency and the state of the art in bringing AAT gene therapy to the bedside.

  17. The national alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency registry in Poland.

    PubMed

    Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Struniawski, Radoslaw; Sliwinski, Paweł; Wajda, Beata; Czajkowska-Malinowska, Małgorzata

    2015-05-01

    The alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) targeted screening program, together with the National Registry, were established in Poland in 2010 soon after the AATD diagnostics became available. Between 2010 and 2014 a total of 2525 samples were collected from respiratory patients countrywide; 55 patients with severe AAT deficiency or rare mutations were identified and registered, including 36 PiZZ subjects (65%). The majority of AATD patients were diagnosed with COPD (40%) or emphysema (7%), but also with bronchial asthma (16%) and bronchiectasis (13%). Therefore, the registry has proved instrumental in setting-up the AATD-dedicated network of respiratory medical centres in Poland. Since augmentation therapy is not reimbursed in our country, the smoking cessation guidance, optimal pharmacotherapy of respiratory symptoms as well the early detection, and effective treatment of exacerbations is absolutely essential.

  18. An ECLIPSE View of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lomas, David A

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multicomponent condition that is estimated to become the third leading cause of death in 2020. The ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints) study, funded by GlaxoSmithKline, is an observational study designed to define outcomes that can be used as endpoints in clinical trials in individuals with COPD. It allowed us to describe the heterogeneity of COPD, the stability of the exacerbation phenotype, and the factors associated with a progressive decline in lung function and the progression of emphysema on computed tomography scans. The cohort was also used to define genetic factors and biomarkers associated with COPD and disease progression. This review considers how the results from ECLIPSE can inform our understanding of the lung disease associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

  19. Alpha-1-Antitrypsin Deficiency in Serbian Adults with Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Marija; Divac-Rankov, Aleksandra; Petrovic-Stanojevic, Natasa; Mitic-Milikic, Marija; Nagorni-Obradovic, Ljudmila; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is the main inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, and severe alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is a genetic risk factor for early-onset emphysema. Despite the relatively high prevalence of A1ATD, this condition is frequently underdiagnosed. Our aim was to determine the distribution of the A1ATD phenotypes/alleles in patients with lung diseases as well as in the Serbian population. Methods: The study included the adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n=348), asthma (n=71), and bronchiectasis (n=35); the control was 1435 healthy blood donors. The A1ATD variants were identified by isoelectric focusing or polymerase chain reaction-mediated site-directed mutagenesis. Results: PiMZ heterozygotes, PiZZ homozygotes, and Z allele carriers are associated with significantly higher risk of developing COPD than healthy individuals (odds ratios 3.43, 42.42, and 5.49 respectively). The calculated prevalence of PiZZ, PiMZ, and PiSZ was higher in patients with COPD (1:202, 1:8, and 1:1243) than in the Serbian population (1:5519, 1:38, and 1:5519). Conclusion: The high prevalence of A1ATD phenotypes/allele in our population has confirmed the necessity of screening for A1ATD in patients with COPD. On the other hand, on the basis of the estimated number of those with A1ATD among the COPD patients, it is possible to assess the diagnostic efficiency of A1ATD in the Serbian population. PMID:22971141

  20. Alpha-1-Antitrypsin in Pathogenesis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Topic, Aleksandra; Ljujic, Mila; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2012-01-01

    Context Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is the most abundant liver-derived, highly polymorphic, glycoprotein in plasma. Hereditary deficiency of alpha-1-antitrypsin in plasma (A1ATD) is a consequence of accumulation of polymers of A1AT mutants in endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and other A1AT-producing cells. One of the clinical manifestations of A1ATD is liver disease in childhood and cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in adulthood. Epidemiology and pathophysiology of liver failure in early childhood caused by A1ATD are well known, but the association with hepatocellular carcinoma is not clarified. The aim of this article is to review different aspects of association between A1AT variants and hepatocellular carcinoma, with emphasis on the epidemiology and molecular pathogenesis. The significance of A1AT as a biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC is also discussed. Evidence Acquisitions Search for relevant articles were performed through Pub Med, HighWire, and Science Direct using the keywords “alpha-1-antitrypsin”, “liver diseases”, “hepatocellular carcinoma”, “SERPINA1”. Articles published until 2011 were reviewed. Results Epidemiology studies revealed that severe A1ATD is a significant risk factor for cirrhosis and HCC unrelated to the presence of HBV or HCV infections. However, predisposition to HCC in moderate A1ATD is rare, and probably happens in combination with HBV and/or HCV infections or other unknown risk factors. It is assumed that accumulation of polymers of A1ATD variants in endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes leads to damage of hepatocytes by gain-of-function mechanism. Also, increased level of A1AT was recognized as diagnostic and prognostic marker of HCC. Conclusions Clarification of a carcinogenic role for A1ATD and identification of proinflammatory or some still unknown factors that lead to increased susceptibility to HCC associated with A1ATD may contribute to a better understanding of hepatic carcinogenesis and to the

  1. Alpha1-antitrypsin protects beta-cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Lu, Yuanqing; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Spencer, Terry; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark; Song, Sihong

    2007-05-01

    Beta-cell apoptosis appears to represent a key event in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated that administration of the serine proteinase inhibitor alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) prevents type 1 diabetes development in NOD mice and prolongs islet allograft survival in rodents; yet the mechanisms underlying this therapeutic benefit remain largely unclear. Herein we describe novel findings indicating that AAT significantly reduces cytokine- and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced beta-cell apoptosis. Specifically, strong antiapoptotic activities for AAT (Prolastin, human) were observed when murine insulinoma cells (MIN6) were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-alpha. In a second model system involving STZ-induced beta-cell apoptosis, treatment of MIN6 cells with AAT similarly induced a significant increase in cellular viability and a reduction in apoptosis. Importantly, in both model systems, treatment with AAT completely abolished induced caspase-3 activity. In terms of its activities in vivo, treatment of C57BL/6 mice with AAT prevented STZ-induced diabetes and, in agreement with the in vitro analyses, supported the concept of a mechanism involving the disruption of beta-cell apoptosis. These results propose a novel biological function for this molecule and suggest it may represent an effective candidate for attempts seeking to prevent or reverse type 1 diabetes.

  2. Pulmonary emphysema associated with the FZ alpha 1-antitrypsin phenotype.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, D W; Tennent, R K; Horne, S L

    1981-03-15

    In one family three brothers were found to have a moderate deficiency of alpha 1-antitrypsin associated with the unusual Pi (protease inhibitor) phenotype FZ. The Pi phenotypes of their six living siblings were found to be FM (in three), M (in two) and MZ (in one). The three FZ brothers all had moderate to severe obstructive airways disease, and two had at least moderately severe pulmonary emphysema. Additional risk factors included moderate cigarette smoking in two and prolonged exposure to grain dust in all three. The same risk factors applied to the six non-FZ siblings, but they had only mild symptoms and pulmonary dysfunction or no lung problems at all; one, a female smoker with the MZ phenotype, had probable early emphysema demonstrated radiologically. The three FZ men may have had reduced fertility, as they produced only 1 child among them, as compared with 39 among the other eight siblings. This family study thus suggests that individuals with the FZ phenotype are at risk for pulmonary emphysema and chronic obstructive airways disease, particularly in the presence of other risk factors, such as cigarette smoking and grain dust exposure.

  3. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency - what are the treatment options?

    PubMed

    Modrykamien, Ariel; Stoller, James K

    2009-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an under-recognized genetic condition that predisposes to liver disease and early-onset emphysema. Although AAT is mainly produced in the liver, its main function is to protect the lung against proteolytic damage from neutrophil elastase. The most common mutation responsible for severe AAT deficiency, the so-called Z variant, reduces serum levels by promoting polymerization of the molecule within the hepatocyte, thereby reducing secretion. Serum levels below the putative protective threshold level of 11 micromolar (mumol/L) increase the risk of emphysema. In addition to the usual treatments for emphysema, infusion of purified AAT from pooled human plasma represents a specific therapy for AAT deficiency and raises serum and epithelial lining fluid levels above the protective threshold. Substantial evidence supports the biochemical efficacy of this approach, particularly for the weekly infusion regimen. Definitive evidence of clinical efficacy is still needed, as the two available randomized controlled trials showed non-significant trends towards slowing rates of loss of lung density on lung computerized axial tomography. However, concordant results of prospective cohort studies suggest that augmentation therapy has efficacy in slowing the rate of decline of lung function in patients with moderate airflow obstruction and severe deficiency of AAT. Overall, augmentation therapy is well-tolerated and, despite its failure to satisfy criteria for cost-effectiveness, is recommended because it is the only currently available specific therapy for AAT deficiency.

  4. Role of alpha-1 antitrypsin in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    de Serres, F; Blanco, I

    2014-10-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an under-recognized hereditary disorder associated with the premature onset of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, liver cirrhosis in children and adults, and less frequently, relapsing panniculitis, systemic vasculitis and other inflammatory, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases. Severe AAT deficiency mainly affects Caucasian individuals and has its highest prevalence (1 : 2000-1 : 5000 individuals) in Northern, Western and Central Europe. In the USA and Canada, the prevalence is 1: 5000-10 000. Prevalence is five times lower in Latin American countries and is rare or nonexistent in African and Asian individuals. The key to successful diagnosis is by measuring serum AAT, followed by the determination of the phenotype or genotype if low concentrations are found. Case detection allows implementation of genetic counselling and, in selected cases, the application of augmentation therapy. Over the past decade, it has been demonstrated that AAT is a broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-infective and tissue-repair molecule. These new capacities are promoting an increasing number of clinical studies, new pharmacological formulations, new patent applications and the search for alternative sources of AAT (including transgenic and recombinant AAT) to meet the expected demand for treating a large number of diseases, inside and outside the context of AAT deficiency.

  5. Alpha1-antitrypsin monotherapy prolongs islet allograft survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Eli C; Shapiro, Leland; Bowers, Owen J; Dinarello, Charles A

    2005-08-23

    Islet transplantation for type 1 diabetic patients shows promising results with the use of nondiabetogenic immunosuppressive therapy. However, in addition to compromising the immune system of transplant recipients, long-term studies demonstrate that islet viability is impaired. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of immunosuppressive agents, monotherapy with clinical-grade human alpha1-antitrypsin (hAAT), the major serum serine-protease inhibitor, prolongs islet graft survival and normoglycemia in transplanted allogeneic diabetic mice, lasting until the development of anti-hAAT antibodies. Compared to untreated or albumin-control-treated graft recipients, which rejected islets at day 10, AAT-treated mice displayed diminished cellular infiltrates and intact intragraft insulin production throughout treatment. Using peritoneal infiltration models, we demonstrate that AAT decreases allogeneic fibroblast-elicited natural-killer-cell influx by 89%, CD3-positive cell influx by 44%, and thioglycolate-elicited neutrophil emigration by 66%. ATT also extended islet viability in mice after streptozotocin-induced beta cell toxicity. In vitro, several islet responses to IL-1beta/IFNgamma stimulation were examined. In the presence of AAT, islets displayed enhanced viability and inducible insulin secretion. Islets also released 36% less nitric oxide and 82% less macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and expressed 63% fewer surface MHC class II molecules. TNFalpha release from IL-1beta/IFNgamma-stimulated islet cells was reduced by 99%, accompanied by an 8-fold increase in the accumulation of membrane TNFalpha on CD45-positive islet cells. In light of the established safety record and the nondiabetogenic potential of AAT, these data suggest that AAT may be beneficial as adjunctive therapy in patients undergoing islet transplantation.

  6. Polymorphism of alpha-1-antitrypsin in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) or serine protease inhibitor A1 (SERPINA1) is an important serine protease inhibitor in humans. The main physiological role of AAT is to inhibit neutrophil elastase (NE) released from triggered neutrophils, with an additional lesser role in the defense against damage inflicted by other serine proteases, such as cathepsin G and proteinase 3. Although there is a reported association between AAT polymorphism and different types of cancer, this association with hematological malignancies (HM) is, as yet, unknown. We identified AAT phenotypes by isoelectric focusing (in the pH 4.2-4.9 range) in 151 serum samples from patients with HM (Hodgkins lymphomas, non-Hodgkins lymphomas and malignant monoclonal gammopathies). Healthy blood-donors constituted the control group (n = 272). The evaluated population of patients as well as the control group, were at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the AAT gene (χ2 = 4.42, d.f.11, p = 0.96 and χ2 = 4.71, d.f.11, p = 0.97, respectively). There was no difference in the frequency of deficient AAT alleles (Pi Z and Pi S) between patients and control. However, we found a significantly higher frequency of PiM1M1 homozygote and PiM1 allele in HM patients than in control (for phenotype: f = 0.5166 and 0.4118 respectively, p = 0.037; for allele: f = 0.7020 and 0.6360 respectively, p = 0.05). In addition, PiM homozygotes in HM-patients were more numerous than in controls (59% and 48%, respectively, p = 0.044). PiM1 alleles and PiM1 homozygotes are both associated with hematological malignancies, although this is considered a functionally normal AAT variant. PMID:21637443

  7. [ALPHA-1-ANTITRYPSIN ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS HOSPITALIZED FOR CELLULITIS].

    PubMed

    Tov, Naveh; Katy, Lisa; Maor, Irit; Wolfovitz, Efrat

    2015-12-01

    Deficiency or impaired activity of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), which neutralizes multiple proteolytic enzymes, such as collagenases and elastases may result in significant tissue autodigestion. Hence, AAT may have a role in the healing process in chronic and acute inflammation including skin infection, such as cellulitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of AAT activity and inflammatory markers in patients with cellulitis. The study included eleven consecutive patients (6 males and 5 females, mean age 68.5 ± 4.5 years) who were hospitalized for cellulitis between 09/2009-02/2010. We analyzed tests results for C reactive protein (CRP), AAT level and activity that were obtained on admission (T1), 2 days after admission (T2) and 2 weeks after admission (T3). AAT levels were found to be within the normal range. AAT activity values were found to be within or above the normal range. The highest activity values were measured after 2 days of treatment and the lowest values were measured after 2 weeks of treatment. CRP values were highest on admission and lowest, as expected, after the end of treatment 2 weeks later. AAT activity values were significantly lower statistically in patients with unresolved cellulitis 2 weeks after treatment began. AAT activity was significantly lower statistically in patients who suffered from slow resolving cellulitis 14 days after hospitalization. This possibly suggests a role AAT activity may have in the inflammation cascade in patients with cellulitis. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of AAT activity in the inflammatory process.

  8. Rationale and Design of the Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis Study. Alpha-1 Protocol.

    PubMed

    Strange, Charlie; Senior, Robert M; Sciurba, Frank; O'Neal, Scott; Morris, Alison; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Bowler, Russell; Hochheiser, Harry S; Becich, Michael J; Zhang, Yingze; Leader, Joseph K; Methé, Barbara A; Kaminski, Naftali; Sandhaus, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    Severe deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin has a highly variable clinical presentation. The Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis α1 Study is a prospective, multicenter, cross-sectional study of adults older than age 35 years with PiZZ or PiMZ alpha-1 antitrypsin genotypes. It is designed to better understand if microbial factors influence this heterogeneity. Clinical symptoms, pulmonary function testing, computed chest tomography, exercise capacity, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) will be used to define chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) phenotypes that can be studied with an integrated systems biology approach that includes plasma proteomics; mouth, BAL, and stool microbiome and virome analysis; and blood microRNA and blood mononuclear cell RNA and DNA profiling. We will rely on global genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome datasets. Matched cohorts of PiZZ participants on or off alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy, PiMZ participants not on augmentation therapy, and control participants from the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study who match on FEV1 and age will be compared. In the primary analysis, we will determine if the PiZZ individuals on augmentation therapy have a difference in lower respiratory tract microbes identified compared with matched PiZZ individuals who are not on augmentation therapy. By characterizing the microbiome in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), we hope to define new phenotypes of COPD that explain some of the diversity of clinical presentations. As a unique genetic cause of COPD, AATD may inform typical COPD pathogenesis, and better understanding of it may illuminate the complex interplay between environment and genetics. Although the biologic approaches are hypothesis generating, the results may lead to development of novel biomarkers, better understanding of COPD phenotypes, and development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic trials in AATD and COPD

  9. Comparison of alpha-1-antitrypsin levels and antineutrophil elastase capacity of blood and lung in a patient with the alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotype null-null before and during alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wewers, M D; Casolaro, M A; Crystal, R G

    1987-03-01

    The null-null phenotype of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT), a phenotype characterized by no detectable alpha 1AT in serum, presents a rare opportunity to examine the contribution of alpha 1AT to the antineutrophil elastase protection of the lower respiratory tract. The subject, a 35-yr-old lifetime non-smoker with moderate emphysema, has been characterized as having alpha 1AT serum levels of zero resulting from the homozygous inheritance of alpha 1AT genes that do not express detectable alpha 1AT mRNA transcripts. Evaluation of the antineutrophil elastase capacity of the null-null serum showed it was less than 5% of normal, whereas that of the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the lower respiratory tract was 13% of normal. However, after 60 mg/kg of intravenously administered alpha 1AT augmentation therapy once weekly for 4 wk, the serum alpha 1AT levels peaked at greater than 300 mg/dl, trough levels just prior to the next infusion were 81 +/- 2 mg/dl, and the average serum level integrated for the month of infusions was 138 mg/dl. Consistent with this serum rise in alpha 1AT, the serum antineutrophil elastase capacity increased in parallel(r = 0.98). Importantly, evaluation of the ELF 2 and 6 days after infusion demonstrated increases of alpha 1AT levels (range, 1.4 to 2.1 microM) and antineutrophil elastase capacity (range, 1.6 to 2.5 microM), values within the lower range of normal. Furthermore, the lung ELF alpha 1AT levels rose in direct proportion to the serum alpha 1AT levels, and the ELF antineutrophil elastase capacity rose in direct proportion to the ELF alpha 1AT levels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Trials and Tribulations: An Industry Perspective on Conducting Registrational Trials in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Forshag, Mark S

    2016-08-01

    Registrational trials in rare and orphan diseases present complexities related to the identification of subjects, recruitment, logistical hurdles incumbent with far-flung study sites, and end points that are often less well defined than are those used in more common illnesses. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an orphan disease of genetic origin that carries the additional challenges of variable penetration and slow disease progression. Registrational trials of augmentation therapy using plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin carry all of the above-noted burdens, as well as competition from commercially available augmentation therapy in many countries.

  11. Alpha 1-antitrypsin genetic polymorphism in ANCA-positive systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Esnault, V L; Testa, A; Audrain, M; Rogé, C; Hamidou, M; Barrier, J H; Sesboüé, R; Martin, J P; Lesavre, P

    1993-06-01

    Alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) is the major inhibitor of proteinase 3 (PR3), the main target antigen of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) in Wegener's granulomatosis. alpha 1-AT is encoded by a polymorphic gene, with over 75 alleles, defining severely, medium and non-deficient protease inhibitor (PI) phenotypes. We describe the association of severely and medium deficient PI phenotypes with anti-PR3 positive systemic vasculitis, and postulate a pathogenetic role for alpha 1-AT deficiency and the occurrence of ANCA, with specificity for PR3 in a subgroup of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis.

  12. Alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in deficient individuals enrolled in the Alpha-1 Foundation DNA and Tissue Bank.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Adriano R; Rouhani, Farshid; Li, Ning; Schreck, Pam; Brantly, Mark L

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous augmentation therapy with purified intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin replaces the deficient protein and is the only currently approved treatment for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) related lung disease. While augmentation therapy has been available for more than 20 years, there are a limited number of studies evaluating the effect of augmentation on lung function. We examined the decline in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) in patients enrolled in the Alpha-1 Foundation DNA and Tissue Bank in relation to the use or not of alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy. For the purpose of our analysis we included 164 patients with AATD and PI ZZ genotype. Mean age of the patients was 60 years, 52% were females, 94% were white and 78% ex-smokers. The mean FEV(1) at baseline was 1.7 L and the mean FEV(1) % of predicted was 51.3%. The mean follow-up time was 41.7 months. A total of 124 (76%) patients received augmentation therapy (augmented group) while 40 patients (24%) did not received it (non-augmented group). When adjusted by age at baseline, sex, smoking status, baseline FEV(1) % of predicted, the mean overall change in FEV(1) was 47.6 mL/year, favoring the augmented group (DeltaFEV(1) 10.6 +/- 21.4 mL/year) in comparison with the non-augmented group (DeltaFEV(1) -36.96 +/- 12.1 mL/year) (P = 0.05). Beneficial DeltaFEV(1) were observed in ex-smokers and the group with initial FEV(1) % of predicted of <50%. No differences were observed in mortality. In conclusion, augmentation therapy improves lung function in subjects with AATD when adjusted by age, gender, smoking status and baseline FEV(1) % of predicted. The beneficial effects were noted in ex-smoker subjects with FEV(1) below 50% of predicted.

  13. Alpha-1 antitrypsin reduces ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alpha-1antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional protein with proteinase inhibitor and anti-inflammatory activities. Recent studies showed that AAT has therapeutic effect for diseases associated with inflammation, such as type 1 diabetes and arthritis. Proinflammatory cytokines are primary mediators of...

  14. alpha1-Antitrypsin inhalation reduces airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Griese, M; Latzin, P; Kappler, M; Weckerle, K; Heinzlmaier, T; Bernhardt, T; Hartl, D

    2007-02-01

    The airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are characterised by neutrophils that release high amounts of elastase overwhelming the local antiprotease shield. Inhalation of alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) may restore the protease-antiprotease balance and attenuate airway inflammation in CF airways. The aims of the present study were: 1) to assess the best deposition region for inhaled AAT by two different inhalation strategies; and 2) to examine the effect of 4 weeks of AAT inhalation on lung function, protease-antiprotease balance and airway inflammation in CF patients. In a prospective, randomised study, 52 CF patients received a daily deposition by inhalation of 25 mg AAT for 4 weeks targeting their peripheral or bronchial compartment. The levels of elastase activity, AAT, pro-inflammatory cytokines, neutrophils, immunoglobulin G fragments and the numbers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were assessed in induced sputum before and after the inhalation period. Inhalation of AAT increased AAT levels and decreased the levels of elastase activity, neutrophils, pro-inflammatory cytokines and the numbers of P. aeruginosa. However, it had no effect on lung function. No difference was found between the peripheral and bronchial inhalation mode. In conclusion, although no effect on lung function was observed, the clear reduction of airway inflammation after alpha(1)-antitrypsin treatment may precede pulmonary structural changes. The alpha(1)-antitrypsin deposition region may play a minor role for alpha(1)-antitrypsin inhalation in cystic fibrosis patients.

  15. 21 CFR 866.5130 - Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system. 866.5130 Section 866.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... aid in the diagnosis of several conditions including juvenile and adult cirrhosis of the liver. In...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5130 - Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system. 866.5130 Section 866.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5130 - Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-antitrypsin immunological test system. 866.5130 Section 866.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  18. Molecular characterization of the new defective P(brescia) alpha1-antitrypsin allele.

    PubMed

    Medicina, Daniela; Montani, Nadia; Fra, Anna M; Tiberio, Laura; Corda, Luciano; Miranda, Elena; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bonetti, Fausta; Ingrassia, Rosaria; Scabini, Roberta; Facchetti, Fabio; Schiaffonati, Luisa

    2009-08-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha(1)AT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder associated with reduced alpha(1)AT serum level, predisposing adults to pulmonary emphysema. Among the known mutations of the alpha(1)AT gene (SERPINA1) causing alpha(1)AT deficiency, a few alleles, particularly the Z allele, may also predispose adults to liver disease. We have characterized a new defective alpha(1)AT allele (c.745G>C) coding for a mutant alpha(1)AT (Gly225Arg), named P(brescia). The P(brescia) alpha(1)AT allele was first identified in combination with the rare defective M(würzburg) allele in an 11-year-old boy showing significantly reduced serum alpha(1)AT level. Subsequently, the P(brescia) allele was found in the heterozygous state with the normal M or the defective Z allele in nine and three adults respectively. In cellular models of the disease, we show that the P(brescia) mutant is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum as ordered polymers and is secreted more slowly than the normal M alpha(1)AT. This behaviour recapitulates the abnormal cellular handling and fate of the Z alpha(1)AT and suggests that the mutation present in the P(brescia) alpha(1)AT causes a conformational change of the protein which, by favouring polymer formation, is etiologic to both severe alpha(1)AT deficiency in the plasma and toxic protein-overload in the liver.

  19. Inactivation of synovial fluid alpha 1-antitrypsin by exercise of the inflamed rheumatoid joint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Farrell, A J; Blake, D R; Chidwick, K; Winyard, P G

    1993-04-26

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) is known to be oxidised by reactive oxygen species both in vitro and in vivo, leading to its inactivation. We report here that synovial fluid (SF) alpha 1AT is inactivated during exercise of the knee-joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Sequential SF sampling from exercised RA patients showed a marked decrease in the mean activity of alpha 1AT after exercise with no change in the molecular forms of alpha 1AT. No such inactivation was found in the control (continuously resting) RA patients. We suggest that oxidation may contribute to alpha 1AT inactivation as a consequence of 'hypoxic-reperfusion' injury after exercise of the inflamed joint.

  20. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. High prevalence in the St. Louis area determined by direct population screening.

    PubMed

    Silverman, E K; Miletich, J P; Pierce, J A; Sherman, L A; Endicott, S K; Broze, G J; Campbell, E J

    1989-10-01

    Considerable attention has been focused upon alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency because of the insights into the pathogenesis of human pulmonary emphysema that may derive from study of deficient subjects, and because of evolving therapeutic strategies that may slow the progression of lung disease in affected persons. We have applied an automated immunoassay for alpha-1-antitrypsin to plasma samples from 20,000 blood donors. Seven PI Z antitrypsin-deficient persons were identified and confirmed; this is more than twice the number predicted from previous estimates of the Z allele frequency in the St. Louis area. Five of the subjects were further evaluated. We anticipate that this assay, if utilized to screen large populations, could identify many alpha-1-antitrypsin-deficient persons for study of the natural history of lung and liver disease associated with the deficiency. These subjects would be potential candidates for early intervention strategies to prevent the development of lung disease. The surprisingly high prevalence of deficient persons indicates that direct screening is the best method for prevalence estimation of genetic disorders.

  1. [Neonatal hepatitis with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficit. Apropos of a personal case].

    PubMed

    Michiels, R; Cabanne, F; Nivelon, J L; Justrabo, E; Bastien, H; Knopf, J F; Bordes, M; Izac, M

    1975-01-01

    The authors report a case of neonatal hepatitis with alpha-1-antitrypsin occuring in a child of ZZ phenotype. The anatomopathological study carried out on two liver biopsies showed changes of common cholestatic hepatitis developing into cirrhosis, as well as intrahepatocytary globulins. Moreover, these globulins, P.A.S. positive after treatment by alphaamylase, fix an antialpha-1-antitrypsine antiserum. Ultrastructural analysis shows them to be masses of amorphous material, feebly osmiophilic, outlined by a unitary membrane the moniliform aspect of which recalls the ergastoplasmic membrane. These findings are identical to those already made in cases of cirrhogenous neonatal hepatitis by alpha-1-antitrypsine deficit reported in the literature. They point out the irreversibility of the affection which, after a stage of cholestatic hepatitis with or without inflammatory portal fibrosis, develops into cirrhosis. At this stage cholestasis has regressed or disappeared whereas portal sclerosis, often infiltrated with free elements, surrounds hepatic lobules and biliary neocanaliculi. But the globulins are still present and appear to be the specific feature of this deficit. By their ultrastructural and immuno-histochemical features, these globulins would represent a form of accumulation of alpha-1-antitrypsin in the hepatocytes which normally carry out the synthesis of this antienzyme. Accumulation in the hepatocytes proves excretory disturbance of hypothetical mechanism: structural anomaly, changes in the permeability of the membrane. Its role in the occurrence of hepatitis or cirrhosis lesions is still to be demonstrated but one may think that it consists in absence of inhibition of the enzymatic factors discharged during agressions.

  2. Results of a case-detection programme for alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    de la Roza, C; Rodríguez-Frías, F; Lara, B; Vidal, R; Jardí, R; Miravitlles, M

    2005-10-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) deficiency is an underdiagnosed condition in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The present authors have conducted a nationwide case detection programme of alpha1-AT deficiency in unselected patients with COPD using dried blood spots. The first phase analysed samples from 971 patients by determining alpha1-AT concentrations and identifying the deficient Z allele by genotyping using rapid real-time PCR. The second phase analysed 1,166 samples with alpha1-AT concentrations and identified both the S and the Z allele, but only in samples with low alpha1-AT concentrations. A total of eight (0.37%) individuals with the severe deficiency PiZZ were detected. In addition, three patients were identified with the PiSZ genotype in the second phase (0.3%). The global cost of the programme was 41,512, which represents 19.42 per sample and 5,189 per PiZZ detected. A sensitivity analysis demonstrated that performing Z genotype to all samples would have resulted in increased costs of 28 per sample and 7,479.5 per PiZZ case identified. In conclusion, a case detection programme of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using dried blood spots is feasible and at a reasonable cost per case detected. Diagnostic yield and costs depend largely on inclusion criteria and the protocol for processing of samples.

  3. Specific lysine labeling by 18OH- during alkaline cleavage of the alpha-1-antitrypsin-trypsin complex.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, A B; Gruenke, L D; Craig, J C; Geczy, D

    1977-01-01

    alpha-1-Antitrypsin is a serum protein that inhibits many proteolytic enzymes. Recently, it was suggested that the alpha-1-antitrypsin-trypsin complex is an acyl ester analogous to the acyl intermediate that forms between trypsin and its substrates. In previous work we showed that the alpha-1-antitrypsin-trypsin complex can be split at high pH, releasing a component of alpha-1-antitrypsin. This component had a new carboxyl-terminal lysine, and it had lost a peptide of about 4000 daltons. In order to determine whether the alpha-1-antitrypsin is bound to trypsin through the new carboxy-terminal lysine, as would be expected if the above hypothesis is correct, we split the complex in the presence of 18OH-. When the new carboxy-terminal lysine was cleaved with carboxypeptidase B, singly labeled, doubly labeled, and unlabeled lysine were recovered. These data support the hypothesis that the alpha-1-antitrypsin-trypsin complex is an acyl ester or a tetrahedral precursor that is transformed into the acyl ester form at high pH. If other enzymes are bound by a similar mechanism, the methods used may be useful in determining which amino acids on alpha-1-antitrypsin bind covalently to each enzyme. PMID:303770

  4. Sequestration of mutated alpha1-antitrypsin into inclusion bodies is a cell-protective mechanism to maintain endoplasmic reticulum function.

    PubMed

    Granell, Susana; Baldini, Giovanna; Mohammad, Sameer; Nicolin, Vanessa; Narducci, Paola; Storrie, Brian; Baldini, Giulia

    2008-02-01

    A variant alpha1-antitrypsin with E342K mutation has a high tendency to form intracellular polymers, and it is associated with liver disease. In the hepatocytes of individuals carrying the mutation, alpha1-antitrypsin localizes both to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and to membrane-surrounded inclusion bodies (IBs). It is unclear whether the IBs contribute to cell toxicity or whether they are protective to the cell. We found that in hepatoma cells, mutated alpha1-antitrypsin exited the ER and accumulated in IBs that were negative for autophagosomal and lysosomal markers, and contained several ER components, but not calnexin. Mutated alpha1-antitrypsin induced IBs also in neuroendocrine cells, showing that formation of these organelles is not cell type specific. In the presence of IBs, ER function was largely maintained. Increased levels of calnexin, but not of protein disulfide isomerase, inhibited formation of IBs and lead to retention of mutated alpha1-antitrypsin in the ER. In hepatoma cells, shift of mutated alpha1-antitrypsin localization to the ER by calnexin overexpression lead to cell shrinkage, ER stress, and impairment of the secretory pathway at the ER level. We conclude that segregation of mutated alpha1-antitrypsin from the ER to the IBs is a protective cell response to maintain a functional secretory pathway.

  5. Augmentation therapy with alpha1-antitrypsin: novel perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sabina, Janciauskiene; Tobias, Welte

    2013-08-01

    SERPINA1, α-antitrypsin (AAT) is an acute phase protein, a member of the serpin (serine protease inhibitor) super family and one of the most abundant protease inhibitors in the circulation. The clinical importance of AAT is emphasized in persons with inherited AAT deficiency who exhibit high risk of developing early onset pulmonary emphysema, neonatal hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, which may appear at any age, and in rare cases panniculitis and vasculitis. The most common and severe AAT deficiency is associated with the Z (Glu342 to Lys) mutation. It is also well established that Z AAT deficiency results from the polymerization and accumulation of the misfolded AAT protein. Consequently, low levels of circulating Z AAT are assumed to be inadequate to neutralize elastolytic activity and to prevent lung tissue damage. Novel studies, however, are expanding the link between AAT and human diseases. Associations are shown between reduced AAT levels and HIV type 1 infection, hepatitis C infection, diabetes mellitus, vasculitis, panniculitis and other diseases. Given the importance of the protease/antiprotease imbalance in causing emphysema, augmentation of circulating AAT is used as a specific therapy for patients with AAT deficiency-related emphysema but not for those with liver diseases. According to the novel findings, therapy with AAT possesses antiinflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects across a broad spectrum of experimental models of systemic and local inflammation. Hence, in this article we will discuss putative new directions for the clinical use of therapy with AAT.

  6. Disruption of the murine alpha1-antitrypsin/PI2 gene.

    PubMed

    Kushi, Atsuko; Akiyama, Kiyotaka; Noguchi, Masato; Edamura, Koji; Yoshida, Takayuki; Sasai, Hitoshi

    2004-10-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family regulating numerous proteolytic processes. The genetic disorder, alpha1-AT deficiency, is well known as a cause of hereditary pulmonary emphysema and liver cirrhosis. To create an animal model of human alpha1-AT deficiency, we disrupted the major murine isoform PI2, which is similar to human alpha1-AT and is one of 7 alpha1-AT isoforms found in the mouse. The ability of the serum to inhibit the activities of human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and human chymotrypsin (CYT) was significantly lower in heterozygous mice (alpha1-AT/PI2 -/+) than wild-type (alpha1-AT/PI2 +/+) mice (73.2% vs. 100% for HLE and 67.8% vs.100% for CYT, respectively; P<0.05). The distribution of genotypes among F(2) progeny was not in accordance with Mendelian distribution (P<0.01), as the percentages of wild-type, heterozygotes and homozygotes were 47.8%, 37.3% and 14.9%, respectively. Thus, it is likely that impairment of the protease inhibitor had a critical effect on fetus development. The alpha1-AT/PI2 deficient mouse will be a useful animal model for elucidating the function of alpha1-AT in fetal development, studying the mechanisms of chronic inflammatory disease and evaluating therapeutic candidates for the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  7. alpha-1-antitrypsin in breast milk of healthy Nigerian mothers.

    PubMed

    Omeme, J A; Lantos, J D; Ihongbe, J C

    1981-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitryspin (x-1-AT) may play a possible role as effector of immunological stasis. This study examines the levels of this glycoprotein in 73 breast milk samples from 60 healthy Nigerian mothers. Levels of x-1-AT were measured by single radial immunodiffusion according to the method of Mancini. Serum protein was measured by Lowry's method, albumin by Doumas' method. Highest mean levels of x-1-AT were found in colostrum (25 mg/dl). The level was significantly higher compared to transitional milk (14.2 mg/dl) or mature milk (165 mg/dl) (p0.001). Breast milk contains substantial amounts of x-1-AT which is not destroyed by pasturization at 56 degrees Centigrade. The immunological protective properties of breast milk are ideal for newborn babies, particularly those who are low birthweight and are thus most susceptible to neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.

  8. Prevention of polymerization of M and Z alpha1-Antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) with trimethylamine N-oxide. Implications for the treatment of alpha1-at deficiency.

    PubMed

    Devlin, G L; Parfrey, H; Tew, D J; Lomas, D A; Bottomley, S P

    2001-06-01

    alpha1-Antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) is the most abundant circulating proteinase inhibitor. The Z variant results in profound plasma deficiency as the mutant polymerizes within hepatocytes. The retained polymers are associated with cirrhosis, and the lack of circulating protein predisposes to early onset emphysema. We have investigated the role of the naturally occurring solute trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) in modulating the polymerization of normal M and disease-associated Z alpha1-AT. TMAO stabilized both M and Z alpha1-AT in an active conformation against heat-induced polymerization. Spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that this was due to inhibition of the conversion of the native state to a polymerogenic intermediate. However, TMAO did not aid the refolding of denatured alpha1-AT to a native conformation; instead, it enhanced polymerization. These data show that TMAO can be used to control the conformational transitions of folded alpha1-AT but that it is ineffective in promoting folding of the polypeptide chain within the secretory pathway.

  9. The parallel lives of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In 1963, five cases of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency were reported in the scientific literature, as well as an attempt to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis by a massive washing of the lung (whole lung lavage). Now, fifty years later, it seems the ideal moment not only to commemorate these publications, but also to point out the influence both papers had in the following decades and how knowledge on these two fascinating rare respiratory disorders progressed over the years. This paper is therefore not aimed at being a comprehensive review for both disorders, but rather at comparing the evolution of alpha1-antitrypsin, a rare disorder, with that of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, an ultra-rare disease. We wanted to emphasize how all stakeholders might contribute to the dissemination of the awareness of rare diseases, that need to be chaperoned from the ghetto of neglected disorders to the dignity of recognizable and treatable disorders. PMID:24079310

  10. A Challenging Case of Severe Infantile Cholestasis in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zahida; Venkat, Veena L; Soltys, Kyle A; Stolz, Donna B; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan

    2017-01-01

    Jaundice in the newborn period can be physiologic and is often due to benign causes. Jaundice due to conjugated hyperbilirubinemia extending beyond the second week of life may be an early sign of several cholestatic or metabolic liver diseases, and it requires logical and timely analysis so that specific treatments can be initiated. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is the most common genetic cause of pediatric liver disease and transplantation, and it must be considered when evaluating cholestatic infants. Here, we present an unusual case of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency with severe infantile cholestasis and rapid decompensation in the first 4 months of life, where in-depth but timely diagnosis was crucial for the appropriate intervention to take place.

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis and small airways function. Effects of disease activity, smoking, and alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mountz, J D; Turner, R A; Collins, R L; Gallup, K R; Semble, E L

    1984-07-01

    The sensitive pulmonary function tests of change in maximum expiratory flow (delta Vmax 50) and volume of isoflow were used to determine the effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), smoking, and alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency phenotypes on peripheral airways. Patients were prospectively divided into 4 groups: 14 smokers with RA, 12 nonsmokers with RA, 11 smokers without RA, and 13 nonsmokers without RA. delta Vmax 50 was the most discriminating variable and demonstrated significant small airway obstructive disease in the first 3 groups, with an additive effect in the group of smokers with RA. An increased incidence of the alpha 1-antitrypsin-deficient MS phenotype was seen in the RA smoker group, and this phenotype was associated with severe pulmonary disease.

  12. [Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency: situation in Spain and development of a screening program].

    PubMed

    de la Roza, Cristian; Lara, Beatriz; Vilà, Sara; Miravitlles, Marc

    2006-06-01

    Studies undertaken in Spain indicate that 9% of the general population aged between 40 and 70 years is affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although tobacco smoke is the causative factor in more than 90% of cases, it is estimated that only 10% to 20% of smokers develop COPD. This may be explained by the existence of genetic or environmental factors that modulate the toxic effects of tobacco. The best known genetic factor is alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency, which is associated with an increased risk of developing pulmonary emphysema in smokers. The most recent guidelines from both the World Health Organization and the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society recommend the establishment of screening programs for the detection of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency in patients with COPD. This strategy is crucial in Spain, where the disease is under diagnosed, mainly due to a low index of suspicion among doctors.

  13. The parallel lives of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Trapnell, Bruce C; Luisetti, Maurizio

    2013-09-30

    In 1963, five cases of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency were reported in the scientific literature, as well as an attempt to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis by a massive washing of the lung (whole lung lavage). Now, fifty years later, it seems the ideal moment not only to commemorate these publications, but also to point out the influence both papers had in the following decades and how knowledge on these two fascinating rare respiratory disorders progressed over the years. This paper is therefore not aimed at being a comprehensive review for both disorders, but rather at comparing the evolution of alpha1-antitrypsin, a rare disorder, with that of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, an ultra-rare disease. We wanted to emphasize how all stakeholders might contribute to the dissemination of the awareness of rare diseases, that need to be chaperoned from the ghetto of neglected disorders to the dignity of recognizable and treatable disorders.

  14. Synergistic anticryptosporidial potential of the combination alpha-1-antitrypsin and paromomycin.

    PubMed Central

    Forney, J R; Yang, S; Healey, M C

    1997-01-01

    The combined effect of the serine protease inhibitor alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) and the aminoglycoside paromomycin on Cryptosporidium parvum infection in vitro was investigated. AAT and paromomycin were mixed with C. parvum oocysts as either single or combined treatments and used to inoculate epithelial cell cultures. Single- and combined-treatment groups had significantly lower (P < 0.01) parasite numbers than untreated controls. The mean fractional inhibitory concentration indices suggested significant synergistic activity. PMID:9303402

  15. Design, Cloning, and In Vitro Screening of Artificial miRNAs to Silence Alpha-1 Antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Borel, Florie; Mueller, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes the design, cloning, and in vitro screening of artificial microRNAs (miRNAs) to silence alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT). This method would be of interest to silence AAT in a variety of in vitro or in vivo models, and prevalidated sequences against human AAT are provided. This simple 5-day protocol may more generally be used to design artificial miRNAs against any transcript.

  16. Italian registry of patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: general data and quality of life evaluation.

    PubMed

    Luisetti, Maurizio; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Corda, Luciano; Ottaviani, Stefania; Gatta, Nuccia; Tinelli, Carmine; Bruletti, Gisella; Bertella, Enrica; Balestroni, Gianluigi; Confalonieri, Marco; Seebacher, Christine; Iannacci, Leonardo; Ferrari, Simona; Salerno, Francesco G; Mariani, Frescesca; Carone, Mauro; Balbi, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin Deficiency (AATD) is a rare hereditary disorder with an estimated prevalence of about 1/5000 individuals in Italy. Deficient patients are at a higher risk of developing lung emphysema and chronic liver disease. The low estimated prevalence of AATD prompted the establishment of a registry with the aim of learning more about the natural history and the quality of care of these patients. The Italian registry for AATD was established in 1996. In this study, genetic and clinical findings of Italian AATD patients are presented. Moreover, we also evaluated the changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with COPD and AAT deficiency over a three-year period, in relation to augmentation therapy. In a period spanning 18 years (1996-2014) a total of 422 adult subjects with severe AATD were enrolled, namely 258 PI*ZZ, 74 PI*SZ, 4 PI*SS and 86 patients with at least one rare deficient allele. The 21.3% frequency for AATD patients with at least one deficient rare variant is the highest so far recorded in national registries of AATD. The registry data allow a detailed characterization of the natural course of the disease and the level of patient care, as well as confirm the usefulness of early AATD detection.

  17. Furazolidone-induced cardiomyopathy in turkeys. Association with a relative alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Staley, N A; Noren, G R; Bandt, C M; Sharp, H L

    1978-06-01

    A naturally occurring cardiomyopathy (round heart disease) which is potentiated by inbreeding and a cardiomyopathy produced by furazolidone, a nitrofuran derivative, were studied for an associated alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency in two flocks of turkeys (one inbred for round heart disease and a commercial flock). At 4 weeks of age, the furazolidone-fed birds of both flocks demonstrated a marked increase in mortality and cardiac dilatation associated with disordered hepatic metabolism when compared with controls. Although PAS-positive, diastase-resistant globules were observed in the livers of both strains of turkeys fed furazolidone, these globules were present in lysosomes and not in the rough endoplasmic reticulum as in alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency. The control inbred birds with round heart disease did not demonstrate histologic or biochemical evidence of an alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency. It is proposed that furazolidone in the turkey produces primary hepatic damage that is reflected in lowered total serum proteins, including trypsin inhibitory capacity, and that the alterations produced by furazolidone are superimposed on round heart disease in the inbred flock.

  18. Furazolidone-induced cardiomyopathy in turkeys. Association with a relative alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Staley, N. A.; Noren, G. R.; Bandt, C. M.; Sharp, H. L.

    1978-01-01

    A naturally occurring cardiomyopathy (round heart disease) which is potentiated by inbreeding and a cardiomyopathy produced by furazolidone, a nitrofuran derivative, were studied for an associated alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency in two flocks of turkeys (one inbred for round heart disease and a commercial flock). At 4 weeks of age, the furazolidone-fed birds of both flocks demonstrated a marked increase in mortality and cardiac dilatation associated with disordered hepatic metabolism when compared with controls. Although PAS-positive, diastase-resistant globules were observed in the livers of both strains of turkeys fed furazolidone, these globules were present in lysosomes and not in the rough endoplasmic reticulum as in alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency. The control inbred birds with round heart disease did not demonstrate histologic or biochemical evidence of an alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency. It is proposed that furazolidone in the turkey produces primary hepatic damage that is reflected in lowered total serum proteins, including trypsin inhibitory capacity, and that the alterations produced by furazolidone are superimposed on round heart disease in the inbred flock. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:148846

  19. Alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes in Saudi Arabia: A study in the central province.

    PubMed

    Warsy, A S; El-Hazmi, M A; Sedrani, S H; Kinhal, M

    1991-03-01

    This study was conducted on 204 plasma samples obtained from Saudis living in the central province of Saudi Arabia, to determine the prevalence of alpha-1-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) phenotypes. The alpha1AT phenotypes were separated by isoelectric focusing on ampholine gels (pH 4-5). The prevalences of PiMM, MS, MZ, SZ, and ZZ were 0.8676, 0.0931, 0.0245, 0.0098, and 0.0049, respectively. The gene frequencies of the alpha1AT variants, i.e.., PiM, PiS, and PiZ, were 0.9265, 0.0515, 0.022, respectively. We describe and compare our results in a Saudi population with those reported for other populations.

  20. Idiopathic hemochromotosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: coexistence in a family with progressive liver disease in the proband.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Schade, R R; Bendetti, C; Kelly, R; Rabin, B S; Krause, J; Starzl, T E; Iwatsuki, S; Van Thiel, D H

    1983-01-01

    A patient with coexistent hemochromatosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency which led to cirrhosis and death despite adequate therapy for hemochromatosis is reported. Evaluation of the family revealed first degree relatives with iron overload and others with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but none with both conditions. The role of family studies in the early recognition and possible prevention of overt clinical disease in individuals with either of these two genetic diseases is discussed.

  1. Idiopathic Hemochromotosis and Alpha-1-Antitrypsin Deficiency: Coexistence in a Family with Progressive Liver Disease in the Proband

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Suri; Schade, Robert R.; Bendetti, Carlos; Kelly, Robert; Rabin, Bruce S.; Krause, John; Starzl, Thomas E.; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Van Thiel, David H.

    2010-01-01

    A patient with coexistent hemochromatosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency which led to cirrhosis and death despite adequate therapy for hemochromatosis is reported. Evaluation of the family revealed first degree relatives with iron overload and others with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but none with both conditions. The role of family studies in the early recognition and possible prevention of overt clinical disease in individuals with either of these two genetic diseases is discussed. PMID:6604688

  2. C-Terminal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Peptide: A New Sepsis Biomarker with Immunomodulatory Function.

    PubMed

    Blaurock, Nancy; Schmerler, Diana; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Ludewig, Katrin; Baier, Michael; Brunkhorst, Frank Martin; Imhof, Diana; Kiehntopf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life threatening condition and the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Although single aspects of pathophysiology have been described in detail, numerous unknown mediators contribute to the progression of this complex disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological role of CAAP48, a C-terminal alpha-1 antitrypsin fragment, that we found to be elevated in septic patients and to apply this peptide as diagnostic marker for infectious and noninfectious etiologies of SIRS. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with synthetic CAAP48, the SNP-variant CAAP47, and several control peptides revealed intense neutrophil activation, induction of neutrophil chemotaxis, reduction of neutrophil viability, and release of cytokines. We determined the abundance of CAAP48 in patients with severe sepsis, severe SIRS of noninfectious origin, and viral infection. CAAP48 levels were 3-4-fold higher in patients with sepsis compared to SIRS of noninfectious origin and allowed discrimination of those patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest that CAAP48 is a promising discriminatory sepsis biomarker with immunomodulatory functions, particularly on human neutrophils, supporting its important role in the host response and pathophysiology of sepsis.

  3. C-Terminal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Peptide: A New Sepsis Biomarker with Immunomodulatory Function

    PubMed Central

    Blaurock, Nancy; Schmerler, Diana; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Ludewig, Katrin; Baier, Michael; Brunkhorst, Frank Martin; Imhof, Diana; Kiehntopf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life threatening condition and the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Although single aspects of pathophysiology have been described in detail, numerous unknown mediators contribute to the progression of this complex disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological role of CAAP48, a C-terminal alpha-1 antitrypsin fragment, that we found to be elevated in septic patients and to apply this peptide as diagnostic marker for infectious and noninfectious etiologies of SIRS. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with synthetic CAAP48, the SNP-variant CAAP47, and several control peptides revealed intense neutrophil activation, induction of neutrophil chemotaxis, reduction of neutrophil viability, and release of cytokines. We determined the abundance of CAAP48 in patients with severe sepsis, severe SIRS of noninfectious origin, and viral infection. CAAP48 levels were 3-4-fold higher in patients with sepsis compared to SIRS of noninfectious origin and allowed discrimination of those patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest that CAAP48 is a promising discriminatory sepsis biomarker with immunomodulatory functions, particularly on human neutrophils, supporting its important role in the host response and pathophysiology of sepsis. PMID:27382189

  4. Effect of age and asthma duration upon elastase and alpha1-antitrypsin levels in adult asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Vignola, A M; Bonanno, A; Profita, M; Riccobono, L; Scichilone, N; Spatafora, M; Bousquet, J; Bonsignore, G; Bellia, V

    2003-11-01

    In asthmatic subjects an imbalance between elastase and alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-PI) exists. This study aims to evaluate whether ageing per se affects the levels of elastase. Both young and elderly asthmatics with comparable severity and duration of disease, as well as young and elderly healthy subjects, underwent an induced sputum procedure to measure levels of elastase and alpha1-PI. The percentage of sputum neutrophils and eosinophils was higher in young and elderly asthmatics than in young and elderly controls. The levels of both total and active elastase were significantly higher in young and elderly asthmatics than in young and elderly controls, and directly correlated with the percentage of neutrophils. In addition, in both young and elderly asthmatics the levels of total and active elastase were negatively correlated with forced expiratory volume in one second values, but positively correlated with the duration of the disease. This study indicates that ageing per se does not necessarily lead to a progressive elastase/alpha1-antitrypsin imbalance in asthma, and suggests that an important variable in the development of airway remodelling in both young and elderly asthmatics is represented by the duration of the disease.

  5. Inhaled alpha 1-antitrypsin: gauging patient interest in a new treatment.

    PubMed

    Monk, Richard; Graves, Michael; Williams, Pamela; Strange, Charlie

    2013-08-01

    Given the high cost of plasma derived intravenous alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT), a more efficient method of delivery to the lungs is desirable. Inhaled AAT has been shown feasible for the treatment of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and is currently in clinical trials. To better understand patient preferences about possible inhaled AAT therapy, a survey was conducted to explore patient attitudes. We conducted an email based survey of patients in the Alpha-1 Foundation Research Registry with AATD on intravenous AAT replacement. Respondents were asked to rate their interest in hypothetical nebulized or dry powder inhaled AAT. Respondents reported high levels of interest in both dried powder inhaler and nebulizer delivered inhaled AAT. The interest in dried powder inhaled was higher than interest in nebulized AAT (71% vs 64%, p = 0.0001). The interest in dried powder inhaled AAT was particularly high in respondents currently on bronchodilator therapy (p = 0.0053). Patients were just as likely to use or not use the product if it required 20% more out of pocket cost. There is a high level of patient interest in the development of a commercially available inhaled AAT replacement product.

  6. Clinical Trial Design for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: A Model for Rare Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Adam; Groft, Stephen C.; Teagarden, J. Russell; Krischer, Jeffrey; Davis, Barry R.; Coffey, Christopher S.; Hickam, David H.; Teckman, Jeffrey; Nelson, David R.; McCaleb, Michael L.; Loomba, Rohit; Strange, Charlie; Sandhaus, Robert A.; Brantly, Mark; Edelman, Jonathan M.; Farrugia, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Clinical research in rare diseases, including alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), faces challenges not shared by common disease research. These challenges may include the limited number of patient volunteers available for research, lack of natural history studies on which to base many clinical trial interventions, an urgency for the development of drug therapies given the often poor prognosis of rare diseases and uncertainties about appropriate biomarkers and clinical outcomes critical to clinical trial design. To address these challenges and initiate formal discussions among key stakeholders—patients, researchers, industry, federal regulators—the Alpha-1 Foundation hosted the Clinical Trial Design for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: A Model for Rare Diseases conference February 3-4, 2014 in Bethesda, Maryland. Discussions at the conference led to the conclusions that 1) adaptive designs should be considered for rare disease clinical trials yet more dialogue and study is needed to make these designs feasible for smaller trials and to address current limitations; 2) natural history studies, including the identification of appropriate biomarkers are critically needed and precompetitive collaborations may offer a means of creating these costly studies; and 3) patient registries and databases within the rare disease community need to be more publicly available and integrated, particularly for AATD. This report summarizes the discussions leading to these conclusions. PMID:28848840

  7. Alpha1-antitrypsin and neutrophil elastase imbalance and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Bamlet, William R; Sun, Zhifu; Ebbert, Jon O; Aubry, Marie-Christine; Krowka, Michael J; Taylor, William R; Marks, Randolph S; Deschamps, Claude; Swensen, Stephen J; Wieben, Eric D; Cunningham, Julie M; Melton, Lee Joseph; de Andrade, Mariza

    2005-07-01

    Imbalance between alpha(1)-antitrypsin and neutrophil elastase is an underlying cause of lung tissue damage that may create a favorable host environment for carcinogenesis. We conducted a case-control study to investigate whether genetic variations indicative of alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) or an excess of neutrophil elastase modify lung cancer risk The case patients were 305 consecutively identified primary lung cancer patients, and the control subjects were 338 community residents. Protease inhibitor-1 (PI1), encoding alpha(1)-antitrypsin, was typed by an isoelectric focusing assay. Neutrophil elastase-2 (ELA2), encoding neutrophil elastase, was typed by two single-nucleotide polymorphism sites. Multivariable logistic regression models tested the independent and interactive effects of PI1, ELA2, tobacco smoke exposure, COPD, and family history of lung cancer Sex and ethnicity were comparable between case patients and control subjects, but case patients were more likely to be smokers, and to have a history of COPD, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and a positive family history of lung cancer. Haplotype analysis indicated an overall strong association between the two ELA2 markers and lung cancer risk. Our best-fitting model showed significant and independent effects of the PI1-deficient allele (odds ratio [OR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 3.0) and the ELA2 T-G haplotype (OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.9 to 8.9) on lung cancer risk, and an increased risk (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 2.4 to 2.8) for individuals carrying both a PI1-deficient allele and a G-G haplotype Genotypes indicative of A1ATD and/or an excess of neutrophil elastase are significantly associated with lung cancer risk. Our findings may provide opportunities to better understand the mechanisms of lung cancer development and risk reduction.

  8. [Alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 2-macroglobulin and reactive protein C in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Dumitraşcu, D; Radu, D; Stanciu, L; Ioniţă, A; Petcovici, M

    1989-01-01

    Proteins of acute phase: alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT), alpha 2-macroglobulin (AMG), reactive C protein (RCP) were determined in the serum of 50 patients with gastric cancer. The Mancini, simple radial immunodiffusion method was used (SRID). The concentration of these proteins increased at 32/50 (64%) for AAT; 30/50 (60%) for AMG and 33/50 (66%) for RCP. By cumulative evaluation, the positivity of serum markers increased to 88%. The importance of differential diagnosis with regard to the benign gastric lesions (adenoma, ulcer, segmentary fibrosis, before receiving the bioptic result, is emphasized.

  9. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Presenting with MPO-ANCA Associated Vasculitis and Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    van Schaik, Jan; Crobach, Stijn L. P.; van Rijswijk, Catharina S. P.; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, ANCA-vasculitis, and aortic aneurysm has been rarely described in literature. We report an eventually fatal case in a 70-year-old patient who initially presented with giant cell arteritis and ANCA associated glomerulonephritis. Several years later, he presented with aortic dissection due to large vessel vasculitis, raising the suspicion of AAT deficiency, as two first-line relatives had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, while they never smoked. This diagnosis was confirmed by AAT electrophoresis and immunohistochemistry on a temporal artery biopsy. Considering AAT deficiency in these cases might lead to a more timely diagnosis. PMID:28367219

  10. Rapid PCR real-time genotyping of M-Malton alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency alleles by molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Orrù, Germano; Faa, Gavino; Pillai, Sara; Pilloni, Luca; Montaldo, Caterina; Pusceddu, Gesuina; Piras, Vincenzo; Coni, Pierpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Alpha1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an autosomal codominant inherited disorder, with increased risk of developing lung and liver disease. The large majority of subjects affected by alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency carry the PIZZ or PISZ genotypes, which can be easily detected using several molecular methods. Another pathologic allele, the M-Malton variant (also known as Mnichinan and Mcagliari), can mimic the Pi Z clinical phenotype, but this alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency variant is not easily recognizable and, therefore, seems to be more under-recognized than the Z or S alleles. We report the development of a rapid qualitative fluorescent real-time PCR assay designed for the detection of the M-Malton alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency alleles using 2 specific molecular beacons. The assay is able to detect in a single tube the homozygous as well the heterozygous genotypes. The procedure combines the great sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction, the specificity provided by allele-specific molecular beacons, and the throughput of a multi-color fluorescence detection procedure. This technique will be useful for research and molecular diagnostic laboratories involved in the study of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency-related diseases.

  11. Chlorhexidine prevents hypochlorous acid-induced inactivation of alpha1-antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Bertolotto, M; Ottonello, L; Pende, A; Dapino, P; Quercioli, A; Mach, F; Dallegri, F

    2009-11-01

    1. Chlorhexidine digluconate has been used as a topical antiseptic in the treatment of acne vulgaris and periodontitis. The acute phase of these diseases involves neutrophilic infiltration. Neutrophil activation and recruitment to inflammatory sites are crucial in both protection against bacterial infection and the induction of hystotoxic damage. Activated neutrophils release several enzymes, including elastase and myeloperoxidase (MPO), which contribute to tissue injury via direct toxic actions, the generation of oxidants and inactivation of protective factors, such as alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT). In the present study, we investigated whether chlorhexidine can modulate neutrophil-mediated histotoxicity. 2. Human primary neutrophils were isolated from healthy donors. Inactivation of alpha1-AT by neutrophils or hypochlorous acid (HOCl) was evaluated by spectrophotometry and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of its capacity to complex with porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE). Neutrophil generation of HOCl, superoxide anion and MPO release were assessed spectrophometrically. 3. Chlorhexidine (0, 0.5, 1, 5 and 10 micromol/L) dose-dependently prevented HOCl-induced inactivation of alpha1-AT and reduced HOCl recovery from phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-treated human neutrophils, but did not inhibit superoxide anion and MPO release. Chlorhexidine directly inhibited HOCl recovery from neutrophils and HOCl-induced inactivation of alpha1-AT in a cell-free assay. Accordingly, chlorhexidine reversed HOCl-mediated inhibition of alpha1-AT capacity to complex with PPE. 4. These data suggest that chlorhexidine prevents neutrophil-induced alpha1-AT inactivation via a direct inhibitory action on HOCl. Although highly speculative, the present study indicates that chlorhexidine may protect inflamed tissues not only through its antimicrobial properties, but also via a direct anti-inflammatory effect on neutrophil toxic products.

  12. Genotyping diagnosis of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Saudi adults with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jameil, Noura; Hassan, Amina A.; Buhairan, Ahlam; Hassanato, Rana; Isac, Sree R.; Al-Otaiby, Maram; Al-Maarik, Basmah; Al-Ajeyan, Iman

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The acute phase protein alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is mainly produced in liver cells. AAT deficiency affects the lungs and liver. We conducted a case-control study to define a valuable method for the proper diagnosis of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), as well as the association of liver cirrhosis with AATD in Saudi adults. Blood samples from 300 liver cirrhosis patients and 400 controls were analyzed according to serum AAT concentration, phenotyping, and genotyping. Nephelometry was used for AAT quantification, isoelectric focusing electrophoresis was used for phenotyping detection, and real-time PCR was used for genotyping to determine the Z and S deficiency alleles. This study highlights the accuracy of using genotyping in addition to AAT quantification, since this technique has proven to be successful in the diagnosis of AATD for 100% of our cases. A significant deviation in AAT genotypes frequencies from the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in the adult cirrhosis group occurred due to a higher observed frequency than expected for the Pi ZZ homozygous genotype. Pi ZZ in adults may be considered as the risk factor for liver cirrhosis. However, we could not establish this relationship for heterozygous AATD genotypes (such as Pi MZ and Pi SZ). PMID:28178162

  13. DNA restriction-site polymorphisms associated with the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D W; Billingsley, G D; Mansfield, T

    1987-01-01

    Restriction-site variation in and around the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene has been studied using two genomic probes. With use of restriction enzymes SstI, MspI, and AvaII, three polymorphic sites have been described with a 4.6-kb probe in the 5' portion of the gene. With use of a 6.5-kb probe, polymorphisms in the coding and 3' regions of the gene have been detected with AvaII, MaeIII, and TaqI. All of these polymorphisms are of sufficiently high frequency to be useful in genetic mapping studies. The polymorphisms with AvaII and MaeIII (6.5-kb probe) are particularly useful for prenatal diagnosis. PI types and M subtypes tend to be associated with specific DNA haplotypes; there are two different types of DNA haplotypes associated with PI M1. The extent of linkage disequilibrium differs throughout the region of the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:2890296

  14. Antisense oligonucleotide treatment ameliorates alpha-1 antitrypsin-related liver disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuling; Booten, Sheri L; Aghajan, Mariam; Hung, Gene; Zhao, Chenguang; Blomenkamp, Keith; Gattis, Danielle; Watt, Andrew; Freier, Susan M; Teckman, Jeffery H; McCaleb, Michael L; Monia, Brett P

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disease that results from mutations in the alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) gene. The mutant AAT protein aggregates and accumulates in the liver leading to AATD liver disease, which is only treatable by liver transplant. The PiZ transgenic mouse strain expresses a human AAT (hAAT) transgene that contains the AATD-associated Glu342Lys mutation. PiZ mice exhibit many AATD symptoms, including AAT protein aggregates, increased hepatocyte death, and liver fibrosis. In the present study, we systemically treated PiZ mice with an antisense oligonucleotide targeted against hAAT (AAT-ASO) and found reductions in circulating levels of AAT and both soluble and aggregated AAT protein in the liver. Furthermore, AAT-ASO administration in these animals stopped liver disease progression after short-term treatment, reversed liver disease after long-term treatment, and prevented liver disease in young animals. Additionally, antisense oligonucleotide treatment markedly decreased liver fibrosis in this mouse model. Administration of AAT-ASO in nonhuman primates led to an approximately 80% reduction in levels of circulating normal AAT, demonstrating potential for this approach in higher species. Antisense oligonucleotides thus represent a promising therapy for AATD liver disease.

