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Sample records for care management program

  1. HIV/AIDS managed care program.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately one-half of all patients with HIV infection who are under care have Medicaid as the third party payor. Unlike Medicare, Medicaid is a state-specific program that has huge variations in reimbursement strategies. Multiple studies have shown that care for persons with AIDS is about $20,000/year, but reimbursement through various state Medicaid programs varies about $100/m/m to $2800/m/m despite the fact that expectations for care are identical. Hopkins has a major commitment to persons with HIV infection with a program that now includes 30 faculty members and a support staff of 170. With the introduction of mandatory managed care for Medicaid recipients in July, 1997, we were confronted with the issue of substantial downsizing with abandonment of over half of our patients, or learning the transition to managed care. This has been a steep learning curve involving negotiations with the state Medicaid office, reorganization of our clinic, careful scrutiny of our database regarding resource utilization and cost, education of providers, and longitudinal collection of new information and integration of the rapid changes in the field. In the process of this transition, we learned that there are precious few resources to provide guidance and that there is a perceived need for assistance by HIV providers throughout the country. Consequently, we have now established the "HIV Managed Care Network" with substantial funding from diverse sources to support education, data collection, and public policy review. It is premature to evaluate performance since most of these activities have just begun, but we expect that this Network will serve as a demonstration model for methods to deal with chronic diseases under managed care. PMID:10881336

  2. Disease Management, Case Management, Care Management, and Care Coordination: A Framework and a Brief Manual for Care Programs and Staff.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Osman I

    2016-01-01

    With the changing landscape of health care delivery in the United States since the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010, health care organizations have struggled to keep pace with the evolving paradigm, particularly as it pertains to population health management. New nomenclature emerged to describe components of the new environment, and familiar words were put to use in an entirely different context. This article proposes a working framework for activities performed in case management, disease management, care management, and care coordination. The author offers standard working definitions for some of the most frequently used words in the health care industry with the goal of increasing consistency for their use, especially in the backdrop of the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services offering a "chronic case management fee" to primary care providers for managing the sickest, high-cost Medicare patients. Health care organizations performing case management, care management, disease management, and care coordination. Road map for consistency among users, in reporting, comparison, and for success of care management/coordination programs. This article offers a working framework for disease managers, case and care managers, and care coordinators. It suggests standard definitions to use for disease management, case management, care management, and care coordination. Moreover, the use of clear terminology will facilitate comparing, contrasting, and evaluating all care programs and increase consistency. The article can improve understanding of care program components and success factors, estimate program value and effectiveness, heighten awareness of consumer engagement tools, recognize current state and challenges for care programs, understand the role of health information technology solutions in care programs, and use information and knowledge gained to assess and improve care programs to design the "next generation" of programs.

  3. Management of a point-of-care testing program.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Kim; Lewandrowski, Kent

    2009-09-01

    The approach to managing a point-of-care testing (POCT) program has evolved over recent years. Although many of the essential features of early POCT management programs remain intact, contemporary challenges including expansion of the test menu, changing regulatory requirements, and the development of more sophisticated data management connectivity require ongoing adaptation of POCT management programs. Despite improvements in test quality and regulatory compliance, significant challenges for the management of POCT will continue for the foreseeable future.

  4. Primary Care Physicians' Experience with Disease Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Alicia; Grumbach, Kevin; Vranizan, Karen; Osmond, Dennis H; Bindman, Andrew B

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine primary care physicians' perceptions of how disease management programs affect their practices, their relationships with their patients, and overall patient care. DESIGN Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING The 13 largest urban counties in California. PARTICIPANTS General internists, general pediatricians, and family physicians. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Physicians' self-report of the effects of disease management programs on quality of patient care and their own practices. Respondents included 538 (76%) of 708 physicians: 183 (34%) internists, 199 (38%) family practitioners, and 156 (29%) pediatricians. Disease management programs were available 285 to (53%) physicians; 178 had direct experience with the programs. Three quarters of the 178 physicians believed that disease management programs increased the overall quality of patient care and the quality of care for the targeted disease. Eighty-seven percent continued to provide primary care for their patients in these programs, and 70% reported participating in major patient care decisions. Ninety-one percent reported that the programs had no effect on their income, decreased (38%) or had no effect (48%) on their workload, and increased (48%)) their practice satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS Practicing primary care physicians have generally favorable perceptions of the effect of voluntary, primary care-inclusive, disease management programs on their patients and on their own practice satisfaction. PMID:11318911

  5. Diabetes disease management in Medicaid managed care: a program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patric, Kenneth; Stickles, Joyce D; Turpin, Robin S; Simmons, Jeffrey B; Jackson, James; Bridges, Elizabeth; Shah, Manan

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of a diabetes disease management initiative among TennCare's Medicaid Population. A quasi-experimental group design was conducted using a control group and a diabetes disease management intervention group. Primary outcomes measures were rates for three key recommended tests (ie, microalbuminuria, lipids, and hemoglobin A1c). Secondary performance measures --patient satisfaction and program evaluation issues -- also were assessed. The study was performed among TennCare beneficiaries with diabetes mellitus. It utilized a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group design, with 993 intervention participants in Knoxville and 1167 control group members in Chattanooga. Variables analyzed included testing rates for hemoglobin A1c, lipids, microalbuminuria, and demographics. A logistic regression model using baseline covariates was constructed to analyze the differences between the intervention and the control groups. Intracluster correlations were accounted for by generalized estimating equations. Statistical process control detected process changes in testing rates over time. There were meaningful changes in the rate of ordering recommended tests. The odds of an individual in the intervention group having at least one microalbuminuria test were 196% more (confidence interval [CI] = 1.50, 5.82; p = 0.002); the odds of having at least one lipid profile were 43% more (CI = 1.01, 2.02; p = 0.042); and the odds of having two or more hemoglobin A1c tests were 39% more (CI = 0.87, 2.23; p = 0.165) than the odds of an individual in the control group. The analysis also showed a high rate of satisfaction among patients in the intervention group. The program was successful in meeting its stated goals of providing effective disease management for TennCare patients with diabetes.

  6. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  7. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  8. Preparing health care organizations for successful case management programs.

    PubMed

    Bonvissuto, C A; Kastens, J M; Atwell, S R

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of four hospital-based providers in varying stages of implementing case management programs. Three of the providers had most of the necessary elements in place to ensure success, such as a mix of reimbursement sources, an effective and integrated information management system, a full range of clinical services, and continuous quality improvement programs. The authors make several suggestions for key activities that must be pursued by any health care organization seeking to implement a case management program in an era of managed care, tightening reimbursement, and consumer demand for quality care. These include the need to (a) organize essential case management functions under a centralized structure; (b) set realistic, quantifiable targets, and (c) design a communications plan for the program.

  9. Administration of Child Care Programs: Business Management. Student Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    Designed as a laboratory experience guide and workbook, this manual exposes postsecondary students to the general competencies and business management aspects of child care program administration. The four units cover general competencies (functions of management, leadership, and board of directors), regulations and legal concerns, personnel…

  10. CARELINK: partners in a caring model: a cardiac management program for home care.

    PubMed

    Shellman, Juliette; Lacey, Kimberly; Clemmens, Donna

    2008-01-01

    As a model of care, CARELINK promotes self-care and self-management of chronic illnesses for homebound older adults no longer eligible for skilled nursing services. A case-study method is used to highlight the key constructs and outcomes related to the model. The benefits of applying the CARELINK model as a cardiac management program for home care are discussed.

  11. Administration of Child Care Programs: Business Management. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    Designed for use by postsecondary child development instructors, this guide is organized into four units that expose students to the general competencies and business management aspects of child care program administration. Introductory materials discuss the use of the materials and provide guidelines for evaluating students. The four units cover…

  12. Heart failure management: optimal health care delivery programs.

    PubMed

    Moser, D K

    2000-01-01

    Heart failure is the single most costly health care expenditure in the United States. The major proportion of these costs is attributable to rehospitalizations, and by many estimates the majority of rehospitalizations might be preventable with better health care delivery. The past 5 years have seen an explosion in the number of heart failure disease management programs put in place across the country to try to decrease the economic burden of heart failure and improve patient outcomes. Yet few of these are based on programs tested by researchers, let alone tested in randomized, controlled trials. This chapter summarizes findings from studies of heart failure disease management programs from 1980 to the present, critiques those studies, and offers suggestions for future research in this area.

  13. Pricing specialty carve-outs and disease management programs under managed care.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, K T

    1997-01-01

    The drive toward improved efficiency and effectiveness in health care has spawned disease management programs to address the needs of patients with certain conditions. These programs parallel traditional case management programs in monitoring patients, but disease management differs from case management in early assessment of patient risk, with proactive clinical interventions and educational efforts. The most comprehensive programs include a coordinated delivery system that can be "carved out" from other health care benefits. Pricing disease management can benefit from the analysis of detailed, disease-specific and community-specific data from public or private sources.

  14. Louisiana's Ventilator Assisted Care Program: Case Management Services to Link Tertiary with Community-Based Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkhart, Kathryn A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Ventilator Assisted Care Program provides centralized case management services to ventilator-using youths and their families in Louisiana. Case managers develop individualized, comprehensive plans to be implemented locally using community resources; plans are based on needs identified by tertiary care providers and family members and are…

  15. Louisiana's Ventilator Assisted Care Program: Case Management Services to Link Tertiary with Community-Based Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkhart, Kathryn A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Ventilator Assisted Care Program provides centralized case management services to ventilator-using youths and their families in Louisiana. Case managers develop individualized, comprehensive plans to be implemented locally using community resources; plans are based on needs identified by tertiary care providers and family members and are…

  16. Commercial managed care plans leaving the Medicaid managed care program in New York State: impact on quality and access.

    PubMed

    Roohan, P J; Conroy, M B; Anarella, J P; Butch, J M; Gesten, F C

    2000-12-01

    To develop sufficient managed care capacity to accomplish the goal of transitioning Medicaid recipients into managed care, state policymakers have relied on commercial health maintenance organizations to open their panels of providers to the Medicaid population. However, while commercial health maintenance organization involvement in Medicaid managed care was high initially, since 1996 New York State has had 14 commercial plans leave the New York State Medicaid Managed Care Program. It has been speculated that the exodus of these commercial plans would have a negative impact on Medicaid enrollees' access and quality of care. This paper attempts to evaluate the impact of this departure from the perspective of quality and access measures and plan audit performance. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluation the effect of commercial managed care plans leaving the Medicaid program. The overall performance of plans that remained in the program was compared to that of the plans that chose to leave for the two time periods 1996-1997 and 1998-2000. Access to care, quality of care, and annual audit performance data were analyzed. The departure of commercial health plans from the New York State Medicaid Managed Care Program has not had a statistically significant negative effect on the quality of care provided to Medicaid recipients as evaluated by standardized performance measures. In addition, there were no instances when there was a negative impact of the exit of the commercial plans on access to care. Managed care plans that chose to remain in Medicaid passed the Quality Assurance Reporting Requirements audit at a significantly (P < .01) higher rate than plans that chose to leave. A program consisting of health plans voluntarily participating and committed to Medicaid managed care can provide Medicaid recipients with appropriate access to high-quality health care. The exodus of commercial health plans from New York's Medicaid Managed Care Program

  17. The Quality of Care under a Managed-Care Program for Dual Eligibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Homyak, Patricia; Bershadsky, Boris; Lum, Terry; Flood, Shannon; Zhang, Hui

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective in this study was to compare the quality of care provided under the Minnesota Senior Health Options (MSHO), a special program designed to serve dually eligible older persons, to care provided to controls who received fee-for-service Medicare and Medicaid managed care. Design and Methods: Two control groups were used; one was…

  18. The Quality of Care under a Managed-Care Program for Dual Eligibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Homyak, Patricia; Bershadsky, Boris; Lum, Terry; Flood, Shannon; Zhang, Hui

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective in this study was to compare the quality of care provided under the Minnesota Senior Health Options (MSHO), a special program designed to serve dually eligible older persons, to care provided to controls who received fee-for-service Medicare and Medicaid managed care. Design and Methods: Two control groups were used; one was…

  19. Essential pain management: an educational program for health care workers.

    PubMed

    Goucke, C Roger; Jackson, Tracy; Morriss, Wayne; Royle, Jane

    2015-04-01

    Education for health care workers on pain-related topics is not always readily available, and this is especially so in low and middle income countries (LMICs). The Essential Pain Management program (EPM) has been developed to offer a simple interactive educational opportunity for health care workers in LMICs. Following a needs analysis in Papua New Guinea, an 8 h educational program with the aims of improving pain knowledge and providing a simple pain management framework was developed. An evaluation of the program using the Kirkpatrick model is being used. The program has a "teach the teachers" component to encourage sustainability. The program has been run in 30 countries, delivered to 1,600 participants, and 340 instructors have been trained. Feedback has been positive, pre post testing in 27 sites showed a mean pre score of 65.89% rising to 75.23% (n = 581 respondents). A subanalysis demonstrates doctors and nurses improving by similar degrees. When local instructors have delivered the program after attending the trainer's session the participant test results were comparable to the results seen when the overseas instructors taught the course. The widespread adoption of the EPM program suggests there is a need for pain education in LMICs. The teach the teachers component of the program and the comparable results from their teaching should contribute to sustainability. Further support and mentoring using electronic systems such as Facebook, text messaging, and a website may also contribute to sustainability.

  20. A disease management program for heart failure: collaboration between a home care agency and a care management organization.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa A; Johnson, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative approach to manage patients with heart failure between a home care agency and a care management agency. The resulting disease management program used a combination of home visits and phone contact. Care management plans emphasized patient education on increasing adherence to medical and diet regimens, and recognizing early symptoms of exacerbation that could lead to rehospitalization. Clinician activities and patient outcomes are described.

  1. Effectiveness of a quality management program in dental care practices.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Katja; Campbell, Stephen M; Broge, Björn; Brodowski, Marc; Wensing, Michel; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2014-04-28

    Structured quality management is an important aspect for improving patient dental care outcomes, but reliable evidence to validate effects is lacking. We aimed to examine the effectiveness of a quality management program in primary dental care settings in Germany. This was an exploratory study with a before-after-design. 45 dental care practices that had completed the European Practice Assessment (EPA) accreditation scheme twice (intervention group) were selected for the study. The mean interval between the before and after assessment was 36 months. The comparison group comprised of 56 dental practices that had undergone their first assessment simultaneously with follow-up assessment in the intervention group. Aggregated scores for five EPA domains: 'infrastructure', 'information', 'finance', 'quality and safety' and 'people' were calculated. In the intervention group, small non-significant improvements were found in the EPA domains. At follow-up, the intervention group had higher scores on EPA domains as compared with the comparison group (range of differences was 4.2 to 10.8 across domains). These differences were all significant in regression analyses, which controlled for relevant dental practice characteristics. Dental care practices that implemented a quality management program had better organizational quality in contrast to a comparison group. This may reflect both improvements in the intervention group and a selection effect of dental practices volunteering for the first round of EPA practice assessment.

  2. Integrating end-of-life care with disease management programs: a new role for case managers.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, A

    2001-03-01

    Case managers are crucial to any well-designed disease management program. However, in the progressive course of serious illness, patients, their families, and MCOs need the skills of case manager more than ever to help them through end-of-life care choices. The author describes what case managers will need in their "toolbox" to provide insight to these health plan members.

  3. Linking pediatric primary care obesity management to community programs.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adolfo J; Hartman, Jennifer; Grodecki, Jennifer; Clavier, Alejandro; Ghaey, Kamala; Elsner, Mary; Moore, Chantal; Reina, Olga Ochoa; Binns, Helen J

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for obesity management in primary care call for linking to community services. The Promoting Health Project (PHP) was a multi-component, practice-based intervention aimed at improving care of obese children, including referrals to community services. Promoting Health Project staff identified and interviewed representatives of 40 nutrition or physical activity services/programs. Quality improvement (QI) teams at three practices worked to improve overweight/obesity identification and care and implement practice-to-community connections that used the information gathered from the programs/ services. A practice community coordinator (PCC) facilitated interactions between practices, community programs and families. Researchers tracked patients referred, PCC to family interactions, and time spent. They surveyed parents of referred patients and interviewed key clinicians. Forty-six patients participated in programs. Substantial efforts were necessary to create smooth referral systems. Family motivation was perceived as a limiting factor in program attendance. Clinicians were satisfied with systems established. Effectively linking practitioners to community programs requires the use of additional resources.

  4. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early…

  5. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  6. Implementing an integrated care management program in community pharmacies: A focus on medication management services.

    PubMed

    Smith, Megan G; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Brown, Patrick; Wines, Kristen; Shea, Christopher M; Pfeiffenberger, Trista M

    To describe the initiation of a community pharmacy medication management service within a statewide integrated care management program. One hundred twenty-three community and community health center pharmacies in 58 counties of North Carolina. Independent and community health center pharmacies offering medication management as part of an integrated care management program to Medicaid, Medicare, dually eligible Medicare-Medicaid, and NC Health Choice beneficiaries in North Carolina. Community pharmacies joined an enhanced service network created by Community Care of North Carolina to provide medication management services as part of an integrated care management program. During the first 3 months of the program, 41% of pharmacies consistently documented the medication management services. Interviews were conducted with pharmacists from the inconsistent pharmacies to drive program improvements. Pharmacists at 73 community and community health center pharmacies were interviewed. The majority of pharmacists reported that challenges in "initiating services" and "documenting" were due to increased intensity of service and documentation compared with Medicare Part D medication therapy management requirements. Program changes to improve participation included revision of documentation requirements, authorization of technicians to transcribe pharmacists' interventions, additional documentation templates, workflow consultations, and feedback on documentation quality. Community pharmacies are capable of providing medication management integrated with care management. Some pharmacies have more difficulty initiating new services in the current workflow landscape. To facilitate implementation, it is important to minimize administrative burden and provide mechanisms for direct feedback. Pharmacy owners, managers, and leaders in pharmacy policy can use these findings to aid implementation of new services in community pharmacies. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association

  7. Quality of Care Provided by a Comprehensive Dementia Care Co-management Program

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Lee A.; Tan, Zaldy; Wenger, Neil S.; Cook, Erin A.; Han, Weijuan; McCreath, Heather E.; Serrano, Katherine S.; Roth, Carol P.; Reuben, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that quality of care for dementia in primary care is poor with physician adherence to dementia quality indicators (QIs) ranging from 18-42%. In response, the University of California, Los Angeles Health System created the UCLA Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care (ADC) Program, a quality improvement program that uses a co-management model with a nurse practitioner dementia care manager (DCM) working with primary care physicians and community-based organizations to provide comprehensive dementia care. Our objective was to measure the quality of dementia care provided by nurse practitioner DCMs using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE-3) and Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement QIs. Participants included 797 community-dwelling adults with dementia referred to the UCLA ADC program over a two-year period. UCLA is an urban academic medical center with primarily fee-for-service reimbursement. We measured the percentage of recommended care received for 17 dementia QIs. The primary outcome was aggregate quality of care for the UCLA ADC cohort calculated as the total number of recommended care processes received divided by the total number of eligible quality indicators. Secondary outcomes included aggregate quality of care in three domains of dementia care: assessment and screening (7 QIs), treatment (6 QIs), and counseling (4 QIs). QIs were abstracted from DCM notes over a three-month period from date of initial assessment. Patients were eligible for 9,895 QIs, of which 92% were passed. Overall pass-rates among DCMs were similar (range 90% to 96%). All counseling and assessment QIs had pass-rates >80% with most exceeding 90%. Wider variation in adherence was found among QIs addressing treatments for dementia, which were triggered by patient-specific criteria, ranging from 27% for discontinuation of medications associated with mental status changes to 86% for discussion about acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Comprehensive

  8. A randomized trial of an acid-peptic disease management program in a managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Ofman, Joshua J; Segal, Richard; Russell, Wayne L; Cook, Deborah J; Sandhu, Meenu; Maue, Susan K; Lowenstein, Edward H; Pourfarzib, Ray; Blanchette, Erv; Ellrodt, Gray; Weingarten, Scott R

    2003-06-01

    To study the effectiveness of a disease management program for patients with acid-related disorders. A cluster-randomized clinical trial of 406 patients comparing a disease management program with "usual practice." Enrolled patients included those presenting with new dyspepsia and chronic users of antisecretory drugs in 8 geographically separate physician offices associated with the Orlando Health Care Group. There were 35 providers in the intervention group and 48 in the control group. The disease management program included evidence-based practice guidelines implemented by using physician champions, academic detailing, and multidisciplinary teams. Processes of care, patient symptoms, quality of life, costs, and work days lost were measured 6 months after patient enrollment. Compared with usual practice, disease management was associated with improvements in Helicobacter pylori testing (61% vs 9%; P = .001), use of recommended H pylori treatment regimens (96% vs 10%; P = .001), and discontinuation rates of proton pump therapy after treatment (70% vs 36%; P = .04). There were few differences in patient quality of life or symptoms between the 2 study groups. Disease management resulted in fewer days of antisecretory therapy (71.7 vs 88.1 days; P = .02) but no difference in total costs. This disease management program for patients with acid-related disorders led to improved processes of care. The effectiveness of such a program in other settings requires further study.

  9. Program directors' views of the effect of managed care on substance abuse programs in Los Angeles county.

    PubMed

    McNeese-Smith, D K

    1998-10-01

    This study sought information about the effect of managed care on substance abuse treatment programs through a survey of program directors. Fifty program directors who supervised a total of 134 substance abuse treatment programs in Los Angeles County completed a survey during the period from January to May 1997 on program changes made in response to managed care, major concerns, the advantages and disadvantages of managed care, and plans for further program changes to succeed in the managed care environment. Program directors reported that the most frequent change made in response to managed care was increased outreach and marketing. Their greatest concern in the managed care environment was being forced to provide the least costly service, rather than the best care for patients. Respondents identified an increased focus on outcomes as an advantage of managed care and restrictions on services due to contractual agreements as a disadvantage. Planned program changes addressed the areas of program structure, types of programs offered, staff composition, revenue generation, referral sources, prevention, outcome measures, relationships with other organizations, and accreditation and certification. Although some substance abuse treatment programs seem to be reducing their scope or preparing to close in response to managed care, others are developing strategies to survive and even thrive in this new economic environment.

  10. Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) Programs; Medicaid Managed Care, CHIP Delivered in Managed Care, and Revisions Related to Third Party Liability. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-06

    This final rule modernizes the Medicaid managed care regulations to reflect changes in the usage of managed care delivery systems. The final rule aligns, where feasible, many of the rules governing Medicaid managed care with those of other major sources of coverage, including coverage through Qualified Health Plans and Medicare Advantage plans; implements statutory provisions; strengthens actuarial soundness payment provisions to promote the accountability of Medicaid managed care program rates; and promotes the quality of care and strengthens efforts to reform delivery systems that serve Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries. It also ensures appropriate beneficiary protections and enhances policies related to program integrity. This final rule also implements provisions of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) and addresses third party liability for trauma codes.

  11. Disease management programs in type 2 diabetes: quality of care.

    PubMed

    Berthold, Heiner K; Bestehorn, Kurt P; Jannowitz, Christina; Krone, Wilhelm; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether disease management programs (DMPs) for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can improve some processes of care and intermediate outcomes. Two cross-sectional registries of patients with T2DM were used for data extraction before (previous cohort) and after (recent cohort) introduction of DMPs in Germany (N = 78,110). In the recent cohort, 15,293 patients were treated within the DMPs and 9791 were not. Processes of care, medications, and intermediate outcomes (achievement of treatment targets for low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol, blood pressure, and glycosylated hemoglobin [A1C]) were analyzed using multi- variable, multilevel logistic regression, adjusting for patient case-mix and physician-level clustering to derive odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Availability of structured diabetes education and of lipid, blood pressure, and A1C measurements increased over time. In DMP patients, availability was significantly higher for blood pressure and A1C but not for lipid measurements. Prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, oral antidiabetic drugs, and insulin increased over time and was more common in DMP patients. Statin prescription increased over time but was not influenced by DMP status. Intermediate outcomes improved over time, but DMPs had no influence on intermediate outcomes except for reaching LDL cholesterol targets (odds ratio 1.12 [95% CI 1.06, 1.19] in favor of DMPs). While there may be some unmeasured confounding, our data suggest that improvement in processes of care by DMPs, as implemented in Germany, only partially translates into improvement of intermediate outcomes.

  12. Effects of stress management program on the quality of nursing care and intensive care unit nurses

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saied; Asgari, Zohreh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: High level of stress in intensive care unit nurses affects the quality of their nursing care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of a stress management program on the quality of nursing care of intensive care unit nurses. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial that was conducted on 65 nurses. The samples were selected by stratified sampling of the nurses working in intensive care units 1, 2, 3 in Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan, Iran and were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group underwent an intervention, including 10 sessions of stress management that was held twice a week. In the control group, placebo sessions were held simultaneously. Data were gathered by demographic checklist and Quality Patient Care Scale before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention in both groups. Then, the data were analyzed by Student's t-test, Mann–Whitney, Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) through SPSS software version 18. Results: Mean scores of overall and dimensions of quality of care in the intervention group were significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to pre-intervention (P < 0.001). The results showed that the quality of care in the intervention group was significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: As stress management is an effective method to improve the quality of care, the staffs are recommended to consider it in improvement of the quality of nursing care. PMID:27186196

  13. Caring for high-need, high-cost patients: what makes for a successful care management program?

    PubMed

    Hong, Clemens S; Siegel, Allison L; Ferris, Timothy G

    2014-08-01

    Provider groups taking on risk for the overall costs of care in accountable care organizations are developing care management programs to improve care and thereby control costs. Many such programs target "high-need, high-cost" patients: those with multiple or complex conditions, often combined with behavioral health problems or socioeconomic challenges. In this study we compared the operational approaches of 18 successful complex care management programs in order to offer guidance to providers, payers, and policymakers on best practices for complex care management. We found that effective programs customize their approach to their local contexts and caseloads; use a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods to identify patients; consider care coordination one of their key roles; focus on building trusting relationships with patients as well as their primary care providers; match team composition and interventions to patient needs; offer specialized training for team members; and use technology to bolster their efforts.

  14. Managed care under siege: how an effective compliance program can protect your company.

    PubMed

    Stratton, K M; Nahra, M H

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses the current enforcement emphasis on managed care fraud and examines how managed care organizations can utilize compliance programs, including legal audits, to protect against unwarranted investigations and liability. The article reviews the elements of an effective compliance program, how to conduct an internal audit, and the risks and benefits of a voluntary disclosure in the event fraudulent activity is discovered.

  15. The chronic care model versus disease management programs: a transaction cost analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jennifer; Mark, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The present article applies transaction cost analysis as a framework for better understanding health plans' decisions to improve chronic illness management by using disease management programs versus redesigning care within physician practices.

  16. Enrollee satisfaction with three Florida Medicaid managed care programs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hsou-mei; Duncan, R Paul; Porter, Colleen K

    2003-05-01

    A study was undertaken to compare adult enrollees' satisfaction with three Medicaid Programs operating in South Florida: (1) the provider service network (PSN), (2) MediPass, and (3) Medicaid HMOs. The Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Study 2.0 Medicaid Adult instrument was used to collect information on four global ratings and five composite ratings. MediPass enrollees were satisfied with their overall health care, whereas PSN enrollees gave only average scores for their doctors, specialists, overall health care, provider communication, and staff helpfulness. The HMO enrollees were satisfied with their specialists, health plan, access to care, promptness of care, staff helpfulness, and member/customer service. Improvements in satisfaction would require different interventions in each of the programs.

  17. State Medicaid Programs Bring Managed Care Tenets to Fee for Service.

    PubMed

    Keast, Shellie L; Skrepnek, Grant; Nesser, Nancy

    2016-02-01

    Rising numbers of enrollees in state Medicaid programs have resulted in the increased use of commercial managed care organizations by the states. Research shows that the implementation of these programs has produced mixed results. While many states have implemented managed care principles and have seen reductions in costs, some basic managed care tenets may not apply to a Medicaid population because of limited financial risk and responsibility. The application of commercial managed care organizations to these populations may not result in additional savings for those states already actively engaged in managed care. As such, the purpose of this article is to provide a synopsis of key managed care principles as applied to state Medicaid programs and discuss issues regarding the optimization of cost, access, and quality for this population.

  18. Managed Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... three types of managed care plans: Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO) usually only pay for care within the ... who coordinates most of your care. Preferred Provider Organizations (PPO) usually pay more if you get care ...

  19. Case selection for a Medicaid chronic care management program.

    PubMed

    Weir, Sharada; Aweh, Gideon; Clark, Robin E

    2008-01-01

    Medicaid agencies are beginning to turn to care management to reduce costs and improve health care quality. One challenge is selecting members at risk of costly, preventable service utilization. Using claims data from the State of Vermont, we compare the ability of three pre-existing health risk predictive models to predict the top 10 percent of members with chronic conditions: Chronic Illness and Disability Payment System (CDPS), Diagnostic Cost Groups (DCG), and Adjusted Clinical Groups Predictive Model (ACG-PM). We find that the ACG-PM model performs best. However, for predicting the very highest-cost members (e.g, the 99th percentile), the DCG model is preferred.

  20. German diabetes management programs improve quality of care and curb costs.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stephanie; Drabik, Anna; Büscher, Guido; Graf, Christian; Ullrich, Walter; Gerber, Andreas; Lauterbach, Karl W; Lüngen, Markus

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports the results of a large-scale analysis of a nationwide disease management program in Germany for patients with diabetes mellitus. The German program differs markedly from "classic" disease management in the United States. Although it combines important hallmarks of vendor-based disease management and the Chronic Care Model, the German program is based in primary care practices and carried out by physicians, and it draws on their personal relationships with patients to promote adherence to treatment goals and self-management. After four years of follow-up, overall mortality for patients and drug and hospital costs were all significantly lower for patients who participated in the program compared to other insured patients with similar health profiles who were not in the program. These results suggest that the German disease management program is a successful strategy for improving chronic illness care.

  1. Cost, utilization, and quality of care: an evaluation of illinois' medicaid primary care case management program.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert L; Han, Meiying; Petterson, Stephen M; Makaroff, Laura A; Liaw, Winston R

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, Illinois established Illinois Health Connect (IHC), a primary care case management program for Medicaid that offered enhanced fee-for-service, capitation payments, performance incentives, and practice support. Illinois also implemented a complementary disease management program, Your Healthcare Plus (YHP). This external evaluation explored outcomes associated with these programs. We analyzed Medicaid claims and enrollment data from 2004 to 2010, covering both pre- and post-implementation. The base year was 2006, and 2006-2010 eligibility criteria were applied to 2004-2005 data to allow comparison. We studied costs and utilization trends, overall and by service and setting. We studied quality by incorporating Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures and IHC performance payment criteria. Illinois Medicaid expanded considerably between 2006 (2,095,699 full-year equivalents) and 2010 (2,692,123). Annual savings were 6.5% for IHC and 8.6% for YHP by the fourth year, with cumulative Medicaid savings of $1.46 billion. Per-beneficiary annual costs fell in Illinois over this period compared to those in states with similar Medicaid programs. Quality improved for nearly all metrics under IHC, and most prevention measures more than doubled in frequency. Medicaid inpatient costs fell by 30.3%, and outpatient costs rose by 24.9% to 45.7% across programs. Avoidable hospitalizations fell by 16.8% for YHP, and bed-days fell by 15.6% for IHC. Emergency department visits declined by 5% by 2010. The Illinois Medicaid IHC and YHP programs were associated with substantial savings, reductions in inpatient and emergency care, and improvements in quality measures. This experience is not typical of other states implementing some, but not all, of these same policies. Although specific features of the Illinois reforms may have accounted for its better outcomes, the limited evaluation design calls for caution in making causal inferences. © 2014 Annals of

  2. Cost, Utilization, and Quality of Care: An Evaluation of Illinois’ Medicaid Primary Care Case Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert L.; Han, Meiying; Petterson, Stephen M.; Makaroff, Laura A.; Liaw, Winston R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE In 2006, Illinois established Illinois Health Connect (IHC), a primary care case management program for Medicaid that offered enhanced fee-for-service, capitation payments, performance incentives, and practice support. Illinois also implemented a complementary disease management program, Your Healthcare Plus (YHP). This external evaluation explored outcomes associated with these programs. METHODS We analyzed Medicaid claims and enrollment data from 2004 to 2010, covering both pre- and post-implementation. The base year was 2006, and 2006–2010 eligibility criteria were applied to 2004–2005 data to allow comparison. We studied costs and utilization trends, overall and by service and setting. We studied quality by incorporating Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures and IHC performance payment criteria. RESULTS Illinois Medicaid expanded considerably between 2006 (2,095,699 full-year equivalents) and 2010 (2,692,123). Annual savings were 6.5% for IHC and 8.6% for YHP by the fourth year, with cumulative Medicaid savings of $1.46 billion. Per-beneficiary annual costs fell in Illinois over this period compared to those in states with similar Medicaid programs. Quality improved for nearly all metrics under IHC, and most prevention measures more than doubled in frequency. Medicaid inpatient costs fell by 30.3%, and outpatient costs rose by 24.9% to 45.7% across programs. Avoidable hospitalizations fell by 16.8% for YHP, and bed-days fell by 15.6% for IHC. Emergency department visits declined by 5% by 2010. CONCLUSIONS The Illinois Medicaid IHC and YHP programs were associated with substantial savings, reductions in inpatient and emergency care, and improvements in quality measures. This experience is not typical of other states implementing some, but not all, of these same policies. Although specific features of the Illinois reforms may have accounted for its better outcomes, the limited evaluation design calls for caution in making

  3. Effect of care management program structure on implementation: a normalization process theory analysis.

    PubMed

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Potworowski, Georges; Fitzpatrick, Laurie; Kowalk, Amy; Green, Lee A

    2016-08-15

    Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health status, however, primary care practices are often challenged with implementation. Further, there are different ways to structure care management that may make implementation more or less successful. Normalization process theory (NPT) provides a means of understanding how a new complex intervention can become routine (normalized) in practice. In this study, we used NPT to understand how care management structure affected how well care management became routine in practice. Data collection involved semi-structured interviews and observations conducted at 25 practices in five physician organizations in Michigan, USA. Practices were selected to reflect variation in physician organizations, type of care management program, and degree of normalization. Data were transcribed, qualitatively coded and analyzed, initially using an editing approach and then a template approach with NPT as a guiding framework. Seventy interviews and 25 observations were completed. Two key structures for care management organization emerged: practice-based care management where the care managers were embedded in the practice as part of the practice team; and centralized care management where the care managers worked independently of the practice work flow and was located outside the practice. There were differences in normalization of care management across practices. Practice-based care management was generally better normalized as compared to centralized care management. Differences in normalization were well explained by the NPT, and in particular the collective action construct. When care managers had multiple and flexible opportunities for communication (interactional workability), had the requisite knowledge, skills, and personal characteristics (skill set workability), and the organizational support and resources (contextual integration), a trusting professional relationship

  4. Pharmacy characteristics associated with the provision of medication management services within an integrated care management program.

    PubMed

    Smith, Megan G; Shea, Christopher M; Brown, Patrick; Wines, Kristen; Farley, Joel F; Ferreri, Stefanie P

    To examine pharmacy operational and personnel characteristics that influence engagement in providing a community pharmacy medication management service within a statewide integrated care management program. Before the program launch, all of the pharmacies were surveyed to collect demographic, operational, and personnel characteristics such as weekly prescription volume and number of staff, respectively. Those data were then compared with engagement in the program. Engagement was defined as providing initial comprehensive medication review as part of the medication management service. Three months after program launch, pharmacies were dichotomized as consistently engaged or inconsistently engaged. Data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics and chi-square and t tests to test for statistical significance between consistent and inconsistent engagement groups. A baseline survey was collected for all 123 pharmacies who joined the integrated care management program. After the first 3 months, 50 pharmacies were consistently engaged in the program. Compared with inconsistently engaged pharmacies, consistently engaged pharmacies employed more full-time pharmacists (mean 2.1 vs. 1.8; P = 0.05) and more full-time technicians (mean 4.0 vs. 3.0; P <0.01), allocated more nondispensing hours for pharmacists (88% vs 60%; P <0.01), were more likely to employ a dedicated clinical pharmacist (20% vs 5%; P = 0.013), and hosted more pharmacy residents (78% vs 22%; P = 0.02). Years of pharmacy operation (P = 0.05) and pharmacy store type (P = 0.05) also were significantly associated with level of engagement. Neither prescription volume dispensed per week, number of hours of pharmacist overlap, nor hosting pharmacy students was statistically different between consistent and inconsistent pharmacies. Engagement in clinical activities in community pharmacy appears to improve with adequate staffing, availability of time for nondispensing activities, and having 1 or more

  5. The influence of managed care on U.S. baccalaureate nursing education programs.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Susan E

    2006-02-01

    The transformation of health care into managed care has raised many issues and concerns for nurse educators. The milieu in which nurses currently practice reflects the restructuring shaped by managed care principles. The shift from acute care to expanded community services has changed the way health care is provided within hospital settings. The organization of nursing programs has been affected by this shift, and the ramifications of these external forces on curriculum structure have altered the way nursing students are educated. This article presents research demonstrating the changes in the structure of the curricula for baccalaureate nursing education in 2001, which were caused by health care reform in effect since 1994.

  6. Managed care in the public sector: lessons learned from the Los Angeles PARTNERS program.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, G; Young, A S; Fortney, S; Tillipman, D; Murata, D; Koegel, P

    2001-05-01

    PARTNERS is the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health's capitated managed care treatment program. To explore the context in which public sector managed care reforms are occurring and to understand the obstacles to implementing such programs, qualitative data were collected from administrators, case managers, and clients. Administrators were found to need assistance in negotiating managed care contracts and in tracking costs. Case managers, although concerned about increased clinical demands, enjoyed the flexibility and creativity their new roles allowed. Clients were satisfied with their increased independence, even though many had to change their site of care. Beyond considering these concerns, the range of community stakeholders who may be affected by such interventions must be addressed.

  7. Managed behavioral health care: an instrument to characterize critical elements of public sector programs.

    PubMed

    Ridgely, M Susan; Giard, Julienne; Shern, David; Mulkern, Virginia; Burnam, M Audrey

    2002-08-01

    To develop an instrument to characterize public sector managed behavioral health care arrangements to capture key differences between managed and "unmanaged" care and among managed care arrangements. The instrument was developed by a multi-institutional group of collaborators with participation of an expert panel. Included are six domains predicted to have an impact on access, service utilization, costs, and quality. The domains are: characteristics of the managed care plan, enrolled population, benefit design, payment and risk arrangements, composition of provider networks, and accountability. Data are collected at three levels: managed care organization, subcontractor, and network of service providers. Data are collected through contract abstraction and key informant interviews. A multilevel coding scheme is used to organize the data into a matrix along key domains, which is then reviewed and verified by the key informants. This instrument can usefully differentiate between and among Medicaid fee-for-service programs and Medicaid managed care plans along key domains of interest. Beyond documenting basic features of the plans and providing contextual information, these data will support the refinement and testing of hypotheses about the impact of public sector managed care on access, quality, costs, and outcomes of care. If managed behavioral health care research is to advance beyond simple case study comparisons, a well-conceptualized set of instruments is necessary.