  15. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitors for the treatment of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: safety, tolerability, and patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Al-Alawi, Mazen; McEnery, Thomas; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency remains an underrecognized genetic disease with predominantly pulmonary and hepatic manifestations. AAT is derived primarily from hepatocytes; however, macrophages and neutrophils are secondary sources. As the natural physiological inhibitor of several proteases, most importantly neutrophil elastase (NE), it plays a key role in maintaining pulmonary protease–antiprotease balance. In deficient states, unrestrained NE activity promotes damage to the lung matrix, causing structural defects and impairing host defenses. The commonest form of AAT deficiency results in a mutated Z AAT that is abnormally folded, polymerized, and aggregated in the liver. Consequently, systemic levels are lower, resulting in diminished pulmonary concentrations. Hepatic disease occurs due to liver aggregation of the protein, while lung destruction ensues from unopposed protease-mediated damage. In this review, we will discuss AAT deficiency, its clinical manifestations, and augmentation therapy. We will address the safety and tolerability profiles of AAT replacement in the context of patient outcomes and cost-effectiveness and outline future directions for work in this field. PMID:25673994

  16. [Significance of alpha-1-antitrypsin and alpha-2-pregnancy-associated glycoprotein in the serum of patients with bronchial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Homolka, J; Voslárová, Z; Malbohan, I

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigated alpha-1-antitrypsin and pregnancy associated alpha-2-glycoprotein at diagnosis and follow-up of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. Both proteins were determined by single radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini in 60 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma, in 31 patients with nontumorous respiratory diseases, and in 10 patients with tumour metastases in the lungs. The statistical significance of differences was evaluated using Student's t-test. None of the determined proteins was found to be a specific and sensitive marker of bronchogenic carcinoma. The concentration of alpha-1-antitrypsin is increasing with the growth of the tumour, and the values of pregnancy associated alpha-2-glycoproteins are decreasing at the same time. Alpha-1-antitrypsin can be used in follow-up after tumour resection, where recurrent increase of its concentration may indicate a relapse of the tumour.

  17. Isolation and characterization of alpha 1-antitrypsin in PAS-positive hepatic granules from rats with experimental alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bolmer, S; Kleinerman, J

    1986-05-01

    Chronic galactosamine (GalNH2) administration in rats decreases plasma alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) levels to 10-50% of control levels and induces the formation of diastase-resistant, PAS-positive granules, which contain AAT in hepatocytes. This report describes the isolation and purification of hepatic granule AAT by three different methods: solubilization with guanidine hydrochloride followed by gel filtration on Bio-gel A5M, extraction with methylamine and 2-chloroethanol, and solubilization with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) followed by preparative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All three methods yield a single protein which precipitates with anti-rat plasma AAT antibody, and which has an apparent molecular weight of 45,000 daltons, in contrast to the molecular weight of plasma AAT, 50,000 daltons. Unlike plasma AAT, granule AAT contains no sialic acid, galactose, or fucose. Moreover, granule AAT contains a reduced amount of N-acetylglucosamine and an increased amount of mannose, compared with plasma AAT. The carbohydrate content of granule AAT varies with the isolation procedure used. Granule AAT is susceptible to cleavage by endoglucosaminidase H, which indicates the presence of high-mannose type oligosaccharides. Comparison of the molecular weight, carbohydrate composition, isoelectric point, and endoglucosaminidase H sensitivity of granule AAT isolated from rats with GalNH2-induced AAT deficiency with granule AAT from PiZ humans extends the list of similarities between experimental GalNH2-induced AAT deficiency in rats by and genetically determined AAT deficiency in humans.

  18. Increased outer arm and core fucose residues on the N-glycans of mutated alpha-1 antitrypsin protein from alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient individuals.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cormac; Saldova, Radka; O'Brien, M Emmet; Bergin, David A; Carroll, Tomás P; Keenan, Joanne; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Rudd, Pauline M; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-02-07

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the major physiological inhibitor of a range of serine proteases, and in the lung, it maintains a protease-antiprotease balance. AAT deficiency (AATD) is an autosomal co-dominant condition with the Z mutation being the most common cause. Individuals homozygous for Z (PiZZ) have low levels of circulating mutant Z-AAT protein leading to premature emphysematous lung disease. Extensive glycoanalysis has been performed on normal AAT (M-AAT) from healthy individuals and the importance of glycosylation in affecting the immune modulatory roles of AAT is documented. However, no glycoanalysis has been carried out on Z-AAT from deficient individuals to date. In this study, we investigate whether the glycans present on Z-AAT differ to those found on M-AAT from healthy controls. Plasma AAT was purified from 10 individuals: 5 AATD donors with the PiZZ phenotype and 5 PiMM healthy controls. Glycoanalysis was performed employing N-glycan release, exoglycosidase digestion and UPLC analysis. No difference in branched glycans was identified between AATD and healthy controls. However, a significant increase in both outer arm (α1-3) (p = 0.04) and core (α1-6) fucosylated glycans (p < 0.0001) was found on Z-AAT compared to M-AAT. This study has identified increased fucosylation on N-glycans of Z-AAT indicative of ongoing inflammation in AATD individuals with implications for early therapeutic intervention.

  19. Indications for active case searches and intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin treatment for patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency chronic pulmonary obstructive disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Casas, Francisco; Blanco, Ignacio; Martínez, María Teresa; Bustamante, Ana; Miravitlles, Marc; Cadenas, Sergio; Hernández, José M; Lázaro, Lourdes; Rodríguez, Esther; Rodríguez-Frías, Francisco; Torres, María; Lara, Beatriz

    2015-04-01

    The effect of hereditary alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency can manifest clinically in the form of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AAT deficiency (AATD) is defined as a serum concentration lower than 35% of the expected mean value or 50 mg/dl (determined by nephelometry). It is associated in over 95% of cases with Pi*ZZ genotypes, and much less frequently with other genotypes resulting from combinations of Z, S, rare and null alleles. A systematic qualitative review was made of 107 articles, focusing mainly on an active search for AATD in COPD patients and intravenous (iv) treatment with AAT. On the basis of this review, the consultant committee of the Spanish Registry of Patients with AATD recommends that all COPD patients be screened for AATD with the determination of AAT serum concentrations, and when these are low, the evaluation must be completed with phenotyping and, on occasions, genotyping. Patients with severe AATD COPD should receive the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment recommended in the COPD guidelines. There is enough evidence from large observational studies and randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials to show that the administration of iv AAT reduces mortality and slows the progression of emphysema, hence its indication in selected cases that meet the inclusion criteria stipulated in international guidelines. The administration of periodic infusions of AAT is the only specific treatment for delaying the progression of emphysema associated with AATD. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of bronchial epithelial cells in the pathogenesis of COPD in Z-alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pini, Laura; Tiberio, Laura; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Bezzi, Michela; Corda, Luciano; Luisetti, Maurizio; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Malerba, Mario; Lomas, David A; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Vizzardi, Enrico; Modina, Denise; Schiaffonati, Luisa; Tantucci, Claudio

    2014-09-14

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin is the main inhibitor of neutrophil elastase in the lung. Although it is principally synthesized by hepatocytes, alpha-1 antitrypsin is also secreted by bronchial epithelial cells. Gene mutations can lead to alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, with the Z variant being the most clinically relevant due to its propensity to polymerize. The ability of bronchial epithelial cells to produce Z-variant protein and its polymers is unknown. Experiments using a conformation-specific antibody were carried out on M- and Z-variant-transfected 16HBE cells and on bronchial biopsies and ex vivo bronchial epithelial cells from Z and M homozygous patients. In addition, the effect of an inflammatory stimulus on Z-variant polymer formation, elicited by Oncostatin M, was investigated. Comparisons of groups were performed using t-test or ANOVA. Non-normally distributed data were assessed by Mann-Whitney U test or the Kruskal-Wallis test, where appropriate. A P value of < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Alpha-1 antitrypsin polymers were found at a higher concentration in the culture medium of ex vivo bronchial epithelial cells from Z-variant homozygotes, compared with M-variant homozygotes (P < 0.01), and detected in the bronchial epithelial cells and submucosa of patient biopsies. Oncostatin M significantly increased the expression of alpha-1 antitrypsin mRNA and protein (P < 0.05), and the presence of Z-variant polymers in ex vivo cells (P < 0.01). Polymers of Z-alpha-1 antitrypsin form in bronchial epithelial cells, suggesting that these cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema and in bronchial epithelial cell dysfunction.

  1. Benefits Among Patients with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Enrolled in a Disease Management and Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Jordan T; Choate, Radmila; Mannino, David M; Browning, Stephen R; Sandhaus, Robert A

    2016-12-24

    Rationale: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is characterized by decreased circulating levels or activity of the serum protein, alpha-1 antitrypsin, which increases risk for chronic lung or liver injury and may lead to diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Currently there is no cure for AATD, and it is largely controlled through disease management and augmentation therapy. This study was designed to describe characteristics of patients enrolled in a disease management and prevention program. Methods: Data from questionnaires administered by AlphaNet were obtained on 4747 AATD patients and included demographic information, medical history, lifestyle choices, and adherence to the Alpha-1 Disease Management and Prevention Program (ADMAPP). A total of 1221 participants (25.72%) had missing adherence information and were excluded, leaving a final study population of 3526. Questionnaire answer dates ranged from May 29, 2008 to February 14, 2015. Logistic regression was used to adjust for demographic factors and comorbidities, comparing the populations stratified by adherence to ADMAPP. Results: After adjustment for age, sex, race, Charlson Comorbidity Index, and income level, individuals who self-reported any adherence to ADMAPP were more likely to feel informed about their condition (odds ratio[OR]adj 4.95, 95% confidence interval[CI][3.24, 7.57]), and be taking preventive measures, such as smoking cessation (ORadj 0.47, 95% CI [0.31, 0.70]), appropriate immunizations, and self-reported exercise (ORadj 2.07, 95% CI [1.74, 2.47]). Conclusions: This study suggests that ADMAPP may be a useful tool for informing and improving preventive measures taken by individuals with AATD. Future studies are needed to clarify the observed associations and study additional outcomes.

  2. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency: current perspective on research, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha One International Registry (AIR), a multinational research program focused on alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, was formed in response to a World Health Organization recommendation. Each of the nearly 20 participating countries maintains a national registry of patients with AAT deficiency and contributes to an international database located in Malmö, Sweden. This database is designed to increase understanding of AAT deficiency. Additionally, AIR members are engaged in active, wide-ranging investigations to improve the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of the disease and meet biennially to exchange views and research findings. The fourth biennial meeting was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2–3 June 2005. This review covers the wide range of AAT deficiency-related topics that were addressed encompassing advances in genetic characterization, risk factor identification, clinical epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques. PMID:18046892

  3. Infected tracheal diverticulum: a rare association with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cecília Beatriz Alves; Silva, Sónia; Feijó, Salvato

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal diverticulum, defined as a benign outpouching of the tracheal wall, is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice. It can be congenital or acquired in origin, and most cases are asymptomatic, typically being diagnosed postmortem. We report a case of a 69-year-old woman who was hospitalized after presenting with fever, fatigue, pleuritic chest pain, and a right neck mass complicated by dysphagia. Her medical history was significant: pulmonary emphysema (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency); bronchiectasis; and thyroidectomy. On physical examination, she presented diminished breath sounds and muffled heart sounds, with a systolic murmur. Laboratory tests revealed elevated inflammatory markers, a CT scan showed an air-filled, multilocular mass in the right tracheal wall, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the CT findings. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy failed to reveal any abnormalities. Nevertheless, the patient was diagnosed with tracheal diverticulum. The treatment approach was conservative, consisting mainly of antibiotics. After showing clinical improvement, the patient was discharged.

  4. Alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency alleles are associated with joint dislocation and scoliosis in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morris, Colleen A; Pani, Ariel M; Mervis, Carolyn B; Rios, Cecilia M; Kistler, Doris J; Gregg, Ronald G

    2010-05-15

    Elastin haploinsufficiency is responsible for a significant portion of the Williams syndrome (WS) phenotype including hoarse voice, supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS), hernias, diverticuli of bowel and bladder, soft skin, and joint abnormalities. All of the connective tissue signs and symptoms are variable in the WS population, but few factors other than age and gender are known to influence the phenotype. We examined a cohort of 205 individuals with WS for mutations in SERPINA1, the gene that encodes alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), the inhibitor of elastase. Individuals with classic WS deletions and SERPINA1 genotypes PiMS or PiMZ were more likely than those with a SERPINA1 PiMM genotype to have joint dislocation or scoliosis. However, carrier status for AAT deficiency was not correlated with presence of inguinal hernia or with presence or severity of SVAS. These findings suggest that genes important in elastin metabolism are candidates for variability in the connective tissue abnormalities in WS.

  5. Functional analysis of novel alpha-1 antitrypsin variants G320R and V321F.

    PubMed

    Ljujic, Mila; Divac Rankov, Aleksandra; Kojic, Snezana; Miranda, Elena; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2014-09-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) gene is highly polymorphic, with a large number of rare variants whose phenotypic consequences often remain inconclusive. Studies addressing functional characteristics of AAT variants are of significant biomedical importance since deficiency and dysfunctionality of AAT are associated with liver and lung diseases. We report the results of the functional analysis of two naturally occurring AAT variants, G320R and V321F, previously identified in patients with lung disease. Neither of variants has been fully functionally characterized. In order to perform their functional analysis both variants were expressed in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems and their intracellular localization, activity, stability, and polymerization were determined. The results of this study demonstrated that variants G320R and V321F have neither impaired activity against porcine pancreatic elastase nor propensity to form polymers. However, both variants had altered electrophoretic mobility and reduced thermostability when compared to M variant of the protein, indicating a slightly impaired secondary or tertiary structure.

  6. Lung distensibility and airway function in intermediate alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (Pi MZ).

    PubMed Central

    Tattersall, S F; Pereira, R P; Hunter, D; Blundell, G; Pride, N B

    1979-01-01

    We examined the role of intermediate alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency in predisposing to abnormalities of lung distensibility and airway function in 20 heterozygotes (Pi MZ) who were individually matched with a control Pi M subject of similar age, height, and smoking habits drawn from the same male, working population. There were no significant differences between the heterozygotes and their controls in the results of spirometry, maximum expiratory flow-volume curves (breathing air), single breath nitrogen test, arterialised capillary blood oxygen pressure, or single breath carbon monoxide transfer. Additional studies were made in 12 of the pairs of Pi MZ and Pi M subjects. Comparison of maximum expiratory flow-volume curves breathing air and 80% helium-20% oxygen showed no differences between the Pi MZ and Pi M subjects. Although airway function was similar in the two groups, four of 12 Pi MZ subjects showed abnormalities of the pressure-volume curve of the lung (reduction in lung recoil pressure, abnormal shape factor, increase in functional residual capacity). Abnormalities of washout of a helium-sulphur hexafluoride gas mixture, of a type previously described as characteristic of emphysema, were found in two of the men with abnormal pressure-volume curves. The results suggest that Pi MZ subjects have an increased susceptibility to alveolar abnormalities without increased abnormalities of airway function; this may explain the increased frequency of emphysema at necropsy despite many studies showing no predisposition to abnormal airway function in life. The functional changes we observed would be unlikely to cause symptoms. The risk of disablement from chronic lung disease appears to be only slightly enhanced by intermediate alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:316207

  7. Normal exocytosis and endocytosis of lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase in a case of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, K

    1983-03-15

    Secretion of lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase by cultivated skin fibroblasts and receptor-mediated endocytosis of leucocyte beta-hexosaminidase from a patient by cultivated non-parenchymal rat liver cells and skin fibroblasts were similar to that of a control proband. The results suggest normal oligosaccharide side chains of high mannose type on lysosomal enzymes in alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency.

  8. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency resulting in a hitherto unseen presentation of hepatocellular carcinoma: Polycythemia but with normal alpha fetoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Owen, David Ryan; Sivakumar, Ramachandran; Suh, Eui-Sik; Seevaratnam, Murugiah

    2006-01-01

    Polycythemia is a known paraneopastic manifestation of hepatoma, but only in the presence of alpha-fetopro (AFP). We present a case of polycythemia in the absence of AFP, and suggest concurrent alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency as the cause for breaking this rule. We also suggest a reason for the apparent constant conjunction between polycythemia and AFP in hepatoma. PMID:16937479

  9. Normal diffusing capacity in patients with PiZ alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency, severe airflow obstruction, and significant radiographic emphysema.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J S; Galvin, J R

    2000-09-01

    alpha(1)-Antitrypsin deficiency is usually suspected clinically in young adults with irreversible airflow obstruction that is out of proportion to their smoking history. Many patients with alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency receive an initial diagnosis of asthma or chronic bronchitis. Measurement of the diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) has been recommended as a way to help distinguish emphysema from asthma and chronic bronchitis. In this article, we describe four patients with severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency, each of whom had a repeatedly normal DLCO despite having a significant component of fixed airway obstruction and prominent panacinar emphysema on high-resolution CT scan (HRCT). Each patient also demonstrated significant bronchodilator responsiveness, and two patients received an initial diagnosis of asthma. Potential explanations for these findings are discussed. We report these findings to illustrate the limitations of DLCO in this setting. alpha(1)-Antitrypsin deficiency should be considered in patients with fixed airway obstruction that is out of proportion to their age and smoking history, regardless of their diffusing capacity and response to bronchodilators.

  10. Cytidine-5'-monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid. Asialoglycoprotein sialic acid transferase activity in liver and serum of patients with juvenile hepatic cirrhosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kuhlenschmidt, M S; Peters, S P; Pinkard, O D; Glew, R H; Sharp, H

    1976-04-08

    The molecular basis for the accumulation of a substance which displays the immunological reactivity of alpha-1-antitrypsin within vesicles of liver parenchymal cells of individuals with hepatic cirrhosis and serum alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency remains unclear. We recently reported that serum from a patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis was substantially deficient in sialyltransferease (EC 2.4.99.1) an enzyme which transfers sialic acid from cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid to a variety of asialoglycoprotein acceptors. In the present report we have extended these studies to include serum from five additional patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and juvenile hepatic cirrhosis as well as a liver specimen obtained at autopsy of one of these patients. We find the sialytransferase activity in serum from six patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis to be 50% of healthy pediatric control values and 30% of pediatric patients with liver disease. However, serum from family members homozygous for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency but without hepatic cirrhosis, and serum from patients with a variety of other kinds of liver disease, failed to exhibit the marked sialytransferase deficiency. Similar assays carried out on a homogenate of a liver sample from one patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis indicated that the deficiency of sialyltransferase activity was not demonstrable in liver. Furthermore, a comparative kinetic analysis of serum and liver sialytransferase in normal and afflicted individuals failed to detect differences in substrate affinities which might account for a decrease in functional sialyltransferase capacity in individuals with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and hepatic cirrhosis. These observations suggest that the serum sialyltransferase deficiency in such patients probably arises after chronic and extensive liver disease involving hepatic accumulation of

  11. Spanish Registry of Patients With Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: Database Evaluation and Population Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lara, Beatriz; Blanco, Ignacio; Martínez, María Teresa; Rodríguez, Esther; Bustamante, Ana; Casas, Francisco; Cadenas, Sergio; Hernández, José M; Lázaro, Lourdes; Torres, María; Curi, Sergio; Esquinas, Cristina; Dasí, Francisco; Escribano, Amparo; Herrero, Inés; Martínez-Delgado, Beatriz; Michel, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez-Frías, Francisco; Miravitlles, Marc

    2017-01-01

    REDAAT, the Spanish Registry of Patients with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency, was set up in order to improve knowledge of this disease. This study is an evaluation of the registry and an analysis of its patient population. The registry has a database hosted on the website www.redaat.es. It collects clinical and functional data on patients with PiSZ, ZZ phenotypes and other rare variants. Thanks to the collaboration of 124 physicians, the registry currently contains information on 511 individuals from 103 healthcare centers. Of these 511, 348 (74.2%) are Pi*ZZ homozygotes, and 100 (19.5%) are Pi*SZ heterozygotes. More cases are seen in tertiary level hospitals. A total of 81% of the cases have respiratory disease, and a lower proportion of AATD cases were detected by family screening or liver disease. Follow-up data are available for 45% of the cases, and 35% received alpha-1 antitripsin replacement therapy. The REDAAT registry is a useful tool for obtaining quality information about this minority disease in routine clinical practice conditions, although it is difficult to obtain follow-up data, and the representativeness of the sample included cannot be determined. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of a disease management program in individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Campos, Michael A; Alazemi, Saleh; Zhang, Guoyan; Wanner, Adam; Sandhaus, Robert A

    2009-02-01

    Disease management programs improve outcomes in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but their effect in subjects with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) has not been evaluated. To assess the impact of a disease management program, applicable to subjects with AATD-associated COPD throughout the United States, on exacerbations, healthcare resource utilization and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The Alpha-1 Disease Management and Prevention Program (ADMAPP) consisted of comprehensive written educational patient-directed material for self-study and treatment plans. Program reinforcement was performed through monthly phone calls by specialized coordinators. Outcomes were collected prospectively for 12 months before, and 12 months after enrollment into the program. Exacerbations and healthcare resource utilization were recorded monthly. HRQoL was measured with the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) every 6 months and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) every 12 months. A total of 878 subjects completed the 2-year study. During the intervention year, there was a significant increase in the use of long-acting bronchodilators, better compliance with oxygen therapy, and more use of steroid courses during exacerbations. Total exacerbation rates, unscheduled physician visits and emergency room visits significantly decreased. There was also a statistically significant slowing in the deterioration of the SGRQ's activity domain, while total SGRQ scores remained stable during the study. Significant improvements were observed in some of the SF-36 domains, particularly in the general health domain. The ADMAPP improved health outcomes in subjects with AATD-associated COPD.

  13. How Can We Improve the Detection of Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Maria Teresa; Dresel, Marc; Koczulla, Rembert; Ottaviani, Stefania; Baldo, Raffaele; Gorrini, Marina; Sala, Giorgia; Cavallon, Luana; Welte, Tobias; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Luisetti, Maurizio; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    The Z deficiency in α1-antitrypsin (A1ATD) is an under-recognized condition. Alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is the main protein in the α1-globulin fraction of serum protein electrophoresis (SPE); however, evaluation of the α1-globulin protein fraction has received very little attention. Serum Z-type A1AT manifests in polymeric forms, but their interference with quantitative immunoassays has not been reported. Here, 214 894 samples were evaluated by SPE at the G. Fracastoro Hospital of Verona, Italy. Patients with an A1AT level ≤ 0.92 g/L were recalled to complete A1ATD diagnosis. In parallel, to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize A1AT, sera samples from 10 PiZZ and 10 PiMM subjects obtained at the National Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Warsaw, Poland, were subjected to non-denaturing 7.5% PAGE and 7.5% SDS-PAGE followed by Western blot. Moreover, purified A1AT was heated at 60°C and analyzed by a non-denaturing PAGE and 4–15% gradient SDS-PAGE followed by Western blot as well as by isolelectrofocusing and nephelometry. A total of 966 samples manifested percentages ≤ 2.8 or a double band in the alpha1-zone. According to the nephelometry data, 23 samples were classified as severe (A1AT ≤ 0.49 g/L) and 462 as intermediate (A1AT >0.49≤ 1.0 g/L) A1ATD. Twenty subjects agreed to complete the diagnosis and an additional 21 subjects agreed to family screening. We detected 9 cases with severe and 26 with intermediate A1ATD. Parallel experiments revealed that polymerization of M-type A1AT, when measured by nephelometry or isolelectrofocusing, yields inaccurate results, leading to the erroneous impression that it was Z type and not M-type A1AT. We illustrate the need for confirmation of Z A1AT values by “state of the art” method. Clinicians should consider a more in-depth investigation of A1ATD in patients when they exhibit serum polymers and low α1-globulin protein levels by SPE. PMID:26270547

  14. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency in COPD Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Sorroche, Patricia Beatriz; Fernández Acquier, Mariano; López Jove, Orlando; Giugno, Eduardo; Pace, Salvador; Livellara, Beatriz; Legal, Susana; Oyhamburu, José; Saez, María Soledad

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a genetic disorder associated with early onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and liver disease. It is also a highly under-diagnosed condition. As early diagnosis could prompt specific interventions such as smoking cessation, testing of family members, genetic counselling and use of replacement therapy, screening programs are needed to identify affected patients. To estimate the prevalence of severe AATD in COPD patients by routine dried blood spot testing and subsequent genotyping in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) levels below an established threshold. Cross-sectional study of adult COPD patients attending the Hospital Dr. Antonio Cetrángolo (Buenos Aires, Argentina) between 2009 and 2012. The study consisted of capillary blood collection via finger stick to determine AAT levels, clinical evaluation and lung function tests. Genotype was determined in AAT-deficient patients. A total of 1,002 patients were evaluated, of whom 785 (78.34%) had normal AAT levels, while low AAT levels were found in 217 (21.66%). Subsequent genotyping of the latter sub-group found: 15 (1.5%, 95% CI 0.75-2.25) patients with a genotype associated with severe AATD, of whom 12 were ZZ (1.2%, 95% CI 0.52-1.87) and 3 SZ (0.3%, 95% CI 0-0.64). The remaining 202 patients were classified as: 29 Z heterozygotes (2.89%, 95% CI 1.86-3.93), 25 S heterozygotes (2.5%, 95% CI 1.53-3.46) and 4 SS (0.4%, 95% CI 0.01-0.79). A definitive diagnosis could not be reached in 144 patients (14.37%, 95% CI 12.2-16.54). The strategy using an initial serum AAT level obtained by dried blood spot testing and subsequent genotyping was a satisfactory initial approach to a screening program for severe AAT, as a definitive diagnosis was achieved in 87% of patients. However, results were not obtained for logistical reasons in the remaining 13%. This major obstacle may be overcome by the use of dried blood spot phenotyping techniques. We believe this approach

  15. Approaches to maximizing stable expression of alpha 1-antitrypsin in transformed CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Paterson, T; Innes, J; Moore, S

    1994-01-01

    A variety of approaches to maximizing the production of recombinant human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have been investigated. The highly active and inducible human cytomegalovirus immediate early (IE) promoter/enhancer was used to drive transcription of a recombinant AAT gene in transiently transfected and stably transformed CHO cells. The AAT gene was modified to incorporate highly efficient 3'RNA processing signals from the herpes simplex virus type 2 IE gene 5, and optimal translational initiation signals were created by site-directed mutagenesis. The effect of flanking the recombinant gene with matrix attachment regions was investigated. Combinations of these modifications allowed secretion of up to 44 micrograms AAT/ml per day by cell lines growing in serum-rich medium. This could be increased to up to 100 micrograms AAT/ml per day upon chemical induction of expression by propionate, butyrate or hexamethylene bisacetamide. Cell lines adapted to grow in protein-free medium produced less AAT but still responded to chemical induction to secrete up to 14 micrograms/ml per day of readily purified AAT.

  16. Dysfunctional glycogen storage in a mouse model of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hubner, Ralf H; Leopold, Philip L; Kiuru, Maija; De, Bishnu P; Krause, Anja; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-02-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular pathway that contributes to the degradation and recycling of unfolded proteins. Based on the knowledge that autophagy affects glycogen metabolism and that alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is associated with an autophagic response in the liver, we hypothesized that the conformational abnormalities of the Z-AAT protein interfere with hepatocyte glycogen storage and/or metabolism. Compared with wild-type mice (WT), the Z-AAT mice had lower liver glycogen stores (P < 0.001) and abnormal activities of glycogen-related enzymes, including acid alpha-glucosidase (P < 0.05) and the total glycogen synthase (P < 0.05). As metabolic consequences, PiZ mice demonstrated lower blood glucose levels (P < 0.05), lower body weights (P < 0.001), and lower fat pad weights (P < 0.001) compared with WT. After the stress of fasting or partial hepatectomy, PiZ mice had further reduced liver glycogen and lower blood glucose levels (both P < 0.05 compared WT). Finally, PiZ mice exhibited decreased survival after partial hepatectomy (P < 0.01 compared with WT), but this was normalized with postoperative dextrose supplementation. In conclusion, these observations are consistent with the general concept that abnormal protein conformation and degradation affects other cellular functions, suggesting that diseases in the liver might benefit from metabolic compensation if glycogen metabolism is affected.

  17. Curative and beta cell regenerative effects of alpha1-antitrypsin treatment in autoimmune diabetic NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Koulmanda, Maria; Bhasin, Manoj; Hoffman, Lauren; Fan, Zhigang; Qipo, Andi; Shi, Hang; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Putheti, Prabhakar; Degauque, Nicolas; Libermann, Towia A; Auchincloss, Hugh; Flier, Jeffrey S; Strom, Terry B

    2008-10-21

    Invasive insulitis is a destructive T cell-dependent autoimmune process directed against insulin-producing beta cells that is central to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in humans and the clinically relevant nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. Few therapies have succeeded in restoring long-term, drug-free euglycemia and immune tolerance to beta cells in overtly diabetic NOD mice, and none have demonstrably enabled enlargement of the functional beta cell mass. Recent studies have emphasized the impact of inflammatory cytokines on the commitment of antigen-activated T cells to various effector or regulatory T cell phenotypes and insulin resistance and defective insulin signaling. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that inflammatory mechanisms trigger insulitis, insulin resistance, faulty insulin signaling, and the loss of immune tolerance to islets. We demonstrate that treatment with alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT), an agent that dampens inflammation, does not directly inhibit T cell activation, ablates invasive insulitis, and restores euglycemia, immune tolerance to beta cells, normal insulin signaling, and insulin responsiveness in NOD mice with recent-onset T1DM through favorable changes in the inflammation milieu. Indeed, the functional mass of beta cells expands in AAT-treated diabetic NOD mice.

  18. Immune protective effect of human alpha-1-antitrypsin gene during β cell transplantation in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Liao, Yu-Ting; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Reng, Li-Wei; Qi, Hui; Li, Fu-Rong

    2015-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease in which β cells are destroyed. Islet transplantation is the most promising therapeutic treatment for T1D patients. However, allograft rejection and autoimmune reaction have been recognized as primary causes of graft loss after transplantation. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is an important serine protease inhibitor in serum. AAT is characterized by anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis, and induction-specific immunological tolerance. In this study, we successfully established NIT-hAAT cell lines, which are murine islet β cell lines with stable expression of human AAT (hAAT) gene. These NIT-hAAT cells were transplanted under the left kidney capsule of BALB/c diabetic mice. Interestingly, the sustained expression of hAAT in vivo can block the inflammatory cell infiltration and reduce the production of proinflammatory cytokines to effectively prevent nonspecific inflammation. Results showed that hAAT can inhibit the proliferation of lymphocytes, shift the balance between Th17 and Treg, and suppress the maturation of dendritic cells. Therefore, hAAT can serve as a beneficial immunomodulator that limits immune rejection to prolong islet allograft survival and achieve long-term successful transplant outcomes.

  19. Alpha 1-antitrypsin reduces inflammation and enhances mouse pancreatic islet transplant survival.

    PubMed

    Koulmanda, Maria; Bhasin, Manoj; Fan, Zhigang; Hanidziar, Dusan; Goel, Nipun; Putheti, Prabhakar; Movahedi, Babak; Libermann, Towia A; Strom, Terry B

    2012-09-18

    The promise of islet cell transplantation cannot be fully realized in the absence of improvements in engraftment of resilient islets. The marginal mass of islets surviving the serial peritransplant insults may lead to exhaustion and thereby contribute to an unacceptably high rate of intermediate and long-term graft loss. Hence, we have studied the effects of treatment with alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) in a syngeneic nonautoimmune islet graft model. A marginal number of syngeneic mouse islets were transplanted into nonautoimmune diabetic hosts and islet function was analyzed in control and AAT treated hosts. In untreated controls, marginal mass islet transplants did not restore euglycemia. Outcomes were dramatically improved by short-term AAT treatment. Transcriptional profiling identified 1,184 differentially expressed transcripts in AAT-treated hosts at 3 d posttransplantation. Systems-biology-based analysis revealed AAT down-regulated regulatory hubs formed by inflammation-related molecules (e.g., TNF-α, NF-κB). The conclusions yielded by the systems-biology analysis were rigorously confirmed by QRT-PCR and immunohistology. These data suggest that short-term AAT treatment of human islet transplant recipients may be worthy of a clinical trial.

  20. Sustained expression of alpha1-antitrypsin after transplantation of manipulated hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew A; Kwok, Letty W; Hovav, Avi-Hai; Ohle, Sarah J; Little, Frederic F; Fine, Alan; Kotton, Darrell N

    2008-08-01

    Inherited mutations in the human alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) gene lead to deficient circulating levels of AAT protein and a predisposition to developing emphysema. Gene therapy for individuals deficient in AAT is an attractive goal, because transfer of a normal AAT gene into any cell type able to secrete AAT should reverse deficient AAT levels and attenuate progression of lung disease. Here we present an approach for AAT gene transfer based on the transplantation of lentivirally transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We develop a novel dual-promoter lentiviral system to transfer normal human AAT cDNA as well as a fluorescent tracking "reporter gene" into murine HSCs. After transplantation of 3,000 transduced HSCs into irradiated mouse recipients, we demonstrate simultaneous and sustained systemic expression of both genes in vivo for at least 31 weeks. The stem cells transduced with this protocol maintain multipotency, self-renewal potential, and the ability to reconstitute the hematopoietic systems of both primary and secondary recipients. This lentiviral-based system may be useful for investigations requiring the systemic secretion of anti-proteases or cytokines relevant to the pathogenesis of a variety of lung diseases.

  1. Alpha-1-antitrypsin for the improvement of autoimmunity and allograft rejection in beta cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Liao, Yu-Ting; Jian, You-Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Wei, Pei; Qi, Hui; Deng, Chun-Yan; Li, Fu-Rong

    2013-02-01

    Islet transplantation offers hope for patients with type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease. However, islet transplant recipients must overcome two obstacles in both allograft rejection and autoimmune reaction. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (a1-proteinase inhibitor, AAT) possesses anti-inflammatory properties, reduces cytokine-mediated islet damage, and induces specific immune tolerance. In this study, an insulinoma cell line, NIT-1, was transfected with human AAT (hAAT), named NIT-hAAT, and was transplanted to the left renal subcapsular spaces of 7-week-old female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice (n=22). Cyclophosphamide(CY) was administered to synchronize and accelerate the development of diabetes. Thus, the immunosuppressive and cytoprotective activity of hAAT in β-cell transplantation was investigated. NIT-hAAT has immunomodulatory properties, which delay the onset of autoimmune diabetes, reduce diabetes incidence, inhibit insulitis and β-cell apoptosis, and dampen transplant site inflammation. We propose that NIT-hAAT has a dual function by improving islet autoimmunity and protecting transplanted β-cells from allograft rejection. However, the low expression of hAAT in vivo results in the inability of NIT-hAAT to induce long-term specific immune tolerance and to completely block allograft rejection.

  2. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in Madeira (Portugal): the highest prevalence in the world.

    PubMed

    Spínola, Carla; Bruges-Armas, Jácome; Pereira, Conceição; Brehm, António; Spínola, Hélder

    2009-10-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a common genetic disease which affects both lung and liver. Early diagnosis can help asymptomatic patients to adjust their lifestyle choices in order to reduce the risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The determination of this genetic deficiency prevalence in Madeira Island (Portugal) population is important to clarify susceptibility and define the relevance of performing genetic tests for AAT on individuals at risk for COPD. Two hundred samples of unrelated individuals from Madeira Island were genotyped for the two most common AAT deficiency alleles, PI*S and PI*Z, using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Mediated Site-Directed Mutagenesis. Our results show one of the highest frequencies for both mutations when compared to any already studied population in the world. In fact, PI*S mutation has the highest prevalence (18%), and PI*Z mutation (2.5%) was the third highest worldwide. The frequency of AAT deficiency genotypes in Madeira (PI*ZZ, PI*SS, and PI*SZ) is estimated to be the highest in the world: 41 per 1000. This high prevalence of AAT deficiency on Madeira Island reveals an increased genetic susceptibility to COPD and suggests a routine genetic testing for individuals at risk.

  3. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency-Associated Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Family Perspective.

    PubMed

    Anzueto, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) is a genetic condition that can lead to the early onset of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a disorder that comprises elements of chronic bronchitis and emphysema. AATD is characterized by reduced levels of the AAT protease inhibitor, leading to unrestricted protease activity in the lung, which promotes destruction of lung tissue. In severe cases, patients with AATD have an increased mortality risk and, potentially, a poor quality of life due to more frequent COPD exacerbations and/or limitations on daily activity. However, the burden of AATD on members of the patient's immediate family who may serve as caregivers has not been described. Because the age range at which most patients are diagnosed with AATD may affect the economic status of an individual and/or of a family, it is likely that a diagnosis of AATD may have negative effects that extend beyond those on the diagnosed person to include immediate family members. Here, we review the literature to investigate the impact of the caregiver role of family members in disease states that affect an age group similar to AATD. Furthermore, we provide a case study showing the effect of AATD on immediate family members.

  4. Effect of expectoration on inflammation in induced sputum in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Simon; Hill, Adam T; Bayley, Darren L; Stockley, Robert A

    2006-06-01

    It is unclear how chronic expectoration influences airway inflammation in patients with chronic lung disease. The aim of this study was to investigate factors influencing inflammation in induced sputum samples, including, in particular, chronic sputum production. Myeloperoxidase, interleukin-8, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), neutrophil elastase, secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI) and protein leakage were compared in induced sputum samples from 48 patients (36 with chronic expectoration) with COPD (with and without alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency; AATD), 9 individuals with AATD but without lung disease and 14 healthy controls. There were no differences in inflammation in induced sputum samples from healthy control subjects and from AATD deficient patients with normal lung function but without chronic expectoration (P>0.05). Inflammation in induced sputum from AATD patients with airflow obstruction and chronic sputum expectoration was significantly greater than for similar patients who did not expectorate: Interleukin-8 (P<0.01), elastase activity (P=0.01), and protein leakage (P<0.01). The presence of spontaneous sputum expectoration in AATD patients with airflow obstruction was associated with increased neutrophilic airway inflammation in induced sputum samples. The presence of chronic expectoration in some patients will clearly complicate interpretation of studies employing sputum induction where this feature has not been identified.

  5. Development of predictive models for airflow obstruction in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Castaldi, P J; DeMeo, D L; Kent, D M; Campbell, E J; Barker, A F; Brantly, M L; Eden, E; McElvaney, N G; Rennard, S I; Stocks, J M; Stoller, J K; Strange, C; Turino, G; Sandhaus, R A; Griffith, J L; Silverman, E K

    2009-10-15

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic condition associated with severe, early-onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there is significant variability in lung function impairment among persons with the protease inhibitor ZZ genotype. Early identification of persons at highest risk of developing lung disease could be beneficial in guiding monitoring and treatment decisions. Using a multicenter, family-based study sample (2002-2005) of 372 persons with the protease inhibitor ZZ genotype, the authors developed prediction models for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) and the presence of severe COPD using demographic, clinical, and genetic variables. Half of the data sample was used for model development, and the other half was used for model validation. In the training sample, variables found to be predictive of both FEV(1) and severe COPD were age, sex, pack-years of smoking, bronchodilator responsiveness, chronic bronchitis symptoms, and index case status. In the validation sample, the predictive model for FEV(1) explained 50% of the variance in FEV(1), and the model for severe COPD exhibited excellent discrimination (c statistic = 0.88).

  6. Acid Denaturation of alpha1-antitrypsin: characterization of a novel mechanism of serpin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Glyn L; Chow, Michelle K M; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Bottomley, Stephen P

    2002-12-06

    The native serpin architecture is extremely sensitive to mutation and environmental factors. These factors induce the formation of a partially folded species that results in the production of inactive loop-sheet polymers. The deposition of these aggregates in tissue, results in diseases such as liver cirrhosis, thrombosis, angioedema and dementia. In this study, we characterize the kinetics and conformational changes of alpha(1)-antitrypsin polymerization at pH 4 using tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism, turbidity changes and thioflavin T binding. These biophysical techniques have demonstrated that polymerization begins with a reversible conformational change that results in partial loss of secondary structure and distortion at the top of beta-sheet A. This is followed by two bimolecular processes. First, protodimers are formed, which can be dissociated by changing the pH back to 8. Then, an irreversible conformational change occurs, resulting in the stabilization of the dimers with a concomitant increase in beta-sheet structure, allowing for subsequent polymer extension. Electron microscopy analysis of the polymers, coupled with the far-UV CD and thioflavin T properties of the pH 4 polymers suggest they do not form via the classical loop-beta-sheet A linkage. However, they more closely resemble those formed by the pathological variant M(malton). Taken together, these data describe a novel kinetic mechanism of serine proteinase inhibitor polymerization.

  7. Intrapulmonary vascular remodeling: MSCT-based evaluation in COPD and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosnier, Adeline; Fetita, Catalin; Thabut, Gabriel; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-03-01

    Whether COPD is generally known as a small airway disease, recent investigations suggest that vascular remodeling could play a key role in disease progression. This paper develops a specific investigation framework in order to evaluate the remodeling of the intrapulmonary vascular network and its correlation with other image or clinical parameters (emphysema score or FEV1) in patients with smoking- or genetic- (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency - AATD) related COPD. The developed approach evaluates the vessel caliber distribution per lung or lung region (upper, lower, 10%- and 20%- periphery) in relation with the severity of the disease and computes a remodeling marker given by the area under the caliber distribution curve for radii less than 1.6mm, AUC16. It exploits a medial axis analysis in relation with local caliber information computed in the segmented vascular network, with values normalized with respect to the lung volume (for which a robust segmentation is developed). The first results obtained on a 34-patient database (13 COPD, 13 AATD and 8 controls) showed significant vascular remodeling for COPD and AATD versus controls, with a negative correlation with the emphysema degree for COPD, but not for AATD. Significant vascular remodeling at 20% lung periphery was found both for the severe COPD and AATD patients, but not for the moderate groups. Also the vascular remodeling in AATD did not correlate with the FEV1, nor with DLCO, which might suggest independent mechanisms for bronchial and vascular remodeling in the lung.

  8. SVIP regulates Z variant alpha-1 antitrypsin retro-translocation by inhibiting ubiquitin ligase gp78

    PubMed Central

    Khodayari, Nazli; Wang, Rejean liqun; Marek, George; Krotova, Karina; Kirst, Mariana; Liu, Chen; Rouhani, Farshid; Brantly, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is an inherited disorder characterized by early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common disease-causing mutation is a single amino acid substitution (Glu/Lys) at amino acid 342 of the mature protein, resulting in disruption of the 290–342 salt bridge (an electrophoretic abnormality defining the mutation [Z allele, or ZAAT]), protein misfolding, polymerization, and accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and monocytes. The Z allele causes a toxic gain of function, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase gp78 promotes degradation and increased solubility of endogenous ZAAT. We hypothesized that the accumulation of ZAAT is influenced by modulation of gp78 E3 ligase and SVIP (small VCP-interacting protein) interaction with p97/VCP in ZAAT-expressing hepatocytes. We showed that the SVIP inhibitory effect on ERAD due to overexpression causes the accumulation of ZAAT in a human Z hepatocyte–like cell line (AT01). Overexpression of gp78, as well as SVIP suppression, induces gp78-VCP/p97 interaction in AT01 cells. This interaction leads to retro-translocation of ZAAT and reduction of the SVIP inhibitory role in ERAD. In this context, overexpression of gp78 or SVIP suppression may eliminate the toxic gain of function associated with polymerization of ZAAT, thus providing a potential new therapeutic approach to the treatment of AATD. PMID:28301499

  9. Development and results of the Spanish registry of patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Beatriz; de la Roza, Cristian; Vilà, Sara; Vidal, Rafael; Miravitlles, Marc

    2007-01-01

    The Spanish registry of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency was founded in 1993 and became a member of the International Registry (AIR) in 1999. We describe the updating process following its incorporation into AIR and compare the data collected in the first period (1993–1999) and the second period (1999–2005), during which time patients were included exclusively by internet. The registry included 301 patients during period 1, 69% males and 46% had a history of smoking. Their mean age was 46 years (SD = 13) and 284 (94%) had the ZZ phenotype, 49% received augmentation therapy. During period 2, 161 new cases were included, 63% of whom were males with a mean age of 44 years (SD = 16). A total of 126 (78%) had the ZZ phenotype. Only 12% received augmentation therapy. A total of 462 different patients were included in both periods. Significant differences were observed in the number of cases with the SZ phenotype and the severity of FEV1 impairment between the two periods. Implementation of an internet-based collection of data did not result in a lower rate of reporting to the registry. However, data from a significant number of patient included in period 1 could not be actualized in the new data base. PMID:18229578

  10. Alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency alleles are associated with joint dislocation and scoliosis in Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Colleen A.; Pani, Ariel M.; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Rios, Cecilia M.; Kistler, Doris J.; Gregg, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Elastin haploinsufficiency is responsible for a significant portion of the Williams syndrome (WS) phenotype including hoarse voice, supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS), hernias, diverticuli of bowel and bladder, soft skin, and joint abnormalities. All of the connective tissue signs and symptoms are variable in the WS population, but few factors other than age and gender are known to influence the phenotype. We examined a cohort of 205 individuals with WS for mutations in SERPINA1, the gene that encodes alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), the inhibitor of elastase. Individuals with classic WS deletions and SERPINA1 genotypes PiMS or PiMZ were more likely than those with a SERPINA1 PiMM genotype to have joint dislocation or scoliosis. However, carrier status for AAT deficiency was not correlated with presence of inguinal hernia or with presence or severity of SVAS. These findings suggest that genes important in elastin metabolism are candidates for variability in the connective tissue abnormalities in WS. PMID:20425789

  11. Alpha1-antitrypsin heterozygosity plays a positive role in attainment of longevity.

    PubMed

    Listì, Florinda; Candore, Giuseppina; Grimaldi, Maria Paola; Lio, Domenico; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Orlando, Valentina; Caruso, Marco; Hoffmann, Enrico; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Franceschi, Claudio; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-04-01

    Genes involved in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) play an opposite role in human longevity. The alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) is a serine-protease inhibitor required for the prevention of proteolytic tissue damage, by neutrophil elastase. The role of AAT in CVD has not been definitively assessed and its effect on longevity has not yet fully been studied. To clarify these points, we have studied the distribution of AAT allele variants in 3 cohorts: 127 young patients affected by acute myocardial infarction (AMI), 255 young controls and 143 centenarians from Sicily. The Z allele frequency was most frequent in centenarians (13.3%), intermediate in healthy young controls (3.1%) and less frequent in AMI patients (1.2%) (P = 0.0000001). The heterozygous MZ genotype was significantly over represented in centenarians (38/143) and under represented in AMI patients (3/127) with intermediate values in young controls (16/255) (P = 0.0000001). After adjustment for well-recognized AMI risk factors, the MZ genotype still predicted a significant negative risk factor for developing AMI in the Sicilian population. Thus, our data show a positive role of MZ heterozygosity in attainment of successful ageing linked to the positive effects of this genotype versus the cardiovascular ischemic diseases.

  12. Delayed diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency following post-hepatectomy liver failure: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Benjamin; Denson, Jemimah; Briggs, Christopher; Bowles, Matthew; Stell, David; Aroori, Somaiah

    2016-01-01

    Post-hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality following major liver resection. The development of PHLF is dependent on the volume of the remaining liver tissue and hepatocyte function. Without effective pre-operative assessment, patients with undiagnosed liver disease could be at increased risk of PHLF. We report a case of a 60-year-old male patient with PHLF secondary to undiagnosed alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) following major liver resection. He initially presented with acute large bowel obstruction secondary to a colorectal adenocarcinoma, which had metastasized to the liver. There was no significant past medical history apart from mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. After colonic surgery and liver directed neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, he underwent a laparoscopic partially extended right hepatectomy and radio-frequency ablation. Post-operatively he developed PHLF. The cause of PHLF remained unknown, prompting re-analysis of the histology, which showed evidence of AATD. He subsequently developed progressive liver dysfunction, portal hypertension, and eventually an extensive parastomal bleed, which led to his death; this was ultimately due to a combination of AATD and chemotherapy. This case highlights that formal testing for AATD in all patients with a known history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heavy smoking, or strong family history could help prevent the development of PHLF in patients undergoing major liver resection. PMID:27004008

  13. Bile Duct Ligation Induces ATZ Globule Clearance In a Mouse Model of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zahida; Yokota, Shinichiro; Ono, Yoshihiro; Bell, Aaron W.; Stolz, Donna B.; Michalopoulos, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; however, not all patients are susceptible to severe liver disease. In A1ATD, a toxic gain-of-function mutation generates insoluble ATZ “globules” in hepatocytes, overwhelming protein clearance mechanisms. The relationship between bile acids and hepatocytic autophagy is less clear, but may involve altered gene expression pathways. Based on previous findings that bile duct ligation (BDL) induces autophagy, we hypothesized that retained bile acids may have hepatoprotective effects in PiZZ transgenic mice, which model A1ATD. Methods We performed BDL and partial BDL (pBDL) in PiZZ mice, followed by analysis of liver tissues. Results PiZZ liver subjected to BDL showed up to 50% clearance of ATZ globules, with increased expression of autophagy proteins. Analysis of transcription factors revealed significant changes. Surprisingly nuclear TFEB, a master regulator of autophagy, remained unchanged. pBDL confirmed that ATZ globule clearance was induced by localized stimuli rather than diet or systemic effects. Several genes involved in bile metabolism were over-expressed in globule-devoid hepatocytes, compared to globule-containing cells. Conclusions Retained bile acids led to a dramatic reduction of ATZ globules, with enhanced hepatocyte regeneration and autophagy. These findings support investigation of synthetic bile acids as potential autophagy-enhancing agents. PMID:27938510

  14. [Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Affects U0126-Induced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cell Line (HCT116)].

    PubMed

    Ljujic, M; Mijatovic, S; Bulatovic, M Z; Mojic, M; Maksimovic-Ivanic, D; Radojkovic, D; Topic, A

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein, is the principal circulatory anti-protease. This multifunctional protein is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. Although AAT was recognised as a potential tumour marker, its role in cancer biology remains unknown. Given that it has been demonstrated that AAT has an anti-apoptotic property against non-malignant cells, we aimed to investigate whether AAT affects apoptosis in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116). The presence of AAT in the HCT116 cell culture antagonized cytotoxicity of blockers of MEK1/2, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as NF-κB. The dominantly recovered cell viability was observed in the co-treatment with MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. In addition, it was revealed that AAT almost completely abolished U0126-induced apoptosis through maintenance of the autophagy process. Our study revealed for the first time that the observed cyto-protection triggered by AAT was accompanied by sustained autophagy which opposed apoptosis. These results may contribute to understanding of the role of AAT in cancer development and evaluation of efficacy of cancer therapy.

  15. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Prevents the Development of Preeclampsia Through Suppression of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaling; Xu, Jianjuan; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Rong; Liu, Nin; Wu, Yanqun; Yuan, Hua; Che, Haisha

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) and its complications have become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the world. And the development of PE is still barely predictable and thus challenging to prevent and manage clinically. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of the disease. Our previous study demonstrated that exogenous Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) played a cytoprotective role in vascular endothelial cell by suppressing oxidative stress. In this study, we aim to investigate whether AAT contributes to the development of PE, and to identify the mechanism behind these effects. We found that AAT levels were significantly decreased in placenta tissues from women with PE compared that of healthy women. Notably, we demonstrate that AAT injection is able to relieve the high blood pressure and reduce urine protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in PE mice. In addition, our results showed that AAT injection exhibited an anti-oxidative stress role by significantly reducing PE mediated-upregulation of ROS, MMP9 and MDA, and increasing the levels of SOD, eNOS, and GPx with increased dosage of AAT. Furthermore, we found that AAT injection inactivated PE mediated activation of PAK/STAT1/p38 signaling. These findings were confirmed in human samples. In conclusion, our study suggests that exogenous AAT injection increases the antioxidants and suppresses oxidative stress, and subsequent prevention of PE development through inactivation of STAT1/p38 signaling. Thus, AAT would become a potential strategy for PE therapy.

  16. Three missense variants of metabolic syndrome-related genes are associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin levels.

    PubMed

    Setoh, Kazuya; Terao, Chikashi; Muro, Shigeo; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Meiko; Nakayama, Takeo; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Yamada, Ryo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2015-07-15

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) encoded by SERPINA1 is an acute-phase inflammation marker, and AAT deficiency (AATD) is known as one of the common genetic disorders in European populations. However, no genetic determinants to AAT levels apart from the SERPINA gene clusters have been identified to date. Here we perform a genome-wide association study of serum AAT levels followed by a two-staged replication study recruiting a total of 9,359 Japanese community-dwelling population. Three missense variants of metabolic syndrome-related genes, namely, rs671 in ALDH2, rs1169288 in HNF1A and rs1260326 in GCKR, significantly associate with AAT levels (P≤1.5 × 10(-12)). Previous reports have shown the functional relevance of ALDH2 and HNF1A to AAT. We observe a significant interaction of rs671 and alcohol consumption on AAT levels. We confirm the association between AAT and rs2896268 in SERPINA1, which is independent of known causative variants of AATD. These findings would support various AAT functions including metabolic processes.

  17. Historical role of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in respiratory and hepatic complications.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Li; Pannell, Benjamin K; Zhou, Tingyang; Chuang, Chia-Chen

    2016-09-10

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a heritable disease that is commonly associated with complications in the respiratory and hepatic systems. AAT acts as a regulatory enzyme that primarily inhibits neutrophil elastase activity thus protecting tissues from proteolytic damage after inflammation. This paper provides a historical review of the discovery, classification, phenotypic expression, and treatment of AAT deficiency. While its pattern of inheritance has been long understood, the underlying mechanism between AAT deficiency and related diseases remains to be elucidated. Most commonly, AAT deficiency is associated with the development of emphysema in the lungs as well as various liver injuries. Cigarette smoke has been shown to be particularly detrimental in AAT deficient individuals during the development of lung disease. Therefore, understanding familial history may be beneficial when educating patients regarding lifestyle choices. While numerous AAT deficient phenotypes exist in the human populations, only specific variants have been proven to markedly predispose individuals to lung and liver disorders. The exact relationship between AAT levels and the aforementioned diseases is an essential area of further research. It is imperative that clinicians and researchers alike strive to standardize diagnostic criteria and develop safe and effective therapies for this genetic disease.

  18. Alpha-1 antitrypsin inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and functions.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Mohammad Ahsanul; Nardo, David; Chen, Mong-Jen; Elshikha, Ahmed S; Ahamed, Rubina; Elsayed, Eslam M; Bigot, Claire; Holliday, Lexie Shannon; Song, Sihong

    2017-03-21

    Osteoporosis is a global public health problem affecting more than 200 million people worldwide. We previously showed that treatment with alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a multifunctional protein with anti-inflammatory properties, mitigated bone loss in an ovariectomized mouse model. However, the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect of AAT on bone tissue are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of AAT on osteoclast formation and function in vitro. Our results showed that AAT dose-dependently inhibited the formation of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand) induced osteoclasts derived from mouse bone marrow macrophages/monocyte (BMM) lineage cells and the murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7 cells. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms underlying this inhibition, we tested the effect of AAT on the gene expression of cell surface molecules, transcription factors, and cytokines associated with osteoclast formation. We showed that AAT inhibited M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor) induced cell surface RANK expression in osteoclast precursor cells. In addition, AAT inhibited RANKL-induced TNF-α production, cell surface CD9 expression, and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) gene expression. Importantly, AAT treatment significantly inhibited osteoclast-associated mineral resorption. Together, these results uncovered new mechanisms for the protective effects of AAT and strongly support the notion that AAT has therapeutic potential for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  19. Alternative transcripts of the SERPINA1 gene in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Matamala, Nerea; Martínez, Maria Teresa; Lara, Beatriz; Pérez, Laura; Vázquez, Irene; Jimenez, Azucena; Barquín, Miguel; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Blanco, Ignacio; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Martinez-Delgado, Beatriz

    2015-07-04

    SERPINA1 is the gene for alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein with anti-protease and immunoregulatory activities. Mutations in SERPINA1 gene cause AAT deficiency and predispose individuals to early-onset emphysema and liver diseases. Expression of the SERPINA1 gene is regulated by different promoters and alternative splicing events among non-coding exons 1A, 1B and 1C. We have developed three quantitative PCR (QT-PCR) assays (1A, 1B and 1C). These assays were applied for the analysis of SERPINA1 alternative transcripts in: (1) 16 human tissues and (2) peripheral blood leukocytes from 33 subjects with AAT mutations and 7 controls. Tissue-specific expression was found for the SERPINA1 transcripts. The 1A transcripts were mainly expressed in leukocytes and lung tissue while those detected with the 1B assay were highly restricted to leukocytes. Only 1B transcripts significantly correlated with serum AAT levels. The 1C transcripts were specifically found in lung, liver, kidney and pancreas. Furthermore, the expression of transcripts was related to AAT genotypes. While deficient variants of AAT had no pronounced effect on the transcript expression, null alleles were associated with significant reduction of different transcripts. The possibility to discriminate between SERPINA1 alternative splicing products will help us to understand better the regulation of SERPINA1 gene and its association with SERPINA1 mutations-related diseases.

  20. Pulmonary vasculature directed adenovirus increases epithelial lining fluid alpha-1 antitrypsin levels.

    PubMed

    Buggio, Maurizio; Towe, Christopher; Annan, Anand; Kaliberov, Sergey; Lu, Zhi Hong; Stephens, Calvin; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Curiel, David T

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy for inherited serum deficiency disorders has previously been limited by the balance between obtaining adequate expression and causing hepatic toxicity. Our group has previously described modifications of a replication deficient human adenovirus serotype 5 that increase pulmonary vasculature transgene expression. In the present study, we use a modified pulmonary targeted adenovirus to express human alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) in C57BL/6 J mice. Using the targeted adenovirus, we were able to achieve similar increases in serum A1AT levels with less liver viral uptake. We also increased pulmonary epithelial lining fluid A1AT levels by more than an order of magnitude compared to that of untargeted adenovirus expressing A1AT in a mouse model. These gains are achieved along with evidence of decreased systemic inflammation and no evidence for increased inflammation within the vector-targeted end organ. In addition to comprising a step towards clinically viable gene therapy for A1AT, maximization of protein production at the site of action represents a significant technical advancement in the field of systemically delivered pulmonary targeted gene therapy. It also provides an alternative to the previous limitations of hepatic viral transduction and associated toxicities. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Costs and health-related quality of life in Alpha-1-Antitrypsin Deficient COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Karl, Florian M; Holle, Rolf; Bals, Robert; Greulich, Timm; Jörres, Rudolf A; Karch, Annika; Koch, Armin; Karrasch, Stefan; Leidl, Reiner; Schulz, Holger; Vogelmeier, Claus; Wacker, Margarethe E

    2017-04-17

    Alpha-1-Antitrypsin Deficiency (AATD) is an economically unexplored genetic disease. Direct and indirect costs (based on self-reported information on healthcare utilization) and health-related quality of life (HRQL, as assessed by SGRQ, CAT, and EQ-5D-3 L) were compared between 131 AATD patients (106 with, 25 without augmentation therapy (AT)) and 2,049 COPD patients without AATD participating in the COSYCONET COPD cohort. The medication costs of AT were excluded from all analyses to reveal differences associated with morbidity profiles. The association of AATD (with/without AT) with costs or HRQL was examined using generalized linear regression modelling (GLM) adjusting for age, sex, GOLD grade, BMI, smoking status, education and comorbidities. Adjusted mean direct annual costs were €6,099 in AATD patients without AT, €7,117 in AATD patients with AT (excluding costs for AT), and €7,460 in COPD patients without AATD. AATD with AT was significantly associated with higher outpatient (+273%) but lower inpatient (-35%) and medication costs (-10%, disregarding AT) compared with COPD patients without AATD. There were no significant differences between groups regarding indirect costs and HRQL. Apart from AT costs, AATD patients tended to have lower, though not significant, overall costs and similar HRQL compared to COPD patients without AATD. AT was not associated with lower costs or higher HRQL. NCT01245933.

  2. Early Access Program Using Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Infusion for Patients With Steroid Refractory Acute GvHD After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-29

    SR aGvHD; Acute-graft-versus-host Disease; Steroid Refractory Acute Graft Versus Host Disease; Graft-versus-host-disease; Graft Vs Host Disease; Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency; Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor; Alpha-1 Protease Inhibitor Deficiency; Acute Graft-Versus-Host Reaction Following Bone Marrow Transplant

  3. [Relationship between serum levels of C-reactive protein and alpha1-antitrypsin and insulin resistance in obese women].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Alvarado, María Matilde; Sánchez Roitz, César

    2014-09-01

    Adipose tissue produces cytokines involved in insulin resistance (IR) such as IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha and proinflammatory molecules such as C reactive protein (CRP). alpha1-antitrypsin is an inflammation-sensitive plasma protein. The objective of this study is to determine the correlation between serum CRP high-sensitivity (CRPhs) and alpha1-antitrypsin levels with IR indices in obese Venezuelan women. The study population consisted of 15 normal weight women (BMI 21.8 +/- 1.9 kg/m2) and 15 obese women (BMI 35.3 +/- 5.3 kg/m2). Obese and lean women underwent a 2 h-75 g oral glucose tolerance test and the following indices were calculated: homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), homeostatic model assessment of beta cell function (HOMA-beta), Matsuda Index and Insulinogenic Index. The relationship between serum CRPhs and alpha1-antitrypsin levels and these indices were determined. Obese women had higher CRPhs levels (p = 0.001) compared with normal weight women. In obese women, serum CRPhs levels were positively correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.73, p = 0.0021), HOMA-beta (r = 0.53, p = 0.031) and negatively correlated with the Matsuda Index (r = -0.60, p = 0.017). No correlation between serum levels of alpha1-antitrypsin and IR indices in the obese group and the lean group was observed. There was a relation between serum CRPhs levels and insulin resistance, suggesting a role of subclinical inflammation in IR.

  4. Discovery of an Inhibitor of Z-Alpha1 Antitrypsin Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelier, Valerie; Harris, Jason Brett; Estenson, Kasey Noel; Baudry, Jerome; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-05-11

    Polymerization of the Z variant alpha-1-antitrypsin (Z-α1AT) results in the most common and severe form of α1AT deficiency (α1ATD), a debilitating genetic disorder whose clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to fatal liver and/or lung disease. As the altered conformation of Z-α1AT and its attendant aggregation are responsible for pathogenesis, the polymerization process per se has become a major target for the development of therapeutics. Based on the ability of Z-alpha 1AT to aggregate by recruiting the reactive center loop (RCL) of another Z-α1AT into its s4A cavity, we developed a high-throughput screening assay that uses a modified 6-mer peptide mimicking the RCL to screen for inhibitors of Z-α1AT polymer growth. We used a subset of compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) with molecular weights ranging from 300 to 700 Da, to evaluate the assay's capabilities. The inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine was identified as a lead compound and its ability to prevent Z-α1AT polymerization confirmed by secondary assays. In order to further investigate the binding location of S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine, an in silico strategy was pursued and the intermediate alpha 1AT M* state modeled to allow molecular docking simulations and explore various potential binding sites. Docking results predict that S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine can bind at the s4A cavity and at the edge of beta-sheet A. The former binding site would directly block RCL insertion whereas the latter site would prevent beta-sheet A from expanding between s3A/s5A, and thus indirectly impede RCL insertion. Our investigations have revealed a novel compound that inhibits the formation of Z-α1AT polymers, as well as in vitro and in silico strategies for identifying and characterizing additional blocking molecules of Z-α1AT polymerization.

  5. Discovery of an Inhibitor of Z-Alpha1 Antitrypsin Polymerization

    DOE PAGES

    Berthelier, Valerie; Harris, Jason Brett; Estenson, Kasey Noel; ...

    2015-05-11

    Polymerization of the Z variant alpha-1-antitrypsin (Z-α1AT) results in the most common and severe form of α1AT deficiency (α1ATD), a debilitating genetic disorder whose clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to fatal liver and/or lung disease. As the altered conformation of Z-α1AT and its attendant aggregation are responsible for pathogenesis, the polymerization process per se has become a major target for the development of therapeutics. Based on the ability of Z-alpha 1AT to aggregate by recruiting the reactive center loop (RCL) of another Z-α1AT into its s4A cavity, we developed a high-throughput screening assay that uses a modified 6-mer peptide mimickingmore » the RCL to screen for inhibitors of Z-α1AT polymer growth. We used a subset of compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) with molecular weights ranging from 300 to 700 Da, to evaluate the assay's capabilities. The inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine was identified as a lead compound and its ability to prevent Z-α1AT polymerization confirmed by secondary assays. In order to further investigate the binding location of S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine, an in silico strategy was pursued and the intermediate alpha 1AT M* state modeled to allow molecular docking simulations and explore various potential binding sites. Docking results predict that S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine can bind at the s4A cavity and at the edge of beta-sheet A. The former binding site would directly block RCL insertion whereas the latter site would prevent beta-sheet A from expanding between s3A/s5A, and thus indirectly impede RCL insertion. Our investigations have revealed a novel compound that inhibits the formation of Z-α1AT polymers, as well as in vitro and in silico strategies for identifying and characterizing additional blocking molecules of Z-α1AT polymerization.« less

  6. Alpha-1 antitrypsin, retinol binding protein and keratin 10 alterations in patients with psoriasis vulgaris, a proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Sadegh; Kazemipour, Nasrin; Hashemi, Mohammad; Sepehrimanesh, Masood

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that appears on the skin. Although psoriasis is clinically and histologically well characterized, its pathogenesis is unknown in detail. The aims of this study were to evaluate the proteome of psoriatic patients' sera and to compare them with those of normal healthy human to find valuable biomarkers. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, twenty cases of white patients with psoriasis vulgaris, 10 males and 10 females and sixteen healthy controls, 8 males and 8 females were enrolled in the study. The serum protein expression patterns obtained after depletion of albumin were compared by using two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to MALDI/TOF-TOF to identify disease associated proteins. Results: Differential expression of nine protein spots representing four unique proteins including alpha-1 antitrypsin, retinol binding protein, keratin 10 and an unknown protein (with pI 6.47 and molecular weight of 19941 Da), between psoriatic and healthy human serum were found. Furthermore, expression of four new alpha-1 antitrypsin isoforms with different molecular weight and isoelectric point were observed in psoriatic serums in this research for the first time. Conclusion: A unique proteomic profiling with abnormal expression of alpha-1 antitrypsin and presence of keratin 10 in sera of psoriasis patients were observed that may constitute new and useful findings of psoriasis and offer a clue to a better understanding of the inflammatory pathway. PMID:25691940

  7. Gastric clearance of alpha-1-antitrypsin under cimetidine perfusion. New test to detect protein-losing gastropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Florent, C.; Vidon, N.; Flourie, B.; Carmantrand, A.; Zerbani, A.; Maurel, M.; Bernier, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Gastric losses of plasma are usually measured with radiolabeled macromolecules. This method is expensive and cumbersome. Direct measurement of exudated plasma proteins are ineffective since proteins are denaturated by acidic gastric juice and pepsin. It was recently shown that albumin measurement after immediate neutralization allowed detection of gastric protein losses, but this method is quite complex and time consuming. We studied alpha 1-antitrypsin and 51Cr-labeled protein clearance in gastric juice during normal saline and cimetidine (1.5 mg/kg/hr) infusion in six healthy volunteers and six patients with exudative gastropathy. alpha 1-Antitrypsin was measurable in all samples during cimetidine infusion: alpha 1-AT and 51Cr losses were significantly correlated (P less than 0.001). The upper limit of gastric alpha 1-AT clearance in controls was 0.86 ml/hr (mean + 2 SD). Using this value, there was no overlapping between patients and controls. The upper limit of 51Cr test was 1.87 ml/hr (mean + 2 SD) in controls but gastric clearance of 51Cr was below this value in one patient. This suggests that the measurement of alpha 1-AT gastric clearance during cimetidine perfusion is a good test to detect an exudative gastropathy. This test is inexpensive and lasts only 3 hr.

  8. Reduction of the elastase inhibitory capacity of alpha 1-antitrypsin by peroxides in cigarette smoke: an analysis of brands and filters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.B.; James, H.L.

    1982-07-01

    A procedure for measuring the oxidant content of aqueous condensates of tobacco cigarette smoke is described. The procedure was used in conjunction with analysis of the ability of the smoke solutions to inactivate the elastase inhibitory capacity (EIC) of alpha 1-antitrypsin. The ability of the smoke of a brand to inactivate alpha 1-antitrypsin correlates well with the known tar and nicotine and with the amount of oxidants as measured using o-dianisidine. Filters were found to remove about 73% of the oxidants from smoke. Smoke from a commercial nontobacco cigarette was also found to contain a significant amount of oxidants and to also destroy alpha 1-antitrypsin. Catalase and superoxide dismutase reduce the effect of solutions containing smoke on the EIC of alpha 1-antitrypsin, suggesting that peroxides and superoxide anions in smoke contribute to the oxidant capacity of the smoke. The extent of apparent oxidation by a given quantity of smoke condensate increases for as long as an hour from the time the condensate is collected. The addition of hydrogen peroxide to the smoke solution increases both its oxidant content and its ability to inactivate alpha 1-antitrypsin. These data suggest that occurrence of hydrogen peroxide caused by secretion from macrophages found in the small airways of smokers may contribute to a locally damaging environment for alpha 1-antitrypsin in the presence of cigarette smoke that could promote the development of centrilobular emphysema.

  9. Alpha1-Antitrypsin Attenuates Renal Fibrosis by Inhibiting TGF-β1-Induced Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang-Hee; Ryu, Hye-Myung; Oh, Eun-Joo; Yook, Ju-Min; Ahn, Ji-Sun; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Choi, Ji-Young; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Kim, Chan-Duck

    2016-01-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) exerts its anti-inflammatory effect through regulating the activity of serine proteinases. This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of AAT against the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO) mice and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. C57BL/6 mice with induced UUO were injected intraperitoneally with AAT (80 mg/Kg) or vehicle for 7 days. MDCK cells were treated with TGF-β1 (2 ng/mL) for 48 hours to induce EMT, and co-treated with AAT (10 mg/mL) to inhibit the EMT. Masson’s trichrome and Sirius red staining was used to estimate the extent of renal fibrosis in UUO mice. The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), vimentin, fibronectin, collagen I, and E-cadherin in MDCK cells and kidney tissue were evaluated. Masson’s and Sirius red staining revealed that the area of renal fibrosis was significantly smaller in AAT treated UUO group compared with that of UUO and vehicle treated UUO groups. AAT treatment attenuated upregulation of Smad2/3 phosphorylation in UUO mouse model. Co-treatment of MDCK cells with TGF-β1 and AAT significantly attenuated the changes in the expression of α-SMA, vimentin, fibronectin, collagen I, and E-cadherin. AAT also decreased the phosphorylated Smad3 expression and the phosphorylated Smad3/Smad3 ratio in MDCK cells. AAT treatment inhibited EMT induced by TGF-β1 in MDCK cells and attenuated renal fibrosis in the UUO mouse model. The results of this work suggest that AAT could inhibit the process of EMT through the suppression of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling. PMID:27607429

  10. Mutant p53 upregulates alpha-1 antitrypsin expression and promotes invasion in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shakya, R; Tarulli, G A; Sheng, L; Lokman, N A; Ricciardelli, C; Pishas, K I; Selinger, C I; Kohonen-Corish, M R J; Cooper, W A; Turner, A G; Neilsen, P M; Callen, D F

    2017-04-03

    Missense mutations in the TP53 tumor-suppressor gene inactivate its antitumorigenic properties and endow the incipient cells with newly acquired oncogenic properties that drive invasion and metastasis. Although the oncogenic effect of mutant p53 transcriptome has been widely acknowledged, the global influence of mutant p53 on cancer cell proteome remains to be fully elucidated. Here, we show that mutant p53 drives the release of invasive extracellular factors (the ‘secretome’) that facilitates the invasion of lung cancer cell lines. Proteomic characterization of the secretome from mutant p53-inducible H1299 human non-small cell lung cancer cell line discovered that the mutant p53 drives its oncogenic pathways through modulating the gene expression of numerous targets that are subsequently secreted from the cells. Of these genes, alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) was identified as a critical effector of mutant p53 that drives invasion in vitro and in vivo, together with induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition markers expression. Mutant p53 upregulated A1AT transcriptionally through the involvement with its family member p63. Conditioned medium containing secreted A1AT enhanced cell invasion, while an A1AT-blocking antibody attenuated the mutant p53-driven migration and invasion. Importantly, high A1AT expression correlated with increased tumor stage, elevated p53 staining and shorter overall survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients. Collectively, these findings suggest that A1AT is an indispensable target of mutant p53 with prognostic and therapeutic potential in mutant p53-expressing tumors. Oncogene advance online publication, 3 April 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.66.

  11. Heterozygosity for the alpha1-antitrypsin Z allele may confer genetic risk of cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mihalache, F; Höblinger, A; Grünhage, F; Krawczyk, M; Gärtner, B C; Acalovschi, M; Sauerbruch, T; Lammert, F; Zimmer, V

    2011-02-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (α1AT) deficiency caused by Z allele homozygosity represents a well-established risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous studies have also implicated α1AT Z heterozygosity in cholangiocarcinogenesis. To assess the 'common' Z and S alleles as well as the promoter variant rs8004738 for association with cholangiocarcinoma. We genotyped 182 Caucasian patients and 350 controls for rs28929474 (Z), rs17580 (S) and the variant rs8004738. Exploratory analyses were performed in relation to gender and cholangiocarcinoma localisation. rs28929474 was significantly enriched in the cholangiocarcinoma group (4.1 vs. 1.7%; OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.14-5.32; Bonferroni corrected p(c) = 0.036), reinforced by Armitage trend testing (OR 2.53; p(c) = 0.032). The rs8004738 (promoter) minor allele tended to be overrepresented in Z heterozygotes (30.0 vs. 16.7%: P = 0.13). Exploratory data analyses suggested a high genetic risk for extrahepatic tumour localisation (OR 3.0; p(c) = 0.016) and potentially female Z allele carriers (OR 3.37; unadjusted P = 0.022, p(c) = 0.088). These data point to a novel role of α1AT Z heterozygosity as a potential genetic susceptibility factor for cholangiocarcinoma formation and suggest a contribution of aberrant α1AT function in biliary carcinogenesis. However, given the overall low rs28929474 minor allele frequency, larger studies are warranted to confirm and extend our findings. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Efficacy of alpha1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in conditions other than pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ignacio; Lara, Beatriz; de Serres, Frederick

    2011-04-12

    Up to now alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) augmentation therapy has been approved only for commercial use in selected adults with severe AAT deficiency-related pulmonary emphysema (i.e. PI*ZZ genotypes as well as combinations of Z, rare and null alleles expressing AAT serum concentrations <11 μmol/L). However, the compassionate use of augmentation therapy in recent years has proven outstanding efficacy in small cohorts of patients suffering from uncommon AAT deficiency-related diseases other than pulmonary emphysema, such as fibromyalgia, systemic vasculitis, relapsing panniculitis and bronchial asthma. Moreover, a series of preclinical studies provide evidence of the efficacy of AAT augmentation therapy in several infectious diseases, diabetes mellitus and organ transplant rejection. These facts have generated an expanding number of medical applications and patents with claims for other indications of AAT besides pulmonary emphysema. The aim of the present study is to compile and analyze both clinical and histological features of the aforementioned published case studies and reports where AAT augmentation therapy was used for conditions other than pulmonary emphysema. Particularly, our research refers to ten case reports and two clinical trials on AAT augmentation therapy in patients with both AAT deficiency and, at least, one of the following diseases: fibromyalgia, vasculitis, panniculitis and bronchial asthma. In all the cases, AAT was successfully applied whereas previous maximal conventional therapies had failed. In conclusion, laboratory studies in animals and humans as well as larger clinical trials should be, thus, performed in order to determine both the strong clinical efficacy and security of AAT in the treatment of conditions other than pulmonary emphysema.

  13. Aberrant disulphide bonding contributes to the ER retention of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency variants.

    PubMed

    Ronzoni, Riccardo; Berardelli, Romina; Medicina, Daniela; Sitia, Roberto; Gooptu, Bibek; Fra, Anna Maria

    2016-02-15

    Mutations in alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) can cause the protein to polymerise and be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes. The ensuing systemic AAT deficiency leads to pulmonary emphysema, while intracellular polymers are toxic and cause chronic liver disease. The severity of this process varies considerably between individuals, suggesting the involvement of mechanistic co-factors and potential for therapeutically beneficial interventions. We show in Hepa1.6 cells that the mildly polymerogenic I (Arg39Cys) AAT mutant forms aberrant inter- and intra-molecular disulphide bonds involving the acquired Cys39 and the only cysteine residue in the wild-type (M) sequence (Cys232). Substitution of Cys39 to serine partially restores secretion, showing that disulphide bonding contributes to the intracellular retention of I AAT. Covalent homodimers mediated by inter-Cys232 bonding alone are also observed in cells expressing the common Z and other polymerising AAT variants where conformational behaviour is abnormal, but not in those expressing M AAT. Prevention of such disulphide linkage through the introduction of the Cys232Ser mutation or by treatment of cells with reducing agents increases Z AAT secretion. Our results reveal that disulphide interactions enhance intracellular accumulation of AAT mutants and implicate the oxidative ER state as a pathogenic co-factor. Redox modulation, e.g. by anti-oxidant strategies, may therefore be beneficial in AAT deficiency-associated liver disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Human alpha 1-antitrypsin therapy induces fatal anaphylaxis in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y; Parker, M; Pileggi, A; Zhang, B; Choi, Y-K; Molano, R D; Wasserfall, C; Ricordi, C; Inverardi, L; Brantly, M; Schatz, D; Atkinson, M; Song, S

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) gene delivery prevents type 1 diabetes (T1D) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Furthermore, hAAT protein administration prolongs acceptance of islet allografts. Therefore, we evaluated the use of purified hAAT protein therapy to prevent T1D in NOD mice. Female NOD, non-obese resistant (NOR), Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with vehicle alone or vehicle containing hAAT, human albumin or mouse albumin (or mg/injection/mouse; 2×/week). Preparations of clinical-grade hAAT included API®, Aralast®, Prolastin® and Zemaira®. Surprisingly, hAAT administration was associated with a high rate of fatal anaphylaxis. In studies seeking T1D prevention at 4 weeks of age, 100% mice died after six injections of hAAT. When administrated at 8–10 weeks of age, most (80–100%) NOD mice died following the fourth injection of hAAT, while 0% of Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice and 10% of NOR mice died. Interestingly, repeated injections of human albumin, but not mouse albumin, also induced sudden death in NOD mice. Antibodies to hAAT were induced 2–3 weeks after hAAT administration and death was prevented by treatment with anti-platelet-activating factor along with anti-histamine. In studies of disease reversal in NOD mice, using the four pharmaceutical grade formulations of hAAT, anaphylactic deaths were observed with all hAAT preparations. The propensity for fatal anaphylaxis following antigenic administration appears to be NOD- but not hAAT-specific. The susceptibility of NOD mice to hypersensitivity provides a significant limitation for testing of hAAT. Development of strategies to avoid this unwanted response is required to use this promising therapeutic agent for T1D. PMID:18759852

  15. Do native and polymeric alpha1-antitrypsin activate human neutrophils in vitro?

    PubMed

    Persson, Caroline; Subramaniyam, Devipriya; Stevens, Tim; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2006-06-01

    alpha(1)-Antitrypsin (AAT)-Z deficiency is a risk factor for the development of COPD. Compared to wild-type M, AAT-Z has an increased tendency to polymerize, rendering it inactive as a serine proteinase inhibitor. It has been demonstrated that wild-type M- and Z-deficiency AAT polymers are chemotactic for human neutrophils. However, our own studies dispute a proinflammatory role for polymerized AAT-M and AAT-Z, suggesting rather that they are predominantly antiinflammatory, exhibiting inhibitory effects on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocyte activation. The discrepancies between these observations prompted us to re-examine the effects of AAT. The effects of native and polymerized AAT-M and AAT-Z with varying levels of endotoxin contamination (0.08 to 2.55 endotoxin units [EU]/mg protein) on human neutrophil chemotaxis and interleukin (IL)-8 release, in vitro, were evaluated. Neither native nor polymerized (M- or Z-deficient) AAT contaminated with low levels of endotoxin (/= 0.88 EU/mg protein), and significant chemotaxis occurred when AAT was spiked with either endotoxin or zymosan. In support, native and polymeric AAT-M with low endotoxin contamination completely inhibited neutrophil IL-8 release triggered by the zymosan, while AATs with high endotoxin contamination strongly induced IL-8 release and did not inhibit zymosan-stimulated IL-8 release. The proinflammatory effects of native and polymeric AAT may be critically dependent on the presence of other cell activators, bacterial or otherwise, while pure preparations of AAT appear to exert predominantly antiinflammatory activity.

  16. Alpha-1-antitrypsin monotherapy reduces graft-versus-host disease after experimental allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tawara, Isao; Sun, Yaping; Lewis, Eli C.; Toubai, Tomomi; Evers, Rebecca; Nieves, Evelyn; Azam, Tania; Dinarello, Charles A.; Reddy, Pavan

    2012-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a major complication that prevents successful outcomes after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), an effective therapy for hematological malignancies. Several studies demonstrate that donor T cells and host antigen-presenting cells along with several proinflammatory cytokines are required for the induction of GvHD and contribute to its severity. Increasing evidence demonstrates that human serum-derived αalpha-1- anti-trypsin (AAT) reduces production of proinflammatory cytokines, induces anti-inflammatory cytokines, and interferes with maturation of dendritic cells. Using well-characterized mouse models of BMT, we have studied the effects of AAT on GvHD severity. Administration of AAT early after BMT decreased mortality in three models of GvHD and reduced serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the allogeneic recipients compared with vehicle (albumin) treated animals. AAT treatment reduced the expansion of alloreactive T effector cells but enhanced the recovery of T regulatory T cells, (Tregs) thus altering the ratio of donor T effector to T regulatory cells in favor of reducing the pathological process. However, despite altering the ratio in vivo, AAT had no direct effects on either the donor T effector cells or T regulatory cells Tregs in vitro. In contrast, AAT suppressed LPS-induced in vitro secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, enhanced the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, and impaired NF-κB translocation in the host dendritic cells. In light of its long history of safety in humans, these findings suggest that administration of AAT represents a novel unique and viable strategy to mitigate clinical GvHD. PMID:22203983

  17. Alpha1-Antitrypsin Attenuates Renal Fibrosis by Inhibiting TGF-β1-Induced Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jang-Hee; Ryu, Hye-Myung; Oh, Eun-Joo; Yook, Ju-Min; Ahn, Ji-Sun; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Choi, Ji-Young; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Kim, Chan-Duck

    2016-01-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) exerts its anti-inflammatory effect through regulating the activity of serine proteinases. This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of AAT against the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO) mice and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. C57BL/6 mice with induced UUO were injected intraperitoneally with AAT (80 mg/Kg) or vehicle for 7 days. MDCK cells were treated with TGF-β1 (2 ng/mL) for 48 hours to induce EMT, and co-treated with AAT (10 mg/mL) to inhibit the EMT. Masson's trichrome and Sirius red staining was used to estimate the extent of renal fibrosis in UUO mice. The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), vimentin, fibronectin, collagen I, and E-cadherin in MDCK cells and kidney tissue were evaluated. Masson's and Sirius red staining revealed that the area of renal fibrosis was significantly smaller in AAT treated UUO group compared with that of UUO and vehicle treated UUO groups. AAT treatment attenuated upregulation of Smad2/3 phosphorylation in UUO mouse model. Co-treatment of MDCK cells with TGF-β1 and AAT significantly attenuated the changes in the expression of α-SMA, vimentin, fibronectin, collagen I, and E-cadherin. AAT also decreased the phosphorylated Smad3 expression and the phosphorylated Smad3/Smad3 ratio in MDCK cells. AAT treatment inhibited EMT induced by TGF-β1 in MDCK cells and attenuated renal fibrosis in the UUO mouse model. The results of this work suggest that AAT could inhibit the process of EMT through the suppression of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling.

  18. Prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and allele frequency in patients with COPD in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Rodrigo; Zillmer, Laura Russo; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Manzano, Beatriz; Ivanaga, Ivan Teruaki; Fritscher, Leandro; Lundgren, Fernando; Miravitlles, Marc; Gondim, Heicilainy Del Carlos; Santos, Gildo; Alves, Marcela Amorim; Oliveira, Maria Vera; de Souza, Altay Alves Lino; Sales, Maria Penha Uchoa; Jardim, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the prevalence of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD), as well as allele frequency, in COPD patients in Brazil. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 926 COPD patients 40 years of age or older, from five Brazilian states. All patients underwent determination of AAT levels in dried blood spot (DBS) samples by nephelometry. Those with DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL underwent determination of serum AAT levels. Those with serum AAT levels of < 113 mg/dL underwent genotyping. In case of conflicting results, SERPINA1 gene sequencing was performed. Results: Of the 926 COPD patients studied, 85 had DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL, and 24 (2.6% of the study sample) had serum AAT levels of < 113 mg/dL. Genotype distribution in this subset of 24 patients was as follows: PI*MS, in 3 (12.5%); PI*MZ, in 13 (54.2%); PI*SZ, in 1 (4.2%); PI*SS, in 1 (4.2%); and PI*ZZ, in 6 (25.0%). In the sample as a whole, the overall prevalence of AATD was 2.8% and the prevalence of the PI*ZZ genotype (severe AATD) was 0.8% Conclusions: The prevalence of AATD in COPD patients in Brazil is similar to that found in most countries and reinforces the recommendation that AAT levels be measured in all COPD patients. PMID:27812629

  19. Does urinary peptide content differ between COPD patients with and without inherited alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Carleo, Alfonso; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Koeck, Thomas; Mischak, Harald; Czajkowska-Malinowska, Małgorzata; Rozy, Adriana; Welte, Tobias; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2017-01-01

    Differentiating between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with normal (PiMM) or deficient (PiZZ) genetic variants of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is important not only for understanding the pathobiology of disease progression but also for improving personalized therapies. This pilot study aimed to investigate whether urinary peptides reflect the A1AT-related phenotypes of COPD. Urine samples from 19 clinically stable COPD cases (7 PiMM and 12 PiZZ A1AT) were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We identified 66 peptides (corresponding to 36 unique proteins) that differed between PiZZ and PiMM COPD. Among these, peptides from the collagen family were the most abundant and divergent. A logistic regression model based on COL1A1 or COL5A3 peptides enabled differentiation between PiMM and PiZZ groups, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 85.71% for COL1A1 and a sensitivity of 91.67% and specificity of 85.71% for COL5A3. Furthermore, patients with PiZZ presented low levels of urinary peptides involved in lipoproteins/lipids and retinoic acid metabolism, such as apolipoprotein A-I and C4, retinol-binding protein 4 and prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase. However, peptides of MDS1 and EVII complex locus, gelsolin and hemoglobin alpha were found in the urine of COPD cases with PiZZ, but not with PiMM. These capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry-based results provide the first evidence that urinary peptide content differs between PiMM and PiZZ patients with COPD. PMID:28331304

  20. Rapid renal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene induction in experimental and clinical acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Frostad, Kirsten B

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is a hepatic stress protein with protease inhibitor activity. Recent evidence indicates that ischemic or toxic injury can evoke selective changes within kidney that resemble a hepatic phenotype. Hence, we tested the following: i) Does acute kidney injury (AKI) up-regulate the normally renal silent AAT gene? ii) Does rapid urinary AAT excretion result? And iii) Can AAT's anti-protease/anti-neutrophil elastase (NE) activity protect injured proximal tubule cells? CD-1 mice were subjected to ischemic or nephrotoxic (glycerol, maleate, cisplatin) AKI. Renal functional and biochemical assessments were made 4-72 hrs later. Rapidly following injury, 5-10 fold renal cortical and isolated proximal tubule AAT mRNA and protein increases occurred. These were paralleled by rapid (>100 fold) increases in urinary AAT excretion. AKI also induced marked increases in renal cortical/isolated proximal tubule NE mRNA. However, sharp NE protein levels declines resulted, which strikingly correlated (r, -0.94) with rising AAT protein levels (reflecting NE complexing by AAT/destruction). NE addition to HK-2 cells evoked ∼95% cell death. AAT completely blocked this NE toxicity, as well as Fe induced oxidant HK-2 cell attack. Translational relevance of experimental AAT gene induction was indicated by ∼100-1000 fold urinary AAT increases in 22 AKI patients (matching urine NGAL increases). We conclude: i) AKI rapidly up-regulates the renal cortical/proximal tubule AAT gene; ii) NE gene induction also results; iii) AAT can confer cytoprotection, potentially by blocking/reducing cytotoxic NE accumulation; and iv) marked increases in urinary AAT excretion in AKI patients implies clinical relevance of the AKI- AAT induction pathway.

  1. Outcomes for recipients of liver transplantation for alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency–related cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carey, Elizabeth J; Iyer, Vivek N; Nelson, Darlene R; Nguyen, Justin H; Krowka, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a rare genetic disease caused by an abnormal production of the serine protease inhibitor AAT. Liver transplantation (LT) cures cirrhosis caused by AAT deficiency and restores the normal production of AAT. There are few reports on the post-LT outcomes of patients with AAT deficiency. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics and outcomes of patients undergoing LT for AAT deficiency at 3 large transplant centers. All patients undergoing LT at these 3 transplant centers from 1987 to 2012 for AAT deficiency (ZZ or SZ phenotype) were included. The most recent 50 patients with the MZ phenotype were also included for comparison. Data were collected retrospectively from internal databases and medical records. Seventy-three patients (50 with the ZZ phenotype and 23 with the SZ phenotype)underwent LT. The mean age was 52.8 years, and the majority of the patients (75.6%) were men. Before LT, serum AAT levels were lower for the ZZ patients versus the SZ patients (28.3 versus 58.0 mg/dL, P < 0.001). More than 40% of the SZ patients had an additional liver disease, whereas 8% in the ZZ group and 90% in the MZ group did. Before LT, there was no significant difference in pulmonary function between the ZZ and SZ groups. Seventeen patients (all with ZZ phenotype)had pulmonary function tests performed before and after LT. The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) continued to decline for the majority. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year post-LT survival rates were 86%, 83%, 80%, and 72%, respectively, for the ZZ patients and 91%, 86%, 79%, and 79%, respectively, for the SZ patients. In conclusion, survival after LT for patients with ZZ or SZ AAT deficiency is excellent. Despite the normalization of AAT levels after LT, FEV1 continues to decline unexpectedly after LT in some ZZ and SZ patients.

  2. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: Current Perspective from Genetics to Diagnosis and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Simona; Scarlata, Simone; Poeta, Maria L; Bialas, Adam J; Paone, Gregorino; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is a 52-kDa, acute phase glycoprotein encoded by the protease inhibitor (PI) locus, located on the long arm of chromosome 14 (14q31-32.3). Its structure is composed of a total of 7 exons, 4 coding (II, III, IV, and V) and 3 non-coding (IA, IB, and IC). A1AT is produced primarily by hepatocytes and acts as a serine protease inhibitor with antiprotease and immunoregulatory activities. The main target of A1AT is neutrophil elastase (NE), an enzyme released during a neutrophil-mediated inflammatory process. When the enzyme is not adequately balanced by A1AT activity, it can cause tissue injury and destruction. A1AT deficiency (A1ATD) is a genetic autosomal recessive disease, characterized by low serum levels of A1AT. The condition may lead to liver disease, early-onset pulmonary emphysema and, rare multi-organ vasculitis, necrotizing panniculitis and fibromyalgia. At least 100 allelic variants of the polymorphic PI locus have been described with groups including associations with different A1AT plasma levels and functions. Treatments with purified A1AT preparations, obtained through pooled human plasma (augmentation therapy), have been proven to improve survival and disease-related quality of life, as well as, slow down the progression of organ damage. Furthermore, ongoing research is now focusing on the development of specifically targeted, new medications. The aim of this review is to summarize our knowledge of the genetic A1AT variants, focusing on their variable clinical manifestation, report routine and recently updated laboratory diagnostic techniques, and to highlight the relevance of early diagnosis of A1ATD. Moreover, we will review the role of augmentation therapy recommendations and future perspectives focusing on a personalized treatment of A1ATD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Homocysteine and alpha-1 antitrypsin concentration in patients with subclinical hypercortisolemia.

    PubMed

    Świątkowska-Stodulska, R; Kaniuka-Jakubowska, S; Wiśniewski, P; Skibowska-Bielińska, A; Babińska, A; Sowińska-Przepiera, E; Sworczak, K

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids have particularly strong impact on the thromboembolic complications. A factor which increases the risk of thrombosis is hyperhomocysteinemia, observed in patients with hypercortisolemia. Proinflammatory factors also affect the haemostatic balance. There has been an extensive research which estimates hemostatic system in patients with Cushing's syndrome. Undoubtedly, much fewer publications are available on thromboembolic complications in patients with Subclinical Cushing's Syndrome (SCS). The purpose of this study was to estimate of homocysteine (HCY) and alpha-1 antitrypsin (α1ATp) concentrations in patients with SCS. We studied 35 patients (56.0 ± 15.0 years) with SCS and 33 healthy volunteers (53.3 ± 17.7 years). In all subjects the analysis of HCY and α1ATp concentration in serum was determined with an immunonephelometric method. P-values below 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A comparison of HCY and α1ATp mean concentrations in patients with SCS and healthy representatives indicated statistically higher values of both analysed parameters in the sera of patients than in the healthy controls (p values were 0.018 and 0.008, respectively). In the patients with SCS a negative correlation between α1ATp and cortisol concentration in overnight dexamethasone test was found (p=0.017, R=-0.40). We did not reveal any statistically significant correlation between the concentrations of HCY and α1ATp, and coagulation parameters such as INR, APTT, fibrinogen concentration in patients with SCS. On the basis of the obtained results, a slight increase in the concentration of homocysteine and α1ATp is observed in patients with SCS, which may influence vascular complications.

  4. Efficacy of alpha1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in conditions other than pulmonary emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Up to now alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) augmentation therapy has been approved only for commercial use in selected adults with severe AAT deficiency-related pulmonary emphysema (i.e. PI*ZZ genotypes as well as combinations of Z, rare and null alleles expressing AAT serum concentrations <11 μmol/L). However, the compassionate use of augmentation therapy in recent years has proven outstanding efficacy in small cohorts of patients suffering from uncommon AAT deficiency-related diseases other than pulmonary emphysema, such as fibromyalgia, systemic vasculitis, relapsing panniculitis and bronchial asthma. Moreover, a series of preclinical studies provide evidence of the efficacy of AAT augmentation therapy in several infectious diseases, diabetes mellitus and organ transplant rejection. These facts have generated an expanding number of medical applications and patents with claims for other indications of AAT besides pulmonary emphysema. The aim of the present study is to compile and analyze both clinical and histological features of the aforementioned published case studies and reports where AAT augmentation therapy was used for conditions other than pulmonary emphysema. Particularly, our research refers to ten case reports and two clinical trials on AAT augmentation therapy in patients with both AAT deficiency and, at least, one of the following diseases: fibromyalgia, vasculitis, panniculitis and bronchial asthma. In all the cases, AAT was successfully applied whereas previous maximal conventional therapies had failed. In conclusion, laboratory studies in animals and humans as well as larger clinical trials should be, thus, performed in order to determine both the strong clinical efficacy and security of AAT in the treatment of conditions other than pulmonary emphysema. PMID:21486454

  5. Faecal alpha-1-antitrypsin and excretion of 111indium granulocytes in assessment of disease activity in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, W; Becker, W; Mössner, J; Koch, W; Reiners, C

    1987-01-01

    Intestinal protein loss in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases may be easily determined by measurement of alpha-1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) stool concentration and alpha 1-AT clearance. Both parameters were significantly raised in 36 and 34 patients respectively with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, compared with eight patients with non-inflammatory bowel diseases, or 19 healthy volunteers. There was wide range of overlap between active and inactive inflammatory disease. Contrary to serum alpha 1-AT, faecal excretion and clearance of alpha 1-AT did not correlate with ESR, serum-albumin, orosomucoid, and two indices of disease activity. A comparison of alpha 1-AT faecal excretion and clearance with the faecal excretion of 111In labelled granulocytes in 27 patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, showed no correlation between the intestinal protein loss and this highly specific marker of intestinal inflammation. Enteric protein loss expressed by faecal excretion and clearance of alpha 1-AT does not depend on mucosal inflammation only, but may be influenced by other factors. PMID:3495470

  6. A new allele of human alpha1-antitrypsin: PiNhampton.

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, P; Galbraith, R M; Galbraith, G M; Allen, R C; Fudenberg, H H

    1978-01-01

    A new allele of alpha1AT is described. By isoelectric focusing, the microheterogeneous pattern of the variant was similar to but more cathodal than that of Pi N. This allele has therefore been tentatively designated PiNhampton(Nham). Further examination revealed that the minor bands of Nham are indistinguishable from the major bands of Z by isoelectric focusing, and a careful family study was necessary to clearly define the proband's phenotype. Pi Nham was found in association with M1, S, and Z, but to date its possession is not apparently related to clinical disorders or reduced serum levels of alpha1AT. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:311584

  7. SPARTA clinical trial design: exploring the efficacy and safety of two dose regimens of alpha1-proteinase inhibitor augmentation therapy in alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, Susan; Camprubi, Sandra; Griffin, Rhonda; Chen, Junliang; Ayguasanosa, Jaume

    2015-04-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is an underdiagnosed genetic disorder that results in early-onset emphysema due to low serum levels of alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI), leading to increased activity of tissue-damaging neutrophil elastase. Clinical outcomes of AATD may be improved by administering alpha1-PI augmentation therapy. Here, we describe the design of the ongoing Study of ProlAstin-c Randomized Therapy with Alpha-1 augmentation (SPARTA), a phase 3 trial designed to evaluate progression of lung tissue loss in patients with severe AATD receiving human alpha1-PI (Prolastin(®)-C) versus placebo, using whole-lung computed tomography (CT) densitometry. SPARTA is a randomized, placebo-controlled trial assessing the efficacy and safety of two separate doses of Prolastin-C (60 and 120 mg/kg) administered weekly over 3 years in patients aged 18-70 years with a diagnosis of AATD and clinical evidence of pulmonary emphysema. The primary measure of efficacy (change from baseline whole-lung 15th percentile lung density [PD15]) will be determined by CT lung densitometry measured at total lung capacity. Secondary efficacy variables will be the evaluation of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations, as defined by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria, and PD15 of the basal lung region using CT densitometry. Adverse events will be collected and documented. The SPARTA trial is designed to evaluate the long-term (3-year) efficacy of 2 separate doses of Prolastin-C for the treatment of emphysema in patients with AATD. Protocol number: GTi1201. NCT01983241. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Tracking structural features leading to resistance of activated protein C to alpha 1-antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Dahlbäck, B; Villoutreix, B O

    2000-03-21

    Activated protein C (APC) is a multi-modular anticoagulant serine protease, which degrades factor V/Va and factor VIIIa. Human APC (hAPC) is inhibited by human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT), while the bovine enzyme (bAPC) is fully resistant to this serpin. Structural features in the catalytic domains between the two species cause this difference, but detailed knowledge about the causal molecular difference is missing. To gain insight into the APC-AAT interaction and to create a human protein C resistant to AAT inhibition, we have used molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis. First, a structural model for bAPC based on the Gla-domainless X-ray structure of hAPC was built. Screening the molecular surface of the human and bovine APC enzymes suggested that a hAPC molecule resistant to AAT inhibition could be constructed by substituting only a few amino acids. We thus produced recombinant hAPC molecules with a single mutation (S173E, the numbering follows the chymotrypsinogen nomenclature), two mutations (E60aS/S61R) or a combination of all these substitutions (E60aS/S61R/S173E). Amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of the three mutant APC molecules were similar to those of wild-type hAPC. Inhibition of wild-type hAPC by AAT was characterized by a second-order rate constant (k2) of 2.71 M-1 s-1. The amino acid substitution at position 173 (S173E mutant) led to partial resistance to AAT (k2 = 0.84 M-1 s-1). The E60aS/S61R mutant displayed mild resistance to AAT inhibition (k2 = 1.70 M-1 s-1), whereas the E60aS/S61R/S173E mutant was inefficiently inactivated by AAT (k2 = 0.40 M-1 s-1). Inhibition of recombinant APC molecules by the serpin protein C inhibitor (PCI) in the presence and absence of heparin was also investigated.

  9. Liver function in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficient individuals at 37 to 40 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Behrouz; Diaz, Sandra; Tanash, Hanan A.; Piitulainen, Eeva

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Severe alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (PiZZ) is a risk factor for liver disease, but the prevalence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer in PiZZ adults is unknown. The risk of liver disease in adults with moderate AAT deficiency (PiSZ) is also unknown. A cohort of 127 PiZZ, 2 PiZnull, 54 PiSZ, and 1 PiSnull individuals were identified by the Swedish national neonatal AAT screening program between 1972 and 1974, when all 200,000 newborn infants in Sweden were screened for AAT deficiency. The cohort has been followed up since birth. Our aim was to study liver function and signs of liver disease in this cohort at 37 to 40 years of age in comparison with a matched, random sample of control subjects identified from the population registry. Eighty seven PiZZ, 32 PiSZ, and 92 control subjects (PiMM) answered a questionnaire on medication and alcohol consumption and provided blood samples. Liver stiffness was assessed by Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography in 32 PiZZ, 15 PiSZ, and 51 PiMM subjects. The median of liver function tests and procollagen-III-peptide were within the normal range in all Pi subgroups. However, the PiZZ men had significantly higher plasma bilirubin than the PiMM men (P = 0.018). Plasma ɣ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) was significantly higher in the PiZZ men (P = 0.009) and the PiSZ men (P = 0.021) compared with the PiMM men. The median of liver stiffness was significantly higher in the PiZZ men (P = 0.037) and the PiSZ men (P = 0.032) compared with the PiMM men. The PiZZ women taking medication influencing liver enzymes had significantly higher GGT than the PiMM women on the corresponding treatment (P = 0.023). These AAT-deficient individuals identified by neonatal screening have normal plasma levels of liver function tests, and no clinical signs indicating liver disease at the age of 37 to 40 years. However, bilirubin, GGT, and liver stiffness are significantly higher in PiZZ men than Pi

  10. Discovery of an Inhibitor of Z-Alpha1 Antitrypsin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Estenson, Kasey Noel; Baudry, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Polymerization of the Z variant alpha-1-antitrypsin (Z-α1AT) results in the most common and severe form of α1AT deficiency (α1ATD), a debilitating genetic disorder whose clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to fatal liver and/or lung disease. As the altered conformation of Z-α1AT and its attendant aggregation are responsible for pathogenesis, the polymerization process per se has become a major target for the development of therapeutics. Based on the ability of Z-α1AT to aggregate by recruiting the reactive center loop (RCL) of another Z-α1AT into its s4A cavity, we developed a high-throughput screening assay that uses a modified 6-mer peptide mimicking the RCL to screen for inhibitors of Z-α1AT polymer growth. A subset of compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) with molecular weights ranging from 300 to 700 Da, was used to evaluate the assay’s capabilities. The inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine was identified as a lead compound and its ability to prevent Z-α1AT polymerization confirmed by secondary assays. To further investigate the binding location of S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine, an in silico strategy was pursued and the intermediate α1AT M* state modeled to allow molecular docking simulations and explore various potential binding sites. Docking results predict that S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine can bind at the s4A cavity and at the edge of β-sheet A. The former binding site would directly block RCL insertion whereas the latter site would prevent β-sheet A from expanding between s3A/s5A, and thus indirectly impede RCL insertion. Altogether, our investigations have revealed a novel compound that inhibits the formation of Z-α1AT polymers, as well as in vitro and in silico strategies for identifying and characterizing additional blocking molecules of Z-α1AT polymerization. PMID:25961288

  11. Discovery of an inhibitor of Z-alpha1 antitrypsin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Berthelier, Valerie; Harris, Jason Brett; Estenson, Kasey Noel; Baudry, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Polymerization of the Z variant alpha-1-antitrypsin (Z-α1AT) results in the most common and severe form of α1AT deficiency (α1ATD), a debilitating genetic disorder whose clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to fatal liver and/or lung disease. As the altered conformation of Z-α1AT and its attendant aggregation are responsible for pathogenesis, the polymerization process per se has become a major target for the development of therapeutics. Based on the ability of Z-α1AT to aggregate by recruiting the reactive center loop (RCL) of another Z-α1AT into its s4A cavity, we developed a high-throughput screening assay that uses a modified 6-mer peptide mimicking the RCL to screen for inhibitors of Z-α1AT polymer growth. A subset of compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) with molecular weights ranging from 300 to 700 Da, was used to evaluate the assay's capabilities. The inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine was identified as a lead compound and its ability to prevent Z-α1AT polymerization confirmed by secondary assays. To further investigate the binding location of S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine, an in silico strategy was pursued and the intermediate α1AT M* state modeled to allow molecular docking simulations and explore various potential binding sites. Docking results predict that S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine can bind at the s4A cavity and at the edge of β-sheet A. The former binding site would directly block RCL insertion whereas the latter site would prevent β-sheet A from expanding between s3A/s5A, and thus indirectly impede RCL insertion. Altogether, our investigations have revealed a novel compound that inhibits the formation of Z-α1AT polymers, as well as in vitro and in silico strategies for identifying and characterizing additional blocking molecules of Z-α1AT polymerization.

  12. CT lung densitometry in young adults with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bernspång, Elisabeth; Diaz, Sandra; Stoel, Berend; Wollmer, Per; Sveger, Tomas; Piitulainen, Eeva

    2011-01-01

    Severe (PiZZ) and moderate (PiSZ) alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency predispose to lung emphysema, especially in smokers. We hypothesized that multi-slice computed tomography (CT) might be superior to pulmonary function tests (PFT) to detect lung emphysema in AAT-deficient individuals at the age of 32 years. A subgroup of PiZZ and PiSZ individuals identified during the Swedish newborn screening programme in 1972-74 underwent multi-slice CT and PFT at the age of 32 years. From the CT scans the percentile density at 15% (PD(15)) and the relative area below -910 Hounsfield Units (RA(-910) HU) were calculated. The results of PFT and CT were compared between the AAT-deficient individuals and an age-matched control group. Twenty-five PiZZ, 11 PiSZ and 17 PiMM individuals participated in the study. All Pi subgroups had normal lung function. The mean PD(15) was 81 (SD 22) g/L in the PiZZ individuals, 96 (SD 35) g/L in the PiSZ individuals and 79 (SD 17) g/L in the PiMM individuals (ns), and the RA-910 were 30 (SD 18)%, 24 (SD 20)%, and 32 (SD 18)%, respectively (ns). For the never-smoker subgroups, in the PiZZ (n = 23), PiSZ (n = 8) and PiMM (n = 12), the mean PD(15) were 95 (SD 35) g/L, 81 (SD 22) g/L, and 75 (SD 12) g/L, respectively (ns). PD(15) was significantly correlated to CT derived lung size (r = -0.72; p < 0.001). CT densitometry revealed no signs of emphysema and no differences between the AAT-deficient individuals identified by neonatal screening and age-matched control subjects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Augmentation therapy for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: towards a personalised approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravenous augmentation therapy is the only specific treatment available for emphysema associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Despite large observational studies and limited interventional studies there remains controversy about the efficacy of this treatment due to the impracticality of conducting adequately powered studies to evaluate the rate of decline in lung function, due to the low prevalence and the slow progression of the disease. However, measurement of lung density by computed tomography is a more specific and sensitive marker of the evolution of emphysema and two small placebo-controlled clinical trials have provided evidence supporting a reduction in the rate of decline in lung density with augmentation therapy. The problem Where augmentation therapy has become available there has been little consideration of a structured approach to therapy which is often introduced on the basis of functional impairment at diagnosis. Data from registries have shown a great variability in the evolution of lung disease according to patient acquisition and the presence of recognised risk factors. Avoidance of risk factors may, in many cases, stabilise the disease. Since augmentation therapy itself will at best preserve the presenting level of lung damage yet require intravenous administration for life with associated costs, identification of patients at risk of continued rapid or long term progression is essential to select those for whom this treatment can be most appropriate and hence generally more cost-effective. This represents a major reconsideration of the current practice in order to develop a consistent approach to management world wide. Purpose of this review The current review assesses the evidence for efficacy of augmentation therapy and considers how the combination of age, physiological impairment, exacerbation history and rate of decline in spirometry and other measures of emphysema may be used to improve therapeutic decision making

  14. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevents type I diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Goudy, K; Campbell-Thompson, M; Wasserfall, C; Scott-Jorgensen, M; Wang, J; Tang, Q; Crawford, J M; Ellis, T M; Atkinson, M A; Flotte, T R

    2004-01-01

    Type I diabetes results from an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Although the exact immunologic processes underlying this disease are unclear, increasing evidence suggests that immunosuppressive, immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory agents can interrupt the progression of the disease. Alpha 1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) that also displays a wide range of anti-inflammatory properties. To test the ability of AAT to modulate the development of type I diabetes, we performed a series of investigations involving recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery of human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) to nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Recombinant AAV-expressing hAAT (rAAV2-CB-AT) was administered intramuscularly to 4-week-old female NOD mice (1 x 10(10) i.u./mouse). A single injection of this vector reduced the intensity of insulitis, the levels of insulin autoantibodies, and the frequency of overt type I diabetes (30% (3/10) at 32 weeks of age versus 70% (7/10) in controls). Transgene expression at the injection sites was confirmed by immunostaining. Interestingly, antibodies against hAAT were present in a majority of the vector-injected mice and circulating hAAT was undetectable when assessed 10 weeks postinjection. This study suggests a potential therapeutic role for AAT in preventing type I diabetes as well as the ability of AAV gene therapy-based approaches to ameliorate disease effectively.

  15. Capitalizing on the autophagic response for treatment of liver disease caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and other genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Chu, Andrew S; Perlmutter, David H; Wang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD) is one of the most common genetic causes of liver disease and is a prototype of liver diseases caused by the pathologic accumulation of aggregated mutant alpha-1-antitrypsin Z (ATZ) within liver cells. In the case of ATD-associated liver disease, the resulting "gain-of-function" toxicity can lead to serious clinical manifestations, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, the only definitive therapy for ATD-associated liver disease is liver transplantation, but recent efforts have demonstrated the exciting potential for novel therapies that target disposal of the mutant protein aggregates by harnessing a cellular homeostasis mechanism called autophagy. In this review, we will summarize research advances on autophagy and genetic liver diseases. We will discuss autophagy enhancer strategies for liver disease due to ATD and another genetic liver disease, inherited hypofibrinogenemia, caused by the proteotoxic effects of a misfolded protein. On the basis of recent evidence that autophagy plays a role in cellular lipid degradation, we also speculate about autophagy enhancer strategies for treatment of hepatic lipid storage diseases such as cholesterol ester storage disease.

  16. Fecal excretion of alpha 1-antitrypsin in patients with Crohn's disease. A comparison of nephelometry and radial immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    López, A; Hinojosa, J; Miralles, A; Primo, J; Bermúdez, J D

    1994-03-01

    A comparison is made of two methods for quantifying fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin (A1ATF): nephelometry (NPL) (the method habitually employed in our laboratory), and radial immunodiffusion (RID). A method is also described for extracting A1ATF from single 24-hr stool samples. The normal A1ATF values were initially established in 25 healthy controls, followed by quantification of the protein in 30 patients with Crohn's disease, with the aim of evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of the test in assaying A1ATF and alpha 1-antitrypsin fecal clearance (CLAT). The precision of the measurement method and its applicability to the A1ATF extraction process are also evaluated. The ranges of normal A1ATF and CLAT values were found to be 0-42.2 mg/24 hr and 0-12.6 ml/24 hr, respectively; sensitivity was in turn 83% and 80% for A1ATF and CLAT, respectively, with a specificity of 100% in both cases. A good correlation was observed between the A1ATF quantifications afforded by RID and NPL in both the controls and patients with Crohn's disease (r = 0.917 and 0.997, respectively). We consider that A1ATF quantification is a rapid, safe, and reproducible method that is well tolerated by the patient.

  17. Prevalence of PI*Z and PI*S alleles of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in Finland.

    PubMed

    Häggblom, Jan; Kettunen, Kaisa; Karjalainen, Jussi; Heliövaara, Markku; Jousilahti, Pekka; Saarelainen, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of PI*Z and PI*S alleles of SERPINA1 gene related to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency has previously been estimated to be lower in Finland than in the other countries of Northern Europe. The prevalence of PI*M (Malton) has not been studied in Finland before. We determined alpha-1-antitrypsin PI*Z and PI*S and PI*M (Malton) genotypes from a representative population sample. The number of subjects was 6,354 in the PI*S and PI*M (Malton) genotyping. PI*Z genotyping was performed in a subsample of 2,482 subjects. The allele frequencies were PI*Z 19.7/1,000 and PI*S 10.2/1,000. No PI*M (Malton) was found. The number of carriers of PI*Z and PI*S is significantly higher than previously estimated. The prevalences are in line with the findings in the neighboring countries.

  18. Art, alpha-1-antitrypsin polymorphisms and intense creative energy: blessing or curse?

    PubMed

    Schmechel, Donald Everett

    2007-09-01

    Persons heterozygous for Z, S and rare alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT, SERPIN1A) polymorphisms (ca. 9% of population) are often considered 'silent' carriers with increased vulnerability to environmentally modulated liver and lung disease. They may have significantly more anxiety and bipolar spectrum disorders, nutritional compromise, and white matter disease [Schmechel DE, Browndyke J, Ghio A. Strategies for the dissection of genetic-environmental interactions in neurodegenerative disorders. Neurotoxicology 2006;27:637-57]. Given association of art and mood disorders, we examined occupation and artistic vocation from this same series. One thousand five hundred and thirty-seven consecutive persons aged 16-90 years old received comprehensive work-up including testing for AAT 'phenotype' and level, nutritional factors, and inflammatory, iron and copper indices. Occupations were grouped by Bureau of Labor Standards classification and information gathered on artistic activities. Proportion of reactive airway disease, obstructive pulmonary disease, and pre-existing anxiety disorder or bipolar disorder were significantly increased in persons carrying AAT non-M polymorphisms compared to normal MM genotype (respectively, 10, 20, 21, and 33% compared to 8, 12, 11, and 9%; contingency table, pulmonary: chi2 37, p=0.0001; affective disorder: chi2=171, p=0.0001). In persons with artistic avocation (n=189) or occupation (n=57), AAT non-M polymorphisms are significantly increased (respectively, proportions of 44 and 40% compared to background rate of 9%; contingency table, avocation: chi2=172, p=0.0001; occupation: chi2=57, p=0.0007). Artistic ability and 'anxiety/bipolar spectrum' mood disorders may represent phenotypic attributes that had selective advantage during recent human evolution, an 'intensive creative energy' (ICE) behavioral phenotype. Background proportion of ICE of 7% consists of 49 of 1312 persons with AAT MM genotype (4%), and 58 of 225 persons with non-MM genotypes

  19. Prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and allele frequency in patients with COPD in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Russo, Rodrigo; Zillmer, Laura Russo; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Manzano, Beatriz; Ivanaga, Ivan Teruaki; Fritscher, Leandro; Lundgren, Fernando; Miravitlles, Marc; Gondim, Heicilainy Del Carlos; Santos, Gildo; Alves, Marcela Amorim; Oliveira, Maria Vera; Souza, Altay Alves Lino de; Sales, Maria Penha Uchoa; Jardim, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD), as well as allele frequency, in COPD patients in Brazil. This was a cross-sectional study involving 926 COPD patients 40 years of age or older, from five Brazilian states. All patients underwent determination of AAT levels in dried blood spot (DBS) samples by nephelometry. Those with DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL underwent determination of serum AAT levels. Those with serum AAT levels of < 113 mg/dL underwent genotyping. In case of conflicting results, SERPINA1 gene sequencing was performed. Of the 926 COPD patients studied, 85 had DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL, and 24 (2.6% of the study sample) had serum AAT levels of < 113 mg/dL. Genotype distribution in this subset of 24 patients was as follows: PI*MS, in 3 (12.5%); PI*MZ, in 13 (54.2%); PI*SZ, in 1 (4.2%); PI*SS, in 1 (4.2%); and PI*ZZ, in 6 (25.0%). In the sample as a whole, the overall prevalence of AATD was 2.8% and the prevalence of the PI*ZZ genotype (severe AATD) was 0.8. The prevalence of AATD in COPD patients in Brazil is similar to that found in most countries and reinforces the recommendation that AAT levels be measured in all COPD patients. Determinar a prevalência da deficiência de alfa 1-antitripsina (AAT), bem como a frequência alélica, em pacientes com DPOC no Brasil. Estudo transversal com 926 pacientes com DPOC, com 40 anos ou mais, oriundos de cinco estados brasileiros. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a dosagem de AAT em amostras de sangue seco por meio de nefelometria. Aqueles em que a concentração de AAT no sangue seco foi ≤ 2,64 mg/dl foram submetidos a dosagem sérica de AAT. Aqueles em que a concentração sérica de AAT foi < 113 mg/dl foram submetidos a genotipagem. Quando os resultados foram discrepantes, foi realizado o sequenciamento do gene SERPINA1. Dos 926 pacientes com DPOC estudados, 85 apresentaram concentração de AAT em sangue seco ≤ 2,64 mg/dl, e 24 (2,6% da amostra) apresentaram

  20. Inactivation of alpha 1-antitrypsin by aqueous coal solutions: Possible relation to the emphysema of coal workers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Laurent, P.A.; Zalma, R.; Pezerat, H. )

    1993-07-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that emphysema in coal workers may be related to their exposure to coal dusts. The hypothesis that emphysema could be related to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by inhaled coal dusts was examined in the present study. Using ESR, we investigated whether the interaction of different coals with dissolved oxygen in aqueous medium could generate ROS. Indeed, we found that one of the five examined French coal samples, Vouters coal, was effective in oxidizing formate anions or ethanol by a radical pathway. Inactivation of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) in vitro was then examined for all five coal filtrates. The Vouters coal filtrate, which exhibits oxidative activity, can also inactivate alpha 1-AT. When this coal filtrate was crystallized and redissolved, its oxidative activity was found to be conserved. By use of various analytical techniques, the active component of this coal filtrate was identified to be primarily ferrous sulfate. We confirmed that pure ferrous sulfate can effectively reduce oxygen to produce ROS in aqueous medium in vitro and can also inactivate alpha 1-AT. In this report, the nature of the coal-generated oxidative species, the origin of ferrous sulfate, and the stability of ferrous sulfate in the different coal samples are discussed. These results offer evidence that some inhaled coal dusts are capable of producing ROS, which may play an important role in the development of coal workers' emphysema.

  1. An approach for producing transgenic cloned cows by nuclear transfer of cells transfected with human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene.

    PubMed

    Jang, Goo; Bhuiyan, M M U; Jeon, Hyun Yong; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Park, Hee Jung; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Joung Ju; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2006-06-01

    In an attempt to produce transgenic cloned cows secreting alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) protein into milk, bovine cumulus cells were transfected with a plasmid containing an alpha1-AT gene and green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene using Fugene 6 as a lipid carrier. The GFP-expressing cells were selected and transferred into enucleated bovine oocytes. Couplets were fused, chemically activated and cultured. Developmental competence was monitored and the number of inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cells in blastocysts were counted after differential staining. The percentage of blastocysts was lower (P < 0.05) in transgenic cloned embryos compared to non-transgenic cloned embryos (23% versus 35%). No difference in the numbers of ICM and TE cells between the two groups of embryos was observed. One or two GFP-expressing blastocysts were transferred into the uterus of each recipient cow. Out of 49 recipient cows, three pregnancies were detected by non-return estrus and rectal palpation. However, the pregnancies failed to maintain to term; two fetuses were aborted at Day 60 and 150, respectively, and one fetus at Day 240. The genomic DNA from the aborted fetus was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to investigate integration of the transgene in the fetus. The expected PCR product was sequenced and was identical to the sequence of alpha1-AT transgene. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that developmental competence of cloned embryos derived from transgenic donor cells was lower than embryos derived from non-transfected donor cells. Although we failed to obtain a viable transgenic cloned calf, integration of alpha1-AT gene into the fetus presents the possibility of producing transgenic cloned cows by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  2. Fast chromatofocusing of human serum proteins with special reference to alpha 1-antitrypsin and Gc-globulin.

    PubMed

    Fägerstam, L G; Lizana, J; Axiö-Fredriksson, U B; Wahlström, L

    1983-08-26

    A new chromatofocusing medium, MonoP, was used for fast (60 min or less) separations of human serum proteins. Separations in the broad pH interval 6.0-3.8 were analysed by fused rocket immunoelectrophoresis to identify a number of proteins, and by gradient gel electrophoresis to determine the molecular weight distribution of the eluted material. To illustrate further the high resolving power of chromatofocusing, narrow pH intervals of about 0.5 pH units were used to study the microheterogeneity of alpha 1-antitrypsin and Gc-globulin. Due to its high resolving power and preparative capacity, chromatofocusing is attractive as the first dimension in two-dimensional techniques for the resolution of complex protein mixtures.

  3. Severe postoperative wound healing disturbance in a patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: the impact of augmentation therapy.

    PubMed

    Cathomas, Marionna; Schüller, Alexandra; Candinas, Daniel; Inglin, Roman

    2015-10-01

    Wound healing disturbance is a common complication following surgery, but the underlying cause sometimes remains elusive. A 50-year-old Caucasian male developed an initially misunderstood severe wound healing disturbance following colon and abdominal wall surgery. An untreated alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency in the patient's medical history, known since 20 years and clinically apparent as a mild to moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, was eventually found to be at its origin. Further clinical work-up showed AAT serum levels below 30% of the lower reference value; phenotype testing showed a ZZ phenotype and a biopsy taken from the wound area showed the characteristic, disease-related histological pattern of necrotising panniculitits. Augmentation therapy with plasma AAT was initiated and within a few weeks, rapid and adequate would healing was observed. AAT deficiency is an uncommon but clinically significant, possible cause of wound healing disturbances. An augmentation therapy ought to be considered in affected patients during the perioperative period.

  4. Ulcerative colitis responsive to smoking and to nicotine chewing gum in a patient with alpha 1 anti-trypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Watson, J P; Lewis, R A

    1995-10-01

    Ulcerative colitis is one of the few diseases in which smoking appears to confer some benefit (1). We report a patient whose ulcerative colitis deteriorated on several occasions on stopping cigarettes, and improved on restarting smoking. As a result, she continued smoking despite developing airflow limitation and severe emphysema. She was subsequently found to have alpha 1 anti-trypsin deficiency. She later noticed that she could get a similar benefit in her colitis with nicotine chewing gum as she had with cigarettes. For patients with smoking-responsive ulcerative colitis, non-tobacco forms of nicotine delivery such as gum or transdermal patches should be considered to avoid the hazards of cigarette smoke.

  5. alpha-1-Antitrypsin (Pi) polymorphism in Serbia: deviation of Pi M subtype distribution from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Jelić-Ivanović, Z; Spasojević-Kalimanovska, V; Topić, A; Spasić, S; Petrović, V

    1994-08-01

    The distribution of the alpha 1-antitrypsin (Pi) phenotypes and subtypes was investigated in a population sample of 1060 unrelated individuals from Serbia (Yugoslavia). The allele frequencies estimates were: Pi*M1: 0.702; Pi*M2: 0.183; Pi*M3: 0.088; Pi*Z: 0.013, Pi*S: 0.007; Pi*P: 0.004; Pi*F: 0.003. The observed phenotype frequencies differed very significantly from those expected assuming H.W. equilibrium (chi 2 = 49.51, p < 0.0005). The deviation from equilibrium involved the three Pi*M subtypes: an excess of Pi*M1, Pi*M2 and Pi*M3 homozygotes was found, with the corresponding decreased number of M1M2 and M1M3 heterozygotes. The possible significance of this finding is discussed.

  6. Elevated soluble HLA II protein levels in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency with or without COPD.

    PubMed

    Li, Liping; Kueppers, Friedrich; Hildebrand, William; Buchli, Rico; Gaughan, John

    2012-08-01

    Elevated levels of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins have been reported in several pathologic conditions that are associated with increased concentrations of white blood cells (e.g., infection, inflammation, and lymphoproliferative disorders). The mechanisms by which HLA proteins are solubilized from cell membranes are insufficiently understood. We hypothesized that HLA proteins may be cleaved from cell membranes by insufficiently inhibited leukocytic elastase, as expected in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD), resulting in elevated plasma levels of soluble HLA (sHLA) proteins. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we measured sHLA II levels in the peripheral blood of patients with A1ATD with or without co-existing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with COPD only, and in a control group. Mean (±SD) sHLA II plasma levels were 110 ± 200 pg/mL in patients with A1ATD and COPD (Group 1), 10 ± 30 pg/mL in patients with COPD without A1ATD (Group 2), 70 ± 90 pg/mL in patients with A1ATD without COPD (Group 3), and 10 ± 30 pg/mL in healthy donors (Group 4). Soluble HLA II plasma levels were significantly higher in Group 1 (P = .001) and Group 3 (P = .002) versus Group 4. Our preliminary results suggest that leukocytic elastase and probably other proteinases solubilize HLA proteins from cell membranes. This mechanism would operate in inflammation with elevated leukocytic elastase levels but more so with inflammation and A1ATD, where elastase would be insufficiently inhibited. If this mechanism is verified, plasma sHLA levels could potentially be used to measure cell damage due to proteinases and, therefore, for monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) augmentation therapy.

  7. Clinical utility of alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in the management of adult patients with severe alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Parr, David G; Lara, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and its deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The putative protective serum concentration is generally considered to be above a threshold of 11 μM/L, and therapeutic augmentation of AAT above this value is believed to retard the progression of emphysema. Several AAT preparations, all derived from human donor plasma, have been commercialized since approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1987. Biochemical efficacy has been demonstrated by augmentation of pulmonary antiprotease activity, but demonstration of clinical efficacy in randomized, placebo-controlled trials has been hampered by the practical difficulties of performing conventional studies in a rare disease with a relatively long natural history. Computed tomography has been applied to measure lung density as a more specific and sensitive surrogate outcome measure of emphysema than physiologic indices, such as forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and studies consistently show a therapeutic reduction in the rate of lung density decline. However, convincing evidence of benefit using traditional clinical measures remains elusive. Intravenous administration of AAT at a dose of 60 mg/kg/week is the commonest regime in use and has well-documented safety and tolerability. International and national guidelines on the management of AAT deficiency recommend intravenous augmentation therapy to supplement optimized usual COPD treatment in patients with severe deficiency and evidence of lung function impairment. PMID:28769553

  8. Proteome Profiling of Urinary Exosomes Identifies Alpha 1-Antitrypsin and H2B1K as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers for Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Wu, His-Chin; Lin, Ching-Chan; Chang, Kai-Po; Yang, Chi-Rei; Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Chen, Chao-Jung

    2016-01-01

    MALDI-TOF spectrometry has not been used for urinary exosome analysis. We used it for determining UC biomarkers. From 2012 to 2015, we enrolled 129 consecutive patients with UC and 62 participants without UC. Exosomes from their urine were isolated, and analyzed through MALDI-TOF spectrometry. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of another 122 UC and 26 non-UC tissues was conducted to verify the discovered biomarkers. Two peaks at m/z 5593 (fragmented peptide of alpha-1-antitrypsin; sensitivity, 50.4%; specificity, 96.9%) and m/z 5947 (fragmented peptide of histone H2B1K sensitivity, 62.0%; specificity, 92.3%) were identified as UC diagnosis exosome biomarkers. UC patients with detectable histone H2B1K showed 2.29- and 3.11-fold increased risks of recurrence and progression, respectively, compared with those with nondetectable histone H2B1K. Verification results of IHC staining revealed significantly higher expression of alpha 1-antitrypsin (p = 0.038) and H2B1K (p = 0.005) in UC tissues than in normal tissues. The expression of alpha 1-antitrypsin and H2B1K in UC tissues was significantly correlated with UC grades (p < 0.05). Urinary exosome proteins alpha 1-antitrypsin and histone H2B1K, which are identified through MALDI-TOF analysis, could facilitate rapid diagnosis and prognosis of UC. PMID:27686150

  9. Good and bad prognosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in children: when to list for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bakula, A; Socha, P; Pawlowska, J; Teisseyre, M; Jankowska, I; Kalicinski, P

    2007-12-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (alpha1-ATD) is a genetic disorder that may predispose to chronic liver disease. The clinical manifestations and prognosis of this disorder are variable. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical presentation and liver tests in two groups of children with alpha1-ATD: those with a good prognosis who survived long term with their native liver, and those with a bad one, requiring liver transplantation (OLT) or dying before OLT. We studied 59 children homozygous for alpha1-ATD admitted to our hospital with cholestasis or chronic hepatitis since infancy. Patients without liver transplantation were regarded to be the good prognosis group I (n=45). In contrast the 11 children who required liver transplantation and the three who died before OLT were the bad prognosis cohort (Group II, n=14). We analyzed the laboratory parameters of cholestasis, hepatitis, and liver insufficiency in both groups. In the group with a good prognosis, eight children still suffered from cholestasis at the ages of 9 to 14 years while nine had hepatitis at the ages of 9 to 14 years. We observed a temporarily increased international normalized ratio (1.2 to 1.5) in eight subjects at the ages of 1 month to 17 years, and slight hypoalbuminemia (30 to 35 mg/dL) in nine children at the ages of 1 month to 10 years. OLT was performed in 11 children at the ages of 10 to 17 years. Our center's experience suggested that in the PiZZ patients with portal hypertension, esophageal varices, or deterioration of hepatic function, liver transplantation should not be delayed.