  8. Managed Behavioral Health Care: An Instrument to Characterize Critical Elements of Public Sector Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ridgely, M Susan; Giard, Julienne; Shern, David; Mulkern, Virginia; Burnam, M Audrey

    2002-01-01

    Objective To develop an instrument to characterize public sector managed behavioral health care arrangements to capture key differences between managed and “unmanaged” care and among managed care arrangements. Study Design The instrument was developed by a multi-institutional group of collaborators with participation of an expert panel. Included are six domains predicted to have an impact on access, service utilization, costs, and quality. The domains are: characteristics of the managed care plan, enrolled population, benefit design, payment and risk arrangements, composition of provider networks, and accountability. Data are collected at three levels: managed care organization, subcontractor, and network of service providers. Data Collection Methods Data are collected through contract abstraction and key informant interviews. A multilevel coding scheme is used to organize the data into a matrix along key domains, which is then reviewed and verified by the key informants. Principal Findings This instrument can usefully differentiate between and among Medicaid fee-for-service programs and Medicaid managed care plans along key domains of interest. Beyond documenting basic features of the plans and providing contextual information, these data will support the refinement and testing of hypotheses about the impact of public sector managed care on access, quality, costs, and outcomes of care. Conclusions If managed behavioral health care research is to advance beyond simple case study comparisons, a well-conceptualized set of instruments is necessary. PMID:12236386

  9. Participation of plans and providers in Medicaid and SCHIP managed care. State Children's Health Insurance Program.

    PubMed

    Gold, Marsha; Mittler, Jesslca; Draper, Debra; Rousseau, David

    2003-01-01

    For Medicaid and SCHIP managed care programs to succeed, they must attract enough and the right kinds of plans and providers to meet access and care goals. In 2001 we analyzed practices and perceptions that bear on these goals by surveying managed care plans participating in Medicaid or SCHIP, or both, in eleven states. Participating plans appear supportive of both programs and are largely able to secure providers to participate, too. To date, SCHIP has not attracted many plans not already participating in Medicaid. While perceptions were positive in 2001, maintaining current plan and provider relationships in an environment that has become much more budget constrained will be challenging.

  10. What Do High-Risk Patients Value? Perspectives on a Care Management Program.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Ishani; Orav, E John; Weil, Eric; Ferris, Timothy G; Vogeli, Christine

    2017-10-05

    There is growing interest in coordinating care for high-risk patients through care management programs despite inconsistent results on cost reduction. Early evidence suggests patient-centered benefits, but we know little about how participants engage with the programs and what aspects they value. To explore care management program participants' awareness and perceived utility of program offerings. Cross-sectional telephone survey administered December 2015-January 2016. Patients enrolled in a Boston-area primary care-based care management program. Our main outcome was the number of topics in which patients reported having "very helpful" interactions with their care team in the past year. We analyzed awareness of one's care manager as an intermediate outcome, and then as a primary predictor of the main outcome, along with patient demographics, years in the program, attitudes, and worries as secondary predictors. The survey response rate was 45.8% (n = 1220); non-respondents were similar to respondents. More respondents reported worrying about family (72.8%) or financial issues (52.5%) than about their own health (41.6%). Seventy-four percent reported care manager awareness, particularly women (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.01-1.77) and those with more years in the program (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.03-1.30). While interaction rates ranged from 19.8% to 72.4% across topics, 81.3% rated at least one interaction as very helpful. Those who were aware of their care manager reported very helpful interactions on more topics (OR 2.77, 95% CI 2.15-3.56), as did women (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.00-1.55), younger respondents (OR 0.98 for older age, 95% CI 0.97-0.99), and those with higher risk scores (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.06), preference for deferring treatment decisions to doctors (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.60-2.50), and reported control over their health (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.33-2.10). High-risk patients reported helpful interactions with their care team around medical and social determinants of health

  11. Impact of a comprehensive population health management program on health care costs.

    PubMed

    Grossmeier, Jessica; Seaverson, Erin L D; Mangen, David J; Wright, Steven; Dalal, Karl; Phalen, Chris; Gold, Daniel B

    2013-06-01

    Assess the influence of participation in a population health management (PHM) program on health care costs. A quasi-experimental study relied on logistic and ordinary least squares regression models to compare the costs of program participants with those of nonparticipants, while controlling for differences in health care costs and utilization, demographics, and health status. Propensity score models were developed and analyses were weighted by inverse propensity scores to control for selection bias. Study models yielded an estimated savings of $60.65 per wellness participant per month and $214.66 per disease management participant per month. Program savings were combined to yield an integrated return-on-investment of $3 in savings for every dollar invested. A PHM program yielded a positive return on investment after 2 years of wellness program and 1 year of integrated disease management program launch.

  12. Relational coordination promotes quality of chronic care delivery in Dutch disease-management programs.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with the delivery of hospital care, acute care, emergency care, trauma care, and nursing home care. The effect of relational coordination in primary care settings, such as disease-management programs, remains unknown. This study examined relational coordination between general practitioners and other professionals in disease-management programs and assessed the impact of relational coordination on the delivery of chronic illness care. Professionals (n = 188; response rate = 57%) in 19 disease-management programs located throughout the Netherlands completed surveys that assessed relational coordination and chronic care delivery. We used a cross-sectional study design. Our study demonstrated that the delivery of chronic illness care was positively related to relational coordination. We found positive relationships with community linkages (r = .210, p < .01), self-management support (r = .217, p < .01), decision support (r = .190, p < .01), delivery system design (r = .278, p < .001), and clinical information systems (r = .193, p < .01). Organization of the health delivery system was not significantly related to relational coordination. The regression analyses showed that even after controlling for all background variables, relational coordination still significantly affected chronic care delivery (β = .212, p ≤ .01). As expected, our findings showed a lower degree of relational coordination among general practitioners than between general practitioners and other core disease-management team members: practice nurses (M = 2.69 vs. 3.73; p < .001), dieticians (M = 2.69 vs. 3.07; p < .01), physical therapists (M = 2.69 vs. 3.06; p < .01), medical specialists (M = 2.69 vs. 3.16; p < .01), and nurse practitioners (M = 2.69 vs. 3.19; p < .001). The enhancement of relational coordination among core disease-management professionals with different disciplines is expected to improve chronic

  13. Transitioning HIV care and treatment programs in southern Africa to full local management.

    PubMed

    Vermund, Sten H; Sidat, Mohsin; Weil, Lori F; Tique, José A; Moon, Troy D; Ciampa, Philip J

    2012-06-19

    Global AIDS programs such as the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) face a challenging health care management transition. HIV care must evolve from vertically-organized, externally-supported efforts to sustainable, locally controlled components that are integrated into the horizontal primary health care systems of host nations. We compared four southern African nations in AIDS care, financial, literacy, and health worker capacity parameters (2005 to 2009) to contrast in their capacities to absorb the huge HIV care and prevention endeavors that are now managed with international technical and fiscal support. Botswana has a relatively high national income, a small population, and an advanced HIV/AIDS care program; it is well poised to take on management of its HIV/AIDS programs. South Africa has had a slower start, given HIV denialism philosophies of the previous government leadership. Nonetheless, South Africa has the national income, health care management, and health worker capacity to succeed in fully local management. The sheer magnitude of the burden is daunting, however, and South Africa will need continuing fiscal assistance. In contrast, Zambia and Mozambique have comparatively lower per capita incomes, many fewer health care workers per capita, and lower national literacy rates. It is improbable that fully independent management of their HIV programs is feasible on the timetable being contemplated by donors, nor is locally sustainable financing conceivable at present. A tailored nation-by-nation approach is needed for the transition to full local capacitation; donor nation policymakers must ensure that global resources and technical support are not removed prematurely.

  14. Physicians' satisfaction with a collaborative disease management program for late-life depression in primary care.

    PubMed

    Levine, Stuart; Unützer, Jürgen; Yip, Judy Y; Hoffing, Marc; Leung, Moon; Fan, Ming-Yu; Lin, Elizabeth H B; Grypma, Lydia; Katon, Wayne; Harpole, Linda H; Langston, Christopher A

    2005-01-01

    This study describes physicians' satisfaction with care for patients with depression before and after the implementation of a primary care-based collaborative care program. Project Improving Mood, Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment for late-life depression (IMPACT) is a multisite, randomized controlled trial comparing a primary care-based collaborative disease management program for late-life depression with care as usual. A total of 450 primary care physicians at 18 participating clinics participated in a satisfaction survey before and 12 months after IMPACT initiation. The preintervention survey focused on physicians' satisfaction with current mental health resources and ability to provide depression care. The postintervention survey repeated these and added questions about physician's experience with the IMPACT collaborative care model. Before intervention, about half (54%) of the participating physicians were satisfied with resources to treat patients with depression. After intervention, more than 90% reported the intervention as helpful in treating patients with depression and 82% felt that the intervention improved patients' clinical outcomes. Participating physicians identified proactive patient follow-up and patient education as the most helpful components of the IMPACT model. Physicians perceived a substantial need for improving depression treatment in primary care. They were very satisfied with the IMPACT collaborative care model for treating depressed older adults and felt that similar care management models would also be helpful for treating other chronic medical illnesses.

  15. Integrated telehealth and care management program for Medicare beneficiaries with chronic disease linked to savings.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurence C; Johnson, Scott J; Macaulay, Dendy; Birnbaum, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Treatment of chronically ill people constitutes nearly four-fifths of US health care spending, but it is hampered by a fragmented delivery system and discontinuities of care. We examined the impact of a care coordination approach called the Health Buddy Program, which integrates a telehealth tool with care management for chronically ill Medicare beneficiaries. We evaluated the program's impact on spending for patients of two clinics in the US Northwest who were exposed to the intervention, and we compared their experience with that of matched controls. We found significant savings among patients who used the Health Buddy telehealth program, which was associated with spending reductions of approximately 7.7-13.3 percent ($312-$542) per person per quarter. These results suggest that carefully designed and implemented care management and telehealth programs can help reduce health care spending and that such programs merit continued attention by Medicare. Meanwhile, mortality differences in the treatment and control groups suggest that the intervention may have produced noticeable changes in health outcomes, but we leave it to future research to explore these effects fully.

  16. Implementation and Methodology of a Multidisciplinary Disease-State-Management Program for Comprehensive Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Antoline, Catherine; Kramer, Amy; Roth, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Before the implementation of a multidisciplinary disease-state-management program in the Kaiser Permanente Ohio Region, the primary care physician (PCP) worked with a registered nurse care manager (RNCM) and a clinical pharmacist with the degree of PharmD to control diabetes mellitus (DM). This occurred through PCP referral when patients required a higher level of care than could be achieved during initial PCP office visits and subsequent follow-up visits. However, not all PCPs consistently initiated referrals, and as patients in need of referral were typically identified through office visits, those without routine appointments were often missed. This practice translated into suboptimal 2008 comprehensive DM care Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) scores. Methods: A quality-improvement disease-management committee convened for design and implementation of a multidisciplinary DM disease-state-management program, as well as oversight and analysis of the new process. This regional intervention required many members of the health care team to obtain additional education about comprehensive DM care, adopt new work flows, and learn to use tools for evaluating patient care gaps. Results: Within one year, this regional multidisciplinary intervention resulted in improvements in blood pressure, lipid levels, and glycemic control as indicated by 2009 comprehensive DM-care HEDIS scores. Discussion: Main contributors to the success of the program included executive support and sponsorship, the leadership of the oversight committee, systematic identification and assignment of patients, the blood-pressure service run by licensed practical nurses, continuous education efforts, dedicated panel-management time, use of a multidisciplinary team, and expanding treatment of the diabetic patient beyond glucose control to include blood pressure and lipid management. PMID:21505617

  17. Implementing a cognitive-behavioral pain self-management program in home health care, part 1: program adaptation.

    PubMed

    Beissner, Katherine; Bach, Eileen; Murtaugh, Christopher; Parker, Samantha J; Trachtenberg, Melissa; Reid, M Carrington

    2013-01-01

    Pain is highly prevalent among older adults receiving home care, contributing to disability, increased health care utilization, nursing home placement, and diminished quality of life. Pain is a particular problem in the home care setting, where current approaches are often inadequate, resulting in persistent high levels of pain and disability in this vulnerable population. Cognitive-behavioral approaches to pain management have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing pain intensity and associated disability but have not been systematically implemented in home health care. The purpose of this project was to adapt a community-based, cognitive-behavioral pain self-management program designed for patients with persistent back pain for implementation by physical therapists (PTs) to use with patients with activity-limiting pain in the home care setting. In this observational study, 2 groups of PTs practicing in home care were trained in the community-based program and completed surveys and participated in discussions during the training workshops to gather input on the program components perceived to be most helpful for their patients with pain; modifications to the program and the patient education materials for use in home care; and recommendations concerning program training and support required for successful implementation. Data collected during the workshops were summarized and presented to 2 expert panels for additional input and final decisions regarding program adaptations. Seventeen PTs with an average of 16.6 years of practice as a PT received the training and provided input on the community-based program. Program modifications based upon PT and expert panel review included reduction in the number of sessions, deletion of content, modification of the exercise component of the program, revision of patient materials, and modification of therapist training. This study successfully adapted a group-based pain management program for implementation by health care

  18. Description of drug therapy problem resolution in a statewide care management program.

    PubMed

    Renfro, Chelsea Phillips; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Williams, Neil; Clark, Cole; Pfeiffenberger, Trista

    To describe drug therapy problem (DTP) resolution as part of a statewide, team-based care management program. This was a retrospective, observational study of DTPs documented between March 1 and August 31, 2015. Data were retrieved from a Web-based platform 5 months after the observation period. DTPs were placed into groups based on the credentials of the person who documented the DTP. Next, they were identified as being documented in a transitional or nontransitional care setting. DTPs were further classified into 1 of 3 categories: medication adherence, discrepancy, or optimization. Lastly, DTP resolution was assessed. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. During the 6-month study period, 135,100 DTPs were documented, with 99% (n = 133,847) being documented by social work care managers, nurse care managers, and pharmacy staff personnel. Pharmacy staff personnel documented the majority of DTPs (51.5%), and the majority of DTPs (55%) were identified in the transitional care setting. Nurse care managers resolved more discrepancy DTPs (59.3%), whereas pharmacy staff personnel resolved more optimization DTPs (47.2%). Social work care managers resolved more medication adherence DTPs (68.6%). Pharmacy staff personnel primarily identified and resolved opportunities to optimize medication use, whereas nurse care managers primarily identified and resolved medication discrepancies. Social work care managers primarily identified and resolved problems related to medication adherence. When each member of the interdisciplinary care team functioned at the top of their license, all types of DTPs were effectively identified and resolved. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Gill; Concanen, Karyn; Youens, David

    2016-01-01

    The Home Independence Program (HIP), an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model - a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC) service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably with the outcomes achieved in HIP when health professionals take the Care Manager role. These findings will be of interest to managers of home care services and to policy makers interested in reducing the long-term care needs of older community dwelling individuals.

  20. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Gill; Concanen, Karyn; Youens, David

    2016-01-01

    The Home Independence Program (HIP), an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model – a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC) service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably with the outcomes achieved in HIP when health professionals take the Care Manager role. These findings will be of interest to managers of home care services and to policy makers interested in reducing the long-term care needs of older community dwelling individuals. PMID:27382264

  1. Effectiveness of disease-management programs for improving diabetes care: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pimouguet, Clément; Le Goff, Mélanie; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Dartigues, Jean François; Helmer, Catherine

    2011-02-08

    We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to assess the effectiveness of disease-management programs for improving glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus and to study which components of programs are associated with their effectiveness. We searched several databases for studies published up to December 2009. We included randomized controlled trials involving adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes that evaluated the effect of disease-management programs on glycated hemoglobin (hemoglobin A₁(C)) concentrations. We performed a meta-regression analysis to determine the effective components of the programs. We included 41 randomized controlled trials in our review. Across these trials, disease-management programs resulted in a significant reduction in hemoglobin A₁(C) levels (pooled standardized mean difference between intervention and control groups -0.38 [95% confidence interval -0.47 to -0.29], which corresponds to an absolute mean difference of 0.51%). The finding was robust in the sensitivity analyses based on quality assessment. Programs in which the disease manager was able to start or modify treatment with or without prior approval from the primary care physician resulted in a greater improvement in hemoglobin A₁(C) levels (standardized mean difference -0.60 v. -0.28 in trials with no approval to do so; p < 0.001). Programs with a moderate or high frequency of contact reported a significant reduction in hemoglobin A₁(C) levels compared with usual care; nevertheless, only programs with a high frequency of contact led to a significantly greater reduction compared with low-frequency contact programs (standardized mean difference -0.56 v. -0.30, p = 0.03). Disease-management programs had a clinically moderate but significant impact on hemoglobin A₁(C) levels among adults with diabetes. Effective components of programs were a high frequency of patient contact and the ability for disease managers to adjust treatment with or without

  2. Leadership development programs for health care middle managers: An exploration of the top management team member perspective.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Alan; Gillis, William E

    2016-10-14

    Hospitals throughout the United States establish leadership and management programs for their middle managers. Despite their pervasiveness and an increased emphasis on physician leadership, there is limited research regarding the development programs designed for clinical and nonclinical health care middle managers. Using two theoretical lenses, signaling and institutional theory, this exploratory study investigates mid-sized hospital development programs from the perspective of top management team (TMT) members. Our objective is to find out what types of programs hospitals have, how they are developed, and how they are evaluated. We conducted semistructured interviews with 13 TMT members in six purposefully selected hospitals and matched these interviews with program curricula. Careful coding of the data allowed us not only to show our data in a meaningful visual representation but also to show the progression of the data from raw form to aggregate themes in the qualitative research process. We identified four types of development programs used in the selected hospitals: (a) ongoing series, (b) curriculum-based, (c) management orientation, and (d) mentoring. Challenges existed in aligning the need for the program with program content. Communication occurred both through direct messaging regarding policies and procedures and through hidden signals. TMT members referenced other programs for guidance but were not always clear about what it is they wanted the programs to accomplish. Finally, there was limited program outcome measurement. Our small sample indicates that specific, structured, and comprehensive programs perform best. The better programs were always trying to improve but that most needed better accountability of tracking outcomes. In setting up a program, a collaborative approach among TMT members to establish what the needs are and how to measure outcomes worked well. Successful programs also tied in their leadership development with overall employee

  3. Veterans Health Administration's MOVE! Weight Management Program: Primary Care Clinicians' Perceptions of Program Implementation.

    PubMed

    Arigo, Danielle; Funderburk, Jennifer; Hooker, Stephanie; Dundon, Margaret; Evans-Hudnall, Gina; Dubbert, Patricia; Dickinson, Eva-Maria; Catanese, Sarah; O'Donohue, Jenny

    2015-10-01

    The Veterans Health Administration's MOVE! Program is the largest health care-delivered weight loss intervention in the United States. As a referring clinician's perceptions and knowledge of health programs may impact implementation, examining perceptions of MOVE! may inform improvements to this and other programs. This study investigated primary care clinician perceptions of MOVE! (n = 754, 50% nurses). Perceived effectiveness ratings were highest for groups with 11 to 25 group members (p < 0.01) and for a combined lecture and support group format (p = 0.026), though session length and several other aspects of delivery were not associated with perceptions of effectiveness. MOVE! staff also rated the program as more effective than did other clinicians (p < 0.01). Many respondents lacked knowledge about program specifics, especially those not involved with MOVE! delivery (vs. those directly involved; p < 0.01). These findings indicate that variety in group size and format is related to perceptions of MOVE! effectiveness. Also, clinicians not involved with MOVE! may lack knowledge about the program and underestimate its effectiveness, which could negatively affect referral likelihood or enthusiasm expressed to referred patients. Findings highlight opportunities for clarifying perceptions of a weight control program among clinicians in a large health care system.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of a disease management program for major depression in elderly primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Judith; de Bruijne, Martine; van Hout, Hein; van Marwijk, Harm; Beekman, Aartjan; Bouter, Lex; Stalman, Wim; van Tulder, Maurits

    2006-10-01

    Major depression is common in older adults and is associated with increased health care costs. Depression often remains unrecognized in older adults, especially in primary care. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a disease management program for major depression in elderly primary care patients compared with usual care. Economic evaluation alongside a cluster randomized-controlled trial. Consecutive patients of 55 years and older were screened for depression using the Geriatric Depression Scale and the PRIME-MD was used for diagnosis. General practitioners in the intervention group received training on how to implement the disease management program consisting of screening, patient education, drug therapy with paroxetine, and supportive contacts. General practitioners in the usual care group were blind to the screening results. Treatment in this group was not restricted in any way. Severity of depression, recovery from depression, and quality of life. Resource use measured over a 12-month period using interviews and valued using standard costs. Differences in clinical outcomes between the intervention and usual care group were small and statistically insignificant. Total costs were 2,123 dollars in the intervention and 2,259 dollars in the usual care group (mean difference -136 dollars, 95% confidence interval: -1,194 dollars; 1,110 dollars). Cost-effectiveness planes indicated that there were no statistically significant differences in cost-effectiveness between the 2 groups. This disease management program for major depression in elderly primary care patients had no statistically significant relationship with clinical outcomes, costs, and cost-effectiveness. Therefore, based on these results, continuing usual care is recommended.

  5. Application of a diabetes managed care program. The feasibility of using nurses and a computer system to provide effective care.

    PubMed

    Peters, A L; Davidson, M B

    1998-07-01

    Treatment of patients with diabetes often falls short of recommended process and outcome guidelines. To improve the quality of the provided diabetes care, a program (the Comprehensive Diabetes Care Service [CDCS]) using a computerizing tracking and recall system in conjunction with nurses following protocols was implemented in a managed care setting. The impact of this program was studied and compared to the care provided to patients in another managed care setting. Patients followed in the CDCS who completed a diabetes education course were compared with patients followed in a group model health maintenance organization (GMH) who also completed a diabetes education course. CDCS patients received routine care in the program. GMH patients came to the CDCS yearly to have a diabetes evaluation. A chart review was also performed on their GMH outpatient records. Initial HbA1c levels were higher in the CDCS group than in the GMH group (median of 11.9 vs. 10.0%). In the CDCS patients, HbA1c levels not only fell significantly but were also significantly lower (P < 0.05) than in the GMH patients during the 2nd and 3rd year of follow-up care. There were no significant changes in HbA1c levels in the GMH patients. When CDCS patients were divided into compliant and noncompliant patients, the median HbA1c levels in compliant patients was 8.2%, compared with 11.5% in the noncompliant group. The CDCS patients who needed treatment for hypercholesterolemia were more likely to have a lowering of their cholesterol levels than the GMH patients. All process measures, such as yearly measurement of HbA1c levels, lipid levels, and foot and retinal exams, occurred much more frequently in the CDCS patients. The system developed and implemented for managing diabetes improved both outcome and process measures. The comparison group, followed at another managed care setting, received the care consistent with the average (suboptimal) quality of care provided to patients with diabetes in the U

  6. The development of a community and home-based chronic care management program for older adults.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jennifer; McCarter, Kathryn A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate a chronic care management program piloted by a visiting nurses association. Desired outcomes were to increase nurses' knowledge of self-management of chronic conditions and improve patient self-efficacy and clinical measures. The program provided educational development for nurses and piloted encounters with patients with chronic conditions targeting community health nurses for a chronic care professional (CCP) certification and invited 300 faith community nurses to an education program on chronic condition(s). Thirteen patients with chronic condition(s) were enrolled. Chronic care professional modules were used to increase nurses' knowledge and were measured by successful completion of a certification exam. Faith community nurses participated in an education program and completed a posttest to measure knowledge of content. Patient improvement in self-management was measured by pre- and postintervention self-efficacy scores and clinical measures. Seventeen nurses successfully completed the exam, and 38 faith community nurses participated in the program and completed the posttest. Three patients showed improvement in self-efficacy scores and eight in clinical measures. The educational development of community nurses prepared them to provide effective encounters to improve self-efficacy and clinical outcomes for older adults with chronic conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The School Health Innovative Programs: integrating school health and managed care in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Taras, H; Nader, P; Swiger, H; Fontanesi, J

    1998-01-01

    Managed care organizations (MCOs) are being recruited to support school health services delivered in school clinics. Schools without clinics already provide numerous health services and could provide more if they had support from managed care organizations. This article describes the first two years of a San Diego-based collaborative consisting of MCOs, school districts, and other health care agencies. By establishing trust, developing overriding principles, and creating an interagency communication infrastructure, this collaborative has encouraged shared management of many student health issues. Because the agreements apply to all schools, programs can reduce high rates of absenteeism district-wide and avoid unnecessary doctor appointments for common health problems. These collaborative agreements are designed to be financially self-sustaining. However, data collection, the logistics of obtaining parental consent, and getting health professionals to communicate with each other in new ways remain to be significant challenges.

  8. Development of a diabetes care management curriculum in a family practice residency program.

    PubMed

    Nuovo, Jim; Balsbaugh, Thomas; Barton, Sue; Davidson, Ellen; Fox-Garcia, Jane; Gandolfo, Angela; Levich, Bridget; Seibles, Joann

    2004-01-01

    Improving the quality of care for patients with chronic illness has become a high priority. Implementing training programs in disease management (DM) so the next generation of physicians can manage chronic illness more effectively is challenging. Residency training programs have no specific mandate to implement DM training. Additional barriers at the training facility include: 1) lack of a population-based perspective for service delivery; 2) weak support for self-management of illness; 3) incomplete implementation due to physician resistance or inertia; and 4) few incentives to change practices and behaviors. In order to overcome these barriers, training programs must take the initiative to implement DM training that addresses each of these issues. We report the implementation of a chronic illness management curriculum based on the Improving Chronic Illness Care (ICIC) Model. Features of this process included both patient care and learner objectives. These were: development of a multidisciplinary diabetes DM team; development of a patient registry; development of diabetes teaching clinics in the family practice center (nutrition, general management classes, and one-on-one teaching); development of a group visit model; and training the residents in the elements of the ICIC Model, ie, the community, the health system, self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Barriers to implementing these curricular changes were: the development of a patient registry; buy-in from faculty, residents, clinic leadership, staff, and patients for the chronic care model; the ability to bill for services and maintain clinical productivity; and support from the health system key stakeholders for sustainability. Unique features of each training site will dictate differences in emphasis and structure; however, the core principles of the ICIC Model in enhancing self-management may be generalized to all sites.

  9. Chile: Acceptability of a Training Program for Depression Management in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Rigoberto; Martínez, Pablo; Cornejo, Juan P.; Díaz, Berta; Peralta, José; Tala, Álvaro; Rojas, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Chile, there are inconsistencies in the management of depression in primary care settings, and the National Depression Program, currently in effect, was implemented without a standardized training program. The objective of this study is to evaluate the acceptability of a training program on the management of depression for primary care health teams. Methods: The study was a randomized controlled trial, and two primary centers from the Metropolitan Region of Santiago were randomly selected to carry out the intervention training program. Pre-post surveys were applied, to evaluate expectations and satisfaction with the intervention, respectively. Descriptive and content analysis was carried out. Result: The sample consisted of 41 health professionals, 56.1% of who reported that their expectations for the intervention were met. All of the training activities were evaluated with scores higher than 6.4 (on a 1–7 scale). The trainers, the methodology, and the learning environment were considered strengths and facilitators of the program, while the limited duration of the training, the logistical problems faced during part of the program, and the lack of educational material were viewed as weaknesses. Conclusion: The intervention was well accepted by primary health care teams. However, the clinical impact in patients still has to be evaluated. PMID:27375531

  10. Impact of a telehealth and care management program for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Au, David H; Macaulay, Dendy S; Jarvis, John L; Desai, Urvi S; Birnbaum, Howard G

    2015-03-01

    Improving outcomes and health resource use for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care is a priority for health systems. The Health Buddy Program, a content-driven telehealth system coupled with care management, is designed to enhance patient education, self-management, and timely access to care. To examine the effects of the Health Buddy Program on resource use among Medicare patients with COPD who participated in a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services demonstration project from 2006 to 2010. Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with COPD who enrolled in the intervention at two participating clinics were propensity-score matched to similar patients with COPD identified from a 5% random sample of Medicare patients. Difference-in-difference analyses descriptively compared the program's effect on quarterly healthcare resource use over the 3-year study period compared with baseline. Negative binomial models estimated the association of the program with healthcare resource outcomes adjusting for significant (P<0.05) baseline differences post matching. The effect of the Health Buddy Program on quarterly all-cause and respiratory-related hospital admissions, hospital admissions for COPD exacerbations, and all-cause emergency department use was assessed after matching. Intervention (n=619) and matched control subjects (n=619) had similar baseline characteristics after matching. The Health Buddy Program was associated with 23% lower quarterly all-cause hospital admissions and 40% lower quarterly respiratory-related hospital admissions compared with baseline for intervention beneficiaries versus control subjects. In subgroup analyses, patients who engaged in the intervention during the study period (n=247) demonstrated significantly lower quarterly hospital admissions for COPD exacerbations. The Health Buddy Program was not associated with reductions in quarterly emergency department use. Results were robust in analyses that adjusted for

  11. Developing a rural transitional care community case management program using clinical nurse specialists.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen M; Black, Denice; Hammond, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    This quality improvement project developed a community nursing case management program to decrease preventable readmissions to the hospital and emergency department by providing telephonic case management and, if needed, onsite assessment and treatment by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with prescriptive authority. As more people reach Medicare age, the number of individuals with worsening chronic diseases with dramatically increases unless appropriate disease management programs are developed. Care transitions can result in breakdown in continuity of care, resulting in increased preventable readmissions, particularly for indigent patients. The CNS is uniquely educated to managing care transitions and coordination of community resources to prevent readmissions. After a thorough SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis, we developed and implemented a cost-avoidance model to prevent readmissions in our uninsured and underinsured patients. The project CNS used a wide array of interventions to decrease readmissions. In the last 2 years, there have been a total of 22 less than 30-day readmissions to the emergency department or hospital in 13 patients, a significant decrease from readmissions in these patients prior to the program. Three of them required transfer to a larger hospital for a higher level of care. Using advanced practice nurses in transitional care can prevent readmissions, resulting in cost avoidance. The coordination of community resources during transition from hospital to home is a job best suited to CNSs, because they are educated to work within organizations/systems. The money we saved with this project more than justified the cost of hiring a CNS to lead it. More research is needed into this technology. Guidelines for this intervention need to be developed. Replicating our cost-avoidance transitional care model can help other facilities limit that loss.

  12. The association between quality of care and the intensity of diabetes disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Mangione, Carol M; Gerzoff, Robert B; Williamson, David F; Steers, W Neil; Kerr, Eve A; Brown, Arleen F; Waitzfelder, Beth E; Marrero, David G; Dudley, R Adams; Kim, Catherine; Herman, William; Thompson, Theodore J; Safford, Monika M; Selby, Joe V

    2006-07-18

    Although disease management programs are widely implemented, little is known about their effectiveness. To determine whether disease management by physician groups is associated with diabetes care processes, control of intermediate outcomes, or the amount of medication used when intermediate outcomes are above target levels. Cross-sectional study. Patients were randomly sampled from 63 physician groups nested in 7 health plans sponsored by Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (87%) and from 4 health plans with individual physician contracts (13%). 8661 adults with diabetes who completed a survey (2000-2001) and had medical record data. Physician group and health plan directors described their organizations' use of physician reminders, performance feedback, and structured care management on a survey; their responses were used to determine measures of intensity of disease management. The current study measured 8 processes of care, including most recent hemoglobin A1c level, systolic blood pressure, serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and several measures of medication use. Increased use of any of 3 disease management strategies was significantly associated with higher adjusted rates of retinal screening, nephropathy screening, foot examinations, and measurement of hemoglobin A1c levels. Serum lipid level testing and influenza vaccine administration were associated with greater use of structured care management and performance feedback. Greater use of performance feedback correlated with an increased rate of foot examinations (difference, 5 percentage points [95% CI, 1 to 8 percentage points]), and greater use of physician reminders was associated with an increased rate of nephropathy screening (difference, 15 percentage points [CI, 6 to 23 percentage points]). No strategies were associated with intermediate outcome levels or level of medication management. Physician groups were not randomly sampled from population-based listings, and disease

  13. Effectiveness of disease-management programs for improving diabetes care: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pimouguet, Clément; Le Goff, Mélanie; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Dartigues, Jean François; Helmer, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Background We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to assess the effectiveness of disease-management programs for improving glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus and to study which components of programs are associated with their effectiveness. Methods We searched several databases for studies published up to December 2009. We included randomized controlled trials involving adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes that evaluated the effect of disease-management programs on glycated hemoglobin (hemoglobin A1C) concentrations. We performed a meta-regression analysis to determine the effective components of the programs. Results We included 41 randomized controlled trials in our review. Across these trials, disease-management programs resulted in a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1C levels (pooled standardized mean difference between intervention and control groups −0.38 [95% confidence interval −0.47 to −0.29], which corresponds to an absolute mean difference of 0.51%). The finding was robust in the sensitivity analyses based on quality assessment. Programs in which the disease manager was able to start or modify treatment with or without prior approval from the primary care physician resulted in a greater improvement in hemoglobin A1C levels (standardized mean difference −0.60 v. −0.28 in trials with no approval to do so; p < 0.001). Programs with a moderate or high frequency of contact reported a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1C levels compared with usual care; nevertheless, only programs with a high frequency of contact led to a significantly greater reduction compared with low-frequency contact programs (standardized mean difference −0.56 v. −0.30, p = 0.03). Interpretation Disease-management programs had a clinically moderate but significant impact on hemoglobin A1C levels among adults with diabetes. Effective components of programs were a high frequency of patient contact and the ability for disease managers to

  14. Evaluation of a program to improve diabetes care through intensified care management activities and diabetes medication copayment reduction.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Stephen J; Johnson, Scott; Higgins, Tara; Quilliam, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Medication copayment reduction can be integrated with disease management programs to incentivize patient engagement in chronic care management. While disease management programs in diabetes have been evaluated across a range of settings and designs, less is known regarding the effectiveness of copayment reduction as a component of disease management. To evaluate the short-term results of a diabetes-focused disease management program that included copayment reduction, care coordination, and patient goal setting, focusing on rates of evidence-based care processes and all-cause pharmacy and health care costs. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island offered large employer groups the opportunity to participate in a diabetes disease management initiative that featured reduced copayments (from $7/$25/$40 for generic, tier 2, and tier 3 drugs, respectively, to $0 for generic and $0-$2 for brand drugs) for diabetes-related medications. In return for the copayment reduction, participants agreed to the following: (a) participate in care coordination with a case manager, (b) have an annual physical examination, (c) have a hemoglobin A1c blood test at least twice annually, and (d) have a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) test at least once annually. Patients received personalized support provided by a registered nurse and dietician, disease-related education provided by nurses, and intensified case management services, including working with a health coach to establish healthy behavioral change goals. All study subjects were aged 18 years or older and had at least 1 ICD-9-CM code for diabetes and at least 1 claim for an antidiabetic drug during a 12-month measurement period, which was each subject's most recent 12-month period of continuous enrollment from January 1, 2008, through May 31, 2010. Administrative claims data were used to determine the percentage of intervention (participating) and nonintervention (nonparticipating) subjects from among all of the plan

  15. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Diabetes Care and Impact of Vendor-Based Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying-Ying; Diamant, Allison; Jones, Jenna; Lin, Wenjiao; Chen, Xiao; Wu, Shang-Hua; Pourat, Nadereh; Roby, Dylan; Kominski, Gerald F

    2016-05-01

    We examined the existence of disparities in receipt of appropriate diabetes care among California's fee-for-service Medicaid beneficiaries and the effectiveness of a telephonic-based disease management program delivered by a disease management vendor on the reduction of racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes care. We conducted an intervention-control cohort study to test the effectiveness of a 3-year-long disease management program delivered to Medicaid fee-for-service beneficiaries aged 22 to 75 with a diagnosis of diabetes in Los Angeles and Alameda counties. The outcome measures were the receipt of at least one hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test, LDL cholesterol test, and retinal examination each year. We used generalized estimating equations models with logit link to analyze the claims data for a cohort of beneficiaries in two intervention counties (n = 2,933) and eight control counties (n = 2,988) from September 2005 through August 2010. Racial/ethnic disparities existed in the receipt of all three types of testing in the intervention counties before the program. African Americans (0.66; 95% CI 0.62-0.70) and Latinos (0.77; 95% CI 0.74-0.80) had lower rates of receipt for HbA1c testing than whites (0.83; 95% CI 0.81-0.85) in the intervention counties. After the intervention, the disparity among African Americans and Latinos compared with whites persisted in the intervention counties. For Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, the disparity in testing rates decreased. We did not find similar disparities in the control counties. This disease management program was not effective in reducing racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes care in the most racially/ethnically diverse counties in California. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  16. Clinical metric and medication persistency effects: evidence from a Medicaid care management program.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gregory D; Leary, Fredric; Medina, Wendie; Donnelly, Shawn; Warnick, Kathleen

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to estimate clinical metric and medication persistency impacts of a care management program. The data sources were Medicaid administrative claims for a sample population of 32,334 noninstitutionalized Medicaid-only aged, blind, or disabled patients with diagnosed conditions of asthma, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, or heart failure between 2005 and 2009. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test the hypothesis that exposure to a care management intervention increased the likelihood of having the appropriate medication or procedures performed, as well as increased medication persistency. Statistically significant clinical metric improvements occurred in each of the 5 conditions studied. Increased medication persistency was found for beta-blocker medication for members with coronary artery disease, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker and diuretic medications for members with heart failure, bronchodilator and corticosteroid medications for members with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and aspirin/antiplatelet medications for members with diabetes. This study demonstrates that a care management program increases the likelihood of having an appropriate medication dispensed and/or an appropriate clinical test performed, as well as increased likelihood of medication persistency, in people with chronic conditions.

  17. Use of chronic disease management programs for diabetes: in Alberta's primary care networks.

    PubMed

    Campbell, David J T; Sargious, Peter; Lewanczuk, Richard; McBrien, Kerry; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Manns, Braden

    2013-02-01

    To determine the types of chronic disease management (CDM) programs offered for patients with diabetes in Alberta's primary care networks (PCNs). A survey was administered to PCNs to determine the types of CDM programs offered for patients with diabetes; CDM programs were organized into categories by their resource intensity and effectiveness. Results of the survey were reported using frequencies and percentages. Alberta has recently created PCNs-groups of family physicians who receive additional funds to enable them to support activities that fall outside the typical physician-based fee-for-service model, but which address specified objectives including CDM. It is currently unknown what additional programs are being provided through the PCN supplemental funding. A survey was administered to the individual responsible for CDM in each PCN. This included executive directors, chronic disease managers, and CDM nurses. We determined the CDM strategies used in each PCN to care for patients with diabetes, whether they were available to all patients, and whether the services were provided exclusively by the PCN or in conjunction with other agencies. There was considerable variation across PCNs with respect to the CDM programs offered for people with diabetes. Nearly all PCNs used multidisciplinary teams (which could include nurses, dietitians, and pharmacists) and patient education. Fewer than half of the PCNs permitted personnel other than the primary physician to write or alter prescriptions for medications. Alberta's PCNs have successfully established many different types of CDM programs. Multidisciplinary care teams, which are among the most effective CDM strategies, are currently being used by most of Alberta's PCNs.

  18. Web-based weight management programs in an integrated health care setting: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rothert, Kendra; Strecher, Victor J; Doyle, Laurie A; Caplan, William M; Joyce, Jodi S; Jimison, Holly B; Karm, Lya M; Mims, Adrienne D; Roth, Mark A

    2006-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of a Web-based tailored behavioral weight management program compared with Web-based information-only weight management materials. Participants, 2862 eligible overweight and obese (BMI = 27 to 40 kg/m2) members from four regions of Kaiser Permanente's integrated health care delivery system, were randomized to receive either a tailored expert system or information-only Web-based weight management materials. Weight change and program satisfaction were assessed by self-report through an Internet-based survey at 3- and 6-month follow-up periods. Significantly greater weight loss at follow-up was found among participants assigned to the tailored expert system than among those assigned to the information-only condition. Subjects in the tailored expert system lost a mean of 3 +/- 0.3% of their baseline weight, whereas subjects in the information-only condition lost a mean of 1.2 +/- 0.4% (p < 0.0004). Participants were also more likely to report that the tailored expert system was personally relevant, helpful, and easy to understand. Notably, 36% of enrollees were African-American, with enrollment rates higher than the general proportion of African Americans in any of the study regions. The results of this large, randomized control trial show the potential benefit of the Web-based tailored expert system for weight management compared with a Web-based information-only weight management program.