  10. [Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency with histologic expression of metabolic disease of carbohydrates].

    PubMed

    de la Oliva Senovilla, P; Díaz Fernández, M C; Hierro Llanillo, L; Larrauri Martínez, J; Jara Vega, P

    1989-02-01

    A two months old male affected by alpha-1-AT PiZZ deficiency with severe transient neonatal cholestasis is presented. Two hepatic biopsies were practiced in neonatal period. There was no evidence of PAS positive globules, but an intense univacuolar steatosis and a rossetoid transformation of hepatocytes were observed. Both findings are identical to those found in the histopathologic study of the liver in certain metabolic diseases such as fructosemia and galactosemia. A third biopsy practiced at an age of two years confirmed diagnosis of alpha-1-AT deficit since presence of PAS positive globules was established. It must be pointed out that histopathological findings show great variability among different patients with alpha-1-AT deficit in the neonatal period, as well as the infrequent presence of PAS positive globules in hepatic biopsies of those c during the first months of life.

  11. Alpha1-antitrypsin polymorphism and systematics of eastern North American wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Federoff, Nicholas E.

    2002-01-01

    We used data on the polymorphic status of α1-antitrypsin (α1AT) to study the relationship of Minnesota wolves to the gray wolf (Canis lupus), which was thought to have evolved in Eurasia, and to red wolves (Canis rufus) and coyotes (Canis latrans), which putatively evolved in North America. Recent evidence had indicated that Minnesota wolves might be more closely related to red wolves and coyotes. Samples from wild-caught Minnesota wolves and from captive wolves, at least some of which originated in Alaska and western Canada, were similarly polymorphic for α1AT, whereas coyote and red wolf samples were all monomorphic. Our findings, in conjunction with earlier results, are consistent with the Minnesota wolf being a gray wolf of Eurasian origin or possibly a hybrid between the gray wolf of Eurasian origin and the proposed North American wolf.

  12. Population genetic screening for alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency in a high-prevalence area.

    PubMed

    Corda, Luciano; Medicina, Daniela; La Piana, Giuseppe Emanuele; Bertella, Enrica; Moretti, Giovanni; Bianchi, Luca; Pinelli, Valentina; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Baiardi, Paola; Facchetti, Fabio; Gatta, Nuccia; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Balbi, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Current guidelines for α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) state that adult population screening should only be done in high-risk areas. Up-to-date genetic methods are always recommended. To determine the prevalence of AATD in a suspected high-risk area by population screening, applying new genetic analyses and comparing the prevalence of liver and lung abnormalities in subjects with or without AATD. Adult residents of Pezzaze, a village in an Italian alpine valley, voluntarily participated in the screening, and were examined for: nephelometric α1-antitrypsin (AAT) serum level, DNA analysis (mutagenic polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism tests for Z and S AATD causative mutations, and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and/or direct gene sequencing if needed), serum aspartate and alanine transaminases, a respiratory questionnaire and the Medical Research Council dyspnea index scale. The prevalence of AATD was compared with that expected in Italy (Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium), and transaminases and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms were compared between study groups. Of 1,353 residents, 817 (60.4%) participated; 67 (8.2%) had low AAT serum levels (<90 mg/dl); 118 were carriers of AATD-associated alleles, 4 (0.5%) homozygotes or compound heterozygotes (1 Z, 1 S, 2 ZP(brescia)), 114 (14%) heterozygotes (46 Z, 52 S, 9 P(brescia), 4 M(wurzburg), 2 I, 1 P(lowell)). The prevalence and frequency of all AATD-related alleles was higher than expected for Italy (p < 0.001). There were no differences in symptoms of respiratory disease and transaminases between individuals with normal and low serum AAT. The screening design is one of the main strengths of this study. The large number of mostly asymptomatic individuals with AATD identified suggests that in high-risk areas adult population screening programs employing the latest genetic methods are feasible. Early recognition of individuals at risk means primary or secondary

  13. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P < 0.001). To explore the clinical significance of these observations, we measured the levels of AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P < 0.01), while in patients with HSAP serum AAT levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). Further studies showed that acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r = −0.85, P < 0.01). In conclusion, low serum levels of AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis. PMID:26634430

  14. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-12-04

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P < 0.001). To explore the clinical significance of these observations, we measured the levels of AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P < 0.01), while in patients with HSAP serum AAT levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). Further studies showed that acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r = -0.85, P < 0.01). In conclusion, low serum levels of AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis.

  15. Mechanistic evidence in support of alpha1-antitrypsin as a therapeutic approach for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fleixo-Lima, Gabriella; Ventura, Hilla; Medini, Michal; Bar, Liliana; Strauss, Pnina; Lewis, Eli C

    2014-11-01

    Utilizing endogenous molecules as a therapeutic approach is almost unequivocally superior to engineered or synthetic molecules. However, one rarely encounters an anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, immunomodulatory and wound-healing molecule that has been available for use for decades. α1-antitrypsin (AAT), a circulating protein that rises more than 4-fold during acute-phase responses, has been administered for a rare genetic deficiency at large doses, for life. Aside from advances in insulin therapy, medical research in type 1 diabetes (T1D) has predominantly focused on autoimmunity--controlling the adaptive immune response. However, it is now appreciated that one may need to extend therapeutic targets to incorporate immune responses to cellular injury, as well as promote selective control over excessive inflammation and early tissue repair. Recent data suggest that tissue damage related to lung and renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, stroke, and ischemic heart disease is markedly reduced by AAT. AAT was also shown to protect pancreatic islet β cells at multiple levels. Unlike classic immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory approaches, AAT exerts some antiviral and antibacterial activities. Based on these and other reports, AAT is under evaluation for treatment of T1D patients in multiple clinical trials. Initial results suggest that AAT therapy could potentially improve insulin production without adverse effects. Up to 50% of individuals displayed improved islet function. It is a rare occurrence in T1D research that a therapy is offered that holds a safety profile equal or superior to that of insulin alone. While placebo-controlled trials are ongoing, the mechanism(s) behind these favorable activities of AAT are still being explored.

  16. Polymorphism of alpha 1 antitrypsin in North American species of Canis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Federoff, N.E.; Kueppers, F.

    2000-01-01

    a1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) is a major protease inhibitor present in all mammalian sera that have thus far been investigated. A1AT is also highly polymorphic and is therefore a useful genetic marker. Previously reported A1AT polymorphism in domestic dogs consisted of two alleles designated as PiM and PiS which exhibited frequencies of 0.72 and 0.28, respectively, in a group of randomly collected mongrel dogs. North American species of Canis, which included gray wolves (n=29), Mexican wolves (n=20), coyotes (n=24), wolfdog crosses (n=9), and red wolves (n=27) were tested for A1AT polymorphism. A1AT phenotypes were determined by isoelectric focusing, followed by direct immunoblotting using a specific antiserum. A1AT concentrations were determined by radial immunodiffusion. Concentrations of A1AT were similar to those found in domestic dogs (2.26 + 0.3 mg/ml SD) and tended to be higher in females than in males, possibly indicating that A1AT may be hormonally influenced in females. Three phenotypic band patterns were observed (M, MS, S). The allele frequencies for domestic dogs and gray wolves were very similar, 0.72 and 0.69 for PiM and 0.28 and 0.31 for PiS, respectively. The Mexican wolves had a significantly lower frequency of PiS= 0.10. Coyotes and red wolves were all found to be monomorphic for the PiS allele and were indistinguishable from each other in that respect.

  17. Ni(ii) ions cleave and inactivate human alpha-1 antitrypsin hydrolytically, implicating nickel exposure as a contributing factor in pathologies related to antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wezynfeld, Nina Ewa; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bal, Wojciech; Frączyk, Tomasz

    2015-04-01

    Human alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is an abundant serum protein present at a concentration of 1.0-1.5 g L(-1). AAT deficiency is a genetic disease that manifests with emphysema and liver cirrhosis due to the accumulation of a misfolded AAT mutant in hepatocytes. Lung AAT amount is inversely correlated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a serious and often deadly condition, with increasing frequency in the aging population. Exposure to cigarette smoke and products of fossil fuel combustion aggravates AAT deficiency and COPD according to mechanisms that are not fully understood. Taking into account that these fumes contain particles that can release nickel to human airways and skin, we decided to investigate interactions of AAT with Ni(ii) ions within the paradigm of Ni(ii)-dependent peptide bond hydrolysis. We studied AAT protein derived from human blood using HPLC, SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry. These studies were aided by spectroscopic experiments on model peptides. As a result, we identified three hydrolysis sites in AAT. Two of them are present in the N-terminal part of the molecule next to each other (before Thr-13 and Ser-14 residues) and effectively form one N-terminal cleavage site. The single C-terminal cleavage site is located before Ser-285. The N-terminal hydrolysis was more efficient than the C-terminal one, but both abolished the ability of AAT to inhibit trypsin in an additive manner. Nickel ions bound to hydrolysis products demonstrated an ability to generate ROS. These results implicate Ni(ii) exposure as a contributing factor in AAT-related pathologies.

  18. Alpha1-antitrypsin gene therapy modulates cellular immunity and efficiently prevents type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanqing; Tang, Mei; Wasserfall, Clive; Kou, Zhongchen; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Gardemann, Thomas; Crawford, James; Atkinson, Mark; Song, Sihong

    2006-06-01

    An imbalance of the immune-regulatory pathways plays an important role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Therefore, immunoregulatory and antiinflammatory strategies hold great potential for the prevention of this autoimmune disease. Studies have demonstrated that two serine proteinase inhibitors, alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and elafin, act as potent antiinflammatory agents. In the present study, we sought to develop an efficient gene therapy approach to prevent type 1 diabetes. Cohorts of 4-week-old female nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice were injected intramuscularly with rAAV1-CB-hAAT, rAAV1-CB-hElafin, or saline. AAV1 vector mediated sustained high levels of transgene expression, sufficient to overcome a humoral immune response against hAAT. AAT gene therapy, contrary to elafin and saline, was remarkably effective in preventing type 1 diabetes. T cell receptor spectratyping indicated that AAT gene therapy altered T cell repertoire diversity in splenocytes from NOD mice. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that AAT gene therapy attenuated cellular immunity associated with beta cell destruction. This study demonstrates that AAT gene therapy attenuates cell-mediated autoimmunity, alters the T cell receptor repertoire, and efficiently prevents type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse model. These results strongly suggest that rAAV1-mediated AAT gene therapy may be useful as a novel approach to prevent type 1 diabetes.

  19. Detection of circulating and endothelial cell polymers of Z and wild type alpha 1-antitrypsin by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Janciauskiene, Sabina; Dominaitiene, Ruta; Sternby, Nils H; Piitulainen, Eva; Eriksson, Sten

    2002-07-19

    Globular inclusions of abnormal alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes are a characteristic feature of AAT deficiency of the PiZZ phenotype. Monoclonal antibodies, which contain constant specificity and affinity, are often used for the identification of Z-mutation carriers. A mouse monoclonal antibody (ATZ11) raised against PiZZ hepatocytic AAT was successfully used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and in identification of Z-related AAT globular inclusions by immunohistochemical techniques. Using electrophoresis, Western blotting, and ELISA procedures, we have shown in the present study that this monoclonal antibody specifically detects a conformation-dependent neoepitope on both polymerized and elastase-complexed molecular forms of AAT. The antibody has no apparent affinity for native, latent, or cleaved forms of AAT. The antibody ATZ11 illustrates the structural resemblance between the polymerized form of AAT and its complex with elastase and provides evidence that Z-homozygotes beyond the native form may have at least one more circulating molecular form of AAT, i.e. its polymerized form. In addition, staining of endothelial cells with ATZ11 antibody in both M- and Z-AAT individuals shows that AAT attached to endothelial cells is in a polymerized form. The antibody can be a powerful tool for the study of the molecular profile of AAT, not only in Z-deficiency cases but also in other (patho)physiological conditions.

  20. Targeted Biomarker Discovery by High Throughput Glycosylation Profiling of Human Plasma Alpha1-Antitrypsin and Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Koeleman, Carolien A. M.; Uh, Hae-Won; Stam, Jord C.; van Heemst, Diana; Maier, Andrea B.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation patterns are known to show vast genetic as well as physiological and pathological variation and represent a large pool of potential biomarkers. Large-scale studies are needed for the identification and validation of biomarkers, and the analytical techniques required have recently been developed. Such methods have up to now mainly been applied to complex mixtures of glycoproteins in biofluids (e.g. plasma). Here, we analyzed N-glycosylation profiles of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) enriched fractions by 96-well microtitration plate based high-throughput immuno-affinity capturing and N-glycan analysis using multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF). Human plasma samples were from the Leiden Longevity Study comprising 2415 participants of different chronological and biological ages. Glycosylation patterns of AAT enriched fractions were found to be associated with chronological (calendar) age and they differed between females and males. Moreover, several glycans in the AAT enriched fraction were associated with physiological parameters marking cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Pronounced differences were found between males and females in the glycosylation profiles of IgA enriched fractions. Our results demonstrate that large-scale immuno-affinity capturing of proteins from human plasma using a bead-based method combined with high-throughput N-glycan analysis is a powerful tool for the discovery of glycosylation-based biomarker candidates. PMID:24039863

  1. Three New Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Variants Help to Define a C-Terminal Region Regulating Conformational Change and Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Fra, Anna M.; Gooptu, Bibek; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Miranda, Elena; Scabini, Roberta; Ronzoni, Riccardo; Benini, Federica; Corda, Luciano; Medicina, Daniela; Luisetti, Maurizio; Schiaffonati, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder associated with reduced AAT plasma levels, predisposing adults to pulmonary emphysema. The most common genetic AAT variants found in patients are the mildly deficient S and the severely deficient Z alleles, but several other pathogenic rare alleles have been reported. While the plasma AAT deficiency is a common trait of the disease, only a few AAT variants, including the prototypic Z AAT and some rare variants, form cytotoxic polymers in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and predispose to liver disease. Here we report the identification of three new rare AAT variants associated to reduced plasma levels and characterize their molecular behaviour in cellular models. The variants, called Mpisa (Lys259Ile), Etaurisano (Lys368Glu) and Yorzinuovi (Pro391His), showed reduced secretion compared to control M AAT, and accumulated to different extents in the cells as ordered polymeric structures resembling those formed by the Z variant. Structural analysis of the mutations showed that they may facilitate polymerization both by loosening ‘latch’ interactions constraining the AAT reactive loop and through effects on core packing. In conclusion, the new AAT deficiency variants, besides increasing the risk of lung disease, may predispose to liver disease, particularly if associated with the common Z variant. The new mutations cluster structurally, thus defining a region of the AAT molecule critical for regulating its conformational state. PMID:22723858

  2. C-36 peptide, a degradation product of alpha1-antitrypsin, modulates human monocyte activation through LPS signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyam, Devipriya; Glader, Pernilla; von Wachenfeldt, Karin; Burneckiene, Jurate; Stevens, Tim; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2006-01-01

    alpha1-Antitrypsin (AAT), a major endogenous inhibitor of serine proteases, plays an important role in minimizing proteolytic injury to host tissue at sites of infection and inflammation. There is now increasing evidence that AAT undergoes post-translational modifications to yield by-products with novel biological activity. One such molecule, the C-terminal fragment of AAT, corresponding to residues 359-394 (C-36 peptide) has been reported to stimulate significant pro-inflammatory activity in monocytes and neutrophils in vitro. In this study we showed that C-36 peptide is present in human lung tissue and mimics the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), albeit with lower magnitude, by inducing monocyte cytokine (TNFalpha, IL-1beta) and chemokine (IL-8) release in conjunction with the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). Using receptor blocking antibodies and protein kinase inhibitors, we further demonstrated that C-36, like LPS, utilizes CD14 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) receptors and enzymes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways to stimulate monocyte TNFalpha release. The specificity of C-36 effects were demonstrated by failure of a shorter peptide (C-20) to elicit biological activity and the failure of C-36 to inhibit CD3/CD28-stimulated IL-2 receptor expression or proliferation in T-cells which lack TLR4 and CD14. We suggest that C-36 mediates its effects though the activation of LPS signaling pathways.

  3. Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Presenting with Atypical Cutaneous Involvement and Diagnosis of ZZ Phenotype Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Teresa; Cherry, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare condition. Specific neoplastic involvement can be primary (confined to the skin) or secondary to systemic involvement (metastatic). Cutaneous involvement by HL usually occurs late in the course and is associated with poor prognosis; however in some cases it can exhibit indolent behavior. Skin involvement with nonspecific cutaneous findings may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome. We describe a case of 46-year-old white male patient presented with rash and lymphadenopathy which led to the diagnosis of stage IVE mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma with skin involvement. His disease was refractory to multiple lines of chemotherapy including (1) AVD (doxorubicin/bleomycin/dacarbazine), (2) brentuximab, and (3) bendamustine, he later achieved complete remission with (4) GCD (gemcitabine/carboplatin/dexamethasone) salvage regimen. Bleomycin was not given secondary to poor pulmonary function tests. His treatment was complicated after AVD with multiple pneumothoraces which unmasked the diagnosis of ZZ phenotype alpha-1 antitrypsin (ATT) deficiency. Simultaneous existence of Hodgkin lymphoma and ATT is rarely reported. PMID:24955265

  4. The Impact of Social Contexts in Testing for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: The Roles of Physicians and Others

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To elucidate psychosocial and ethical issues faced by adults at risk for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) that have received little attention. Methods: Eleven individuals with AATD were interviewed in detail for 2 hours each. Results: Several specific aspects of AATD created critical, socially dynamic issues that shaped the patients' responses. The disease being relatively newly discovered, physicians do not know much about it and thus often do not consider or recommend testing for it. Hence, patients who may benefit from diagnosis and treatment are not always diagnosed. General practitioners, when they do diagnose patients, often refer them to specialists and thus remain inexperienced in treating the disorder. As a result, many individuals, too, remain unaware of this disease in their families and thus do not consider mentioning its possibility to doctors or family members. Thus, intrafamilial disclosures by patients become critical. Patients may be shocked and upset at diagnosis, as they might possibly already have transmitted the mutation to offspring, which further impedes disclosure to family members. Conclusions: These issues highlight how patients' interactions with doctors and others concerning genetics are critical, and need to be further explored and addressed. Several aspects of physician education and practice (e.g., regarding disclosures to at-risk family members) need to be improved. PMID:19371228

  5. Oncostatin M induced alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) gene expression in Hep G2 cells is mediated by a 3' enhancer.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kevin; Marsters, Peter; Morley, Stephen; van Gent, Diana; Hejazi, Ala; Backx, Matt; Thorpe, Emma R K; Kalsheker, Noor

    2002-07-15

    alpha(1)-Antitrypsin (AAT) is the major serine proteinase inhibitor (SERPIN A1) in human plasma. Its target proteinase is neutrophil elastase and its main physiological function is protection of the lower respiratory tract from the destructive effects of neutrophil elastase during an inflammatory response. Circulating levels of AAT rise 2-3-fold during inflammation and the liver produces most of this increase. The cytokines oncostatin M (OSM) and interleukin-6 have been shown to be mainly responsible for this effect, which is mediated via the interaction of cytokine-inducible transcription factors with regulatory elements within the gene. In the present study, we report for the first time that OSM stimulation of hepatocyte AAT occurs via an interaction between the hepatocyte promoter and an OSM-responsive element at the 3'-end of the AAT gene. This effect is mediated by the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 ('STAT 3') binding to an OSM-responsive element (sequence TTCTCTTAA), and this site is distinct from, but close to, a previously reported interleukin-6-responsive element.

  6. Long-term augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin in an MZ-AAT severe persistent asthma.

    PubMed

    Blanco, I; Canto, H; Flóres, J; Camblor, C; Cárcaba, V; de Serres, F J; Janciauskiene, S; Bustillo, E F

    2008-12-01

    A young Caucasian female with severe bronchial asthma and Alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, MZ phenotype, experienced a quick and severe limitation of her physical capacity, which negatively affected her psychological state and social life, though she was under a strong antiasthmatic treatment. Given her declining health status and the significant chronic corticoid administration-related side-effects (including high reduction of muscle mass and bone density), a clinical trial with commercial intravenous AAT was proposed by the patient's doctors, and accepted by the Spanish Ministry of Health, although it this therapy was not approved for MZ phenotypes yet. This new therapy quickly stopped lung function decline rate, dramatically reduced the number of hospital admissions of the patient, suppressed the oral administration of prednisone, reversed the corticosteroid-related health adverse effects, significantly improving her quality of life. Thus, although AAT replacement therapy is not approved nor indicated for the treatment of bronchial asthma in MZ patients, its favourable effects observed in this isolated case support the hypothesis that bronchial asthma could be due to pathogenic mechanisms related to a protease-antiprotease imbalance, what which could open new perspectives for future research on the field.

  7. A procedure for the analysis of site-specific and structure-specific fucosylation in alpha-1-antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Haidi; Zhu, Jianhui; Wu, Jing; Tan, Zhijing; An, Mingrui; Zhou, Shiyue; Mechref, Yehia; Lubman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    A MS-based methodology has been developed for analysis of core-fucosylated versus antennary-fucosylated glycosites in glycoproteins. This procedure is applied to the glycoprotein alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT), which contains both core- and antennary-fucosylated glycosites. The workflow involves digestion of intact glycoproteins into glycopeptides, followed by double digestion with sialidase and galactosidase. The resulting glycopeptides with truncated glycans were separated using an off-line HILIC (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) separation where multiple fractions were collected at various time intervals. The glycopeptides in each fraction were treated with PNGase F and then divided into halves. One half of the sample was applied for peptide identification while the other half was processed for glycan analysis by derivatizing with a meladrazine reagent followed by MS analysis. This procedure provided site-specific identification of glycosylation sites and the ability to distinguish core fucosylation and antennary fucosylation via a double digestion and a mass profile scan. Both core and antennary fucosylation are shown to be present on various glycosites in A1AT. PMID:27439567

  8. Multiple hepatic trans-acting factors are required for in vitro transcription of the human alpha-1-antitrypsin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y; Shen, R F; Tsai, S Y; Woo, S L

    1988-01-01

    The human alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) gene is expressed in the liver, and its deficiency causes pulmonary emphysema. We have demonstrated that its 5'-flanking region contains cis-acting elements capable of directing proper transcription in the presence of rat liver nuclear extract. The in vitro transcription system is tissue-specific in that the AAT promoter is functional in nuclear extracts prepared from the liver but not from HeLa cells. Experiments in which rat liver and HeLa nuclear extracts were mixed suggested the presence of a specific activator(s) in hepatocytes rather than a repressor(s) in nonproducing cells. Two protected regions were detected in the promoter by DNase I footprinting analysis with rat liver nuclear extracts. Region one spanned -78 to -52 and region two spanned -125 to -100 in the 5'-flanking sequence of the gene. By gel retardation assays with synthetic oligonucleotides, at least two distinct liver nuclear factors were identified, HNF-1 and HNF-2 (hepatocyte nuclear factors), which bound specifically to the first and second region, respectively. We present evidence that HNF-1 and HNF-2 are positively acting, tissue-specific transcription factors that regulate hepatic expression of the human AAT gene. Images PMID:3263567

  9. Distribution and levels of alpha-1-antitrypsin in the lung and plasma in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Linja-aho, Anna; Mazur, Witold; Toljamo, Tuula; Nieminen, Pentti; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Rönty, Mikko; Kinnula, Vuokko L

    2013-01-01

    Our recent non-biased proteomic screening study revealed elevated SerpinA1 i.e. alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) levels in induced sputum of smokers with Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study was designed to further investigate the role of AAT in smokers and subjects with COPD. The expression/distribution of AAT was studied by immunohistochemistry/digital image morphometry in the lung, by Western blot in the lung and sputum, and by ELISA in the plasma at baseline (n = 349) and after a 2-year follow-up (n = 58). AAT was localized mainly in airway and alveolar epithelium and endothelium, especially in smokers and in those with COPD. AAT was elevated in smokers and in subjects with COPD in the lung endothelial cells. Total lung AAT immunoreactivity was elevated in subjects with moderate COPD compared with smokers and with non-smokers. AAT showed elevated tendency in sputum of smokers with COPD compared with 'healthy' smokers. Plasma AAT levels were elevated in smokers with/without COPD compared with non-smokers. In the follow-up, plasma AAT concentrations decreased significantly after quitting smoking. Chronic smoking/COPD leads to AAT elevation especially in the endothelium of the lung periphery; these changes reflect only modestly to the AAT in sputum, while plasma AAT significantly reflects smoking-related systemic manifestations, and decreases after smoking cessation.

  10. SP-A binds alpha1-antitrypsin in vitro and reduces the association rate constant for neutrophil elastase

    PubMed Central

    Gorrini, Marina; Lupi, Anna; Iadarola, Paolo; Santos, Conceição Dos; Rognoni, Paola; Dalzoppo, Daniele; Carrabino, Natalia; Pozzi, Ernesto; Baritussio, Aldo; Luisetti, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Background α1-antitrypsin and surfactant protein-A (SP-A) are major lung defense proteins. With the hypothesis that SP-A could bind α1-antitrypsin, we designed a series of in vitro experiments aimed at investigating the nature and consequences of such an interaction. Methods and results At an α1-antitrypsin:SP-A molar ratio of 1:1, the interaction resulted in a calcium-dependent decrease of 84.6% in the association rate constant of α1-antitrypsin for neutrophil elastase. The findings were similar when SP-A was coupled with the Z variant of α1-antitrypsin. The carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-A appeared to be a major determinant of the interaction, by recognizing α1-antitrypsin carbohydrate chains. However, binding of SP-A carbohydrate chains to the α1-antitrypsin amino acid backbone and interaction between carbohydrates of both proteins are also possible. Gel filtration chromatography and turnover per inactivation experiments indicated that one part of SP-A binds several molar parts of α1-antitrypsin. Conclusion We conclude that the binding of SP-A to α1-antitrypsin results in a decrease of the inhibition of neutrophil elastase. This interaction could have potential implications in the physiologic regulation of α1-antitrypsin activity, in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, and in the defense against infectious agents. PMID:16351724

  11. Extinction of alpha1-antitrypsin expression in cell hybrids is independent of HNF1alpha and HNF4 and involves both promoter and internal DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Bulla, G A

    1999-01-01

    In rat hepatoma x fibroblast somatic cell hybrids, extinction of rat alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) gene expression is accompanied by the loss of liver-enriched transcription factors hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1alpha) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4). Previous analysis showed that forced expression of functional HNF1alpha failed to prevent extinction of the rat alpha1AT locus in cell hybrids. Here I show that ectopic co-expression of HNF1alpha plus HNF4 fails to prevent extinction of either rat or human alpha1AT genes in cell hybrids. A 40 kb human alpha1AT minilocus integrated into the rat genome is fully silenced in cell hybrids in the presence of transacting factors. The integrated alpha1AT promoter, but not a viral or ubiquitously active promoter, is repressed 35-fold in the cell hybrids. In addition, position effects also contributed to extinction of many integrated transgenes in a cell type-dependent manner. Finally, internal DNA sequences within the human alpha1AT gene contributed dramatically to the extinction phenotype, resulting in a further 10- to 30-fold reduction in alpha1AT gene expression in cell hybrids. Thus, multiple mechanisms contribute to silencing of tissue-specific gene expression of the alpha1AT gene in cell hybrids. PMID:9927755

  12. Isolation of two cDNAs encoding zinc finger proteins which bind to the alpha 1-antitrypsin promoter and to the major histocompatibility complex class I enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchelmore, C; Traboni, C; Cortese, R

    1991-01-01

    Two partial cDNAs coding for DNA-binding proteins (AT-BP1 and AT-BP2) have been isolated. Both proteins, when prepared from lambda gt11 lysogens, bind to the B-domain of the alpha 1-antitrypsin promoter, an element which is important for the liver-specific expression of alpha 1-antitrypsin. Analysis of the cDNA sequences encoding these proteins reveals that both contain two zinc fingers of the Cys2-His2 type followed by a highly acidic stretch of 20 amino acids. AT-BP1 contains a second putative DNA-binding domain consisting of an 8-fold repeat of a SPKK (Ser-Pro-Lys/Arg-Lys/Arg) motif. Both proteins bind to the NF-kappa B recognition site in the MHC gene enhancer with significantly higher affinity than to the kappa immunoglobulin gene enhancer, or to the B-domain of the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene promoter. Analysis of mRNA expression shows that AT-BP1 and AT-BP2 are expressed in all the tissues examined. While the physiological roles of AT-BP1 and AT-BP2 remain to be elucidated, their predicted amino acid sequence and their DNA-binding characteristics suggest a role as transcriptional regulators. Images PMID:1901405

  13. Accumulation of mutant alpha1-antitrypsin Z in the endoplasmic reticulum activates caspases-4 and -12, NFkappaB, and BAP31 but not the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hidvegi, Tunda; Schmidt, Bela Z; Hale, Pamela; Perlmutter, David H

    2005-11-25

    In alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, a polymerogenic mutant form of the secretory glycoprotein alpha1AT, alpha1ATZ, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of liver cells. It is not yet known how this results in liver injury in a subgroup of deficient individuals and how the remainder of deficient individuals escapes liver disease. One possible explanation is that the "susceptible" subgroup is unable to mount the appropriate protective cellular responses. Here we examined the effect of mutant alpha1ATZ on several potential protective signaling pathways by using cell lines with inducible expression of mutant alpha1AT as well as liver from transgenic mice with liver-specific inducible expression of mutant alpha1AT. The results show that ER retention of polymerogenic mutant alpha1ATZ does not result in an unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR can be induced in the presence of alpha1ATZ by tunicamycin excluding the possibility that the pathway has been disabled. In striking contrast, ER retention of nonpolymerogenic alpha1AT mutants does induce the UPR. These results indicate that the machinery responsible for activation of the UPR can distinguish the physical characteristics of proteins that accumulate in the ER in such a way that it can respond to misfolded but not relatively ordered polymeric structures. Accumulation of mutant alpha1ATZ does activate specific signaling pathways, including caspase-12 in mouse, caspase-4 in human, NFkappaB, and BAP31, a profile that was distinct from that activated by nonpolymerogenic alpha1AT mutants.

  14. Congruence-Incongruence Patterns in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Couples’ Genetic Determinist Beliefs and Perceived Control over Genes: Implications for Clinical and Public Health Genomic Communication

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A.; Hong, Soo Jung; Worthington, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Genomics makes possible the isolation of multiple genes as co-factors that increase, but do not determine, risk for many adult-onset medical conditions, including alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). Those diagnosed with an adult-onset medical condition, such as AATD, are often married and make decisions about testing and care as a couple. We examined genetic essentialist and threat beliefs, focusing on beliefs about the genetic contribution to disease susceptibility and severity, as well as perceptions of control related to genes and health for married couples (N =59), in which one spouse has been tested for genetic mutations associated with AATD. The intraclass correlation for spouses’ beliefs about genetic essentialism was strong and statistically significant, but the associations for their other beliefs were not. Incongruence between AATD participants and their spouses regarding genes’ influence on disease severity directly related to incongruent perceptions of control and genetic contribution to disease susceptibility. Results revealed an inverse relationship to AATD participants’ perceptions of behavioral control and a direct relationship to their beliefs about genes’ influence on disease severity. This suggests a pattern of incongruence in which AATD participants have low levels of perceived control over genes’ influence on health and high levels of perceived genetic influence on disease severity compared to spouses. With public health communication efforts lagging behind the science of genomics, insights regarding the congruence or incongruence associated with married couples’ beliefs about genes’ influence on disease afford pathways to guide clinical and public health communication about genomics. PMID:25413221

  15. Application of a diagnostic algorithm for the rare deficient variant Mmalton of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: a new approach

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Irene; Barrecheguren, Miriam; López-Martínez, Rosa M; Esquinas, Cristina; Rodríguez, Esther; Miravitlles, Marc; Rodríguez-Frías, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is associated with a high risk for the development of early-onset emphysema and liver disease. A large majority of subjects with severe AATD carry the ZZ genotype, which can be easily detected. Another rare pathologic variant, the Mmalton allele, causes a deficiency similar to that of the Z variant, but it is not easily recognizable and its detection seems to be underestimated. Therefore, we have included a rapid allele-specific genotyping assay for the detection of the Mmalton variant in the diagnostic algorithm of AATD used in our laboratory. The objective of this study was to test the usefulness of this new algorithm for Mmalton detection. Materials and methods We performed a retrospective revision of all AATD determinations carried out in our laboratory over 2 years using the new diagnostic algorithm. Samples with a phenotype showing one or two M alleles and AAT levels discordant with that phenotype were analyzed using the Mmalton allele-specific genotyping assay. Results We detected 49 samples with discordant AAT levels; 44 had the MM and five the MS phenotype. In nine of these samples, a single rare Mmalton variant was detected. During the study period, two family screenings were performed and four additional Mmalton variants were identified. Conclusion The incorporation of the Mmalton allele-specific genotyping assay in the diagnostic algorithm of AATD resulted in a faster and cheaper method to detect this allele and avoided a significant delay in diagnosis when a sequencing assay was required. This methodology can be adapted to other rare variants. Standardized algorithms are required to obtain conclusive data of the real incidence of rare AAT alleles in each region. PMID:27877030

  16. Ubiquitin ligase gp78 increases solubility and facilitates degradation of the Z variant of {alpha}-1-antitrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuxian; Ballar, Petek; Fang, Shengyun . E-mail: fangs@umbi.umd.edu

    2006-11-03

    Deficiency of circulating {alpha}-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is the most widely recognized abnormality of a proteinase inhibitor that causes lung disease. AAT-deficiency is caused by mutations of the AAT gene that lead to AAT protein retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Moreover, the mutant AAT accumulated in the ER predisposes the homozygote to severe liver injuries, such as neonatal hepatitis, juvenile cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the fact that mutant AAT protein is subject to ER-associated degradation (ERAD), yeast genetic studies have determined that the ubiquitination machinery, Hrd1/Der3p-cue1p-Ubc7/6p, which plays a prominent role in ERAD, is not involved in degradation of mutant AAT. Here we report that gp78, a ubiquitin ligase (E3) pairing with mammalian Ubc7 for ERAD, ubiquitinates and facilitates degradation of ATZ, the classic deficiency variant of AAT having a Z mutation (Glu 342 Lys). Unexpectedly, gp78 over-expression also significantly increases ATZ solubility. p97/VCP, an AAA ATPase essential for retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins from the ER during ERAD, is involved in gp78-mediated degradation of ATZ. Surprisingly, unlike other ERAD substrates that cause ER stress leading to apoptosis when accumulated in the ER, ATZ, in fact, increases cell proliferation when over-expressed in cells. This effect can be partially inhibited by gp78 over-expression. These data indicate that gp78 assumes multiple unique quality control roles over ATZ, including the facilitation of degradation and inhibition of aggregation of ATZ.

  17. Rationale and Design of the Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) Study. Sarcoidosis Protocol.

    PubMed

    Moller, David R; Koth, Laura L; Maier, Lisa A; Morris, Alison; Drake, Wonder; Rossman, Milton; Leader, Joseph K; Collman, Ronald G; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Sweiss, Nadera J; Zhang, Yingze; O'Neal, Scott; Senior, Robert M; Becich, Michael; Hochheiser, Harry S; Kaminski, Naftali; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Gibson, Kevin F

    2015-10-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease characterized by noncaseating granulomatous inflammation with tremendous clinical heterogeneity and uncertain pathobiology and lacking in clinically useful biomarkers. The Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) study is an observational cohort study designed to explore the role of the lung microbiome and genome in these two diseases. This article describes the design and rationale for the GRADS study sarcoidosis protocol. The study addresses the hypothesis that distinct patterns in the lung microbiome are characteristic of sarcoidosis phenotypes and are reflected in changes in systemic inflammatory responses as measured by peripheral blood changes in gene transcription. The goal is to enroll 400 participants, with a minimum of 35 in each of 9 clinical phenotype subgroups prioritized by their clinical relevance to understanding of the pathobiology and clinical heterogeneity of sarcoidosis. Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of sarcoidosis undergo a baseline visit with self-administered questionnaires, chest computed tomography, pulmonary function tests, and blood and urine testing. A research or clinical bronchoscopy with a research bronchoalveolar lavage will be performed to obtain samples for genomic and microbiome analyses. Comparisons will be made by blood genomic analysis and with clinical phenotypic variables. A 6-month follow-up visit is planned to assess each participant's clinical course. By the use of an integrative approach to the analysis of the microbiome and genome in selected clinical phenotypes, the GRADS study is powerfully positioned to inform and direct studies on the pathobiology of sarcoidosis, identify diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, and provide novel molecular phenotypes that could lead to improved personalized approaches to therapy for sarcoidosis.

  18. The Clinical Profile of Subjects Included in the Swedish National Register on Individuals with Severe Alpha 1-Antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Piitulainen, Eeva; Tanash, Hanan A

    2015-05-01

    The Swedish national register of severe alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency was established in 1991. The main aims are to prospectively study the natural history of severe AAT deficiency, and to improve the knowledge of AAT deficiency. The inclusion criteria in the register are age ≥ 18 years, and the PiZ phenotype diagnosed by isoelectric focusing. The register is kept updated by means of repeated questionnaires providing data to allow analysis of the mode of identification, lung and liver function, smoking-habits, respiratory symptoms and diagnoses as reported by physicians. Until February 2014, a total of 1553 PiZZ individuals had been included in the register. The 1102 subjects still alive constituted about 20% of the adult PiZZ individuals in Sweden. Forty-three percent of the subjects had been identified during investigation of respiratory symptoms, 7% by an investigation of liver disease, 26% in an investigation of other pathological conditions, and 24% in a population or family screening. Forty five percent of the subjects had never smoked, 47% were ex-smokers, and 8% current smokers. Twenty-eight percent of the never-smokers, 72% of the ex-smokers, and 61% of the current smokers fulfilled the criteria for COPD with a FEV1/FVC ratio of <0.70. Among the 451 deceased, the most common cause of death was respiratory diseases (55%), followed by liver diseases (13%). We conclude that the detection rate of severe AAT deficiency is relatively high in Sweden. Large numbers of subjects are identified for other reasons than respiratory symptoms, and the majority of these have never smoked.

  19. The Anti-inflammatory Effect of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin in Rhinovirus-infected Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Di; Berman, Reena; Wu, Qun; Stevenson, Connor; Chu, Hong Wei

    2017-01-01

    Objective Excessive airway inflammation is seen in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients experiencing acute exacerbations, which are often associated with human rhinovirus (HRV) infection. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) has anti-inflammatory function in endothelial cells and monocytes, but its anti-inflammatory effect has not been investigated in COPD airway epithelial cells. We determined A1AT’s anti-inflammatory function in COPD airway epithelial cells and the underlying mechanisms such as the role of caspase-1. Methods Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from COPD and normal subjects were cultured at air-liquid interface and treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin (BSA, control) two hours prior to whole cigarette smoke (WCS) or air exposure, followed by HRV-16 infection. After 24 hours of viral infection, cell supernatants were collected for measuring IL-8, and cells were examined for caspase-1. The in vivo anti-inflammatory function of A1AT was determined by infecting mice intranasally with HRV-1B followed by aerosolized A1AT or BSA. Results A1AT significantly reduced WCS and HRV-16-induced IL-8 production in normal and COPD airway epithelial cells. COPD cells are less sensitive to A1AT’s anti-inflammatory effect than normal cells. A1AT exerted the anti-inflammatory function in part via reducing caspase-1 in normal cells, but not in COPD cells. In mice, A1AT significantly reduced HRV-1B induced lung neutrophilic inflammation. Conclusions A1AT exerts an anti-inflammatory effect in cigarette smoke-exposed and HRV-infected human airway epithelial cells, which may be related to its inhibitory effect on caspase-1 activity. PMID:28191362

  20. Prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin high-risk variants in Mexican mestizo population and their association with lung function values.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rubio, Gloria; Jiménez-Valverde, Luis Octavio; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra; Camarena, Ángel; Sansores, Raúl H; Flores-Trujillo, Fernando; Reséndiz-Hernández, Juan M; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés

    2015-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by restricted airflow. The best-documented genetic factor is alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT). AAT is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. The PiZ (rs28929474) and PiS (rs17580) variants are believed to cause severe AAT deficiency and are linked to a high risk of developing COPD. This study sought to identify whether genetic polymorphisms rs28929474 and rs17580 are associated with COPD susceptibility and lung function values in a Mexican mestizo population. In this study, 558 smokers were included, of whom 279 had COPD and 279 did not (smokers without COPD - SWC). The PiS and PiZ variants were genotyped by allelic discrimination. Independent populations and lung function values were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. A bivariate logistic regression analysis was also conducted. Stage I and iv COPD patients showed significant differences in the frequencies of both heterozygous genotypes compared to SWC. For PiS, individuals with the heterozygous genotype AT demonstrated a decreased FEV1/FVC ratio compared to subjects with the homozygous genotype AA (P=0.037). A significant association was found between the FEV1/FVC ratio and genotype AA for PiS (OR=0.982, β coefficient=-0.019, 95% CI=0.966-0.997). COPD-causing AAT deficiency risk alleles exist at a very low frequency among Mexican mestizo population. Although they are not directly linked in our study population with disease susceptibility, these risk alleles are associated with poorer lung function measurements. It is important to characterize how often these genetic risk variants occur in other Latin American populations. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of a diagnostic algorithm for the rare deficient variant Mmalton of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Irene; Barrecheguren, Miriam; López-Martínez, Rosa M; Esquinas, Cristina; Rodríguez, Esther; Miravitlles, Marc; Rodríguez-Frías, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is associated with a high risk for the development of early-onset emphysema and liver disease. A large majority of subjects with severe AATD carry the ZZ genotype, which can be easily detected. Another rare pathologic variant, the Mmalton allele, causes a deficiency similar to that of the Z variant, but it is not easily recognizable and its detection seems to be underestimated. Therefore, we have included a rapid allele-specific genotyping assay for the detection of the Mmalton variant in the diagnostic algorithm of AATD used in our laboratory. The objective of this study was to test the usefulness of this new algorithm for Mmalton detection. We performed a retrospective revision of all AATD determinations carried out in our laboratory over 2 years using the new diagnostic algorithm. Samples with a phenotype showing one or two M alleles and AAT levels discordant with that phenotype were analyzed using the Mmalton allele-specific genotyping assay. We detected 49 samples with discordant AAT levels; 44 had the MM and five the MS phenotype. In nine of these samples, a single rare Mmalton variant was detected. During the study period, two family screenings were performed and four additional Mmalton variants were identified. The incorporation of the Mmalton allele-specific genotyping assay in the diagnostic algorithm of AATD resulted in a faster and cheaper method to detect this allele and avoided a significant delay in diagnosis when a sequencing assay was required. This methodology can be adapted to other rare variants. Standardized algorithms are required to obtain conclusive data of the real incidence of rare AAT alleles in each region.

  2. Corticosteroid-binding globulin cleavage is paradoxically reduced in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: Implications for cortisol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nenke, Marni A; Holmes, Mark; Rankin, Wayne; Lewis, John G; Torpy, David J

    2016-01-15

    High-affinity corticosteroid-binding globulin (haCBG) is cleaved by neutrophil elastase (NE) resulting in permanent transition to the low cortisol-binding affinity form (laCBG), thereby increasing cortisol availability at inflammatory sites. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the major inhibitor of NE. AAT deficiency (AATD) predisposes patients to early-onset emphysema due to increased proteolytic destruction from the inherent proteinase-antiproteinase imbalance. We hypothesized that AATD may result in increased CBG cleavage in vivo. We collected demographic data and blood samples from 10 patients with AATD and 28 healthy controls measuring total CBG and haCBG levels by parallel in-house ELISAs, as well as AAT, total and free cortisol levels. haCBG was higher (median [range]); 329 [210-551] vs. 250 [175-365] nmol/L; P<0.005, and laCBG lower; 174 [68-229] vs. 220 [119-348] nmol/L; P=0.016 in the AATD group, compared with controls. The ratio of haCBG:total CBG was also higher in AATD; 72 [53-83] vs. 54 [41-72] %; P=0.0001). There was a negative correlation between haCBG:total CBG and AAT levels (P<0.05, R=-0.64). Paradoxically, proteolytic cleavage of CBG was reduced in AATD, despite the recognized increase in NE activity. This implies that NE activity is not the mechanism for systemic CBG cleavage in basal, low inflammatory conditions. Relatively low levels of laCBG may have implications for cortisol action in AATD.

  3. Rationale and Design of the Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) Study. Sarcoidosis Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Koth, Laura L.; Maier, Lisa A.; Morris, Alison; Drake, Wonder; Rossman, Milton; Leader, Joseph K.; Collman, Ronald G.; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Sweiss, Nadera J.; Zhang, Yingze; O’Neal, Scott; Senior, Robert M.; Becich, Michael; Hochheiser, Harry S.; Kaminski, Naftali; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Gibson, Kevin F.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease characterized by noncaseating granulomatous inflammation with tremendous clinical heterogeneity and uncertain pathobiology and lacking in clinically useful biomarkers. The Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) study is an observational cohort study designed to explore the role of the lung microbiome and genome in these two diseases. This article describes the design and rationale for the GRADS study sarcoidosis protocol. The study addresses the hypothesis that distinct patterns in the lung microbiome are characteristic of sarcoidosis phenotypes and are reflected in changes in systemic inflammatory responses as measured by peripheral blood changes in gene transcription. The goal is to enroll 400 participants, with a minimum of 35 in each of 9 clinical phenotype subgroups prioritized by their clinical relevance to understanding of the pathobiology and clinical heterogeneity of sarcoidosis. Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of sarcoidosis undergo a baseline visit with self-administered questionnaires, chest computed tomography, pulmonary function tests, and blood and urine testing. A research or clinical bronchoscopy with a research bronchoalveolar lavage will be performed to obtain samples for genomic and microbiome analyses. Comparisons will be made by blood genomic analysis and with clinical phenotypic variables. A 6-month follow-up visit is planned to assess each participant’s clinical course. By the use of an integrative approach to the analysis of the microbiome and genome in selected clinical phenotypes, the GRADS study is powerfully positioned to inform and direct studies on the pathobiology of sarcoidosis, identify diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, and provide novel molecular phenotypes that could lead to improved personalized approaches to therapy for sarcoidosis. PMID:26193069

  4. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in the Cape Verde islands (Northwest Africa): High prevalence in a sub-Saharan population.

    PubMed

    Spínola, Carla; Brehm, António; Spínola, Hélder

    2010-07-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations on the Protease Inhibitor (PI) locus located in chromosome 14 and has been associated with pulmonary early-onset emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). African populations show a lower prevalence of AAT deficiency compared to Europeans. Two hundred and two (202) unrelated samples from the Cape Verde archipelago (Northwest Africa) were genotyped for the two most common AAT deficiency alleles, PI*S and PI*Z, using PCR - Mediated Site-Directed Mutagenesis. PI*S mutation in Cape Verde (3.2%) presents one of the highest frequencies in sub-Saharans, similar to South Africa (3.3%) but lower than Angolans (18.8%), Namibians (14.7%), Nigerians (6.4%) and Botswains (4.5%). The PI*Z mutation shows lower values (0.2%) than other sub-Saharan populations, namely Somalia (1.15%), Mali (0.98%)or Nigeria (0.36%). However, many other sub-Saharan populations, like Botswana, Congo, Cameroon, Angola, Gambia, South Africa, Mozambique and Namibia, lack the PI*Z mutation. The frequency of all the AAT deficiency genotypes in the Cape Verde archipelago (PI*ZZ, PI*SS, and PI*SZ) was estimated to be one of the highest in sub-Saharans (15 per 1000), only lower than Angola (54 per 1000) and Namibia (22 per 1000). The results obtained show a high prevalence of the AAT deficiency in Cape Verdeans when compared to other sub-Saharans a condition that can be explained by a heavy European genetic influence, characteristic of that population.

  5. Alpha-1 antitrypsin Pi*Z gene frequency and Pi*ZZ genotype numbers worldwide: an update

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Ignacio; Bueno, Patricia; Diego, Isidro; Pérez-Holanda, Sergio; Casas-Maldonado, Francisco; Esquinas, Cristina; Miravitlles, Marc

    2017-01-01

    In alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), the Z allele is present in 98% of cases with severe disease, and knowledge of the frequency of this allele is essential from a public health perspective. However, there is a remarkable lack of epidemiological data on AATD worldwide, and many of the data currently used are outdated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to update the knowledge of the frequency of the Z allele to achieve accurate estimates of the prevalence and number of Pi*ZZ genotypes worldwide based on studies performed according to the following criteria: 1) samples representative of the general population, 2) AAT phenotyping characterized by adequate methods, and 3) measurements performed using a coefficient of variation calculated from the sample size and 95% confidence intervals. Studies fulfilling these criteria were used to develop maps with an inverse distance weighted (IDW)-interpolation method, providing numerical and graphical information of Pi*Z distribution worldwide. A total of 224 cohorts from 65 countries were included in the study. With the data provided by these cohorts, a total of 253,404 Pi*ZZ were estimated worldwide: 119,594 in Europe, 91,490 in America and Caribbean, 3,824 in Africa, 32,154 in Asia, 4,126 in Australia, and 2,216 in New Zealand. In addition, the IDW-interpolation maps predicted Pi*Z frequencies throughout the world even in some areas that lack real data. In conclusion, the inclusion of new well-designed studies and the exclusion of the low-quality ones have significantly improved the reliability of results, which may be useful to plan strategies for future research and diagnosis and to rationalize the therapeutic resources available. PMID:28243076

  6. Alpha-1 antitrypsin Pi*Z gene frequency and Pi*ZZ genotype numbers worldwide: an update.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ignacio; Bueno, Patricia; Diego, Isidro; Pérez-Holanda, Sergio; Casas-Maldonado, Francisco; Esquinas, Cristina; Miravitlles, Marc

    2017-01-01

    In alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), the Z allele is present in 98% of cases with severe disease, and knowledge of the frequency of this allele is essential from a public health perspective. However, there is a remarkable lack of epidemiological data on AATD worldwide, and many of the data currently used are outdated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to update the knowledge of the frequency of the Z allele to achieve accurate estimates of the prevalence and number of Pi*ZZ genotypes worldwide based on studies performed according to the following criteria: 1) samples representative of the general population, 2) AAT phenotyping characterized by adequate methods, and 3) measurements performed using a coefficient of variation calculated from the sample size and 95% confidence intervals. Studies fulfilling these criteria were used to develop maps with an inverse distance weighted (IDW)-interpolation method, providing numerical and graphical information of Pi*Z distribution worldwide. A total of 224 cohorts from 65 countries were included in the study. With the data provided by these cohorts, a total of 253,404 Pi*ZZ were estimated worldwide: 119,594 in Europe, 91,490 in America and Caribbean, 3,824 in Africa, 32,154 in Asia, 4,126 in Australia, and 2,216 in New Zealand. In addition, the IDW-interpolation maps predicted Pi*Z frequencies throughout the world even in some areas that lack real data. In conclusion, the inclusion of new well-designed studies and the exclusion of the low-quality ones have significantly improved the reliability of results, which may be useful to plan strategies for future research and diagnosis and to rationalize the therapeutic resources available.

  7. Safety and pharmacokinetics of 120 mg/kg versus 60 mg/kg weekly intravenous infusions of alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, crossover study (SPARK).

    PubMed

    Campos, Michael A; Kueppers, Friedrich; Stocks, James M; Strange, Charlie; Chen, Junliang; Griffin, Rhonda; Wang-Smith, Laurene; Brantly, Mark L

    2013-12-01

    Augmentation therapy with the approved dose of 60 mg/kg weekly intravenous (IV) alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI), achieves a trough serum level of 11 μM in individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), yet this is still below the level observed in healthy individuals. This study assessed the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of weekly infusions of a 120 mg/kg dose of alpha1-PI in 30 adults with AATD. Subjects with symptomatic, genetically determined (genotypes PI*ZZ, PI*Z(null), PI*(null)(null) or PI*(Z)Mmalton) AATD were randomly assigned to weekly infusions of 60 or 120 mg/kg alpha1-PI (Prolastin-C®) for 8 weeks before crossing over to the alternate dose for 8 weeks. Adverse events (AEs) (including exacerbations), vital signs, pulmonary function tests, and laboratory assessments were recorded. Pharmacokinetic measurements included AUC0-7days, Cmax, trough, tmax, and t1/2, based on serum alpha1-PI concentrations. In total for both treatments, 112 AEs were reported, with exacerbation of COPD being the most frequent, consistent with the subjects' diagnoses. Mean steady-state serum alpha1-PI concentrations following 120 mg/kg weekly IV alpha1-PI were higher than with the 60 mg/kg dose and mean trough concentrations were 27.7 versus 17.3 μM, respectively. Dose proportionality was demonstrated for AUC0-7days and Cmax, with low inter-subject variability. The 120 mg/kg alpha1-PI weekly dose was considered to be safe and well tolerated, and provided more favorable physiologic alpha1-PI serum levels than the currently recommended 60 mg/kg dose. The effect of this dosing regimen on slowing and/or preventing emphysema progression in subjects with AATD warrants further investigation.

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... much as 20 years. AAT deficiency has no cure, but treatments are available. Treatments often are based on the type of disease you develop. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: October 11, 2011 Twitter Facebook YouTube ...

  9. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a young age (younger than 45 years old) and/or no obvious risk factors for the ... and chronic inflammatory conditions, infections, and with some cancers. Increased levels of AAT may also be seen with oral contraceptive use, pregnancy , and stress. These temporary or ...

  10. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver from damage. The condition can lead to emphysema and liver disease ( cirrhosis ). ... descent. Adults with severe A1AT deficiency will develop emphysema, often before 40 years of age. Smoking can ...

  11. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month Personal Story - David Roncori Liver Disease - The Big Picture 13 Ways to a Healthy Liver In the Field Call to Action - Change Tomorrow, Give Today Liver Lowdown Sept 2013 Recovery Month Path to Wellness 5 Facts About Recovery Patient Story In the Field ...

  12. Encapsulation of Alpha-1 antitrypsin in PLGA nanoparticles: In Vitro characterization as an effective aerosol formulation in pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha 1- antitrypsin (α1AT) belongs to the superfamily of serpins and inhibits different proteases. α1AT protects the lung from cellular inflammatory enzymes. In the absence of α1AT, the degradation of lung tissue results to pulmonary complications. The pulmonary route is a potent noninvasive route for systemic and local delivery. The aerosolized α1AT not only affects locally its main site of action but also avoids remaining in circulation for a long period of time in peripheral blood. Poly (D, L lactide-co glycolide) (PLGA) is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer approved for sustained controlled release of peptides and proteins. The aim of this work was to prepare a wide range of particle size as a carrier of protein-loaded nanoparticles to deposit in different parts of the respiratory system especially in the deep lung. Various lactide to glycolide ratio of the copolymer was used to obtain different release profile of the drug which covers extended and rapid drug release in one formulation. Results Nonaqueous and double emulsion techniques were applied for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of surface morphology, size distribution, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, FTIR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). To evaluate the nanoparticles cytotoxicity, cell cytotoxicity test was carried out on the Cor L105 human epithelial lung cancer cell line. Nanoparticles were spherical with an average size in the range of 100 nm to 1μ. The encapsulation efficiency was found to be higher when the double emulsion technique was applied. XRD and DSC results indicated that α1AT encapsulated in the nanoparticles existed in an amorphous or disordered-crystalline status in the polymer matrix. The lactic acid to glycolic acid ratio affects the release profile of α1AT. Hence, PLGA with a 50:50 ratios exhibited the ability to release %60 of the drug within 8

  13. Neutrophilic inflammation and IL-8 levels in induced sputum of alpha-1-antitrypsin PiMZ subjects.

    PubMed

    Malerba, M; Ricciardolo, F; Radaeli, A; Torregiani, C; Ceriani, L; Mori, E; Bontempelli, M; Tantucci, C; Grassi, V

    2006-02-01

    Severe alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), due to homozygosity for the protease inhibitor (Pi) Z allele, is a genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a previous study the sputum of severe AATD subjects with airflow obstruction showed a pattern of cellular inflammation similar to COPD patients. It is uncertain whether heterozygotes for the Z allele or intermediate deficiency (PiMZ) have an increased risk of developing COPD. Sputum cell counts and the supernatant level of the neutrophil chemoattractant interleukin (IL)-8 were investigated by sputum induction in 10 non-smoker asymptomatic PiMZ subjects with normal pulmonary function, 10 patients with stable COPD, and 10 age matched normal subjects. Data are expressed as mean (SD). The mean (SD) number of neutrophils was significantly higher (p<0.01) in the sputum of PiMZ subjects (84.5 (22.2) x10(4)/ml) and patients with COPD (126.9 (18.8) x10(4)/ml) than in matched normal subjects (55.0 (8.7) x10(4)/ml). IL-8 levels were increased in PiMZ subjects (828.5 (490.6) ng/ml; median 1003.0 ng/ml; range 1260-100 ng/ml) and in COPD patients (882.5 (524.3) ng/ml; median 934.9 ng/ml; range 1506-258 mg/ml) compared with normal subjects (3.5 (0.5) ng/ml; median 3.5 ng/ml; range 4.5-2.5 ng/ml). There was a significant positive correlation between IL-8 supernatant concentration and neutrophil count in PiMZ subjects (p = 0.036; r = 0.66). An inverse correlation was observed between the percentage of neutrophils and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (% predicted) in patients with COPD (p = 0.04; r = -0.43). These findings indicate that PiMZ subjects without airflow obstruction may have an IL-8 related neutrophilic inflammation in the airways, similar to stable COPD patients, suggesting an increased risk of developing pulmonary changes.

  14. Causal and Synthetic Associations of Variants in the SERPINA Gene Cluster with Alpha1-antitrypsin Serum Levels

    PubMed Central

    Thun, Gian Andri; Kumar, Ashish; Obeidat, Ma'en; Zorzetto, Michele; Haun, Margot; Curjuric, Ivan; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Jackson, Victoria E.; Albrecht, Eva; Ried, Janina S.; Teumer, Alexander; Lopez, Lorna M.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Enroth, Stefan; Bossé, Yohan; Hao, Ke; Timens, Wim; Gyllensten, Ulf; Polasek, Ozren; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Sandford, Andrew J.; Deary, Ian J.; Koch, Beate; Reischl, Eva; Schulz, Holger; Hui, Jennie; James, Alan L.; Rochat, Thierry; Russi, Erich W.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Strachan, David P.; Hall, Ian P.; Tobin, Martin D.; Dahl, Morten; Fallgaard Nielsen, Sune; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Kronenberg, Florian; Luisetti, Maurizio; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Several infrequent genetic polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 gene are known to substantially reduce concentration of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the blood. Since low AAT serum levels fail to protect pulmonary tissue from enzymatic degradation, these polymorphisms also increase the risk for early onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The role of more common SERPINA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in respiratory health remains poorly understood. We present here an agnostic investigation of genetic determinants of circulating AAT levels in a general population sample by performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1392 individuals of the SAPALDIA cohort. Five common SNPs, defined by showing minor allele frequencies (MAFs) >5%, reached genome-wide significance, all located in the SERPINA gene cluster at 14q32.13. The top-ranking genotyped SNP rs4905179 was associated with an estimated effect of β = −0.068 g/L per minor allele (P = 1.20*10−12). But denser SERPINA1 locus genotyping in 5569 participants with subsequent stepwise conditional analysis, as well as exon-sequencing in a subsample (N = 410), suggested that AAT serum level is causally determined at this locus by rare (MAF<1%) and low-frequent (MAF 1–5%) variants only, in particular by the well-documented protein inhibitor S and Z (PI S, PI Z) variants. Replication of the association of rs4905179 with AAT serum levels in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (N = 8273) was successful (P<0.0001), as was the replication of its synthetic nature (the effect disappeared after adjusting for PI S and Z, P = 0.57). Extending the analysis to lung function revealed a more complex situation. Only in individuals with severely compromised pulmonary health (N = 397), associations of common SNPs at this locus with lung function were driven by rarer PI S or Z variants. Overall, our meta-analysis of lung function in ever-smokers does not support a functional role of common SNPs in

  15. Causal and synthetic associations of variants in the SERPINA gene cluster with alpha1-antitrypsin serum levels.

    PubMed

    Thun, Gian Andri; Imboden, Medea; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Kumar, Ashish; Obeidat, Ma'en; Zorzetto, Michele; Haun, Margot; Curjuric, Ivan; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Jackson, Victoria E; Albrecht, Eva; Ried, Janina S; Teumer, Alexander; Lopez, Lorna M; Huffman, Jennifer E; Enroth, Stefan; Bossé, Yohan; Hao, Ke; Timens, Wim; Gyllensten, Ulf; Polasek, Ozren; Wilson, James F; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Sandford, Andrew J; Deary, Ian J; Koch, Beate; Reischl, Eva; Schulz, Holger; Hui, Jennie; James, Alan L; Rochat, Thierry; Russi, Erich W; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Strachan, David P; Hall, Ian P; Tobin, Martin D; Dahl, Morten; Fallgaard Nielsen, Sune; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Kronenberg, Florian; Luisetti, Maurizio; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Several infrequent genetic polymorphisms in the SERPINA1 gene are known to substantially reduce concentration of alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the blood. Since low AAT serum levels fail to protect pulmonary tissue from enzymatic degradation, these polymorphisms also increase the risk for early onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The role of more common SERPINA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in respiratory health remains poorly understood. We present here an agnostic investigation of genetic determinants of circulating AAT levels in a general population sample by performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1392 individuals of the SAPALDIA cohort. Five common SNPs, defined by showing minor allele frequencies (MAFs) >5%, reached genome-wide significance, all located in the SERPINA gene cluster at 14q32.13. The top-ranking genotyped SNP rs4905179 was associated with an estimated effect of β = -0.068 g/L per minor allele (P = 1.20*10(-12)). But denser SERPINA1 locus genotyping in 5569 participants with subsequent stepwise conditional analysis, as well as exon-sequencing in a subsample (N = 410), suggested that AAT serum level is causally determined at this locus by rare (MAF<1%) and low-frequent (MAF 1-5%) variants only, in particular by the well-documented protein inhibitor S and Z (PI S, PI Z) variants. Replication of the association of rs4905179 with AAT serum levels in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (N = 8273) was successful (P<0.0001), as was the replication of its synthetic nature (the effect disappeared after adjusting for PI S and Z, P = 0.57). Extending the analysis to lung function revealed a more complex situation. Only in individuals with severely compromised pulmonary health (N = 397), associations of common SNPs at this locus with lung function were driven by rarer PI S or Z variants. Overall, our meta-analysis of lung function in ever-smokers does not support a functional role of common SNPs in the SERPINA gene cluster in

  16. Characteristics of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin-Deficient Individuals in the Long-term Oxygen Treatment Trial and Comparison with Other Subjects with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Stoller, James K; Aboussouan, Loutfi S; Kanner, Richard E; Wilson, Laura A; Diaz, Phil; Wise, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) predisposes to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but is underrecognized. Oxygenation and exercise desaturation in individuals with AATD-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been sparsely studied. The Long-term Oxygen Treatment Trial (LOTT) permits comparing these features of individuals with AATD with alpha-1 antitrypsin-replete (called "usual chronic obstructive pulmonary disease") LOTT participants. Compare demographic, clinical, baseline oxygenation, and exercise desaturation features in participating AATD subjects with those of other LOTT subjects. LOTT is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing use of supplemental oxygen versus not in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and moderate hypoxemia (resting oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry, 89-93%) or normal oxygen saturation at rest and significant exercise desaturation. Among the 597 LOTT participants with nonmissing alpha-1 antitrypsin levels, 11 (1.8%) had severe AATD and 44 (7.4%) had mild/moderate AATD. Comparison of the 11 severely AAT-deficient individuals with the 542 LOTT participants with usual chronic obstructive pulmonary disease showed that the AATD subjects were younger and despite less smoking, had lower FEV1/FVC (mean post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC, 0.38 ± 0.06 vs. 0.46 ± 0.13; P = 0.002). Comparison with 27 age-, sex-, and FEV1-matched alpha-1 antitrypsin-normal LOTT participants showed no baseline difference in resting room air pulse oximetry saturation (AATD, 93.6% ± 2.3% vs. 92.7% ± 2.2%; P = 0.64). Exercise-related desaturation was more severe in the individuals with AATD based on desaturation to 88% or less sooner during a 6-minute-walk test, having a higher percentage of desaturation points (e.g., <90%) during exercise, and having a higher distance-saturation product (defined as the distance walked in 6 min multiplied by the nadir saturation achieved during the 6-minute-walk test). These

  17. Human Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (hAAT) therapy reduces renal dysfunction and acute tubular necrosis in a murine model of bilateral kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Maicas, Nuria; van der Vlag, Johan; Bublitz, Janin; Florquin, Sandrine; Bakker-van Bebber, Marinka; Dinarello, Charles A.; Verweij, Vivienne; Masereeuw, Roos; Joosten, Leo A.