  19. Effectiveness of a quality-improvement program in improving management of primary care practices

    PubMed Central

    Szecsenyi, Joachim; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Laux, Gunter; Willms, Sara; Wensing, Michel; Goetz, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Background: The European Practice Assessment program provides feedback and outreach visits to primary care practices to facilitate quality improvement in five domains (infrastructure, people, information, finance, and quality and safety). We examined the effectiveness of this program in improving management in primary care practices in Germany, with a focus on the domain of quality and safety. Methods: In a before–after study, 102 primary care practices completed a practice assessment using the European Practice Assessment instrument at baseline and three years later (intervention group). A comparative group of 102 practices was included that completed their first assessment using this instrument at the time of the intervention group’s second assessment. Mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100. Results: We found significant improvements in all domains between the first and second assessments in the intervention group. In the domain of quality and safety, improvements in scores (mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100) were observed in the following dimensions: complaint management (from a mean score of 51.2 at first assessment to 80.7 at second assessment); analysis of critical incidents (from 79.1 to 89.6); and quality development, quality policy (from 40.7 to 55.6). Overall scores at the time of the second assessment were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the comparative group. Interpretation: Primary care practices that completed the European Practice Assessment instrument twice over a three-year period showed improvements in practice management. Our findings show the value of the quality-improvement cycle in the context of practice assessment and the use of established organizational standards for practice management with the

  20. Effectiveness of a quality-improvement program in improving management of primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Szecsenyi, Joachim; Campbell, Stephen; Broge, Bjoern; Laux, Gunter; Willms, Sara; Wensing, Michel; Goetz, Katja

    2011-12-13

    The European Practice Assessment program provides feedback and outreach visits to primary care practices to facilitate quality improvement in five domains (infrastructure, people, information, finance, and quality and safety). We examined the effectiveness of this program in improving management in primary care practices in Germany, with a focus on the domain of quality and safety. In a before-after study, 102 primary care practices completed a practice assessment using the European Practice Assessment instrument at baseline and three years later (intervention group). A comparative group of 102 practices was included that completed their first assessment using this instrument at the time of the intervention group's second assessment. Mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100. We found significant improvements in all domains between the first and second assessments in the intervention group. In the domain of quality and safety, improvements in scores (mean scores were based on the proportion of indicators for which a positive response was achieved by all of the practices, on a scale of 0 to 100) were observed in the following dimensions: complaint management (from a mean score of 51.2 at first assessment to 80.7 at second assessment); analysis of critical incidents (from 79.1 to 89.6); and quality development, quality policy (from 40.7 to 55.6). Overall scores at the time of the second assessment were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the comparative group. Primary care practices that completed the European Practice Assessment instrument twice over a three-year period showed improvements in practice management. Our findings show the value of the quality-improvement cycle in the context of practice assessment and the use of established organizational standards for practice management with the Europeaen Practice Assessment.

  1. Quality of Care for Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in a Managed Care Medicaid Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zima, Bonnie T.; Bussing, Regina; Tang, Lingqi; Zhang, Lily; Ettner, Susan; Belin, Thomas R.; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether clinical severity is greater among children receiving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) care in primary care compared with those in specialty mental health clinics, and to examine how care processes and clinical outcomes vary by sector across three 6-month time intervals. Method: This was a longitudinal…

  2. Quality of Care for Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in a Managed Care Medicaid Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zima, Bonnie T.; Bussing, Regina; Tang, Lingqi; Zhang, Lily; Ettner, Susan; Belin, Thomas R.; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether clinical severity is greater among children receiving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) care in primary care compared with those in specialty mental health clinics, and to examine how care processes and clinical outcomes vary by sector across three 6-month time intervals. Method: This was a longitudinal…

  3. Integrating interdisciplinary pain management into primary care: development and implementation of a novel clinical program.

    PubMed

    Dorflinger, Lindsey M; Ruser, Christopher; Sellinger, John; Edens, Ellen L; Kerns, Robert D; Becker, William C

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to develop and implement an interdisciplinary pain program integrated in primary care to address stakeholder-identified gaps. Program development and evaluation project utilizing a Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) approach to address the identified problem of insufficient pain management resources within primary care. A large Healthcare System within the Veterans Health Administration, consisting of two academically affiliated medical centers and six community-based outpatients clinics. An interprofessional group of stakeholders participated in a Rapid Process Improvement Workshop (RPIW), a consensus-building process to identify systems-level gaps and feasible solutions and obtain buy-in. Changes were implemented in 2012, and in a 1-year follow-up, we examined indicators of engagement in specialty and multimodal pain care services as well as patient and provider satisfaction. In response to identified barriers, RPIW participants proposed and outlined two readily implementable, interdisciplinary clinics embedded within primary care: 1) the Integrated Pain Clinic, providing in-depth assessment and triage to targeted resources; and 2) the Opioid Reassessment Clinic, providing assessment and structured monitoring of patients with evidence of safety, efficacy, or misuse problems with opioids. Implementation of these programs led to higher rates of engagement in specialty and multimodal pain care services; patients and providers reported satisfaction with these services. Our PDSA cycle engaged an interprofessional group of stakeholders that recommended introduction of new systems-based interventions to better integrate pain resources into primary care to address reported barriers. Early data suggest improved outcomes; examination of additional outcomes is planned. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Managed health care.

    PubMed

    Curtiss, F R

    1989-04-01

    The fundamental components of managed-care plans are described; the development of managed-care programs is discussed; and the impact of managed care on pharmacy services and the price, quality, and accessibility of health care are reviewed. Health care can be considered to be managed when at least one of the following fundamental components is present: prospective pricing, "UCR" (usual, customary, and reasonable) pricing of services, peer review, mandatory use review, benefit redesign, capitation payments, channeling, quality criteria, and health promotion. The managed-care industry consists of health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and managed fee-for-service plans. Managed-care reimbursement principles involve transferring some or all of the impetus for controlling use of services to the health-care provider. Means by which this is done include prospective pricing, services bundling, price discounts and negotiated fees, and capitation financing and reimbursement. Financial risk-sharing arrangements with providers--including hospitals, physicians, pharmacies, and home-care companies--are necessary for any managed-care plan to attain true control over its service costs. Use-review and use-management services are also fundamental to containing health-care spending. These include retrospective, concurrent, and prospective reviews of the necessity and appropriateness of medical services. Use management, like services bundling and prospective pricing, has been more effective in reducing costs of hospital inpatient services than costs associated with ambulatory care. Per case payments and services bundling have made individual charges for items irrelevant to hospital revenue. This has forced hospital pharmacy managers to become more sensitive to cost management. Drug formularies, improved productivity, and use of prescribing protocols are means by which hospital pharmacies have controlled costs. However, since shorter hospital

  5. A chronic care ostomy self-management program for cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Krouse, Robert S; Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Wendel, Christopher S; Cobb, Martha D; Tallman, Nancy J; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Sun, Virginia; Hibbard, Judith H; Hornbrook, Mark C

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with ostomies experience extensive changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and daily routine. Patients and families are typically forced to use trial and error to improve self-management. This is a longitudinal one-group design pilot study of a five-session ostomy self-care curriculum based on the Chronic Care Model to improve HRQOL and self-management for cancer survivors with ostomies. Participants were surveyed to evaluate each session. Multiple instruments were administered to examine outcomes at baseline, post-intervention, and at 6-month follow-up (Patient Activation Measure, self-efficacy, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Ways of Coping, Group Health Association of America Satisfaction with ostomy care survey, and the City of Hope Quality of Life Ostomy). Changes from pre-intervention to post-intervention and pre-intervention to follow-up were evaluated with paired t-tests. Text responses were coded and evaluated for important themes and recommendations. Thirty-eight subjects participated in the study. Most had a history of rectal cancer (60.5%) or bladder cancer (28.9%). Participants rated the overall program high (4.4-4.8 on 5-point scale). Text feedback indicated that participants enjoyed the group forums, wanted more participants, and more hands-on training. Scores on multiple surveys were shown to be improved and sustained, including patient activation (p = 0.0004), self-efficacy (p = 0.006), total HRQOL (p = 0.01), physical well-being (p = 0.005), and social well-being (p = 0.002). Survivor anxiety was significantly reduced by follow-up (p = 0.047). This self-management ostomy program can help cancer survivors with ostomies adapt to their stoma. Initiating this program in the community setting would be beneficial to many cancer survivors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. 76 FR 34541 - Child and Adult Care Food Program Improving Management and Program Integrity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... data collection and analysis (the Child Care Assessment Project) designed to evaluate implementation of... extensive data collection and analysis, known as the Child Care Assessment Project (CCAP). The CCAP was... Care Centers and Day Care Homes''; March 29, 2005--``Transfer of Data Related to the CACFP and the Food...

  7. The Economic Impact of Intensive Care Management for High-Cost Medically Complex Patients: An Evaluation of New Mexico's Care One Program.

    PubMed

    Horn, Brady P; Crandall, Cameron; Moffett, Maurice; Hensley, Michael; Howarth, Sam; Binder, Douglas S; Sklar, David

    2016-12-01

    High-cost, medically complex patients have been a challenging population to manage in the US health care system, in terms of both improving health outcomes and containing costs. This paper evaluated the economic impact of Care One, an intensive care management program (data analysis, evaluation, empanelment, specialist disease management, nurse case management, and social support) designed to target the most expensive 1% of patients in a university health care system. Data were collected for a cohort of high-cost, medically complex patients (N = 753) who received care management and a control group (N = 794) of similarly complex health system users who did not receive access to the program. A pre-post empirical model estimated the Care One program to be associated with a per-patient reduction in billed charges of $92,227 (95% confidence interval [CI]: $83,988 to $100,466). A difference-in-difference model, which utilized the control group, estimated a per-patient reduction in billing charges of $44,504 (95% CI: $29,195 to $59,813). Results suggest that care management for high-cost, medically complex patients in primary care can reduce costs compared to a control group. In addition, significant reversion to the mean is found, providing support for the use of a difference-in-difference estimator when evaluating health programs for high-cost, medically complex patients.

  8. Increased adherence to cardiac standards of care during participation in cardiac disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Coberley, Carter; Morrow, Greg; McGinnis, Matthew; Wells, Aaron; Coberley, Sadie; Orr, Patty; Shurney, Dexter

    2008-04-01

    Adherence to cardiovascular disease standards of care is critically important for minimizing the risk of mortality and morbidity for individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) and heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of cardiac disease management (DM) programs to assist members with their adherence to evidence-based medicine for cardiovascular diseases. A total of 20,202 members with CHD and/or HF were evaluated 12 months prior to the start of DM programs and during their first 12 months of participation in the programs. Members were assessed for their adherence to appropriate cardiac medications. In addition, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) testing rates and clinical control of LDL values (defined as <100 mg/dL) were measured. The association between LDL control and use of lipid-lowering statins also was assessed. During participation in the cardiac programs, members achieved significant improvement in their adherence to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, and beta-blockers (P < 0.0001). The cardiac population also achieved a significant increase in LDL testing rates and statin use (P < 0.0001). More members attained appropriate LDL control in year 1 compared to baseline (36% relative increase), and this improvement was associated with a 40% relative increase in statin use. In summary, participation in these cardiac DM programs assisted members to improve their adherence to cardiac medications and standards of care guidelines. Such improvements in cardiovascular disease care are likely associated with improved quality of life and reduced risk for mortality.

  9. A Patient-Centered Transitional Care Case Management Program: Taking Case Management to the Streets and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Derenda; Hancock, Diane; Hughes, Sabrina S; Wyche, Phyllis R; Jenkins, Claire; Logan, Cindy

    In 2011, the Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC) in Richmond, VA, had a cumulative readmission rate and emergency department (ED) revisits for discharged Veterans of 1 in 5. In 2012, a transitional care program (TCP) was implemented to improve care coordination and outcomes among Veterans, with an emphasis on geriatric patients with chronic disease. This TCP was created with an interdisciplinary approach using intensive case management interventions, with a goal of reducing Veteran ED and hospital revisits by 30%. To examine the impact of the McGuire VAMC TCP on Veteran ED and hospital utilization and costs. Veterans being discharged to home following an inpatient admission, ED visit, and/or short rehab stay. The primary means of identifying patients for the program is through daily screening of the previous 24-hour admission and ED report, which the inpatient nurse practitioner performs. She completes an extensive review of each Veteran's electronic medical record to determine the number of ED visits and inpatient admissions at the VAMC and in the community. Initial criteria for consideration in the program included the following: more than two hospital admissions and/or ED visits in the past 90 days or at high risk for readmission based on a Care Assessment Need score of greater than 95. Two hundred Veterans participated in the program in fiscal year (FY) 2013, with 146 participating in FY 2014. A retrospective chart review of Veterans participating in the TCP in FYs 2013 and 2014 was conducted, with a focus on number of admissions and ED visits 90 days prior to admission to the TCP and 90 days following TCP admission. Average admission and ED costs for this VA were calculated to determine cost savings from pre- to post-90 days of admission and ED visits. Veterans who obtained TCP services in FYs 2013 and 2014 experienced a 67% decrease in hospital admissions and a 61% decrease in ED visits in the 90 days following participation in

  10. Exploring Robust Methods for Evaluating Treatment and Comparison Groups in Chronic Care Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Hamar, Brent; Bradley, Chastity; Gandy, William M.; Harrison, Patricia L.; Sidney, James A.; Coberley, Carter R.; Rula, Elizabeth Y.; Pope, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of chronic care management (CCM) programs is necessary to determine the behavioral, clinical, and financial value of the programs. Financial outcomes of members who are exposed to interventions (treatment group) typically are compared to those not exposed (comparison group) in a quasi-experimental study design. However, because member assignment is not randomized, outcomes reported from these designs may be biased or inefficient if study groups are not comparable or balanced prior to analysis. Two matching techniques used to achieve balanced groups are Propensity Score Matching (PSM) and Coarsened Exact Matching (CEM). Unlike PSM, CEM has been shown to yield estimates of causal (program) effects that are lowest in variance and bias for any given sample size. The objective of this case study was to provide a comprehensive comparison of these 2 matching methods within an evaluation of a CCM program administered to a large health plan during a 2-year time period. Descriptive and statistical methods were used to assess the level of balance between comparison and treatment members pre matching. Compared with PSM, CEM retained more members, achieved better balance between matched members, and resulted in a statistically insignificant Wald test statistic for group aggregation. In terms of program performance, the results showed an overall higher medical cost savings among treatment members matched using CEM compared with those matched using PSM (-$25.57 versus -$19.78, respectively). Collectively, the results suggest CEM is a viable alternative, if not the most appropriate matching method, to apply when evaluating CCM program performance. (Population Health Management 2013;16:35–45) PMID:22788834

  11. Effectiveness of a pharmacy care management program for veterans with dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael C; Boldt, Amy S; Walston, Cassandra M; Zillich, Alan J

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a care management program provided by clinical pharmacists for veterans with dyslipidemia. Retrospective cohort design. Two primary care clinics at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. An intervention (IT) cohort of 213 patients referred for management of dyslipidemia by clinical pharmacists and a control cohort of 219 patients with dyslipidemia receiving usual care (UC). Data were obtained from electronic medical records regarding drug therapy, lipid levels, and patient characteristics. Using multivariable regression models to adjust for baseline characteristics, the primary analyses compared mean final measured values of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides (TGs) among the IT and UC cohorts at the final follow-up visits. Secondary analyses compared the proportion of patients achieving National Cholesterol Education Program/Third Report of the Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP/ATPIII) concordant LDL goals and the time to achieve LDL goals between the two groups. Compared with the UC cohort, the adjusted difference in the mean final measured LDL for the IT cohort was -10.4 mg/dl (95% confidence interval [CI] -16.1 to -4.6, p < 0.001) and TC was -12.7 (95% CI -21.3 to -4.1, p=0.004). There were no significant differences in the adjusted mean final measured HDL or TGs between the two groups. The NCEP/ATPIII goal LDL was met in 80.3% of patients in the IT cohort and 65.3% of patients in the UC cohort (odds ratio [OR], 2.6; 95% CI 1.6-4.3, p<0.001). Time to achieve goal LDL was significantly shorter for the IT cohort compared with the UC cohort (risk ratio, 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.8, log-rank p=0.002). Veterans referred to a clinical pharmacist for treatment of dyslipidemia achieved significant reductions in TC and LDL. A greater proportion of patients achieved NCEP/ATPIII goal LDL, and the

  12. The Impact of a Health Education Program Targeting Patients with High Visit Rates in a Managed Care Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dally, Diana L.; Dahar, Wendy; Scott, Ann; Roblin, Douglas; Khoury, Allan T.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether a mailed health promotion program would reduce outpatient visits while improving health status among people with chronic conditions and high visit rates in a managed care organization. Surveys of treatment and control groups before and 1 year after randomization indicated that the program reduced visit rates while improving…

  13. Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit--A Unique Stress Management Program That Improves Lifestyle Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter-Smith, Molly; Massey, Vera; Rellergert, Linda; Wissmann, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit is a multi-session group program developed by University of Missouri Extension that provides a unique and practical approach to helping adults better managing their stress and bounce back from life's challenges while improving lifestyle behaviors. The program combines mindfulness and a variety of other…

  14. Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit--A Unique Stress Management Program That Improves Lifestyle Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter-Smith, Molly; Massey, Vera; Rellergert, Linda; Wissmann, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Taking Care of You: Body, Mind, Spirit is a multi-session group program developed by University of Missouri Extension that provides a unique and practical approach to helping adults better managing their stress and bounce back from life's challenges while improving lifestyle behaviors. The program combines mindfulness and a variety of other…

  15. Implementation of a diabetes self-management education program in primary care for adults using shared medical appointments.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Iris

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement diabetes self-management education in primary care using the Chronic Care Model and shared medical appointments (SMA) to provide evidence-based interventions to improve process and measure outcomes. A quality improvement project using the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle was implemented in a primary care setting in South Texas to provide diabetes self-management education for adults. Biological measures were evaluated in 70 patients at initiation of the project and thereafter based on current practice guidelines. The results of the project were consistent with the literature regarding the benefits, sustainability, and viability of SMA. As compared with that in studies presented in the literature, the patient population who participated in SMA had similar outcomes regarding improvement in A1C, self-management skills, and satisfaction. SMA are an innovative system redesign concept with the potential to provide comprehensive and coordinated care for patients with multiple and chronic health conditions while still being an efficient, effective, financially viable, and sustainable program. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes increase, innovative models of care can meet the growing demand for access and utilization of diabetes self-management education programs. Programs focusing on chronic conditions to improve outcomes can be replicated by health care providers in primary care settings. SMA can increase revenue and productivity, improve disease management, and increase provider and patient satisfaction.

  16. Cooperative disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Jedrey, C M; Chaurette, K A; Winn, L B

    2001-01-01

    Cooperative disease management programs sponsored by pharmaceutical companies and managed care organizations or health care providers can offer significant benefits to patients. They can be structured so as to comply with applicable OIG, FDA, and IRS regulations. Such programs must be structured for the benefit of patients, and not to require the use of or otherwise directly promote the selection of the sponsoring pharmaceutical company's products.

  17. Pilot Program to Improve Self-Management of Patients with Heart Failure by Redesigning Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jessica D.; O'Neal, Daniel J.; Siddharthan, Kris; Neugaard, Britta I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested both an educational and a care coordination element of health care to examine if better disease-specific knowledge leads to successful self-management of heart failure (HF). Background. The high utilization of health care resources and poor patient outcomes associated with HF justify tests of change to improve self-management of HF. Methods. This prospective study tested two components of the Chronic Care Model (clinical information systems and self-management support) to improve outcomes in the self-management of HF among patients who received intensive education and care coordination during their acute care stay. A postdischarge follow-up phone call assessed their knowledge of HF self-management compared to usual care patients. Results. There were 20 patients each in the intervention and usual care groups. Intervention patients were more likely to have a scale at home, write down their weight, and practice new or different health behaviors. Conclusion. Patients receiving more intensive education knew more about their disease and were better able to self-manage their weight compared to patients receiving standard care. PMID:24864206

  18. Managing costs and managing care.

    PubMed

    Rivers, P A; Tsai, K L

    2001-01-01

    With a defined population served, contracted provider panels and the nature of care delivery integration, managed care has provided a solution, though not a panacea, to provide equitable services, standardized and prevention oriented cares to its enrolled members. Combined with the earmarked capitation reimbursement system and a series of cost containment and utilization review techniques, managed care has also demonstrated potently its capacity in cost-saving and quality promotion. Presents steps and measures related to managed care that federal government has taken to manage care and contain cost. It is crucial to identify and promulgate best practices continually, while managing utilization of resources for improving health care, containing cost, and equalizing medical care access to a greater proportion of the population. Concludes that it may take time for a universal adoption of managed care. However, Americans may actually benefit more from having a standard level of health care that managed care could achieve and provide.

  19. AIDS Drug Assistance Programs: managers confront uncertainty and need to adapt as the Affordable Care Act kicks in.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erika G; Meehan, Terence; Schackman, Bruce R

    2013-06-01

    With the Affordable Care Act set to expand insurance coverage to millions more Americans next year, existing discretionary health programs that receive federal support might find themselves competing for funds as the health reform law is fully implemented. To assess the implications the Affordable Care Act might have for discretionary health programs, we focused on state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs, which provide free medications to low-income HIV patients. We conducted semistructured interviews with program managers from twenty-two states. Many of the managers predicted that their programs will change focus to provide "wrap-around services," such as helping newly insured clients finance out-of-pocket expenses, including copayments, deductibles, and premiums. Although program managers acknowledged that they must adapt to a changing environment, many said that they were overwhelmed by the complexity of the Affordable Care Act, and some expressed fear that state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs would be eliminated entirely. To remain viable, such programs must identify and justify the need for services in the context of the Affordable Care Act and receive sufficient political support and funding.

  20. What Would It Take? Stakeholders’ Views and Preferences for Implementing a Health Care Manager Program in Community Mental Health Clinics Under Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Gomes, Arminda P.; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders’ recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice. PMID:25542194

  1. What would it take? Stakeholders' views and preferences for implementing a health care manager program in community mental health clinics under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Gomes, Arminda P; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders' recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice.

  2. Innovating in health care management education: development of an accelerated MBA and MPH degree program at Yale.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Forman, Howard P; Pistell, Anne F; Nembhard, Ingrid M

    2015-03-01

    Increasingly, there is recognition of the need for individuals with expertise in both management and public health to help health care organizations deliver high-quality and cost-effective care. The Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management began offering an accelerated Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Public Health (MPH) joint degree program in the summer of 2014. This new program enables students to earn MBA and MPH degrees simultaneously from 2 fully accredited schools in 22 months. Students will graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to become innovative leaders of health care organizations. We discuss the rationale for the program, the developmental process, the curriculum, benefits of the program, and potential challenges.

  3. Innovating in Health Care Management Education: Development of an Accelerated MBA and MPH Degree Program at Yale

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Howard P.; Pistell, Anne F.; Nembhard, Ingrid M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, there is recognition of the need for individuals with expertise in both management and public health to help health care organizations deliver high-quality and cost-effective care. The Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management began offering an accelerated Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Public Health (MPH) joint degree program in the summer of 2014. This new program enables students to earn MBA and MPH degrees simultaneously from 2 fully accredited schools in 22 months. Students will graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to become innovative leaders of health care organizations. We discuss the rationale for the program, the developmental process, the curriculum, benefits of the program, and potential challenges. PMID:25706023

  4. Impact of an educational program on knowledge and practice of health care staff toward pharmaceutical waste management in Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Tabash, Mohammed I; Hussein, Rim A; Mahmoud, Aleya H; El-Borgy, Mohamed D; Abu-Hamad, Bassam A

    2016-04-01

    In health care facilities, pharmaceutical waste is generally discharged down the drain or sent to landfill. Poor knowledge about their potential downstream impacts may be a primary factor for improper disposal behavior. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an intervention program on knowledge and practice of health care staff regarding pharmaceutical waste management. The study was designed as a pre/posttest intervention study. Total sample size was 530 in the pre-intervention phase, and then a subsample of 69 individuals was selected for the intervention and the post-intervention phases. Paired-sample t test was used to assess the difference between pretest and follow-up test results. A statistically significant improvement in knowledge and practice was achieved (P<0.001). Poor knowledge and poor practice levels (scores<50%) were found to improve to satisfactory levels (scores≥75%). Therefore, educational programs could be considered as an effective tool for changing health care staff practice in pharmaceutical waste management. In health care facilities, pharmaceutical waste is generally discharged down the drain or sent to landfill. A lack of knowledge about the potential impacts of this type of waste may be a leading factor in improper disposal behavior. Following an educational program, statistically significant improvement in knowledge and practice of health care staff as regards to pharmaceutical waste management (PWM) was achieved. It is thus recommended that authorities implement training-of-trainers (TOT) programs to educate health care staff on PWM and organize refreshment workshops regularly.

  5. Quality management in nuclear medicine for better patient care: the IAEA program.

    PubMed

    Dondi, Maurizio; Kashyap, Ravi; Pascual, Thomas; Paez, Diana; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency promotes the practice of nuclear medicine among its Member States with a focus on quality and safety. It considers quality culture as a part of the educational process and as a tool to reduce heterogeneity in the practice of nuclear medicine, and in turn, patient care. Sensitization about quality is incorporated in all its delivery mechanisms. The Agency has developed a structured peer-review process called quality management (QM) audits in nuclear medicine practices to help nuclear medicine facilities improve their quality through this voluntary comprehensive audit process. The process is multidisciplinary, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine practice with a focus on the patient. It complements other QM and accreditation approaches developed by professional societies or accreditation agencies. The Agency is committed to propagate its utility and assist in the implementation process. Similar auditing programs for practice in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, called QUADRIL and QUATRO, respectively, are also in place. Necessary amendments in the auditing process and content are incorporated based on technological and practice changes with time. The reader will become familiar with the approach of the Agency on QM in nuclear medicine and its implementation process to improve patient care.

  6. The interdisciplinary approach to the implementation of a diabetes home care disease management program.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mary Ann; Lapides, Shawn; Hayden, Corrine; Santangelo, Roxanne

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes is a national epidemic and a leading cause of hospitalizations in the United States. Home care agencies need to be able to provide effective Diabetes Disease Management to help prevent avoidable hospitalizations and assist patients to live a good quality of life. This article describes one organization's journey toward providing patients with better diabetes care resulting in an improved quality of life.

  7. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of An Aged Care Specific Leadership and Management Program to Improve Work Environment, Staff Turnover, and Care Quality.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Simpson, Judy M; Li, Zhicheng; Cunich, Michelle M; Thomas, Tamsin H; Chenoweth, Lynn; Kendig, Hal L

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a leadership and management program in aged care. Double-blind cluster randomized controlled trial. Twelve residential and community-aged care sites in Australia. All care staff employed for 6 months or longer at the aged care sites were invited to participate in the surveys at 3 time points: baseline (time 1), 9 months from baseline (time 2), and 9 months after completion of time 2 (time 3) from 2011 to 2013. At each time point, at least 500 care staff completed a survey. At baseline (N = 503) the largest age group was 45 to 54 years (37%), and the majority of care staff were born in Australia (70%), spoke English (94%), and had at least completed secondary education (57%). A 12-month Clinical Leadership in Aged Care (CLiAC) program for middle managers, which aimed to further develop their leadership and management skills in creating positive workplace relationships and in enabling person-centered, evidence-based care. The primary outcomes were care staff ratings of the work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes were care staff's intention to leave their employer and profession, workplace stress, job satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness of implementing the program. Absenteeism was excluded due to difficulty in obtaining reliable data. Managers' self-rated knowledge and skills in leadership and management are not included in this article, which focuses on care staff perceptions only. At 6 months after its completion, the CLiAC program was effective in improving care staff's perception of management support [mean difference 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-1.18; P = .04]. Compared with the control sites, care staff at the intervention sites perceived their managers' leadership styles as more transformational (mean difference 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.51; P = .005), transactional (mean difference 0.22, 95% CI 0.05-0.39; P = .01), and less passive avoidant (mean difference 0.30, 95% CI 0

  8. Management of pain induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs: views of patients and care providers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The expectations of patients for managing pain induced by exercise and mobilization (PIEM) have seldom been investigated. We identified the views of patients and care providers regarding pain management induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 12 patients (7 women) and 14 care providers (6 women): 4 general practitioners [GPs], 1 rheumatologist, 1 physical medicine physician, 1 geriatrician, 2 orthopedic surgeons, and 5 physical therapists. Results Patients and care providers have differing views on PIEM in the overall management of the state of disease. Patients' descriptions of PIEM were polymorphic, and they experienced it as decreased health-related quality of life. The impact of PIEM was complex, and patient views were sometimes ambivalent, ranging from denial of symptoms to discontinuation of therapy. Care providers agreed that PIEM is generally not integrated in management strategies. Care providers more often emphasized the positive and less often the negative dimensions of PIEM than did patients. However, the consequences of PIEM cited included worsened patient clinical condition, fears about physical therapy, rejection of the physical therapist and refusal of care. PIEM follow-up is not optimal and is characterized by poor transmission of information. Patients expected education on how better to prevent stress and anxiety generated by pain, education on mobilization, and adaptations of physical therapy programs according to pain intensity. Conclusion PIEM management could be optimized by alerting care providers to the situation, improving communication among care providers, and providing education to patients and care providers. PMID:21781296

  9. The effectiveness of an aged care specific leadership and management program on workforce, work environment, and care quality outcomes: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A plethora of observational evidence exists concerning the impact of management and leadership on workforce, work environment, and care quality. Yet, no randomised controlled trial has been conducted to test the effectiveness of leadership and management interventions in aged care. An innovative aged care clinical leadership program (Clinical Leadership in Aged Care − CLiAC) was developed to improve managers’ leadership capacities to support the delivery of quality care in Australia. This paper describes the study design of the cluster randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of the program. Methods Twenty-four residential and community aged care sites were recruited as managers at each site agreed in writing to participate in the study and ensure that leaders allocated to the control arm would not be offered the intervention program. Sites undergoing major managerial or structural changes were excluded. The 24 sites were randomly allocated to receive the CLiAC program (intervention) or usual care (control), stratified by type (residential vs. community, six each for each arm). Treatment allocation was masked to assessors and staff of all participating sites. The objective is to establish the effectiveness of the CLiAC program in improving work environment, workforce retention, as well as care safety and quality, when compared to usual care. The primary outcomes are measures of work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes include manager leadership capacity, staff absenteeism, intention to leave, stress levels, and job satisfaction. Differences between intervention and control groups will be analysed by researchers blinded to treatment allocation using linear regression of individual results adjusted for stratification and clustering by site (primary analysis), and additionally for baseline values and potential confounders (secondary analysis). Outcomes measured at the site level will be

  10. Severely obese preschoolers in a tertiary care obesity program: characteristics and management.

    PubMed

    Baughcum, Amy E; Gramling, Kerri; Eneli, Ihuoma

    2015-04-01

    To describe the characteristics and management of severely obese 2- to 5-year-olds children referred to a tertiary care multidisciplinary obesity center. A retrospective chart review was conducted of children 2 to 5 years old evaluated at the center from January 2009 to February 2011. Referral eligibility was a body mass index (BMI) ≥95th percentile. Of the 2- to 5-year-olds seen at the center, 140 (94%) had a BMI >99th percentile. Of these children with severe obesity, 54% were female, 48% were Caucasian, and mean age was 4.60 years (SD = 1.00). Mean BMI and BMI z-score at initial visit was 26.5 kg/m(2) (SD = 4.12) and 3.59 (SD = 0.95), respectively. BMI z-scores varied significantly by age-χ(2)(3, N = 140) = 54.44, P < .001-and gender-χ(2)(1, N = 140) = -5.31, P < .001-with males and younger children presenting at much higher BMI z-scores. Most of the children had a family history of obesity, (85%), type 2 diabetes (74%), and hypertension (74%). Nearly one third of families reported history of mental health or substance abuse problems. Comorbidities were prevalent, particularly dyslipidemia and problematic eating behaviors. For the 53% of children who returned for at least one follow-up visit, mean BMI z-score decreased significantly by 0.15-t(79) = 5.31, P < .001. Our findings underscore the severity of the condition facing these children and their families. With improved retention, the tertiary care multidisciplinary program may be a viable option for successful intervention for these children. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Implications of Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) programs for managed care pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Gaurang; Chon, Ashley; Johnson, Nik; Kidder, Phyllis A; Lee, Peter; Leung, Kevin; Ma, Ingrid; Ness, Stacey; Sampsel, Elizabeth; Schlaifer, Marissa; Seifert, Randall; Sternaman, Debora B

    2012-04-01

    In the last 2 decades, health care management has been challenged by more aggressive therapy, the increased number of specialty medications, and more stringent guidelines to monitor adverse events or health risk. To promote patient safety, various communication requirements are mandated to increase the risk awareness of patients and physicians. These include black-box warnings, "Dear Health Care Provider" letters, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Talk Papers, MedGuides, and Risk Minimization Action Plans (RiskMAPs).

  12. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting.

  13. Capitated Medicaid Managed Care in a Rural Area: The Impact of Minnesota's PMAP Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Sharon K.; Coughlin, Teresa A.; King, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Although states have had difficulty extending Medicaid managed care (MMC) to rural areas, rural models of capitated MMC are expected to grow in response to new federal regulations and the serious budget problems facing nearly all states. As such, understanding the effects of capitated MMC in rural settings is important for policy considerations.…

  14. Capitated Medicaid Managed Care in a Rural Area: The Impact of Minnesota's PMAP Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Sharon K.; Coughlin, Teresa A.; King, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Although states have had difficulty extending Medicaid managed care (MMC) to rural areas, rural models of capitated MMC are expected to grow in response to new federal regulations and the serious budget problems facing nearly all states. As such, understanding the effects of capitated MMC in rural settings is important for policy considerations.…

  15. The impact of a proactive chronic care management program on hospital admission rates in a German health insurance society.

    PubMed

    Hamar, Brent; Wells, Aaron; Gandy, William; Haaf, Andreas; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E; Rula, Elizabeth Y

    2010-12-01

    Hospital admissions are the source of significant health care expenses, although a large proportion of these admissions can be avoided through proper management of chronic disease. In the present study, we evaluate the impact of a proactive chronic care management program for members of a German insurance society who suffer from chronic disease. Specifically, we tested the impact of nurse-delivered care calls on hospital admission rates. Study participants were insured individuals with coronary artery disease, heart failure, diabetes, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who consented to participate in the chronic care management program. Intervention (n  = 17,319) and Comparison (n  = 5668) groups were defined based on records of participating (or not participating) in telephonic interactions. Changes in admission rates were calculated from the year prior to (Base) and year after program commencement. Comparative analyses were adjusted for age, sex, region of residence, and disease severity (stratification of 3 [least severe] to 1 [most severe]). Overall, the admission rate in the Intervention group decreased by 6.2% compared with a 14.9% increase in the Comparison group (P  <  0.001). The overall decrease in admissions for the Intervention group was driven by risk stratification levels 2 and 1, for which admissions decreased by 8.2% and 14.2% compared to Comparison group increases of 12.1% and 7.9%, respectively. Additionally, Intervention group admissions decreased as the number of calls increased (P  =  0.004), indicating a dose-response relationship. These findings indicate that proactive chronic care management care calls can help reduce hospital admissions among German health insurance members with chronic disease.

  16. Training of Unskilled Child Care Providers: An In-House Program to Overcome Management's Financial Constraints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Brian

    An in-house staff development program was designed and implemented for unskilled child caregivers employed at Tiny Tots Educare Academies, Inc., a privately owned and operated child care center located in Ellenton, Florida. Employees had little knowledge of child development and other topics related to early childhood education and, therefore,…

  17. Negotiating managed care contracts.

    PubMed

    Beckman, P A; Fischer, T J

    1997-08-01

    Physicians currently have a major opportunity to help guide the rapid evolution of managed care in the United States. General principles on how physicians can successfully negotiate a managed care contract are discussed.

  18. The role of disease management in pay-for-performance programs for improving the care of chronically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Beich, Jeff; Scanlon, Dennis P; Ulbrecht, Jan; Ford, Eric W; Ibrahim, Ibrahim A

    2006-02-01

    To date, pay-for-performance programs targeting the care of persons with chronic conditions have primarily been directed at physicians and provide an alternative to health plan-sponsored chronic disease management (DM) programs. Both approaches require similar infrastructure, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages for program implementation. Pay-for-performance programs use incentives based on patient outcomes; however, an alternative system might incorporate measures of structure and process. Using a conceptual framework, the authors explore the variation in 50 diabetes DM programs using data from the 2002 National Business Coalition on Health's eValue8 Request for Information (RFI). The authors raise issues relevant to the assignment of accountability for patient outcomes to either health plans or physicians. They analyze the association between RFI scores measuring structures and processes, and HEDIS diabetes intermediate outcome measures. Finally, the strengths and weaknesses of using the RFI scores as an alternative metric for pay-for-performance programs are discussed.

  19. Health care use and costs for participants in a diabetes disease management program, United States, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Dall, Timothy M; Roary, Mary; Yang, Wenya; Zhang, Shiping; Chen, Yaozhu J; Arday, David R; Gantt, Cynthia J; Zhang, Yiduo

    2011-05-01

    The Disease Management Association of America identifies diabetes as one of the chronic conditions with the greatest potential for management. TRICARE Management Activity, which administers health care benefits for US military service personnel, retirees, and their dependents, created a disease management program for beneficiaries with diabetes. The objective of this study was to determine whether participation intensity and prior indication of uncontrolled diabetes were associated with health care use and costs for participants enrolled in TRICARE's diabetes management program. This ongoing, opt-out study used a quasi-experimental approach to assess program impact for beneficiaries (n = 37,370) aged 18 to 64 living in the United States. Inclusion criteria were any diabetes-related emergency department visits or hospitalizations, more than 10 diabetes-related ambulatory visits, or more than twenty 30-day prescriptions for diabetes drugs in the previous year. Beginning in June 2007, all participants received educational mailings. Participants who agreed to receive a baseline telephone assessment and telephone counseling once per month in addition to educational mailings were considered active, and those who did not complete at least the baseline telephone assessment were considered passive. We categorized the diabetes status of each participant as "uncontrolled" or "controlled" on the basis of medical claims containing diagnosis codes for uncontrolled diabetes in the year preceding program eligibility. We compared observed outcomes to outcomes predicted in the absence of diabetes management. Prediction equations were based on regression analysis of medical claims for a historical control group (n = 23,818) that in October 2004 met the eligibility criteria for TRICARE's program implemented June 2007. We conducted regression analysis comparing historical control group patient outcomes after October 2004 with these baseline characteristics. Per-person total annual

  20. Empowering the dementia care workforce to manage behavioral symptoms of dementia: Development and training outcomes from the VOICE Dementia Care Program.

    PubMed

    Karlin, Bradley E; Young, David; Dash, Kim

    2016-07-25

    Nonpharmacological approaches for managing behavioral symptoms of dementia remain widely underutilized, due in part to near-universal training needs reported by dementia caregivers in recent research. This article examines the development, core components, and initial outcomes of an evidence-informed, competency-based training program in the prevention and management of behavioral symptoms of dementia among care managers and nurses within an aging services system. The Vital Outcomes Inspired by Caregiver Engagement (VOICE) Dementia Care Training Program was developed based on identification of state-of-the-art approaches to managing behaviors through expert review of the literature and structured needs assessment. Results reveal robust improvements in knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy among training participants, with largest effect sizes (d = 1.8) on domains of knowledge and self-efficacy to manage behaviors. Findings support the feasibility and effectiveness of training in improving the abilities and confidence of aging services providers in dementia care and, specifically, in the nonpharmacological management of dementia-related behaviors.