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), the major serum serine protease inhibitor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of human AAT (hAAT) monotherapy during the early and recovery phase of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury. Mild renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury was induced in male C57Bl/6 mice by bilateral clamping of the renal artery and vein for 20 min. hAAT (80 mg/kg, Prolastin®) was administered daily intraperitoneally (i.p.) from day -1 until day 7 after surgery. Control animals received the same amount of human serum albumin (hAlb). Plasma, urine and kidneys were collected at 2h, 1, 2, 3, 8 and 15 days after reperfusion for histological and biochemical analysis. hAAT partially preserved renal function and tubular integrity after induction of bilateral kidney I/R injury, which was accompanied with reduced renal influx of macrophages and a significant decrease of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) protein levels in urine and plasma. During the recovery phase, hAAT significantly decreased kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) protein levels in urine but showed no significant effect on renal fibrosis. Although the observed effect size of hAAT administration was limited and therefore the clinical relevance of our findings should be evaluated carefully, these data support the potential of this natural protein to ameliorate ischemic and inflammatory conditions. PMID:28235038

  18. Comparison of stool microbiota compositions, stool alpha1-antitrypsin and calprotectin concentrations, and diarrhoeal morbidity of Indonesian infants fed breast milk or probiotic/prebiotic-supplemented formula.

    PubMed

    Oswari, Hanifah; Prayitno, Lamtorogung; Dwipoerwantoro, Pramita G; Firmansyah, Agus; Makrides, Maria; Lawley, Blair; Kuhn-Sherlock, Barbara; Cleghorn, Geoffrey; Tannock, Gerald W

    2013-12-01

    The composition of faecal microbiota of babies is known to be influenced by diet. Faecal calprotectin and α1-antitrypsin concentrations may be associated with mucosal permeability and inflammation. We aimed to assess whether there was any difference after consumption of a probiotic/prebiotic formula on faecal microbiota composition, calprotectin and α1-antitrypsin levels, and diarrhoea in comparison with breast milk-fed Indonesian infants. One hundred sixty infants, 2 to 6 weeks old, were recruited to the study. They were either breastfed or formula fed (80 per group). Faecal samples were collected at recruitment and 3 months later. Bacterial groups characteristic of the human faecal microbiota were quantified in faeces by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Calprotectin and α1-antitrypsin concentrations were measured using commercial kits. Details of diarrhoeal morbidity were documented and rated for severity. The compositions of the faecal microbiota of formula-fed compared with breast milk-fed children were similar except that the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DR10 was more abundant after 3 months consumption of the formula. Alpha1-antitrypsin levels were higher in breastfed compared with formula-fed infants. The occurrence of diarrhoea did not differ between the groups of babies. Feeding Indonesian babies with a probiotic/prebiotic formula did not produce marked differences in the composition of the faecal microbiota in comparison with breast milk. Detrimental effects of formula feeding on biomarkers of mucosal health were not observed. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  19. A study of common Mendelian disease carriers across ageing British cohorts: meta-analyses reveal heterozygosity for alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency increases respiratory capacity and height

    PubMed Central

    North, Teri-Louise; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Cooper, Cyrus; Deary, Ian J; Gallacher, John; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Martin, Richard M; Pattie, Alison; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Starr, John M; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Rodriguez, Santiago; Day, Ian N M

    2016-01-01

    Background Several recessive Mendelian disorders are common in Europeans, including cystic fibrosis (CFTR), medium-chain-acyl-Co-A-dehydrogenase deficiency (ACADM), phenylketonuria (PAH) and alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (SERPINA1). Methods In a multicohort study of >19 000 older individuals, we investigated the relevant phenotypes in heterozygotes for these genes: lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC)) for CFTR and SERPINA1; cognitive measures for ACADM and PAH; and physical capability for ACADM, PAH and SERPINA1. Results Findings were mostly negative but lung function in SERPINA1 (protease inhibitor (PI) Z allele, rs28929474) showed enhanced FEV1 and FVC (0.13 z-score increase in FEV1 (p=1.7×10−5) and 0.16 z-score increase in FVC (p=5.2×10−8)) in PI-MZ individuals. Height adjustment (a known, strong correlate of FEV1 and FVC) revealed strong positive height associations of the Z allele (1.50 cm increase in height (p=3.6×10−10)). Conclusions The PI-MZ rare (2%) SNP effect is nearly four times greater than the ‘top’ common height SNP in HMGA2. However, height only partially attenuates the SERPINA1-FEV1 or FVC association (around 50%) and vice versa. Height SNP variants have recently been shown to be positively selected collectively in North versus South Europeans, while the Z allele high frequency is localised to North Europe. Although PI-ZZ is clinically disadvantageous to lung function, PI-MZ increases both height and respiratory function; potentially a balanced polymorphism. Partial blockade of PI could conceivably form part of a future poly-therapeutic approach in very short children. The notion that elastase inhibition should benefit patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may also merit re-evaluation. PI is already a therapeutic target: our findings invite a reconsideration of the optimum level in respiratory care and novel pathway potential for development of agents for the

  20. Minimalistic sample preparation strategies for LC-MS quantification of large molecule biopharmaceuticals: a case study highlighting alpha-1 antitrypsin protein.

    PubMed

    Wright, Katherine; Dufield, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Large molecule biotherapeutics pose a distinctive bioanalytical challenge for LC-MS assay development, particularly when optimizing sample enrichment steps. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is used as an example for highlighting large-molecule assay-development strategies. Two sensitive and selective LC-MS/MS-based quantification assays were developed. Fit-for-purpose assay qualifications for BAL and serum matrices were performed by assessing sensitivity, precision and accuracy, dilution linearity and interferences. Our approach to sample preparation focuses on optimizing the simplest methodology necessary to generate fit-for-purpose bioanalytical assays. To measure AAT protein levels in preclinical species with selectivity and increased assay sensitivity, a minimalistic sample preparation strategy was adopted that included either traditional direct digestion or a more complicated immunoprecipitation enrichment process.

  1. Features of the milk whey protein partitioning in polyethyleneglycol-sodium citrate aqueous two-phase systems with the goal of isolating human alpha-1 antitrypsin expressed in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Boaglio, Andrea; Bassani, Georgina; Picó, Guillermo; Nerli, Bibiana

    2006-06-06

    Partitioning behaviour of the bovine whey proteins (bovine serum albumin, alpha-lactoalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin) and human alpha-1 antitrypsin in aqueous two-phase systems prepared with polyethyleneglycol (molecular masses: 1000, 1450 and 3350)-sodium citrate was analysed at pH 5.2, 6.2 and 8.2. Alpha lactoalbumin concentrated in the polyethyleneglycol rich-phase, while beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin and alpha-1 antitrypsin showed affinity for the citrate rich-phase. In aqueous two-phase systems of high medium pH and high polyethyleneglycol molecular mass the protein partitioning equilibrium is displaced to the citrate rich-phase. The polyethyleneglycol 1450-pH 5.2 system with a top/bottom phase-volume ratio of 3 showed to have the best capability of recovering the alpha-1 antitrypsin from a mixture prepared with natural milk whey and human alpha-1 antitrypsin. The recovery of this protein in the bottom phase was of 90% and the purity of the obtained product was of 98%. The method appears to be suitable as a starting point to isolate other human proteins expressed in transgenic bovine milk.

  2. Evaluation of Alpha 1-Antitrypsin and the Levels of mRNA Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase 7, Urokinase Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor and COX-2 for the Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Cosme, Angel; Hijona, Elizabeth; Enríquez-Navascués, José M.; Placer, Carlos; Villarreal, Eloisa; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Giraldez, María D.; Gironella, Meritxell; Balaguer, Francesc; Castells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer in both men and women in the majority of developed countries. Molecular tests of blood could potentially provide this ideal screening tool. Aim Our objective was to assess the usefulness of serum markers and mRNA expression levels in the diagnosis of CRC. Methods In a prospective study, we measured mRNA expression levels of 13 markers (carbonic anhydrase, guanylyl cyclase C, plasminogen activator inhibitor, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7), urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), urokinase-type plasminogen activator, survivin, tetranectin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cytokeratin 20, thymidylate synthase, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and CD44) and three proteins in serum (alpha 1 antitrypsin, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and activated C3 in 42 patients with CRC and 33 with normal colonoscopy results. Results Alpha 1-antitrypsin was the serum marker that was most useful for CRC diagnosis (1.79±0.25 in the CRC group vs 1.27±0.25 in the control group, P<0.0005). The area under the ROC curve for alpha 1-antitrypsin was 0.88 (0.79–0.96). The mRNA expression levels of five markers were statistically different between CRC cases and controls: those for which the ROC area was over 75% were MMP7 (0.81) and tetranectin (0.80), COX-2 (0.78), uPAR (0.78) and carbonic anhydrase (0.77). The markers which identified early stage CRC (Stages I and II) were alpha 1-antitrypsin, uPAR, COX-2 and MMP7. Conclusions Serum alpha 1-antitrypsin and the levels of mRNA expression of MMP7, COX-2 and uPAR have good diagnostic accuracy for CRC, even in the early stages. PMID:23300952

  3. Classifying Married Adults Diagnosed with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Based on Spousal Communication Patterns Using Latent Class Analysis: Insights for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A.; Wienke, Sara E.; Baker, Michelle K.

    2013-01-01

    Married adults are increasingly exposed to test results that indicate an increased genetic risk for adult-onset conditions. For example, a SERPINA1 mutation, associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), predisposes affected individuals to diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cancer, which are often detected in adulthood. Married adults are likely to discuss genetic test results with their spouses, and interpersonal research suggests that spouses’ communication patterns differ. Latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups of spousal communication patterns about AATD results from a sample of married adults in the Alpha-1 Research Registry (N = 130). A five-class model was identified, and the subgroups were consistent with existing spousal-communication typologies. This study also showed that genetic beliefs (e.g., genetic stigma), emotions, and experiences (e.g., insurance difficulties) covaried with membership in particular subgroups. Understanding these differences can serve as the foundation for the creation of effective, targeted communications interventions to address the specific needs and conversational patterns of different kinds of couples. PMID:24177906

  4. Spirituality, Illness Unpredictability, and Math Anxiety Effects on Negative Affect and Affect-Management Coping for Individuals Diagnosed with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Amber K; Parrott, Roxanne L; Smith, Rachel A

    2017-01-06

    A growing number of genetic tests are included in diagnostic protocols associated with many common conditions. A positive diagnosis associated with the presence of some gene versions in many instances predicts a range of possible outcomes, and the uncertainty linked to such results contributes to the need to understand varied responses and plan strategic communication. Uncertainty in illness theory (UIT; Mishel, 1988, 1990) guided the investigation of efforts to feel in control and hopeful regarding genetic testing and diagnosis for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). Participants included 137 individuals with AATD recruited from the Alpha-1 Research Registry who were surveyed about their subjective numeracy, anxiety about math, spirituality, perceptions of illness unpredictability, negative affect regarding genetic testing, and coping strategies about a diagnosis. Results revealed that experiencing more fear and worry contributed both directly and indirectly to affect-management coping strategies, operating through individual perceptions of illness unpredictability. The inability to predict the symptoms and course of events related to a genetic illness and anxiety regarding math heightened fear and worry. Spirituality lessened both illness unpredictability and negative affective responses to a diagnosis. Results affirm the importance of clinician and counselor efforts to incorporate attention to patient spirituality. They also illustrate the complexity associated with strategic efforts to plan communication about the different versions of a gene's effects on well-being, when some versions align with mild health effects and others with severe effects.

  5. Classifying married adults diagnosed with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency based on spousal communication patterns using latent class analysis: insights for intervention.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel A; Wienke, Sara E; Baker, Michelle K

    2014-06-01

    Married adults are increasingly exposed to test results that indicate an increased genetic risk for adult-onset conditions. For example, a SERPINA1 mutation, associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), predisposes affected individuals to diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cancer, which are often detected in adulthood. Married adults are likely to discuss genetic test results with their spouses, and interpersonal research suggests that spouses' communication patterns differ. Latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups of spousal communication patterns about AATD results from a sample of married adults in the Alpha-1 Research Registry (N = 130). A five-class model was identified, and the subgroups were consistent with existing spousal-communication typologies. This study also showed that genetic beliefs (e.g., genetic stigma), emotions, and experiences (e.g., insurance difficulties) covaried with membership in particular subgroups. Understanding these differences can serve as the foundation for the creation of effective, targeted communications interventions to address the specific needs and conversational patterns of different kinds of couples.

  6. Identification of a novel SERPINA-1 mutation causing alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in a patient with severe bronchiectasis and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Milger, Katrin; Holdt, Lesca Miriam; Teupser, Daniel; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Behr, Jürgen; Kneidinger, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), is known to cause emphysema and liver disease. Other manifestations, including airway disease or skin disorders, have also been described. A 44-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with dyspnea and respiratory insufficiency. She had never smoked, and had been diagnosed with COPD 9 years earlier. Three months previously, she had suffered a pulmonary embolism. Chest computed tomography scan revealed severe cystic bronchiectasis with destruction of the lung parenchyma. The sweat test was normal and there was no evidence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation. Capillary zone electrophoresis showed a decrease of alpha-1 globin band and AAT levels were below the quantification limit (<25 mg/dL). No S or Z mutation was identified, but sequencing analysis found a homozygous cytosine and adenine (CA) insertion in exon 2 of the SERPINA-1 gene, probably leading to a dysfunctional protein (PI Null/Null). This mutation has not been previously identified. The atypical presentation of the patient, with severe cystic bronchiectasis, highlights AAT deficiency as a differential diagnosis in bronchiectasis. Further, awareness should be raised regarding a possible increased risk of thromboembolism associated with AAT deficiency.

  7. Understanding Lung Deposition of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin in Acute Experimental Mouse Lung Injury Model Using Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yutian; Chen, Jianqing; Rong, Haojing; O'Neil, Shawn P.; Ghosh, Brahma; Nguyen, Vuong; Li, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Human plasma-derived α1-antitrypsin (AAT) delivered by intravenous infusion is used as augmentation therapy in patients with emphysema who have a genetic mutation resulting in deficiency of AAT. Inhalation is an alternative route of administration that can potentially increase the efficacy and convenience of treatment. This study was conducted to determine whether delivery to the lungs, initially via the intratracheal (IT) route of administration, would deliver efficacious levels of a recombinant AAT (rAAT) to the site of action in the lungs in mice. 125I-radiolabeled rAAT, fluorophore-conjugated rAAT (rAAT-Alexa488), and NE680 (neutrophil elastase 680, a silent fluorescent substrate of neutrophil elastase which fluoresces in the near-infrared range upon activation by neutrophil elastase) were used to characterize the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profile, distribution of rAAT within the lung, and efficacy of rAAT to inhibit neutrophil elastase at the site of action, respectively. The study has demonstrated that rAAT was able to gain access to locations where neutrophil elastase was localized. The histochemical quantification of rAAT activity relative to dose at the site of action provided here will improve confidence in predicting the human dose via the inhalation route. PMID:28050284

  8. Relationship between frequency, length, and treatment outcome of exacerbations to baseline lung function and lung density in alpha-1 antitrypsin-deficient COPD

    PubMed Central

    Vijayasaratha, Kesavaperumal; Stockley, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Background Diary cards are useful for analyzing exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although factors influencing the length and frequency of each episode are poorly understood. This study investigated factors that influence the features of exacerbations in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (PiZ phenotype) and COPD. Methods Daily diary cards were collected over 2 years. Patients had emphysema visualized and quantified by computed tomography scan, and had at least one documented exacerbation in the previous year. Results The patients (n = 23) had a mean age of 52.5 years, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of 1.2 L (38.4% predicted), corrected gas transfer (KCO) of 0.90 mmol/min/kPa/L (59.7% predicted), and 15th percentile lung density of 44.55 g/L. Two hundred and sixty-three exacerbations (164 treated) were identified. The frequency of treated exacerbations correlated negatively with KCO% predicted (r = −0.432; P = 0.022). Exacerbation length (determined for 17 of the patients for whom diary card data through the episode were available) correlated negatively with baseline 15th percentile lung density (r = −0.361; P = 0.003), and increased the longer treatment was delayed (r = 0.503; P < 0.001). Treatment delay was shorter with higher day 1 symptom score, lower baseline FEV1, FEV1/forced vital capacity, and lower 15th percentile lung density (r = −0.368, 0.272, 0.461, and 0.786; P = 0.004, 0.036, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively). Time to resolution of exacerbation after treatment initiation was not affected by treatment delay, but correlated negatively with KCO% predicted (r = −0.647; P = 0.007). Conclusion In alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, the frequency and length of resolution of exacerbation were related to baseline gas transfer. Treatment delay adversely affected exacerbation length, and lung density was the best independent predictor of delay in starting treatment. PMID:23226015

  9. Inflammatory cytokine response to exercise in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficient COPD patients ‘on’ or ‘off’ augmentation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is still limited information on systemic inflammation in alpha-1-antitrypsin-deficient (AATD) COPD patients and what effect alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy and/or exercise might have on circulating inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that AATD COPD patients on augmentation therapy (AATD + AUG) would have lower circulating and skeletal muscle inflammatory cytokines compared to AATD COPD patients not receiving augmentation therapy (AATD-AUG) and/or the typical non-AATD (COPD) patient. We also hypothesized that cytokine response to exercise would be lower in AATD + AUG compared to AATD-AUG or COPD subjects. Methods Arterial and femoral venous concentration and skeletal muscle expression of TNFα, IL-6, IL-1β and CRP were measured at rest, during and up to 4-hours after 50% maximal 1-hour knee extensor exercise in all COPD patient groups, including 2 additional groups (i.e. AATD with normal lung function, and healthy age-/activity-matched controls). Results Circulating CRP was higher in AATD + AUG (4.7 ± 1.6 mg/dL) and AATD-AUG (3.3 ± 1.2 mg/dL) compared to healthy controls (1.5 ± 0.3 mg/dL, p < 0.05), but lower in AATD compared to non-AATD-COPD patients (6.1 ± 2.6 mg/dL, p < 0.05). TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β were significantly increased by 1.7-, 1.7-, and 4.7-fold, respectively, in non-AATD COPD compared to AATD COPD (p < 0.05), and 1.3-, 1.7-, and 2.2-fold, respectively, compared to healthy subjects (p < 0.05). Skeletal muscle TNFα was on average 3–4 fold greater in AATD-AUG compared to the other groups (p < 0.05). Exercise showed no effect on these cytokines in any of our patient groups. Conclusion These data show that AATD COPD patients do not experience the same chronic systemic inflammation and exhibit reduced inflammation compared to non-AATD COPD patients. Augmentation therapy may help to improve muscle efflux of TNFα and reduce muscle TNFα concentration, but showed no

  10. Rapid DNA extraction protocol for detection of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency from dried blood spots by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Struniawski, R; Szpechcinski, A; Poplawska, B; Skronski, M; Chorostowska-Wynimko, J

    2013-01-01

    The dried blood spot (DBS) specimens have been successfully employed for the large-scale diagnostics of α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency as an easy to collect and transport alternative to plasma/serum. In the present study we propose a fast, efficient, and cost effective protocol of DNA extraction from dried blood spot (DBS) samples that provides sufficient quantity and quality of DNA and effectively eliminates any natural PCR inhibitors, allowing for successful AAT genotyping by real-time PCR and direct sequencing. DNA extracted from 84 DBS samples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients was genotyped for AAT deficiency variants by real-time PCR. The results of DBS AAT genotyping were validated by serum IEF phenotyping and AAT concentration measurement. The proposed protocol allowed successful DNA extraction from all analyzed DBS samples. Both quantity and quality of DNA were sufficient for further real-time PCR and, if necessary, for genetic sequence analysis. A 100% concordance between AAT DBS genotypes and serum phenotypes in positive detection of two major deficiency S- and Z- alleles was achieved. Both assays, DBS AAT genotyping by real-time PCR and serum AAT phenotyping by IEF, positively identified PI*S and PI*Z allele in 8 out of the 84 (9.5%) and 16 out of 84 (19.0%) patients, respectively. In conclusion, the proposed protocol noticeably reduces the costs and the hand-on-time of DBS samples preparation providing genomic DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for further real-time PCR or genetic sequence analysis. Consequently, it is ideally suited for large-scale AAT deficiency screening programs and should be method of choice.

  11. Expression of human alpha1-antitrypsin in mice and dogs following AAV6 vector-mediated gene transfer to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Christine L; Madtes, David K; Vaughan, Andrew E; Wang, Zejing; Storb, Rainer; Tapscott, Stephen J; Miller, A Dusty

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the potential of lung-directed gene therapy for alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency using an adeno-associated virus type 6 (AAV6) vector containing a human AAT (hAAT) complementary DNA (cDNA) delivered to the lungs of mice and dogs. The results in normal and immune-deficient mice showed that hAAT concentrations were much higher in lung fluid than in plasma, and therapeutic levels were obtained even in normal mice. However, in normal mice an immune response against the vector and/or transgene limited long-term gene expression. An AAV6 vector expressing a marker protein verified that AAV6 vectors efficiently transduced lung cells in dogs. Delivery of AAV6-hAAT resulted in low levels of hAAT in dog serum but therapeutic levels in the lung that persisted for at least 58 days to 4 months in three immunosuppressed dogs. Expression in the serum was not detectable after 45 days in one nonimmune suppressed dog. A lymphoproliferative response to AAV capsid but not to hAAT was detected even after immunosuppression. These results in mice and dogs show the feasibility of expression of therapeutic levels of AAT in the lungs after AAV vector delivery, and advocate for approaches to prevent cellular immune responses to AAV capsid proteins for persistence of gene expression in humans.

  12. Validation and development of an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin levels in dried blood spots from patients with COPD*

    PubMed Central

    Zillmer, Laura Russo; Russo, Rodrigo; Manzano, Beatriz Martins; Ivanaga, Ivan; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; de Souza, Altay Alves Lino; Santos, Gildo; Rodriguez, Francisco; Miravitlles, Marc; Jardim, José Roberto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate and develop an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) levels in dried blood spots from COPD patients in Brazil. METHODS: We determined AAT levels in serum samples and dried blood spots from 192 COPD patients. For the preparation of dried blood spots, a disk (diameter, 6 mm) was placed into a tube, eluted with 200 µL of PBS, and stored overnight at 4ºC. All of the samples were analyzed by immunonephelometry in duplicate. We used the bootstrap resampling method in order to determine a cut-off point for AAT levels in dried blood spots. RESULTS: The correlation coefficient between the AAT levels in serum samples and those in dried blood spots was r = 0.45. For dried blood spots, the cut-off value was 2.02 mg/dL (97% CI: 1.45-2.64 mg/dL), with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 100%, 95.7%, 27.2%, and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This method for the determination of AAT levels in dried blood spots appears to be a reliable screening tool for patients with AAT deficiency. PMID:24310627

  13. Comparison between the thermodynamic features of alpha1-antitrypsin and human albumin partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems of polyethyleneglycol-dextran.

    PubMed

    Di Nucci, H; Nerli, B; Picó, G

    2001-02-15

    The partitioning features of human serum albumin and alpha1-antitrypsin in aqueous two-phase systems of dextran and polyethyleneglycol were studied. The effect of factors that affect the electrostatic term of Albertsson equation such as pH, ionic strength, presence of neutral salts as well as those which affect the non-electrostatic term such as polyethyleneglycol mol. wt. and temperature were assayed. At room temperature, the positive entropy and enthalpy changes associated to the partition may be due to a release of part of the structured water in the domain of proteins caused by H-bonds rupture when the proteins are transferred to the upper phase. This behaviour may be explained on the basis of a preferential hydration of the proteins in presence of dextran (bottom phase) and a preferential interaction of polyethyleneglycols with the protein domain (top phase). The electrostatic interactions were similar for both proteins due to the proximity of their isoelectric point and similar dissociation profiles of their prototropic groups.

  14. Nonsmoking, non-alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency-induced emphysema in nonsmokers with healed spontaneous pneumothorax, identified by computed tomography of the lungs.

    PubMed

    Bense, L; Lewander, R; Eklund, G; Hedenstierna, G; Wiman, L G

    1993-02-01

    This case-control study is based on an investigation of 27 nonsmoking patients with radiologically verified spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) and ten healthy never-smoker control subjects. The posteroanterior and lateral radiographs of patients and control subjects were normal. They were all submitted to the same clinical, laboratory, and radiologic examinations, including computed tomography (CT) of the lungs, with the aim of detecting any parenchymatous lung changes. Emphysema-like changes (ELCs) were detected on CT in 22 (81 percent) of the 27 patients, and if the ELC cases detected during interventional surgery are added, the frequency increases to 24/27 (89 percent). In 20 patients with unilateral SP, at least one ELC was found in 13 of the 20 SP-affected lungs, but only in five of the 20 lungs that were not diagnosed as having SP (p < 0.05). ELCs were found more frequently in the upper than in the lower lung regions (p < 0.05) and more frequently in the radiologically peripheral than in central regions (p < 0.001). No ELC was detected in the control group on CT. No alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency was found in the 27 nonsmoking patients with radiologically verified SP who had ELCs despite the absence of these known promoters of emphysema.

  15. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) anomalies are associated with lung disease due to rapidly growing mycobacteria and AAT inhibits Mycobacterium abscessus infection of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chan, Edward D; Kaminska, Aleksandra M; Gill, Wendy; Chmura, Kathryn; Feldman, Nicole E; Bai, Xiyuan; Floyd, Corinne M; Fulton, Kayte E; Huitt, Gwen A; Strand, Matthew J; Iseman, Michael D; Shapiro, Leland

    2007-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are ubiquitous in the environment but cause lung disease in only a fraction of exposed individuals. This variable susceptibility to disease implies vulnerability to RGM infection due to weakness in host defense. Since most persons who contract RGM lung disease have no known host defense defect, it is likely that uncharacterized host deficiencies exist that predispose to RGM infection. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is a host factor that may protect individuals from respiratory infections. Therefore, we assessed AAT protein anomalies as a risk factor for RGM lung disease. In a cohort of 100 patients with RGM lung disease, Mycobacterium (M.) abscessus was the most prevalent organism, isolated in 64 (64%) subjects. Anomalous AAT proteins were present in 27% of the cohort, which is 1.6 times the estimated prevalence of anomalous AAT proteins in the United States population (p=0.008). In in vitro studies, both AAT and a synthetic inhibitor of serine proteases suppressed M. abscessus infection of monocyte-derived macrophages by up to 65% (p<0.01). AAT may be an anti-RGM host-defense factor, and anomalous AAT phenotypes or AAT deficiency may constitute risk factors for pulmonary disease due to RGM.

  16. SERPINA1 and MAN1B1 polymorphisms are not linked to severe liver disease in a French cohort of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency children.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lachaux, Alain; Ruiz, Mathias; Restier, Lioara; Belmalih, Abdelhouaed; Chapuis-Cellier, Colette; Francina, Alain; Renoux, Céline; Bouchecareilh, Marion

    2017-09-08

    Fifteen to twenty percent of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency patients (A1ATD) have a severe liver outcome (portal hypertension - PHT) during childhood. Since they all share the same ZZSERPINA1 genotype and that environmental factors such as alcohol cannot be advanced, the presence of modifier genes is now well recognized. SNPs located on the SERPINA1 and MAN1B1 genes have already been tested in very few studies with contradictory or not replicated results. Our genotype-phenotype correlation study, performed on 92 ZZ children, aimed at determining once and for all if SERPINA1 and MAN1B1 polymorphisms may be implied in the onset of PHT. To do so, we also performed for the first time a complete haplotype reconstruction for data analysis. The two genetic associations with severe liver disease that had been suspected previously (one SNP for SERPINA1 and another for MAN1B1) were not confirmed in our cohort. Moreover, the haplotype analysis identified only one major genetic background for the SERPINA1 Z-allele, allowing us to exclude the presence of a frequent modifier SNP within. For MAN1B1, four major haplotypes were identified but the prevalence of PHT did not significantly differ between them. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms in these two genes probably do not influence the onset of severe liver disease in A1ATD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Emergence of a Stage-Dependent Human Liver Disease Signature with Directed Differentiation of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin-Deficient iPS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew A.; Ying, Lei; Liesa, Marc; Segeritz, Charis-Patricia; Mills, Jason A.; Shen, Steven S.; Jean, Jyhchang; Lonza, Geordie C.; Liberti, Derek C.; Lang, Alex H.; Nazaire, Jean; Gower, Adam C.; Müeller, Franz-Josef; Mehta, Pankaj; Ordóñez, Adriana; Lomas, David A.; Vallier, Ludovic; Murphy, George J.; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Spira, Avrum; Shirihai, Orian S.; Ramirez, Maria I.; Gadue, Paul; Kotton, Darrell N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an inexhaustible source of cells for modeling disease and testing drugs. Here we develop a bioinformatic approach to detect differences between the genomic programs of iPSCs derived from diseased versus normal human cohorts as they emerge during in vitro directed differentiation. Using iPSCs generated from a cohort carrying mutations (PiZZ) in the gene responsible for alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, we find that the global transcriptomes of PiZZ iPSCs diverge from normal controls upon differentiation to hepatic cells. Expression of 135 genes distinguishes PiZZ iPSC-hepatic cells, providing potential clues to liver disease pathogenesis. The disease-specific cells display intracellular accumulation of mutant AAT protein, resulting in increased autophagic flux. Furthermore, we detect beneficial responses to the drug carbamazepine, which further augments autophagic flux, but adverse responses to known hepatotoxic drugs. Our findings support the utility of iPSCs as tools for drug development or prediction of toxicity. PMID:25843048

  18. Salivary levels of secretary IgA, C5a and alpha 1-antitrypsin in sulfur mustard exposed patients 20 years after the exposure, Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study (SICS).

    PubMed

    Yarmohammadi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Mostafaie, Ali; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Yaraee, Roya; Pourfarzam, Shahryar; Jalali-Nadoushan, Mohammadreza; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Vaez-Mahdavi, Mohammad-Reza; Soroush, Mohammad-Reza; Khamesipour, Ali; Faghihzadeh, Elham; Sharifnia, Zarin; Naghizadeh, Mohammad-Mehdi; Ghazanfari, Tooba

    2013-11-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a strong toxic agent that causes acute and chronic health effects on a myriad of organs following exposure. Although the primary targets of inhaled mustard gas are the epithelia of the upper respiratory tract, the lower respiratory tract is the focus of the current study, and upper tract complications remain obscure. To our knowledge there is no study addressing the secretory IgA (S-IgA), C5a, alpha 1 antitrypsin (A1AT) in the saliva of SM-exposed victims. In this study, as many as 500 volunteers, including 372 SM-exposed cases and 128 control volunteers were recruited. A 3 ml sample of saliva was collected from each volunteer, and the level of secretory IgA, C5a, and alpha 1 antitrypsin in the samples were compared between the two groups. The SM-exposed group showed a significantly higher amount of salivary alpha 1 antitrypsin and secretary IgA compared to the control group (p<.006 and p<.018 respectively). The two groups showed no significant difference (p=0.192) in the level of C5a. The results also showed that the level of salivary A1AT is more than that of IgA in severely injured cases. The findings presented here provide valuable insight for both researchers and practitioners dealing with victims of the chemical warfare agent, sulfur mustard. This research indicates that certain branches of the inflammatory processes mandate serious attention in therapeutic interventions.

  19. Engineering of alpha1-antitrypsin variants selective for subtilisin-like proprotein convertases PACE4 and PC6: importance of the P2' residue in stable complex formation of the serpin with proprotein convertase.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Akihiko; Kanie, Hiroki; Makise, Hirotaka; Yuasa, Keizo; Nagahama, Masami; Matsuda, Yoshiko

    2007-04-01

    Furin and PACE4, members of the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase (SPC) family, have been implicated in the metastatic progression of certain tumors in addition to the activation of viral coat proteins and bacterial toxins, indicating that these enzymes are potential targets for therapeutic agents. Alpha1-Antitrypsin Portland is an engineered alpha1-antitrypsin designed as a furin-specific inhibitor and has been used as a tool in the functional analysis of furin. In this work, we engineered rat alpha1-antitrypsin to create a PACE4-specific inhibitor. Substituting Arg-Arg-Arg-Arg for Ala-Val-Pro-Met(352) at P4-P1 and Ala for Leu(354) at P2' created a potent PACE4- and PC6-specific inhibitor. This variant (RRRRSA) formed an SDS- and heat-stable serpin/proteinase complex with PACE4 or PC6 and inhibited both enzyme activities. The RRRRSA variant was efficiently cleaved by furin without formation of the stable complex. This is the first report of a highly selective protein-based inhibitor of PACE4 and PC6. This inhibitor will be useful in delineating the roles of PACE4 and PC6 localized in the extracellular matrix.

  20. Additional N-glycosylation in the N-terminal region of recombinant human alpha-1 antitrypsin enhances the circulatory half-life in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye-Shin; Kim, Ji-Sun; Lee, Sang Mee; Park, Soon Jae

    2016-04-01

    Glycosylation affects the circulatory half-lives of therapeutic proteins. However, the effects of an additional N-glycosylation in the unstructured region or the loop region of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) on the circulatory half-life of the protein are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of an additional N-glycosylation site (Q4N/D6T, Q9N, D12N/S14T, A70N, G148T, R178N, or V212N) to the three naturally occurring N-glycosylation sites in human A1AT. A single-dose (445 μg/kg) pharmacokinetic study using male Sprague-Dawley rats showed that, among the seven recombinant A1AT (rA1AT) mutants, Q9N and D12N/S14T showed the highest serum concentration and area under the curve values, as well as similar circulatory half-lives that were 2.2-fold higher than plasma-derived A1AT and 1.7-fold higher than wild-type rA1AT. We further characterized the Q9N mutant regarding the N-glycan profile, sialic acid content, protease inhibitory activity, and protein stability. The results indicate that an additional N-glycosylation in the flexible N-terminal region increases the circulatory half-life of rA1AT without altering its protease inhibitory activity. Our study provides novel insight into the use of rA1AT for the treatment of emphysema with an increased injection interval relative to the clinically used plasma-derived A1AT.

  1. The role and importance of glycosylation of acute phase proteins with focus on alpha-1 antitrypsin in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cormac; Saldova, Radka; Wormald, Mark R; Rudd, Pauline M; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2014-07-03

    Acute phase proteins (APPs) are a group of circulating plasma proteins which undergo changes quantitatively or qualitatively at the time of inflammation. Many of these APPs are glycosylated, and it has been shown that alterations in glycosylation may occur in inflammatory and malignant conditions. Changes in glycosylation have been studied as potential biomarkers in cancer and also in chronic inflammatory conditions and have been shown to correlate with disease severity in certain conditions. Serine protease inhibitors (serpins), many of which are also APPs, are proteins involved in the control of proteases in numerous pathways. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (AAT) is the most abundant serpin within the circulation and is an APP which has been shown to increase in response to inflammation. The primary role of AAT is maintaining the protease/antiprotease balance in the lung, but it also possesses important anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. Several glycoforms of AAT exist, and they possess differing properties in regard to plasma half-life and stability. Glycosylation may also be important in determining the immune modulatory properties of AAT. The review will focus on the role and importance of glycosylation in acute phase proteins with particular attention to AAT and its use as a biomarker of disease. The review describes the processes involved in glycosylation, how glycosylation changes in differing disease states, and the alterations that occur to glycans of APPs with disease and inflammation. Finally, the review explores the importance of changes in glycosylation of AAT at times of inflammation and in malignant conditions and how this may impact upon the functions of AAT.

  2. Intradermal alpha1-antitrypsin therapy avoids fatal anaphylaxis, prevents type 1 diabetes and reverses hyperglycaemia in the NOD mouse model of the disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Lu, Y; Li, H; Campbell-Thompson, M; Parker, M; Wasserfall, C; Haller, M; Brantly, M; Schatz, D; Atkinson, M; Song, S

    2010-10-01

    Human alpha1-antitrypsin (hAAT) gene therapy prevents type 1 diabetes in a NOD mouse model of diabetes. However, repeated i.p. injections of hAAT into NOD mice leads to fatal anaphylaxis. The aim of the study was to determine if an alternative route of administration avoids anaphylaxis and allows evaluation of hAAT's potential for diabetes prevention and reversal. We also sought to determine if the addition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), augments hAAT's capacity to prevent or reverse disease in the NOD mice. To evaluate hAAT pharmacokinetics, serum hAAT levels were monitored in NOD mice receiving a single dose (2 mg) of hAAT by i.p., s.c. or i.d. injection. For studies of type 1 diabetes prevention and reversal, mice received i.d. hAAT (2 mg/mouse/3 days) for 8 or 10 weeks or hAAT and G-CSF (i.p., 6 microg/day) for 6 weeks. Blood glucose determinations, glucose tolerance testing and insulin tolerance tests were performed. Both i.p. and s.c. injections resulted in fatal anaphylaxis. The i.d. injection avoided anaphylaxis and i.d. injection of hAAT into 11-week-old NOD mice prevented disease (p = 0.005, AAT vs PBS at 40 weeks of age). Treatment of diabetic NOD mice with hAAT or hAAT plus G-CSF provided long-term (at least 100 days) reversal of diabetes in 50% of treated animals. G-CSF did not enhance the reversal rates of hAAT. Glucose tolerance and insulin levels were normalised in mice with hAAT prevention and reversal. Intradermal hAAT prevents and reverses disease in a NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes without inducing anaphylaxis.

  3. Identification of a new defective SERPINA1 allele (PI*Zla palma) encoding an alpha-1-antitrypsin with altered glycosylation pattern.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, José M; Ramos-Díaz, Ruth; Pérez, José A

    2017-10-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a genetic condition that arises from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and predisposes to develop pulmonary emphysema and, less frequently, liver disease. Occasionally, new defective SERPINA1 alleles are detected as an outcome of targeted-screening programs or case-findings. This study began with a female patient showing bronchial hyperreactivity. Serum level and phenotype for AAT was analysed by immunonephelometry and isoelectric focusing electrophoresis. The SERPINA1 gene of the proband was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Analysis of AAT deficiency was extended to the proband's family. An abnormal AAT variant that migrated to a more cathodal position than PiZ AAT was detected in the proband's serum. Genetic analysis demonstrated that proband is heterozygous for a new defective SERPINA1 allele (PI*Zla palma) characterized by the c.321C > A (p.Asn83Lys) mutation in the M1Val213 background. This mutation abolishes the N-glycosylation site in position 83 of the mature AAT. Eight relatives of the proband are carriers of the PI*Zla palma allele and four of them have shown symptoms of bronchial asthma or bronchial hyperreactivity. The mean α1AT level in the serum of PI*MZla palma individuals was 87.1 mg/dl. The reduction in circulating AAT levels associated to the PI*Zla palma allele was similar to that of PI*Z allele, representing a risk of impairment in lung function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Polymorphisms in the HPC/ELAC-2 and alpha 1-antitrypsin genes that correlate with human diseases in a North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Sobti, Ranbir C; Thakur, Hitender; Gupta, Lipsy; Janmeja, Ashok K; Seth, Amlesh; Singh, Sharwan K

    2011-06-01

    Two genes HPC/ELAC-2 and AAT were studied in north Indian population. HPC/ELAC-2 was studied in prostate cancer cases and AAT was studied in COPD patients. HPC/ELAC-2 is considered as an important cancer-susceptibility gene in prostate cancer. There are two common polymorphisms of this gene, i.e., Ser217Leu and Ala541Thr. Alpha 1 antitrypsin is a highly polymorphic anti-elastase enzyme, especially active in the protection of alveoli and liver. In the present study, we observed the distribution of two deficient alleles PiZ and Pi S in COPD patients. We extracted the DNA from 157 prostate cancer cases, 200 COPD patients, 170 BPH and 370 healthy controls. The polymorphisms were studied by PCR-RFLP technique. The mutant genotype (Leu/Leu) of HPC/ELAC-2 was present in 9.6, 7.6 and 5.9% of BPH, cancer cases and healthy controls, respectively. Higher risk of Ser/Leu as well as Leu/Leu had shown when compared to healthy controls. That was about 1.5 and 1.7-fold (OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 0.96-2.51; OR = 1.70; 95% CI = 0.74-3.92), respectively. Risk was found to be increased in smokers and those consuming non-vegetarian diet. Our results suggest that the HPC/ELAC-2 polymorphisms, especially in localized cases, could help to predict prostate cancer risk and confirm its high prevalence of the leu/leu allele in north Indian population. Considering heterozygous PiZ genotype, we obtained an OR of 3.82 (P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis adjusted by age sex and drinking habit showed 4.15-fold increased risk for COPD in PiZ heterozygous individuals. No increased risk was observed in the individuals carrying PiS alleles.

  5. Alpha 1-antitrypsin activates lung cancer cell survival by acting on cap-dependent protein translation, vesicle-mediated transport, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seung-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Hong, Seong-Ho; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ah Young; Kim, Sanghwa; Lee, Somin; Kang, Jeong Won; Chae, Chanhee; Park, Jongsun; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-07-19

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although elevated expression levels of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) have been reported in lung cancer patients, the precise role of AAT in lung cancer progression and prevention has not yet been fully elucidated. We have explored the mechanisms by which AAT stimulates in lung cancer progression. Here, we used proteomic analyses to compare protein levels following AAT overexpression in normal lung L132 cells containing fundamentally low level of AAT. Overexpression of AAT increased levels of proteins involved in transcription and translation, such as signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1-alpha 2 (EEF1A2). Furthermore, dual luciferase activity for cap-dependent protein translation increased a 53% at 24 h and 45% at 48 h in AAT-overexpressing cells compared with control. Overexpression of AAT also increased levels of the vesicular transport protein, GOPC, which inhibited the expression of the autophagy protein, BECN1, thereby possibly increasing cell survival. In addition, overexpression of AAT promoted angiogenesis and cell adhesion through increasing expression of the metastatic protein, thrombospondin 1 (THBS1). In contrast, down-regulation of AAT by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) suppressed cell proliferation, metastasis, and adhesion in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and in the lung tissue of K-rasLA1 lung cancer model mice. These findings strongly suggest that AAT regulation shows promise as an alternative avenue for lung cancer treatment and prevention.

  6. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: from genoma to liver disease. PiZ mouse as model for the development of liver pathology in human.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, Isabella; Callea, Francesco; Stefanelli, Marta; Mariani, Riccardo; Santorelli, Filippo M; Francalanci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous individuals with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) type PiZ have an increased risk of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is noteworthy that HCCs are composed by hepatocytes without accumulation of AAT, but the reason for this remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine liver pathology in PiZ mice, focusing the attention on the distribution of AAT globules in normal liver, regenerative foci and neoplastic nodules. Liver of 79 PiZ mice and 18 wild type (Wt) was histologically analysed for steatosis, clear cell foci, hyperplasia and neoplasia. The expression of human-AAT transgene and murine AAT, in non-neoplastic liver and in hyperplastic/neoplastic nodules was tested by qPCR and qRT-PCR. RT-PCR was used to study expression of hepatic markers: albumin, α-foetoprotein, transthyretin, AAT, glucose-6-phospate, tyrosine aminotransferase. Liver pathology was seen more frequently in PiZ (47/79) than in Wt (5/18) and its development was age related. In older PiZ mice (18-24 m), livers showed malignant tumours (HCC and angiosarcoma) (17/50), hyperplastic nodules (28/50), non-specific changes (33/50), whereas only 9/50 were normal. Both human-AATZ DNA and mRNA showed no differences between tumours/nodules and normal liver, while murine-AAT mRNA was reduced in tumours/nodules. Accumulation of AAT is associated with an increased risk of liver nodules. The presence of globule-devoid hepatocytes and the reduced expression of murine-AAT mRNA in hyperplastic and neoplastic nodules suggest that these hepatic lesions in AATD could originate from proliferating dedifferentiated cells, lacking AAT storage and becoming capable of AFP re-expression. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pancreatic islet xenograft survival in mice is extended by a combination of alpha-1-antitrypsin and single-dose anti-CD4/CD8 therapy.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Efrat; Baranovski, Boris M; Shahaf, Galit; Lewis, Eli C

    2013-01-01

    Clinical pancreatic islet transplantation is under evaluation for the treatment of autoimmune diabetes, yet several limitations preclude widespread use. For example, there is a critical shortage of human pancreas donors. Xenotransplantation may solve this problem, yet it evokes a rigorous immune response which can lead to graft rejection. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a clinically available and safe circulating anti-inflammatory and tissue protective glycoprotein, facilitates islet alloimmune-tolerance and protects from inflammation in several models. Here, we examine whether human AAT (hAAT), alone or in combination with clinically relevant approaches, achieves long-term islet xenograft survival. Rat-to-mouse islet transplantation was examined in the following groups: untreated (n = 6), hAAT (n = 6, 60-240 mg/kg every 3 days from day -10), low-dose co-stimulation blockade (anti-CD154/LFA-1) and single-dose anti-CD4/CD8 (n = 5-7), either as mono- or combination therapies. Islet grafting was accompanied by blood glucose follow-up. In addition, skin xenografting was performed in order to depict responses that occur in draining lymph nodes. According to our results hAAT monotherapy and hAAT/anti-CD154/LFA-1 combined therapy, did not delay rejection day (11-24 days untreated vs. 10-22 day treated). However, host and donor intragraft inflammatory gene expression was diminished by hAAT therapy in both setups. Single dose T-cell depletion using anti-CD4/CD8 depleting antibodies, which provided 14-15 days of reduced circulating T-cells, significantly delayed rejection day (28-52 days) but did not achieve graft acceptance. In contrast, in combination with hAAT, the group displayed significantly extended rejection days and a high rate of graft acceptance (59, 61, >90, >90, >90). In examination of graft explants, marginal mononuclear-cell infiltration containing regulatory T-cells predominated surviving xenografts. We suggest that temporal T-cell depletion, as in the

  8. Health status and lung function in the Swedish alpha 1-antitrypsin deficient cohort, identified by neonatal screening, at the age of 37–40 years

    PubMed Central

    Piitulainen, Eeva; Mostafavi, Behrouz; Tanash, Hanan A

    2017-01-01

    Background Severe alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (genotype PiZZ) is a well-known risk factor for COPD. A cohort of PiZZ and PiSZ individuals was identified by the Swedish national neonatal AAT screening program in 1972–1974 and followed up regularly since birth. Our aim was to study the lung function, respiratory symptoms and health status at the age of 38 years in comparison with a random sample of control subjects selected from the population registry. Methods The study group included 120 PiZZ, 46 PiSZ and 164 control subjects (PiMM), who answered a questionnaire on smoking habits and symptoms and the Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) on quality of life. A total of 89 PiZZ, 33 PiSZ and 92 PiMM subjects underwent spirometry. Results Four percent of the PiZZ, 2% of the PiSZ and 12% of the control subjects were current smokers (P=0.008), and 17% of the PiZZ, 9% of the PiSZ and 21% of the control subjects had stopped smoking. The PiZZ current smokers had a significantly higher (ie, poorer) median activity score according to the SGRQ than the PiZZ never-smokers (P=0.032). The PiMM current smokers had significantly higher activity score (P<0.001), symptom score (P<0.001), and total score (P=0.001) according to the SGRQ than the PiMM never-smokers. The PiZZ current smokers had a significantly lower postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)% of predicted value (P=0.019) and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio (P=0.032) than the PiZZ never-smokers. The proportion of subjects with a FEV1/FVC ratio of <0.70, indicating COPD, was significantly higher in the PiZZ current smokers than in the PiZZ never-smokers (P=0.001). Among the PiSZ and PiMM subjects, the differences in lung function between the smoking subgroups were insignificant. Conclusion PiZZ current smokers were found to have signs of COPD before 40 years of age. Smoking is less common among the AAT-deficient subjects identified by neonatal screening than among their peers

  9. Alpha-1-antitrypsin suppresses oxidative stress in preeclampsia by inhibiting the p38MAPK signaling pathway: An in vivo and in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Yuan, Hua; Yang, Lan; Xu, Jian-Juan; Hu, Ling-Qin

    2017-01-01

    This present study was designed to investigate the effects of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) on oxidative stress in preeclampsia (PE) by regulating p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) signaling pathway. HTR8/SVneo cells were randomly assigned into normal, hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R), HR + AAT and HR + siRNA-AAT groups. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expressions of p-p38MAPK, AAT, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and activating transcription factor2 (ATF2). Flow cytometry, scratch test, cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and the 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiazol (-z-y1)-3,5-di- phenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay were conducted to detect reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell apoptosis, cell migration, proliferation and cytotoxicity, respectively. Mouse models in PE were established, which were divided into normal pregnancy (NP), PE and PE + AAT groups with blood pressure and urine protein measured. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were conducted to detect the activity of oxidative stress-related kinases and expressions of inflammatory cytokines and coagulation-related factors in cells and mice placenta. Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect AAT and p38MAPK expressions, apoptosis-related protein expressions, and apoptosis rate in mice placenta. Compared with the normal group, the H/R group had decreased expression of AAT, activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and GSH-Px, cell proliferation and migration, but increased p38MAPK, STAT1, ATF2, MDA, H2O2, inflammatory cytokines, coagulation-related factors, cell cytotoxicity, ROS, apoptotic factors and apoptosis rate. Compared with the H/R group, the HR + ATT group had increased expressions of AAT, activity of SOD and GSH-Px, cell proliferation and

  10. [Alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes in togolese population: description of high frequency of rare allele Pi(F) in isolated ethnic group].

    PubMed

    Tete-Benissan, A; Gbeassor, M

    2011-10-01

    The study, which is a ethnobiologic characterization, investigated α(1)-antitrypsin gene polymorphism in the togolese ethnic groups. We aimed to determine the existence of rare or deficient alleles predisposing to pulmonary or hepatic genetic diseases. We focused our study on healthy subjects of two samples by comparing 205 Adélé from relative isolated ethnic group alive in mountain region and 255 subjects from pluriethnic population living on Atlantic coastal region. Data analysis was performed by α(1)-antitrypsin level quantification and serum isoelectric focusing. The two alleles Pi(M) et Pi(F) frequencies are respectively 0.834 and 0.166 in Adélé; 0.989 and 0.011 in the subjects from pluriethnic population. Phenotypes MM and FM distribution in the two groups is significantly different (p<0.001). However, α(1)-antitrypsin polymorphism does not significantly influence proteinic and lipidic profiles of the subjects in the two samples. The Pi(F) allele of α(1) antitrypsin is rare allele in the world global populations. Its very high frequency in Adélé explained by preferential endogamic marriage in this ethnic group. Compared to the subjects from pluriethnic population, more than 30 Adélé subjects present a higher risk to develop pulmonary diseases according to isoform F properties. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Deposition of alpha 1-antitrypsin and loss of glycoconjugate carrying Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I binding sites in the glomerular sclerotic process. Phenomena common to chronic pyelonephritis and chronic diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, S; Irisa, S; Nakamura, T; Uemura, S; Otsuji, Y; Ohi, Y; Sato, E

    1983-01-01

    Sclerotic processes of glomeruli in chronic pyelonephritis (CPN) and chronic diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (CDPGN) were investigated in a lectin binding study in connection with an immunofluorescent examination of protease inhibitor deposition. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), which is specific to a certain terminal alpha-L-fucosyl residue of glycoconjugates, specifically labelled intact endothelia of glomerular capillaries, peritubular capillaries and blood vessels in human kidneys. Segmental or global loss of the UEA-I binding with glomerular capillaries was observed in the sclerotic areas where alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) deposits were always detected in the glomeruli with segmental or global sclerosis of CPN. This high correlation between loss of UEA-I binding and alpha 1AT deposition was also observed in the affected glomeruli of CDPGN. In considering glomerular sclerosis, it is significant that loss of UEA-I binding and alpha 1AT deposition are common to both CPN and CDPGN, although their original etiologies are quite different.

  12. Low serum levels of alpha1 anti-trypsin (α1-AT) and risk of airflow obstruction in non-primary α1-AT-deficient patients with compensated chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romero, Elizabeth; Suárez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Elizalde-Barrera, César Iván; Mondragón-Terán, Paul; Martínez-Hernández, José Enrique; Gómez-Cortés, Eduardo; Pérez-Cabeza de Vaca, Rebeca; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando E; Melchor-López, Alberto; Jiménez-Saab, Nayeli Gabriela

    2015-04-27

    Alpha1 anti-trypsin (α1-AT), a serine protease inhibitor synthesized in the liver, is a major circulating antiprotease that provides defense against proteolytic damage in several tissues. Its deficiency is associated with airflow obstruction. The present study aimed to explore the role of α1-AT as a biomarker of airflow performance in chronic liver disease (CLD). Serum α1-AT levels and lung function (spirometry) were evaluated in non-primary α1-AT-deficient, alcoholic CLD patients without evident respiratory limitations. Thirty-four patients with airflow obstruction (n=11), airflow restriction (n=12), and normal airflow (n=11, age-matched controls) were eligible. α1-AT was decreased in the airflow obstruction group. ROC-cutoff α1-AT=24 mg/dL effectively discriminated airflow obstruction (AUC=0.687) and was associated with a 10-fold higher risk (p=0.0007). Lower α1-AT increased the risk of airflow obstruction in CLD patients without primary α1-AT deficiency.

  13. Development of selectivity of alpha1-antitrypsin variant by mutagenesis in its reactive site loop against proprotein convertase. A crucial role of the P4 arginine in PACE4 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Akihiko; Ikoma, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Emi; Matsuda, Yoshiko

    2002-02-01

    PACE4, furin and PC6 are Ca2+-dependent serine endoproteases that belong to the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase (SPC) family. Recent reports have supported the involvement of these enzymes in processing of growth/differentiation factors, viral replication, activation of bacterial toxins and tumorigenesis, indicating that these enzymes are a fascinating target for therapeutic agents. In this work, we evaluated the sensitivity and selectivity of three rat alpha1-antitrypsin variants which contained RVPR352, AVRR352 and RVRR352, respectively, within their reactive site loop using both inhibition of enzyme activity toward a fluorogenic substrate in vitro and formation of a SDS-stable protease/inhibitor complex ex vivo. The RVPR variant showed relatively broad selectivity, whereas the AVRR and RVRR variants were more selective than the RVPR variant. The AVRR variant inhibited furin and PC6 but not PACE4. This selectivity was further confirmed by complex formation and inhibition of pro-complement C3 processing. On the other hand, although the RVRR variant inhibited both PACE4 and furin effectively, it needed a 600-fold higher concentration than the RVPR variant to inhibit PC6 in vitro. These inhibitors will be useful tools in helping us to understand the roles of PACE4, furin and PC6.

  14. Low Serum Levels of Alpha1 Anti-trypsin (α1-AT) and Risk of Airflow Obstruction in Non-Primary α1-AT-Deficient Patients with Compensated Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Romero, Elizabeth; Suárez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Elizalde-Barrera, César Iván; Mondragón-Terán, Paul; Martínez-Hernández, José Enrique; Gómez-Cortés, Eduardo; de Vaca, Rebeca Pérez-Cabeza; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando E.; Melchor-López, Alberto; Jiménez-Saab, Nayeli Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Background Alpha1 anti-trypsin (α1-AT), a serine protease inhibitor synthesized in the liver, is a major circulating antiprotease that provides defense against proteolytic damage in several tissues. Its deficiency is associated with airflow obstruction. The present study aimed to explore the role of α1-AT as a biomarker of airflow performance in chronic liver disease (CLD). Material/Methods Serum α1-AT levels and lung function (spirometry) were evaluated in non-primary α1-AT-deficient, alcoholic CLD patients without evident respiratory limitations. Results Thirty-four patients with airflow obstruction (n=11), airflow restriction (n=12), and normal airflow (n=11, age-matched controls) were eligible. α1-AT was decreased in the airflow obstruction group. ROC-cutoff α1-AT=24 mg/dL effectively discriminated airflow obstruction (AUC=0.687) and was associated with a 10-fold higher risk (p=0.0007). Conclusions Lower α1-AT increased the risk of airflow obstruction in CLD patients without primary α1-AT deficiency. PMID:25913248

  15. Alpha-1-antitrypsin inhibits nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Chan, Edward D; Pott, Gregory B; Silkoff, Philip E; Ralston, Annemarie H; Bryan, Courtney L; Shapiro, Leland

    2012-12-01

    NO is an endogenously produced gas that regulates inflammation, vascular tone, neurotransmission, and immunity. NO production can be increased by exposing cells to several endogenous and exogenous proinflammatory mediators, including IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and LPS. As AAT has been shown to inhibit cell activation and suppress cytokine production associated with proinflammatory stimulation, we examined AAT for NO-suppressive function. In RAW 264.7 murine macrophagic cells, physiological AAT concentrations significantly inhibited combined LPS- and IFN-γ-induced NO synthesis, and NO synthesis inhibition was associated with decreased expression of iNOS, suppressed NF-κB activation, and reduced translocation of extracellular AAT into the interior of RAW 264.7 cells. CE-2072, a synthetic inhibitor of serine proteases, also suppressed NO production, iNOS expression, and NF-κB activation. However, AAT did not alter activation of intracellular MAPKs. In subjects with genetic AAT deficiency, exhaled NO was increased significantly compared with exhaled NO in healthy controls. These in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that AAT is an endogenous inhibitor of NO production. Administering AAT or AAT-like molecules may have use as a treatment for diseases associated with excessive NO production.

  16. Living with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... safe for you to drink alcohol. Be Physically Active Try to do physical activity regularly. Talk with ... problems can improve your emotional and physical health. Relaxation techniques—such as meditation, yoga, breathing exercises, and ...

  17. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or symptoms of a serious lung condition, especially emphysema , without any obvious cause. He or she also may suspect AAT deficiency if you develop emphysema when you're 45 years old or younger. ...

  18. Learning about Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (AATD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with AATD have advanced lung disease and have emphysema, in which the small air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs are damaged. Symptoms of emphysema include difficulty breathing, a hacking cough and a ...

  19. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Inherited Emphysema)

    MedlinePlus

    ... general term used to describe diseases such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis. In emphysema there is damage to the walls of the ... alveoli) in the lungs. The earliest symptom of emphysema is shortness of breath during activity. Later the ...

  20. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, you may be a candidate for it. Augmentation (og-men-TA-shun) therapy is a treatment ... bloodstream. They're also studying a type of augmentation therapy in which the AAT protein is inhaled ...

  1. Astute, Assertive, and Alpha-1: Quantifying Empowerment in a Rare Genetic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Symma

    2008-01-01

    We investigated empowerment in the Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) community, a rare, genetic disease network in the United States. The research was motivated by nine years of observations in the community. After observing what seemed to be a heightened amount of activism among Alpha-1 community members, I had hypothesized that this…

  2. Astute, Assertive, and Alpha-1: Quantifying Empowerment in a Rare Genetic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Symma

    2008-01-01

    We investigated empowerment in the Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) community, a rare, genetic disease network in the United States. The research was motivated by nine years of observations in the community. After observing what seemed to be a heightened amount of activism among Alpha-1 community members, I had hypothesized that this…

  3. How Can Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in which you receive infusions of AAT protein. Augmentation therapy raises the level of AAT protein in your blood and lungs. (For more information, go to ... National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  4. Effect of cigarette smoke on human serum trypsin inhibitory capacity and antitrypsin concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, P.; Bone, R.C.; Louria, D.B.; Rayford, P.L.

    1982-07-01

    Investigation of the effect of cigarette smoke on the serum trypsin inhibitory capacity (TIC) and antitrypsin content in 89 smokers compared with 37 nonsmokers revealed that cigarette smoking is associated with a significantly lower level of TIC. No alteration in serum antitrypsin content was found because of cigarette smoking. Further analysis of the data indicated a correlation between the magnitude of smoking and the reduction in serum TIC. The reduction of TIC in cigarette smokers is consistent with the recent findings of decreased alpha 1-antitrypsin activity in rat lung and the reduced elastase inhibitory capacity per mg of alpha 1-antitrypsin found in the serum of smokers. The decrease in TIC in the serum of smokers, in addition to the reported decrease in elastolytic activity, may be useful in explaining the pathogenesis of emphysema frequently found in smokers.

  5. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency · 6: New and emerging treatments for α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sandhaus, R

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a genetic condition that increases the risk of developing lung and liver disease, as well as other associated conditions. Most treatment of affected individuals is not specifically directed at AAT deficiency but focuses on the resultant disease state. The only currently available specific therapeutic agent—namely, intravenous augmentation with plasma derived AAT protein—is marketed in a limited number of countries. Treatments aimed at correcting the underlying genetic abnormality, supplementing or modifying the gene product, and halting or reversing organ injury are now beginning to emerge. These innovative approaches may prove effective at modifying or eliminating diseases association with AAT deficiency. PMID:15454659

  6. 1H, 15N and 13C backbone resonance assignments of the archetypal serpin α1-antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Nyon, Mun Peak; Kirkpatrick, John; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John; Gooptu, Bibek

    2012-10-01

    Alpha(1)-antitrypsin is a 45-kDa (394-residue) serine protease inhibitor synthesized by hepatocytes, which is released into the circulatory system and protects the lung from the actions of neutrophil elastase via a conformational transition within a dynamic inhibitory mechanism. Relatively common point mutations subvert this transition, causing polymerisation of α(1)-antitrypsin and deficiency of the circulating protein, predisposing carriers to severe lung and liver disease. We have assigned the backbone resonances of α(1)-antitrypsin using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. These assignments provide the starting point for a detailed solution state characterization of the structural properties of this highly dynamic protein via NMR methods.

  7. Appropriateness of Newborn Screening for α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Teckman, Jeffrey; Pardee, Erin; Howell, R. Rodney; Mannino, David; Sharp, Richard R.; Brantly, Mark; Wanner, Adam; Lamson, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The Alpha-1 Foundation convened a workshop to consider the appropriateness of newborn screening for α-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. Methods: A review of natural history and technical data was conducted. Results: Homozygous ZZ AAT deficiency is a common genetic disease occurring in 1 in 2000 to 3500 births; however, it is underrecognized and most patients are undiagnosed. AAT deficiency can cause chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and liver failure in children and adults, and lung disease in adults. The clinical course is highly variable. Some neonates present with cholestatic hepatitis and some children require liver transplantation, but many patients remain well into adulthood. Some adults develop emphysema. There is no treatment for AAT liver disease, other than supportive care and liver transplant. There are no data on the effect of early diagnosis on liver disease. Avoidance of smoking is of proven benefit to reduce future lung disease, as is protein replacement therapy. Justifying newborn screening with the aim of reducing smoking and reducing adult lung disease-years in the future would be a significant paradigm shift for the screening field. Recent passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) and the Affordable Care Act may have a major effect on reducing the psychosocial and financial risks of newborn screening because many asymptomatic children would be identified. Data on the risk–benefit ratio of screening in the new legal climate are lacking. Conclusions: Workshop participants recommended a series of pilot studies focused on generating new data on the risks and benefits of newborn screening. PMID:24121147

  8. Retinoid treatment of Emphysema in Patients on the Alpha-1 International Registry. The REPAIR study: study design, methodology and quality control of study assessments.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Jan; Cooper, Brendan G; Stoel, Berend; Rames, Alexis; Rutman, Olga; Soliman, Sherif; Stockley, Robert

    2010-12-01

    Emphysema is characterized by the destruction of alveolar wall and enlargement of alveolar airspaces, resulting in a reduction of the total lung gas exchange area, loss of lung elastic recoil and hyperinflation. The REPAIR study (Retinoid treatment of Emphysema in Patients on the Alpha-1 International Registry) is the first proof-of-concept study of a new potential disease-modifying drug, Palovarotene©, an orally active, gamma selective retinoid agonist in patients with emphysema secondary to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) as a model population for the general smoke-induced emphysema population. This article describes the study design as well as the effectiveness of the quality control that was implemented on the key efficacy endpoints, based on data derived from the placebo-treated subjects. In this multicentre, multinational study the implementation of standardized procedures included: careful site selection, use of trained staff, regular monitoring and machine calibration, use of biological controls and regular feedback to sites by an independent quality control centre. All of these procedures resulted in high-quality measurements of lung density, spirometry, static lung volumes and gas transfer. It was also confirmed that CT lung density was the most sensitive endpoint followed by TLco, FEV(1) and RV measured by body box.

  9. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some people who have severe AAT deficiency develop emphysema (em-fi-SE-ma)—often when they're ... their forties or fifties. Signs and symptoms of emphysema include problems breathing, wheezing, and a chronic (ongoing) ...

  10. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevented bone loss in ovariectomy induced osteoporosis mouse model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at meno...

  11. The Alpha-1 Association Genetic Counseling Program: an innovative approach to service.

    PubMed

    McGee, Dawn; Strange, Charlie; McClure, Rebecca; Schwarz, Laura; Erven, Marlene

    2011-08-01

    In an era of specialty medicine, genetic counselors are becoming increasingly focused in their service provision. The Alpha-1 Association Genetic Counseling Program, established in September 2007, specializes in confidential toll-free genetic counseling provided by a certified genetic counselor for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin deficiency, a co-dominant condition associated with lung and/or liver disease. The program received more than 600 callers in its first 2 years. Sixty-seven percent of new callers were family members, carriers, or health professionals. The number of callers increased between the first 2 years, with the greatest increases being family members and health professionals. Testing options and explanation of results encompassed 60% of initial reasons for calls. Seventy-two percent of referrals came from family and friends, test result letters, and the Alpha-1 Association. Between year 1 and 2 family member referrals showed the largest increase. This disease-specific genetic counseling program provides a model that may be useful for other rare disease communities.

  12. Alpha-1 couples: interpersonal and intrapersonal predictors of spousal communication and stress.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel A; Wienke, Sara; Coffman, Donna L

    2014-04-01

    Couples often discuss genetic test results, and then manage their implications together. This interdependence can lead to common, shared experiences, similar intrapersonal processes to manage shared stressors, or interpersonal influences between spouses, leading to different outcomes. This study sought to reveal the intracouple, intrapersonal, and interpersonal influences of genetic stigma and negative feelings on spousal communication and perceived stress with 50 couples in which one spouse is a member of a genetic disease registry. The results were analyzed with dyadic analysis, including multilevel modeling. The findings showed that registered members and their spouses were not statistically different in their mean levels of perceived genetic stigma, negative feelings about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), conversations with each other about the AATD test results, and their perceived stress. The findings also showed that their intracouple consistencies were not high, and their intrapersonal and interpersonal influences on communication and stress differed. The social implications of genetic research at the interpersonal level are discussed.

  13. Alpha-1 Couples: Interpersonal and Intrapersonal Predictors of Spousal Communication and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A.; Wienke, Sara; Coffman, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Couples often discuss genetic test results, and then manage their implications together. This interdependence can lead to common, shared experiences, similar intrapersonal processes to manage shared stressors, or interpersonal influences between spouses, leading to different outcomes. This study sought to reveal the intracouple, intrapersonal, and interpersonal influences of genetic stigma and negative feelings on spousal communication and perceived stress with 50 couples in which one spouse is a member of a genetic disease registry. The results were analyzed with dyadic analysis, including multilevel modeling. The findings showed that registered members and their spouses were not statistically different in their mean levels of perceived genetic stigma, negative feelings about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), conversations with each other about the AATD test results, and their perceived stress. The findings also showed that their intracouple consistencies were not high, and their intrapersonal and interpersonal influences on communication and stress differed. The social implications of genetic research at the interpersonal level are discussed. PMID:23934327

  14. Initial experience with the Sophono Alpha 1 osseointegrated implant.

    PubMed

    Escorihuela-García, Vicente; Llópez-Carratalá, Ignacio; Pitarch-Ribas, Ignacia; Latorre-Monteagudo, Emilia; Marco-Algarra, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In the last several years, bone anchored hearing aids have proven to be useful in treating conductive and mixed unilateral or bilateral hearing loss, as well as for sensorineural unilateral hearing loss. The Sophono Alpha 1 model has the advantage of not requiring an abutment, with it being coupled by magnetism instead. We report the cases of 3 infants with congenital malformations of external and middle ear. Audiometry showed conductive hearing loss. All 3 patients were implanted with Alpha 1 model (Sophono). Patients evolved satisfactorily. After 30 days we applied the processor and the control audiometry showed a marked improvement of hearing thresholds, although without a complete closure of the gap. With minimal care, the skin over the implant remained in excellent condition, with a very satisfactory cosmetic outcome.

  15. Comparison of the Ca2 + currents induced by expression of three cloned alpha1 subunits, alpha1G, alpha1H and alpha1I, of low-voltage-activated T-type Ca2 + channels.

    PubMed

    Klöckner, U; Lee, J H; Cribbs, L L; Daud, A; Hescheler, J; Pereverzev, A; Perez-Reyes, E; Schneider, T

    1999-12-01

    Expression of rat alpha1G, human alpha1H and rat alpha1I subunits of voltage-activated Ca2 + channels in HEK-293 cells yields robust Ca2 + inward currents with 1.25 mM Ca2 + as the charge carrier. Both similarities and marked differences are found between their biophysical properties. Currents induced by expression of alpha1G show the fastest activation and inactivation kinetics. The alpha1H and alpha1I currents activate and inactivate up to 1.5- and 5-fold slower, respectively. No differences in the voltage dependence of steady state inactivation are detected. Currents induced by expression of alpha1G and alpha1H deactivate with time constants of up to 6 ms at a test potential of - 80 mV, but currents induced by alpha1I deactivate about three-fold faster. Recovery from short-term inactivation is more than three-fold slower for currents induced by alpha1H and alpha1I in comparison to alpha1G. In contrast to these characteristics, reactivation after long-term inactivation was fastest for currents arising from expression of alpha1I and slowest in cells expressing alpha1H calcium channels. The calcium inward current induced by expression of alpha1I is increased by positive prepulses while currents induced by alpha1H and alpha1G show little ( < 5%) or no facilitation. The data thus provide a characteristic fingerprint of each channel's activity, which may allow correlation of the alpha1G, alpha1H and alpha1I induced currents with their in vivo counterparts.

  16. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency • 4: Molecular pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Lomas, D; Parfrey, H

    2004-01-01

    The molecular basis of α1-antitrypsin deficiency is reviewed and is shown to be due to the accumulation of mutant protein as ordered polymers within the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes. The current goals are to determine the cellular response to polymeric α1-antitrypsin and to develop therapeutic strategies to block polymerisation in vivo. PMID:15170041

  17. α-1-antitrypsin inhibits acute liver failure in mice.

    PubMed

    Jedicke, Nils; Struever, Nina; Aggrawal, Nupur; Welte, Tobias; Manns, Michael P; Malek, Nisar P; Zender, Lars; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Wuestefeld, Torsten

    2014-06-01

    Acute liver failure remains a critical clinical condition, with high mortality rates, and increased apoptosis of hepatocytes represents a key event in the cause of liver failure. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is synthesized and secreted mainly by hepatocytes, and plasma purified AAT is used for augmentation therapy in patients with AAT deficiency. Because AAT therapy exerts antiinflammatory and immune modulatory activities in various experimental models, and it was recently suggested that AAT exerts antiapoptotic activities, we aimed to explore whether administration of AAT may represent a therapeutic strategy to treat acute liver failure in mice. Well-established preclinical models of acute liver failure such as the Jo2 FAS/CD95 activating model and models of acetaminophen and α-amanitin poisoning were used. Therapeutic effects of AAT were evaluated by monitoring animal survival, histopathological changes, measurement of caspase activity, and serum cytokine levels. Systemic treatment with AAT significantly decreased Jo2-induced liver cell apoptosis and prolonged survival of mice. Native and oxidized (lacking elastase inhibitory activity) forms of AAT were equally effective in preventing acute liver injury and showed direct inhibition of active caspase-3 and -8 in liver homogenates and in a cell-free system in vitro. Concomitantly, mice treated with AAT showed significantly lower serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which also paralleled the reduced activity of ADAM17 (TACE). Noticeably, the increased survival and a reduction of apoptotic hepatocytes were also observed in the α-amanitin and acetaminophen-induced liver injury mouse models. Our data suggest that systemic administration of AAT can be a promising therapy to treat acute liver failure and clinical studies to explore this treatment in humans should be initiated. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Doze, Van A; Handel, Evelyn M; Jensen, Kelly A; Darsie, Belle; Luger, Elizabeth J; Haselton, James R; Talbot, Jeffery N; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2009-08-18

    Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) drugs are used for the treatment of chronic depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anxiety-related disorders. Chronic use of TCA drugs increases the expression of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs). Yet, it is unclear whether increased alpha(1)-AR expression contributes to the antidepressant effects of these drugs or if this effect is unrelated to their therapeutic benefit. In this study, mice expressing constitutively active mutant alpha(1A)-ARs (CAM alpha(1A)-AR) or CAM alpha(1B)-ARs were used to examine the effects of alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-AR signaling on rodent behavioral models of depression, OCD, and anxiety. CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice, but not CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice, exhibited antidepressant-like behavior in the tail suspension test and forced swim test. This behavior was reversed by prazosin, a selective alpha(1)-AR inverse agonist, and mimicked by chronically treating wild type mice with cirazoline, an alpha(1A)-AR agonist. Marble burying behavior, commonly used to model OCD in rodents, was significantly decreased in CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice but not in CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice. In contrast, no significant differences in anxiety-related behavior were observed between wild type, CAM alpha(1A)-AR, and CAM alpha(1B)-AR animals in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box. This is the first study to demonstrate that alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-ARs differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse. These data suggest that alpha(1A)-ARs may be a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of depression.

  19. Novel arylpiperazines as selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Murray, W V; Jolliffe, L; Pulito, V

    2000-05-15

    A novel series of arylpiperazines has been synthesized and identified as antagonists of alpha1a adrenergic receptor (alpha1a-AR) implicated in benign prostatic hyperplasia. These compounds selectively bind to membrane bound alpha1a-AR with K(i)s as low as 0.66 nM. As such, these potentially represent a viable treatment for BPH without the side effects associated with known alpha1-adrenergic antagonists.

  20. Phenylpiperazinylalkylamino substituted pyridazinones as potent alpha(1) adrenoceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Barlocco, D; Cignarella, G; Piaz, V D; Giovannoni, M P; De Benedetti, P G; Fanelli, F; Montesano, F; Poggesi, E; Leonardi, A

    2001-07-19

    QSAR models have been used for designing a series of compounds characterized by a N-phenylpiperazinylalkylamino moiety linked to substituted pyridazinones, which have been synthesized. Measurements of the binding affinities of the new compounds toward the alpha(1a)-, alpha(1b)-, and alpha(1d)-AR cloned subtypes as well as the 5-HT(1A) receptor have been done validating, at least in part, the estimations of the theoretical models. This study provides insight into the structure activity relationships of the alpha(1)-ARs ligands and their alpha(1)-AR/5-HT(1A) selectivity.

  1. Ozone inactivation of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.A.

    1980-06-01

    Ozone decreased the trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase inhibitory activities of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor both in plasma and in solutions of the pure inhibitor. The total loss of porcine elastase inhibitory activity required 18 mol of ozone/mol of pure alpha 1-PI and approximately 850 mol of ozone/mol of alpha 1-PI in plasma. A corresponding loss of the ability to inhibit human leukocyte elastase was observed. Inactivated alpha 1-PI contains four residues of methionine sulfoxide, in addition to oxidized tryosine and tryptophan. Electrophoretic analysis demonstrated that the ozone-inactivated alpha 1-PI did not form normal complexes with serine proteinases. These findings suggest that the inhalation of ozone could inactivate alpha 1-PI on the airspace side of the lung to create a localized alpha 1-PI deficiency, which might contribute to the development of emphysema.

  2. Study of alpha one antitrypsin activity in lepra reaction.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S R; Dhole, T N; Jahagirdar, V L; Yemul, V L; Chawhan, R N

    1983-04-01

    In our earlier study (Yemul et, al, 1983) we have reported elevation of serum alpha one antitrypsin levels in patients of lepromatous leprosy and lepra reaction. In this study estimation of serum alpha one antitrypsin levels in fifty lepra reaction patients (8 of type 1 and 42 of type II) and fifty age and sex matched healthy controls is described. Alpha one antitrypsin levels were elevated in lepra reaction patients (type I--mean value of 332 mg% and S.D. +/- 118.8 and type II--mean value of 450 mg% and S.D. +/- 73.7) when compared with the healthy controls (mean value of 285 mg% and S.D. +/- 66.05). The increase in levels in type II lepra reaction patients was statistically significant. The results are discussed to correlate the increased levels of alpha one antitrypsin and the high bacterial load leading to the release of various proteases in type II lepra reaction.

  3. Isolation, characterization, and cDNA sequencing of alpha-1-antiproteinase-like protein from rainbow trout seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Mak, Monika; Mak, Paweł; Olczak, Mariusz; Szalewicz, Agata; Glogowski, Jan; Dubin, Adam; Watorek, Wiesław; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2004-03-17

    Seminal plasma of teleost fish contains serine proteinase inhibitors related to those present in blood. These inhibitors can be bound to Q-Sepharose and sequentially eluted with a NaCl gradient. In the present study, using a two-step procedure, we purified (73-fold to homogeneity) and characterized the inhibitor eluted as the second fraction of antitrypsin activity (inhibitor II) from Q-Sepharose. The molecular weight of this inhibitor was estimated to be 56 kDa with an isoelectric point of 5.4. It effectively inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin but was less effective against elastase. It formed SDS-stable complexes with cod and bovine trypsin. Inhibitor II appeared to be a glycoprotein. Carbohydrate content was determined to be 16%. N-terminal Edman sequencing allowed identification of the first 30 N-terminal amino acids HDGDHAGHTEDHHHHLHHIAGEAHPQHSHG and 25 amino acids within the reactive loop IMPMSLPDTIMLNRPFLLFILEDST. The N-terminal sequence did not match any known sequence, however, the sequence within the reactive loop was significantly similar to carp and mammalian alpha1-antiproteinases. Both sequences were used to construct primers and obtain a cDNA sequence from liver. The mRNA coding the protein is 1675 nt in length including a single open reading frame of 1281 nt that encodes 426 amino acid residues. Analysis of this sequence indicated the presence of putative conserved serpin domains and confirmed the similarity to carp alpha1-antiproteinase and mammalian alpha1-antiproteinase. Our results indicate that inhibitor II belongs to the serpin superfamily and is similar to alpha1-antiproteinase.

  4. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    PubMed Central

    Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  5. New potential uroselective NO-donor alpha1-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Donatella; Tron, Gian Cesare; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Poggesi, Elena; Motta, Gianni; Leonardi, Amedeo

    2003-08-14

    A recent uroselective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, REC15/2739, has been joined with nitrooxy and furoxan NO-donor moieties to give new NO-donor alpha(1)-antagonists. All the compounds studied proved to be potent and selective ligands of human cloned alpha(1a)-receptor subtype. Derivatives 6 and 7 were able to relax the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens contracted by (-)-noradrenaline because of both their alpha(1A)-antagonist and their NO-donor properties.

  6. Pharmacological profiles of a novel alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist, PNO-49B, at alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, I; Ohmura, T; Kigoshi, S

    1995-01-01

    The effects of a newly synthesized compound, PNO-49B, (R)-(-)-3'-(2-amino-1-hydroxyethyl)-4'-fluoromethanesulfonanilide hydrochloride, on alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in various tissues in which the following distribution of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes has been suggested: dog carotid artery (alpha 1B), dog mesenteric artery (alpha 1N), rabbit thoracic aorta (alpha 1B + alpha 1L), rat liver (alpha 1B), rat vas deferens (alpha 1A + alpha 1L), rat cerebral cortex (alpha 1A + alpha 1B) and rat thoracic aorta (controversial subtype). PNO-49B (0.1-100 microM) produced concentration-dependent contractions in dog mesenteric artery, rabbit thoracic aorta, rat thoracic aorta and rat vas deferens; and the maximal amplitudes of contraction were almost the same as or slightly less than those of noradrenaline. By contrast, the maximal response to PNO-49B in dog carotid artery was markedly smaller than the response to noradrenaline. In rabbit thoracic aorta, the contractile response to PNO-49B was not affected by inactivation of the alpha 1B subtype with chloroethylclonidine (CEC), although the response to noradrenaline was attenuated by that treatment. The dissociation constants (KA) of PNO-49B were not different among the rat thoracic aorta, dog carotid and mesenteric arteries and rabbit thoracic aorta (CEC-pretreated). The contractile responses to PNO-49B were inhibited competitively by prazosin, HV723 (alpha-ethyl-3,4,5-trimethoxy-alpha-(3-((2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-ethyl)- amino(propyl)benzeneacetonitrile fumarate) and by WB4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)-aminomethyl-1,4- benzodioxane).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Identification and DNA sequence analysis of 15 new {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin variants, including two PI*QO alleles and one deficient PI*M allele

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, J.P.; Kirchgesser, M.; Schwaab, R.; Bidlingmaier, F.; Poller, W.; Weidinger, S.; Olek, K. |

    1994-12-01

    The authors have investigated the molecular basis of 15 new {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin ({alpha}1AT) variants. Phenotyping by isoelectric focusing (IEF) was used as a screening method to detect {alpha}1AT variants at the protein level. Genotyping was then performed by sequence analysis of all coding exons, exon-intron junctions, and the hepatocyte-specific promotor region including exon Ic. Three of these rare variants are alleles of clinical relevance, associated with undetectable or very low serum levels of {alpha}1AT: the PI*Q0saarbruecken allele generated by a 1-bp C-nucleotide insertion within a stretch of seven cytosines spanning residues 360-362, resulting in a 3{prime} frameshift and the acquisition of a stop codon at residue 376; a point mutation in the PI*Q0lisbon allele, resulting in a single amino acid substitution Thr{sup 68}(ACC){yields}Ile(ATC); and an in-frame trinucleotide deletion {Delta}Phe{sup 51} (TTC) in the highly deficient PI*Mpalermo allele. The remaining 12 alleles are associated with normal {alpha}1AT serum levels and are characterized by point mutations causing single amino acid substitutions in all but one case. This exception is a silent mutation, which does not affect the amino acid sequence. The limitation of IEF compared with DNA sequence analysis, for identification of new variants, their generation by mutagenesis, and the clinical relevance of the three deficiency alleles are discussed.

  8. [Place of genotyping in addition to the phenotype and the assay of serum α-1 antitrypsin].

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Francina, Alain; Lacan, Philippe; Heraut, Jessica; Chapuis-Cellier, Colette

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is based on isoelectric focusing of serum proteins and the extent of serum. However, the focusing is technically difficult and a greatly reduced concentration in abnormal A1AT tapeless does not differentiate an unstable variant of a variant called 'null' (that is to say without any phenotypic expression) to 'heterozygous' state. In this study, we compared the results of the assay, the phenotype and genotype of A1AT in 50 patients. Normal A1AT alleles (Pi*M1 to Pi*M4) or loss of the most common (Pi*S and Pi*Z) were clearly identified in phenotyping. However, genotyping was necessary to characterize: (i) certain alleles rarer A1AT (S-Munich, X-Christchurch); (ii) a null allele and; (iii) two new alleles A1AT not yet described in the literature. In conclusion, although the A1AT genotyping is generally not necessary, it is necessary to resolve complex cases and to obtain witnesses validated for isoelectric focusing.

  9. Phenylacetamides as selective alpha-1A adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Patane, M A; DiPardo, R M; Newton, R C; Price, R P; Broten, T P; Chang, R S; Ransom, R W; Di Salvo, J; Nagarathnam, D; Forray, C; Gluchowski, C; Bock, M G

    2000-08-07

    A novel class of potent and selective alpha-1a receptor antagonists has been identified. The structures of these antagonists were derived from truncating the 4-aryl dihydropyridine subunit present in known alpha-1a antagonists. The design principles which led to the discovery of substituted phenylacetamides, the synthesis and SAR of key analogues, and the results of select in vitro and in vivo studies are described.

  10. Impaired alpha1-adrenergic responses in aged rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Olivier; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Guenoun, Thierry; Laplace, Monique; Crozatier, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    To determine age-related changes in the cardiac effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, both cardiomyocyte Ca2+-transient and cardiac protein kinase C (PKC) activity were measured in 3-month- (3MO) and 24-month- (24MO) old Wistar rats. Ca2+ transients obtained under 1 Hz pacing by microfluorimetry of cardiomyocyte loaded with indo-1 (405/480 nm fluorescence ratio) were compared in control conditions (Kreb's solution alone) and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation (phenylephrine or cirazoline, an alpha1-specific agonist). PKC activity and PKC translocation index (particulate/total activity) were also assayed before and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In 3MO, cirazoline induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient for a 10(-9) M concentration which returned to control values for larger concentrations. In contrast, in 24MO, we observed a constant negative effect of cirazoline on the Ca2+ transient with a significant decrease at 10(-6) M compared with both baseline and Kreb's solution. Preliminary experiments showed that, in a dose-response curve to phenylephrine, the response of Ca2+ transient was maximal at 10(-7) M. This concentration induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient in 3MO and a significant decrease in 24MO. The same concentration was chosen to perform PKC activity measurements under alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In the basal state, PKC particulate activity was higher in 24MO than that in 3MO but was not different in cytosolic fractions; so that the translocation index was higher in 24MO (P < 0.01). After phenylephrine, a translocation of PKC toward the particulate fraction was observed in 3MO but not in 24MO. In conclusion, cardiac alpha1-adrenoceptor response was found to be impaired in aged hearts. The negative effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation on Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes obtained from old rats can be related to an absence of alpha1-adrenergic-induced PKC translocation.

  11. The nonpsychotropic cannabinoid cannabidiol modulates and directly activates alpha-1 and alpha-1-Beta glycine receptor function.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jörg; Demir, Reyhan; Leuwer, Martin; de la Roche, Jeanne; Krampfl, Klaus; Foadi, Nilufar; Karst, Matthias; Haeseler, Gertrud

    2009-01-01

    Loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord plays a key role in the development of chronic pain following inflammation or nerve injury. Inhibitory postsynaptic transmission in the adult spinal cord involves mainly glycine. Cannabidiol is a nonpsychotropic plant constituent of Cannabis sativa. As we hypothesized that non-CB receptor mechanisms of cannabidiol might contribute to its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects, we investigated the interaction of cannabidiol with strychnine-sensitive alpha(1 )and alpha(1)beta glycine receptors by using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Cannabidiol showed a positive allosteric modulating effect in a low micromolar concentration range (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 12.3 +/- 3.8 micromol/l and alpha(1)beta = 18.1 +/- 6.2 micromol/l). Direct activation of glycine receptors was observed at higher concentrations above 100 micromol/l (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 132.4 +/- 12.3 micromol/l and alpha(1)beta = 144.3 +/- 22.7 micromol/l). These in vitro results suggest that strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors may be a target for cannabidiol mediating some of its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties.

  12. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system....5420 Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-glycoproteins... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system....5420 Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-glycoproteins... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system....5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of alpha-1...

  15. Intrapleural administration of an AAVrh.10 vector coding for human α1-antitrypsin for the treatment of α1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Sondhi, Dolan; Hackett, Neil R; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Frenk, Esther Z; Hwang, Yihharn; Van de Graaf, Benjamin G; Hutt, Julie A; Wang, Gensheng; Benson, Janet; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-12-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (α1AT) deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a marked reduction in serum α1AT levels, lung and liver disease. α1AT is mainly produced and secreted by hepatocytes, with its primary function to protect the lung against the proteolytic activity of neutrophil elastase. Serum α1AT levels <11 μM are associated with progressive destruction of lung parenchyma and early-onset of panacinar emphysema in the age range 35-45. The current approved treatment for α1AT deficiency is a costly protein augmentation therapy requiring weekly intravenous infusion of purified α1AT from pooled human plasma. Gene therapy offers the advantage of a single vector administration, eliminating the burden of the repeated purified protein infusions, with the consequent reduced overall drug cost and improved compliance. We have developed a novel, highly efficient gene therapy approach for α1AT deficiency based on the administration of AAVrh.10hα1AT, an adeno-associated viral vector serotype rh.10 coding for normal M-type human α1AT via the intrapleural route. On the basis of prior murine studies, this approach provides sustained α1AT proximal to the lung with a highly efficient vector. In support of a clinical trial for this approach, we carried out a study to assess the safety of intrapleural administration of AAVrh.10hα1AT to 280 mice and 36 nonhuman primates. The data demonstrate that this approach is safe, with no toxicity issues. Importantly, there was persistent expression of the human α1AT mRNA in chest cavity cells for the duration of the study (6 months in mice and 1 year in nonhuman primates). Together, these data support the initiation of a clinical trial of intrapleural human AAVrh.10hα1AT for the treatment of α1AT deficiency.

  16. Characteristics of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin–Deficient Individuals in the Long-term Oxygen Treatment Trial and Comparison with Other Subjects with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aboussouan, Loutfi S.; Kanner, Richard E.; Wilson, Laura A.; Diaz, Phil; Wise, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) predisposes to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but is underrecognized. Oxygenation and exercise desaturation in individuals with AATD-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been sparsely studied. The Long-term Oxygen Treatment Trial (LOTT) permits comparing these features of individuals with AATD with alpha-1 antitrypsin–replete (called “usual chronic obstructive pulmonary disease”) LOTT participants. Objectives: Compare demographic, clinical, baseline oxygenation, and exercise desaturation features in participating AATD subjects with those of other LOTT subjects. Methods: LOTT is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing use of supplemental oxygen versus not in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and moderate hypoxemia (resting oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry, 89–93%) or normal oxygen saturation at rest and significant exercise desaturation. Measurement and Main Results: Among the 597 LOTT participants with nonmissing alpha-1 antitrypsin levels, 11 (1.8%) had severe AATD and 44 (7.4%) had mild/moderate AATD. Comparison of the 11 severely AAT-deficient individuals with the 542 LOTT participants with usual chronic obstructive pulmonary disease showed that the AATD subjects were younger and despite less smoking, had lower FEV1/FVC (mean post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC, 0.38 ± 0.06 vs. 0.46 ± 0.13; P = 0.002). Comparison with 27 age-, sex-, and FEV1-matched alpha-1 antitrypsin–normal LOTT participants showed no baseline difference in resting room air pulse oximetry saturation (AATD, 93.6% ± 2.3% vs. 92.7% ± 2.2%; P = 0.64). Exercise-related desaturation was more severe in the individuals with AATD based on desaturation to 88% or less sooner during a 6-minute-walk test, having a higher percentage of desaturation points (e.g., <90%) during exercise, and having a higher distance-saturation product (defined as the distance

  17. The alpha1-fetoprotein locus is activated by a nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family.

    PubMed Central

    Galarneau, L; Paré, J F; Allard, D; Hamel, D; Levesque, L; Tugwood, J D; Green, S; Bélanger, L

    1996-01-01

    The alpha1-fetoprotein (AFP) gene is located between the albumin and alpha-albumin genes and is activated by transcription factor FTF (fetoprotein transcription factor), presumed to transduce early developmental signals to the albumin gene cluster. We have identified FTF as an orphan nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family. FTF recognizes the DNA sequence 5'-TCAAGGTCA-3', the canonical recognition motif for FTZ-F1 receptors. cDNA sequence homologies indicate that rat FTF is the ortholog of mouse LRH-1 and Xenopus xFF1rA. Rodent FTF is encoded by a single-copy gene, related to the gene encoding steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1). The 5.2-kb FTF transcript is translated from several in-frame initiator codons into FTF isoforms (54 to 64 kDa) which appear to bind DNA as monomers, with no need for a specific ligand, similar KdS (approximately equal 3 x 10(-10) M), and similar transcriptional effects. FTF activates the AFP promoter without the use of an amino-terminal activation domain; carboxy-terminus-truncated FTF exerts strong dominant negative effects. In the AFP promoter, FTF recruits an accessory trans-activator which imparts glucocorticoid reactivity upon the AFP gene. FTF binding sites are found in the promoters of other liver-expressed genes, some encoding liver transcription factors; FTF, liver alpha1-antitrypsin promoter factor LFB2, and HNF-3beta promoter factor UF2-H3beta are probably the same factor. FTF is also abundantly expressed in the pancreas and may exert differentiation functions in endodermal sublineages, similar to SF-1 in steroidogenic tissues. HepG2 hepatoma cells seem to express a mutated form of FTF. PMID:8668203

  18. The alpha1-fetoprotein locus is activated by a nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, L; Paré, J F; Allard, D; Hamel, D; Levesque, L; Tugwood, J D; Green, S; Bélanger, L

    1996-07-01

    The alpha1-fetoprotein (AFP) gene is located between the albumin and alpha-albumin genes and is activated by transcription factor FTF (fetoprotein transcription factor), presumed to transduce early developmental signals to the albumin gene cluster. We have identified FTF as an orphan nuclear receptor of the Drosophila FTZ-F1 family. FTF recognizes the DNA sequence 5'-TCAAGGTCA-3', the canonical recognition motif for FTZ-F1 receptors. cDNA sequence homologies indicate that rat FTF is the ortholog of mouse LRH-1 and Xenopus xFF1rA. Rodent FTF is encoded by a single-copy gene, related to the gene encoding steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1). The 5.2-kb FTF transcript is translated from several in-frame initiator codons into FTF isoforms (54 to 64 kDa) which appear to bind DNA as monomers, with no need for a specific ligand, similar KdS (approximately equal 3 x 10(-10) M), and similar transcriptional effects. FTF activates the AFP promoter without the use of an amino-terminal activation domain; carboxy-terminus-truncated FTF exerts strong dominant negative effects. In the AFP promoter, FTF recruits an accessory trans-activator which imparts glucocorticoid reactivity upon the AFP gene. FTF binding sites are found in the promoters of other liver-expressed genes, some encoding liver transcription factors; FTF, liver alpha1-antitrypsin promoter factor LFB2, and HNF-3beta promoter factor UF2-H3beta are probably the same factor. FTF is also abundantly expressed in the pancreas and may exert differentiation functions in endodermal sublineages, similar to SF-1 in steroidogenic tissues. HepG2 hepatoma cells seem to express a mutated form of FTF.

  19. Automated docking of {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides in the glucoamylase active site

    SciTech Connect

    Countinho, P.M.; Reilly, P.J.; Dowd, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Low-energy conformers of five {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides were flexibly docked into the glucoamylase active site using AutoDock 2.2. To ensure that all significant conformational space was searched, the starting trisaccharide conformers for docking were all possible combinations of the corresponding disaccharide low-energy conformers. All docked trisaccharides occupied subsites {minus}1 and +1 in very similar modes to those of corresponding nonreducing-end disaccharides. For linear substrates, full binding at subsite +2 occurred only when the substrate reducing end was {alpha}-(1,4)-linked, with hydrogen-bonding with the hydroxy-methyl group being the only polar interaction there. Given the absence of other important interactions at this subsite, multiple substrate conformations are allowed. For the one docked branched substrate, steric hindrance in the {alpha}-(1,6)-glycosidic oxygen suggests that the active-site residues have to change position for hydrolysis to occur. Subsite +1 of the glucoamylase active site allows flexibility in binding but, at least in Aspergillus glucoamylases, subsite +2 selectively binds substrates {alpha}-(1,4)-linked between subsites +1 and +2. Enzyme engineering to limit substrate flexibility at subsite +2 could improve glucoamylase industrial properties.

  20. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (a protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues. Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin helps protect tissues against proteolytic (protein-splitting) enzymes released during...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected to... diagnosis of collagen (connective tissue) disorders, tuberculosis, infections, extensive malignancy,...

  2. Diagnosis and Management of Patients with a1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David; Teckman, Jeffrey; Di Bisceglie, Adrian; Brenner, David A.

    2012-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency is an autosomal co-dominant disease that can cause chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in children and adults and increases risk for emphysema in adults. The development of symptomatic disease varies—some patients have life-threatening symptoms in childhood whereas others remain asymptomatic and healthy into old age. As a result of this variability, patients present across multiple disciplines, including pediatrics, adult medicine, hepatology, genetics, and pulmonology. This can give physicians the mistaken impression that the condition is less common than it actually is, and can lead to fragmented care that omits critical interventions commonly performed other specialists. We sought to present a rational approach for hepatologists to manage adult patients with A1AT deficiency. PMID:22200689

  3. Positive allosteric modulatory effects of ajulemic acid at strychnine-sensitive glycine alpha1- and alpha1beta-receptors.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jörg; Leuwer, Martin; Demir, Reyhan; Krampfl, Klaus; de la Roche, Jeanne; Foadi, Nilufar; Karst, Matthias; Haeseler, Gertrud

    2009-04-01

    The synthetic cannabinoid ajulemic acid (CT-3) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist which was found to reduce pain scores in neuropathic pain patients in the absence of cannabis-like psychotropic adverse effects. The reduced psychotropic activity of ajulemic acid has been attributed to a greater contribution of peripheral CB receptors to its mechanism of action as well as to non-CB receptor mechanisms. Loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord plays a key role in the development of chronic pain following inflammation or nerve injury. Inhibitory postsynaptic transmission in the adult spinal cord involves mainly glycine. As we hypothesised that additional non-CB receptor mechanisms of ajulemic acid might contribute to its effect in neuropathic pain, we investigated the interaction of ajulemic acid with strychnine-sensitive alpha(1)- and alpha(1)beta-glycine receptors by using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Ajulemic acid showed a positive allosteric modulating effect in a concentration range which can be considered close to clinically relevant concentrations (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 9.7 +/- 2.6 microM and alpha(1)beta = 12.4 +/- 3.4 microM). Direct activation of glycine receptors was observed at higher concentrations above 100 microM (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 140.9 +/- 21.5 microM and alpha(1)beta = 154.3 +/- 32.1 microM). These in vitro results demonstrate that ajulemic acid modulates strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in clinically relevant concentrations.

  4. Molecular characterization of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J K; Pearson, W R; Lynch, K R

    1991-02-01

    Three 'alpha 1-adrenoceptors' and three 'alpha 2-adrenoceptors' have now been cloned. How closely do these receptors match the native receptors that have been identified pharmacologically? What are the properties of these receptors, and how do they relate to other members of the cationic amine receptor family? Kevin Lynch and his colleagues discuss these questions in this review.

  5. Alpha 1-adrenergic blockade and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, E; Hull, S S; Foreman, R D; Ferrari, A; Schwartz, P J

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal of the present study was to test whether selective pharmacologic blockade of alpha 1 receptors, and specifically of the subtype alpha 1a, could prevent ventricular fibrillation (VF) during acute myocardial ischemia. The development of new autonomic interventions is of clinical interest in view of the failure of traditional antiarrhythmic drugs to prevent sudden death. Experimental evidence indicates that alpha 1 receptors, and in particular the subtype alpha 1a, may be involved in the genesis of malignant arrhythmias during acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. Despite this evidence, questions have been raised about the actual antifibrillatory efficacy of alpha-adrenergic blockade in the acutely ischemic myocardium. The effects of prazosin and of abanoquil (UK 52,046), a highly selective alpha 1a receptor blocker, were tested and compared with propranolol in a conscious animal preparation for sudden death. Ten dogs with a 1-month-old anterior wall myocardial infarction were studied. These dogs had all developed, in control conditions, VF during a 2-minute occlusion of the circumflex coronary artery while exercising (n = 9) or lying on the table (n = 1). Afterwards, the dogs underwent additional tests with the following intravenously administered drugs: abanoquil (n = 10; 1 micrograms/kg), prazosin (n = 9; 0.1 mg/kg), and propranolol (n = 10; 1 mg/kg). Internal control analysis was used. All dogs tested had recurrence of VF with both alpha-adrenergic blockers. Propranolol significantly reduced heart rate during ischemia and prevented VF in 5 of 10 dogs tested (P < 0.05). When heart rate was kept constant by atrial pacing (n = 3), 2 of the 3 animals remained protected by propranolol. Just prior to onset of VF, heart rate was not significantly different in the control and in the abanoquil tests (237 +/- 45 and 253 +/- 34 beats/min, respectively), whereas it was higher (P < 0.05) with prazosin (288 +/- 40 beats/min). Alpha 1 and alpha 1a receptor

  6. Insertion of alpha1S II-III loop and C terminal sequences into alpha1H fails to restore excitation-contraction coupling in dysgenic myotubes.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Christina M; Beam, Kurt G

    2003-01-01

    The L-type Ca2+ channel in skeletal muscle (alpha1S) is essential for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. Previous studies using chimeras composed of alpha1S together with alpha1C or alpha1M demonstrated the importance of the alpha1S II-III loop and of a smaller subdomain (residues 720-764; 'ECC') in skeletal EC coupling. However, these chimeras failed to test the significance of regions outside the II-III loop, which are highly conserved between alpha1S and alpha1C. Therefore, we have injected dysgenic (alpha1S-lacking) myotubes with cDNAs encoding chimeras between alpha1S and the highly divergent T-type Ca2+ channel, alpha1H. The chimeras consisted of GFP-tagged alpha1H with one or more of the following substitutions: alpha1S II-III loop residues 720-764 ('ECC'), a putative targeting domain of the alpha1S C terminus ('target'; residues 1543-1662) or the entire alpha1S C terminus ('Cterm'; residues 1382-1873). The presence of either target or Cterm affected the expression and/or kinetics of whole-cell currents recorded from both dysgenic muscle cells and tsa-201 cells. Importantly, substitution of ECC alone into GFP-alpha1H (GFP-alpha1H + ECC), or together with either target (GFP-alpha1H + ECC + target) or Cterm (GFP-alpha1H + ECC + Cterm), was insufficient to restore electrically evoked contractions. Depolarization-induced fluorescence transients for GFP-alpha1H + ECC, GFP-alpha1H + ECC + target or GFP-alpha1H + ECC + Cterm had a bell shaped dependence upon membrane voltage (inconsistent with skeletal EC coupling) and were also exceedingly small (unlike cardiac EC coupling). The absence of EC coupling for these chimeras raises the possibility that regions of alpha1S outside of ECC and target are necessary for providing the context that allows these two domains to function in EC coupling and targeting, respectively. Additionally, an inadequate membrane density of the chimeras may have contributed to the lack of coupling.

  7. Liver Test Results Do Not Identify Liver Disease in Adults with α-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Virginia C.; Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Brantly, Mark; Rouhani, Farshid; Schreck, Pamela; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Liver disease is a significant cause of mortality among adults with α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. Age and male sex are reported risk factors for liver disease. In the absence of adequate risk stratification, current recommendations are to intermittently test AAT-deficient adults for liver function. We evaluated this recommendation in a large group of adults with AAT deficiency, to determine the prevalence of increased levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and identify risk factors for liver disease. METHODS We used the Alpha-1 Foundation DNA and Tissue Bank to identify a cross-section of AAT-deficient adults (n=647) with and without liver disease; individuals without AAT-deficiency were used as controls (n=152). Results from ALT tests were compared between groups. RESULTS The prevalence of liver disease among individuals with ATT-deficiency was 7.9%; an increased level of ALT was observed in 7.8% of ATT-deficient individuals, which did not differ significantly from controls. Mean levels of ALT fell within normal range for all groups. An increased level of ALT identified patients with liver disease with 11.9% sensitivity. The level of only γ- glutamyl transpeptidase was significantly higher in the AAT-deficient group than in controls (43 vs 30 IU/ml; P<.003). A childhood history of liver disease and male sex were risk factors for adult liver disease in the multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS An increased level of ALT does not identify adults with AAT deficiency who have liver disease. Male sex and liver disease during childhood might help identify those at risk. PMID:22835581

  8. Association of cigarette smoking and CRP levels with DNA methylation in α-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Siedlinski, Mateusz; Klanderman, Barbara; Sandhaus, Robert A; Barker, Alan F; Brantly, Mark L; Eden, Edward; McElvaney, N Gerard; Rennard, Stephen I; Stocks, James M; Stoller, James K; Strange, Charlie; Turino, Gerard M; Campbell, Edward J; Demeo, Dawn L

    2012-07-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency and tobacco smoking are confirmed risk factors for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. We hypothesized that variable DNA methylation would be associated with smoking and inflammation, as reflected by the level of C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in AAT-deficient subjects. Methylation levels of 1,411 autosomal CpG sites from the Illumina GoldenGate Methylation Cancer Panel I were analyzed in 316 subjects. Associations of five smoking behaviors and CRP levels with individual CpG sites and average methylation levels were assessed using non-parametric testing, linear regression and linear mixed effect models, with and without adjustment for age and gender. Univariate linear regression analysis revealed that methylation levels of 16 CpG sites significantly associated with ever-smoking status. A CpG site in the TGFBI gene was the only site associated with ever-smoking after adjustment for age and gender. No highly significant associations existed between age at smoking initiation, pack-years smoked, duration of smoking, and time since quitting smoking as predictors of individual CpG site methylation levels. However, ever-smoking and younger age at smoking initiation associated with lower methylation level averaged across all sites. DNA methylation at CpG sites in the RUNX3, JAK3 and KRT1 genes associated with CRP levels. The most significantly associated CpG sites with gender and age mapped to the CASP6 and FZD9 genes, respectively. In summary, this study identified multiple potential candidate CpG sites associated with ever-smoking and CRP level in AAT-deficient subjects. Phenotypic variability in Mendelian diseases may be due to epigenetic factors.

  9. Association of cigarette smoking and CRP levels with DNA methylation in α-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Siedlinski, Mateusz; Klanderman, Barbara; Sandhaus, Robert A.; Barker, Alan F.; Brantly, Mark L.; Eden, Edward; McElvaney, N. Gerard; Rennard, Stephen I.; Stocks, James M.; Stoller, James K.; Strange, Charlie; Turino, Gerard M.; Campbell, Edward J.; DeMeo, Dawn L.

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency and tobacco smoking are confirmed risk factors for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. We hypothesized that variable DNA methylation would be associated with smoking and inflammation, as reflected by the level of C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in AAT-deficient subjects. Methylation levels of 1,411 autosomal CpG sites from the Illumina GoldenGate Methylation Cancer Panel I were analyzed in 316 subjects. Associations of five smoking behaviors and CRP levels with individual CpG sites and average methylation levels were assessed using non-parametric testing, linear regression and linear mixed effect models, with and without adjustment for age and gender. Univariate linear regression analysis revealed that methylation levels of 16 CpG sites significantly associated with ever-smoking status. A CpG site in the TGFBI gene was the only site associated with ever-smoking after adjustment for age and gender. No highly significant associations existed between age at smoking initiation, pack-years smoked, duration of smoking, and time since quitting smoking as predictors of individual CpG site methylation levels. However, ever-smoking and younger age at smoking initiation associated with lower methylation level averaged across all sites. DNA methylation at CpG sites in the RUNX3, JAK3 and KRT1 genes associated with CRP levels. The most significantly associated CpG sites with gender and age mapped to the CASP6 and FZD9 genes, respectively. In summary, this study identified multiple potential candidate CpG sites associated with ever-smoking and CRP level in AAT-deficient subjects. Phenotypic variability in Mendelian diseases may be due to epigenetic factors. PMID:22617718

  10. Liver test results do not identify liver disease in adults with α(1)-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Clark, Virginia C; Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Brantly, Mark; Rouhani, Farshid; Schreck, Pamela; Nelson, David R

    2012-11-01

    Liver disease is a significant cause of death among adults with α(1)-antitrypsin (A-AT) deficiency. Age and male sex are reported risk factors for liver disease. In the absence of adequate risk stratification, current recommendations are to intermittently test A-AT-deficient adults for liver function. We evaluated this recommendation in a large group of adults with A-AT deficiency to determine the prevalence of increased levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and identify risk factors for liver disease. We used the Alpha-1 Foundation DNA and Tissue Bank to identify a cross section of A-AT-deficient adults (n = 647) with and without liver disease; individuals without A-AT deficiency were used as controls (n = 152). Results from ALT tests were compared between groups. The prevalence of liver disease among individuals with A-AT deficiency was 7.9%; an increased level of ALT was observed in 7.8% of A-AT-deficient individuals, which did not differ significantly from controls. Mean levels of ALT fell within normal range for all groups. An increased level of ALT identified patients with liver disease with 11.9% sensitivity. The level of only γ-glutamyl transpeptidase was significantly higher in the A-AT-deficient group than in controls (43 vs 30 IU/mL; P < .003). A childhood history of liver disease and male sex were risk factors for adult liver disease in the multivariate analysis. An increased level of ALT does not identify adults with A-AT deficiency who have liver disease. Male sex and liver disease during childhood might help identify those at risk. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Preventing serpin aggregation: The molecular mechanism of citrate action upon antitrypsin unfolding

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, Mary C.; Morton, Craig J.; Feil, Susanne C.; Hansen, Guido; Adams, Julian J.; Parker, Michael W.; Bottomley, Stephen P.

    2008-11-21

    The aggregation of antitrypsin into polymers is one of the causes of neonatal hepatitis, cirrhosis, and emphysema. A similar reaction resulting in disease can occur in other human serpins, and collectively they are known as the serpinopathies. One possible therapeutic strategy involves inhibiting the conformational changes involved in antitrypsin aggregation. The citrate ion has previously been shown to prevent antitrypsin aggregation and maintain the protein in an active conformation; its mechanism of action, however, is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the citrate ion prevents the initial misfolding of the native state to a polymerogenic intermediate in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we have solved the crystal structure of citrate bound to antitrypsin and show that a single citrate molecule binds in a pocket between the A and B beta-sheets, a region known to be important in maintaining antitrypsin stability.

  12. Internal duplication in human alpha 1 and beta 1 interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, B W; May, L T; Sehgal, P B

    1984-01-01

    Metric analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the intron-free human interferon beta 1 (IFN-beta 1) gene by using the Sellers TT algorithm revealed that this gene contains two major repeated segments, which span the entire coding region. These repeats are each approximately 300 nucleotides in length and have 45% identical aligned nucleotides (common bases). When these metrically aligned DNA repeats were translated into amino acids, 9 (19%) of the 47 in-phase amino acid residues were identical (common acids). This internal duplication was also apparent on visual inspection of the amino acid sequence of IFN-beta 1. In addition, metric analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the intron-free IFN-alpha 1 gene showed that this gene also contains two repeats, each approximately 300 nucleotides long, having 47% common bases and 19% common acids. Since the IFN-alpha 1 and -beta 1 genes are known to be related (by the present metric analysis they contain 53% common bases and 45% common acids), a consensus DNA sequence was derived from all four of these repeats. Manual alignment of the separate metric alignments corresponding to the two halves of the IFN-alpha 1 and -beta 1 genes provided a composite alignment with 58% of the alignment positions having the same nucleotide in at least three of the four repeats. When this composite nucleotide alignment was translated to define a composite alignment of the four protein segments, 10 (31%) of the 32 in-phase amino acid residues contained the same amino acid in at least three of the four segments. These sequences relationships provide insight into the origin of the IFN-alpha 1 and -beta 1 genes and furnish an additional basis for comparing them with other related genes. PMID:6594689

  13. Mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Vatner, D. E.; Uemura, N.; Bigaud, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hempel, D. M.; Graham, R. M.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization, osmotic minipumps containing either saline (n = 9) or amidephrine mesylate (AMD) (n = 9), a selective alpha 1-adrenergic receptor agonist, were implanted subcutaneously in dogs with chronically implanted arterial and right atrial pressure catheters and aortic flow probes. After chronic alpha 1-adrenergic receptor stimulation, significant physiological desensitization to acute AMD challenges was observed, i.e., pressor and vasoconstrictor responses to the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist were significantly depressed (p < 0.01) compared with responses in the same dogs studied in the conscious state before pump implantation. However, physiological desensitization to acute challenges of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) in the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade was not observed for either mean arterial pressure (MAP) (30 +/- 7 versus 28 +/- 5 mm Hg) or total peripheral resistance (TPR) (29.8 +/- 4.9 versus 28.9 +/- 7.3 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor plus ganglionic blockade after AMD pump implantation, physiological desensitization to NE was unmasked since the control responses to NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) before the AMD pumps were now greater (p < 0.01) than after chronic AMD administration for both MAP (66 +/- 5 versus 32 +/- 2 mm Hg) and TPR (42.6 +/- 10.3 versus 23.9 +/- 4.4 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor, ganglionic, plus NE-uptake blockade after AMD pump implantation, desensitization was even more apparent, since NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) induced even greater differences in MAP (33 +/- 5 versus 109 +/- 6 mm Hg) and TPR (28.1 +/- 1.8 versus 111.8 +/- 14.7 mm Hg/l per minute). The maximal force of contraction induced by NE in the presence or absence of endothelium was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in vitro in mesenteric artery rings from AMD pump dogs

  14. Mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Vatner, D. E.; Uemura, N.; Bigaud, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hempel, D. M.; Graham, R. M.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization, osmotic minipumps containing either saline (n = 9) or amidephrine mesylate (AMD) (n = 9), a selective alpha 1-adrenergic receptor agonist, were implanted subcutaneously in dogs with chronically implanted arterial and right atrial pressure catheters and aortic flow probes. After chronic alpha 1-adrenergic receptor stimulation, significant physiological desensitization to acute AMD challenges was observed, i.e., pressor and vasoconstrictor responses to the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist were significantly depressed (p < 0.01) compared with responses in the same dogs studied in the conscious state before pump implantation. However, physiological desensitization to acute challenges of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) in the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade was not observed for either mean arterial pressure (MAP) (30 +/- 7 versus 28 +/- 5 mm Hg) or total peripheral resistance (TPR) (29.8 +/- 4.9 versus 28.9 +/- 7.3 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor plus ganglionic blockade after AMD pump implantation, physiological desensitization to NE was unmasked since the control responses to NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) before the AMD pumps were now greater (p < 0.01) than after chronic AMD administration for both MAP (66 +/- 5 versus 32 +/- 2 mm Hg) and TPR (42.6 +/- 10.3 versus 23.9 +/- 4.4 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor, ganglionic, plus NE-uptake blockade after AMD pump implantation, desensitization was even more apparent, since NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) induced even greater differences in MAP (33 +/- 5 versus 109 +/- 6 mm Hg) and TPR (28.1 +/- 1.8 versus 111.8 +/- 14.7 mm Hg/l per minute). The maximal force of contraction induced by NE in the presence or absence of endothelium was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in vitro in mesenteric artery rings from AMD pump dogs

  15. Autoantibody production in rheumatoid arthritis associated with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is complex and likely driven by inflammation and neutrophil dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cormac; Orr, Carl; Fearon, Ursula; Veale, Douglas J; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2017-09-07

    We thank Drs Hutchinson and Eggleton for their interest in our report and for raising some interesting points. While we believe there is some merit in the issues they raise, we do not believe these invalidate the data we have presented or the conclusions we made in our initial report. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. The alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor directly regulates arterial blood pressure via vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Koshimizu, Takaaki; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Kawai, Takayuki; Sunada, Sachie; Takeo, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2002-03-01

    To investigate the physiological role of the alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor (alpha(1D)-AR) subtype, we created mice lacking the alpha(1D)-AR (alpha(1D)(-/-)) by gene targeting and characterized their cardiovascular function. In alpha(1D)-/- mice, the RT-PCR did not detect any transcript of the alpha(1D)-AR in any tissue examined, and there was no apparent upregulation of other alpha(1)-AR subtypes. Radioligand binding studies showed that alpha(1)-AR binding capacity in the aorta was lost, while that in the heart was unaltered in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Non-anesthetized alpha(1D)-/- mice maintained significantly lower basal systolic and mean arterial blood pressure conditions, relative to wild-type mice, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. Besides hypotension, the pressor responses to phenylephrine and norepinephrine were decreased by 30-40% in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Furthermore, the contractile response of the aorta and the pressor response of isolated perfused mesenteric arterial beds to alpha(1)-AR stimulation were markedly reduced in alpha(1D)-/- mice. We conclude that the alpha(1D)-AR participates directly in sympathetic regulation of systemic blood pressure by vasoconstriction.

  17. Heteropolymerization of S, I, and Z α1-antitrypsin and liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahadeva, Ravi; Chang, Wun-Shaing W.; Dafforn, Timothy R.; Oakley, Diana J.; Foreman, Richard C.; Calvin, Jacqueline; Wight, Derek G.D.; Lomas, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The association between Z α1-antitrypsin deficiency and juvenile cirrhosis is well-recognized, and there is now convincing evidence that the hepatic inclusions are the result of entangled polymers of mutant Z α1-antitrypsin. Four percent of the northern European Caucasian population are heterozygotes for the Z variant, but even more common is S α1-antitrypsin, which is found in up to 28% of southern Europeans. The S variant is known to have an increased susceptibility to polymerization, although this is marginal compared with the more conformationally unstable Z variant. There has been speculation that the two may interact to produce cirrhosis, but this has never been demonstrated experimentally. This hypothesis was raised again by the observation reported here of a mixed heterozygote for Z α1-antitrypsin and another conformationally unstable variant (I α1-antitrypsin; 39Arg→Cys) identified in a 34-year-old man with cirrhosis related to α1-antitrypsin deficiency. The conformational stability of the I variant has been characterized, and we have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to demonstrate the formation of heteropolymers between S and Z α1-antitrypsin. Taken together, these results indicate that not only may mixed variants form heteropolymers, but that this can causally lead to the development of cirrhosis. PMID:10194472

  18. Characterising the association of latency with α(1)-antitrypsin polymerisation using a novel monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lu; Perez, Juan; Mela, Marianna; Miranda, Elena; Burling, Keith A; Rouhani, Farshid N; DeMeo, Dawn L; Haq, Imran; Irving, James A; Ordóñez, Adriana; Dickens, Jennifer A; Brantly, Mark; Marciniak, Stefan J; Alexander, Graeme J M; Gooptu, Bibek; Lomas, David A

    2015-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin is primarily synthesised in the liver, circulates to the lung and protects pulmonary tissues from proteolytic damage. The Z mutant (Glu342Lys) undergoes inactivating conformational change and polymerises. Polymers are retained within the hepatocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in homozygous (PiZZ) individuals, predisposing the individuals to hepatic cirrhosis and emphysema. Latency is an analogous process of inactivating, intra-molecular conformational change and may co-occur with polymerisation. However, the relationship between latency and polymerisation remained unexplored in the absence of a suitable probe. We have developed a novel monoclonal antibody specific for latent α1-antitrypsin and used it in combination with a polymer-specific antibody, to assess the association of both conformers in vitro, in disease and during augmentation therapy. In vitro kinetics analysis showed polymerisation dominated the pathway but latency could be promoted by stabilising monomeric α1-antitrypsin. Polymers were extensively produced in hepatocytes and a cell line expressing Z α1-antitrypsin but the latent protein was not detected despite manipulation of the secretory pathway. However, α1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy contains latent α1-antitrypsin, as did the plasma of 63/274 PiZZ individuals treated with augmentation therapy but 0/264 who were not receiving this medication (p<10(-14)). We conclude that latent α1-antitrypsin is a by-product of the polymerisation pathway, that the intracellular folding environment is resistant to formation of the latent conformer but that augmentation therapy introduces latent α1-antitrypsin into the circulation. A suite of monoclonal antibodies and methodologies developed in this study can characterise α1-antitrypsin folding and conformational transitions, and screen methods to improve augmentation therapy.

  19. Characterising the association of latency with α1-antitrypsin polymerisation using a novel monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lu; Perez, Juan; Mela, Marianna; Miranda, Elena; Burling, Keith A; Rouhani, Farshid N; DeMeo, Dawn L; Haq, Imran; Irving, James A; Ordóñez, Adriana; Dickens, Jennifer A; Brantly, Mark; Marciniak, Stefan J; Alexander, Graeme J M; Gooptu, Bibek; Lomas, David A

    2015-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin is primarily synthesised in the liver, circulates to the lung and protects pulmonary tissues from proteolytic damage. The Z mutant (Glu342Lys) undergoes inactivating conformational change and polymerises. Polymers are retained within the hepatocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in homozygous (PiZZ) individuals, predisposing the individuals to hepatic cirrhosis and emphysema. Latency is an analogous process of inactivating, intra-molecular conformational change and may co-occur with polymerisation. However, the relationship between latency and polymerisation remained unexplored in the absence of a suitable probe. We have developed a novel monoclonal antibody specific for latent α1-antitrypsin and used it in combination with a polymer-specific antibody, to assess the association of both conformers in vitro, in disease and during augmentation therapy. In vitro kinetics analysis showed polymerisation dominated the pathway but latency could be promoted by stabilising monomeric α1-antitrypsin. Polymers were extensively produced in hepatocytes and a cell line expressing Z α1-antitrypsin but the latent protein was not detected despite manipulation of the secretory pathway. However, α1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy contains latent α1-antitrypsin, as did the plasma of 63/274 PiZZ individuals treated with augmentation therapy but 0/264 who were not receiving this medication (p < 10−14). We conclude that latent α1-antitrypsin is a by-product of the polymerisation pathway, that the intracellular folding environment is resistant to formation of the latent conformer but that augmentation therapy introduces latent α1-antitrypsin into the circulation. A suite of monoclonal antibodies and methodologies developed in this study can characterise α1-antitrypsin folding and conformational transitions, and screen methods to improve augmentation therapy. PMID:25462157

  20. Isolation and characterization of fibronectin-alpha 1-microglobulin complex in rat plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Falkenberg, C; Enghild, J J; Thøgersen, I B; Salvesen, G; Akerström, B

    1994-01-01

    Molecules containing the 28 kDa immunoregulatory protein alpha 1-microglobulin (alpha 1-m), also known as protein HC, were isolated from rat plasma or serum by immunoaffinity chromatography. Three molecular species were distinguished on the basis of nondenaturing PAGE. Two of these have been described previously: uncomplexed alpha 1-m, and the complex of alpha 1-m with alpha 1-inhibitor-3. The third species was analysed by denaturing PAGE, immunoblotting, proteinase digestion and N-terminal-sequence analyses, and shown to consist of a complex between alpha 1-m and fibronectin. This complex, with a mass of about 560 kDa, was resistant to dissociation in the presence of denaturants, but not in the presence of reducing agents in combination with denaturants, and we conclude that the two components are linked by disulphide bonds. About 60% of the total detectable plasma alpha 1-m exists as high-molecular-mass complexes distributed approximately evenly between fibronectin and alpha 1-inhibitor-3. Immunochemical analyses were used to determine the proportion of the total plasma pools of fibronectin and alpha 1-inhibitor-3 that circulate in complex with alpha 1-m. About 3-7% of the total plasma fibronectin from three different rat strains contained alpha 1-m, whereas 0.3-0.8% of the total plasma alpha 1-inhibitor-3 contained alpha 1-m. Complexes were found at similar levels in plasma and serum, indicating that coagulation is not responsible for complex formation. Moreover, immunochemical analyses of human plasma revealed small amounts of alpha 1-m in complex with fibronectin and alpha 2-macroglobulin (an alpha 1-inhibitor-3 homologue). The existence of a complex between alpha 1-m and fibronectin in rats and humans suggests a mechanism for the incorporation of the immunoregulatory molecule alpha 1-m into the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7519849

  1. Distinctive biophysical and pharmacological properties of class A (BI) calcium channel alpha 1 subunits.

    PubMed

    Sather, W A; Tanabe, T; Zhang, J F; Mori, Y; Adams, M E; Tsien, R W

    1993-08-01

    Transcripts for the class A Ca2+ channel alpha 1 subunit (also known as BI) are present at high levels in many parts of the mammalian CNS and are widely assumed to encode the P-type Ca2+ channel. To characterize the biophysical and pharmacological properties of alpha 1A channels, macroscopic and single-channel recordings were made in Xenopus oocytes injected with alpha 1A cRNA. alpha 1-specific properties were identified by making systematic comparisons with the more familiar class C alpha 1 subunit under the condition of a standard ancillary subunit (alpha 2/delta + beta) makeup. alpha 1A currents activate and inactivate more rapidly and display steeper voltage dependence of gating than alpha 1C currents. Unlike alpha 1C, alpha 1A channels are largely insensitive to dihydropyridines and FPL 64176, but respond to the cone snail peptide omega-CTx-MVIIC(SNX-230), a potent and fairly selective inhibitor. In comparison with P-type Ca2+ channels in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells, alpha 1A channels in oocytes are approximately 10(2)-fold less sensitive to omega-Aga-IVA and approximately 10-fold more sensitive to omega-CTx-MVIIC. alpha 1A channels are not inhibited by Bay K 8644 and inactivate much more rapidly than P-type Ca2+ channels. Thus, alpha 1A is capable of generating a Ca2+ channel phenotype quite different from P-type current.

  2. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. 866.5580 Section 866.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of alpha-1...