  1. The formation, elements of success, and challenges in managing a critical care program: Part I.

    PubMed

    St Andre, Arthur

    2015-04-01

    Leaders of critical care programs have significant responsibility to develop and maintain a system of intensive care. At inception, those clinician resources necessary to provide and be available for the expected range of patient illness and injury and throughput are determined. Simultaneously, non-ICU clinical responsibilities and other expectations, such as education of trainees and participation in hospital operations, must be understood. To meet these responsibilities, physicians must be recruited, mentored, and retained. The physician leader may have similar responsibilities for nonphysician practitioners. In concert with other critical care leaders, the service adopts a model of care and assembles an ICU team of physicians, nurses, nonphysician providers, respiratory therapists, and others to provide clinical services. Besides clinician resources, leaders must assure that services such as radiology, pharmacy, the laboratory, and information services are positioned to support the complexities of ICU care. Metrics are developed to report success in meeting process and outcomes goals. Leaders evolve the system of care by reassessing and modifying practice patterns to continually improve safety, efficacy, and efficiency. Major emphasis is placed on the importance of continuity, consistency, and communication by expecting practitioners to adopt similar practices and patterns. Services anticipate and adapt to evolving expectations and resource availability. Effective services will result when skilled practitioners support one another and ascribe to a service philosophy of care.

  2. A pragmatic randomized controlled trial of the Flinders Program of chronic condition management in community health care services.

    PubMed

    Battersby, Malcolm; Harris, Melanie; Smith, David; Reed, Richard; Woodman, Richard

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the Flinders Program in improving self-management in common chronic conditions. To examine properties of the Partners in Health scale (PIH). Participants were randomized to usual care or Flinders Program plus usual care. Self-management competency, quality of life, and other outcomes were measured at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Of 231 participants, 172 provided data at 6 months and 61 at 12 months. At 6 months, intention-to-treat outcomes favoured the intervention group for SF-12 physical health (p=0.043). Other pre-determined outcomes did not show significance. At 6 months intervention participants' problem severity scores reduced (p<0.001) and goal achievement scores increased (p<0.001). Only 55% of the intervention group received a Flinders Program, compromising study power. The PIH was associated with other measures at baseline and for change over time. In a pragmatic community trial, the Flinders Program improved quality of life at 6 months. Incomplete in-practice intervention delivery limited trial power. Studies are now needed on improving delivery. The PIH has potential as a generic risk screening tool and predictive measure of change in self-management and chronic condition outcomes over time. Better implementation including service integration is required for improved chronic disease management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Incorporating person centred care principles into an ongoing comprehensive cancer management program: an experiential account.

    PubMed

    Nandini, Vallath; Sridhar, Cn; Usharani, Mr; Kumar, John Preshanth; Salins, Naveen

    2011-01-01

    Recent research indicates a definite positive impact on treatment outcomes when an integrative approach that focuses on symptom control and quality of life is provided along with the standard therapeutic regimens. However implementation or practice of this approach is not seen widely due to the culture of medical training and practice. This article presents the initial development of a program for incorporating integrative care principles into an ongoing comprehensive cancer care program at a tertiary centre. The key purpose of the program being to develop, facilitate, and establish comprehensive and holistic processes including palliative care principles, that would positively enhance the quantity and quality of life of the person with disease, as well as create an environment that reflects and sustains this approach. The vision, objectives, goals, strategies, activities and results within the 7 months of implementation are documented. The new learnings gained during the process have also been noted in the hope that the model described may be used to conceptualize similar care giving facilities in other centres.

  4. Use of the short form 36 in a primary care based disease management program for patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Jaan; Shull, Robert D; Girolami, Sabrina; Mensch, Debra

    2003-01-01

    While disease management has been described as an important strategy for the care of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) in the managed care setting, little is known about the impact of this approach on overall health-related quality of life. In this study the Short Form 36 (SF-36) was administered to all patients entering CHF disease management at the time of program entry and at 1 year following entry. Scores on the eight subscales and the two composite scales were calculated and compared before and after. Patients were enrolled from a mixed-model health maintenance organization (HMO) with 34,740 Medicare + Choice enrollees residing in 38 counties in central and northeastern Pennsylvania. Two hundred sixty-eight continuously enrolled patients in an HMO-sponsored CHF disease state management program with completed baseline and follow-up SF-36 surveys were sampled. All patients entered into disease management received primary care based, nurse-directed education about CHF self-management including instruction on etiology of CHF, the importance of medication compliance, home care services if indicated, monitoring weight gain, increased understanding of the warning signs of worsening CHF, and coaching on strategies to contact a physician in a timely manner when CHF worsens. Nurses also facilitated for CHF guidelines among primary care physicians, including the need to obtain a baseline assessment of cardiac function, prescribe angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta blockers when appropriate, and initiated appropriate specialist referral. Compared with enrollees who did not complete a pair of SF-36 surveys, the 268 respondents were younger and had a significantly higher rate of cardiac imaging as well as use of ACE inhibitors and beta blocker medications. Analysis of the SF-36 data revealed that three of the eight (Role Physical, General Health Perceptions, and Role Emotional) subscales increased in a statistically significant manner, as

  5. Geography Undergraduate Program Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estaville, Lawrence E.; Brown, Brock J.; Caldwell, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Vision and mission statements are the foundation for the types of undergraduate degrees departments confer as well as other types of academic programs such as pre-major, certificate, and distance education curricula. Critical to each department should be careful administration of course selections and offerings and management of academic majors,…

  6. Use of the emergency department for less-urgent care among type 2 diabetics under a disease management program

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This study analyzed the likelihood of less-urgent emergency department (ED) visits among type 2 diabetic patients receiving care under a diabetes disease management (DM) program offered by the Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division (LSU HCSD). Methods All ED and outpatient clinic visits made by 6,412 type 2 diabetic patients from 1999 to 2006 were extracted from the LSU HCSD Disease Management (DM) Evaluation Database. Patient ED visits were classified as either urgent or less-urgent, and the likelihood of a less-urgent ED visit was compared with outpatient clinic visits using the Generalized Estimating Equation methodology for binary response to time-dependent variables. Results Patients who adhered to regular clinic visit schedules dictated by the DM program were less likely to use the ED for less urgent care with odds ratio of 0.1585. Insured patients had 1.13 to 1.70 greater odds of a less-urgent ED visit than those who were uninsured. Patients with better-managed glycated hemoglobin (A1c or HbA1c) levels were 82 times less likely to use less-urgent ED visits. Furthermore, being older, Caucasian, or a longer participant in the DM program had a modestly lower likelihood of less-urgent ED visits. The patient's Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), gender, prior hospitalization, and the admitting facility showed no effect. Conclusion Patients adhering to the DM visit guidelines were less likely to use the ED for less-urgent problems. Maintaining normal A1c levels for their diabetes also has the positive impact to reduce less-urgent ED usages. It suggests that successful DM programs may reduce inappropriate ED use. In contrast to expectations, uninsured patients were less likely to use the ED for less-urgent care. Patients in the DM program with Medicaid coverage were 1.3 times more likely to seek care in the ED for non-emergencies while commercially insured patients were nearly 1.7 times more likely to do so. Further research to understand

  7. Use of the emergency department for less-urgent care among type 2 diabetics under a disease management program.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shang-Jyh; Campbell, Claudia; Horswell, Ronald; Myers, Leann; Culbertson, Richard

    2009-12-07

    This study analyzed the likelihood of less-urgent emergency department (ED) visits among type 2 diabetic patients receiving care under a diabetes disease management (DM) program offered by the Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division (LSU HCSD). All ED and outpatient clinic visits made by 6,412 type 2 diabetic patients from 1999 to 2006 were extracted from the LSU HCSD Disease Management (DM) Evaluation Database. Patient ED visits were classified as either urgent or less-urgent, and the likelihood of a less-urgent ED visit was compared with outpatient clinic visits using the Generalized Estimating Equation methodology for binary response to time-dependent variables. Patients who adhered to regular clinic visit schedules dictated by the DM program were less likely to use the ED for less urgent care with odds ratio of 0.1585. Insured patients had 1.13 to 1.70 greater odds of a less-urgent ED visit than those who were uninsured. Patients with better-managed glycated hemoglobin (A1c or HbA1c) levels were 82 times less likely to use less-urgent ED visits. Furthermore, being older, Caucasian, or a longer participant in the DM program had a modestly lower likelihood of less-urgent ED visits. The patient's Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), gender, prior hospitalization, and the admitting facility showed no effect. Patients adhering to the DM visit guidelines were less likely to use the ED for less-urgent problems. Maintaining normal A1c levels for their diabetes also has the positive impact to reduce less-urgent ED usages. It suggests that successful DM programs may reduce inappropriate ED use. In contrast to expectations, uninsured patients were less likely to use the ED for less-urgent care. Patients in the DM program with Medicaid coverage were 1.3 times more likely to seek care in the ED for non-emergencies while commercially insured patients were nearly 1.7 times more likely to do so. Further research to understand inappropriate ED use among insured

  8. [Modern concepts of medical care--what has been achieved by the implementation of disease management programs?].

    PubMed

    Kirchner, H

    2005-01-01

    Since 2003, structured treatment programs for chronically ill patients (disease management programs; DMPs) have been under development in Germany. Virtually nationwide, programs in which physicians and patients can register are being offered for diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2, breast cancer, coronary heart disease and asthma/COPD. The medical content of the programs is determined on the basis of evidence-based medicine. Even though the effectiveness of structured treatment programs is documented for diabetes, adequate studies confirming the overall transferability of results to the German health care system are as yet lacking. Physicians above all strongly criticise the coupling of DMPs with the risk adjustment scheme of the statutory health insurance funds, as well as the large amount of paperwork involved.

  9. The Lifestyle Engagement Activity Program (LEAP): Implementing Social and Recreational Activity into Case-Managed Home Care.

    PubMed

    Low, Lee-Fay; Baker, Jessica Rose; Harrison, Fleur; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Haertsch, Maggie; Camp, Cameron; Skropeta, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    The Lifestyle Engagement Activity Program (LEAP) incorporates social support and recreational activities into case-managed home care. This study's aim was to evaluate the effect of LEAP on engagement, mood, and behavior of home care clients, and on case managers and care workers. Quasi-experimental. Five Australian aged home care providers, including 2 specializing in care for ethnic minorities. Clients (n = 189) from 5 home care providers participated. The 12-month program had 3 components: (1) engaging support of management and staff; (2) a champion to drive practice change; (3) staff training. Case managers were trained to set meaningful social and/or recreational goals during care planning. Care workers were trained in good communication, to promote client independence and choice, and in techniques such as Montessori activities, reminiscence, music, physical activity, and humor. Data were collected 6 months before program commencement, at baseline, and 6 and 12 months. The Homecare Measure of Engagement Staff report and Client-Family interview were primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes were the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory; apathy, dysphoria, and agitation subscales of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Clinician Rating; the geriatric depression scale; UCLA loneliness scale; and home care satisfaction scale. Staff provided information on confidence in engaging clients and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. Twelve months after program commencement, clients showed a significant increase in self- or family-reported client engagement (b = 5.39, t[113.09] = 3.93, P < .000); and a significant decrease in apathy (b = -0.23, t(117.00) = -2.03, P = .045), dysphoria (b = -0.25, t(124.36) = -2.25, P = .026), and agitation (b = -0.97, t(98.15) = -3.32, P = .001) on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Clinician. Case managers and care workers both reported significant increases in their confidence to socially and recreationally engage clients (b = 0.52, t(21.33) = 2.80, P

  10. Prospective evaluation of an outpatient heart failure disease management program designed for primary care: the Oregon model.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Ray E; Nauman, Deirdre J; Byrkit, James; Gillespie, Gordon; Lackides, Greg; Toy, Warren; Burgess, Donna; Dutton, Diana

    2005-05-01

    Most heart failure care is provided by primary care providers. Although heart failure disease management programs improve outcomes, most have been hospital-based with little integration with primary care providers. To address this issue, a heart failure clinic disease management model was adapted for use in the primary care setting. A heart failure clinic staffed by 2 internists and their nurses was established in a large primary care practice. Medical care and pharmacotherapy were based on national guidelines. Nurses assisted with disease management. Primary outcomes included quality of life, functional class, and all-cause hospital and emergency room admissions 12 months before compared with 12 months after enrollment; a secondary endpoint was patient satisfaction. Of 165 patients sent to the heart failure clinic, 54 were referred back because of no active heart failure, and 18 had only 1 clinic visit. The 93 patients seen 2 or more times had a median age of 75 years. Anti-angiotensin II therapy was present in 84% and did not change over time, but doses of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor increased by >50%. beta-blocker use increased from 40% at baseline to 63% at 6 months. Emergency room visits or all-cause hospitalizations were reduced (0.86 +/- 1.5 to 0.52 +/- 0.86, P < .001) or trended to be reduced (0.56 +/- 0.98 to 0.35 +/- 0.62, P = .07), respectively, by approximately 40%. Quality of life improved significantly at all time points, and patients were highly satisfied. This heart failure disease management model, designed for patients and providers in an primary care setting, was feasible and successful.

  11. Review of the cultural safety of a national Indigenous point-of-care testing program for diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Mark; O'Brien, Christopher; Burgoyne, Anthony; Croft, Jody; Garlett, Trevor; Barancek, Kristina; Halls, Heather; McAteer, Bridgit; Motta, Lara; Shephard, Anne

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have approximately three-fold higher rates of diabetes than non-Indigenous Australians. Point-of-care testing, where pathology tests are conducted close to the patient, with results available during the patient consultation, can potentially deliver several benefits for both the Indigenous client and the health professional team involved in their care. Currently, point-of-care testing for diabetes management is being conducted in over 180 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Medical Services as part of a national program called Quality Assurance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Medical Services (QAAMS). The cultural safety of the Program was reviewed by sourcing the views of the QAAMS Indigenous Leaders Team in a focus group setting and by surveying the point-of-care testing operators enrolled in QAAMS, via an electronic questionnaire. The current study confirms that QAAMS remains a culturally safe program that fills a permanent and positive niche within the Indigenous health sector. The study demonstrates that QAAMS provides a convenient and accessible 'one-stop' pathology service for Indigenous clients with diabetes and empowers Aboriginal Health Workers to have a direct role in the care of their diabetes clients.

  12. Impact of disease management on health care utilization: evidence from the "Florida: A Healthy State (FAHS)" Medicaid Program.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Abdelmonem A; Morisky, Donald E; Kominski, Gerald F; Kotlerman, Jenny B

    2007-06-01

    To examine the impact of disease management on utilization of selected health care services. Prospective observational population-based study comparing Florida Medicaid patients who elected to participate in disease management (DM, N=15,275) with a usual-care (UC, N=32,034) group who elected not to participate in the program. Patients had at least one of four chronic diseases (diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, and hypertension) and all received standard health care. DM participants received supplementary telephone health counseling by a managed care specialist. The data for this paper were collected between October 2001 and October 2004. Annual rates of inpatient hospital stays, inpatient days, emergency room (ER) visits, and outpatient (OP) visits, during and post intervention, were used as outcomes. Age, race, gender, comorbidities, severity indicators, geographic location and pre-intervention utilization were used as covariates. Compared to UC patients, DM patients had lower adjusted post intervention annualized rates of hospitalizations ranging from 0.07 to 0.38 stays, lower rates of hospital days ranging from 0.40 to 2.54 days, and lower rates of ER visits ranging from 0.10 to 0.91 visits per DM enrollee in all four chronic conditions. Most results were statistically significant at the 5% level, except for hypertension patients, where they were suggestive, though not significant. Disease management is effective in reducing potentially avoidable inpatient hospital stays and ER visits among patients with chronic illness.

  13. The formation, elements of success, and challenges in managing a critical care program: part II.

    PubMed

    St Andre, Arthur

    2015-05-01

    Leaders of critical care services require knowledge and skills not typically acquired during their medical education and training. Leaders possess personality characteristics and evolve and adopt behaviors and knowledge in addition to those useful in the care of patients and rounding with an ICU team. Successful leaders have impeccable integrity, possess a service mentality, are decisive, and speak the truth consistently and accurately. Effective leaders are thoughtful listeners, introspective, develop a range of relationships, and nurture others. They understand group psychology, observe, analyze assumptions, decide, and improve the system of care and the performance of their team members. A leader learns to facilely adapt to circumstance, generate new ideas, and be a catalyst of change. Those most successful further their education as a leader and learn when and where to seek mentorship. Leaders understand their organization and its operational complexities. Leaders learn to participate and knowledgeably contribute to the fiscal aspects of income, expense, budget, and contracts from an institutional and department perspective. Clinician compensation must be commensurate with expectations and be written to motivate and make clear duties that are clinical and nonclinical. A leader understands and plans to address the evolving challenges facing healthcare, especially resource constraints, the emotions and requirements of managing the end of life, the complexities of competing demands and motivations, the bureaucracy of healthcare practice, and reimbursement. Responsibilities to manage and evolve must be met with intelligence, sensitivity, and equanimity.

  14. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program: the experience of frequent users of health care services and peer leaders

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Diadiou, Fatoumata; Bouliane, Danielle; Lambert, Mireille; Hudon, Émilie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Large amount of evidence supports the contribution of the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) to a global chronic disease management strategy. However, many studies have suggested further exploring of the factors influencing acceptance and completion of participants in this program. Objective. This study aimed to describe and examine factors associated with acceptance and completion rates of the CDSMP among frequent users of health care services, and to highlight the experience of patients and peer leaders who facilitated the program. Methods. A descriptive design with mixed sequential data was used. Acceptance and completion rates were calculated and their relationship with patient characteristics was examined in regression analysis (n = 167). Interviews were conducted among patients who accepted (n = 11) and refused (n = 13) to participate and with the program coordinator. Focus groups were held with the seven peer leaders who facilitated the program. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results. Of the 167 patients invited, 60 (36%) accepted to participate in the program. Group format was the most frequent reason to decline the invitation to participate. Twenty-eight participants (47%) completed the program. Participants who dropped out during the program raised different reasons such as poor health and too much heterogeneity among participants. Factors such as location, schedule, content, group composition and facilitation were considered as important elements contributing to the success of the program. Conclusion. The CDSMP could therefore be considered as a self-management support option for this vulnerable clientele, while taking measures to avoid too much heterogeneity among participants to improve completion rates. PMID:26984994

  15. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program: the experience of frequent users of health care services and peer leaders.

    PubMed

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Diadiou, Fatoumata; Bouliane, Danielle; Lambert, Mireille; Hudon, Émilie

    2016-04-01

    Large amount of evidence supports the contribution of the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) to a global chronic disease management strategy. However, many studies have suggested further exploring of the factors influencing acceptance and completion of participants in this program. This study aimed to describe and examine factors associated with acceptance and completion rates of the CDSMP among frequent users of health care services, and to highlight the experience of patients and peer leaders who facilitated the program. A descriptive design with mixed sequential data was used. Acceptance and completion rates were calculated and their relationship with patient characteristics was examined in regression analysis (n = 167). Interviews were conducted among patients who accepted (n = 11) and refused (n = 13) to participate and with the program coordinator. Focus groups were held with the seven peer leaders who facilitated the program. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Of the 167 patients invited, 60 (36%) accepted to participate in the program. Group format was the most frequent reason to decline the invitation to participate. Twenty-eight participants (47%) completed the program. Participants who dropped out during the program raised different reasons such as poor health and too much heterogeneity among participants. Factors such as location, schedule, content, group composition and facilitation were considered as important elements contributing to the success of the program. The CDSMP could therefore be considered as a self-management support option for this vulnerable clientele, while taking measures to avoid too much heterogeneity among participants to improve completion rates. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Efficacy of a systematic depression management program in high utilizers of primary care: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Approximately 25% of so-called high utilizers of medical care are estimated to suffer from depression. A large proportion of these individuals remain undiagnosed and untreated. This study aims to examine the effects of a systematic screening and collaborative treatment program on depression severity in small primary care practices of the German outpatient health care system. Method High utilizers of primary care who screened positive for depressive symptoms on the Brief Psychiatric Health Questionnaire (B-PHQ) were further diagnosed using the DIA-X, a standardized diagnostic interview, performed by trained and supervised interviewers. Patients with major depression were randomized (cluster randomization by practice) to (a) a six-month treatment program of pharmacotherapy, standardized patient and provider education, and physician and patient counseling or (b) six months of usual medical care. All subjects were followed for a 12-month observation period using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating scale (HAMD-17) rated by the treating physicians and the B-PHQ-9 rated by the patients. Results A total of 63 high utilizer patients were included in the trial (17 male, 46 female), 19 randomized to intervention, 44 to usual care. The mean age was 49.7 (SD 13.8). Most patients had one or more somatic co-morbidities. There was no significant difference in response (defined as a decrease in the HAMD-17 sum score of at least 50%) after six months of treatment (50% vs. 42%, p = 0.961, all analyses adjusted for age) and after 12 months of treatment (83% vs. 54%, p = 0.282) between groups. Using patient self-rating assessments with the B-PHQ-9 questionnaire the intervention was superior to treatment as usual at six months (83% vs. 16%, p = 0.000). There was no significant difference in HAMD-17 depression severity at six months between the groups (10.5 (SD 7.6) vs. 12.3 (SD 7.8), p = 0.718), but a trend at 12 months (4.7 (SD 8.0) vs. 11.2 (SD 7.4), p = 0.083). Again

  17. Evaluation of an integrated workers' compensation/managed care pharmacy benefit program: employee satisfaction and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Shadi; Washington, Stephanie; Stapleton, David; DiCiccio-Miller, Yasamin

    2005-02-01

    In response to rising costs, New York State developed an integrated workers' compensation/managed care pharmacy benefit program, ONECARD Rx. This study examined the effect of the program on employee satisfaction and health outcomes. The study design is cross-sectional; the two main study groups comprised users and nonusers of ONECARD Rx between January 1998 and March 2000. All 462 users and a sample of 880 nonusers were surveyed. More than 80% of ONECARD Rx users rated their prescription drug program as excellent, very good, or good compared with 47% of nonusers (P < .01). Of the least desirable features of ONECARD Rx were the time to get the prescription filled and the need to have a workers' compensation number to use the benefit, both of which may be a factor of the short period of exposure time to the benefit. No significant differences in health status were detected among users and nonusers. This study reveals that integration of workers' compensation and managed care pharmacy benefit programs is a promising innovative strategy to improve quality.

  18. The early experience of a voluntary small group insurance program utilizing managed care plans.

    PubMed

    Christianson, J B; Liu, C F; Schroeder, C; Read, W; Murphy, J

    1997-01-01

    HealthCare Group of Arizona (HCGA), a state-sponsored, voluntary health insurance purchasing program offering prepaid health plans to small businesses, became operational in 1988. This article summarizes the results from a wide-ranging evaluation of that program and discusses their implications. In general, enrollees were satisfied with their experience in their plans. HCGA did not appear to attract an adverse mix of health risks, and service utilization rates were consistent with HMO industry averages. However, these findings varied across health plans and the marketing approaches they adopted. Enrollment growth in HCGA has been steady, but premium subsidies may be necessary if HCGA is to substantially increase its enrollment of low-wage, uninsured workers.

  19. The effect of a diabetes collaborative care management program on clinical and economic outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    McAdam-Marx, Carrie; Dahal, Arati; Jennings, Brandon; Singhal, Mukul; Gunning, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Clinical pharmacy services (CPS) in the primary care setting have been shown to help patients attain treatment goals and improve outcomes. However, the availability of CPS in community-based primary care is not widespread. One reason is that current fee-for-service models offer limited reimbursement opportunities for CPS in the community setting. Furthermore, data demonstrating the value of CPS in this setting are limited, making it difficult for providers to determine the feasibility and sustainability of incorporating CPS into primary care practice. To (a) evaluate the association between a pharmacist-led, diabetes collaborative drug therapy management program and patient outcomes, including glycemic control and health care costs, and (b) assess short-term economic outcomes in a primary care setting. A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted using medical record data. This study was conducted using patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2DM), defined as HbA1c ≥ 7.0%. Outcomes were compared between patients referred to a diabetes collaborative care management (DCCM) intervention from 2009-2012 and patients who did not participate in the DCCM program. To illustrate the difference in HbA1c between the 2 cohorts over the follow-up period, mean time adjusted HbA1c values were estimated using a panel-type random effects regression model, with results plotted at 90-day intervals from index date through the end of the study period. To help control for confounding by other factors, multivariate regression models were run. A difference-in-difference model was employed to estimate the effect of the program on resource utilization and all-cause charges. A total of 303 DCCM and 394 comparison patients were included. Mean (95% CI) age was 57.4 years (55.963, 58.902) versus 59.9 years (58.613, 61.276; P < 0.001) with 48% and 44% female for DCCM and comparison patients, respectively (P = 0.49). Mean baseline HbA1c was higher for DCCM (10.3%; 10.10, 10.53) than

  20. Analysis of benzodiazepine withdrawal program managed by primary care nurses in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzodiazepine (BZD), the long-term treatment of which is harmful for cognitive function, is widely prescribed by General Practitioners in Spain. Based on studies performed in other countries we designed a nurse-led BZD withdrawal program adapted to Spanish Primary Care working conditions. Results A pseudo-experimental (before-after) study took place in two Primary Care Centres in Barcelona. From a sample of 1150 patients, 79 were identified. They were over 44 years old and had been daily users of BZD for a period exceeding six months. Out of the target group 51 patients agreed to participate. BZD dosage was reduced every 2-4 weeks by 25% of the initial dose with the optional support of Hydroxyzine or Valerian. The rating measurements were: reduction of BZD prescription, demographic variables, the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) to measure quality of life, the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) Sleep Scale, and the Goldberg Depression and Anxiety Scale. By the end of the six-month intervention, 80.4% of the patients had discontinued BZD and 64% maintained abstinence at one year. An improvement in all parameters of the Goldberg scale (p <0.05) and in the mental component of SF-12 at 3.3 points (p = 0.024), as well as in most components of the MOS scale, was observed in the group that had discontinued BZD. No significant differences in these scales before and after the intervention were observed in the group that had not discontinued. Conclusions At one year approximately 2/3 of the patients had ceased taking BZD. They showed an overall improvement in depression and anxiety scales, and in the mental component of the quality of life scale. There was no apparent reduction in the sleep quality indicators in most of the analysed components. Nurses in a Primary Care setting can successfully implement a BZD withdrawal program. PMID:23237104

  1. Quantifying Differences in Health Care Consumption for the Management of Multiple Sclerosis Within Privately and Publicly Insured Health Care Programs.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Terrie; Fay, Monica; Iyer, Ravi; Wells, Wendy; Pill, Michael W

    2016-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic and debilitating disease of the central nervous system that affects more than 570,000 persons in the United States and 2.3 million worldwide. Since most individuals experience initial symptoms between the ages of 20 and 40 years, MS can have a significant effect on health care consumption, quality of life, productivity, and employment over the long-term disease course. Opportunities exist to better understand how benefit design and other nonclinical factors can affect health care delivery and associated costs. To observe and report variances in health care consumed for the treatment of MS in patients enrolled in privately (commercial) and publicly (Medicaid) funded health insurance programs. In a retrospective analysis using Havas Gemini's proprietary MS Benchmarks Disease-Modeling Process and IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims and Longitudinal Prescriptions databases, integrated medical and pharmacy claims data were analyzed to select patients with a diagnosis of MS during the 2012 calendar year. Comorbidities were determined using ICD-9-CM codes present on medical claims. Prescription drug use was evaluated by pharmacy claims and drug-specific billing codes. 19,984 patients with MS were identified-18,269 from commercial payers and 1,715 from Medicaid. Although total annual costs related to the care of MS for the groups reflected a relatively small difference ($31,107 commercial; $33,344 Medicaid), costs associated with specific service categories varied greatly. Pharmacy costs were considerably less in the Medicaid group; however, inpatient and emergency room costs were as much as 5 times higher. Overall use of disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) in the Medicaid group was seen in 32.5% of patients and 52.1% in the commercial patient group. Thus, lower pharmacy costs in the Medicaid group were possibly related to lesser use of DMTs among that group of patients. This analysis illustrates that notable variances exist in consumption

  2. Influence of patient literacy on the effectiveness of a primary care-based diabetes disease management program.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Russell L; DeWalt, Darren A; Malone, Robb; Bryant, Betsy; Shintani, Ayumi; Crigler, Britton; Weinberger, Morris; Pignone, Michael

    2004-10-13

    Low literacy is an important barrier for patients with diabetes, but interventions to address low literacy have not been well examined. To examine the role of literacy on the effectiveness of a comprehensive disease management program for patients with diabetes. Analysis of the influence of literacy on glycemic control and systolic blood pressure using data from a randomized controlled trial (conducted from February 2001 through April 2003) of a comprehensive diabetes management program. Participants were 217 patients aged 18 years or older with type 2 diabetes and poor glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] levels > or =8.0%) and presenting to a US academic general internal medicine practice. All communication to patients was individualized and delivered to enhance comprehension among patients with low literacy. Intervention patients received intensive disease management from a multidisciplinary team. Control patients received an initial management session and continued with usual care. Achievement of goal HbA1c levels and systolic blood pressure at 12-month follow-up for control and intervention patients stratified by literacy status. Complete 12-month data were available for 193 patients (89%). Among patients with low literacy, intervention patients were more likely than control patients to achieve goal HbA1c levels (< or =7.0%) (42% vs 15%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 17.2; P = .02). Patients with higher literacy had similar odds of achieving goal HbA1c levels regardless of intervention status (24% vs 23%; adjusted OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.4 to 2.5; P = .98). Improvements in systolic blood pressure were similar by literacy status. Literacy may be an important factor for predicting who will benefit from an intervention for diabetes management. A diabetes disease management program that addresses literacy may be particularly beneficial for patients with low literacy, and increasing access to such a

  3. Health care engineering management.

    PubMed

    Jarzembski, W B

    1980-01-01

    Today, health care engineering management is merely a concept of dreamers, with most engineering decisions in health care being made by nonengineers. It is the purpose of this paper to present a rationale for an integrated hospital engineering group, and to acquaint the clinical engineer with some of the salient features of management concepts. Included are general management concepts, organization, personnel management, and hospital engineering systems.

  4. Decreasing NICU Costs in the managed care arena: the positive impact of collaborative high-risk OB and NICU disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Diehl-Svrjcek, Beth C; Richardson, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Costs for preterm and critically ill neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be astronomical related to the number of inpatient day's accrued and professional ancillary fees. NICU births are often associated with maternal risk factors such as previous preterm or low birth weight delivery, maternal infections, chronic disease states, substance abuse and/or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Accordingly, Johns Hopkins HealthCare provides a disease management approach for the prevention of NICU births through "Partners With Mom." This maternity disease management program identifies pregnant women that could potentially generate high-dollar claims. The mission of the program is to reduce hospital/NICU admissions related to pregnancy complications and improve maternal/neonatal outcomes. If an NICU birth does occur, multiple avenues are pursued to control costs. By working in concert with Partners With Mom, the NICU Disease Management Program utilizes a multifaceted approach by tracking maternal risk factors, optimizing levels of required inpatient neonatal care and pursuing other avenues of revenue enhancement.

  5. Implementation of an evidence-based depression care management program (PEARLS): perspectives from staff and former clients.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Lesley; Cristofalo, Margaret; Snowden, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Although researchers develop evidence-based programs for public health practice, rates of adoption and implementation are often low. This qualitative study aimed to better understand implementation of the Program to Encourage Active, Rewarding Lives for Seniors (PEARLS), a depression care management program at a Seattle-King County area agency on aging. We used stratified, purposive sampling in 2008 to identify 38 PEARLS clients and agency staff for participation. In 9 focus groups and 1 one-on-one interview, we asked participants to identify benefits and negative consequences of PEARLS, facilitators of and barriers to program implementation, and strategies for overcoming the barriers. Two independent researchers used thematic analysis to categorize data into key themes and subthemes. PEARLS benefits clients by decreasing depression symptoms and addressing other concerns, such as health problems. For staff, PEARLS provides "another set of eyes" and is a comprehensive program to help them meet clients' mental health needs. Barriers included issues with implementation process (eg, lack of communication) and the perception that eligibility criteria were more rigid than those of other agency programs. Recommended solutions included changing eligibility criteria, providing additional staff training, increasing communication, and clarifying referral procedures, roles, and responsibilities. Barriers to PEARLS delivery discourage referrals to what is generally viewed as a beneficial program. Implementing participants' strategies for overcoming these barriers can enhance delivery of PEARLS to a greater number of older adults and help them improve their depression symptoms.

  6. Comprehensive technology-assisted training and supervision program to enhance depression management in primary care in Santiago, Chile: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Graciela; Martínez, Pablo; Vöhringer, Paul A; Martínez, Vania; Castro-Lara, Ariel; Fritsch, Rosemarie

    2015-07-24

    Depression is a common and disabling condition. Since 2001, Chile has had a national program for depression in primary care and universal access to treatment for depressed people over the age of 15. There are National Guidelines to treat depression but no training program exists. The aim of the present study protocol is to measure the effectiveness of a comprehensive technology-assisted training and supervision program to enhance depression management in primary care. This is a two-arm, single-blind, cluster randomized controlled trial to compare the efficacy of the program versus usual care to treat depression in primary care clinics. In total, 434 depressed persons 18 to 65 years of age, recruited from four primary care clinics located in Santiago, will participate in the study. In order to ensure the quality of interventions supported by the national program for depression in Chile, it is desirable to have training programs of proven effectiveness. NCT02232854, registered on 2 September 2014.

  7. Efficacy of multidisciplinary outpatient management (MOM) program in long term heart failure care.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rahul; Evenson, Ariana; Jain, Rohit; Biddison, Elizabeth; Dalal, Darshan; Kelly, Kathleen M; Karmand, Arezo J; Hullsiek, Heide; Punnam, Jyothi; Plantholt, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) management programs worldwide have reported conflicting outcomes in the past. We sought to determine retrospectively whether the multidisciplinary outpatient management (MOM) program [heart failure clinic (HFC)], decreased readmission rates (RR), duration of hospital stay, and/or mortality in HF patients. Records of 138 HF patients who had their first encounter either as admission for HF at St. Agnes Hospital or visit to HFC during the period June 2005 through June 2006 were evaluated for outcomes through September 2007. Twenty-seven patients were followed in the HFC and 111 were in the non-HFC group. During follow up, 39 of the non-HFC group patients crossed over to the HFC group. All baseline parameters, except age (P = 0.006), were similar in both groups. In the HFC group 4 patients had a total of 5 readmissions, whereas 85 patients had a total of 187 readmissions (P < 0.001) in the non-HFC group. Average lengths of hospitalization were 5.2 +/- 4.8 days and 4.2 +/- 3.2 days (P = 0.18) and the number of readmissions/patient/year was 0.3 and 1.45 (P < 0.001) in the HFC and non-HFC groups, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of cross overs (n = 39), there was a 60% reduction in the readmission rate after crossing over to the HFC group. The significance of decreased mortality in the HFC group could not be assessed due to the small sample size. The study suggests that the MOM program can significantly reduce RR secondary to HF.

  8. Preventing cardiovascular disease in primary care: role of a national risk factor management program.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Emer R; Glynn, Liam G; Murphy, Andrew W; O Conghaile, Aengus; Canavan, Michelle; Reid, Claire; Moloney, Brian; O'Donnell, Martin J

    2012-04-01

    Heartwatch, a structured risk factor modification program for secondary prevention of cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD) in primary care, is associated with improvements in CV risk factors in participating patients. However, it is not known whether Heartwatch translates into reductions in clinically important CV events. The aim of the study was to determine the association between participation in Heartwatch and future risk of CV events in patients with CVD. The study consisted of a prospective cohort of 1,609 patients with CVD in primary care practices. Of these, 97.5% had data available on Heartwatch participation status, of whom 15.2% were Heartwatch participants. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the association between Heartwatch participation and risk of the CV composite (CV death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, heart failure, and nonfatal stroke). All-cause mortality and CV mortality were secondary outcome measures. During follow-up, the CV composite occurred in 208 patients (13.6%). Of Heartwatch participants, 8.4% experienced the CV composite compared with 14.5% of nonparticipants (P = .003). Participation in Heartwatch was associated with a significantly reduced risk of the CV composite (hazard ratio [HR] 0.52, 95% CI, 0.31-0.87), CV mortality (HR 0.31, 95% CI, 0.11-0.89), and all-cause mortality (HR 0.32, 95% CI, 0.15-0.68). Heartwatch participation was also associated with greater reductions in mean systolic blood pressure (P = .047), mean diastolic blood pressure (P < .001), and greater use of secondary preventative therapies for CVD, such as lipid-lowering agents (P < .001), β-blockers (P < .001), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (P < .001). Heartwatch is associated with a reduced risk of major vascular events and improved risk factor modification, supporting its potential as a nationwide program for secondary prevention of CVD. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Managed care: Practice, pitfalls, and potential

    PubMed Central

    Wallack, Stanley S.

    1992-01-01

    The results of coordinating and changing patterns of health care using managed care activities and organizations are reviewed in this article. Although utilization review and high-cost case management programs reduce the use of expensive services, incentives for providers of care, placing them at risk, are important for managing the intensity of health care. Managed care appears capable of reducing health care costs substantially. However, this increased efficiency has not translated to lower insurance premiums or modulated total health care expenditures because either purchasers are not aware or are not concerned about securing care at the least cost. To correct these deficiencies and deliver the potential of managed care, the author suggests the need to separate insurance into its three components parts (financing, risk spreading, and program management) and developed policies for each. PMID:25372989

  10. Medicaid Managed Care Structures and Care Coordination.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist-Scott, Douglas H; Feinstein, James A; Agrawal, Rishi

    2017-09-01

    Child enrollment in Medicaid managed care (MMC) has expanded dramatically, primarily through state mandates. Care coordination is a key metric in MMC evaluation because it drives much of the proposed cost savings and may be associated with improved health outcomes and utilization. We evaluated the relationships between enrollment in 2 MMC structures, primary care case management (PCCM) and health maintenance organization (HMO) and access to and receipt of care coordination by children. Using data from the 2011/2012 National Survey of Children's Health and the Medicaid Statistical Information System state data mart, we conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of the relationships between fee-for-service, PCCM or HMO enrollment, and access to and receipt of care coordination. State-level univariate analyses and individual and state multilevel multivariable analyses evaluated correlations between MMC enrollment and care coordination, controlling for demographic characteristics and state financing levels. In univariate and multilevel multivariable analyses, the PCCM penetration rate was significantly associated with increased access to care coordination (adjusted odds ratio: 1.23, P = .034) and receipt of care coordination (adjusted odds ratio: 1.37, P = .02). The HMO penetration rate was significantly associated with lower access to care coordination (adjusted odds ratio: 0.85, P = .05) and receipt of care coordination (adjusted odds ratio: 0.71, P < .001). Fee-for-service served as the referent. State utilization of MMC varied widely. These data suggest that care coordination may be more effective in PCCM than HMO structures. States should consider care coordination outcomes when structuring their Medicaid programs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Integrated care management.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J

    Some clinicians are at the leading edge of good practice in the introduction of integrated care management (ICM) (Wilson, 1996) based on partnership, quality and driven by performance. The new Government White Paper (Department of Health, 1997) outlines proposals for integrated care with all care planners and providers working collaboratively. A number of health and social care organizations have worked collaboratively to develop care programmes based on patient-centred care. One of the vehicles is multidisciplinary pathways of care (MPCs) which is the risk management tool for monitoring jointly agreed quality and patient outcome criteria from the performance of planning and providing individual patient care. ICM views the multidisciplinary approaches to collaborating care delivery by activity, cost and quality, and using a process approach to problem- and outcome-based care delivery. Involving patients and their carers in determining the process and outcomes of care provides a route to better communication, patient and staff satisfaction and the overall quality of care. This article deals with the use of ICM through the monitoring system of multidisciplinary pathways of care (MPCs) as a tool for minimizing risk and improving the continuous quality improvement of patient care. MPCs are one of the components of ICM which need to incorporate clinical guidelines, protocols, interdisciplinary standards, evidenced-based practice and clinical outcomes which are continuously monitored across all sectors of care.

  12. The impact of managed care in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Clouse, H R

    1999-01-01

    Managed care plans attempt to control health care expenditures aggressively. These plans directly influence access to medical care and the type, level, and frequency of care rendered. As a result, hospital stays are reduced, focus shifts from inpatient to outpatient care, and patients are responsible for a larger share of health care costs. Dentistry is not immune from the impact of managed care. The attractiveness of the dental market has drawn many managed care organizations, insurers, and entrepreneurs to encourage dentists to participate in a wide variety of managed care programs. However, the delivery of dental care differs markedly in many respects from that of medical care. Therefore, many of the cost saving aspects of managed care that have been so successful in medicine may not result in similar cost savings in dentistry.

  13. The effects of two workplace weight management programs and weight loss on health care utilization and costs

    PubMed Central

    Østbye, Truls; Stroo, Marissa; Eisenstein, Eric L.; Dement, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Compare the impact of two worksite weight management programs, WM (education) and WM+ (education plus counseling), on health care utilization and costs. Secondarily, compare the intervention groups to an observational control group of obese workers. Finally, evaluate the impact of actual weight loss on these outcomes. Methods Estimate the change in the WM and WM+ intervention groups. Using propensity score adjustment compare the two intervention groups with the observational control group; and compare those who lost weight with those who did not. Results No significant differences between the two intervention groups, or between these intervention groups and the observational control group. Those who lost weight reduced their overall health care costs. Conclusion To achieve weight loss and associated morbidity reductions, more extensive and intensive interventions, with more attention to motivation and compliance, are required. PMID:26849260

  14. Effect of an Innovative Medicare Managed Care Program on the Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Flood, Shannon; Bershadsky, Boris; Keckhafer, Gail

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to assess the quality of care provided by an innovative Medicare+Choice HMO targeted specifically at nursing home residents and employing nurse practitioners to provide additional primary care over and above that provided by physicians. The underlying premise of the Evercare approach is that the additional primary care will…

  15. Effect of an Innovative Medicare Managed Care Program on the Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Flood, Shannon; Bershadsky, Boris; Keckhafer, Gail

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to assess the quality of care provided by an innovative Medicare+Choice HMO targeted specifically at nursing home residents and employing nurse practitioners to provide additional primary care over and above that provided by physicians. The underlying premise of the Evercare approach is that the additional primary care will…

  16. Comparison of Cardiovascular Risk Screening Methods and Mortality Data among Hungarian Primary Care Population: Preliminary Results of the First Government-Financed Managed Care Program.

    PubMed

    Móczár, Csaba; Rurik, Imre

    2015-09-01

    Besides participation in the primary prevention, screening as secondary prevention is an important requirement for primary care services. The effect of this work is influenced by the characteristics of individual primary care practices and doctors' screening habits, as well as by the regulation of screening processes and available financial resources. Between 1999 and 2009, a managed care program was introduced and carried out in Hungary, financed by the government. This financial support and motivation gave the opportunity to increase the number of screenings. 4,462 patients of 40 primary care practices were screened on the basis of SCORE risk assessment. The results of the screening were compared on the basis of two groups of patients, namely: those who had been pre-screened (pre-screening method) for known risk factors in their medical history (smoking, BMI, age, family cardiovascular history), and those randomly screened. The authors also compared the mortality data of participating primary care practices with the regional and national data. The average score was significantly higher in the pre-screened group of patients, regardless of whether the risk factors were considered one by one or in combination. Mortality was significantly lower in the participating primary practices than had been expected on the basis of the national mortality data. This government-financed program was a big step forward to establish a proper screening method within Hungarian primary care. Performing cardiovascular screening of a selected target group is presumably more appropriate than screening within a randomly selected population. Both methods resulted in a visible improvement in regional mortality data, though it is very likely that with pre-screening a more cost-effective selection for screening may be obtained.

  17. Disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, E P; Langley, P C

    1996-01-01

    Disease management (DM) activities are described, and their implementation and monitoring in managed care organizations are discussed. DM programs involve systematic evaluation of the relationships between treatment options and the associated resource use and patient outcomes for the purpose of providing a given standard of health care at the lowest possible resource cost. A DM arrangement covers a specified disease or therapy intervention for a patient group that may be defined by diagnosis, drug use, prior resource use, or patient characteristics. Often, the partners in a DM arrangement are a managed care organization and a pharmaceutical industry representative or division. The development and monitoring of disease management arrangements are dependent on access to several types of data, and these data are available in managed care plans. A DM arrangement includes interventions to change prescribing patterns or patient compliance and assessment of the effects of these interventions against target outcomes specified in the contract. The agreement that is developed specifies guidelines for treatment and requirements for data collection, monitoring, and reporting that are consistent with the target outcomes. In many DM arrangements, the partners share cost savings and risk; other arrangements involve case management on a capitated basis. A pharmaceutical company involved in risk sharing must change its focus from market share to optimal use of drugs within the total cost of treatment. If a risk-sharing contract covers an entire therapeutic class of drugs, a pharmaceutical company may share risk for the use of other manufacturers' products as well as its own. Disease management contracts must consider the full impact of each treatment option on the health system; the goal should be not simply to decrease the drug budget, but to decrease overall costs for treatment that achieves desired outcomes for specific diseases.

  18. Medicare Pays for Chronic Care Management.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-09-01

    As of January, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services began paying for chronic care management of patients with two or more conditions under its Chronic Care Management program. The payment applies to patients in traditional fee-for-service and noncapitated Medicare Advantage plan arrangements. Texas Medical Association leaders caution the program has some hefty requirements.

  19. [Business activity in medicine: economic analysis of medical support programs and characteristics of management in business risks in health care system (problems and perspectives)].

    PubMed

    Poliachenko, Iu V; Dynnik, O B; Kishinets, A D; Zalesskiĭ, V N

    2005-06-01

    Current scientific data on the assessment of cost expenditure on the realization of programs to assist medically patients with cardiological, oncological, rheumatologic and other diseases were analyzed. Peculiarities of the management of business risks were considered in the article. It was concluded that the management of business risks in health care system should be improved.

  20. Foster Care and Medicaid Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Kelleher, Kelly J.; Burns, Barbara J.; Landsverk, John; Rolls, Jennifer A.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews issues surrounding the delivery of managed health care services to children in foster care. Details the unique characteristics of children in foster care, including limited medical histories upon entry into foster care, multiple health care needs, lack of a clearly identified medical care coordinator, and frequent placement changes.…

  1. New developments concerning health care financial management.

    PubMed

    Drati, Nathan; Kleiner, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Managed care has become one of the leading developments in health care financial management, but ignorance and confusion surround its meaning and origins. Managed care seeks to reduced costs and increase profits while maintaining quality, yet the evidence that it is able to achieve these aims is mixed. The following analysis is a review of the events leading to the establishment of managed care and what it has become. Various terms and health care organizations involved in managed care are identified, with emphasis placed on the strengths and weaknesses of managed care programs. This analysis is performed to gain insight and better understanding of the direction health care financial management is headed in the 21st century.

  2. Diabetes disease management in managed care organizations.

    PubMed

    Lynne, Donna

    2004-01-01

    Recent clinical trials and disease management programs sponsored by managed care organizations have demonstrated achievements in limiting complications, improving health measures, reducing costs, and enhancing the quality of life of the person with diabetes. In one managed care organization, Group Health, Inc., persons with diabetes received discounted supplies and educational material as encouragement to participate in a diabetes disease management program [Disease Management Solutions (DMS)]. Health risk appraisals (HRAs) were provided at enrollment, and at 6-month intervals thereafter. Over 8,000 persons with diabetes participated in the DMS program over a 2 and 1/2-year period. Claims data over a 3-year period (pre- and post-enrollment) for 1,368 persons with diabetes demonstrated that participation in DMS resulted in greater utilization of primary care services by enrolled persons than by non-enrolled, but a lower increase in costs for those enrolled. In addition to evaluating the program impact through changes in services and costs, HRAs provided self-reported scores on (1) several compliance measures and (2) general health impressions and productivity. In the DMS population, self-reported compliance with physician-recommended office visits and tests (eg, cholesterol screening) improved for persons with diabetes once they enrolled in the program. Participants also reported greater productivity (eg, fewer missed work days) once enrolled in the program. To validate self-reported results, medical claims were used to verify compliance with general office, ophthalmologic, and emergency room visits and hospital admissions. A high level of validity between self-reported results and claims data recording office and emergency room visits and hospital admissions was found.

  3. Changes in diabetes distress related to participation in an internet-based diabetes care management program and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Fonda, Stephanie J; McMahon, Graham T; Gomes, Helen E; Hickson, Sara; Conlin, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    This article investigated how changes in diabetes distress relate to receiving care management through an Internet-based care management (IBCM) program for diabetes and level of participation in this program. Further, it examined the relationship between diabetes distress and changes in glycemic control. We enrolled patients of the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System with diabetes who had hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of ≥9.0%. Subjects were randomized to usual care (n=52) or IBCM (n=52) for 1 year. We measured diabetes distress at baseline and quarterly thereafter using the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) questionnaire. Glycemic control was determined by baseline and quarterly HbA1c. For subjects randomized to IBCM, we measured participation by observing frequency and consistency of their usage of the IBCM patient portal over 12 months. Linear mixed models were used to analyze THE data. PAID scores declined over time for both treatment groups. Among subjects randomized to IBCM, the decline in PAID scores over time was significant for sustained users of the IBCM patient portal but not for nonusers. Moreover, subjects whose usage of the patient portal was sustained throughout the study had lower PAID scores at baseline. With respect to changes in glycemic control, HbA1c reduced individual differences in PAID scores by 44%; a lower baseline HbA1c was associated with lower baseline PAID scores, and over time, the decrease in HbA1c was associated with further decreases in the PAID score. Participation in IBCM varies by initial diabetes distress, with people with less distress participating more. For people who participate, IBCM further mitigates diabetes distress. There is also a relationship between achievements in glycemic control and subsequent lowering of diabetes distress. Future research should identify how to maximize fit between patient needs and the provisions of IBCM, with the aim of increasing patient engagement in the active management of their

  4. Mediation and managed care.

    PubMed

    Dubler, N N

    1998-03-01

    Managed care has not only intensified existing conflicts between patient and provider, it has, by its very nature, changed the shape and scope of the healthcare enterprise and introduced an entirely new set of disputes. The decision-making dynamics have been altered, and the cast of players has expanded. Traditionally, the therapeutic interaction took place between the physician and the patient although it occasionally included the patient's family. Whatever obligations existed, such as fidelity, confidentiality, and standard of care, they bound only those parties. Now, as the managed care organization has interposed itself between the patient and the physician, the dyad has become a triad. The power balance has shifted, and a new set of rights and responsibilities now flows between and among the players, each of whom has interests that may or may not coincide. This article argues that, because of its cost containment origins and orientation, managed care increases the likelihood that misunderstandings, disagreements and disputes will develop into full-blown conflicts. If managed care is to succeed financially and operate with integrity, it must develop techniques for managing the increasing conflicts that arise inevitably between and among the organizations, physicians, and patients. It is clear that the voice of the patient needs to be strengthened within the new complex decision-making, review, and appeal procedures. Mediation is the most appropriate method of dispute resolution for the managed care setting because it balances the disparities in power endemic to the bureaucratization of medicine and refocuses the interests of the various parties. Using bioethics consultation as a model for dispute mediation provides a set of principles and guideline tasks that can be applied effectively to managed care.

  5. Risk of Nonfatal Stroke in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Retrospective Comparison Between Disease Management Programs and Standard Care.

    PubMed

    Wiefarn, Stefan; Heumann, Christian; Rettelbach, Anja; Kostev, Karel

    2017-07-01

    The present retrospective study examines the influence of disease management programs on nonfatal stroke in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Germany. The evaluation is based on retrospective patient data from the Disease Analyzer (IMS Health). The analysis included 169 414 T2DM patients aged 40 years and older with an initial prescription of antihyperglycemic therapy between January 2004 and December 2014. A total of 86 713 patients participated in a disease management program (DMP) for T2DM and 82 701 patients received standard care. The main outcome measure of this study was nonfatal stroke. Kaplan-Meier curves of DMP and SC patients were compared using log rank test. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to provide an adjusted estimate of the DMP effect. It is apparent from the baseline characteristics that the general health of patients receiving standard care was poorer than that of patients participating in a DMP. The baseline HbA1c value was 7.6% in the DMP group and 7.8% in the SC group. Furthermore, the SC group had a higher proportion of preexisting conditions, such as coronary heart disease (CHD), peripheral arterial occlusive disease (pAOD), and renal insufficiency. The proportion of patients who received insulin in first year therapy was higher in the SC group. Time to event analysis showed that DMP was associated with a delayed occurrence of stroke, because stroke occurred an average of 350 days later in DMP patients than in patients receiving SC (DMP: 1.216 days, RV: 866 days). The Cox model with covariable adjustment confirmed the significant association of DMPs with nonfatal stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (HR 0.71; 95% CI: 0.69-0.74). The present study indicates that DMPs are positively associated with stroke. The possible reasons for this must be verified in further studies.

  6. Organizing for effective managed care contracting.

    PubMed

    Mayer, T

    2001-01-01

    While many forums have debated the fairness and ethical implications of managed care arrangements, it is unlikely that physicians will escape practicing within fixed budgets in the future; the economics of health care simply requires it. Although a backlash has developed against managed care, it is actually more recognition of how pervasive it has become, rather than any threat to its existence. Currently managed care comprises the majority of commercial insurance, is making substantial inroads into Medicaid, and is challenging the reductions in Medicare reimbursement by dropping plans at a time when the Federal government's entire strategy for controlling Medicare costs is based upon managed care through its Medicare+Choice program.

  7. Evaluation of the relationship between a chronic disease care management program and california pay-for-performance diabetes care cholesterol measures in one medical group.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Timothy W; Palmieri, James; Khalsa, Maninder; Stebbins, Marilyn

    2007-09-01

    Pay for performance (P4P) is a business model in which health plans pay provider organizations (medical groups) financial incentives based on attainment of clinical quality, patient experience, and use of information technology. The California P4P program is the largest P4P program in the united states and represents a potential revenue source for all participating medical groups. The clinical specifications for the California P4P program are based on the national Committee for Quality assurance (NCQA), Health Plan Employer Data, and information set (HEDIS), and each clinical measure has its own benchmark. in 2005, participating medical groups were paid on the basis of 9 clinical measures that were evaluated in the 2004 measurement year. The cholesterol testing measure represented 4.44%-7.14% of the total P4P dollars available to participating medical groups from the health plans. To (1) compare the percentage of medical group members aged 18 to 75 years with diabetes (type 1 or type 2) who received a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) test and attained LDL-C control (<130 mg per dl) after enrolling in a chronic disease care management (CDCM) program with similar members managed by routine care, and to (2) assess the potential effect of CDCM on the quality performance ranking and financial reimbursement of a medical group reporting these measures in the 2004 California P4P measurement year. This is a retrospective database review of electronic laboratory (lab) values, medical and hospital claims, and encounter data collected between january 1, 2003 and December 31, 2004 at 1 California medical group comprising 160 multispecialty providers. Requirements were continuous patient enrollment in 1 of the 7 health plans participating in P4P during the measurement year (2004) with no more than 1 gap in enrollment of up to 45 days. Patients aged 18 to 75 years were included in the diabetes cholesterol measure (denominator) if they had at least 2 outpatient

  8. A physical examination of health care's readiness for a total quality management program: a case study.

    PubMed

    Weeks, B; Helms, M M; Ettkin, L P

    1995-11-01

    Initiating a total quality management (TQM) effort can be a time-consuming and costly effort for a hospital. Perceptions of management and employees are important in initiating TQM because people function as if perceptions are fact. Assessing these perceptions and determining the levels of readiness or resistance to change are important steps in reducing costs, thus increasing organizational ability to address proactively challenges to the implementation and ultimate success of a TQM effort. Key assessment criteria are discussed including a comparison of management and employee perceptions in one hospital.

  9. Respiratory care management information systems.

    PubMed

    Ford, Richard M

    2004-04-01

    Hospital-wide computerized information systems evolved from the need to capture patient information and perform billing and other financial functions. These systems, however, have fallen short of meeting the needs of respiratory care departments regarding work load assessment, productivity management, and the level of outcome reporting required to support programs such as patient-driven protocols. The respiratory care management information systems (RCMIS) of today offer many advantages over paper-based systems and hospital-wide computer systems. RCMIS are designed to facilitate functions specific to respiratory care, including assessing work demand, assigning and tracking resources, charting, billing, and reporting results. RCMIS incorporate mobile, point-of-care charting and are highly configurable to meet the specific needs of individual respiratory care departments. Important and substantial benefits can be realized with an RCMIS and mobile, wireless charting devices. The initial and ongoing costs of an RCMIS are justified by increased charge capture and reduced costs, by way of improved productivity and efficiency. It is not unusual to recover the total cost of an RCMIS within the first year of its operation. In addition, such systems can facilitate and monitor patient-care protocols and help to efficiently manage the vast amounts of information encountered during the practitioner's workday. Respiratory care departments that invest in RCMIS have an advantage in the provision of quality care and in reducing expenses. A centralized respiratory therapy department with an RCMIS is the most efficient and cost-effective way to monitor work demand and manage the hospital-wide allocation of respiratory care services.

  10. Disease management strategies: managing care giving in managed care.

    PubMed

    Nesse, R E; Hagedorn, S D; Scheitel, S M; Nyman, M A; Broers, J K

    2000-01-01

    The rapid rate of change in health care delivery systems has challenged and troubled health care providers. Some new health care delivery systems primarily emphasize the economics of medical care and leave providers with a sense that their profession has strayed from its mission. In addition, there is an increasing demand by payers and the public for public accountability for the quality and expense of clinical services. One response to these changes in health care is the use of disease management strategies. There is a growing body of knowledge regarding disease management strategies and practice guidelines in the literature. This article discusses how a provider group can implement improvement in the clinical process successfully by applying techniques of disease management.

  11. Parent Report of Child's Health-Related Quality of Life after a Primary-Care-Based Weight Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Schetzina, Karen E.; McBee, Matthew T.; Maphis, Laura; Fulton-Robinson, Hazel; Ho, Ai-Leng; Tudiver, Fred; Wu, Tiejian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been recognized as an important target and health outcome in obesity research. The current study aimed to examine HRQoL in overweight or obese children after a 10-week primary-care–based weight management program, Parent-Led Activity and Nutrition for Healthy Living, in southern Appalachia. Methods: Sixty-seven children (ages 5–12 years) and their caregivers were recruited from four primary care clinics, two of which were randomized to receive the intervention. Caregivers in the intervention groups received two brief motivational interviewing visits and four group sessions led by providers as well as four phone follow-ups with research staff. Caregivers completed the PedsQL and demographic questionnaires at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months postintervention. Child height and weight were collected to determine standardized BMI. Results: Caregivers of children receiving the weight control intervention reported no statistically significant improvements in child total HRQoL, as compared to the control group, across the course of treatment (β=0.178; 95% confidence interval, −0.681, 1.037; p=0.687). Additionally, no statistically significant improvements were found across other HRQoL domains. Conclusions: Future studies examining HRQoL outcomes in primary care may consider treatment dose as well as methodological factors, such as utilization of multiple informants and different measures, when designing studies and interpreting outcomes. PMID:24152081

  12. Medicaid Program; The Use of New or Increased Pass-Through Payments in Medicaid Managed Care Delivery Systems. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-18

    This rule finalizes changes to the pass-through payment transition periods and the maximum amount of pass-through payments permitted annually during the transition periods under Medicaid managed care contract(s) and rate certification(s). This final rule prevents increases in pass-through payments and the addition of new pass-through payments beyond those in place when the pass-through payment transition periods were established, in the final Medicaid managed care regulations effective July 5, 2016.

  13. Effectiveness and efficiency of a practice accreditation program on cardiovascular risk management in primary care: study protocol of a clustered randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Nouwens, Elvira; Van Lieshout, Jan; Adang, Eddy; Bouma, Margriet; Braspenning, Jozé; Wensing, Michel

    2012-10-04

    Cardiovascular risk management is largely provided in primary healthcare, but not all patients with established cardiovascular diseases receive preventive treatment as recommended. Accreditation of healthcare organizations has been introduced across the world with a range of aims, including the improvement of clinical processes and outcomes. The Dutch College of General Practitioners has launched a program for accreditation of primary care practices, which focuses on chronic illness care. This study aims to determine the effectiveness and efficiency of a practice accreditation program, focusing on patients with established cardiovascular diseases. We have planned a two-arm cluster randomized trial with a block design. Seventy primary care practices will be recruited from those who volunteer to participate in the practice accreditation program. Primary care practices will be the unit of randomization. A computer list of random numbers will be generated by an independent statistician. The intervention group (n = 35 practices) will be instructed to focus improvement on cardiovascular risk management. The control group will be instructed to focus improvement on other domains in the first year of the program. Baseline and follow-up measurements at 12 months after receiving the accreditation certificate are based on a standardized version of the audit in the practice accreditation program. Primary outcomes include controlled blood pressure, serum cholesterol, and prescription of recommended preventive medication. Secondary outcomes are 15 process indicators and two outcome indicators of cardiovascular risk management, self-reported achievement of improvement goals and perceived unintended consequences. The intention to treat analysis is statistically powered to detect a difference of 10% on primary outcomes. The economic evaluation aims to determine the efficiency of the program and investigates the relationship between costs, performance indicators, and accreditation

  14. Comparative Cost Analysis of Housing and Case Management Program for Chronically Ill Homeless Adults Compared to Usual Care

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anirban; Kee, Romina; Buchanan, David; Sadowski, Laura S

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the costs of a housing and case management program in a novel sample—homeless adults with chronic medical illnesses. Data Source The study used data from multiple sources: (1) electronic medical records for hospital, emergency room, and ambulatory medical and mental health visits; (2) institutional and regional databases for days in respite centers, jails, or prisons; and (3) interviews for days in nursing homes, shelters, substance abuse treatment centers, and case manager visits. Total costs were estimated using unit costs for each service. Study Design Randomized controlled trial of 407 homeless adults with chronic medical illnesses enrolled at two hospitals in Chicago, Illinois, and followed for 18 months. Principal Findings Compared to usual care, the intervention group generated an average annual cost savings of (−)$6,307 per person (95 percent CI: −16,616, 4,002; p = .23). Subgroup analyses of chronically homeless and those with HIV showed higher per person, annual cost savings of (−)$9,809 and (−)$6,622, respectively. Results were robust to sensitivity analysis using unit costs. Conclusion The findings of this comprehensive, comparative cost analyses demonstrated an important average annual savings, though in this underpowered study these savings did not achieve statistical significance. PMID:22098257

  15. The impact of a high-risk disease management program on perinatal outcomes in a managed care organization.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Michelle R

    2005-01-01

    Improvements in technology have increased the chances of survival for the micropremature infant and the very low birth-weight infant but have significantly increased the financial burden of health care organizations. This economic burden has a significant impact on third-party payers and on society in general. Of the annual US 10.2 billion dollars spent on newborn care alone, 57% is disproportionately consumed by the 10% of infants who are born preterm.

  16. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: utilization and valuation by patients

    PubMed Central

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Sinnige, Ludovicus G; van Geel, Björn M; Verheul, Freek; Verhagen, Wim I; van der Kruijk, Ruud A; Haverkamp, Reinoud; Schrijver, Hans M; Baart, Jacoba C; Visser, Leo H; Arnoldus, Edo P; Gilhuis, Herman Jacobus; Pop, Paul; Booy, Monique; Heerings, Marco; Kool, Anton; van Noort, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background MSmonitor is an interactive web-based program for self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis. Methods To assess the utilization and valuation by persons with multiple sclerosis, we held an online survey among those who had used the program for at least 1 year. We evaluated the utilization and meaningfulness of the program’s elements, perceived use of data by neurologists and nurses, and appreciation of care, self-management, and satisfaction. Results Fifty-five persons completed the questionnaire (estimated response rate 40%). The Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile (MSIP), Medication and Adherence Inventory, Activities Diary, and electronic consultation (e-consult) were used by 40%, 55%, 47%, and 44% of respondents and were considered meaningful by 83%, 81%, 54%, and 88%, respectively. During out-patient consultations, nurses reportedly used the MSmonitor data three to six times more frequently than neurologists. As to nursing care, more symptoms were dealt with (according to 54% of respondents), symptoms were better discussed (69%), and the overall quality of care had improved (60%) since the use of the program. As to neurological care, these figures were 24%, 31%, and 27%, respectively. In 46% of the respondents, the insight into their symptoms and disabilities had increased since the use of the program; the MSIP, Activities Diary, and e-consult had contributed most to this improvement. The overall satisfaction with the program was 3.5 out of 5, and 73% of the respondents would recommend the program to other persons with multiple sclerosis. Conclusion A survey among persons with multiple sclerosis using the MSmonitor program showed that the MSIP, Medication and Adherence Inventory, Activities Diary, and e-consult were frequently used and that the MSIP, Medication and Adherence Inventory, and e-consult were appreciated the most. Moreover, the quality of nursing care, but not so neurological care, had improved, which

  17. Oral Corticosteroid Prescribing for Children With Asthma in a Medicaid Managed Care Program.

    PubMed

    Farber, Harold J; Silveira, Edwin A; Vicere, Douglas R; Kothari, Viral D; Giardino, Angelo P

    2017-05-01

    Short courses of oral corticosteroid (OCS) medication are recommended for treatment of moderate to severe asthma exacerbations. Concern has been raised about OCS overuse. Our objective is to describe rates of OCS dispensing among children with asthma and factors associated with variation in OCS dispensing. Claims data for children 1 to <18 years of age with an asthma diagnosis between January 2011 and January 2016 were extracted from the computerized databases of Texas Children's Health Plan. In the years 2011 to 2015, 17.1% to 21.8% of children had an asthma diagnosis. In each of these years 42.1% to 44.2% of these children had ≥1 OCS dispensing. OCS dispensing rates were higher for the children 1 to 4 years of age compared with older children. Repeated OCS dispensing was common, and was most common for children 1 to 4 years of age. Most children with an OCS dispensing (81%-83%) did not have other utilization suggesting poor asthma control (excessive β-agonist refills, emergency department visit, or hospitalization for asthma). OCSs were less commonly prescribed to patients whose primary care provider was a board-certified pediatrician compared with other types of primary care providers. There was large variation in OCS prescribing rates among pediatricians (15%-86%). There were minimal differences in asthma emergency department visits and no differences in hospitalization rates by the pediatrician's OCS dispensing rate quartile. The patterns of dispensing observed suggest substantial overprescribing of OCS for children with an asthma diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Multimorbidity, Depression, and Mortality in Primary Care: Randomized Clinical Trial of an Evidence-Based Depression Care Management Program on Mortality Risk.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Joseph J; Hwang, Seungyoung; Joo, Jin Hui; Bogner, Hillary R; Morales, Knashawn H; Bruce, Martha L; Reynolds, Charles F

    2016-04-01

    Two-thirds of older adults have two or more medical conditions that often take precedence over depression in primary care. We evaluated whether evidence-based depression care management would improve the long-term mortality risk among older adults with increasing levels of medical comorbidity. Longitudinal analyses of the practice-randomized Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly: Collaborative Trial (PROSPECT). Twenty primary care practices randomized to intervention or usual care. The sample included 1204 older primary care patients completing the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and other interview questions at baseline. For 2 years, a depression care manager worked with primary care physicians to provide algorithm-based care for depression, offering psychotherapy, increasing the antidepressant dose if indicated, and monitoring symptoms, medication adverse effects, and treatment adherence. Depression status based on clinical interview, CCI to evaluate medical comorbidity, and vital status at 8 years (National Death Index). In the usual care condition, patients with the highest levels of medical comorbidity and depression were at increased risk of mortality over the course of the follow-up compared to depressed patients with minimal medical comorbidity [hazard ratio 3.02 (95% CI, 1.32 to 8.72)]. In contrast, in intervention practices, patients with the highest level of medical comorbidity and depression compared to depressed patients with minimal medical comorbidity were not at significantly increased risk [hazard ratio 1.73 (95% CI, 0.86 to 3.96)]. Nondepressed patients in intervention and usual care practices had similar mortality risk. Depression management mitigated the combined effect of multimorbidity and depression on mortality. Depression management should be integral to optimal patient care, not a secondary focus.

  19. Managed care of infertility.

    PubMed

    Hull, M G

    1996-08-01

    Mandated managed care of infertility, as for other branches of medicine, demands cost-effectiveness, appropriate use of proven clinical methods, and audit of the services provided. Proper standards, and protocols of clinical diagnosis and selection of treatment need to be agreed, although allowing for valid alternatives. A diagnostic process and classification staged for primary, secondary, and tertiary care as appropriate, which has been derived by consensus, is offered in this paper. It is assumed that all couples would be allowed access to diagnostic services. A national estimate has attributed one-quarter of the costs of full infertility services to diagnostic procedures and three-quarters to treatments. It is assumed that any constraints owing to funding would apply only to access to treatment. One model proposed would limit treatment to those couples and methods which could achieve a 50% birthrate target within a reasonable time limit or number of cycles. Although there is as yet no existing model of managed care on which to base exact costing, it should be possible by initial over-restrictiveness to leave room for annual adjustments of treatment provision and to allow for new developments. Other more equitable ways of sharing resources can be argued, and ethical standards should be agreed in any system of managed care for a population.

  20. An overview of Medicaid managed care litigation.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, S; Teitelbaum, J; Kirby, C; Priebe, L; Klement, T

    1998-11-01

    Since the enactment of Medicaid in 1965, states have had the option of offering beneficiaries enrollment in managed care arrangements. With the advent of mandatory managed care reaching millions of beneficiaries (including a growing proportion of disabled recipients), the amount and scope of litigation involving Medicaid managed care plans can be expected to grow. A review of the current litigation regarding Medicaid managed care reveals two basic types of lawsuits: (1) those that challenge the practices of managed care companies under various federal and state laws that safeguard consumer rights, protect health care quality, and prohibit discrimination; and (2) suits that assert claims arising directly under the Medicaid statute and implementing regulations, as well as claims related to Constitutional safeguards that undergird the program. Lawsuits asserting claims arising under Medicaid tend to raise two basic questions: (1) the extent to which enrollment in a Medicaid managed care plan alters existing Medicaid beneficiary rights and state agency duties under federal or state Medicaid law; and (2) the extent to which managed care companies, as agents of the state, act under "color of law" (i.e., undertaking to perform official duties or acting with the imprimatur of state authority). Additionally, states might see an increase in litigation brought by prospective and current contractors who assert that they have been wrongfully denied contracts or improperly penalized for poor performance. These assertions may involve claims that are grounded in federal and state law, the Medicaid statute, and the Constitution. Moreover, in light of the consumer protection elements of the managed care reforms contained in the Balanced Budget Act, future managed care litigation may focus on the manner in which companies carry out states' obligations toward managed care enrollees. Resolution of Medicaid managed care cases involves the application of general principles of

  1. Priority interventions to improve the management of chronic non-cancer pain in primary care: a participatory research of the ACCORD program

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, Lyne; Choinière, Manon; Martin, Elisabeth; Lévesque, Lise; Hudon, Eveline; Bélanger, Danielle; Perreault, Sylvie; Lacasse, Anaïs; Laliberté, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is evidence that the management of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) in primary care is far from being optimal. A 1-day workshop was held to explore the perceptions of key actors regarding the challenges and priority interventions to improve CNCP management in primary care. Methods Using the Chronic Care Model as a conceptual framework, physicians (n=6), pharmacists (n=6), nurses (n=6), physiotherapists (n=6), psychologists (n=6), pain specialists (n=6), patients (n=3), family members (n=3), decision makers and managers (n=4), and pain researchers (n=7) took part in seven focus groups and five nominal groups. Results Challenges identified in focus group discussions were related to five dimensions: knowledge gap, “work in silos”, lack of awareness that CNCP represents an important clinical problem, difficulties in access to health professionals and services, and patient empowerment needs. Based on the nominal group discussions, the following priority interventions were identified: interdisciplinary continuing education, interdisciplinary treatment approach, regional expert leadership, creation and definition of care paths, and patient education programs. Conclusion Barriers to optimal management of CNCP in primary care are numerous. Improving its management cannot be envisioned without considering multifaceted interventions targeting several dimensions of the Chronic Care Model and focusing on both clinicians and patients. PMID:25995648

  2. Teaching Primary Care in a Baccalaureate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivern, Diane O.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The baccalaureate nursing program at Herbert H. Lehman College, Bronx, New York prepares students for primary care nursing by structuring the clinical experience to include the essential, interdependent components of: assessment, accountability, leadership, and management. Graduates are expected to be proficient in the primary care role in any…

  3. Teaching Primary Care in a Baccalaureate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivern, Diane O.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The baccalaureate nursing program at Herbert H. Lehman College, Bronx, New York prepares students for primary care nursing by structuring the clinical experience to include the essential, interdependent components of: assessment, accountability, leadership, and management. Graduates are expected to be proficient in the primary care role in any…

  4. Ethics in managed care.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, J A; Sharfstein, S S

    2000-06-01

    The current era of managed costs and care create ethical dilemmas based on economic constraints and incorporation of principles of distributive justice. Traditional ethical concerns related to confidentiality, conflicts of interest, double agentry, and honesty are complicated by interference in the doctor-patient relationship caused by intrusive utilization management. National health reform must take these issues seriously to ensure that the "cure" promised by such reform efforts is not worse than the disease. The challenge for psychiatrists is to adapt to these constraints without losing site of traditional medical ethical positions. Once the ethics become diseased, no cure may exist at all.

  5. Illinois: Child Care Collaboration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Care Collaboration Program promotes collaboration between child care and other early care and education providers, including Early Head Start (EHS), by creating policies to ease blending of funds to extend the day or year of existing services. While no funding is provided through the initiative, participating programs may take…

  6. Glossary of Managed Care Definitions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) : a private, nonprofit organization that evaluates and accredits managed care plans. The NCQA also gathers and reports managed care plan performance data through its Health Plan Employer Data Information ...

  7. Exploring the Effectiveness of an Internet-Based Program for Reducing Caregiver Distress Using the iCare Stress Management e-Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Kajiyama, Bruno; Thompson, Larry W.; Eto-Iwase, Tamiko; Yamashita, Mio; Di Mario, John; Tzuang, Yuan Marian; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Determine if the online iCare Stress Management e-Training Program reduces stress, bother depression and poor life quality for dementia family caregivers (CGs). METHOD CGs (N=150) were randomly assigned to the iCare Condition (ICC) or to the Education/Information-Only Condition (EOC) for a 3-month periodChange in self-report measures of stress (PSS) (primary outcome), caregiver bother(RMBPC), depression (CES-D) and quality of life (PQOL) (secondary outcomes) was determined, along with usage of new information in one’s own caregiving. RESULTS A mixed ANOVA revealed that change in perceived stress was significant for the ICC but not the EOC (p = .017). Changes in the other measures were not significant. More caregivers in the ICC used the materials in their own caregiving situation than those in the EOC. Roughly one-third of the caregivers enrolled in the study dropped prior to completion. CONCLUSION Results are promising, but the high dropout is a concern. Future efforts to improve dropout rate and increase participant engagement are warranted. To our knowledge this is the first attempt to present an evidence-based intervention for CGs via the Internet. PMID:23461355

  8. Exploring the effectiveness of an internet-based program for reducing caregiver distress using the iCare Stress Management e-Training Program.

    PubMed

    Kajiyama, Bruno; Thompson, Larry W; Eto-Iwase, Tamiko; Yamashita, Mio; Di Mario, John; Marian Tzuang, Yuan; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Determine if the online iCare Stress Management e-Training Program reduces stress, bother, depression, and poor life quality for dementia family caregivers (CGs). CGs (N = 150) were randomly assigned to the iCare Condition (ICC) or to the Education/Information-Only Condition (EOC) for a 3-month period. Change in self-report measures of stress (PSS) (primary outcome), caregiver bother(RMBPC), depression (CES-D), and quality of life (PQOL) (secondary outcomes) was determined, along with usage of new information in one's own caregiving. A mixed ANOVA revealed that change in perceived stress was significant for the ICC but not the EOC (p = .017). Changes in the other measures were not significant. More caregivers in the ICC used the materials in their own caregiving situation than those in the EOC. Roughly one-third of the caregivers enrolled in the study dropped prior to completion. Results are promising, but the high dropout is a concern. Future efforts to improve dropout rate and increase participant engagement are warranted. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to present an evidence-based intervention for CGs via the Internet.

  9. Managed care opportunities for improving asthma care.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jonathan D

    2011-04-01

    Uncontrolled asthma is an enormous burden in terms of the propensity to reach asthma control in the future, direct and indirect costs, and health-related quality of life. The complex pathophysiology, treatment, and triggers of asthma warrant a unified, yet targeted, approach to care. No single factor is fully responsible for poor control. Complicating the problem of asthma control is adherence to long-term controller medications. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) established several key points for asthma control, and developed classifications for asthma control and recommended actions for treatment. All parties involved in the management of asthma, including physicians, pharmacists, nurses, patients, family members, and insurance companies, need to be aware of the NAEPP guidelines. To determine if the goals of asthma therapy are being met, assessment of asthma outcomes is necessary. Unfortunately, some measures may get overlooked, and patient-reported outcomes (as assessed by the validated control instruments) are not often collected during routine examinations. The Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set measure for asthma may be used to quantify asthma care, but there is evidence that it does not fully capture the goals of asthma management. Most well-designed, education-based interventions are considered good value for money, but it can be difficult to put into practice such policy interventions. An optimal managed care plan will adhere to known evidence-based guidelines, can measure outcomes, is targeted to the patient's risk and impairment, and can adapt to changes in our understanding of asthma and its treatment.

  10. Managing Mentoring Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IUME Briefs, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Some programs for helping at-risk youth achieve excellent results, while others do not. One reason for program success can be proper management. Mentoring is a promising strategy for helping at-risk youth. Planners who want to create effective mentoring programs should look at the implementation experiences of other youth programs. Evaluations…

  11. Joint Program Management Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    program examples include the Worldwide Military Command and Control System (WWMCCS), Joint Stand-Off Weapon (JSOW), V22 Osprey , the Joint...MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK LIST OF FIGURES 1-1 DEFINITION OF JOINT POTENTIAL DESIGNATOR . .1-3 2-1 JOINT DOD ACQUISITION AUTHORITY CHAIN (ACAT ID PROGRAMS...INTRODUCTION TO JOINT PROGRAM MANAGEMENT This haIKlimk is designed to help curient and future joint program personnel. It contains advice that

  12. Day Care Center Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

    This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

  13. Hospital program weds case, disease management.

    PubMed

    1997-10-01

    To lower its readmission rates and inpatient length of stay for three high-volume chronic conditions, Memorial Hospital in Colorado Springs, CO, developed a program that combines clinical pathways with a cross-continuum disease management program. Community physicians refer patients to the program. Hospital-based care managers guide patients in the acute setting before handing them off to outpatient case managers, who coordinate the patient's transition to home care. Clinicians at Memorial sold administrators on the "care-case management" approach by arguing that increased inpatient efficiency would offset potential revenue shortfalls due to fewer admissions.

  14. Impact of a disease-management program on symptom burden and health-related quality of life in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and their care partners.