  3. Inhibition of neutrophil activation by alpha1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M J; Gewurz, H; Siegel, J N

    1984-01-01

    We report that alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), a naturally occurring human plasma protein and acute phase reactant of uncertain biological function, inhibits human neutrophil aggregation and superoxide anion generation induced by a variety of stimuli including zymosan treated serum, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and phorbol myristate acetate. Inhibition was transient, directly proportional to the glycoprotein concentration and inversely proportional to the concentration of the stimulus added. Desialyzation, resulting in the removal of a substantial portion of the molecule's negative charge, did not alter the effectiveness of AAG. Removal of the penultimate galactose residues from desialyzed AAG resulted in a slight but significant reversal of inhibition, suggesting that the heteropolysaccharide units of AAG may be important for inhibition of cellular function. We therefore suggest that the acute phase glycoprotein AAG may be a significant modulator of neutrophil as well as platelet and lymphocyte function during inflammation. PMID:6321072

  4. '1-Antitrypsin polymorphism and systematics of eastern North American wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Federoff, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    We used data on the polymorphic status of '1-antitrypsin ('1AT) to study the relationship of Minnesota wolves to the gray wolf (Canis lupus), which was thought to have evolved in Eurasia, and to red wolves (Canis rufus) and coyotes (Canis latrans), which putatively evolved in North America. Recent evidence had indicated that Minnesota wolves might be more closely related to red wolves and coyotes. Samples from wild-caught Minnesota wolves and from captive wolves, at least some of which originated in Alaska and western Canada, were similarly polymorphic for '1AT, whereas coyote and red wolf samples were all monomorphic. Our findings, in conjunction with earlier results, are consistent with the Minnesota wolf being a gray wolf of Eurasian origin or possibly a hybrid between the gray wolf of Eurasian origin and the proposed North American wolf.

  5. Tamsulosin: assessment of affinity of 3H-prazosin bindings to two alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes (alpha1H and alpha1L) in bovine prostate and rat heart and brain.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, K; Nakamura, T; Yoshihara, T; Fukutomi, J; Sugiyama, K; Hattorim, K; Ohnuki, T; Watanabe, K; Nagatomo, T

    1998-10-01

    1. The present study was designed to assess the displacement potencies of tamsulosin to 3H-prazosin bindings in two alpha1-adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes (alpha1H and alpha1L) in bovine prostate, rat heart and brain compared with those of amosulalol, labetalol, ketanserin, clonidine and propranolol. 2. The pKi values of tamsulosin to alpha1H and alpha1L subtypes in bovine prostate were 9.13 and 8.99 and these values were almost the same as those of prazosin. On the other hand, low pKi binding values of amosulalol, labetalol, ketanserin, clonidine and propranolol to these subtypes were observed. 3. Low pKi values of tamsulosin to alpha2- and beta-ARs and muscarinic and 5HT2 receptors in the rat brain were observed. 4. These results suggest that tamsulosin has high affinities to alpha1L-AR subtypes in bovine prostate and rat hearts as well as alpha1H-AR subtypes, implying an inhibitory effect of this drug on the contraction of the prostate.

  6. [Decreased mRNA expressions of T-type channel alpha1H and alpha1G in the sperm of varicocele patients and their implication].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Ping; Wang, Pei-Tao; Gao, Feng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Zhong-Qiang; Fu, Xiu-Yan; Li, Hua-Qin; Wang, Xin-Sheng

    2012-04-01

    To study the relationship of varicocele (VC) with the expressions of T-type channel alpha1H and alpha1G in the sperm of VC patients. Based on the WHO criteria, we examined the semen samples by computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA), and divided the samples into groups A (normal semen from volunteers, n = 20), B (normal semen from VC patients, n = 16) and C (abnormal semen from VC patients, n = 44). We optimized the semen by discontinuous Percoll grade centrifugation, and determined the mRNA expressions of T-type channel alpha1H and alpha1G in the three groups using using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Compared with group A, the mRNA expressions of alpha1H and alpha1G showed with no significant decrease in group B (P>0.05), but were remarkably reduced in group C (P<0.01). The abnormal mRNA expressions of T-type channel alpha1H and alpha1G may be one of the causes of declined semen quality and consequently infertility in VC patients, which has pointed out a new direction for the studies of the causes and treatment of VC-related infertility.

  7. Cardiac Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors: Novel Aspects of Expression, Signaling Mechanisms, Physiologic Function, and Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Timothy D.; Jensen, Brian C.; Baker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors (AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have a crucial role in cardiac physiology in health and disease. Alpha1-ARs signal through Gαq, and signaling through Gq, for example, by endothelin and angiotensin receptors, is thought to be detrimental to the heart. In contrast, cardiac alpha1-ARs mediate important protective and adaptive functions in the heart, although alpha1-ARs are only a minor fraction of total cardiac ARs. Cardiac alpha1-ARs activate pleiotropic downstream signaling to prevent pathologic remodeling in heart failure. Mechanisms defined in animal and cell models include activation of adaptive hypertrophy, prevention of cardiac myocyte death, augmentation of contractility, and induction of ischemic preconditioning. Surprisingly, at the molecular level, alpha1-ARs localize to and signal at the nucleus in cardiac myocytes, and, unlike most GPCRs, activate “inside-out” signaling to cause cardioprotection. Contrary to past opinion, human cardiac alpha1-AR expression is similar to that in the mouse, where alpha1-AR effects are seen most convincingly in knockout models. Human clinical studies show that alpha1-blockade worsens heart failure in hypertension and does not improve outcomes in heart failure, implying a cardioprotective role for human alpha1-ARs. In summary, these findings identify novel functional and mechanistic aspects of cardiac alpha1-AR function and suggest that activation of cardiac alpha1-AR might be a viable therapeutic strategy in heart failure. PMID:24368739

  8. Cell wall alpha1-3glucans induce the aggregation of germinating conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Thierry; Beauvais, Anne; Loussert, Céline; Thevenard, Benoît; Fulgsang, Claus C; Ohno, Naohito; Clavaud, Cécile; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Latgé, Jean-Paul

    2010-08-01

    The germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia can be divided into four stages: breaking of dormancy, isotropic swelling, establishment of cell polarity, and formation of a germ tube. Swelling of conidia is associated in liquid medium with a multi-cellular aggregation that produced large clumps of conidia. Conidial aggregation can be specifically prevented by the addition of alpha1-3glucanase. Swollen conidia specifically adhere to insoluble alpha1-3glucan chains. Electron microscopy studies showed that cell wall alpha1-3glucan chains became exposed at the cell surface during the swelling. These results demonstrate that cell wall alpha1-3glucans play an essential role in the aggregation between swollen conidia. Experiments with alpha1-3glucan coated latex beads show that alpha1-3glucan chains interacted between them without the requirement of any other cell wall component suggesting that biophysical properties of alpha1-3glucans are solely responsible for conidial aggregation.

  9. Separation of basic drug enantiomers by capillary electrophoresis using chicken alpha1-acid glycoprotein: insight into chiral recognition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Hisami; Sadakane, Yutaka; Haginaka, Jun

    2003-08-01

    Recombinant chicken alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (alpha(1)-AGP) was prepared by the Escherichia coli expression system and completely deglycosylated alpha(1)-AGP (cd-alpha(1)-AGP) was obtained by treatments of native alpha(1)-AGP with a mixture of endoglycosidase and N-glycosidase. The average molecular masses of chicken alpha(1)-AGP, cd-alpha(1)-AGP and recombinant alpha(1)-AGP were estimated to be about 29 200, 21 700 and 20 700, respectively, by matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight-mass spectrometry. We compared the chiral recognition ability of chicken alpha(1)-AGP, cd-alpha(1)-AGP and recombinant alpha(1)-AGP using them as chiral selectors in capillary electrophoresis. The chicken alpha(1)-AGP showed higher resolution for eperisone, pindolol and tolperisone than cd-alpha(1)-AGP or recombinant alpha(1)-AGP. Recombinant alpha(1)-AGP still showed chiral recognition for three basic drugs tested. By addition of propranolol as a competitor in the separation solution in CE, no enantioseparations of three basic drugs were observed with chicken alpha(1)-AGP, cd-alpha(1)-AGP or recombinant alpha(1)-AGP. These results reveal that the protein domain of the chicken alpha(1)-AGP is responsible for the chiral recognition ability, and that the chiral recognition site(s) for basic drugs exists on the protein domain.

  10. Oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Aerts, C; Gressier, B; Gosset, P; Voisin, C

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of guinea pig alveolar epithelial type II cells to generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species to inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI). Inactivation of alpha 1-PI was evaluated by its inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic elastase and was expressed as a percentage. The same experiments were performed in parallel with alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained from the same animals and with MRC-5 fibroblasts. Both type II cells and AM released significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, whereas the fibroblasts did not. Unstimulated type II cells (0.5 +/- 2%), AM (1.2 +/- 1.5%), and fibroblasts (0.5 +/- 0.5%) were unable to inactivate alpha 1-PI. Addition of phorbol myristate acetate did not increase their ability to inactivate alpha 1-PI. In contrast, type II cells (79.7 +/- 7%) and AM (80.1 +/- 8%) dramatically inactivated alpha 1-PI in the presence of myeloperoxidase (25 mU/ml), whereas fibroblasts did not. Addition of catalase to the reaction significantly prevented the inactivation of alpha 1-PI. Western blot analysis of alpha 1-PI did not reveal a significant proteolysis of alpha 1-PI, which supports the hypothesis that, in the presence of neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase, type II cells may oxidatively inactivate alpha 1-PI.

  11. Cloning and functional expression of a voltage-gated calcium channel alpha1 subunit from jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Jeziorski, M C; Greenberg, R M; Clark, K S; Anderson, P A

    1998-08-28

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in vertebrates comprise at least seven molecular subtypes, each of which produces a current with distinct kinetics and pharmacology. Although several invertebrate Ca2+ channel alpha1 subunits have also been cloned, their functional characteristics remain unclear, as heterologous expression of a full-length invertebrate channel has not previously been reported. We have cloned a cDNA encoding the alpha1 subunit of a voltage-gated Ca2+ channel from the scyphozoan jellyfish Cyanea capillata, one of the earliest existing organisms to possess neural and muscle tissue. The deduced amino acid sequence of this subunit, named CyCaalpha1, is more similar to vertebrate L-type channels (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D) than to non-L-type channels (alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1E) or low voltage-activated channels (alpha1G). Expression of CyCaalpha1 in Xenopus oocytes produces a high voltage-activated Ca2+ current that, unlike vertebrate L-type currents, is only weakly sensitive to 1,4-dihydropyridine or phenylalkylamine Ca2+ channel blockers and is not potentiated by the agonist S(-)-BayK 8644. In addition, the channel is less permeable to Ba2+ than to Ca2+ and is more permeable to Sr2+. CyCaalpha1 thus represents an ancestral L-type alpha1 subunit with significant functional differences from mammalian L-type channels.

  12. Characterization of microsomal and cytosolic alpha-1,2-mannosidases from mung bean hypocotyls.

    PubMed

    Forsee, W T

    1985-10-01

    Microsomal and cytosolic alpha-mannosidase activities, which hydrolyze alpha-1,2-mannosyl-mannose linkages in the Man5GlcNAc2 oligosaccharide, have been isolated from homogenates of mung bean hypocotyls. The alpha-1,2-mannosidase activities were readily distinguished from previously described aryl alpha-mannosidases by several criteria. They were optimally active in the presence of Ca2+ between pH 5.5 and 6, they were inhibited by Zn2+, and they had essentially no activity with p-nitrophenyl-alpha-mannoside. The microsomal and cytosolic alpha-1,2-mannosidases demonstrated specificity for oligosaccharides with terminal nonreducing alpha-1,2-mannosyl linkages, and they were inhibited by mannosyl-mannose disaccharides, with the inhibition decreasing in the order of alpha-1,2-greater than alpha-1,3-greater than alpha-1,6-mannosyl-mannose. The cytosolic alpha-1,2-mannosidase activity, which was present in the 100,000 g supernatant, was separated from the aryl alpha-mannosidase by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The microsomal alpha-1,2-mannosidase, which was tightly associated with the particulate fraction, was solubilized with Triton X-100 and 0.2 M KCl. The two alpha-1,2-mannosidase activities were readily differentiated by gel-filtration chromatography. The solubilized microsomal enzyme chromatographed in approximately the same position as a Mr 460,000 globular protein whereas the cytosolic enzyme was eluted in a retarded position, indicating a much smaller protein.

  13. Novel alpha1-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways: secreted factors and interactions with the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Duan, Zhong-Hui; Papay, Robert; Pluskota, Elzbieta; Gaivin, Robert J; de la Motte, Carol A; Plow, Edward F; Perez, Dianne M

    2006-07-01

    alpha1-Adrenergic receptor (alpha1-ARs) subtypes (alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D) regulate multiple signal pathways, such as phospholipase C, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases. We employed oligonucleotide microarray technology to explore the effects of both short- (1 h) and long-term (18 h) activation of the alpha1A-AR to enable RNA changes to occur downstream of earlier well characterized signaling pathways, promoting novel couplings. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies confirmed that PKC was a critical regulator of alpha1A-AR-mediated gene expression, and secreted interleukin (IL)-6 also contributed to gene expression alterations. We next focused on two novel signaling pathways that might be mediated through alpha1A-AR stimulation because of the clustering of gene expression changes for cell adhesion/motility (syndecan-4 and tenascin-C) and hyaluronan (HA) signaling. We confirmed that alpha1-ARs induced adhesion in three cell types to vitronectin, an interaction that was also integrin-, FGF7-, and PKC-dependent. alpha1-AR activation also inhibited cell migration, which was integrin- and PKC-independent but still required secretion of FGF7. alpha1-AR activation also increased the expression and deposition of HA, a glycosaminoglycan, which displayed two distinct structures: pericellular coats and long cable structures, as well as increasing expression of the HA receptor, CD44. Long cable structures of HA can bind leukocytes, which this suggests that alpha1-ARs may be involved in proinflammatory responses. Our results indicate alpha1-ARs induce the secretion of factors that interact with the extracellular matrix to regulate cell adhesion, motility and proinflammatory responses through novel signaling pathways.

  14. A transmembrane residue influences the interaction of propofol with the strychnine-sensitive glycine alpha1 and alpha1beta receptor.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jörg; Leuwer, Martin; Stachura, Sina; Krampfl, Klaus; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J; Haeseler, Gertrud

    2008-12-01

    Propofol, well known for its anesthetic effects, acts as a positive allosteric modulator of the alpha-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor but also enhances the function of the glycine receptor. The GABA modulatory effects of propofol are influenced by an amino acid residue located within the second transmembrane domain (TM2) of the GABA(A) receptor beta subunit. In glycine alpha(1) subunits, the homologous residue (serine 267) affects the glycine modulatory actions of alcohols and alkane anesthetics. In the present study we investigated the role of this residue on the interaction of propofol with the glycine alpha(1) and alpha(1)beta receptor. The influence of propofol on wild type and mutant (alpha(1)S267M, alpha(1)S267I, alpha(1)S267Mbeta, alpha(1)S267Ibeta) glycine receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells was investigated by using the whole-cell clamp technique. Mutation of the alpha(1) subunit TM2 serine residue to either isoleucine or methionine decreased the sensitivity of the receptor to glycine, and abolished the direct activation of the glycine receptor by propofol. Additionally, the methionine and particularly the isoleucine mutation decreased the glycine-enhancing actions of propofol. The nature of the TM2 residue (267) of the glycine alpha(1) subunit influences the glycine modulatory effect of propofol and direct activation of the receptor by this anesthetic. A comparison of the impact of such complementary mutations on the interaction of propofol with glycine and GABA(A) receptors should permit a better understanding of the molecular determinants of action of propofol on these structurally related receptors and may aid in the development of selective glycine receptor modulators.

  15. Shark (Prionace glauca) elastoidin: characterization of its collagen as [alpha 1(E)]3 homotrimers.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Uematsu, Y; Miyauchi, Y

    1986-01-01

    A new type of collagen was isolated from elastoidin of great blue shark by limited pepsin digestion. The collagen alpha chain of elastoidin, designated alpha 1(E), was very similar in electrophoretic and chromatographic behavior and amino acid composition to shark skin alpha 1(I) chain, but they were genetically-distinct on the basis of CNBr-peptide maps. The collagen molecule of elastoidin was shown to be an [alpha 1(E)]3 homotrimer.

  16. Recent advances in the molecular pharmacology of the alpha 1-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Guarino, R D; Perez, D M; Piascik, M T

    1996-08-01

    This review is intended to discuss recent developments in the molecular pharmacology of the alpha 1-adrenergic receptor (alpha 1-AR) subtypes. After a brief historical development, we will focus on the more contemporary issues having to do with this receptor family. Emphasis will be put on recent data regarding the cloning, nomenclature, signalling mechanisms, and genomic organization of the alpha 1-AR subtypes. We will also highlight recent mutational studies that identify key amino acid residues involved in ligand binding, as well as the role of the alpha 1-AR subtypes in regulating physiologic processes.

  17. Different pathways of ( sup 3 H)inositol phosphate formation mediated by. alpha. 1a- and. alpha. 1b-adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.M.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1990-10-15

    The types of inositol phosphates (InsPs) formed in response to activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor subtypes were determined in collagenase-dispersed renal cells and hepatocytes by high pressure liquid chromatography separation. In hepatocytes, which contain only the alpha 1b subtype, norepinephrine stimulated rapid (10-s) formation of (3H)Ins(1,4,5)P3 and (3H)Ins(1,3,4)P3 and slower (5-min) formation of Ins(1,4)P2 and Ins(1)P. Selective inactivation of alpha 1b receptors by chloroethylclonidine almost completely blocked the effects of norepinephrine in hepatocytes. In renal cells, which contain both alpha 1a and alpha 1b receptors in a 60:40 ratio, norepinephrine did not significantly increase the size of any peaks until 5 min after agonist activation. At this time, only a peak eluting with Ins(1)P and one eluting shortly after Ins(1,4)P2 were significantly elevated. Incubation with norepinephrine for 2 h caused small but significant increases in peaks co-eluting with Ins(1)P and Ins(1,4,5)P3 in renal cells; however, only the increase in Ins(1)P was inhibited by chloroethylclonidine pretreatment. Extraction under neutral conditions suggested that cyclic InsPs may be the primary compounds formed in response to norepinephrine in renal cells. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ caused a 60% reduction in the InsP response to norepinephrine in renal cells but had no effect in hepatocytes. These results suggest that activation of alpha 1a and alpha 1b receptor subtypes results in formation of different InsPs and that the response to alpha 1a activation may require influx of extracellular Ca2+.

  18. Intraoperative floppy-iris syndrome associated with alpha1-adrenoreceptors: comparison of tamsulosin and alfuzosin.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Marie-Claude; Blouin, Julie; Perreault, Sylvie; Lapointe, André; Dragomir, Alice

    2007-07-01

    To compare the incidence of intraoperative floppy-iris syndrome (IFIS) in men exposed to tamsulosin and men exposed to alfuzosin and evaluate the effect of IFIS on the complication rate of cataract surgery. Tertiary care hospital, Chicoutimi, Quebec, Canada. The medical charts of 64 men (92 eyes) who had phacoemulsification cataract surgery between June 2005 and July 2006 and reported having used tamsulosin or alfuzosin at their initial visit for cataract evaluation were reviewed. The presence or absence of IFIS, potential confounding clinical covariates, duration of surgery, and complications were noted. The history of taking an alpha1-antagonist was verified. To address the main objective of the study, only patients who had exclusively used tamsulosin or alfuzosin were included. For the secondary objective, all eligible patients were included even if they had received more than one alpha1-antagonist in the past. Of men exclusively exposed to tamsulosin (22) or alfuzosin (13), 86.4% and 15.4%, respectively, developed IFIS (P<.001). The adjusted odds ratio of IFIS in patients exposed to tamsulosin compared to those exposed to alfuzosin was 32.15 (95% confidence interval, 2.74-377.11). Eyes with IFIS had a higher risk for complications (focal iris stromal atrophy, transient postoperative hypertension, major iris trauma, posterior capsule break with vitreous loss, zonular dehiscence, postoperative cystoid macular edema) than eyes without IFIS (P<.001). Men exposed to tamsulosin had a significantly higher risk for developing IFIS than men exposed to alfuzosin. Intraoperative floppy-iris syndrome significantly increased the complication rate of cataract surgery.

  19. Identification and characterization of the Trichoderma harzianum gene encoding alpha-1,3-glucanase involved in streptococcal mutan degradation.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Adrian; Janczarek, Monika; Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    alpha-1,3-Glucanases (mutanases) are currently of great interest due to their potential use in the field of dental care. These enzymes have been reported in several bacteria, yeasts and fungi, but up to now, characterization of this family of proteins has been relatively poor. In this study, we identify and characterize a mutanase gene from Trichoderma harzianum CCM F-340. Sequence analysis, on the nucleotide and amino acid levels reveals that this alpha-1,3-glucanase is highly homologous to alpha-1,3-glucanases from T harzianum isolate CBS 243.71 and T asperellum CECT 20539. T. harzianum CCM F-340 mutanase is a 634-aa residue protein with a calculated molecular mass of 67.65 kDa, composed of two distinct, highly conserved domains (a long N-terminal catalytic domain and a short C-terminal polysaccharide-binding domain) separated by a less conserved Pro-Ser-Thr-rich linker region. The mutanase gene was expressed in an E. coli BL21 (DE3) host, under the transcriptional control of T7 promoter. The purified enzyme migrated as a band of about 68 kDa after SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which coincided with the predicted size based on the amino acid sequence. Our data indicate that this enzyme is highly conserved in Trichoderma and can be produced in active form in such heterologous expression system.

  20. Relationship between angiotensinogen, alpha 1-protease inhibitor elastase complex, antithrombin III and C-reactive protein in septic ARDS.

    PubMed

    Hilgenfeldt, U; Kellermann, W; Kienapfel, G; Jochum, M

    1990-01-01

    The time-course of plasma angiotensinogen (Ao), elastase-alpha 1-protease inhibitor complex (EL alpha 1PI), antithrombin III (AT III) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been investigated of six patients suffering from adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The total plasma Ao level (active and inactive Ao) varied in individuals but was increased up to five-fold. An increasing amount of inactive Ao is found. From the beginning of their stay in the intensive care unit up to five days half of the patients displayed a positive correlation between the plasma CRP and Ao level. The CRP and Ao values were either not or were negatively correlated with the AT III values. In contrast plasma Ao and AT III levels in all patients were positively correlated during a particular period in the subsequent phase of the disease, where there was no or a negative correlation with CRP. The two acute phase reactants CRP and EL alpha 1PI were only correlated in two patients at the beginning of the disease. The markedly increased plasma level at the beginning of the inflammatory disease indicates that Ao is an acute phase reactant, and this is supported by the parallel changes in plasma CRP and Ao levels during the early days of ARDS. The relationship between the plasma levels of Ao and AT III for more than fourteen days suggests similar regulation of these members of the serpin family after termination of the acute-phase.

  1. Recombinant production of native human α-1-antitrypsin protein in the liver HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-10-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency is associated with emphysema and liver disease. Only plasma-derived A1AT protein is available for augmentation therapy. Recombinant A1AT (recA1AT) protein expressed in various types of available hosts are either non-glycosylated or aberrantly glycosylated resulting into reduced stability and biological activity. To overcome these limitations, we have used the human liver HepG2 cell line to produce recA1AT protein. HepG2 cells were transfected by A1AT cDNA and cell populations were generated that stably overexpressed A1AT protein. Real-time RT-PCR and rocket immunoelectrophoresis of cell culture supernatants indicated that the transfection resulted more than two-fold increase in A1AT production compared to that of control parental cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that both plasma and HepG2-produced A1AT proteins have identical molecular weight in either glycosylated or deglycosylated form. Partial digestion with PNGase F indicated that the three N-glycosylation sites of recA1AT, like the native A1AT protein in plasma, are occupied. Recombinant A1AT also like the native A1AT was thermostable and could efficiently inhibit trypsin proteolytic activity against BSA and BAPNA chromogenic substrate. The recombinant HepG2 cells cultured in media containing B27 serum free supplement released recA1AT at the same level as in the serum containing media. RecA1AT production in HepG2 cells grown under serum free condition at a large scale could provide a reliable source of the native protein suitable for therapeutic use in human.

  2. Comparison of guinea-pig, bovine and rat alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Büscher, R.; Heeks, C.; Taguchi, K.; Michel, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    1. To elucidate a possible role of species differences in the classification of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes, we have characterized the alpha 1-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig spleen, kidney and cerebral cortex and in bovine cerebral cortex using concentration-dependent alkylation by chloroethylclonidine and competitive binding with 5-methlurapidil, methoxamine, (+)-niguldipine, noradrenaline, oxymetazoline, phentolamine, SDZ NVI-085, tamsulosin and (+)-tamsulosin. Rat liver alpha 1B-adrenoceptors were studied for comparison. Chloroethylclonidine-sensitivity and (+)-niguldipine affinity were also compared at cloned rat and bovine alpha 1a-adrenoceptors. 2. Chloroethylclonidine concentration-dependently inactivated alpha 1-adrenoceptors in all five tissues. While chloroethylclonidine inactivated almost all alpha 1-adrenoceptors in rat liver and guinea-pig kidney and brain, 20-30% of alpha 1-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig spleen and bovine brain were resistant to alkylation by 10 microM chloroethylclonidine. With regard to concentration-dependency guinea-pig kidney and brain were approximately 10 fold less sensitive than guinea-pig spleen or rat liver. 3. In rat liver, all drugs tested competed for [3H]-prazosin binding with steep and monophasic curves. Drug affinities were relatively low and resembled most closely those of cloned rat alpha 1b-adrenoceptors. 4. In guinea-pig spleen, all drugs tested competed for [3H]-prazosin binding with steep and monophasic curves. Drug affinities were relatively low and resembled most closely those of cloned rat alpha 1b-adrenoceptors. 5. In guinea-pig kidney most drugs tested competed for [3H]-prazosin binding with steep and monophasic curves and had relatively low drug affinities close to those of cloned rat alpha 1b- and alpha 1d-adrenoceptors. However, noradrenaline and tamsulosin had consistently biphasic competition curves recognizing 36-39% high and 61-64% low affinity sites. 6. In guinea-pig cerebral cortex, all drugs tested

  3. T-Type calcium channel alpha1G and alpha1H subunits in human retinoblastoma cells and their loss after differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Bertolesi, Gabriel E; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Sun, Xiaolu; Hamid, Jawed; Zamponi, Gerald W; Juhasz, Alexander E; Haynes, Lawrence W; Barnes, Steven

    2002-07-01

    Human retinoblastoma cells are multipotent retinal precursor cells capable of differentiating into photoreceptors, neurons, and glia. The current-voltage relation of the undifferentiated cells is dominated by a transient inward current that disappears shortly after differentiation. In 20 mM Ba(2+)-containing bath solutions, the current has an activation midpoint near -25 mV and appears to be fully inactivated at -20 mV. Sr(2+) and Ca(2+) are preferred charge carriers relative to Ba(2+), and the current vanishes in the absence of these divalent cations. Cd(2+) blocks the current with an IC(50) of 160 microM, and Ni(2+) blocks in a biphasic manner with IC(50)s of 22 and 352 microM. The current is unaffected when sodium is replaced with other monovalent cations, and it is insensitive to nifedipine, omega-conotoxin GVIA, omega-agatoxin IVA, and omega-conotoxin MVIIC. RT-PCR revealed the presence of alpha 1G and alpha 1H mRNA in undifferentiated cells, but following differentiation, a striking reduction of both alpha 1G and alpha 1H mRNA was found, and this was paralleled by the loss of T-type Ca channel currents. alpha 1I subunit mRNA levels were low in undifferentiated and differentiated cells. These results suggest that T-type Ca channels could play a role in undifferentiated retinoblastoma cell physiology since alpha 1G and alpha 1H Ca channel subunit expression is reduced in cells that have differentiated and exited the cell cycle.

  4. Lower-zone emphysema in young patients without α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Nestor A.; Goldman, Ernesto; Roncoroni, Aquiles J.

    1974-01-01

    Martelli, N. A., Goldman, E., and Roncoroni, A. J. (1974).Thorax, 29, 237-244. Lowerzone emphysema in young patients without α1-antitrypsin deficiency. Three young patients with radiographic pulmonary emphysema predominantly in the lower zones are reported. The clinical and physiological features were those observed in severe pulmonary emphysema. Predominance of the main lesions in the lower zones was confirmed in two cases by selective pulmonary angiography. One of the patients died and extensive panlobular emphysema was found at necropsy. Although the similarities between our patients and those with emphysema and α1-antitrypsin deficiency were remarkable, the latter condition was ruled out. Images PMID:4545502

  5. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  6. GFR alpha-1 is expressed in parvalbumin GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sarabi, A; Hoffer, B J; Olson, L; Morales, M

    2000-09-22

    Glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent survival factor for several types of neurons. GDNF binds with high affinity to GDNF-family receptor alpha-1 (GFR alpha-1). This receptor is expressed in different areas of the brain, including the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. By using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we found that 19% to 37% of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) expressing neurons co-expressed GFR alpha-1 in the hippocampus. GFR alpha-1/GAD co-expression was found mainly in the stratum (s) pyramidale (29-37%) and s. oriens (20-25%). Further characterization of GFR alpha-1 expressing interneurons, based on their calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity, demonstrated that many parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactive neurons express GFR alpha-1 in the s. pyramidale of CA1 (72%), CA2 (70%) and CA3 (70%) subfields of the hippocampus. GFR alpha-1/PV double labeled neurons were also detected in the s. oriens of CA1 (52%), CA2 (27%) and CA3 (36%) subfields. The expression of GFR alpha-1 in principal neurons and in a specific sub-population of GABAergic neurons (PV-containing neurons) suggest that GDNF might modulate, in a selective manner, functions of the entire adult hippocampus.

  7. Overexpression of the alpha1B-adrenergic receptor causes apoptotic neurodegeneration: multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Zuscik, M J; Sands, S; Ross, S A; Waugh, D J; Gaivin, R J; Morilak, D; Perez, D M

    2000-12-01

    Progress toward elucidating the function of alpha1B-adrenergic receptors (alpha1BARs) in the central nervous system has been constrained by a lack of agonists and antagonists with adequate alpha1B-specificity. We have obviated this constraint by generating transgenic mice engineered to overexpress either wild-type or constitutively active alpha1BARs in tissues that normally express the receptor, including the brain. All transgenic lines showed granulovacular neurodegeneration, beginning in alpha1B-expressing domains of the brain and progressing with age to encompass all areas. The degeneration was apoptotic and did not occur in non-transgenic mice. Correspondingly, transgenic mice showed an age-progressive hindlimb disorder that was parkinsonian-like, as demonstrated by rescue of the dysfunction by 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and considerable dopaminergic-neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Transgenic mice also had a grand mal seizure disorder accompanied by a corresponding dysplasia and neurodegeneration of the cerebral cortex. Both behavioral phenotypes (locomotor impairment and seizure) could be partially rescued with the alpha1AR antagonist terazosin, indicating that alpha1AR signaling participated directly in the pathology. Our results indicate that overstimulation of alpha1BAR leads to apoptotic neurodegeneration with a corresponding multiple system atrophy indicative of Shy-Drager syndrome, a disease whose etiology is unknown.

  8. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  9. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in brown adipose tissue. Thermogenic significance and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Mohell, N

    1984-01-01

    The main function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is to produce heat in response to cold. Norepinephrine (NE), released from sympathetic nerve terminals, activates the tissue via binding to adrenergic receptors. While the role of the classical beta-adrenergic pathways (including cAMP production and lipolysis) in regulation of BAT metabolism is well documented, very little is known about alpha-adrenergic receptors and responses, which are the scope of the present thesis. The results demonstrate that hamster and rat BAT possess a large number of specific (3H)prazosin binding sites (about 100 000 binding sites per cell) with all the characteristics generally expected of physiologically relevant alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The stimulation of these receptors results in at least two physiological responses; increased phosphatidylinositol turnover and increased respiration. About 20% of the NE-stimulated oxygen consumption (i.e. heat production) is due to the activation of (as yet unknown) alpha 1-adrenergic pathways, while 80% originates from beta 1-adrenergic responses. Comparison of agonist and antagonist affinities for alpha 1-receptors with their potencies to regulate the above responses indicates that tight coupling exists between alpha 1-receptor occupation and respiration, and that part of the alpha 1-stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover is closely associated with receptor occupation and may thus be related to the mediation of alpha 1-stimulation. Part of the hormone-stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover is also Ca2+-independent. Agonist affinity of alpha 1-receptors is regulated by guanine nucleotides, Mg2+, and Na+. This indicates an involvement of a guanine nucleotide binding protein in the transduction of alpha 1-adrenergic signals. However, alpha 1-stimulation does not alter cAMP production (instead changes in cellular Ca2+ dynamics have been demonstrated). Cold acclimation of animals increases alpha 1-receptor density in BAT. As the opposite has been

  10. Immobility from administration of the alpha1-adrenergic antagonist, terazosin, in the IVth ventricle in rats.

    PubMed

    Stone, Eric A; Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David

    2003-12-26

    Brain alpha1-adrenoceptors have been shown to be essential for motor activity and movement in mice using intraventricular injection of alpha1-antagonists. To facilitate subsequent neuroanatomical mapping of these receptors, the present study was undertaken to replicate these effects in the rat. Rats were administered the alpha1-antagonist, terazosin, in the absence and presence of the alpha1-agonist, phenylephrine, in the IVth ventricle and were tested for their motor activity responses to an environmental change. Terazosin was found to produce a dose-dependent, virtually complete cessation of behavioral activity that was reversed by coinfusion of phenylephrine. The results could not be explained by sedation. It is concluded that central alpha1-adrenoceptors are essential for behavioral activation in rats as in mice.

  11. Protein domain of chicken alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein is responsible for chiral recognition.

    PubMed

    Sadakane, Yutaka; Matsunaga, Hisami; Nakagomi, Kazuya; Hatanaka, Yasumaru; Haginaka, Jun

    2002-07-19

    Ovoglycoprotein from chicken egg whites (OGCHI) has been used as a chiral selector to separate drug enantiomers. However, neither the amino acid sequence of OGCHI nor the responsible part for the chiral recognition (protein domain or sugar moiety) has yet to be determined. First, we isolated a cDNA clone encoding OGCHI, and clarified the amino acid sequence of OGCHI, which consists of 203 amino acids including a predictable signal peptide of 20 amino acids. The mature OGCHI shows 31-32% identities to rabbit and human alpha(1)-acid glycoproteins (alpha(1)-AGPs). Thus, OGCHI should be the chicken alpha(1)-AGP. Second, the recombinant chicken alpha(1)-AGP was prepared by the Escherichia coli expression system, and its chiral recognition ability was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis. Since proteins expressed in E. coli are not modified by any sugar moieties, this result shows that the protein domain of the chicken alpha(1)-AGP is responsible for the chiral recognition.

  12. Expanding the Clinical Indications for α1-Antitrypsin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Eli C

    2012-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a 52-kDa circulating serine protease inhibitor. Production of AAT by the liver maintains 0.9–1.75 mg/mL circulating levels. During acute-phase responses, circulating AAT levels increase more than fourfold. In individuals with one of several inherited mutations in AAT, low circulating levels increase the risk for lung, liver and pancreatic destructive diseases, particularly emphysema. These individuals are treated with lifelong weekly infusions of human plasma–derived AAT. An increasing amount of evidence appears to suggest that AAT possesses not only the ability to inhibit serine proteases, such as elastase and proteinase-3 (PR-3), but also to exert antiinflammatory and tissue-protective effects independent of protease inhibition. AAT modifies dendritic cell maturation and promotes T regulatory cell differentiation, induces interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist and IL-10 release, protects various cell types from cell death, inhibits caspases-1 and -3 activity and inhibits IL-1 production and activity. Importantly, unlike classic immunosuppressants, AAT allows undeterred isolated T-lymphocyte responses. On the basis of preclinical and clinical studies, AAT therapy for nondeficient individuals may interfere with disease progression in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, acute myocardial infarction, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, transplant rejection, graft versus host disease and multiple sclerosis. AAT also appears to be antibacterial and an inhibitor of viral infections, such as influenza and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and is currently evaluated in clinical trials for type 1 diabetes, cystic fibrosis and graft versus host disease. Thus, AAT therapy appears to have advanced from replacement therapy, to a safe and potential treatment for a broad spectrum of inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22634722

  13. Molecular Mechanism of Z α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Fei; Wei, Zhenquan; Wang, Yugang; Carrell, Robin W; Read, Randy J; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Zhou, Aiwu

    2016-07-22

    The Z mutation (E342K) of α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), carried by 4% of Northern Europeans, predisposes to early onset of emphysema due to decreased functional α1-AT in the lung and to liver cirrhosis due to accumulation of polymers in hepatocytes. However, it remains unclear why the Z mutation causes intracellular polymerization of nascent Z α1-AT and why 15% of the expressed Z α1-AT is secreted into circulation as functional, but polymerogenic, monomers. Here, we solve the crystal structure of the Z-monomer and have engineered replacements to assess the conformational role of residue Glu-342 in α1-AT. The results reveal that Z α1-AT has a labile strand 5 of the central β-sheet A (s5A) with a consequent equilibrium between a native inhibitory conformation, as in its crystal structure here, and an aberrant conformation with s5A only partially incorporated into the central β-sheet. This aberrant conformation, induced by the loss of interactions from the Glu-342 side chain, explains why Z α1-AT is prone to polymerization and readily binds to a 6-mer peptide, and it supports that annealing of s5A into the central β-sheet is a crucial step in the serpins' metastable conformational formation. The demonstration that the aberrant conformation can be rectified through stabilization of the labile s5A by binding of a small molecule opens a potential therapeutic approach for Z α1-AT deficiency. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Sequestration of Mutated α1-Antitrypsin into Inclusion Bodies Is a Cell-protective Mechanism to Maintain Endoplasmic Reticulum Function

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Susana; Baldini, Giovanna; Mohammad, Sameer; Nicolin, Vanessa; Narducci, Paola; Storrie, Brian

    2008-01-01

    A variant α1-antitrypsin with E342K mutation has a high tendency to form intracellular polymers, and it is associated with liver disease. In the hepatocytes of individuals carrying the mutation, α1-antitrypsin localizes both to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and to membrane-surrounded inclusion bodies (IBs). It is unclear whether the IBs contribute to cell toxicity or whether they are protective to the cell. We found that in hepatoma cells, mutated α1-antitrypsin exited the ER and accumulated in IBs that were negative for autophagosomal and lysosomal markers, and contained several ER components, but not calnexin. Mutated α1-antitrypsin induced IBs also in neuroendocrine cells, showing that formation of these organelles is not cell type specific. In the presence of IBs, ER function was largely maintained. Increased levels of calnexin, but not of protein disulfide isomerase, inhibited formation of IBs and lead to retention of mutated α1-antitrypsin in the ER. In hepatoma cells, shift of mutated α1-antitrypsin localization to the ER by calnexin overexpression lead to cell shrinkage, ER stress, and impairment of the secretory pathway at the ER level. We conclude that segregation of mutated α1-antitrypsin from the ER to the IBs is a protective cell response to maintain a functional secretory pathway. PMID:18045994

  15. Subunit regulation of the neuronal alpha 1A Ca2+ channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    De Waard, M; Campbell, K P

    1995-01-01

    1. Voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are multi-protein complexes composed of at least three subunits: alpha 1, alpha 2 delta and beta. Ba2+ currents were recorded in Xenopus oocytes expressing the neuronal alpha 1A Ca2+ channel, using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Various subunit combinations were studied: alpha 1A, alpha 1A alpha 2 delta b, alpha 1A beta or alpha 1A alpha 2 delta b beta. 2. The alpha 1A subunit alone directs the expression of functional Ca2+ channels. It carries all the properties of the channel: gating, permeability, voltage dependence of activation and inactivation, and pharmacology. The alpha 1A channel is activated by low voltages when physiological concentrations of the permeant cation are used. Both ancillary subunits alpha 2 delta and beta induced considerable changes in the biophysical properties of the alpha 1A current. The subunit specificity of the changes in current properties was analysed for all four beta gene products by coexpressing beta 1b, beta 2a, beta 3 and beta 4. 3. All beta subunits induce a stimulation in the current amplitude, a change in inactivation kinetics, and two hyperpolarizing shifts--one in the voltage dependence of activation and a second in the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation. The most significant difference in regulation among beta subunits is the induction of variable rate constants of current inactivation. Rates of inactivation were induced in the following order (fastest to slowest): beta 3 > beta 1b = beta 4 > beta 2a. 4. The alpha 2 delta b subunit does not modify the properties of alpha 1A Ca2+ channels in the absence of beta subunits. However, this subunit increases the beta-induced stimulation in current amplitude and also regulates the beta-induced change in inactivation kinetics. 5. Of all the subunit combinations tested, Ca2+ channels that included a beta subunit were the most prone to decrease in activity. It is concluded that beta subunits are the primary target for the

  16. Eliciting hyperacute xenograft response to treat human cancer: alpha(1,3) galactosyltransferase gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Link, C J; Seregina, T; Atchison, R; Hall, A; Muldoon, R; Levy, J P

    1998-01-01

    Xenograft hyperacute rejection in humans occurs as a secondary response to a cellular glycosylation incompatibility with most non-human mammalian species. A key component of hyperacute rejection, alpha(1,3)galactosyl (agal) epitopes present on the surface of most non-human mammal cells, is bound by host anti-agal IgG antibodies leading to the activation of complement and, cellular lysis (1). The enzyme causing specific glycosylation patterns, alpha(1,3)galactosyltransferase [alpha(1,3)GT], directs the addition of agal to N-acetyl glucosamine residues in the trans Golgi apparatus in most mammalian species including Mus musculus, but not old world primates, apes or humans. In this report, we cloned both a truncated and full length murine alpha(1,3)GT gene into a retroviral vector backbone in order to transfer alpha(1,3)galactosyl epitopes into human A375 melanoma cells. Expression of agal epitopes on A375 cells after alpha(1,3)GT gene transfer was demonstrated using FITC-labeled ligand and FACS analysis. These cells were exposed to human serum for 30 minutes and > 90% of the agal expressing cells were killed by this treatment. These pretreated cells failed to establish tumors after implantation into athymic nude mice. This is the first report of retroviral vector transfer of the alpha(1,3)GT gene into human tumor cells in an attempt to elicit hyperacute rejection as a novel anti-cancer gene therapy strategy.

  17. Immunohistochemical localization of alpha(1a)-adrenoreceptors in muscle spindles of rabbit masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Bombardi, C; Grandis, A; Chiocchetti, R; Bortolami, R; Johansson, H; Lucchi, M L

    2006-04-01

    The expression of alpha(1a)-adrenoreceptors (alpha(1a)-ARs) within the muscle spindles of rabbit masseter muscle was investigated. The alpha(1a)-ARs were detected by immunohistochemical fluorescent method and examined along the entire length of 109 cross serially sectioned spindles. The sympathetic fibers were visualized by the immunofluorescent labeling of the noradrenaline synthesizing enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH). In order to recognize the intrafusal muscle fiber types, antibodies for different myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHCI) were used. TH and DBH immunolabeled nerve fibers have been observed within the capsule lamellar layers, in the periaxial fluid space and close to intrafusal muscle fibers. The alpha(1a)-ARs were detected on the smooth muscle cells of the blood vessels coursing in the muscle and in the capsule lamellar layers or within the periaxial fluid space of the spindles. Moreover, at the polar regions of a high percentage (88.1%) of muscle spindles a strong alpha(1a)-ARs immunoreactivity was present on the intrafusal muscle fibers. In double immunostained sections for alpha(1a)-ARs and MyHCI it was evidenced that both bag, and nuclear chain fibers express alpha(1a)-ARs. The receptors that we have detected by immunofluorescence may support a direct control by adrenergic fibers on muscle spindle.

  18. Kinetic assay of antitrypsin in human serum by a surface acoustic wave(SAW)-impedance sensor.

    PubMed

    Cai, Q; Wei, W; Wang, R; Nie, L; Yao, S

    1996-08-01

    Antitrypsin in human serum was determined by using both the SAW-impedance sensor system and spectrophotometry, indicating that the mean value for women was significantly higher than the mean value for men; the value for acute pancreasis patients is about 2-folds of the normal values, and there is no significant difference between the acute pancreasis patients and the pancreatic cancer patients.

  19. Two alpha1-adrenergic receptor subtypes regulating the vasopressor response have differential roles in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Chihiro; Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Oikawa, Ryo; Tomabechi, Takashi; Fukuda, Shinya; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Takeo, Satoshi; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Cotecchia, Susanna; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2005-03-01

    To study the functional role of individual alpha1-adrenergic (AR) subtypes in blood pressure (BP) regulation, we used mice lacking the alpha1B-AR and/or alpha1D-AR with the same genetic background and further studied their hemodynamic and vasoconstrictive responses. Both the alpha1D-AR knockout and alpha1B-/alpha1D-AR double knockout mice, but not the alpha1B-AR knockout mice, had significantly (p < 0.05) lower levels of basal systolic and mean arterial BP than wild-type mice in nonanesthetized condition, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. All mutants showed a significantly (p < 0.05) reduced catecholamine-induced pressor and vasoconstriction responses. It is noteworthy that the infusion of norepinephrine did not elicit any pressor response at all in alpha1B-/alpha1D-AR double knockout mice. In an attempt to further examine alpha1-AR subtype, which is involved in the genesis or maintenance of hypertension, BP after salt loading was monitored by tail-cuff readings and confirmed at the endpoint by direct intra-arterial recording. After salt loading, alpha1B-AR knockout mice developed a comparable level of hypertension to wild-type mice, whereas mice lacking alpha1D-AR had significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated BP and lower levels of circulating catecholamines. Our data indicated that alpha1B- and alpha1D-AR subtypes participate cooperatively in BP regulation; however, the deletion of the functional alpha1D-AR, not alpha1B-AR, leads to an antihypertensive effect. The study shows differential contributions of alpha1B- and alpha1D-ARs in BP regulation.

  20. The tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline, nortriptyline and imipramine are weak antagonists of human and rat alpha1B-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Nojimoto, F D; Mueller, A; Hebeler-Barbosa, F; Akinaga, J; Lima, V; Kiguti, L R de A; Pupo, A S

    2010-01-01

    Although it is long known that the tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline, nortriptyline and imipramine inhibit the noradrenaline transporter and alpha(1)-adrenoceptors with similar affinities, which may lead to self-cancelling actions, the selectivity of these drugs for alpha(1)-adrenoceptor subtypes is unknown. The present study investigates the selectivity of amitriptyline, nortriptyline and imipramine for human recombinant and rat native alpha(1)-adrenoceptor subtypes. The selectivity of amitriptyline, nortriptyline and imipramine was investigated in HEK-293 cells expressing each of the human alpha(1)-subtypes and in rat native receptors from the vas deferens (alpha(1A)), spleen (alpha(1B)) and aorta (alpha(1D)) through [(3)H]prazosin binding, and noradrenaline-induced intracellular Ca(2+) increases and contraction assays. Amitriptyline, nortriptyline and imipramine showed considerably higher affinities for alpha(1A)- (approximately 25- to 80-fold) and alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors (approximately 10- to 25-fold) than for alpha(1B)-adrenoceptors in both contraction and [(3)H]prazosin binding assays with rat native and human receptors, respectively. In addition, amitriptyline, nortriptyline and imipramine were substantially more potent in the inhibition of noradrenaline-induced intracellular Ca(2+) increases in HEK-293 cells expressing alpha(1A)- or a truncated version of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors which traffics more efficiently towards the cell membrane than in cells expressing alpha(1B)-adrenoceptors. Amitriptyline, nortriptyline and imipramine are much weaker antagonists of rat and human alpha(1B)-adrenoceptors than of alpha(1A)- and alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors. The differential affinities for these receptors indicate that the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor subtype which activation is most increased by the augmented noradrenaline availability resultant from the blockade of neuronal reuptake is the alpha(1B)-adrenoceptor. This may be important for the behavioural effects of these

  1. Interaction between calcofluor white and carbohydrates of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Plancke, Y D

    1999-05-31

    Interactions between the fluorescent probe, calcofluor white, and human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) are compared. The two proteins have comparable isoelectric points, but alpha 1-acid glycoprotein is highly glycosylated (40% of glycans by weight), while the serum albumin is not. Binding of calcofluor to the proteins induces an increase in both the fluorescence anisotropy and the fluorescence intensity of the fluorophore. Also, we found that the calcofluor exhibits a fluorescence emission with a maximum located at 432, 415 or 445 nm, respectively, in the absence of proteins, in the presence of HSA, and in the presence of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein. The stoichiometries of the calcofluor-serum albumin and calcofluor-alpha 1-acid glycoprotein complexes are 2:1 and 1:1, respectively. The association constants are 0.04 and 0.15 microM-1, respectively. The calcofluor does not interact with Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), although the protein has a hydrophobic site. Nevertheless, one cannot exclude that the binding of the fluorophore to the HSA is nonspecific. Our results, when compared with those obtained with calcofluor dissolved in the hydrophobic solvent isobutanol, and with the fluorescent probe, potassium 6-(p-toluidino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), bound to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, indicate that the emission of calcofluor bound to HSA occurs from a hydrophobic state, while that of calcofluor bound to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein occurs from a hydrophilic state. The fluorescence intensity of calcofluor decreases in the presence of carbohydrates isolated from alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, while it increases in the presence of alpha 1-cellulose. Thus, calcofluor interacts mainly with the glycan moiety of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, and its fluorescence is sensitive to the secondary structure of the glycans.

  2. Abnormal coronary function in mice deficient in alpha1H T-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Lamping, Kathryn G; Nuno, Daniel W; Barresi, Rita; Prouty, Sally J; Lavoie, Julie L; Cribbs, Leanne L; England, Sarah K; Sigmund, Curt D; Weiss, Robert M; Williamson, Roger A; Hill, Joseph A; Campbell, Kevin P

    2003-11-21

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels is important for the regulation of vascular tone. Activation of L-type Ca2+ channels initiates muscle contraction; however, the role of T-type Ca2+ channels (T-channels) is not clear. We show that mice deficient in the alpha1H T-type Ca2+ channel (alpha(1)3.2-null) have constitutively constricted coronary arterioles and focal myocardial fibrosis. Coronary arteries isolated from alpha(1)3.2-null arteries showed normal contractile responses, but reduced relaxation in response to acetylcholine and nitroprusside. Furthermore, acute blockade of T-channels with Ni2+ prevented relaxation of wild-type coronary arteries. Thus, Ca2+ influx through alpha1H T-type Ca2+ channels is essential for normal relaxation of coronary arteries.

  3. Alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists potentiate responses mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors in the cat nictitating membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Shepperson, N. B.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha 1 but not alpha 2-adrenoceptors mediate contractions of the cat nictitating membrane. The contractions of this tissue evoked by alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists, but not those evoked by angiotensin II, are potentiated by pre-dosing with alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists. This potentiation is reversed by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, WY 26392. Pressor responses evoked by alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists or angiotensin II were not affected by alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists. Contractions of the nictitating membrane evoked by noradrenaline were reduced by pretreatment with WY 26392. These results suggest that in some tissues the role of alpha 2-adrenoceptors may be to modulate responses to alpha 1-adrenoceptors, rather than to evoke a discrete response themselves. PMID:6148985

  4. Bioisosteric phentolamine analogs as selective human alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Bavadekar, Supriya A; Hong, Seoung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ii; Miller, Duane D; Feller, Dennis R

    2008-08-20

    Phentolamine is known to act as a competitive, non-subtype-selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist. In an attempt to improve alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptor selectivity and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtype-selectivity, two new chemical series of bioisosteric phentolamine analogs were prepared and evaluated. These compounds were evaluated for binding affinities on alpha(1)- (alpha(1A)-, alpha(1B)-, alpha(1D)-) and alpha(2)- (alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)-, alpha(2C)-) adrenoceptor subtypes that had been stably expressed in human embryonic kidney and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, respectively. Methylation of the phenolic hydroxy group and replacement of the 4-methyl group of phentolamine with varying lipophilic substituents yielded bioisosteric analogs selective for the alpha(2)- versus alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. Within the alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, these analogs bound with higher affinity at the alpha(2A)- and alpha(2C)-subtypes as compared to the alpha(2B)-subtype. In particular, the t-butyl analog was found to be the most selective, its binding at the alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor (Ki=3.6 nM) being 37- to 173-fold higher than that at the alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, and around 2- and 19-fold higher than at the alpha(2A)- and alpha(2B)-adrenoceptors, respectively. Data from luciferase reporter gene assays confirmed the functional antagonist activities of selected compounds from the bioisosteric series on human alpha(1A)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors. Thus, the results with these bioisosteric analogs of phentolamine provide a lead to the rational design of potent and selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor ligands that may be useful in improving the therapeutic profile of this drug class for human disorders.

  5. Estrogen alters the diurnal rhythm of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities in selected brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1987-11-01

    Norepinephrine regulates the proestrous and estradiol-induced LH surge by binding to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The density of alpha 1-receptors may be regulated by estradiol, photoperiod, and noradrenergic neuronal activity. We wished to determine whether alpha 1-receptors exhibit a diurnal rhythm in ovariectomized and/or estradiol-treated female rats, whether estradiol regulates alpha 1-receptors in those areas of brain involved with LH secretion and/or sexual behavior, and whether the concentrations of alpha-receptors vary inversely relative to previously reported norepinephrine turnover patterns. Young female rats, maintained on a 14:10 light-dark cycle were ovariectomized. One week later, half of them were outfitted sc with Silastic capsules containing estradiol. Groups of animals were decapitated 2 days later at 0300, 1000, 1300, 1500, 1800, and 2300 h. Brains were removed, frozen, and sectioned at 20 micron. Sections were incubated with (/sup 3/H)prazosin in Tris-HCl buffer, washed, dried, and exposed to LKB Ultrofilm. The densities of alpha 1-receptors were quantitated using a computerized image analysis system. In ovariectomized rats, the density of alpha 1-receptors exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and pineal gland. In SCN and MPN, receptor concentrations were lowest during the middle of the day and rose to peak levels at 1800 h. In the pineal gland, the density of alpha 1-receptors was lowest at middark phase, rose to peak levels before lights on, and remained elevated during the day. Estradiol suppressed the density of alpha 1 binding sites in the SCN, MPN, median eminence, ventromedial nucleus, and the pineal gland but had no effect on the lateral septum. Estrogen treatment altered the rhythm of receptor densities in MPN, median eminence, and the pineal gland.

  6. An Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Megan D.; Chan, Trevor; Swigart, Philip M.; Myagmar, Bat-erdene; Dash, Rajesh; Simpson, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors mediate adaptive effects in the heart and cardiac myocytes, and a myocyte survival pathway involving the alpha-1A receptor subtype and ERK activation exists in vitro. However, data in vivo are limited. Here we tested A61603 (N-[5-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-2-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl]methanesulfonamide), a selective imidazoline agonist for the alpha-1A. A61603 was the most potent alpha-1-agonist in activating ERK in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. A61603 activated ERK in adult mouse ventricular myocytes and protected the cells from death caused by the anthracycline doxorubicin. A low dose of A61603 (10 ng/kg/d) activated ERK in the mouse heart in vivo, but did not change blood pressure. In male mice, concurrent subcutaneous A61603 infusion at 10 ng/kg/d for 7 days after a single intraperitoneal dose of doxorubicin (25 mg/kg) increased survival, improved cardiac function, heart rate, and cardiac output by echocardiography, and reduced cardiac cell necrosis and apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis. All protective effects were lost in alpha-1A-knockout mice. In female mice, doxorubicin at doses higher than in males (35–40 mg/kg) caused less cardiac toxicity than in males. We conclude that the alpha-1A-selective agonist A61603, via the alpha-1A adrenergic receptor, prevents doxorubicin cardiomyopathy in male mice, supporting the theory that alpha-1A adrenergic receptor agonists have potential as novel heart failure therapies. PMID:28081170

  7. Role of alpha1-adrenoreceptors in cocaine-induced NADPH oxidase expression and cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Isabelle, Marc; Monteil, Christelle; Moritz, Fabienne; Dautreaux, Brigitte; Henry, Jean-Paul; Richard, Vincent; Mulder, Paul; Thuillez, Christian

    2005-09-01

    We assessed whether alpha1-adrenoreceptor (alpha1-AR) stimulation contributes to activation of myocardial NADPH oxidase in a rat model of cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction. After 7 days of cocaine injection (2 x 7.5 mg/kg/day, i.p., Coc), NADPH activity assessed by chemiluminescence increases as well as phosphorylation of p47phox, one of the cytosolic components of NADPH oxidase. The alpha1-AR antagonist prazosin (Prz), administered 1 h before each cocaine injection (2 x 1 mg/kg/day, i.p., Coc+Prz), prevents these effects. Moreover, Prz pretreatment reduces left ventricular/body weight (LV/BW) ratio and partially prevents the cocaine-induced alterations in fractional shortening and cardiac index assessed by echocardiography. In order to confirm the involvement of alpha1-AR stimulation in NADPH oxidase up-regulation in vivo, we used phenylephrine (Phe) administration with the same protocol of injections as that used with cocaine (2 x 5 microg/kg/day, i.p.). After Phe administration, as expected, NADPH oxidase activity increases as well as phosphorylation of p47phox. These effects occur in the absence of sustained hemodynamic changes. This study demonstrates the involvement of the alpha1-AR in NADPH oxidase activation and in cocaine-induced LV dysfunction. We suggest that alpha1-AR stimulation, at least in part via NADPH oxidase induction, plays a critical role in the events leading to the cardiomyopathy observed after cocaine abuse.

  8. A single-chain variable fragment intrabody prevents intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin while allowing its antiproteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Ordóñez, Adriana; Pérez, Juan; Tan, Lu; Dickens, Jennifer A.; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Irving, James A.; Haq, Imran; Ekeowa, Ugo; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Miranda, Elena; Lomas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutant Z α1-antitrypsin (E342K) accumulates as polymers within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes predisposing to liver disease, whereas low levels of circulating Z α1-antitrypsin lead to emphysema by loss of inhibition of neutrophil elastase. The ideal therapy should prevent polymer formation while preserving inhibitory activity. Here we used mAb technology to identify interactors with Z α1-antitrypsin that comply with both requirements. We report the generation of an mAb (4B12) that blocked α1-antitrypsin polymerization in vitro at a 1:1 molar ratio, causing a small increase of the stoichiometry of inhibition for neutrophil elastase. A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) intrabody was generated based on the sequence of mAb4B12. The expression of scFv4B12 within the ER (scFv4B12KDEL) and along the secretory pathway (scFv4B12) reduced the intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin by 60%. The scFv4B12 intrabody also increased the secretion of Z α1-antitrypsin that retained inhibitory activity against neutrophil elastase. MAb4B12 recognized a discontinuous epitope probably located in the region of helices A/C/G/H/I and seems to act by altering protein dynamics rather than binding preferentially to the native state. This novel approach could reveal new target sites for small-molecule intervention that may block the transition to aberrant polymers without compromising the inhibitory activity of Z α1-antitrypsin.—Ordóñez, A., Pérez, J., Tan, L., Dickens, J. A., Motamedi-Shad, N., Irving, J. A., Haq, I., Ekeowa, U., Marciniak, S. J., Miranda, E., Lomas, D. A. A single-chain variable fragment intrabody prevents intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin while allowing its antiproteinase activity. PMID:25757566

  9. Protecting the myocardium from ischemic injury: a critical role for alpha(1)-adrenoreceptors?

    PubMed

    Salvi, S

    2001-04-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) refers to the ability of short periods of ischemia to make the myocardium more resistant to a subsequent ischemic insult. It is the most powerful form of endogenous protection against myocardial infarction and has been demonstrated in all species evaluated to date. However, the cellular mechanisms that drive IPC remain poorly understood. This hypothesis describes an important role for alpha(1)-adrenoreceptors in mediating IPC and discusses the underlying mechanisms by which this is likely achieved. alpha(1)-Adrenoreceptors are present in the myocardium of all mammalian species, and several lines of evidence suggest that they play an important role in mediating IPC. During periods of myocardial hypoxia/ischemia, cardiomyocytes have to rely solely on anaerobic glycolysis for energy production; for this, the cells have to depend on increased glucose entry inside the cell as well as increased glycolysis. Stimulation of alpha(1)-adrenoreceptors increases glucose transport inside the cardiomyocytes by translocating glucose transporter (GLUT)-1 and GLUT-4 from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane, enhances glycogenolysis by activating phosphorylase kinase, increases the rate of glycolysis by activating the enzyme phosphofructokinase, reduces intracellular acidity produced during excessive glycolysis by activating the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, and inhibits apoptosis by increasing the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Myocardial ischemia produces an increase in the expression of alpha(1)-adrenoreceptors in cardiomyocytes, as well as increases the levels of its agonist norepinephrine by several fold. During ischemic states, upregulation of alpha(1)-adrenoreceptors and increase in norepinephrine release could be a powerful adaptive mechanism that drives IPC. An understanding into the role of alpha(1)-adrenoreceptors in mediating IPC could not only point to newer treatments for limiting myocardial damage during myocardial infarction or heart

  10. Alpha-(1-3)- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose-specific plant lectins are markedly inhibitory to human immunodeficiency virus and cytomegalovirus infections in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; Schols, D; Neyts, J; Van Damme, E; Peumans, W; De Clercq, E

    1991-01-01

    The alpha-(1-3)-D-mannose- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose-specific agglutinins (lectins) from Galanthus nivalis, Hippeastrum hybrid, Narcissus pseudonarcissus, and Listera ovata inhibited infection of MT-4 cells by human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) and simian immunodeficiency virus at concentrations comparable to the concentrations at which dextran sulfate (molecular weight, 5,000 [DS-5000]) inhibits these viruses (50% effective concentration, 0.2 to 0.6 microgram/ml). Unlike DS-5000, however, the plant lectins did not inhibit the replication of other enveloped viruses, except for human cytomegalovirus (50% effective concentration, 0.9 to 1.6 microgram/ml). The plant lectins suppressed syncytium formation between persistently HIV-1- or HIV-2-infected HUT-78 cells and uninfected MOLT-4 (clone 8) cells at concentrations that were 5- to 10-fold lower than that required for DS-5000. Unlike DS-5000, however, the plant lectins did not inhibit HIV-1 binding to CD4+ cells. Combination of the plant lectins with DS-5000 led to a potent synergistic inhibition of HIV-1-induced cytopathogenicity in MT-4 cells and syncytium formation between HIV-infected HUT-78 cells and MOLT-4 cells. Our data suggest that alpha-(1-3)-D- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose-specific plant lectins interfere with an event in the HIV replicative cycle that is subsequent to the attachment of the virions to the cells (i.e., the fusion process). PMID:1645507

  11. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  12. Functional analysis of alpha 1 beta 1 integrin in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Villar, J J; Melero, I; Gismondi, A; Santoni, A; López-Botet, M

    1996-09-01

    Upon activation with interleukin (IL)-2 human natural killer (NK) cells acquire on their surface the alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1 integrins and down-regulate the expression of alpha 6 beta 1. By employing alpha 1 beta 1-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) HP-2B6, characterized in our laboratory, we examined the functional role of the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin in NK cells. Treatment with HP-2B6 mAb partially interfered with attachment of cultured NK cells to type I collagen, and combined with an anti-alpha 2 beta 1 (TEA 1/41) mAb, it completely abrogated cell adhesion to this extracelular matrix protein. In contrast, NK cell attachment to laminin was completely blocked by the anti-beta 1 LIA 1/2 mAb, but was unaffected by alpha 1 and alpha 2-specific mAb; as alpha 3 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1 were undetectable, the data indicate that the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin binding sites for type I collagen and laminin are different. Incubation with anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 or its F(ab')2 fragments specifically induced a rapid homotypic aggregation of NK cells that was dependent on active metabolism, an intact cytoskeleton and the presence of divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+); homotypic cell adhesion was selectively blocked by anti-CD18, CD11a or CD54 mAb. In addition, stimulation of cultured NK cells with the anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 enhanced TNF-alpha production and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 110-kDa protein. Pretreatment with specific inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity (tyrphostin 25 and herbimycin A) completely abrogated the functional effects induced by the anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 mAb. Our data show that ligation of the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin positively modulates IL-2-activated NK cell function via a PTK-dependent pathway.