    PubMed

    Lindell, Kathleen Oare; Olshansky, Ellen; Song, Mi-Kyung; Zullo, Thomas G; Gibson, Kevin F; Kaminski, Naftali; Hoffman, Leslie A

    2010-01-01

    Patients were recruited from the Dorothy P. and Richard P. Simmons Center for Interstitial Lung Disease, located within the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis results in scarring of the lung and respiratory failure, and has a median survival of 3 to 5 years from the time of diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and their care partners could be more optimally managed by a disease-management intervention entitled "Program to Reduce Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Symptoms and Improve Management," which nurses delivered using the format of a support group. We hypothesized that participation would improve perceptions of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and decrease symptom burden. Subjects were 42 participants randomized to an experimental (10 patient/care partner dyads) or control (11 patient/care partner dyads) group. Experimental group participants attended the 6-week program, and controls received usual care. Before and after the program, all participants completed questionnaires designed to assess symptom burden and HRQoL. Patients and care partners in the intervention group were also interviewed in their home to elicit information on their experience after participating in the Program to Reduce Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Symptoms and Improve Management. After the intervention, experimental group patients rated their HRQoL less positively (P = .038) and tended to report more anxiety (P = .077) compared with controls. Care partners rated their stress at a lower level (P = .018) compared with controls. Course evaluations were uniformly positive. Post-study qualitative interviews with experimental group participants suggested benefits not exemplified by these scores. Patient participants felt less isolated, were able to put their disease into perspective, and valued participating in research and helping others. Further exploration of the impact of disease-management

  15. Effectiveness of a self-management program for dual sensory impaired seniors in aged care settings: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Roets-Merken, Lieve M; Graff, Maud J L; Zuidema, Sytse U; Hermsen, Pieter G J M; Teerenstra, Steven; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J

    2013-10-07

    Five to 25 percent of residents in aged care settings have a combined hearing and visual sensory impairment. Usual care is generally restricted to single sensory impairment, neglecting the consequences of dual sensory impairment on social participation and autonomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-management program for seniors who acquired dual sensory impairment at old age. In a cluster randomized, single-blind controlled trial, with aged care settings as the unit of randomization, the effectiveness of a self-management program will be compared to usual care. A minimum of 14 and maximum of 20 settings will be randomized to either the intervention cluster or the control cluster, aiming to include a total of 132 seniors with dual sensory impairment. Each senior will be linked to a licensed practical nurse working at the setting. During a five to six month intervention period, nurses at the intervention clusters will be trained in a self-management program to support and empower seniors to use self-management strategies. In two separate diaries, nurses keep track of the interviews with the seniors and their reflections on their own learning process. Nurses of the control clusters offer care as usual. At senior level, the primary outcome is the social participation of the seniors measured using the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire and the Activity Card Sort, and secondary outcomes are mood, autonomy and quality of life. At nurse level, the outcome is job satisfaction. Effectiveness will be evaluated using linear mixed model analysis. The results of this study will provide evidence for the effectiveness of the Self-Management Program for seniors with dual sensory impairment living in aged care settings. The findings are expected to contribute to the knowledge on the program's potential to enhance social participation and autonomy of the seniors, as well as increasing the job satisfaction of the licensed practical nurses. Furthermore, an

  16. A Pilot Study Exploring After-School Care Providers' Response to the Incredible Years Classroom Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks-Hoste, Taylor B.; Carlson, John S.; Tiret, Holly B.

    2015-01-01

    The need for and importance of bringing evidence-based interventions into school settings has been firmly established. Adapting and adjusting intervention programs to meet the unique needs of a school district requires personnel to use a data-based approach to implementation. This pilot study is the first to report on after-school care providers'…

  17. Developing a Performance Management System for a Federal Public Health Program: The Ryan White CARE ACT Titles I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Jennifer; Marconi, Katherine; Mannle, Thomas E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an approach to introducing performance measurement into a large federal health program, the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act, in response to the government Performance and Results Act. Also discusses characteristics of the HIV/AIDS epidemic that present unique challenges for performance measurement. (SLD)

  18. Developing a Performance Management System for a Federal Public Health Program: The Ryan White CARE ACT Titles I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Jennifer; Marconi, Katherine; Mannle, Thomas E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an approach to introducing performance measurement into a large federal health program, the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act, in response to the government Performance and Results Act. Also discusses characteristics of the HIV/AIDS epidemic that present unique challenges for performance measurement. (SLD)

  19. A Pilot Study Exploring After-School Care Providers' Response to the Incredible Years Classroom Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks-Hoste, Taylor B.; Carlson, John S.; Tiret, Holly B.

    2015-01-01

    The need for and importance of bringing evidence-based interventions into school settings has been firmly established. Adapting and adjusting intervention programs to meet the unique needs of a school district requires personnel to use a data-based approach to implementation. This pilot study is the first to report on after-school care providers'…

  20. Improving dementia diagnosis and management in primary care: a cohort study of the impact of a training and support program on physician competency, practice patterns, and community linkages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary care physicians routinely provide dementia care, but may lack the clinical skills and awareness of available resources to provide optimal care. We conducted a community-based pilot dementia training intervention designed to both improve clinical competency and increase utilization of local dementia care services. Methods Physicians (N = 29) and affiliated staff (N = 24) participated in a one-day training program on dementia screening, diagnosis and management that included direct engagement with local support service providers. Questionnaires about their dementia care competency and referral patterns were completed before and 6 months after the training intervention. Results Physicians reported significantly higher overall confidence in their dementia care competency 6 months post-training compared to pre-training. The largest reported improvements were in their ability to educate patients and caregivers about dementia and making appropriate referrals to community care services. Participants also reported markedly increased use of cognitive screening tools in providing care. Community service providers recorded approximately 160 physician-initiated referrals over a 2 year-period post-training, compared to few beforehand. Conclusions Combining a targeted physician practice-based educational intervention with community service engagement improves dementia care competency in clinicians and promotes linkages between clinical and community dementia care providers. PMID:24325194

  1. Testing the Replicability of a Successful Care Management Program: Results from a Randomized Trial and Likely Explanations for Why Impacts Did Not Replicate.

    PubMed

    Peterson, G Greg; Zurovac, Jelena; Brown, Randall S; Coburn, Kenneth D; Markovich, Patricia A; Marcantonio, Sherry A; Clark, William D; Mutti, Anne; Stepanczuk, Cara

    2016-12-01

    To test whether a care management program could replicate its success in an earlier trial and determine likely explanations for why it did not. Medicare claims and nurse contact data for Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with chronic illnesses enrolled in the trial in eastern Pennsylvania (N = 483). A randomized trial with half of enrollees receiving intensive care management services and half receiving usual care. We developed and tested hypotheses for why impacts declined. All outcomes and covariates were derived from claims and the nurse contact data. From 2010 to 2014, the program did not reduce hospitalizations or generate Medicare savings to offset program fees that averaged $260 per beneficiary per month. These estimates are statistically different (p < .05) from the large reductions in hospitalizations and spending in the first trial (2002-2010). The treatment-control differences in the second trial disappeared because the control group's risk-adjusted hospitalization rate improved, not because the treatment group's outcomes worsened. Even if demonstrated in a randomized trial, successful results from one test may not replicate in other settings or time periods. Assessing whether gaps in care that the original program filled exist in other settings can help identify where earlier success is likely to replicate. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Comparing Costs of Telephone versus Face-to-Face Extended Care Programs for the Management of Obesity in Rural Settings

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Tiffany A.; Bobroff, Linda B.; Lutes, Lesley D.; Durning, Patricia E.; Daniels, Michael J.; Limacher, Marian C.; Janicke, David M.; Martin, A. Daniel; Perri, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Background A major challenge following successful weight loss is continuing the behaviors required for long-term weight maintenance. This challenge may be exacerbated in rural areas with limited local support resources. Objective This study describes and compares program costs and cost-effectiveness for 12-month extended care lifestyle maintenance programs following an initial 6-month weight loss program. Design A 1-year prospective controlled randomized clinical trial. Participants/Setting The study included 215 female participants age 50 or older from rural areas who completed an initial 6-month lifestyle program for weight loss. The study was conducted from June 1, 2003, to May 31, 2007. Intervention The intervention was delivered through local Cooperative Extension Service offices in rural Florida. Participants were randomly-assigned to a 12-month extended care program using either individual telephone counseling (n=67), group face-to-face counseling (n=74), or a mail/control group (n=74). Main Outcome Measures Program delivery costs, weight loss, and self-reported health status were directly assessed through questionnaires and program activity logs. Costs were estimated across a range of enrollment sizes to allow inferences beyond the study sample. Statistical Analyses Performed Non-parametric and parametric tests of differences across groups for program outcomes were combined with direct program cost estimates and expected value calculations to determine which scales of operation favored alternative formats for lifestyle maintenance. Results Median weight regain during the intervention year was 1.7 kg for participants in the face-to-face format, 2.1 kg for the telephone format, and 3.1 kg for the mail/control format. For a typical group size of 13 participants, the face-to-face format had higher fixed costs, which translated into higher overall program costs ($420 per participant) when compared to individual telephone counseling ($268 per participant) and

  3. Characteristics, management and attainment of lipid target levels in diabetic and cardiac patients enrolled in Disease Management Program versus those in routine care: LUTZ registry.

    PubMed

    Bestehorn, Kurt; Jannowitz, Christina; Karmann, Barbara; Pittrow, David; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2009-08-04

    Since 2002 the sick funds in Germany have widely implemented disease management programs (DMPs) for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and coronary heart disease (CHD). Little is known about the characteristics, treatment and target attainment lipid levels of these patients enrolled in DMPs compared to patients in routine care (non-DMP). In an open, non-interventional registry (LUTZ) in Germany, 6551 physicians documented 15,211 patients with DM (10,110 in DMP, 5101 in routine care) and 14,222 (6259 in DMP, 7963 in routine care) over a follow-up period of 4 months. They received the NCEP ATP III guidelines as a reminder on lipid level targets. While demographic characteristics of DMP patients were similar to routine care patients, the former had higher rates of almost all cardiovascular comorbidities. Patients in DMPs received pharmacological treatment (in almost all drug classes) more often than non-DMP patients (e.g. antiplatelets: in DM 27.0% vs 23.8%; in CHD 63.0% vs. 53.6%). The same applied for educational measures (on life style changes and diet etc.). The rate of target level attainment for low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) < 100 mg/dl was somewhat higher in DMP patients at inclusion compared to non-DMP patients (DM: 23.9% vs. 21.3%; CHD: 30.6% vs. 23.8%) and increased after 4 months (DM: 38.3% vs. 36.9%; CHD: 49.8% vs. 43.3%). Individual LDL-C target level attainment rates as assessed by the treating physicians were higher (at 4 months in DM: 59.6% vs. 56.5%; CHD: 49.8% vs 43.3%). Mean blood pressure (BP) and HbA1c values were slightly lowered during follow-up, without substantial differences between DMP and non-DMP patients. Patients with DM, and (to a greater extent) with CHD in DMPs compared to non-DMP patients in routine care have a higher burden of comorbidities, but also receive more intensive pharmacological treatment and educational measures. The present data support that the substantial additional efforts in DMPs aimed at

  4. Characteristics, management and attainment of lipid target levels in diabetic and cardiac patients enrolled in Disease Management Program versus those in routine care: LUTZ registry

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Since 2002 the sick funds in Germany have widely implemented disease management programs (DMPs) for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and coronary heart disease (CHD). Little is known about the characteristics, treatment and target attainment lipid levels of these patients enrolled in DMPs compared to patients in routine care (non-DMP). Methods In an open, non-interventional registry (LUTZ) in Germany, 6551 physicians documented 15,211 patients with DM (10,110 in DMP, 5101 in routine care) and 14,222 (6259 in DMP, 7963 in routine care) over a follow-up period of 4 months. They received the NCEP ATP III guidelines as a reminder on lipid level targets. Results While demographic characteristics of DMP patients were similar to routine care patients, the former had higher rates of almost all cardiovascular comorbidities. Patients in DMPs received pharmacological treatment (in almost all drug classes) more often than non-DMP patients (e.g. antiplatelets: in DM 27.0% vs 23.8%; in CHD 63.0% vs. 53.6%). The same applied for educational measures (on life style changes and diet etc.). The rate of target level attainment for low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) < 100 mg/dl was somewhat higher in DMP patients at inclusion compared to non-DMP patients (DM: 23.9% vs. 21.3%; CHD: 30.6% vs. 23.8%) and increased after 4 months (DM: 38.3% vs. 36.9%; CHD: 49.8% vs. 43.3%). Individual LDL-C target level attainment rates as assessed by the treating physicians were higher (at 4 months in DM: 59.6% vs. 56.5%; CHD: 49.8% vs 43.3%). Mean blood pressure (BP) and HbA1c values were slightly lowered during follow-up, without substantial differences between DMP and non-DMP patients. Conclusion Patients with DM, and (to a greater extent) with CHD in DMPs compared to non-DMP patients in routine care have a higher burden of comorbidities, but also receive more intensive pharmacological treatment and educational measures. The present data support that the substantial

  5. Does a Depression Management Program Decrease Mortality in Older Adults with Specific Medical Conditions in Primary Care? An Exploratory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Hillary R; Joo, Jin H; Hwang, Seungyoung; Morales, Knashawn H; Bruce, Martha L; Reynolds, Charles F; Gallo, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether treating depression decreases mortality from various chronic medical conditions. Long-term follow-up of multisite-practice randomized controlled trial (Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly: Collaborative Trial). Twenty primary care practices randomized to intervention or usual care. Individuals aged 60 and older identified through depression screening of random patients (N=1,226). For 2 years, a depression care manager worked with primary care physicians in intervention practices to provide algorithm-based care for depression. Mortality risk based on a median follow-up of 98 months (range 0.8-116.4 months) through 2008; chronic medical conditions ascertained through self-report. For heart disease, persons with major depression were at greater risk of death, whether in usual-care or intervention practices. Older adults with major depression and diabetes mellitus in practices randomized to the intervention condition (hazard ratio=0.47, 95% confidence interval=0.24-0.91) were less likely to die. For other medical conditions, the point estimates for risk of death in persons with major depression were all in the direction of indicating lower risk in intervention practices but did not reach statistical significance. Older adults with depression and medical comorbidity pose a significant clinical and public health challenge. Evidence was found of a statistically significant intervention effect on mortality for diabetes mellitus in persons with major depression. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Effectiveness of a self-management program for dual sensory impaired seniors in aged care settings: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Five to 25 percent of residents in aged care settings have a combined hearing and visual sensory impairment. Usual care is generally restricted to single sensory impairment, neglecting the consequences of dual sensory impairment on social participation and autonomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-management program for seniors who acquired dual sensory impairment at old age. Methods/Design In a cluster randomized, single-blind controlled trial, with aged care settings as the unit of randomization, the effectiveness of a self-management program will be compared to usual care. A minimum of 14 and maximum of 20 settings will be randomized to either the intervention cluster or the control cluster, aiming to include a total of 132 seniors with dual sensory impairment. Each senior will be linked to a licensed practical nurse working at the setting. During a five to six month intervention period, nurses at the intervention clusters will be trained in a self-management program to support and empower seniors to use self-management strategies. In two separate diaries, nurses keep track of the interviews with the seniors and their reflections on their own learning process. Nurses of the control clusters offer care as usual. At senior level, the primary outcome is the social participation of the seniors measured using the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire and the Activity Card Sort, and secondary outcomes are mood, autonomy and quality of life. At nurse level, the outcome is job satisfaction. Effectiveness will be evaluated using linear mixed model analysis. Discussion The results of this study will provide evidence for the effectiveness of the Self-Management Program for seniors with dual sensory impairment living in aged care settings. The findings are expected to contribute to the knowledge on the program’s potential to enhance social participation and autonomy of the seniors, as well as increasing the job satisfaction of the

  7. Navigator program risk management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessen, Randii R.; Padilla, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, program risk management as applied to the Navigator Program: In Search of New Worlds will be discussed. The Navigator Program's goals are to learn how planetary systems form and to search for those worlds that could or do harbor life.

  8. Navigator program risk management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessen, Randii R.; Padilla, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, program risk management as applied to the Navigator Program: In Search of New Worlds will be discussed. The Navigator Program's goals are to learn how planetary systems form and to search for those worlds that could or do harbor life.

  9. Optimizing diabetes management: managed care strategies.

    PubMed

    Tzeel, E Albert

    2013-06-01

    Both the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and its associated costs have been rising over time and are projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, type 2 DM (T2DM) management costs represent a potentially untenable strain on the healthcare system unless substantial, systemic changes are made. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are uniquely positioned to attempt to make the changes necessary to reduce the burdens associated with T2DM by developing policies that align with evidence-based DM management guidelines and other resources. For example, MCOs can encourage members to implement healthy lifestyle choices, which have been shown to reduce DM-associated mortality and delay comorbidities. In addition, MCOs are exploring the strengths and weaknesses of several different benefit plan designs. Value-based insurance designs, sometimes referred to as value-based benefit designs, use both direct and indirect data to invest in incentives that change behaviors through health information technologies, communications, and services to improve health, productivity, quality, and financial trends. Provider incentive programs, sometimes referred to as "pay for performance," represent a payment/delivery paradigm that places emphasis on rewarding value instead of volume to align financial incentives and quality of care. Accountable care organizations emphasize an alignment between reimbursement and implementation of best practices through the use of disease management and/ or clinical pathways and health information technologies. Consumer-directed health plans, or high-deductible health plans, combine lower premiums with high annual deductibles to encourage members to seek better value for health expenditures. Studies conducted to date on these different designs have produced mixed results.

  10. Overcoming Barriers in the Management of Hypertension: The Experience of the Cardiovascular Health Program in Chilean Primary Health Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Daniela; Bravo, Miguel; Koch, Elard; Gatica, Sebastián; Ahlers, Ivonne; Henríquez, Oscar; Romero, Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess the blood pressure control and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) in a population of hypertensive patients with access to care under a government-financed program, the Cardiovascular Health Program (CHP). Design. A cross-sectional and multicenter study. Setting. 52 primary care centers, metropolitan area of Santiago, Chile. Participants. 1,194 patients were selected by a systematic random sampling from a universe of 316,654 hypertensive patients. Key Measurements. Demographic information, blood pressure (BP) measurements, and CVRF were extracted from medical records of patients followed for a 12-month period. Results. 59.7% of patients reached target BP <140/90 mmHg. More women were captured in the sampling (2.1 : 1), achieving better BP control than men. Diabetic patients (26.4%) had worse BP control than nondiabetics. Antihypertensive medications were used in 91.5%, with multidrug therapy more frequent in patients with higher BP and more difficult control. Conclusions. The success in improving the BP control to values <140/90 mmHg from 45.3% to 59.7% underscores the contribution of this program in the Chilean primary care cardiovascular preventive strategies. However, fewer hypertensive men than women were captured by this program, and it is of concern the underperforming of BP control observed in diabetics. PMID:22701781

  11. Managed care organizations and products.

    PubMed

    Behnke, L M

    1997-12-01

    Managed care organizations and their products will continue to change in response to consumer demands, competitive pressures, and regulatory requirements. Providers who gain an understanding of the world managed care organizations live in can also expect to influence these organizations for mutual benefit. Just as managed care organizations differ in the sophistication of their functional elements, providers and their organizations differ in their ability to shift their focus from the physician-patient relationship to improving the health of a population. As the future of managed care evolves, there are opportunities for those physicians who strive for a greater understanding of the broad spectrum of forces shaping the health care industry.

  12. A Standardized Certification Program for Case Managers Serving Frail Elderly Texans. Module II: Assessment and Care Plan Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusky, Richard A.; And Others

    This learning module is one of three training modules that were developed for members of the Texas Gerontological Consortium for Continuing Education to use in preparing case managers working in human service professions coordinating community-based programs for frail elderly Texans. Module II deals with the following topics: assessment (role of…

  13. What part of the total care consumed by type 2 diabetes patients is directly related to diabetes? Implications for disease management programs.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Christel E; Verheij, Robert A; Swinkels, Ilse C S; Rijken, Mieke; Schellevis, François G; Groenewegen, Peter P; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2011-10-01

    Disease management programs (DMP) aim at improving coordination and quality of care and reducing healthcare costs for specific chronic diseases. This paper investigates to what extent total healthcare utilization of type 2 diabetes patients is actually related to diabetes and its implications for diabetes management programs. Healthcare utilization for diabetes patients was analyzed using 2008 self-reported data (n=316) and data from electronic medical records (EMR) (n=9023), and divided whether or not care was described in the Dutch type 2 diabetes multidisciplinary healthcare standard. On average 4.3 different disciplines of healthcare providers were involved in the care for diabetes patients. Ninety-six percent contacted a GP-practice and 63% an ophthalmologist, 24% an internist, 32% a physiotherapist and 23% a dietician. Diabetes patients had on average 9.3 contacts with GP-practice of which 53% were included in the healthcare standard. Only a limited part of total healthcare utilization of diabetes patients was included in the healthcare standard and therefore theoretically included in DMPs. Organizing the care for diabetics in a DMP might harm the coordination and quality of all healthcare for diabetics. DMPs should be integrated in the overall organization of care.

  14. Impact of a chronic disease self-management program on health care utilization in rural communities: a retrospective cohort study using linked administrative data.

    PubMed

    Jaglal, Susan B; Guilcher, Sara J T; Hawker, Gillian; Lou, Wendy; Salbach, Nancy M; Manno, Michael; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2014-05-01

    Internationally, chronic disease self-management programs (CDSMPs) have been widely promoted with the assumption that confident, knowledgeable patients practicing self-management behavior will experience improved health and utilize fewer healthcare resources. However, there is a paucity of published data supporting this claim and the majority of the evidence is based on self-report. We used a retrospective cohort study using linked administrative health data. Data from 104 tele-CDSMP participants from 13 rural and remote communities in the province of Ontario, Canada were linked to administrative databases containing emergency department (ED) and physician visits and hospitalizations. Patterns of health care utilization prior to and after participation in the tele-CDSMP were compared. Poisson Generalized Estimating Equations regression was used to examine the impact of the tele-CDSMP on health care utilization after adjusting for covariates. There were no differences in patterns of health care utilization before and after participating in the tele-CDSMP. Among participants ≤ 66 years, however, there was a 34% increase in physician visits in the 12 months following the program (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.61) and a trend for decreased ED visits in those >66 years (OR = 0.59, 95% CI 0.33-1.06). This is the first study to examine health care use following participation in the CDSMP in a Canadian population and to use administrative data to measure health care utilization. Similar to other studies that used self-report measures to evaluate health care use we found no differences in health care utilization before and after participation in the CDSMP. Future research needs to confirm our findings and examine the impact of the CDSMP on health care utilization in different age groups to help to determine whether these interventions are more effective with select population groups.

  15. Program Management Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawadiak, Yuri; Wong, Alan; Maluf, David; Bell, David; Gurram, Mohana; Tran, Khai Peter; Hsu, Jennifer; Yagi, Kenji; Patel, Hemil

    2007-01-01

    The Program Management Tool (PMT) is a comprehensive, Web-enabled business intelligence software tool for assisting program and project managers within NASA enterprises in gathering, comprehending, and disseminating information on the progress of their programs and projects. The PMT provides planning and management support for implementing NASA programmatic and project management processes and requirements. It provides an online environment for program and line management to develop, communicate, and manage their programs, projects, and tasks in a comprehensive tool suite. The information managed by use of the PMT can include monthly reports as well as data on goals, deliverables, milestones, business processes, personnel, task plans, monthly reports, and budgetary allocations. The PMT provides an intuitive and enhanced Web interface to automate the tedious process of gathering and sharing monthly progress reports, task plans, financial data, and other information on project resources based on technical, schedule, budget, and management criteria and merits. The PMT is consistent with the latest Web standards and software practices, including the use of Extensible Markup Language (XML) for exchanging data and the WebDAV (Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning) protocol for collaborative management of documents. The PMT provides graphical displays of resource allocations in the form of bar and pie charts using Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Application (VBA) libraries. The PMT has an extensible architecture that enables integration of PMT with other strategic-information software systems, including, for example, the Erasmus reporting system, now part of the NASA Integrated Enterprise Management Program (IEMP) tool suite, at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The PMT data architecture provides automated and extensive software interfaces and reports to various strategic information systems to eliminate duplicative human entries and minimize data integrity

  16. Managing acute care.

    PubMed

    Russell, J S

    1993-02-01

    In the last few years, much medical-facility construction has been driven by what insurers want. Hospitals have built facilities for well-reimbursed procedures and closed money-losing ones. Health-maintenance organizations increasingly expect to hold down costs by making prepayment arrangements with doctors and their hospitals. President Clinton has pledged early action on health-care reform, which will likely change planners' priorities. Whether the nation goes to Clintonian "managed competition" or a Canadian-style nationwide single-payer system (the two most likely options), the projects on these pages reflect two large-scale trends that are likely to continue: the movement of more procedures from inpatient to outpatient facilities and the separation of treatment functions from ordinary office and administrative tasks so that the latter are not performed in the same high-cost buildings as technology-intensive procedures. Various schemes that make care more "patient-centered" have been tried and been shown to speed healing, even for outpatients, but such hard-to-quantify issues get short shrift in an era of knee-jerk cost containment. The challenge in tomorrow's healthcare universe--whatever it becomes--will be to keep these issues on the table.

  17. “Second-Generation” Medicaid Managed Care: Can It Deliver?

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Marsha; Mittler, Jessica

    2000-01-01

    This article offers insight into what we term “second-generation” Medicaid managed care. In case studies of seven States, we examined three critical questions: (1) Does managed care experience facilitate program operations? (2) Can Medicaid managed care deliver on important goals? and (3) Can States extend the program beyond low-income families and children to others? The answers are encouraging but also suggest caution. Medicaid managed care is not a solution to fundamental problems facing the Medicaid program. It may be a tool to encourage better delivery of care. This requires a long-term commitment and adequate financing to develop stable partnerships with all stakeholders. PMID:12500319

  18. Acquisition-Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E.; Vann, A. Vernon; Jones, Richard H.; Rew, William E.

    1987-01-01

    NASA Acquisition Management Subsystem (AMS) program integrated NASA-wide standard automated-procurement-system program developed in 1985. Designed to provide each NASA installation with procurement data-base concept with on-line terminals for managing, tracking, reporting, and controlling contractual actions and associated procurement data. Subsystem provides control, status, and reporting for various procurement areas. Purpose of standardization is to decrease costs of procurement and operation of automatic data processing; increases procurement productivity; furnishes accurate, on-line management information and improves customer support. Written in the ADABAS NATURAL.

  19. Acquisition-Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E.; Vann, A. Vernon; Jones, Richard H.; Rew, William E.

    1987-01-01

    NASA Acquisition Management Subsystem (AMS) program integrated NASA-wide standard automated-procurement-system program developed in 1985. Designed to provide each NASA installation with procurement data-base concept with on-line terminals for managing, tracking, reporting, and controlling contractual actions and associated procurement data. Subsystem provides control, status, and reporting for various procurement areas. Purpose of standardization is to decrease costs of procurement and operation of automatic data processing; increases procurement productivity; furnishes accurate, on-line management information and improves customer support. Written in the ADABAS NATURAL.

  20. Daily bowel care program

    MedlinePlus

    ... a brain or spinal cord injury. People with multiple sclerosis also have problems with their bowels. Those with ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 18. Read More Multiple sclerosis Recovering after stroke Patient Instructions Constipation - self-care ...

  1. The impact of a comprehensive airway management training program for pulmonary and critical care medicine fellows. A three-year experience.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Malo, Joshua; Sakles, John C; Hypes, Cameron D; Natt, Bhupinder; Snyder, Linda; Knepler, James; Bloom, John W; Joshi, Raj; Knox, Kenneth

    2015-04-01

    Airway management in the intensive care unit (ICU) is challenging, as many patients have limited physiologic reserve and are at risk for clinical deterioration if the airway is not quickly secured. In academic medical centers, ICU intubations are often performed by trainees, making airway management education paramount for pulmonary and critical care trainees. To improve airway management education for our trainees, we developed a comprehensive training program including an 11-month simulation-based curriculum. The curriculum emphasizes recognition of and preparation for potentially difficult intubations and procedural skills to maximize patient safety and increase the likelihood of first-attempt success. Training is provided in small group sessions twice monthly using a high-fidelity simulation program under the guidance of a core group of two to three advanced providers. The curriculum is designed with progressively more difficult scenarios requiring critical planning and execution of airway management by the trainees. Trainees consider patient position, preoxygenation, optimization of hemodynamics, choice of induction agents, selection of appropriate devices for the scenario, anticipation of difficulties, back-up plans, and immediate postintubation management. Clinical performance is monitored through a continuous quality improvement program. Sixteen fellows have completed the program since July 1, 2013. In the 18 months since the start of the curriculum (July 1, 2013-December 31, 2014), first-attempt success has improved from 74% (358/487) to 82% (305/374) compared with the 18 months before implementation (P = 0.006). During that time there were no serious complications related to airway management. Desaturation rates decreased from 26 to 17% (P = 0.002). Other complication rates are low, including aspiration (2.1%), esophageal intubation (2.7%), dental trauma (0.8%), and hypotension (8.3%). First-attempt success in a 6-month period after implementation (July 1

  2. Health system responsiveness and chronic disease care - What is the role of disease management programs? An analysis based on cross-sectional survey and administrative claims data.

    PubMed

    Röttger, Julia; Blümel, Miriam; Linder, Roland; Busse, Reinhard

    2017-07-01

    Health system responsiveness is an important aspect of health systems performance. The concept of responsiveness relates to the interpersonal and contextual aspects of health care. While disease management programs (DMPs) aim to improve the quality of health care (e.g. by improving the coordination of care), it has not been analyzed yet whether these programs improve the perceived health system responsiveness. Our study aims to close this gap by analyzing the differences in the perceived health system responsiveness between DMP-participants and non-participants. We used linked survey- and administrative claims data from 7037 patients with coronary heart disease in Germany. Of those, 5082 were enrolled and 1955 were not enrolled in the DMP. Responsiveness was assessed with an adapted version of the WHO responsiveness questionnaire in a postal survey in 2013. The survey covered 9 dimensions of responsiveness and included 17 items for each, GP and specialist care. Each item had five answer categories (very good - very bad). We handled missing values in the covariates by multiple imputation and applied propensity score matching (PSM) to control for differences between the two groups (DMP/non-DMP). We used Wilcoxon-signed-rank and McNemar test to analyze differences regarding the reported responsiveness. The PSM led to a matched and well balanced sample of 1921 pairs. Overall, DMP-participants rated the responsiveness of care more positive. The main difference was found for the coordination of care at the GP, with 62.0% of 1703 non-participants reporting a "good" or "very good" experience, compared to 69.1% of 1703 participants (p < 0.001). The results of our study indicate an overall high responsiveness for CHD-care, as well for DMP-participants as for non-participants. Yet, the results also clearly indicate that there is still a need to improve the coordination of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Program management model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, J. J.; Russell, J. E.; Seline, J. R.; Sumner, N. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Two models, a system performance model and a program assessment model, have been developed to assist NASA management in the evaluation of development alternatives for the Earth Observations Program. Two computer models were developed and demonstrated on the Goddard Space Flight Center Computer Facility. Procedures have been outlined to guide the user of the models through specific evaluation processes, and the preparation of inputs describing earth observation needs and earth observation technology. These models are intended to assist NASA in increasing the effectiveness of the overall Earth Observation Program by providing a broader view of system and program development alternatives.

  4. Managing Malnutrition in Older Persons Residing in Care Homes: Nutritional and Clinical Outcomes Following a Screening and Intervention Program.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Christopher G; Okonkwo, Arthur C O; Hart, Kathryn; Thompson, Nick P

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to establish prevalence of malnutrition in older adult care home residents and investigate whether a nutritional screening and intervention program could improve nutritional and clinical outcomes. A community-based cohort study was conducted in five Newcastle care homes. 205 participants entered; 175 were followed up. Residents already taking oral nutritional supplements (ONS) were excluded from interventions. Those with Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) score of 1 received dietetic advice and ≥2 received dietetic advice and were prescribed ONS (220 ml, 1.5 kcal/ml) twice daily for 12 weeks. Body mass index (BMI), MUST, mini nutritional assessment score (MNA)®, mid upper arm muscle circumference (MAMC), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were recorded at baseline and 12 weeks. Malnutrition prevalence was 36.6% ± 6.6 (95% CI). A higher MUST was associated with greater mortality (p = 0.004). Type of intervention received was significantly associated with change in MUST score (p < 0.001); dietetic advice resulting in the greatest improvement. There were no significant changes in BMI (p = 0.445), MAMC (p = 0.256), or GDS (p = 0.385) following the interventions. Dietitian advice may slow the progression of nutritional decline. In this study oral nutritional supplements over a 3-month period did not significantly improve nutritional status in malnourished care home residents.

  5. Meeting Abstracts - AMCP Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy Annual Meeting 2017.

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    The AMCP Abstracts program provides a forum through which authors can share their insights and outcomes of advanced managed care practice through publication in AMCP's Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy (JMCP). Poster presentations are Tuesday, March 28, from 5:45 pm to 7:30 pm. The posters will also be displayed on Wednesday, March 29, from 11:45 am to 2:45 pm. Podium presentations for the Platinum award-winning abstracts are Wednesday, March 29, from 4:30 pm to 5:45 pm. The reviewed abstracts are published in the JMCP Meeting Abstracts supplement. The AMCP Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy Annual Meeting 2017 in Denver, Colorado, is expected to attract more than 2,000 managed care pharmacists and other health care professionals who manage and evaluate drug therapies, develop and manage networks, and work with medical managers and information specialists to improve the care of all individuals enrolled in managed care programs.

  6. Family planning, managed care, and rural America.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M; Jacquart, K; Quam, L

    1995-09-01

    Within the United States, rural residents encounter a greater number of barriers in accessing health care services than their urban counterparts. In general, rural Americans have less access to both family planning services and managed care delivery systems. Given the rapid changes in health care, we reviewed the implications for the provision and integration of family planning and managed care services in rural areas, where there is limited experience in establishing working relationships between those services. In many instances, family planning services are well established in rural areas where managed care has not yet penetrated. Our case study in Minnesota suggests that, although managed care and family planning services are developing in rural areas, there is little evidence of collaboration. Several innovative and successful family planning projects do exist in rural areas, however, and serve as models of successful population-based programs that could work well with health plans. Although this study concentrated on the provision and utilization of subsidized family planning services, there is a compelling need for further work to determine accurately where rural residents are accessing such services and how the expansion of managed care will affect the delivery of reproductive health care.

  7. Development and validation of a short version of the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) in Dutch disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Nieboer, Anna P

    2011-07-04

    In the Netherlands the extent to which chronically ill patients receive care congruent with the Chronic Care Model is unknown. The main objectives of this study were to (1) validate the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) in the Netherlands in various Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) and (2) shorten the 34-item ACIC while maintaining adequate validity, reliability, and sensitivity to change. The Dutch version of the ACIC was tested in 22 DMPs with 218 professionals. We tested the instrument by means of structural equation modelling, and examined its validity, reliability and sensitivity to change. After eliminating 13 items, the confirmatory factor analyses revealed good indices of fit with the resulting 21-item ACIC (ACIC-S). Internal consistency as represented by Cronbach's alpha ranged from 'acceptable' for the 'clinical information systems' subscale to 'excellent' for the 'organization of the healthcare delivery system' subscale. Correlations between the ACIC and ACIC-S subscales were also good, ranging from .87 to 1.00, indicating acceptable coverage of the core areas of the CCM. The seven subscales were significantly and positively correlated, indicating that the subscales were conceptually related but also distinct. Paired t-tests results show that the ACIC scores of the original instrument all improved significantly over time in regions that were in the process of implementing DMPs (all components at p < 0.0001). We conclude that the psychometric properties of the ACIC and the ACIC-S are good and the ACIC-S is a promising alternate instrument to assess chronic illness care.

  8. Development and validation of a short version of the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) in Dutch Disease Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands the extent to which chronically ill patients receive care congruent with the Chronic Care Model is unknown. The main objectives of this study were to (1) validate the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) in the Netherlands in various Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) and (2) shorten the 34-item ACIC while maintaining adequate validity, reliability, and sensitivity to change. Methods The Dutch version of the ACIC was tested in 22 DMPs with 218 professionals. We tested the instrument by means of structural equation modelling, and examined its validity, reliability and sensitivity to change. Results After eliminating 13 items, the confirmatory factor analyses revealed good indices of fit with the resulting 21-item ACIC (ACIC-S). Internal consistency as represented by Cronbach's alpha ranged from 'acceptable' for the 'clinical information systems' subscale to 'excellent' for the 'organization of the healthcare delivery system' subscale. Correlations between the ACIC and ACIC-S subscales were also good, ranging from .87 to 1.00, indicating acceptable coverage of the core areas of the CCM. The seven subscales were significantly and positively correlated, indicating that the subscales were conceptually related but also distinct. Paired t-tests results show that the ACIC scores of the original instrument all improved significantly over time in regions that were in the process of implementing DMPs (all components at p < 0.0001). Conclusion We conclude that the psychometric properties of the ACIC and the ACIC-S are good and the ACIC-S is a promising alternate instrument to assess chronic illness care. PMID:21726439

  9. Medicaid and Managed Care: Key Data, Trends, and Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... programs, states contract directly with primary care providers (PCPs) to provide, manage, and monitor the primary care ... beneficiaries who select or are assigned to them; PCPs are also generally responsible for authorizing referrals when ...

  10. Quality Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    According to {section} 35.32, Quality Management Program,'' of 10 CFR Part 35, Medical Use of Byproduct Material,'' applicants or licensees, as applicable, are required to establish a quality management (QM) program. This regulatory guide provides guidance to licensees and applicants for developing policies and procedures for the QM program. This guide does not restrict or limit the licensee from using other guidance that may be equally useful in developing a QM program, e.g., information available from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations or the American College of Radiology. Any information collection activities mentioned in this regulatory guide are contained as requirements in 10 CFR Part 35, which provides the regulatory basis for this guide. This information collection requirements in 10 CFR Part 35 have been cleared under OMB Clearance No. 3150-0010.

  11. A Meta-Analysis of Health Status, Health Behaviors, and Health Care Utilization Outcomes of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Louise; O’Colmain, Benita J.; Beauchesne, Danielle; Daniels, Brandy; Greenberg, Michael; House, Marnie; Chervin, Doryn

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is a community-based self-management education program designed to help participants gain confidence (self-efficacy) and skills to better manage their chronic conditions; it has been implemented worldwide. The objective of this meta-analysis was to quantitatively synthesize the results of CDSMP studies conducted in English-speaking countries to determine the program’s effects on health behaviors, physical and psychological health status, and health care utilization at 4 to 6 months and 9 to 12 months after baseline. Methods We searched 8 electronic databases to identify CDSMP-relevant literature published from January 1, 1999, through September 30, 2009; experts identified additional unpublished studies. We combined the results of all eligible studies to calculate pooled effect sizes. We included 23 studies. Eighteen studies presented data on small English-speaking groups; we conducted 1 meta-analysis on these studies and a separate analysis on results by other delivery modes. Results Among health behaviors for small English-speaking groups, aerobic exercise, cognitive symptom management, and communication with physician improved significantly at 4- to 6-month follow-up; aerobic exercise and cognitive symptom management remained significantly improved at 9 to 12 months. Stretching/strengthening exercise improved significantly at 9 to 12 months. All measures of psychological health improved significantly at 4 to 6 months and 9 to 12 months. Energy, fatigue, and self-rated health showed small but significant improvements at 4 to 6 months but not at 9 to 12 months. The only significant change in health care utilization was a small improvement in the number of hospitalization days or nights at 4 to 6 months Conclusion Small to moderate improvements in psychological health and selected health behaviors that remain after 12 months suggest that CDSMP delivered in small English-speaking groups produces

  12. Effectiveness of the blended care self-management program "Partner in Balance" for early-stage dementia caregivers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Boots, Lizzy M M; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Verhey, Frans R J

    2016-05-04

    The benefits of e-health support for dementia caregivers are becoming increasingly recognized. Reaching early-stage dementia caregivers could prevent high levels of burden and psychological problems in them in the later stages of dementia. An iterative step-wise approach was employed to develop the blended care self-management program "Partner in Balance" for early-stage dementia caregivers. The design of a study evaluating the process characteristics and effects is presented. A mixed-method, single-blind, randomized controlled trial with 80 family caregivers of community-dwelling people with (very) mild dementia will be conducted. Participants will be randomly assigned to either the 8-week blended care self-management program "Partner in Balance" or a waiting-list control group. Data will be collected pre intervention and post intervention and at 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Semi-structured interviews will be conducted post intervention. A process evaluation will investigate the internal and external validity of the intervention. Primary outcomes will include self-efficacy and symptoms of depression. Secondary outcomes will include goal attainment, mastery, psychological complaints (feelings of anxiety and perceived stress), and quality of life. Possible modifying variables such as caregiver characteristics (quality of the relationship, neurotic personality) and interventional aspects (coach) on the intervention effect will also be evaluated. A cost-consequence analysis will describe the costs and health outcomes. We expect to find a significant increase in self-efficacy, goal attainment and quality of life and lower levels of psychological complaints (depression, anxiety and stress) in the intervention group, compared with the control group. If such effects are found, the program could provide accessible care to future generations of early-stage dementia caregivers and increase dementia care efficiency. Dutch trial register NTR4748 .

  13. Waste Management Program management plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    As the prime contractor to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) provides comprehensive waste management services to all contractors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) through the Waste Management (WM) Program. This Program Management Plan (PMP) provides an overview of the Waste Management Program objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. This document will be reviewed at least annually and updated as needed to address revisions to the Waste Management`s objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. Waste Management Program is managed by LMITCO Waste Operations Directorate. The Waste Management Program manages transuranic, low-level, mixed low-level, hazardous, special-case, and industrial wastes generated at or transported to the INEEL.

  14. The Athletic Health Care and Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Stephen G.; Schlotfeldt, John D.; Foley, Wayne E.

    1985-01-01

    The Athletic Health Care and Training Program was developed to meet the educational, organizational and record-keeping needs of the interscholastic athletic program of the Seattle Public Schools. The program components were the education of coaches, school nurses and student trainers; development of a centralized training room; implementation of written procedures, and establishment of a record-keeping system. At the end of the three-year study period, schools involved in the program were better prepared to handle emergencies than were control schools. Schools involved in the program were found to have an injury-recognition rate comparable to that previously reported for high schools that had athletic trainers, a rate substantially higher than that in the control schools. The experimental schools were judged to have managed these injuries satisfactorily 95% of the time, compared with a satisfactory management rate of 14% for the control schools. PMID:3993012

  15. Baseline management practices at providers in better jobs better care.

    PubMed

    Stott, Amy L; Brannon, S Diane; Vasey, Joseph; Dansky, Kathryn H; Kemper, Peter

    2007-01-01

    High turnover and difficult recruitment of direct care workers are challenges for long-term care providers. This study reports the extent and variation of the use of management practices for direct care workers and their supervisors across four long-term care settings in the Better Jobs Better Care demonstration. Overall, there is limited use of direct care worker training, career advancement opportunities, and mentoring programs. Participation in care planning, communication about tasks, and direct care worker supervisor training and development practices vary significantly across long-term care settings. The paucity of training, career advancement opportunities, and mentoring programs suggests that government policies may be needed to encourage their use.

  16. Primary care referral management: a marketing strategy for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bender, A D; Geoghegan, S S; Lundquist, S H; Cantone, J M; Krasnick, C J

    1990-06-01

    With increasing competition among hospitals, primary care referral development and management programs offer an opportunity for hospitals to increase their admissions. Such programs require careful development, the commitment of the hospital staff to the strategy, an integration of hospital activities, and an understanding of medical practice management.

  17. The IMPACT (Incident Management of Patients, Actions Centered on Treatment) program: a quality improvement approach for caring for patients initiating long-term hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Steven M; Robertson, John A; Chen, Grace; Goel, Pooja; Benner, Deborah A; Krishnan, Mahesh; Mayne, Tracy J; Nissenson, Allen R

    2012-09-01

    Patients beginning dialysis therapy are at risk of death and illness. The IMPACT (Incident Management of Patients, Actions Centered on Treatment) quality improvement program was developed to improve incident hemodialysis patient outcomes through standardized care. Quality improvement report. Patients who started hemodialysis therapy between September 2007 and December 2008 at DaVita facilities using the IMPACT program (n = 1,212) constituted the intervention group. Propensity score-matched patients who initiated hemodialysis therapy in the same interval at DaVita facilities not using the IMPACT program (n = 2,424) made up the control group. IMPACT intervention included a structured intake process and monitoring reports; patient enrollment in a 90-day patient education program and 90-day patient management pathway. Mean dialysis adequacy (Kt/V), hemoglobin and albumin levels, percentage of patients using preferred vascular access (arteriovenous fistula or graft), and mortality at each quarter. Compared with the non-IMPACT group, the IMPACT group was associated with a higher proportion of patients dialyzing with a preferred access at 90 days (0.50 [95% CI, 0.47-0.53] vs 0.47 [95% CI, 0.45-0.49]; P = 0.1) and 360 days (0.63 [95% CI, 0.61-0.66] vs 0.48 [95% CI, 0.46-0.50]; P < 0.001) and a lower mortality rate at 90 days (24.8 [95% CI, 19.0-30.7] vs 31.9 [95% CI, 27.1-36.6] deaths/100 patient-years; P = 0.08) and 360 days (17.8 [95% CI, 15.2-20.4] vs 25.1 [95% CI, 20.7-25.2] deaths/100 patient-years; P = 0.01). The study does not determine the care processes responsible for the improved outcomes. Intense management of incident dialysis patients with the IMPACT quality improvement program was associated with significantly decreased first-year mortality. Focused attention to the care of incident patients is an important part of a dialysis program. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Managed care contracting for specialists.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J M

    1999-01-01

    Specialty managed care contracting requires specialists to understand their role in managing care, as well as carve-out and subcapitation agreements. Specialists should know their referral sources, their costs for providing care, and how to provide care that meets their referral sources' needs and the payers' requirements. Once specialists enter carve-out or subcapitation arrangements, they need to determine the best payment calculation method for their practice. Three methods to consider are resource-based relative value scale, per-referral basis, and a point system. Because each method produces different results, providers need to understand each method and the unique concerns of specialty managed care contracting to negotiate the best contracts for their situation.

  19. Managed care: the second generation.

    PubMed

    Curtiss, F R

    1990-09-01

    The current status of managed health care is described and its impact on hospital and pharmacy operations is summarized. In the 1980s, managed care evolved into a three-segment industry, comprising health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred-provider organizations, and fee-for-service plans. Five new trends are emerging as managed care, now an established part of the country's health-care delivery system, enters its second generation: dual- and triple-option plans with financial risk sharing between employers and insurers/HMOs, point-of-service determination of benefits and coverage, consolidation of the number of options offered by employee health plans, creation of exclusive provider organizations, and direct provider contracting. Persons charged with negotiating managed-care contracts will make use of three primary cost-management methods: benefit design, provider reimbursement, and prospective pricing. Employees will take an increasingly active part in purchase decisions. Enrollees will face tradeoffs between their desire for maximum freedom of choice of provider and higher premiums, deductibles, and out-of-pocket expenses. Managed-care plans will continue to have a strong impact on hospitals, especially in the areas of reimbursement and use review. The effect of managed care on pharmacy operations will vary from institution to institution; among the positive results may be increased appreciation of the role of clinical pharmacy services in reducing the incidence of readmissions and the length of hospital stays. The result of these changes in the structure of health-care benefits will be greater price sensitivity, marked by a suppression of unnecessary use of health-care services and an increased tendency to compare and evaluate health-plan costs.

  20. Designing the role of the embedded care manager.

    PubMed

    Hines, Patricia; Mercury, Marge

    2013-01-01

    : The role of the professional case manager is changing rapidly. Health reform has called upon the industry to ensure that care is delivered in an efficient, effective, and high-quality and low cost manner. As a means to achieve this objective, health plans and health systems are moving the care manager out of a centralized location within their organizations to "embedding" them into physician offices. This move enables the care manager to work alongside the primary care physicians and their high-risk patients. This article discusses the framework for designing and implementing an embedded care manager role into a physician practice. Key elements of the program are discussed. IMPLICATIONS FOR CARE MANAGEMENT:: Historically care management has played a foundational role in improving the quality of care for individuals and populations via the efficient and effective use of resources. Now with the goals of health care reform, a successful transition from a volume-based to value-based reimbursement system requires primary care physicians to welcome care managers into their practices to improve patient care, quality, and costs through care coordination across health care settings and populations. : As patient-centered medical homes and integrated delivery systems formulate their plans for population health management, their efforts have included embedding a care manager in the primary practice setting. Having care managers embedded at the physician offices increases their ability to collaborate with the physician and their staff in the implementation and monitoring care plans for their patients. : Implementing an embedded care manager into an existing physician's practice requires the following:Although the embedded care manager is a highly evolving role, physician groups are beginning to realize the benefits from their care management collaborations. Examples cited include improved outreach and coordination, patient adherence to care plans, and improved quality of life.

  1. Negotiating successful managed care contracts.

    PubMed

    Clark, B W

    1995-08-01

    The goal in managed care contracting is to create a coherent framework for treatment and payment decisions that is as unintrusive, flexible, and cooperative as possible for both payers and providers. That goal rarely is achieved with a generic contract that ignores the circumstances and interests unique to a particular payer and provider. This article highlights a number of key issues that arise in managed care contracting in general and offers several practical suggestions for resolving those issues.

  2. Lessons Learned From Transitioning PEPFAR Track 1.0 Care and Treatment Programs: Case Studies in Financial Management Capacity Building in Zambia and Botswana.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Chuck; Tidwell, George; Vhugen, Jann; Sharma, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the United States government mandated transition of internationally managed HIV care and treatment programs to local country ownership. Three case studies illustrate the US Health Resources Services Administration's fiscal assessment and technical assistance (TA) processes to strengthen local organizations' capabilities to absorb and manage United States government funding. Review of initial, TA and follow-up reports reveal that the 1 Botswanan and 2 Zambian organizations closed 10 of 17 financial capacity gaps, with Health Resources Services Administration assisting on 2. Zambian organizations requested and absorbed targeted TA on the basis of the consultant's desk review, their finance staff revised fiscal policies and procedures, and accordingly trained other staff. In Botswana, delays in integrating recommendations necessitated on-site TA for knowledge building and role modeling. Organizational maturity may explain differences in responsiveness, ownership, and required TA approaches. Clarifying expectations of capacity building, funding agreement, and nonmonetary donor involvement can help new organizations determine and act on intervening actions.

  3. Funding mechanisms for depression care management: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Bachman, John; Pincus, Harold Alan; Houtsinger, Jeanie Knox; Unützer, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    Inconsistent third-party reimbursement for depression care management is a significant economic barrier to the utilization and sustainability of the chronic illness care model in primary care practice settings. We review common mechanisms used to procure payment for depression care management services, discuss obstacles encountered and suggest future directions. We describe several extant models for funding depression care management services in use at the demonstration sites of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded "Depression in Primary Care" project and similar programs. We derived this information from ongoing discussions with the sites' project directors and through an extensive electronic literature search on "care management, funding mechanisms and depression." Funding mechanisms include (a) practice-based care management on a fee-for-service basis, (b) practice-based care management under contract to health plans, (c) global capitation, (d) flexible infrastructure support for chronic care management, (e) health-plan-based care management, (f) third-party-based care management under contract to health plans and (g) hybrid models. While substantial obstacles remain in the way of fully implementing these depression care management funding mechanisms (e.g., variations in care managers' credentials and work locations and third-party payer concerns about overutilization and transaction costs), several recent policy advances provide some optimism for the potential adoption of financial mechanisms to support and disseminate these evidence-based practices.

  4. Management of apathy in nursing homes using a teaching program for care staff: the STIM-EHPAD study.

    PubMed

    Leone, Elsa; Deudon, Audrey; Bauchet, Murielle; Laye, Mathilde; Bordone, Nathalie; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Piano, Julie; Friedman, Leah; David, Renaud; Delva, Fleur; Brocker, Patrice; Yesavage, Jerome; Robert, Philippe Henri

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a nursing home (NH) staff education to manage apathy in older individuals with a diagnosis of dementia. Sixteen NHs agreed to participate, and 230 demented apathetic residents were randomly assigned to the reference group (RG) or the intervention group (IG). IG received a month of weekly 4-h training. Qualitative evaluation was performed through interviews and questionnaires regarding work practices and knowledge about dementia. Quantitative evaluation was at baseline, at the end of the training program (week 4), and 3 months after the end of it with the use of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), the Apathy Inventory, and two observation scales. In the qualitative evaluation, very few staff responded to the questionnaire. Concerning the difficulty that managing residents' behavioral symptoms presented, aggressiveness was ranked as the most difficult behavior to manage and apathy as the least difficult. In the quantitative evaluation, the results are as follows. NPI: the IG scores increased from baseline to week 4 more than the RG for symptoms belonging to the affective and the psychotic NPI item subgroup. Apathy Inventory: there was a significant decrease of the emotional blunting score dimension in the IG. Group Observation Scale: significant improvement was observed for the emotional blunting dimension in the IG only. Apathy is rarely identified as a problem in NH. Emotional blunting was the only dimension sensitive to change. Failure to improve residents' level of interest could be explained by the difficulties encountered in accessing information regarding the subjects' personal interests. But it remains possible to modify residents' emotional reactivity and staff's perceptions of residents' behaviors and emotions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-06-27

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

  6. Managing Military Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Based on research as well as on the down-to-earth experiences which come from running a large military child care center, this director's manual provides guidelines for running an effective program. The guidebook, one in a series on the subject of military child care centers, presents advice on the following seven topics: becoming a center…

  7. Health supervision visits among SSI-eligible children in the D.C. Medicaid program: a comparison of enrollees in fee-for-service and partially capitated managed care.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jean M; Gaskin, Darrell J; Kozma, Chahira

    2008-01-01

    Managed care plans that involve some form of capitation may have adverse effects on children with special health care needs because the financial incentives to control costs may result in under-treatment and restrict access to expensive services and specialty providers. Proponents highlight the advantages of a managed care model, including case management and coordination of services. In light of this debate, only a few state Medicaid programs have implemented a managed care option for children with special health care needs. This study evaluates the effects of plan choice (partially capitated managed care versus fee-for-service) on whether children with disabilities eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and enrolled in the District of Columbia's Medicaid program are in compliance with the guidelines for health supervision visits established by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Our findings, based on five years of claims data, show that SSI-eligible children with disabilities enrolled in a partially capitated managed care plan are significantly more likely to be in compliance with the AAP guidelines for health supervision visits compared to their fee-for-service counterparts. Moreover, we find that selection due to unobservable characteristics does not significantly bias the estimated program effects.

  8. Constructing a conflict resolution program for health care.

    PubMed

    Porter-O'Grady, Tim

    2004-01-01

    Resolving conflict throughout organizations requires a programmatic infrastructure and a committed management team. Leaders must recognize the need to approach conflict by building a format for learning, creating and managing an effective conflict management program. Careful attention to the elements of design and the stages of development can make all the difference in building a sustainable and useful conflict management approach.

  9. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: concept, content, and pilot results

    PubMed Central

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Sinnige, Ludovicus G; van Geel, Björn M; Verheul, Freek; Verhagen, Wim I; van der Kruijk, Ruud A; Haverkamp, Reinoud; Schrijver, Hans M; Baart, J Coby; Visser, Leo H; Arnoldus, Edo P; Gilhuis, H Jacobus; Pop, Paul; Booy, Monique; Lemmens, Wim; Donders, Rogier; Kool, Anton; van Noort, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009–2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor) for (self-)monitoring, self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in MS. Methods The notions underlying the MSmonitor concept and the program’s elements are described. We analyze MSmonitor’s role in the self-management of fatigue by retrospective comparison of fatigue and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) before and after usage of specific elements of MSmonitor, and by a correlative analysis between frequency of usage and fatigue change. Results After a step-wise development the program comprises six validated questionnaires: Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile, Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-5 items (MFIS-5), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 items, and the 8-item Leeds Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life (LMSQoL) questionnaires; two inventories: Medication and Adherence Inventory, Miction Inventory; two diaries: Activities Diary, Miction Diary; and two functionalities: e-consult and personal e-logbook. The program is now used in 17 hospitals by 581 PwMS and their neurologists, MS nurses, physical therapists, rehabilitative doctors, continence nurses, and family doctors. Those PwMS (N=105) who used the LMSQoL and MFIS-5 questionnaires at least twice in a period of up to 6 months, showed improved HRQoL (P<0.026). In the subgroup (N=56) who had also used the Activities Diary twice or more, the frequency of diary usage correlated modestly with the degree of fatigue improvement (r=0.292; P=0.028). Conclusion MSmonitor is an interactive web-based program for self-management and integrated care in PwMS. Pilot data suggest that the repeated use of the short MFIS-5 and LMSQoL questionnaires is associated with an increase in HRQoL, and that a

  10. Managed care and physician disability.

    PubMed

    Fraunfelder, F T; Fraunfelder, N

    1999-07-01

    The number of disability claims by physicians has skyrocketed during the last decade. One of the primary reasons for this escalation is decreased job satisfaction brought about by managed care. Certain physician groups are more vulnerable to the stress of advanced managed care: solo practitioners, specialists and subspecialists, certain generalists, doctors with independent personalities, middle-aged or near-retirement physicians, impaired physicians, and those whose practices are almost solely contract driven. Based on analysis of physician disability claims, certain protective measures are recommended to relieve stress and promote survival in today's health care market.

  11. Waste management program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    Current information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant are reported. Process and equipment development studies are considered as well as surveillance and maintenance, waste concentration, low level effluent waste, waste tank evaluation, and tank replacement/waste transfer (formerly waste tank retirement). Criteria for the selection of sites for storage of waste forms produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility are described.

  12. Total quality management issues in managed care.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C P; Kaluzny, A D

    1997-01-01

    The implementation of total quality management (TQM) in health care has gone on in parallel with the growth of managed care. What is the interaction between the two? Key issues are the ascendance of cost control over quality in many areas, erosion of employee commitment and loyalty, and a short-run orientation. Associated with this is an emphasis on organizational learning rather than learning by autonomous professionals. Both TQM and managed care acknowledge the dynamic nature of clinical processes and the ability and responsibility of both institutions and clinicians to improve their processes. Both are consistent with efforts to identify and implement best practices. However, these similarities should not mask fundamental differences. Continuous improvement must shift its focus from avoiding unnecessary variation to facilitating rapid organizational learning and institutionalizing mass customization into the delivery of health services.

  13. Trust in managed care organizations.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allen

    2000-09-01

    Two basic criticisms of managed care are that it erodes patient trust in physicians and subjects physicians to incentives and pressures that compromise the physician's fiduciary obligation to the patient. In this article, I first distinguish between status trust and merit trust, and then argue (1) that the value of status trust in physicians is probably over-rated and certainly underdocumented; (2) that erosion of status trust may not be detrimental if accompanied by an increase in well-founded merit trust; and (3) that under conditions of managed care the physician's commitment to traditional medical ethics cannot serve as an adequate basis for merit trust. Next, drawing on an analogy between managed care organzations and politics, I argue that (4) the most appropriate basis for merit trust in managed care is a conception of organizational legitimacy that includes procedural justice, empowerment of constructive criticism within the organization, and organizational accommodation of the noninstrumental commitment to patient well-being that is distinctive of medical professionalism. I then explore the conditions necessary for robust competition for merit trust among managed care organizations and indicate the kinds of public policies needed to facilitate such competition. Finally, I show how the account of organization-based merit trust can accommodate the special fiduciary obligation of medical professionals, without indulging in the delusion that it is the physician's fiduciary obligation always to provide all care that is expected to be of any net benefit to the patient.

  14. Integrated Financial Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pho, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Having worked in the Employees and Commercial Payments Branch of the Financial Management Division for the past 3 summers, I have seen the many changes that have occurred within the NASA organization. As I return each summer, I find that new programs and systems have been adapted to better serve the needs of the Center and of the Agency. The NASA Agency has transformed itself the past couple years with the implementation of the Integrated Financial Management Program (IFMP). IFMP is designed to allow the Agency to improve its management of its Financial, Physical, and Human Resources through the use of multiple enterprise module applications. With my mentor, Joseph Kan, being the branch chief of the Employees and Commercial Payments Branch, I have been exposed to several modules, such as Travel Manager, WebTads, and Core Financial/SAP, which were implemented in the last couple of years under the IFMP. The implementation of these agency-wide systems has sometimes proven to be troublesome. Prior to IFMP, each NASA Center utilizes their own systems for Payroll, Travel, Accounts Payable, etc. But with the implementation of the Integrated Financial Management Program, all the "legacy" systems had to be eliminated. As a result, a great deal of enhancement and preparation work is necessary to ease the transformation from the old systems to the new. All this work occurs simultaneously; for example, e-Payroll will "go live" in several months, but a system like Travel Manager will need to have information upgraded within the system to meet the requirements set by Headquarters. My assignments this summer have given me the opportunity to become involved with such work. So far, I have been given the opportunity to participate in projects resulting from a congressional request, several bankcard reconciliations, updating routing lists for Travel Manager, updating the majordomo list for Travel Manager approvers and point of contacts, and a NASA Headquarters project involving

  15. Managed care: the next generation.

    PubMed

    Sachs, M A

    1997-01-01

    Managed care today affects most Americans. Of the 160 million Americans receiving employee coverage, 120 million are in a managed care setting. HMO development to date has been driven by the desire to reduce health benefit costs for employers. Employees, the real consumers, perceive a clash between "good care and good profits." Health plans have generated profits by reducing utilization and keeping a portion of the savings. In the future, market conditions will force plans to develop new ways of maintaining profitability. Also, plans will survive by focusing on factors that matter most to consumers-such as overall care quality and access. Care systems that combine the benefits of open-access systems with the benefits of point-of-service products represent the next generation of consumer-driven healthcare.

  16. Data warehousing in disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Ramick, D C

    2001-01-01

    Disease management programs offer the benefits of lower disease occurrence, improved patient care, and lower healthcare costs. In such programs, the key mechanism used to identify individuals at risk for targeted diseases is the data warehouse. This article surveys recent warehousing techniques from HMOs to map out critical issues relating to the preparation, design, and implementation of a successful data warehouse. Discussions of scope, data cleansing, and storage management are included in depicting warehouse preparation and design; data implementation options are contrasted. Examples are provided of data warehouse execution in disease management programs that identify members with preexisting illnesses, as well as those exhibiting high-risk conditions. The proper deployment of successful data warehouses in disease management programs benefits both the organization and the member. Organizations benefit from decreased medical costs; members benefit through an improved quality of life through disease-specific care.

  17. Pediatric palliative care: starting a hospital-based program.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kaye

    2011-01-01

    The value of palliative care in pediatrics has received significant attention over the past 10 years. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Institute of Medicine published recommendations involving children who have a life-limiting diagnosis in a palliative care program early in their disease process. Palliative care is intended to assure an emphasis on quality of life in addition to the current medical treatment, which may be focused on cure, symptom management, and/or end-of-life care. This article describes one hospital's experience in planning, implementing, and managing a pediatric palliative care program. Implementing a hospital-based palliative care program in a children's hospital can be accomplished through careful planning and analysis of need. Writing an official business plan formalized the request for organizational support for this program, including the mission and vision, plans for how services would be provided, expected financial implications, and initial plans for evaluation of success.

  18. Price elasticity and pharmaceutical selection: the influence of managed care.

    PubMed

    Domino, Marisa Elena; Salkever, David S

    2003-07-01

    State Medicaid programs are turning increasingly to managed care to control expenditures, although the types of managed care programs in use have changed dramatically. Little is known about the influence of the shifting Medicaid managed care arena on treatment decisions. This paper investigates factors affecting the selection of treatments for depression by providers participating in either of two Medicaid managed care programs. Of particular interest is the influence of medication price on the choice of treatment, since one vehicle through which managed care organizations can reduce total expenditures is by increasing the price sensitivity of participating providers. We take a new approach by phrasing the problem as a discrete choice, using a nested multinomial logit model for the analyses. Contrary to earlier literature, we find some evidence that physicians in both programs do take price into consideration when selecting among treatment options. HMO providers in particular demonstrate increased price sensitivity in the two most commonly prescribed categories of antidepressants.

  19. Filling the gaps. Systems offer two models of care management: community outreach and inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Anker, L; Rose, R; Watson, R F

    1992-06-01

    The growing number of vulnerable people, such as the elderly and people with long-term disabilities, calls for healthcare providers to offer more programs to ensure a continuum of care. Client-focused care management programs offer access to such a continuum. Care managers understand services and reimbursement and can pull it all together for the client. The Sisters of Charity Health Care Systems, Cincinnati, have two models of care management. St. Joseph Coordinated Care provides extensive outreach to a large, culturally diverse New Mexico community, serving urban and rural clients. Penrose-St. Francis Healthcare System offers inpatient medical care management in Colorado. Coordinated Care at St. Joseph Healthcare System in Albuquerque is comprehensive, covering a wide spectrum of client needs--medical, social, and psychological. The program's central goal is to help individuals remain safely at home. Persistence and devotion to the client are the hallmarks of effective care management and the foundation of the new geriatric care management program at Penrose-St. Francis Healthcare System in Colorado Springs, CO. The program's goals are to improve inpatient geriatric care, smooth the patient's transition to alternative care settings, and ensure efficient and effective resource use during the patient's hospital stay.

  20. Pain management improves care and revenue: an interview with ProCare Systems.

    PubMed

    Davis, F N; Walsh, C

    2000-01-01

    As provider and managed care organizations continue to look for better ways to control costs and improve patient outcomes, disease management programs are getting an increasing share of their attention. One often-over-looked area with significant potential to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and enhance revenues is pain management. It has been estimated that at least 40 percent of senior citizens suffer from chronic pain, and as the population ages, the number of chronic pain sufferers will only increase. Pain management companies have been forming to meet the current and future demand for comprehensive pain management programs. One such company is ProCare Systems, a single-specialty physician practice management company based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. HFM spoke with Fred N. Davis, MD, president and cofounder of ProCare Systems, and Cyndy Walsh, ProCare System's CEO, about pain management programs and the patient care and financial impact they can effect.

  1. The Prenatal Care at School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Carol H.; Nasso, Jacqueline T.; Swider, Susan; Ellison, Brenda R.; Griswold, Daniel L.; Brooks, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    School absenteeism and poor compliance with prenatal appointments are concerns for pregnant teens. The Prenatal Care at School (PAS) program is a new model of prenatal care involving local health care providers and school personnel to reduce the need for students to leave school for prenatal care. The program combines prenatal care and education…

  2. The Prenatal Care at School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Carol H.; Nasso, Jacqueline T.; Swider, Susan; Ellison, Brenda R.; Griswold, Daniel L.; Brooks, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    School absenteeism and poor compliance with prenatal appointments are concerns for pregnant teens. The Prenatal Care at School (PAS) program is a new model of prenatal care involving local health care providers and school personnel to reduce the need for students to leave school for prenatal care. The program combines prenatal care and education…

  3. The marketing function in managed care systems.

    PubMed

    Fleming, K; Short, M; Warren, W E

    1999-01-01

    As managed care spreads through the health care service industry, marketing professionals are faced with the challenge of marketing highly integrated systems. This paper explores three questions related to this development: (1) what is unique about managed care marketing, (2) how has managed care impacted health care marketing, and (3) what new strategies and trends will shape these developing markets?

  4. Inadequate reimbursement for care management to primary care offices.

    PubMed

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Luo, Zhehui; Alexanders, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health; however, primary care practices are often challenged to identify revenue to pay for it. This study explored the impact of direct reimbursement on the provision of care management in a primary care physician organization. Using data on expenses and health plan reimbursement during the initial 16 months of care management implementation at 5 practices, we calculated the percentage of related costs that were covered by payments. Qualitative data from interviews with practice members were used to identify their perceived barriers to care management reimbursement and the impact of current reimbursement strategies on service delivery. Direct reimbursement for care management covered only 21% of the costs. Reimbursement varied by care manager background, patient diagnoses, insurer, and indication for the visit. Barriers to gaining reimbursement included patient resistance to copay, clinician hesitation to bill for care management visits (for fear the patient may receive a bill), differential reimbursement policies of insurers, and general lack of reimbursement for care management in many cases. Although practice-level quality improvement incentives were an alternative means of supporting care management, because these incentives were not directly tied to the service of care management, they were used for other activities ultimately supporting patient care. This study highlights the need for sufficient reimbursement to initiate and maintain care management for patients in primary care as proposed for service reforms under the Affordable Care Act. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  5. The disease management program for type 2 diabetes in Germany enhances process quality of diabetes care - a follow-up survey of patient's experiences.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ingmar; Küver, Claudia; Gedrose, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Falk; Russ-Thiel, Barbara; Brose, Hans-Peter; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna

    2010-03-03

    In summer 2003 a disease management program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes was introduced on a nationwide basis in Germany. Patient participation and continuity of care within the DMP are important factors to achieve long-term improvements in clinical endpoints. Therefore it is of interest, if patients experience any positive or negative effects of the DMP on their treatment that would support or hamper further participation. The main objective of the study was to find out if the German Disease Management Program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes improves process and outcome quality of medical care for patients in the light of their subjective experiences over a period of one year. Cohort study with a baseline interview and a follow-up after 10.4 +/- 0.64 months. Data on process and outcome measures were collected by telephone interviews with 444 patients enrolled and 494 patients not enrolled in the German DMP for type 2 diabetes. Data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analyses. DMP enrolment was significantly associated with a higher process quality of care. At baseline enrolled patients more often reported that they had attended a diabetes education course (OR = 3.4), have > or = 4 contacts/year with the attending physician (OR = 3.3), have at least one annual foot examination (OR = 3.1) and one referral to an ophthalmologist (OR = 3.4) and possess a diabetes passport (OR = 2.4). Except for the annual referral to an ophthalmologist these parameters were also statistically significant at follow-up. In contrast, no differences between enrolled and not enrolled patients were found concerning outcome quality indicators, e.g. self-rated health, Glycated hemoglobin (GHb) and blood pressure. However, 16-36% of the DMP participants reported improvements of body weight and/or GHb and/or blood pressure values due to enrolment - unchanged within one year of follow-up. In the light of patient's experiences the DMP enhances the process quality of medical care for type 2

  6. The disease management program for type 2 diabetes in Germany enhances process quality of diabetes care - a follow-up survey of patient's experiences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In summer 2003 a disease management program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes was introduced on a nationwide basis in Germany. Patient participation and continuity of care within the DMP are important factors to achieve long-term improvements in clinical endpoints. Therefore it is of interest, if patients experience any positive or negative effects of the DMP on their treatment that would support or hamper further participation. The main objective of the study was to find out if the German Disease Management Program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes improves process and outcome quality of medical care for patients in the light of their subjective experiences over a period of one year. Methods Cohort study with a baseline interview and a follow-up after 10.4 ± 0.64 months. Data on process and outcome measures were collected by telephone interviews with 444 patients enrolled and 494 patients not enrolled in the German DMP for type 2 diabetes. Data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results DMP enrolment was significantly associated with a higher process quality of care. At baseline enrolled patients more often reported that they had attended a diabetes education course (OR = 3.4), have ≥ 4 contacts/year with the attending physician (OR = 3.3), have at least one annual foot examination (OR = 3.1) and one referral to an ophthalmologist (OR = 3.4) and possess a diabetes passport (OR = 2.4). Except for the annual referral to an ophthalmologist these parameters were also statistically significant at follow-up. In contrast, no differences between enrolled and not enrolled patients were found concerning outcome quality indicators, e.g. self-rated health, Glycated hemoglobin (GHb) and blood pressure. However, 16-36% of the DMP participants reported improvements of body weight and/or GHb and/or blood pressure values due to enrolment - unchanged within one year of follow-up. Conclusions In the light of patient's experiences the DMP enhances the process

  7. Program audit, A management tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    Program gives in-depth view of organizational performance at all levels of the management structure, and provides means by which managers can effectively and efficiently evaluate adequacy of management direction, policies, and procedures.

  8. A Plan for the Reorganization of the Family Practice Program at Irwin Army Community Hospital Using a Managed Care Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-25

    examination or treatment suplies, and calling waiting patients to exaixation’D Loam. 71he researcer alo noted that the physicians Prepared their own...the waiting area. The physician examines the patient in the exanination roon and prepares any necessary lab slips or other consult requests. A rnw is...health care. Fiue 2. Gateway to Care health care moess del. Figure 3. Current organization chart. Figure 4. Family Practice clinic layout. Guide to

  9. Managed care: mastering the moving parts.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Dawn; Finman, Larry

    2010-05-01

    A hospital's success with managed care depends on how thoroughly the hospital understands its interrelated aspects, including: Managed care strategy Contract negotiations. Contract language. Key performance indicators. Modeling. Contract termination provisions. Movement from wholesale to retail health care.

  10. A model plan for the uninsured: delivering quality and affordability in a limited benefit managed care safety net program in Flint, Michigan.

    PubMed

    Creech, Constance J; Kornblau, Barbara; Strugar-Fritsch, Donna

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the background and multiyear outcome data for a limited benefit safety-net care program in Michigan. It is a possible solution for policymakers and hospital/clinic administrators to consider when evaluating plans to provide primary care for the 30 million uninsured Americans who will be affected by the Affordable Care Act.

  11. A Predoctoral Program in Dental Care for the Developmentally Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Fred S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In 1980, the State University of New York at Stony Brook began a program, integrated into the program of children's dentistry, to train students in care for the developmentally disabled. Management of developmentally disabled patients is provided over three years, and represents an extension of pediatric behavior management. (MSE)

  12. Health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of Dominican women with lymphoedema of the leg: implications for lymphoedema management programs

    PubMed Central

    Person, Bobbie; Addiss, David G; Bartholomew, L Kay; Meijer, Cecilia; Pou, Victor; van den Borne, Bart

    2006-01-01

    Background In the Dominican Republic, a Latin American country with filariasis-endemic areas, more than 63,000 people have lymphatic filariasis and more than 400,000 people are at risk of future infection. In this paper, we explore the health beliefs, health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of women with lymphoedema in filariasis-endemic areas to better understand the needs of women when developing lymphoedema morbidity control programs. Methods Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews of 28 women, 3 focus group discussions with 28 women, field notes and photographs. Results Women described exhaustive and expensive attempts at seeking a cure for their lymphoedema. Family members were influential in providing women with initial care seeking referrals to indigenous healers credited with influence over physical, mental, spiritual and supernatural properties of illness. When indigenous treatments proved to be ineffectual, the women sought care from trained healthcare providers. Most healthcare providers incorrectly diagnosed the edema, failed to adequately treat and meet the needs of women and were viewed as expensive. Most women resorted to self-prescribing injectable, oral, or topical antibiotics along with oral analgesics as a standard practice of self-care. Conclusion Healthcare providers must understand a woman's cultural perspectives of illness, her natural networks of support and referral, her behavioural practices of care-seeking and self-care and the financial burden of seeking care. In the culture of the Dominican Republic family members and traditional healthcare providers are influential advisors on initial health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices. For this reason family-oriented interventions, support groups for women and their families, community education and training on simple, low cost lymphoedema management techniques for indigenous healers are viable ways to influence the early detection, diagnosis and

  13. Disease management in the alternate-site health care setting.

    PubMed

    Lima, H A

    1998-03-01

    The role of pharmacies that specialize in the treatment of specific chronic diseases in the alternate-site health care setting is discussed. The optimal use of medications through disease management programs can improve patient outcomes and lower overall health care costs. The increase in disease management programs has spawned the growth of disease-specific pharmacies in the home care and other alternate-site health care settings. These pharmacies usually operate from a single location or are regionalized operations that deliver pharmaceutical products to patients throughout the United States. The pharmacies employ clinicians who specialize in a particular disease. These clinicians conduct comprehensive patient education programs, drug-use review, and compliance monitoring. Disease management pharmacies focus on chronic, expensive diseases; costs related to inventory, equipment, and storage can be very high. Many disease management pharmacies are involved in preferred-distribution or closed-distribution arrangements with pharmaceutical manufacturers. Pharmacists involved in disease management programs routinely send compliance information about their patients to pharmaceutical companies, managed care organizations, or prescribing physicians. Disease management pharmacies act as advocates for patients with particular chronic diseases. Various foundations and patient advocacy and research groups have created their own disease management pharmacies. Disease management has also reached the community pharmacy practice setting. Pharmacies specializing in the treatment of specific chronic diseases in the alternate-site health care setting can improve health care and promote efficient use of health care dollars.

  14. Effects of a long-term lifestyle intervention program with Mediterranean diet and exercise for the management of patients with metabolic syndrome in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Huelgas, R; Jansen-Chaparro, S; Baca-Osorio, A J; Mancera-Romero, J; Tinahones, F J; Bernal-López, M R

    2015-06-01

    The impact of a lifestyle intervention (LSI) program for the long-term management of subjects with metabolic syndrome in a primary care setting is not known. This 3-year prospective controlled trial randomized adult subjects with metabolic syndrome to receive intensive LSI or to usual care in a community health centre in Malaga, Spain. LSI subjects received instruction on Mediterranean diet and a regular aerobic exercise program by their primary care professionals. Primary outcome included changes from baseline on different components of metabolic syndrome (abdominal circumference, blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose and triglycerides). Among the 2,492 subjects screened, 601 subjects with metabolic syndrome (24.1%) were randomized to LSI (n = 298) or to usual care (n = 303); of them, a 77% and a 58%, respectively, completed the study. At the end of the study period, LSI resulted in significant differences vs. usual care in abdominal circumference (-0.4 ± 6 cm vs. + 2.1 ± 6.7 cm, p < 0.001), systolic blood pressure (-5.5 ± 15 mmHg vs. -0.6 ± 19 mmHg, p = 0.004), diastolic blood pressure (-4.6 ± 10 mmHg vs. -0.2 ± 13 mmHg, p < 0.001) and HDL-cholesterol (+4 ± 12 mg/dL vs. + 2 ± 12 mg/dL, p = 0.05); however, there were no differences in fasting plasma glucose and triglyceride concentration (-4 ± 35 mg/dl vs. -1 ± 32 mg/dl, p = 0.43 and -0.4 ± 83 mg/dl vs. +6 ± 113 mg/dl, p = 0.28). Intensive LSI counseling provided by primary care professionals resulted in significant improvements in abdominal circumference, blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol but had limited effects on glucose and triglyceride levels in patients with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Improving Value in Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Comprehensive Patient Education and Management Program Decreases Discharge to Post-Acute Care Facilities and Post-Operative Complications.