  13. Expression of human. alpha. sub 1 -antitrypsin in dogs after autologous transplantation of retroviral transduced hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.A.; Baley, P.; Rothenberg, S.; Leland, F; Fleming, L.; Ponder, K.P.; Liu, Tajen; Finegold, M.; Darlington, G.; Pokorny, W.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The liver represents an excellent organ for gene therapy since many genetic disorders result from the deficiency of liver-specific gene products. The authors have previously demonstrated that transgenic mouse hepatocytes can be heterologously transplanted into congenic recipients where they survived indefinitely and continued to function as hepatocytes. Here they demonstrate the autologous transplantation of retrovirally transduced canine hepatocytes. In two animals they have transplanted hepatocytes transduced with a retroviral vector containing the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin cDNA under transcriptional control of the cytomegalovirus promotor. Both animals had significant human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin in the serum for 1 month. The results suggest that gene therapy of hepatic deficiencies may be achieved by hepatocellular transplantation after genetic reconstruction with the use of promoters of cellular genes that are active in the normal liver.

  14. The sodium pump alpha1 subunit as a potential target to combat apoptosis-resistant glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, Florence; Kiss, Robert

    2008-03-01

    To review the involvement of the ion transporter Na+/K+-ATPase (NaK) in the migration and proliferation of glioma cells. Preliminary studies indicate that NaK alpha1 subunits seem to be upregulated in a proportion of glioblastomas but not in normal brain tissues. The present review focuses on (1) the natural resistance of migrating malignant glioma cells to apoptosis, (2) autophagic cell death as an alternative to combat malignant gliomas, (3) the fact that reducing the levels of malignant glioma cell motility can restore proapoptotic drug sensitivity,and (4) on the observation that inhibiting the NaK activity reduces both glioma cell proliferation and migration. The natural ligands of the NaK are the cardiotonic steroids. A hemisynthetic derivative of 2"-oxovoruscharin (UNBS1450), a novel cardenolide, displays unique structural features, making its binding affinity to NaK alpha subunits (including alpha1) 10 to 100 times higher than that of other cardenolides. UNBS1450 markedly decreases intracellular ATP concentration in glioma cells, disorganizes the actin cytoskeleton, and leads to autophagic cell death in NaK alpha1 over-expressing glioma cells. Glioblastoma patients who do not respond to chemotherapy and whose tumors over-express NaK alpha1 subunits could benefit from a treatment using ligands with marked binding affinity for the NaK alpha1 subunit.

  15. Cross-talk between receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and alpha1b-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Medina, L; Vázquez-Prado, J; García-Sáinz, J A

    2000-01-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on the phosphorylation and function of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors transfected into Rat-1 fibroblasts was studied. EGF and PDGF increased the phosphorylation of these adrenoceptors. The effect of EGF was blocked by tyrphostin AG1478 and that of PDGF was blocked by tyrphostin AG1296, inhibitors of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activities of the receptors for these growth factors. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, blocked the alpha(1b)-adrenoceptor phosphorylation induced by EGF but not that induced by PDGF. Inhibition of protein kinase C blocked the adrenoceptor phosphorylation induced by EGF and PDGF. The ability of noradrenaline to increase [(35)S]guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP[S]) binding in membrane preparations was used as an index of the functional coupling of the alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors and G-proteins. Noradrenaline-stimulated [(35)S]GTP[S] binding was markedly decreased in membranes from cells pretreated with EGF or PDGF. Our data indicate that: (i) activation of EGF and PDGF receptors induces phosphorylation of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors, (ii) phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is involved in the EGF response, but does not seem to play a major role in the action of PDGF, (iii) protein kinase C mediates this action of both growth factors and (iv) the phosphorylation of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors induced by EGF and PDGF is associated with adrenoceptor desensitization. PMID:10947955

  16. DNA elements regulating alpha1-tubulin gene induction during regeneration of eukaryotic flagella.

    PubMed

    Periz, G; Keller, L R

    1997-07-01

    Eukaryotic flagella are complex organelles composed of more than 200 polypeptides. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms governing synthesis of the flagellar protein subunits and their assembly into this complex organelle. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the premier experimental model system for studying such cellular processes. When acid shocked, C. reinhardtii excises its flagella, rapidly and coordinately activates transcription of a set of flagellar genes, and ultimately regenerates a new flagellar pair. To define functionally the regulatory sequences that govern induction of the set of genes after acid shock, we analyzed the alpha1-tubulin gene promoter. To simplify transcriptional analysis in vivo, we inserted the selectable marker gene ARG7 on the same plasmid with a tagged alpha1-tubulin gene and stably introduced it into C. reinhardtii cells. By deletion of various sequences, two promoter regions (-176 to -122 and -85 to -16) were identified as important for induction of the tagged alpha1-tubulin gene. Deleting the region between -176 and -122 from the transcription start site resulted in an induction level which was only 45 to 70% of that of the resident gene. Deleting the region upstream of -56 resulted in a complete loss of inducibility without affecting basal expression. The alpha1-tubulin promoter region from -85 to -16 conferred partial acid shock inducibility to an arylsulfatase (ARS) reporter gene. These results show that induction of the alpha1-tubulin gene after acid shock is a complex response that requires diverse sequence elements.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of rat alpha 1-acid glycoprotein gene by phenobarbital.

    PubMed

    Fournier, T; Mejdoubi, N; Lapoumeroulie, C; Hamelin, J; Elion, J; Durand, G; Porquet, D

    1994-11-04

    Phenobarbital induces gene transcription of both cytochrome P450IIB (the barbiturate-inducible cytochrome P450 in mammals) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, one of the major acute-phase proteins in rats and humans. Analysis of the 5'-regulatory sequences of cytochrome P450IIB and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein genes in rats revealed the presence of a consensus sequence of 10 base pairs, termed the phenobarbital-responsive element or Barbie box, located in a region extending from positions -136 to -127 from the transcription start site of the alpha 1-acid glycoprotein gene. A 17-base pair oligonucleotide probe specific for alpha 1-acid glycoprotein and including the consensus sequence showed, in mobility shift assays, slight binding to liver nuclear protein from untreated animals. This binding was strongly and specifically increased with protein extracts from phenobarbital-treated rats. Transfection of rat primary hepatocytes with the pAGPcat construct induced basal expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity, which was increased by phenobarbital and dexamethasone treatment of cells. Induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity by phenobarbital was abolished when hepatocytes were transfected by constructs with a mutation or deletion of the Barbie box sequence. These results strongly suggest that the Barbie box sequence is involved in alpha 1-acid glycoprotein gene regulation by phenobarbital.

  18. Alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in canine lower genitourinary tissues: insight into development and function

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Lepor, H.

    1987-10-01

    Radioligand receptor binding methods were used to characterize the alpha 1-adrenergic receptor in the bladder body, bladder base, prostate and urethra of the male dog. Saturation experiments were performed in tissue homogenates using (/sup 125/iodine)-Heat, an alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist of high specific activity (2,200 Ci. per mmol.). The equilibrium dissociation constant Kd for (/sup 125/iodine)-Heat binding in the bladder body (0.56 pM.), bladder base (0.81 +/- 0.11 pM.), prostate (0.86 +/- 0.19 pM.) and urethra (0.55 pM.) was similar, suggesting homogeneity of alpha 1-adrenergic binding sites in lower genitourinary tissues. The receptor density in the bladder body, bladder base, prostate and urethra, expressed as fmol. per mg. wet weight, was 0.22 +/- 0.02, 0.82 +/- 0.09, 0.55 +/- 0.06 and 0.27 +/- 0.06, respectively (mean +/- standard error of mean). Competitive binding experiments with (/sup 125/iodine)-Heat and unlabeled prazosin and clonidine confirmed the selectivity of Heat for alpha 1-adrenergic binding sites. Anatomical dissections have revealed that a major component of the smooth muscle of the bladder base and prostate originates from the ureter, whereas a major component of the smooth muscle of the urethra originates from the bladder. The measured alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities support these developmental theories.

  19. Identification of alpha1-adrenergic receptors and their involvement in phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the frog heart.

    PubMed

    Lazou, Antigone; Gaitanaki, Catherine; Vaxevanellis, Spiros; Pehtelidou, Anastasia

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors in frog heart and to examine their related signal transduction pathway. alpha(1)-Adrenergic binding sites were studied in purified heart membranes using the specific alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist [(3)H]prazosin. Analysis of the binding data indicated one class of binding sites displaying a K(d) of 4.19 +/- 0.56 nM and a B(max) of 14.66 +/- 1.61 fmol/mg original wet weight. Adrenaline, noradrenaline, or phenylephrine, in the presence of propranolol, competed with [(3)H]prazosin binding with a similar potency and a K(i) value of about 10 microM. The kinetics of adrenaline binding was closely related to its biological effect. Adrenaline concentration dependently increased the production of inositol phosphates in the heart in the presence or absence of propranolol. Maximal stimulation was about 8.5-fold, and the half-maximum effective concentration was 30 and 21 microM in the absence and presence of propranolol, respectively. These data clearly show that alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors are coupled to the phosphoinositide hydrolysis in frog heart. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence supporting the presence of functional alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors in the frog heart.

  20. Performance of the BODE index in patients with α1-antitrypsin deficiency-related COPD.

    PubMed

    Thabut, Gabriel; Mornex, Jean-François; Pison, Christophe; Cuvelier, Antoine; Balduyck, Malika; Pujazon, Marie-Christine; Fournier, Michel; AitIlalne, Brahim; Porcher, Raphaël

    2014-07-01

    The BODE (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea and exercise capacity) index is used to decide on referral and transplantation of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The BODE index has not been validated in patients with α1-antitrypsin deficiency, who account for 15% of COPD patients undergoing lung transplantation. We sought to validate the BODE index in α1-antitrypsin deficiency-related COPD. We assessed the prognostic value of the BODE index in 191 patients followed from 2006 to 2012 in a French prospective cohort of patients with α1-antitrypsin deficiency. 20 patients died during follow-up and 22 underwent lung transplantation. Survival (95% CI) was 93.0% (91.7-94.3%) at 3 years and 76.0% (72.9-79.1%) at 5 years. The 3-year survival was 97.4% (96.6-98.2%), 98.0% (96.7-99.3%), 87.7% (84.5-90.9%) and 75.3% (66.0-84.6%) for patients with BODE index 0-2, 3-4, 5-6 and 7-10, respectively. Survival discrimination of the BODE index was better than with both forced expiratory volume in 1 s and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease classification. Regarding calibration, expected survival by BODE index was noticeably lower than observed survival. The BODE index showed very good survival discrimination in patients with α1-antitrypsin deficiency-related COPD. Larger studies are needed to support its use to drive patient referral for lung transplantation.

  1. Framework for Interpretation of Trypsin–antitrypsin Imbalance and Genetic Heterogeneity in Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kun; Gao, Feng; Chen, Qingquan; Liu, Qicai; Chen, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NFκB activation is the major inflammatory pathway involved in the occurrence and development of pancreatitis and it can be induced by intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen. Synthesis of trypsinogen occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and ER stress is an important early acinar cell event. Components of ER stress response are known to be able to trigger cell death as well as NFκB signaling cascade. The strongest evidence supporting the trypsin-centered theory is that gene mutations, which lead to the generation of more trypsin, or reduce the activity of trypsin inhibitors or trypsin degradation, are associated with pancreatitis. Thus, trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance may be the first step leading to pancreatic autodigestion and inducing other pathways. Continued experimental studies are necessary to determine the specific relationships between trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis. In this article, we review the latest advances that contributed to the understanding of the basic mechanisms behind the occurrence and development of pancreatitis with a focus on the interpretation of trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and their relationships with other inflammation pathways. We additionally highlight genetic predispositions to pancreatitis and possible mechanisms associated with them. PMID:26228362

  2. A single-chain variable fragment intrabody prevents intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin while allowing its antiproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Adriana; Pérez, Juan; Tan, Lu; Dickens, Jennifer A; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Irving, James A; Haq, Imran; Ekeowa, Ugo; Marciniak, Stefan J; Miranda, Elena; Lomas, David A

    2015-06-01

    Mutant Z α1-antitrypsin (E342K) accumulates as polymers within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes predisposing to liver disease, whereas low levels of circulating Z α1-antitrypsin lead to emphysema by loss of inhibition of neutrophil elastase. The ideal therapy should prevent polymer formation while preserving inhibitory activity. Here we used mAb technology to identify interactors with Z α1-antitrypsin that comply with both requirements. We report the generation of an mAb (4B12) that blocked α1-antitrypsin polymerization in vitro at a 1:1 molar ratio, causing a small increase of the stoichiometry of inhibition for neutrophil elastase. A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) intrabody was generated based on the sequence of mAb4B12. The expression of scFv4B12 within the ER (scFv4B12KDEL) and along the secretory pathway (scFv4B12) reduced the intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin by 60%. The scFv4B12 intrabody also increased the secretion of Z α1-antitrypsin that retained inhibitory activity against neutrophil elastase. MAb4B12 recognized a discontinuous epitope probably located in the region of helices A/C/G/H/I and seems to act by altering protein dynamics rather than binding preferentially to the native state. This novel approach could reveal new target sites for small-molecule intervention that may block the transition to aberrant polymers without compromising the inhibitory activity of Z α1-antitrypsin.

  3. Distribution of alpha-1 and alpha-2 binding sites in the rat locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Chamba, G; Weissmann, D; Rousset, C; Renaud, B; Pujol, J F

    1991-02-01

    Precise anatomical distribution of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenergic binding sites has been investigated in the rat locus coeruleus (LC) using quantitative radioautography of brain sections incubated with 3H-prazosin or 3H-idazoxan. Distribution patterns of 3H-prazosin (alpha-1 sites) and 3H-idazoxan (alpha-2 sites) were heterogeneous and different along a postero-anterior axis in the LC. Comparison between distribution of alpha-2 binding sites and noradrenergic (NA) cellular density suggests that at least a fraction of these sites might be localized on NA perikarya or dendrites in this structure. Quantitative estimations of the binding parameters along this postero-anterior axis in the LC have revealed that the heterogeneous distributions of alpha-1 and alpha-2 binding sites are due not only to variations in the maximal densities of sites but also to variations in the affinities of these sites for their respective ligand.

  4. Neuronal changes resulting in up-regulation of alpha-1 adrenoceptors after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D

    2014-07-15

    Under normal conditions, the sympathetic neurotransmitter noradrenaline inhibits the production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, after peripheral nerve and tissue injury, pro-inflammatory cytokines appear to induce the expression of the alpha1A-adrenoceptor subtype on immune cells and perhaps also on other cells in the injured tissue. In turn, noradrenaline may act on up-regulated alpha1-adrenoceptors to increase the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. In addition, the release of inflammatory mediators and nerve growth factor from keratinocytes and other cells may augment the expression of alpha1-adrenoceptors on peripheral nerve fibers. Consequently, nociceptive afferents acquire an abnormal excitability to adrenergic agents, and inflammatory processes build. These mechanisms could contribute to the development of sympathetically maintained pain in conditions such as post-herpetic neuralgia, cutaneous neuromas, amputation stump pain and complex regional pain syndrome.

  5. Proteomic Identification of IPSE/alpha-1 as a Major Hepatotoxin Secreted by Schistosoma mansoni Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Maha-Hamadien; Lim, Kee-Chong; McKerrow, James H.; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Eggs deposited in the liver of the mammalian host by the blood fluke parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, normally drive a T-helper-2 (Th2)-mediated granulomatous response in immune-competent mice. By contrast, in mice deprived of T-cells and incapable of producing granulomata, egg-secreted proteins (ESP) induce acute hepatic injury and death. Previous work has shown that one such ESP, the T2 ribonuclease known as omega-1, is hepatotoxic in vivo in that specific antisera to omega-1 prevent hepatocyte damage. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an in vitro culture system employing mouse primary hepatocytes and alanine transaminase (ALT) activity as a marker of heptocyte injury, we demonstrated that S. mansoni eggs, egg-secreted proteins (ESP), soluble-egg antigen (SEA), and omega-1 are directly hepatotoxic and in a dose-dependent manner. Depletion of omega-1 using a monoclonal antibody abolished the toxicity of pure omega-1 and diminished the toxicity in ESP and SEA by 47 and 33%, respectively. Anion exchange chromatography of ESP yielded one predominant hepatotoxic fraction. Proteomics of that fraction identified the presence of IPSE/alpha-1 (IL-4 inducing principle from S. mansoni eggs), a known activator of basophils and inducer of Th2-type responses. Pure recombinant IPSE/alpha-1 also displayed a dose-dependent hepatotoxicity in vitro. Monoclonal antibody depletion of IPSE/alpha-1 abolished the latter's toxicity and diminished the total toxicity of ESP and SEA by 32 and 35%, respectively. Combined depletion of omega-1 and IPSE/alpha-1 diminished hepatotoxicity of ESP and SEA by 60 and 58% respectively. Conclusions We identified IPSE/alpha-1 as a novel hepatotoxin and conclude that both IPSE/alpha-1 and omega-1 account for the majority of the hepatotoxicity secreted by S. mansoni eggs. PMID:22039561

  6. Arachidonic acid modulation of alpha1H, a cloned human T-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Cribbs, L L; Satin, J

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and the products of its metabolism are central mediators of changes in cellular excitability. We show that the recently cloned and expressed T-type or low-voltage-activated Ca channel, alpha1H, is modulated by external AA. AA (10 microM) causes a slow, time-dependent attenuation of alpha1H current. At a holding potential of -80 mV, 10 microM AA reduces peak inward alpha1H current by 15% in 15 min and 70% in 30 min and shifts the steady-state inactivation curve -25 mV. AA inhibition was not affected by applying the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or the lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid. The epoxygenase inhibitor octadecynoic acid partially antagonized AA attenuation of alpha1H. The epoxygenase metabolite epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (8,9-EET) mimicked the inhibitory effect of AA on alpha1H peak current. A protein kinase C (PKC)-specific inhibitor (peptide fragment 19-36) only partially antagonized the AA-induced reduction of peak alpha1H current and the shift of the steady-state inactivation curve but had no effect on 8,9-EET-induced attenuation of current. In contrast, PKA has no role in the modulation of alpha1H. These results suggest that AA attenuation and shift of alpha1H may be mediated directly by AA. The heterologous expression of T-type Ca channels allows us to study for the first time properties of this important class of ion channel in isolation. There is a significant overlap of the steady-state activation and inactivation curves, which implies a substantial window current. The selective shift of the steady-state inactivation curve by AA reduces peak Ca current and eliminates the window current. We conclude that AA may partly mediate physiological effects such as vasodilatation via the attenuation of T-type Ca channel current and the elimination of a T-type channel steady window current.

  7. Investigation of association between alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor haplotype and endometritis in the thoroughbred mare.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, A D; John, H A; Ricketts, S W; Rossdale, P D; Scott, A M

    1994-03-01

    Failure to inhibit proteinases can lead to excessive tissue damage. The possibility that the severity of endometritis in Thoroughbred mares correlates with the haplotypes of plasma alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI) expressed was investigated in two groups of mares. In mares with pyometritis before treatment, the frequency of the N haplotype, which is already high in the Thoroughbred population, was significantly increased when compared with that in a large published population. In mares with acute endometritis which persisted after treatment followed by sexual rest, the absence of S and T haplotypes was significant, suggesting that, when present, they may have a protective function.

  8. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A. )

    1990-11-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography.

  9. Five different profiles of dihydropyridines in blocking T-type Ca(2+) channel subtypes (Ca(v)3.1 (alpha(1G)), Ca(v)3.2 (alpha(1H)), and Ca(v)3.3 (alpha(1I))) expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Taiji; Nukada, Toshihide; Namiki, Yoshiko; Miyashita, Yoriko; Hatsuno, Kento; Ueno, Yasunari; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Isshiki, Takaaki

    2009-06-24

    1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) Ca(2+) antagonists have recently been shown to block T-type Ca(2+) channels, which may render favorable actions on cardiovascular systems. However, this evaluation remains to be done systematically for each T-type Ca(2+) channel subtype except for the Ca(v)3.1 (alpha(1G)) subtype. To address this issue at the molecular level, blocking effects of 14 kinds of DHPs (amlodipine, aranidipine, azelnidipine, barnidipine, benidipine, cilnidipine, efonidipine, felodipine, manidipine, nicardipine, nifedipine, nilvadipine, nimodipine, nitrendipine), which are clinically used for treatments of hypertension, on 3 subtypes of T-type Ca(2+) channels [Ca(v)3.2 (alpha(1H)), Ca(v)3.3 (alpha(1I)), and Ca(v)3.1 (alpha(1G))] were investigated in the Xenopus oocyte expression system using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. These 3 kinds (alpha(1H), alpha(1I) and alpha(1G)) of T-type channels were blocked by amlodipine, manidipine and nicardipine. On the other hand, azelnidipine, barnidipine, benidipine and efonidipine significantly blocked alpha(1H) and alpha(1G), but not alpha(1I) channels, while nilvadipine and nimodipine apparently blocked alpha(1H) and alpha(1I), but not alpha(1G) channels. Moreover, aranidipine blocked only alpha(1H) channels. By contrast, cilnidipine, felodipine, nifedipine and nitrendipine had little effects on these subtypes of T-type channels. The result indicates that the blockade of T-type Ca(2+) channels by derivatives of DHP Ca(2+) antagonist was selective for the channel subtype. Therefore, these selectivities of DHPs in blocking T-type Ca(2+) channel subtypes would provide useful pharmacological and clinical information on the mode of action of the drugs including side-effects and adverse effects.

  10. Oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar macrophages from healthy smokers requires the presence of myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Gressier, B; Aerts, C; Mizon, C; Voisin, C; Mizon, J

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the ability of human alveolar macrophages (AM) of 10 healthy smokers to inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1PI). Purified alpha 1PI was incubated for 45 min, with human alveolar macrophages before and after stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or opsonized zymosan. As a positive control, the same experiments were performed in parallel with blood human neutrophils (PMN). Results are expressed as percentage of inactivation of alpha 1PI as evaluated from its inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic elastase. A strong correlation (r = 0.99) was shown when inhibitory activity of alpha 1PI was evaluated against porcine pancreatic elastase or human neutrophil elastase. Unstimulated AM (1.57 +/- 0.9%) as well as stimulated AM (PMA: 1 +/- 0.4%; zymosan: 3 +/- 0.6%) were unable to inactivate alpha 1PI. Gel electrophoresis of alpha 1PI demonstrated that AM before or after stimulation induced a slight proteolysis of alpha 1PI, whereas both cleaved and complexed alpha 1PI were found when alpha 1PI was incubated with activated PMN. Both unstimulated (22 +/- 2.6%) and activated PMN (PMA: 91.7 +/- 4.7%; zymosan: 90 +/- 5.5%) were responsible for a significant inactivation of alpha 1PI. Catalase, in contrast to superoxide dismutase, was responsible for a near complete protection of alpha 1PI inactivation by PMN. To better determine the role of PMN secretory products, especially myeloperoxidase (MPO), we also investigated the effect of zymosan-activated PMN supernatants or of purified MPO on the alpha 1PI-AM reaction. MPO assay in PMN supernatants demonstrated that activated neutrophils released significant amounts of MPO (16.8 +/- 4.1 U/ml), whereas MPO was undetectable in activated AM supernatants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The endoplasmic reticulum remains functionally connected by vesicular transport after its fragmentation in cells expressing Z-α1-antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, Jennifer A.; Ordóñez, Adriana; Chambers, Joseph E.; Beckett, Alison J.; Patel, Vruti; Malzer, Elke; Dominicus, Caia S.; Bradley, Jayson; Peden, Andrew A.; Prior, Ian A.; Lomas, David A.; Marciniak, Stefan J.

    2016-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin is a serine protease inhibitor produced in the liver that is responsible for the regulation of pulmonary inflammation. The commonest pathogenic gene mutation yields Z-α1-antitrypsin, which has a propensity to self-associate forming polymers that become trapped in inclusions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It is unclear whether these inclusions are connected to the main ER network in Z-α1-antitrypsin-expressing cells. Using live cell imaging, we found that despite inclusions containing an immobile matrix of polymeric α1-antitrypsin, small ER resident proteins can diffuse freely within them. Inclusions have many features to suggest they represent fragmented ER, and some are physically separated from the tubular ER network, yet we observed cargo to be transported between them in a cytosol-dependent fashion that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide and dependent on Sar1 and sec22B. We conclude that protein recycling occurs between ER inclusions despite their physical separation.—Dickens, J. A., Ordóñez, A., Chambers, J. E., Beckett, A. J., Patel, V., Malzer, E., Dominicus, C. S., Bradley, J., Peden, A. A., Prior, I. A., Lomas, D. A., Marciniak, S. J. The endoplasmic reticulum remains functionally connected by vesicular transport after its fragmentation in cells expressing Z-α1-antitrypsin. PMID:27601439

  12. The endoplasmic reticulum remains functionally connected by vesicular transport after its fragmentation in cells expressing Z-α1-antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Jennifer A; Ordóñez, Adriana; Chambers, Joseph E; Beckett, Alison J; Patel, Vruti; Malzer, Elke; Dominicus, Caia S; Bradley, Jayson; Peden, Andrew A; Prior, Ian A; Lomas, David A; Marciniak, Stefan J

    2016-12-01

    α1-Antitrypsin is a serine protease inhibitor produced in the liver that is responsible for the regulation of pulmonary inflammation. The commonest pathogenic gene mutation yields Z-α1-antitrypsin, which has a propensity to self-associate forming polymers that become trapped in inclusions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It is unclear whether these inclusions are connected to the main ER network in Z-α1-antitrypsin-expressing cells. Using live cell imaging, we found that despite inclusions containing an immobile matrix of polymeric α1-antitrypsin, small ER resident proteins can diffuse freely within them. Inclusions have many features to suggest they represent fragmented ER, and some are physically separated from the tubular ER network, yet we observed cargo to be transported between them in a cytosol-dependent fashion that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide and dependent on Sar1 and sec22B. We conclude that protein recycling occurs between ER inclusions despite their physical separation.-Dickens, J. A., Ordóñez, A., Chambers, J. E., Beckett, A. J., Patel, V., Malzer, E., Dominicus, C. S., Bradley, J., Peden, A. A., Prior, I. A., Lomas, D. A., Marciniak, S. J. The endoplasmic reticulum remains functionally connected by vesicular transport after its fragmentation in cells expressing Z-α1-antitrypsin. © The Author(s).

  13. Completion of the amino acid sequence of the alpha 1 chain from type I calf skin collagen. Amino acid sequence of alpha 1(I)B8.

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, R W; Breitkreutz, D; Meitinger, M; Fietzek, P P

    1983-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the 279-residue CNBr peptide CB8 from the alpha 1 chain of type I calf skin collagen is presented. It was determined by sequencing overlapping fragments of CB8 produced by Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, trypsin, Endoproteinase Arg-C and hydroxylamine. Tryptic cleavages were also made specific for lysine by blocking arginine residues with cyclohexane-1,2-dione. This completes the amino acid sequence analysis of the 1054-residues-long alpha (I) chain of calf skin collagen. PMID:6354180

  14. Pharmacological tolerance to alpha 1-adrenergic receptor antagonism mediated by terazosin in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, J; Dachman, W; Blaschke, T F; Hoffman, B B

    1992-01-01

    Chronic administration of alpha 1-receptor antagonists is associated with loss of clinical efficacy, especially in congestive heart failure, although the mechanism is uncertain. To evaluate changes in venous alpha 1-adrenoceptor responsiveness during chronic alpha 1-adrenoceptor blockade, dose-response curves to phenylephrine and angiotensin II were constructed in 10 healthy subjects before, during, and after administration of terazosin 1 mg orally for 28 d. Terazosin initially shifted the dose-response curve of phenylephrine to the right, with a significant increase in ED50 for phenylephrine from a control value of 102 to 759 ng/min on day 1 of terazosin (P < 0.001). However, by day 28, the dose-response curve had shifted back towards baseline with an ED50 of 112 ng/min. After discontinuing terazosin, the ED50 for phenylephrine remained near the baseline value, indicating no evidence of supersensitivity to phenylephrine. There was no change in responsiveness to angiotensin II during the course of treatment with terazosin. Plasma terazosin concentrations were stable throughout the period of drug administration. The mean Kd of terazosin was estimated as 11 +/- 15 nM in the first few days of treatment. This study demonstrates that pharmacological tolerance to the alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking action of terazosin occurs in man and may be responsible for loss in efficacy with chronic therapy. PMID:1358918

  15. Progesterone binding to the tryptophan residues of human alpha1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R

    2006-11-06

    Binding studies between progesterone and alpha1-acid glycoprotein allowed us to demonstrate that the binding site of progesterone contains one hydrophobic tryptophan residue and that the structure of the protein is not altered upon binding. The data obtained at saturated concentrations of progesterone clearly reveal the type of interaction at physiological levels.

  16. Regulation of factor XIa activity by platelets and alpha 1-protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, P N; Sinha, D; Kueppers, F; Seaman, F S; Blankstein, K B

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the complex interrelationships between platelets, Factor XIa, alpha 1-protease inhibitor and Factor IX activation. Platelets were shown to secrete an inhibitor of Factor XIa, and to protect Factor XIa from inactivation in the presence of alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the secreted platelet inhibitor. This protection of Factor XIa did not arise from the binding of Factor XIa to platelets, the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, or the inactivation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor by platelets. The formation of a complex between alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the active-site-containing light chain of Factor XIa was inhibited by activated platelets and by platelet releasates, but not by high molecular weight kininogen. These results support the hypothesis that platelets can regulate Factor XIa-catalyzed Factor IX activation by secreting an inhibitor of Factor XIa that may act primarily outside the platelet microenvironment and by protecting Factor XIa from inhibition, thereby localizing Factor IX activation to the platelet plug. Images PMID:3500185

  17. [Incidence of varying factors on the immunochemical behavior of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein].

    PubMed

    Biou, D; Durand, G; Feger, J; Agneray, J

    1980-02-01

    Electroimmunodiffusion methods of Laurell and radial immunodiffusion method of Mancini are compared for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of native and desialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein. Samples are incubated under different conditions at decreasing pH (3.5 to 0.5 pH units), with increasing ionic strength and with neuraminidase during different time intervals. Results show a pronounced decrease in electrophoretic mobility of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein treated either with acidic reagents or with neuraminidase (ionic strength has no effect). Such a procedure might involve chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis by which sialyl residues are removed. This hydrolysis implicates lower results in the estimation of the desialylated glycoprotein by electroimmunodiffusion. On the other hand, the amounts of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein evaluated by radial immunodiffusion are not modified after incubation. This is expected since diffusion and antigenic properties are not related to the sialic acid content. The data suggest that radial immunodiffusion, less accurate and sensitive than electroimmunodiffusion, is nevertheless more adequate for estimating native and desialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

  18. Alpha 1-acid glycoprotein has immunomodulatory effects in neonatal swine adipose tissue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) is the most abundant protein in serum of neonatal swine. This protein functions as an immunomodulator in the pig. Recent work has demonstrated that adipose tissue can express AGP mRNA, as well as numerous cytokine mRNA. The present study was designed to determine i...

  19. Regulation of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein synthesis by porcine hepatocytes in monolayer culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP, ORM-1) is a highly glycosylated mammalian acute phase protein, which is synthesized primarily in the liver and represents the major serum protein in newborn pigs. Recent data have suggested that the pig is unique in that AGP is a negative acute phase protein in this ...

  20. cDNA sequence and chromosome localization of pig {alpha}1,3 galactosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Strahan, K.M.; Preece, A.F.; Gustafsson, K.; Gu, F.; Gustavsson, I.; Anderson, L.

    1995-01-11

    Human serum contains natural antibodies (NAb), which can bind to endothelial cell surface antigens of other mammals. This is believed to be the major initiating event in the process of hyperacute rejection of pig to primate xenografts. Recent work has implicated galactosyl {alpha}1,3 galactosyl {beta}1,4 N-acetyl-glucosaminyl carbohydrate epitopes, on the surface of pig endothelial cells, as a major target of human natural antibodies. This epitope is made by a specific galactosyltransferase ({alpha}1,3 GT) present in pigs but not in higher primates. We have now cloned and sequenced a full-length pig {alpha}1,3 GT cDNA. The predicted 371 amino acid protein sequence shares 85% and 76% identity with previously characterized cattle and mouse {alpha}1,3 GT protein sequences, respectively. By using fluorescence and isotopic in situ hybridization, the GGTA/gene was mapped to the region q2.10-q2.11 of pig chromosome 1, providing further evidence of homology between the subterminal region of pig chromosome 1q and human chromosome 9q, which harbors the locus encoding the ABO blood group system, as well as a human pseudogene homologous to the pig GGTA1 gene. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor: Binding and phosphoinositide breakdown in human myometrium

    SciTech Connect

    Breuiller-Fouche, M.; Doualla-Bell Kotto Maka, F.; Geny, B.; Ferre, F. )

    1991-07-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors were examined in both inner and outer layers of human pregnant myometrium using radioligand binding of (3H)prazosin. (3H)prazosin bound rapidly and reversibly to a single class of high affinity binding sites in myometrial membrane preparations. Scatchard analysis gave similar values of equilibrium dissociation constants in both myometrial layers. In contrast, more alpha-1 adrenergic receptors were detected in the outer layer than in the inner layer. Antagonist inhibited (3H)prazosin binding with an order of potency of prazosin greater than phentolamine greater than idazoxan. Competition experiments have also revealed that a stable guanine nucleotide decreases the apparent affinity of norepinephrine for myometrial (3H)prazosin binding sites. The functional status of these alpha-1 adrenergic receptors was also assessed by measuring the norepinephrine-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates in myometrial tissue. Norepinephrine produced a concentration-dependent accumulation of inositol phosphates in both myometrial layers. However, norepinephrine-induced increases in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate were only observed in the outer layer. These results indicate that alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in human myometrium at the end of pregnancy are linked to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and that this response occurs mainly in the outer layer.

  2. Alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor subtypes: non-identical triplets with different dancing partners?

    PubMed

    Hague, Chris; Chen, Zhongjian; Uberti, Michelle; Minneman, Kenneth P

    2003-12-12

    Alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors are one of the three subfamilies of G protein coupled receptors activated by epinephrine and norepinephrine to control important functions in many target organs. Three human subtypes (alpha(1A), alpha(1B), alpha(1D)) are derived from separate genes and are highly homologous in their transmembrane domains but not in their amino or carboxyl termini. Recent advances in our understanding of these "non-identical triplets" include development of knockout mice lacking single or multiple subtypes, new insights into subcellular localization and trafficking, identification of allosteric modulators, and increasing evidence for an important role in brain function. Although all three subtypes activate the same G(q/11) signaling pathway, they also appear to interact with different protein binding partners. Recent evidence suggests they may also form dimers, and may initiate independent signals through pathways yet to be clearly elucidated. Thus, this subfamily represents a common phenomenon of a group of similar but non-identical receptor subtypes activated by the same neurotransmitter, whose individual functional roles remain to be clearly established.

  3. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. 866.5420 Section 866.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. 866.5420 Section 866.5420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system. 866.5080 Section 866.5080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  9. Molecular cloning, genomic structure, polymorphism analysis and recombinant expression of a α1-antitrypsin like gene from swamp eel, Monopterus albus.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Quanhe; Li, Shaobin; Jiang, Ao; Sun, Wenxiu

    2017-03-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is a highly polymorphic glycoprotein antiprotease, involved in the regulation of human immune response. Beyond some genomic characterization and a few protein characterizations, the function of teleost AAT remains uncertain. In this study we cloned an AAT-like gene from a swamp eel liver identifying four exons and three introns, and the full-length cDNA. The elucidated swamp eel AAT amino acid sequence showed high homology with known AATs from other teleosts. The swamp eel AAT was examined both in ten healthy tissues and in four bacterially-stimulated tissues resulting in up-regulation of swamp eel AAT at different times. Swamp eel AAT transcripts were ubiquitously but unevenly expressed in ten tissues. Further, the mature peptide sequence of swamp eel AAT was subcloned and transformed into E. coli with the recombinant proteins successfully inhibiting bovine trypsin activity. Analysis of recombinant AAT showed equimolar formation of irreversible complexes with proteinases, high stability at pH 7.0-10.0 and temperatures below 55 °C. Serum AAT protein level significantly increased in response to inflammation with AAT anti-sera, and, NF-κB, apolipoprotein A1 and transferrin gene expression were dramatically decreased over 72 h post recombinant AAT injection. Lastly, examination of swamp eel AAT allelic polymorphism identified all alleles in both healthy and diseased stock except allele*g, found only in diseased stock, but without statistical difference between the distribution frequency of allele*g in the two stocks. These results are crucial to our ongoing study of the role of teleost AAT in the innate immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Phase I trial of intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 alphal-antitrypsin (AAT) vector in AAT-deficient adults.

    PubMed

    Brantly, Mark L; Spencer, L Terry; Humphries, Margaret; Conlon, Thomas J; Spencer, Carolyn T; Poirier, Amy; Garlington, Wendy; Baker, Dawn; Song, Sihong; Berns, Kenneth I; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Snyder, Richard O; Byrne, Barry J; Flotte, Terence R

    2006-12-01

    A phase I trial of intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (rAAV2) alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) vector was performed in 12 AAT-deficient adults, 10 of whom were male. All subjects were either homozygous for the most common AAT mutation (a missense mutation designated PI*Z) or compound heterozygous for PI*Z and another mutation known to cause disease. There were four dose cohorts, ranging from 2.1 x 10(12) vector genomes (VG) to 6.9 x 10(13) VG, with three subjects per cohort. Subjects were injected sequentially in a dose-escalating fashion with a minimum of 14 days between patients. Subjects who had been receiving AAT protein replacement discontinued that therapy 28 days before vector administration. There were no vector-related serious adverse events in any of the 12 participants. Vector DNA sequences were detected in the blood between 1 and 3 days after injection in nearly all patients receiving doses of 6.9 x 10(12) VG or higher. Anti-AAV2 capsid antibodies were present and rose after vector injection, but no other immune responses were detected. One subject who had not been receiving protein replacement exhibited low-level expression of wild-type M-AAT in the serum (82 nM), which was detectable 30 days after receiving an injection of 2.1 x 10(13) VG. Unfortunately, residual but declining M-AAT levels from the washout of the protein replacement elevated background levels sufficiently to obscure any possible vector expression in that range in most of the other individuals in the higher dose cohorts.

  11. Possible dopaminergic stimulation of locus coeruleus alpha1-adrenoceptors involved in behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David; Dunn, Adrian J; Weinshenker, David; Stone, Eric A

    2008-07-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors of the locus coeruleus (LC) have been implicated in behavioral activation in novel surroundings, but the endogenous agonist that activates these receptors has not been established. In addition to the canonical activation of alpha(1)-receptors by norepinephrine (NE), there is evidence that dopamine (DA) may also activate certain brain alpha(1)-receptors. This study examined the contribution of DA to exploratory activity in a novel cage by determining the effect of infusion of various dopaminergic and adrenergic drugs into the mouse LC. It was found that the D2/D3 agonist, quinpirole, which selectively blocks the release of CNS DA, produced a dose-dependent and virtually complete abolition of exploration and all movement in the novel cage test. The quinpirole-induced inactivity was significantly attenuated by coinfusion of DA but not by the D1 agonist, SKF38390. Furthermore, the DA attenuation of quinpirole inactivity was blocked by coinfusion of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, but not by the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390. LC infusions of either quinpirole or terazosin also produced profound inactivity in DA-beta-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice that lack NE, indicating that their behavioral effects were not due to an alteration of the release or action of LC NE. Measurement of endogenous DA, NE, and 5HT and their metabolites in the LC during exposure to the novel cage indicated an increase in the turnover of DA and NE but not 5HT. These results indicate that DA is a candidate as an endogenous agonist for behaviorally activating LC alpha(1)-receptors and may play a role in the activation of this nucleus by novel surroundings.

  12. Cervical mucins carry alpha(1,2)fucosylated glycans that partly protect from experimental vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Domino, Steven E; Hurd, Elizabeth A; Thomsson, Kristina A; Karnak, David M; Holmén Larsson, Jessica M; Thomsson, Elisabeth; Bäckström, Malin; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2009-12-01

    Cervical mucins are glycosylated proteins that form a protective cervical mucus. To understand the role of mucin glycans in Candida albicans infection, oligosaccharides from mouse cervical mucins were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Cervical mucins carry multiple alpha(1-2)fucosylated glycans, but alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase Fut2-null mice are devoid of these epitopes. Epithelial cells in vaginal lavages from Fut2-null mice lacked Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-I) staining for alpha(1-2)fucosylated glycans. Hysterectomy to remove cervical mucus eliminated UEA-I and acid mucin staining in vaginal epithelial cells from wild type mice indicating the cervix as the source of UEA-I positive epithelial cells. To assess binding of alpha(1-2) fucosylated glycans on C. albicans infection, an in vitro adhesion assay was performed with vaginal epithelial cells from wild type and Fut2-null mice. Vaginal epithelial cells from Fut2-null mice were found to bind increased numbers of C. albicans compared to vaginal epithelial cells obtained from wild type mice. Hysterectomy lessened the difference between Fut2-null and wild type mice in binding of C. ablicans in vitro and susceptibility to experimental C. albicans vaginitis in vivo. We generated a recombinant fucosylated MUC1 glycanpolymer to test whether the relative protection of wild type mice compared to Fut2-null mice could be mimicked with exogenous mucin. While a small portion of the recombinant MUC1 epitopes displayed alpha(1-2)fucosylated glycans, the predominant epitopes were sialylated due to endogenous sialyltransferases in the cultured cells. Intravaginal instillation of recombinant MUC1 glycanpolymer partially reduced experimental yeast vaginitis suggesting that a large glycanpolymer, with different glycan epitopes, may affect fungal burden.

  13. Involvement of central alpha1-adrenoceptors on renal responses to central moxonidine and alpha-methylnoradrenaline.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Carina A F; de Andrade, Glaucia M F; De Paula, Patricia M; De Luca, Laurival A; Menani, José V

    2009-04-01

    Moxonidine (alpha2-adrenoceptor/imidazoline receptor agonist) injected into the lateral ventricle induces diuresis, natriuresis and renal vasodilation. Moxonidine-induced diuresis and natriuresis depend on central imidazoline receptors, while central alpha1-adrenoceptors are involved in renal vasodilation. However, the involvement of central alpha1-adrenoceptors on diuresis and natriuresis to central moxonidine was not investigated yet. In the present study, the effects of moxonidine, alpha-methylnoradrenaline (alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist) or phenylephrine (alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist) alone or combined with previous injections of prazosin (alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist), yohimbine or RX 821002 (alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists) intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) on urinary sodium, potassium and volume were investigated. Male Holtzman rats (n = 5-18/group) with stainless steel cannula implanted into the lateral ventricle and submitted to gastric water load (10% of body weight) were used. Injections of moxonidine (20 nmol) or alpha-methylnoradrenaline (80 nmol) i.c.v. induced natriuresis (196 +/- 25 and 171 +/- 30, respectively, vs. vehicle: 101 +/- 9 microEq/2 h) and diuresis (9.0 +/- 0.4 and 12.3 +/- 1.6, respectively, vs. vehicle: 5.2 +/- 0.5 ml/2 h). Pre-treatment with prazosin (320 nmol) i.c.v. abolished the natriuresis (23 +/- 4 and 76 +/- 11 microEq/2 h, respectively) and diuresis (5 +/- 1 and 7.6 +/- 0.8 ml/2 h, respectively) produced by i.c.v. moxonidine or alpha-methylnoradrenaline. RX 821002 (320 nmol) i.c.v. abolished the natriuretic effect of alpha-methylnoradrenaline, however, yohimbine (320 nmol) did not change renal responses to moxonidine. Phenylephrine (80 nmol) i.c.v. induced natriuresis and kaliuresis that were blocked by prazosin. Therefore, the present data suggest that moxonidine and alpha-methylnoradrenaline acting on central imidazoline receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors, respectively, activate central alpha1-adrenergic mechanisms to

  14. Automated docking of alpha-(1-->4)- and alpha-(1-->6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides and maltopentaose into the soybean beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Rockey, W M; Laederach, A; Reilly, P J

    2000-08-01

    The Lamarckian genetic algorithm of AutoDock 3.0 was used to dock alpha-maltotriose, methyl alpha-panoside, methyl alpha-isopanoside, methyl alpha-isomaltotrioside, methyl alpha-(6(1)-alpha-glucopyranosyl)-maltoside, and alpha-maltopentaose into the closed and, except for alpha-maltopentaose, into the open conformation of the soybean beta-amylase active site. In the closed conformation, the hinged flap at the mouth of the active site closes over the substrate. The nonreducing end of alpha-maltotriose docks preferentially to subsites -2 or +1, the latter yielding nonproductive binding. Some ligands dock into less optimal conformations with the nonreducing end at subsite -1. The reducing-end glucosyl residue of nonproductively-bound alpha-maltotriose is close to residue Gln194, which likely contributes to binding to subsite +3. In the open conformation, the substrate hydrogen-bonds with several residues of the open flap. When the flap closes, the substrate productively docks if the nonreducing end is near subsites -2 or -1. Trisaccharides with alpha-(1-->6) bonds do not successfully dock except for methyl alpha-isopanoside, whose first and second glucosyl rings dock exceptionally well into subsites -2 and -1. The alpha-(1-->6) bond between the second and third glucosyl units causes the latter to be improperly positioned into subsite +1; the fact that isopanose is not a substrate of beta-amylase indicates that binding to this subsite is critical for hydrolysis.

  15. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors in heart failure: the adaptive arm of the cardiac response to chronic catecholamine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; OʼConnell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2014-04-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the nonfailing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and beta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure.

  16. Alpha-1-Adrenergic Receptors in Heart Failure: The Adaptive Arm of the Cardiac Response to Chronic Catecholamine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brian C.; O'Connell, Timothy D.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the non-failing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and b□eta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain- and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs, to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure. PMID:24145181

  17. Knockout of the alpha 1A/C-adrenergic receptor subtype: the alpha 1A/C is expressed in resistance arteries and is required to maintain arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Rokosh, D Gregg; Simpson, Paul C

    2002-07-09

    alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) play a major role in blood pressure regulation. The three alpha 1-AR subtypes (A/C, B, and D) stimulate contraction of isolated arteries, but it is uncertain how different subtypes contribute to blood pressure regulation in the intact animal. We studied the role of the alpha 1A/C subtype by using gene knockout. alpha 1A/C knockout (KO) mice were viable and overtly normal. The LacZ reporter gene replaced alpha 1A/C coding sequence in the KO, and beta-galactosidase staining was present in resistance arteries and arterioles, but not in the thoracic aorta or its main branches. By tail cuff manometer and arterial catheter in conscious mice, alpha 1A/C KO mice were hypotensive at rest, with an 8-12% reduction of blood pressure dependent on alpha 1A/C gene copy number. A61603, an alpha 1A/C-selective agonist, caused a pressor response that was lost in the KO and reduced but significant in heterozygous mice with a single copy of the alpha 1A/C. A subtype-nonselective agonist [phenylephrine (PE)] caused a pressor response in KO mice, but the final arterial pressure was only 85% of wild type. The baroreflex was reset in the KO, and heart rate variability was decreased. After baroreflex blockade with atropine, PE increased blood pressure but did not change heart rate. Cardiac and vascular responses to the beta-AR agonist isoproterenol were unchanged, and the arterial lumen area was not altered. We conclude that the alpha 1A/C-AR subtype is a vasopressor expressed in resistance arteries and is required for normal arterial blood pressure regulation. alpha 1A/C-selective antagonists might be desirable antihypertensive agents.

  18. alpha-1-Microglobulin: epidemiological indicator for tubular dysfunction induced by cadmium?

    PubMed Central

    Pless-Mulloli, T.; Boettcher, M.; Steiner, M.; Berger, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the suitability of alpha-1-microglobulin as a marker for cadmium induced renal dysfunction. METHODS: alpha-1- Microglobulin was studied in a cross sectional survey in relation to the body burden of cadmium. Concentrations of alpha-1-microglobulin in 24 h urine of 831 people aged 2-87 years were analysed in association with urinary cadmium excretion, cadmium blood concentration, age, sex, occupational and smoking history, and estimated creatinine clearance. Participants came from a population residentially exposed to cadmium and from two control populations matched for socioeconomic status. RESULTS: The excretion of alpha-1-microglobulin/24 h ranged from 0.1 mg to 176.3 mg and 44.4% of samples showed concentrations near the detection limit. Ordinal logistic regression analysis of people of all ages identified a high risk only for males compared with females (odds ratio (OR) 2.14; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.56 to 2.94), age group, and duration of living on contaminated soil (OR 1.03/year; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.04), but not urinary cadmium excretion (OR 1.30; 95% CI 0.96 to 1.77) as significant predictors. For people < or = 50 years of age a weaker effect of sex (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.13 to 2.73) and age group and an effect of similar magnitude for the duration of soil exposure (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.04) were found. Also, the urinary cadmium excretion (OR 2.26; 95% CI 1.38 to 3.70) and occupational exposure (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.03 to 2.83) were found to be significant in this younger age group. The estimated creatinine clearance had no significant impact on the alpha-1-microglobulin excretion. CONCLUSION: alpha-1- Microglobulin is a suitable marker for early tubular changes only for people < or = 50 years. It may not be sufficiently specific for cadmium, and therefore not a suitable surrogate for cadmium exposure in epidemiological studies.   PMID:9816376

  19. Mysteries of α1-antitrypsin deficiency: emerging therapeutic strategies for a challenging disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghouse, Raafe; Chu, Andrew; Wang, Yan; Perlmutter, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The classical form of α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD) is an autosomal co-dominant disorder that affects ~1 in 3000 live births and is an important genetic cause of lung and liver disease. The protein affected, α1-antitrypsin (AT), is predominantly derived from the liver and has the function of inhibiting neutrophil elastase and several other destructive neutrophil proteinases. The genetic defect is a point mutation that leads to misfolding of the mutant protein, which is referred to as α1-antitrypsin Z (ATZ). Because of its misfolding, ATZ is unable to efficiently traverse the secretory pathway. Accumulation of ATZ in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells has a gain-of-function proteotoxic effect on the liver, resulting in fibrosis, cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma in some individuals. Moreover, because of reduced secretion, there is a lack of anti-proteinase activity in the lung, which allows neutrophil proteases to destroy the connective tissue matrix and cause chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by loss of function. Wide variation in the incidence and severity of liver and lung disease among individuals with ATD has made this disease one of the most challenging of the rare genetic disorders to diagnose and treat. Other than cigarette smoking, which worsens COPD in ATD, genetic and environmental modifiers that determine this phenotypic variability are unknown. A limited number of therapeutic strategies are currently available, and liver transplantation is the only treatment for severe liver disease. Although replacement therapy with purified AT corrects the loss of anti-proteinase function, COPD progresses in a substantial number of individuals with ATD and some undergo lung transplantation. Nevertheless, advances in understanding the variability in clinical phenotype and in developing novel therapeutic concepts is beginning to address the major clinical challenges of this mysterious disorder. PMID:24719116

  20. Expression of voltage sensitive calcium channel (VSCC) L-type Cav1.2 (alpha1C) and T-type Cav3.2 (alpha1H) subunits during mouse bone development.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ying; Alicknavitch, Michael; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2005-09-01

    Voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) are key regulators of osteoblast plasma membrane Ca(2+) permeability and are under control of calcitropic hormones. Subtype specific antibodies were used to probe L-type Ca(v)1.2 (alpha(1C)) and T-type Ca(v)3.2 (alpha(1H)) subunit expression during mouse skeletal development. Commencing from E14.5 and continuing through skeletal maturity, immunoreactivity of Ca(v)1.2 (alpha(1C)) subunits was evident in regions of rapid long bone growth, including the perichondrium, periosteum, chondro-osseous junction and trabecular bones. Ca(v)3.2 (alpha(1H)) subunits appeared simultaneously and followed a similar distribution pattern. Both subunits were observed in osteoblasts and chondrocytes under high magnification. Interestingly, Ca(v)3.2 (alpha(1H)) subunits were present, but Ca(v)1.2 (alpha(1C)) subunits were absent from osteocytes. Western Blot and immunohistochemical assessment of in vitro cell culture models of osteogenesis and chondrogenesis confirmed the in vivo observations. We conclude that both L-type Ca(v)1.2 (alpha(1C)) and T-type Ca(v)3.2 (alpha(1H)) VSCCs are dynamically regulated in bones and cartilages during endochondral bone development. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Mediation of noradrenaline-induced contractions of rat aorta by the alpha 1B-adrenoceptor subtype.

    PubMed Central

    Testa, R; Guarneri, L; Poggesi, E; Simonazzi, I; Taddei, C; Leonardi, A

    1995-01-01

    1. The subtypes of alpha 1-adrenoceptor mediating contractions to exogenous noradrenaline (NA) in rat aorta have been examined in both biochemical and functional studies. 2. Incubation of rat aortic membranes with the irreversible alpha 1B-adrenoceptor antagonist, chloroethylclonidine (CEC: 10 microM) did not change the KD of [3H]-prazosin binding in comparison to untreated membranes, but reduced by 88% the total number of binding sites (Bmax). 3. Contractions of rat aortic strips to NA after CEC (50 microM for 30 min) incubation followed by repetitive washing, showed a marked shift in the potency of NA and a partial reduction in the maximum response. The residual contractions to NA after CEC incubation were not affected by prazosin (10 nM). 4. The competitive antagonists prazosin, terazosin, (R)-YM-12617, phentolamine, 5-methylurapidil and spiperone inhibited contractions to NA with estimated pA2 values of 9.85, 8.54, 9.34, 7.71, 7.64 and 8.41, respectively. 5. The affinity of the same antagonists for the alpha 1A- and alpha 1B- adrenoceptors was evaluated by utilizing membranes from rat hippocampus pretreated with CEC, and rat liver, respectively. 5-Methylurapidil and phentolamine were confirmed as selective for the alpha 1A-adrenoceptors, whereas spiperone was alpha 1B-selective. 6. A significant correlation was found between the pA2 values of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists tested and their affinity for the alpha 1B-adrenoceptor subtype, but not for the alpha 1A-subtype. 7. In conclusion, these findings indicate that in rat aorta most of the contraction is mediated by alpha 1B-adrenoceptors, and that the potency (pA2) of an antagonist in this tissue should be related to its antagonistic effect on this subtype of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor population. PMID:7773533

  2. Attenuation of cardiac contractility in Na,K-ATPase alpha1 isoform-deficient hearts under reduced calcium conditions.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Amy E; Cougnon, Marc H; Grupp, Ingrid L; El Schultz, Jo; Lingrel, Jerry B

    2004-11-01

    We have previously reported that genetic reduction of the Na,K-ATPase alpha1 isoform (alpha1(+/-)) results in a hypocontractile cardiac phenotype. This observation was surprising and unexpected. In order to determine if calcium overload contributes to the depressed phenotype, cardiac performance was examined by perfusing the hearts with buffer containing 2 or 1.5 mM calcium. At 2 mM calcium, +dP/dt for the alpha1(+/-) hearts (1374 +/- 180) was significantly less than that of wild-type (2656 +/- 75, P < 0.05). At 1.5 mM calcium, a larger decrease in +dP/dt occurred (vs. 2 mM calcium) for the alpha1(+/-) hearts (517 +/- 92) compared to wild-type (2238 +/- 157). At 2 mM calcium, -dP/dt was 50% lower in alpha1(+/-) hearts (-1903 +/- 141) than wild-type (-982 +/- 143). At 1.5 mM calcium relaxation was further reduced in alpha1(+/-) compared to wild-type (-443 +/- 56 vs. - 1691 +/- 109). We also tested whether the compensatory upregulation of the Na,K-ATPase alpha2 isoform in the alpha1(+/-) hearts contributes to the hypocontractile phenotype. At 8 x 10(-6) M ouabain, that would completely inhibit the alpha2 isoform, a 30% increase in contractility was obtained in alpha1(+/-) hearts compared to no ouabain treatment, while a 63% faster time-to-peak (TTP) and 67% faster half-time-to-relaxation (RT(1/2)) were observed in alpha1(+/-) hearts treated with ouabain. These results suggest that upregulation of the alpha2 isoform may play a role in slower TTP and RT(1/2) in the alpha1(+/-) hearts. Furthermore, lowering extracellular calcium in the perfusate did not alleviate the depressed contractile phenotype in the alpha1(+/-) hearts and resulted in further depressed cardiac contractility suggesting that these hearts are not calcium overloaded.

  3. Localization of type II collagen, long form alpha 1(IX) collagen, and short form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts in the developing chick notochord and axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, R E; Solursh, M

    1992-06-01

    In this study we compare, by in situ hybridization, the spatial and temporal expression patterns of transcripts of avian type II collagen and the long and short forms of the (alpha 1) chain of type IX collagen during the development of the notochord and axial skeleton. We observed type II collagen and short form type IX collagen transcripts in the developing (stage 25-28) nonchondrogenic notochord. Conversely, long form type IX transcripts were not detectable in the notochord or perinotochordal sheath. Interestingly, all three transcripts colocalized in the developing chondrogenic vertebrae of the axial skeleton as well as in the chondrocranium and Meckel's cartilage. The expression of the short form of type IX collagen in these regions was more restricted than that of the long form. This report provides additional support for a complex regulatory pathway of cartilage marker gene expression in chondrogenic vs. nonchondrogenic tissues during avian embryogenesis.

  4. Altered hepatic vasopressin and alpha 1-adrenergic receptors after chronic endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.L.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are complicated by a number of hemodynamic and metabolic aberrations. These include catecholamine refractoriness and altered glucose metabolism. Recently, a nonshock rat model of continuous endotoxin infusion via an implanted osmotic pump was developed that reproduces some of the metabolic and cardiovascular findings of human sepsis. By using this model, we have found a decreased number of hepatic plasma membrane alpha 1-adrenergic and (Arg8)vasopressin receptors in rats continuously infused with endotoxin. There was a significant decrease in (/sup 3/H)prazosin (35 +/- 7%) and (/sup 3/H) (Arg8)vasopressin (43 +/- 8%) receptors after 30 h of continuous endotoxin infusion with no change in affinity. The ability of norepinephrine to form the high-affinity complex with alpha 1-adrenergic receptors was not altered after chronic endotoxin infusion. The results are consistent with the concept that alterations in receptor number might underlie certain of the metabolic consequences of chronic sepsis.

  5. Inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by Cu(II) and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kwon, N S; Chan, P C; Kesner, L

    1990-03-01

    When alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was treated with 1-5 microM CuSO4 in the presence of H2O2 (250-1000 microM), its elastase inhibitory capacity was markedly decreased. Several other metal ions tested had either very little or no effect. The Cu(II)-catalyzed decreased in the inhibition of elastase activity can also be demonstrated in dialyzed plasma. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that in several pathological conditions in which extracellular copper levels are elevated, Cu(II)-catalyzed peroxidation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor may occur at sites of inflammation where H2O2 is secreted as a major product by activated phagocytes.

  6. Synthesis and release of platelet-activating factor is inhibited by plasma alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor or alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and is stimulated by proteinases

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    TNF and IL-1 stimulate the synthesis and release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by neutrophils and vascular endothelial cells. Serum inhibits PAF production even after inactivation of an acetylhydrolase that degrades PAF. Human plasma was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography, and two inhibitory fractions were detected, one containing PAF-acetylhydrolase activity and the other alpha 1- proteinase inhibitor. Low concentrations of this antiproteinase and of human plasma alpha 1-antichymotrypsin inhibited TNF-induced PAF synthesis in neutrophils, macrophages, and vascular endothelial cells. Both antiproteinases also inhibited PAF production stimulated by phagocytosis in macrophages and induced with IL-1 in neutrophils or with TNF in vascular endothelial cells. These results suggest that a proteinase activated on the plasma membrane or secreted by these cells is involved in promoting PAF synthesis. Indeed, addition of elastase to macrophages, neutrophils, and endothelial cells stimulated synthesis and release of PAF much faster than TNF. A similar stimulation was observed in incubations with cathepsin G. To identify a proteinase activated in TNF-treated cells, neutrophils and endothelial cells were incubated with specific chloromethyl ketone inhibitors of elastase and cathepsin G. Synthesis of PAF was significantly inhibited by low concentrations of the cathepsin G inhibitor. The finding that antiproteinases are inhibitory at concentrations 100-fold lower than those present in plasma raises questions as to the ability of TNF and IL-1 to stimulate neutrophils in circulation or endothelial cells to synthesize PAF. We propose that PAF production is limited to zones of close contact between cells, which exclude antiproteinases. PMID:3049910

  7. Alpha1b-adrenergic receptors control locomotor and rewarding effects of psychostimulants and opiates.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Candice; Darracq, Laurent; Trovero, Fabrice; Blanc, Gérard; Glowinski, Jacques; Cotecchia, Susanna; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2002-04-01

    Drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants and opiates, are generally considered as exerting their locomotor and rewarding effects through an increased dopaminergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens. Noradrenergic transmission may also be implicated because most psychostimulants increase norepinephrine (NE) release, and numerous studies have indicated interactions between noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons through alpha1-adrenergic receptors. However, analysis of the effects of psychostimulants after either destruction of noradrenergic neurons or pharmacological blockade of alpha1-adrenergic receptors led to conflicting results. Here we show that the locomotor hyperactivities induced by d-amphetamine (1-3 mg/kg), cocaine (5-20 mg/kg), or morphine (5-10 mg/kg) in mice lacking the alpha1b subtype of adrenergic receptors were dramatically decreased when compared with wild-type littermates. Moreover, behavioral sensitizations induced by d-amphetamine (1-2 mg/kg), cocaine (5-15 mg/kg), or morphine (7.5 mg/kg) were also decreased in knock-out mice when compared with wild-type. Ruling out a neurological deficit in knock-out mice, both strains reacted similarly to novelty, to intraperitoneal saline, or to the administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg), an anti-muscarinic agent. Finally, rewarding properties could not be observed in knock-out mice in an oral preference test (cocaine and morphine) and conditioned place preference (morphine) paradigm. Because catecholamine tissue levels, autoradiography of D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors, and of dopamine reuptake sites and locomotor response to a D1 agonist showed that basal dopaminergic transmission was similar in knock-out and wild-type mice, our data indicate a critical role of alpha1b-adrenergic receptors and noradrenergic transmission in the vulnerability to addiction.

  8. Characterization of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in tension response of human prostate to electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Guh, J. H.; Chueh, S. C.; Ko, F. N.; Teng, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of various alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists and nifedipine on tension responses of human prostate to electrical field stimulation were evaluated in this study. 2. Prazosin (3 x 10(-10) to 10(-8) M) and 5-methyl-urapidil (10(-9) to 3 x 10(-8) M) blocked concentration-dependently the tension responses to electrical field stimulation and completely abolished them in the maximal concentrations (10(-8) M and 3 x 10(-8) M, respectively); in contrast, chloroethylclonidine (CEC), in the maximal concentration of 100 microM, blocked these effects by only 50%. 3. The contractile responses of rat vas deferens and spleen to exogenously-applied alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists were competitively inhibited by prazosin and 5-methyl-urapidil; in addition, the pA2 values were calculated and the relative potencies with reference to prazosin were obtained. The relative potency of 5-methyl-urapidil in human prostate (0.105) was close to that in rat vas deferens (0.257), which contains primarily putative alpha 1A-adrenoceptors. However, it was much more than that in rat spleen (0.011), which contains primarily putative alpha 1B-adrenoceptors. 4. Nifedipine (10(-8)