    PubMed

    Pelt, Christopher E; Gililland, Jeremy M; Erickson, Jill A; Trimble, Dory E; Anderson, Mike B; Peters, Christopher L

    2017-08-19

    A step-by-step approach to creating a comprehensive patient education, expectation, and management program is described with the aim of reducing discharges to post-acute care centers (PACs) following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). We hypothesized that by lowering discharges to PACs, readmissions and reoperations would also decrease. Following the implementation of a multi-faceted patient education and management program, we retrospectively reviewed 927 TJAs who underwent surgery 12 months before (n = 465) and after (n = 462) the program was implemented. To assess the exposure of the pathway on discharge disposition as well as institutional 30-day and 90-day readmissions and reoperations, a modified Poisson regression was used. There was a 20% absolute reduction in discharges to PACs (<0.001). The frequency of 30-day readmissions was greater in patients who underwent TJA before implementation (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-3.69). The risk for 90-day readmissions (IRR 1.70, 95% CI 1.20-2.40) and reoperations (IRR 1.67, 95% CI 1.12-2.53) was greater prior to implementation. Discharge to PACs was associated with 2.4 and 3.10 times greater risk for 30-day readmissions (95% CI 1.28-4.56) and 30-day reoperations (95% CI 1.40-7.0), respectively. Patients discharged to PACs were also at greater risk for both 90-day readmissions (IRR 1.59, 95% CI 1.08-2.32) and 90-day reoperations (IRR 1.75, 95% CI 1.12-2.73). Our program led to a reduction in the number of patients being discharged to PACs following TJA, while also demonstrating a reduction in readmission and reoperations. Additionally, discharge to these facilities was an independent risk factor for these complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A primary care, multi-disciplinary disease management program for opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain and a high burden of psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Chelminski, Paul R; Ives, Timothy J; Felix, Katherine M; Prakken, Steven D; Miller, Thomas M; Perhac, J Stephen; Malone, Robert M; Bryant, Mary E; DeWalt, Darren A; Pignone, Michael P

    2005-01-13

    Chronic non-cancer pain is a common problem that is often accompanied by psychiatric comorbidity and disability. The effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary pain management program was tested in a 3 month before and after trial. Providers in an academic general medicine clinic referred patients with chronic non-cancer pain for participation in a program that combined the skills of internists, clinical pharmacists, and a psychiatrist. Patients were either receiving opioids or being considered for opioid therapy. The intervention consisted of structured clinical assessments, monthly follow-up, pain contracts, medication titration, and psychiatric consultation. Pain, mood, and function were assessed at baseline and 3 months using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale scale (CESD) and the Pain Disability Index (PDI). Patients were monitored for substance misuse. Eighty-five patients were enrolled. Mean age was 51 years, 60% were male, 78% were Caucasian, and 93% were receiving opioids. Baseline average pain was 6.5 on an 11 point scale. The average CESD score was 24.0, and the mean PDI score was 47.0. Sixty-three patients (73%) completed 3 month follow-up. Fifteen withdrew from the program after identification of substance misuse. Among those completing 3 month follow-up, the average pain score improved to 5.5 (p = 0.003). The mean PDI score improved to 39.3 (p < 0.001). Mean CESD score was reduced to 18.0 (p < 0.001), and the proportion of depressed patients fell from 79% to 54% (p = 0.003). Substance misuse was identified in 27 patients (32%). A primary care disease management program improved pain, depression, and disability scores over three months in a cohort of opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Substance misuse and depression were common, and many patients who had substance misuse identified left the program when they were no longer prescribed opioids. Effective care of patients with chronic pain

  17. A primary care, multi-disciplinary disease management program for opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain and a high burden of psychiatric comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Chelminski, Paul R; Ives, Timothy J; Felix, Katherine M; Prakken, Steven D; Miller, Thomas M; Perhac, J Stephen; Malone, Robert M; Bryant, Mary E; DeWalt, Darren A; Pignone, Michael P

    2005-01-01

    Background Chronic non-cancer pain is a common problem that is often accompanied by psychiatric comorbidity and disability. The effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary pain management program was tested in a 3 month before and after trial. Methods Providers in an academic general medicine clinic referred patients with chronic non-cancer pain for participation in a program that combined the skills of internists, clinical pharmacists, and a psychiatrist. Patients were either receiving opioids or being considered for opioid therapy. The intervention consisted of structured clinical assessments, monthly follow-up, pain contracts, medication titration, and psychiatric consultation. Pain, mood, and function were assessed at baseline and 3 months using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale scale (CESD) and the Pain Disability Index (PDI). Patients were monitored for substance misuse. Results Eighty-five patients were enrolled. Mean age was 51 years, 60% were male, 78% were Caucasian, and 93% were receiving opioids. Baseline average pain was 6.5 on an 11 point scale. The average CESD score was 24.0, and the mean PDI score was 47.0. Sixty-three patients (73%) completed 3 month follow-up. Fifteen withdrew from the program after identification of substance misuse. Among those completing 3 month follow-up, the average pain score improved to 5.5 (p = 0.003). The mean PDI score improved to 39.3 (p < 0.001). Mean CESD score was reduced to 18.0 (p < 0.001), and the proportion of depressed patients fell from 79% to 54% (p = 0.003). Substance misuse was identified in 27 patients (32%). Conclusions A primary care disease management program improved pain, depression, and disability scores over three months in a cohort of opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Substance misuse and depression were common, and many patients who had substance misuse identified left the program when they were no longer prescribed opioids

  18. Challenges for Managed Care from 340B Contract Pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Fein, Adam J

    2016-03-01

    The federal 340B Drug Pricing Program has expanded rapidly, with important yet still unmeasured impact on both managed care practice and policies. Notably, providers increasingly rely on external, contract pharmacies to extend 340B pricing to a broad set of patients. In 2014, 1 in 4 U.S. retail, mail, and specialty pharmacy locations acted as contract pharmacies for 340B-covered entities. This commentary discusses crucial ways in which 340B growth is affecting managed care pharmacy through formulary rebates, profits from managed care paid prescriptions, disruption of retail pharmacy networks, and reduced generic dispensing rates. Managed care should become more engaged in the discussion on how the 340B program should evolve and offer policy proposals to mitigate the challenges being encountered. There is also an urgent need for objective, transparent research on the 340B program's costs, benefits, and implications for managed care pharmacy and practice.

  19. A Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Psycho-Education (B-CBE) Program for Managing Stress and Anxiety of Main Family Caregivers of Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Vico Chung Lim; Chien, Wai Tong; Wong, Ho Ting; Lee, Rainbow Lai Ping; Ha, Juana; Leung, Sharron Shuk Kam; Wong, Daniel Fu Keung

    2016-01-01

    Having a loved one in the intensive care unit (ICU) is a stressful event, which may cause a high level of anxiety to the family members. This could threaten their wellbeing and ability to support the patients in, or after discharge from, the ICU. To investigate the outcomes of a brief cognitive-behavioral psycho-education program (B-CBE) to manage stress and anxiety of the main family caregivers (MFCs), a pragmatic quasi-experimental study involving 45 participants (treatment group: 24; control group: 21) was conducted in an ICU. The Depression and Anxiety Stress Scale and the Critical Care Family Need Inventory were used to evaluate the primary outcomes on stress and anxiety, and satisfaction with family needs. The treatment group reported significantly better improvement in the information satisfaction score compared to the control group (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.09). Overall main effects were observed on the stress (p < 0.01; η2 = 0.20), anxiety (p < 0.01; η2 = 0.18), depression (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.13), support satisfaction (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.13), and comfort satisfaction (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.11) scores. The experience of this study suggest that MFCs are in great need of additional support like B-CBE to manage their stress and anxiety. Given the brevity of B-CBE, it is practical for critical care nurses to deliver and MFCs to take within the industrious context of an ICU. More studies are needed to investigate these types of brief psychological interventions. PMID:27690068

  20. Generation: A Corporate-Sponsored Retiree Health Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharlach, Andrew E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes Generation, geriatric clinic program for one company's retirees and dependents. Describes program's multidisciplinary team approach to health and psychosocial assessment, medication review, retiree advisors, health promotion programs, and case management services. Notes that, in addition to traditional medical care, participants receive…

  1. Generation: A Corporate-Sponsored Retiree Health Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharlach, Andrew E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes Generation, geriatric clinic program for one company's retirees and dependents. Describes program's multidisciplinary team approach to health and psychosocial assessment, medication review, retiree advisors, health promotion programs, and case management services. Notes that, in addition to traditional medical care, participants receive…

  2. Does managed care affect the diffusion of psychotropic medications?

    PubMed

    Domino, Marisa E

    2012-04-01

    Newer technologies to treat many mental illnesses have shown substantial heterogeneity in diffusion rates across states. In this paper, I investigate whether variation in the level of managed care penetration is associated with changes in state-level diffusion of three newer classes of psychotropic medications in fee-for-service Medicaid programs from 1991 to 2005. Three different types of managed care programs are examined: capitated managed care, any type of managed care and behavioral health carve-outs. A fourth-order polynomial fixed effect regression model is used to model the diffusion path of newer antidepressant and antipsychotic medications controlling for time-varying state characteristics. Substantial differences are found in the diffusion paths by the degree of managed care use in each state Medicaid program. The largest effect is seen through spillover effects of capitated managed care programs; states with greater capitated managed care have greater initial shares of newer psychotropic medications. The influence of carve-outs and of all types of managed care combined on the diffusion path was modest. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Does managed care affect the diffusion of psychotropic medications?

    PubMed Central

    Domino, Marisa E.

    2011-01-01

    Newer technologies to treat many mental illnesses have shown substantial heterogeneity in diffusion rates across states. In this paper, I investigate whether variation in the level of managed care penetration is associated with changes in state-level diffusion of three newer classes of psychotropic medications in fee-for-service Medicaid programs from 1991-2005. Three different types of managed care programs are examined: capitated managed care, any type of managed care and behavioral health carve-outs. A fourth order polynomial fixed effect regression model is used to model the diffusion path of newer antidepressant and antipsychotic medications controlling for time-varying state characteristics. Substantial differences are found in the diffusion paths by the degree of managed care use in each state Medicaid program. The largest effect is seen through spillover effects of capitated managed care programs; states with greater capitated managed care have greater initial shares of newer psychotropic medications. The influence of carve-outs and of all types of managed care combined on the diffusion path was modest. PMID:21384465

  4. Collaborative care management effectively promotes self-management: patient evaluation of care management for depression in primary care.

    PubMed

    DeJesus, Ramona S; Howell, Lisa; Williams, Mark; Hathaway, Julie; Vickers, Kristin S

    2014-03-01

    Chronic disease management in the primary care setting increasingly involves self-management support from a nurse care manager. Prior research had shown patient acceptance and willingness to work with care managers. This survey study evaluated patient-perceived satisfaction with care management and patient opinions on the effectiveness of care management in promoting self-management. Qualitative and quantitative survey responses were collected from 125 patients (79% female; average age 46; 94% Caucasian) enrolled in care management for depression. Qualitative responses were coded with methods of content analysis by 2 independent analysts. Patients were satisfied with depression care management. Patients felt that care management improved their treatment above and beyond other aspects of their depression treatment (mean score, 6.7 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), increased their understanding of depression self-management (mean score, 7.2 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), and increased the frequency of self-management goal setting (mean score, 6.9 [SD, 3]; 10 = Very much). Predominant qualitative themes emphasized that patients value emotional, motivational, and relational aspects of the care manager relationship. Patients viewed care managers as caring and supportive, helpful in creating accountability for patients and knowledgeable in the area of depression care. Care managers empower patients to take on an active role in depression self-management. Some logistical challenges associated with a telephonic intervention are described. Care manager training should include communication and motivation strategies, specifically self-management education, as these strategies are valued by patients. Barriers to care management, such as scheduling telephone calls, should be addressed in future care management implementation and study.

  5. Continuing Education for the Health Professions. Developing, Managing, and Evaluating Programs for Maximum Impact on Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Joseph S., Ed.; And Others

    Advice on making continuing education (CE) responsive to the practice needs of professionals in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, allied health, and public health is provided in 16 chapters. Attention is directed to: establishing realistic goals, tailoring programs to specific needs, recruiting subject matter experts, evaluating programs and…

  6. Continuing Education for the Health Professions. Developing, Managing, and Evaluating Programs for Maximum Impact on Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Joseph S., Ed.; And Others

    Advice on making continuing education (CE) responsive to the practice needs of professionals in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, allied health, and public health is provided in 16 chapters. Attention is directed to: establishing realistic goals, tailoring programs to specific needs, recruiting subject matter experts, evaluating programs and…

  7. Implementing a pain management program in a long-term care facility using a quality improvement approach.

    PubMed

    Leone, Andres F; Standoli, Francesco; Hirth, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Pain constitutes a constant challenge facing staff and residents of skilled nursing facilities (SNF) and nursing homes (NH). Many SNF and NH have not adopted a uniform plan to assess and treat pain for their residents despite published literature that demonstrates that the implementation of scales improves detection and treatment of pain. The objective of this study was to analyze the baseline pain level in the institutionalized elderly, and then implement a standard pain scale for its assessment and evaluation, while simultaneously identifying challenges in adopting this standardized method. As part of a Quality Improvement Project (QI), a total of 40 patients were chosen at random in 2 of the major skilled care and dementia units at a Columbia area nursing home, 20 patients from each. A chart review was conducted to document the presence or absence of pain syndromes, pain medications used, and use of standardized tools for the evaluation of pain. Documentation regarding diagnosis of depression and behavioral problems were also noted as potential markers for the manifestation of pain. Verbal and nonverbal pain scales were introduced and approved by the medical and nursing staff. Training sessions for the administration of such tools were implemented. A baseline evaluation of pain level was obtained applying these newly adopted tools. One cycle using the PDSA (Plan-Do-Study and Act) model for QI was followed. Our evaluation showed that 84.2% (32/38) of our study population were females, and the mean age was 91.4 years. Fifty percent (19/38) of patients had mild to moderate pain. Because of nonstandardized approaches to analgesia, some regimens rendered clear potential for toxicity: ie, receiving more than 3 grams per day of acetaminophen. Most patients with cognitive deficits had lower levels of moderate pain (9.5% [2/21]) but higher levels of mild pain (33.3% [7/21]) when compared with patients with normal cognition or mild cognitive deficits (35.3% [6/17] and 17

  8. Quality management in home care: models for today's practice.

    PubMed

    Verhey, M P

    1996-01-01

    In less than a decade, home care providers have been a part of two major transitions in health care delivery. First, because of the advent of managed care and a shift from inpatient to community-based services, home care service delivery systems have experienced tremendous growth. Second, the principles and practices of total quality management and continuous quality improvement have permeated the organization, administration, and practice of home health care. Based on the work of Deming, Juran, and Crosby, the basic tenets of the new quality management philosophy involve a focus on the following five key areas: (1) systems and processes rather than individual performance; (2) involvement, collaboration, and empowerment; (3) internal and external "customers"; (4) data and measurement; and (5) standards, guidelines, and outcomes of care. Home care providers are among those in the forefront who are developing and implementing programs that integrate these foci into the delivery of quality home care services. This article provides a summary of current home care programs that address these five key areas of quality management philosophy and provide models for innovative quality management practice in home care. For further information about each program, readers are referred to the original reports in the home care and quality management journal literature, as cited herein.

  9. Managed care relationships made helpful.

    PubMed

    Welter, R Todd

    2009-01-01

    Managed care is a people business. There are lots of people, data, and relationships involved. Knowing those people and keeping those relationships is incredibly valuable. Understanding your own practice, what it offers to the network, and how it interacts with the customers of the payer are also important. All of these things give you leverage, and leverage means higher rates and better access.

  10. Research, Practice, and Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strupp, Hans H.

    Few questions in psychotherapy are of greater importance than the relationship among practitioners, researchers, and managed care. The present and future roles of psychotherapy are covered here. Despite ample evidence that psychotherapy does work, its effectiveness continues to be questioned. When psychotherapy research emerged some 50 years ago,…

  11. ME Cares: a statewide system engaging providers in disease management.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Richard; Bean, Claudette; Ito, Diane; Kopp, Zoe; LaCasse, John A; Rea, Vicki

    2004-01-01

    ME Cares (Maine Cares) is a coalition of 32 Maine hospitals that offer community-based, telephonic care support (disease management) programs for patients with heart failure and/or coronary heart disease. We describe the steps, challenges, and lessons learned in coalition development and maintenance. We also present a pre- and post-analysis of our clinical outcomes after enrolling 2145 patients.

  12. Leaders, managers, and employee care.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Della W

    2012-01-01

    With the economic and market changes currently taking place, organizations cannot survive or prosper without quality employees. Key to employee loyalty, performance, and retention is the relationship between the leader, manager, and employee. Leaders are visionaries who make sure that the right things are done for the organization. Managers are in a position to make sure that things are done right within the organization. There are traits and qualities that good leaders and managers must possess to ensure organizational success. Displaying these characteristics will ensure that employees are taken care of, which will benefit both the employees and the organization.

  13. Managed occupational health care in an HMO.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, A; Marino, G

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes the efforts of an HMO to improve its delivery of occupational health services. Customer needs identification, occupational health structure, data systems, case management, clinical guidelines, and quality management are outlined. Our experience suggests that high-quality occupational health services can be integrated into managed care systems thereby offering cost-effective care to large numbers of workers. Comparing 1991 to 1995, physician authorization of total disability days was reduced 17.9% per disability case (p < .0001). Based on July 1994 to June 1995 Oregon State Accident Insurance Fund (SAIF Corporation) data, HMO average total claim cost was $916/claim representing respectively, a 21% and a 20% reduced cost compared to two PPO model programs (MCO 00 and MCO 01). Patient satisfaction data indicated that 90% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the physician they saw. The savings appear to be due to cost-effective treatment and rapid return to work.

  14. Farm and Family Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This teacher's guide contains four units for the farm and family management program, a three-year educational program through which farm families have the opportunity to participate in group and individualized instruction. The program is intended to help provide basic farm and home management information to farm families to meet the changes of the…

  15. Management Internship Program: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabezensky, Ferne; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines the Maricopa Community College District's management internship program, detailing the history and operation of the program. Describes program eligibility criteria, the intern's role as Vice Chancellor for Human Services, the provision of a graduate course in management, the rotation of assignments, intern projects, and evaluation.…

  16. Beware the Managed Health-Care Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbaugh, John; Smith, Gary

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses implications of the movement toward managed health care models for long-term health care services for people with disabilities, especially people with developmental disabilities. It notes possible advantages of managed care but raises issues concerning consumer choice, management and financial capacity of managed care…

  17. Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

  18. Liability issues in managed care.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M S

    1997-05-01

    The explosive growth in Managed Care Organizations as a mechanism for providing health care in the United States has generated an equal explosion in litigation and new legislation related to problems within this delivery system. Abuses have included the "gagging" of physicians from providing full disclosure of medical options for their patients, inappropriate denial of care, denial of specialty referral, false claims data, insurer insolvency, economic credentialling, deselection, financial disincentives to render care, and lack of appeal or grievance mechanisms. These issues and others have resulted in injuries to patients and damage to the patient/physician relationship. This article discusses some of the more dramatic litigated cases and endeavors to alert both physicians and patients to potential legal matters that should be considered before becoming involved within this structure.

  19. Treatment-resistant depression: managed care considerations.

    PubMed

    Tierney, John G

    2007-07-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) presents a unique challenge in managed care, requiring review of both the clinical and economic components of care. To review the TRD disease state as well as data supporting the various therapeutic options available for the treatment of persistent depression in managed care. While there is no consensus on the definition of TRD, persistent disease can generally be defined as depression that fails to respond to adequate treatment. When initial treatment is not effective or tolerable after 6 to 8 weeks of therapy, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) treatment guidelines recommend dose titration, augmentation, or switching. In the case of a therapy switch, the body of evidence suggests that selection of an agent with a different mechanism of action than the initial agent may be the most effective treatment. Furthermore, when patients maintain continuous therapy for the recommended treatment duration, outcomes are improved compared with patients who discontinue therapy early. As a result, the most effective treatment strategies promote improved patient compliance as well as the use of agents associated with a reduced incidence of premature discontinuation and therapy change early in the treatment program. While data supporting these clinically effective components of therapy exist, few data are available demonstrating the most cost-effective therapeutic options for TRD. This analysis suggests that managed care providers could benefit from a model that they can customize to evaluate the overall costeffectiveness of different strategies in the management of depression.

  20. Legal implications of managed care arrangements.

    PubMed

    Knox, W A; Epstein, D M

    1994-09-01

    Prior to the 1980s, managed care was virtually nonexistent as a force in health care. Presently, 64 percent of employees in America are covered by managed care plans, including health maintenance organizations (20 percent) and preferred provider organizations (44 percent). In contrast, only 29 percent of employees were enrolled in managed care plans in 1988 and only 47 percent in 1991. To date, the primary reason for this incredible growth in managed care has been economic-market pressure to reduce health care costs. For the foreseeable future, political pressures are likely to fuel this growth, as managed care is at the center of President Clinton's national health care plan. Although there are numerous legal issues surrounding managed care, this article focuses primarily on antitrust implications when forming managed care entities. In addition, the corporate practice of medicine doctrine, certain tax issues, and the fraud and abuse laws are discussed.

  1. Influences on Case-Managed Community Aged Care Practice.

    PubMed

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-10-01

    Case management has been widely implemented in the community aged care setting. In this study, we aimed to explore influences on case-managed community aged care practice from the perspectives of community aged care case managers. We conducted 33 semistructured interviews with 47 participants. We drew these participants from a list of all case managers working in aged care organizations that provided publicly funded case management program(s)/packages in Victoria, Australia. We used a multilevel framework that included such broad categories of factors as structural, organizational, case manager, client, and practice factors to guide the data analysis. Through thematic analysis, we found that policy change, organizational culture and policies, case managers' professional backgrounds, clients with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and case management models stood out as key influences on case managers' practice. In the future, researchers can use the multilevel framework to undertake implementation research in similar health contexts.

  2. Managed care: the US experience.

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, N. K.

    2000-01-01

    This article provides an overview of managed health care in the USA--what has been achieved and what has not--and some lessons for policy-makers in other parts of the world. Although the backlash by consumers and providers makes the future of managed care in the USA uncertain, the evidence shows that it has had a positive effect on stemming the rate of growth of health care spending, without a negative effect on quality. More importantly, it has spawned innovative technologies that are not dependent on the US market environment, but can be applied in public and private systems globally. Active purchasing tools that incorporate disease management programmes, performance measurement report cards, and alignment of incentives between purchasers and providers respond to key issues facing health care reform in many countries. Selective adoption of these tools may be even more relevant in single payer systems than in the fragmented, voluntary US insurance market where they can be applied more systematically with lower transaction costs and where their effects can be measured more precisely. PMID:10916920

  3. The role of the case manager in a disease management program.

    PubMed

    Huston, Carol J

    2002-01-01

    Disease management programs provide new opportunities and roles for case managers to provide population-based healthcare to the chronically ill. This article identifies common components of disease management programs and examines roles assumed by case managers in disease management programs such as baseline assessment, performing economic analyses of diseases and their respective associated resource utilization, developing and/or implementing care guidelines or algorithms, educational interventions, disease management program implementation, and outcomes assessment. Areas of expertise needed to be an effective case manager in a disease management program are also identified.

  4. The role of the case manager in a disease management program.

    PubMed

    Huston, C J

    2001-01-01

    Disease management programs provide new opportunities and roles for case managers to provide population-based healthcare to the chronically ill. This article identifies common components of disease management programs and examines roles assumed by case managers in disease management programs such as baseline assessment, performing economic analyses of diseases and their respective associated resource utilization, developing and/or implementing care guidelines or algorithms, educational interventions, disease management program implementation, and outcomes assessment. Areas of expertise needed to be an effective case manager in a disease management program are also identified.

  5. Medicaid managed care in New York City: recent performance and coming challenges.

    PubMed Central

    DeLia, D; Cantor, J C; Sandman, D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated New York City's voluntary Medicaid managed care program in terms of health care use and access. METHODS: A survey of adults in Medicaid managed care and fee-for-service programs during 1996-1997 was analyzed. RESULTS: Responses showed significant favorable risk selection into managed care but little difference in use of health care services. Although some measures of access favored managed care, many others showed no difference between the study groups. CONCLUSIONS: The early impact of mandatory enrollment will probably include an increase in the average risk of managed care enrollees with little change in beneficiary use and access to care. PMID:11236415

  6. Medicaid managed care in New York City: recent performance and coming challenges.

    PubMed

    DeLia, D; Cantor, J C; Sandman, D

    2001-03-01

    This study evaluated New York City's voluntary Medicaid managed care program in terms of health care use and access. A survey of adults in Medicaid managed care and fee-for-service programs during 1996-1997 was analyzed. Responses showed significant favorable risk selection into managed care but little difference in use of health care services. Although some measures of access favored managed care, many others showed no difference between the study groups. The early impact of mandatory enrollment will probably include an increase in the average risk of managed care enrollees with little change in beneficiary use and access to care.

  7. Oversight mechanisms in public managed care programs: from little oversight to negotiations to shared decision-making.

    PubMed

    Beinecke, R H

    1999-01-01

    An expanded range of oversight mechanisms is being adopted to hold public human service programs more accountable to funding sources as well as consumers, family members, and providers. Most of these approaches are hierarchical in nature. Some involve negotiated agreements and each is designed to meet certain goals and functions. Each utilizes different forms of decision-making. Stakeholders prefer to be part of a shared decision-making process. Understanding these underlying premises can help to assess the strengths and weaknesses of each method and can suggest how to most effectively utilize combinations of approaches to improve program performance. Whether we will move toward a new paradigm emphasizing participation and collaboration rather than more formal structural approaches is yet undetermined but will greatly affect how programs are monitored and evaluated in the future.

  8. Trust and trustworthy care in the managed care era.

    PubMed

    Gray, B H

    1997-01-01

    Trust is essential to the doctor/patient relationship, but trust in physicians' fiduciary ethic has become less plausible as a protector of patients' interests. The rise of managed care often is seen as undermining the fiduciary ethic and lessening the trustworthiness of care. But can managed care enhance that trustworthiness? Four possible sources of trustworthiness in managed care are discussed: ethical standards in the managed care industry, nonprofit organizations, physician control, and performance monitoring by purchasers. Limitations on all of these fronts suggest the continuing importance of a strong fiduciary ethic on the part of physicians who make patient care decisions.

  9. Centralized care management support for "high utilizers" in primary care practices at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brent C; Paik, Jamie L; Haley, Laura L; Grammatico, Gina M

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence of effectiveness is limited, care management based outside primary care practices or hospitals is receiving increased attention. The University of Michigan (UM) Complex Care Management Program (CCMP) provides care management for uninsured and underinsured, high-utilizing patients in multiple primary care practices. To inform development of optimal care management models, we describe the CCMP model and characteristics and health care utilization patterns of its patients. Of a consecutive series of 49 patients enrolled at CCMP in 2011, the mean (SD) age was 48 (+/- 14); 23 (47%) were women; and 29 (59%) were White. Twenty-eight (57%) had two or more chronic medical conditions, 39 (80%) had one or more psychiatric condition, 28 (57%) had a substance abuse disorder, and 11 (22%) were homeless. Through phone, e-mail, and face-to-face contact with patients and primary care providers (PCPs), care managers coordinated health and social services and facilitated access to medical and mental health care. Patients had a mean (SD) number of hospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits in 6 months prior to enrollment of2.2 (2.5) and 4.2 (4.3), respectively, with a nonstatistically significant decrease in hospitalizations, hospital days, and emergency room visits in 6 months following enrollment in CCMP. Centralized care management support for primary care practices engages high-utilizing patients with complex medical and behavioral conditions in care management that would be difficult to provide through individual practices and may decrease health care utilization by these patients.

  10. MANAGING THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMMING EFFORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUMMLER, GEARY A.; AND OTHERS

    THE COMPENDIUM OF CASE HISTORIES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS DESCRIBES ATTEMPTS BY GRADUATES OF A PROGRAMING WORKSHOP TO SOLVE MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS IN THEIR OWN ORGANIZATIONS. AREAS OF DISCUSSION ARE--BEHAVIORAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT, THE PROGRAMING PROCESS, CONTRACT (CUSTOM-MADE) PROGRAMS,…

  11. MANAGING THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMMING EFFORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUMMLER, GEARY A.; AND OTHERS

    THE COMPENDIUM OF CASE HISTORIES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS DESCRIBES ATTEMPTS BY GRADUATES OF A PROGRAMING WORKSHOP TO SOLVE MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS IN THEIR OWN ORGANIZATIONS. AREAS OF DISCUSSION ARE--BEHAVIORAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT, THE PROGRAMING PROCESS, CONTRACT (CUSTOM-MADE) PROGRAMS,…

  12. Cybersecurity Challenges for Program Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    41 Defense AT&L: September–October 2014 Cybersecurity Challenges for Program Managers Steve Mills n Rob Goldsmith Mills is a former program...University. Goldsmith is a systems engineer and currently the Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center Cybersecurity Lead at...Redstone Arsenal, Ala. Cybersecurity threats to Department of De-fense (DoD) acquisi-tion programs are both challenging and com- plex. Program managers (PMs

  13. Evaluation of the ESRD Managed Care Demonstration Operations

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Caitlin Carroll; Shapiro, Jennifer R.; Beronja, Nancy; Dykstra, Dawn M.; Gaylin, Daniel S.; Held, Philip J.; Rubin, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Individuals with end stage renal disease (ESRD), most of whom are insured by Medicare, are generally prohibited from enrolling in Medicare managed care plans (MCPs). CMS offered ESRD patients the opportunity to participate in an ESRD managed care demonstration mandated by Congress. The demonstration tested whether managed care systems would be of interest to ESRD patients and whether these approaches would be operationally feasible and efficient for treating ESRD patients. This article examines the structure, implementation, and operational outcomes of the three demonstration sites, focusing on: the structure of these managed care programs for ESRD patients, requirements needed to attract and enroll patients, and the challenges of introducing managed care programs in the ESRD arena. PMID:14628397

  14. Results of an Aboriginal community-based renal disease management program incorporating point of care testing for urine albumin:creatinine ratio.

    PubMed

    Shephard, M D S; Allen, G G; Paizis, K; Barbara, J A J; Batterham, M; Vanajek, A

    2006-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the burden of renal disease among Aboriginal Australians over the past 15 years. Urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) is a well-established marker of microalbuminuria and can be conveniently performed on the DCA 2000 point-of-care testing (POCT) analyser (Bayer Australia; Melbourne, VIC, Australia) with an on-site result available in 7 min. The application of the urine ACR POCT for renal disease risk assessment was pioneered by our group in the Umoona Kidney Project. This article describes the results of the management arm of the Umoona Kidney Project, which used point-of-care urine ACR testing for the first time within a management framework to monitor albuminuria in patients at highest risk of renal disease. The article also examines the analytical quality of POCT results and overall community acceptance of the Umoona Kidney Project. Adults clinically assessed by Flinders Medical Centre renal specialists as being at greatest risk for renal disease were offered the ACE inhibitor (ACEI) perindopril on a voluntary basis. Selected renal markers, including POCT urine ACR (conducted on-site by Umoona's Aboriginal health worker team), plasma electrolytes, urea, creatinine, calculated glomerular filtration rate and blood pressure were measured six monthly. Regular quality control testing was undertaken to monitor the analytical performance of the POCT analyser. A culturally appropriate questionnaire was designed and implemented to assess community satisfaction with the project. In all, 231 patient management consultations were conducted over a two year period, with over 70% of patients having four or more (up to a maximum of eight) consultations; 35 patients (mean age 49.2 [+/-2.3] years, 54% males) participated voluntarily in the management arm. All were overtly hypertensive, hypertensive with other risk factors or had diabetes. The renal status of these patients was followed for a mean of 63 +/- 4.5 weeks. In total, 111 POCT

  15. A Lesson in Carefully Managing Resources: A Case Study from an Evaluation of a Music Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Kristin A.; Burkhardt, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A music education program with a goal of enhancing cognitive development of preschool-aged children enrolled in local preschools is evaluated by The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University. The budget for the evaluation was small, and therefore presented several challenges to the evaluation team. Purpose: Through a case study…

  16. A Lesson in Carefully Managing Resources: A Case Study from an Evaluation of a Music Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Kristin A.; Burkhardt, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A music education program with a goal of enhancing cognitive development of preschool-aged children enrolled in local preschools is evaluated by The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University. The budget for the evaluation was small, and therefore presented several challenges to the evaluation team. Purpose: Through a case study…

  17. Hanford Environmental Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    DeFigh-Price, C.

    1989-09-01

    The Hanford Environmental Management Program (HEMP) was established in November 1986 by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has been assigned responsibility to manage this program. The program`s goal is to integrate environmental activities such as reporting and planning and to facilitate compliance with environmental regulations. This document describes the scope of work funded by this program for Fiscal Year (FY) 1990, presents the prioritized tasks covered, the management structure in place and the assessment allocation methodology used to determine the FY 1990 assessments. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Disease management programs for the underserved.

    PubMed

    Horswell, Ronald; Butler, Michael K; Kaiser, Michael; Moody-Thomas, Sarah; McNabb, Shannon; Besse, Jay; Abrams, Amir

    2008-06-01

    Disease management has become an important tool for improving population patient outcomes. The Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division (HCSD) has used this tool to provide care to a largely uninsured population for approximately 10 years. Eight programs currently exist within the HCSD focusing on diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, HIV, cancer screening, smoking cessation, chronic kidney disease, and diet, exercise, and weight control. These programs operate at hospital and clinic sites located in 8 population centers throughout southern Louisiana. The programs are structured to be managed at the system level with a clinical expert for each area guiding the scope of the program and defining new goals. Care largely adheres to evidence-based guidelines set forth by professional organizations. To monitor quality of care, indicators are defined within each area and benchmarked to achieve the most effective measures in our population. For example, hemoglobin A1c levels have shown improvements with nearly 54% of the population <7.0%. To support these management efforts, HCSD utilizes an electronic data repository that allows physicians to track patient labs and other tests as well as reminders. To ensure appropriate treatment, patients are able to enroll in the Medication Assistance program. This largely improves adherence to medications for those patients unable to afford them otherwise.

  19. Nursing Care Management: Influence on Bundled Payments.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Shaynie; Luther, Brenda

    Fragmented and uncoordinated care is the third highest driver of U.S. healthcare costs. Although less than 10% of patients experience uncoordinated care, these patients represent 36% of total healthcare costs; care management interaction makes a significant impact on the utilization of healthcare dollars. A literature search was conducted to construct a model of care coordination for elective surgical procedures by collecting best practices for acute, transitions, and post-acute care periods. A case study was used to demonstrate the model developed. Care management defines care coordination as a model of care to address improving patient and caregiver engagement, communication across settings of care, and ultimately improved patient outcomes of care. Nurse-led care coordination in the presurgical, inpatient, and post-acute care settings requires systems change and administrative support to effectively meet the goals of the Affordable Care Act of reducing redundancy and costs while improving the patient experience. Nursing is the lynchpin of care management processes in all settings of care; thus, this model of care coordination for elective surgical admissions can provide nursing care management leaders a comprehensive view of coordinating care for these patient across settings of care during the predetermined time period of care. As bundled payment structures increasingly affect hospital systems, nursing leaders need to be ready to create or improve their care management processes; care coordination is one such process requiring immediate attention.

  20. Adherence and cost in multiple sclerosis patients treated with IM IFN beta-1a: impact of the CARE patient management program.

    PubMed

    Katsarava, Zaza; Ehlken, Birgit; Limmroth, Volker; Taipale, Kirsi; Patel, Sarita Noemi; Niemczyk, Gabriele; Rehberg-Weber, Karin; Wernsdörfer, Colin

    2015-09-22

    Disease modifying treatments (DMT) for MS such as interferon beta (IFNβ) have been shown to reduce the risk for disease progression. Therefore adherence to treatment is essential for treatment outcome.Here we want to evaluate if participation in a patient management program (PMP) improves adherence to DMT as well as health and cost outcomes associated with MS. In this open-label multicentre prospective observational study, German MS patients treated with once weekly intramuscular (IM) IFNβ-1a (Avonex), were offered participation in a PMP and followed for up to 12 months. The PMP included injection trainings, support and quarterly visits for up to 12 months after initiation of therapy. Utilisation of health care services was evaluated. The primary endpoint was to evaluate the direct and indirect cost associated with MS from payer, patient and societal perspective, in patients who participate in the PMP. Secondary endpoint was the clinical outcome in patients who participate in the PMP (differentiated in adherent versus non-adherent patients). In total 731 patients (mean age: 38.2, 73.7% female) were enrolled, 640 (88%) were observed for twelve months. After six months 34% of patients had participated in the PMP continuously and 21% temporarily; 39% had not participated. After twelve months, the proportions of participants were: 37% continuously and 19% temporarily; 40% had not participated. After 6 months, mean reduction in cost per patient in the participants group (€ 2151) was almost twice as high as the cost reduction amongst non-participants (€ 1131). After twelve months, the annual relapse rate was reduced by 58% compared to baseline in both the participant and non-participant groups. In a real-world-setting, participation in a patient management program was associated with improved medication adherence and lower total MS-related direct and indirect cost over time.

  1. FLUOR HANFORD SAFETY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    GARVIN, L. J.; JENSEN, M. A.

    2004-04-13

    This document summarizes safety management programs used within the scope of the ''Project Hanford Management Contract''. The document has been developed to meet the format and content requirements of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses''. This document provides summary descriptions of Fluor Hanford safety management programs, which Fluor Hanford nuclear facilities may reference and incorporate into their safety basis when producing facility- or activity-specific documented safety analyses (DSA). Facility- or activity-specific DSAs will identify any variances to the safety management programs described in this document and any specific attributes of these safety management programs that are important for controlling potentially hazardous conditions. In addition, facility- or activity-specific DSAs may identify unique additions to the safety management programs that are needed to control potentially hazardous conditions.

  2. Managed consumerism in health care.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  3. Effects of a Hypertension Management Program by Seongcheon Primary Health Care Post in South Korea: An Analysis of Changes in the Level of Knowledge of Hypertension in the Period from 2004 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, In Han; Kim, Sang-A; Park, Woong-Sub

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a hypertension management program provided by a primary health care post located in a distant rural area in South Korea on the level of knowledge of hypertension. The panel data consisted of a total of 319 people or the entire population aged above 40 years of five villages located in…

  4. Effects of a Hypertension Management Program by Seongcheon Primary Health Care Post in South Korea: An Analysis of Changes in the Level of Knowledge of Hypertension in the Period from 2004 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, In Han; Kim, Sang-A; Park, Woong-Sub

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a hypertension management program provided by a primary health care post located in a distant rural area in South Korea on the level of knowledge of hypertension. The panel data consisted of a total of 319 people or the entire population aged above 40 years of five villages located in…

  5. Effective planning for managed care.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, L L; Mess, M A; Trott, K J

    1995-11-01

    In response to the changing healthcare market, many providers are forming networks for managed care contracting. These networks may fail, however, if planning focuses on maintaining business practices of the past rather than responding to market forces of the future. Effective planning for managed care requires that network executives establish a vision of the future that is not shackled by experiences of the past, articulate a mission that outlines what the network's role will be in the future, and create strategies that will help the network fulfill its mission. Although financial data are necessary to measure a network's progress toward fulfilling its mission, data on past performance should not be used to shape a vision of the future.

  6. Managing depression in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kerry A.; Wolfe, Vicky V.; Fisman, Sandra; DePace, JoAnne; Steele, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate family physicians’ practice patterns for managing depression and mental health concerns among adolescent and adult patients. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SETTING London, Ont, a mid-sized Canadian city. PARTICIPANTS One hundred sixty-three family physicians identified through the London and District Academy of Medicine. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Practice patterns for managing depression, including screening, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, shared care, and training needs. RESULTS Response rate was 63%. Family physicians reported spending a substantial portion of their time during patient visits (26% to 50%) addressing mental health issues, with depression being the most common issue (51% to 75% of patients with mental health issues). About 40% of respondents did routine mental health screening, and 60% screened patients with risk factors for depression. Shared care with mental health professionals was common (care was shared for 26% to 50% of patients). Physicians and patients were moderately satisfied with shared care, but were frustrated by long waiting lists and communication barriers. Most physicians provided psychotherapy to patients in the form of general advice. Differences in practice patterns were observed; physicians treated more adults than adolescents with depression, and they reported greater comfort in treating adults. Although 33% of physicians described using cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), they reported having little training in CBT. Moderate interest was expressed in CBT training, with a preference for a workshop format. CONCLUSION Although 40% of family physicians routinely screen patients for mental health issues, depression is often not detected. Satisfaction with shared care can be increased through better communication with mental health professionals. Physicians’ management of adolescent patients can be improved by further medical training, consultation, and collaboration with mental health professionals

  7. 78 FR 29441 - Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... development and problem-solving skills. Research shows that the quality and stability of adult, child..., the CCDF program has become an essential support in local communities to provide access to early care... Requirements Subpart F--Use of Child Care and Development Funds Subpart G--Financial Management Subpart H...

  8. Managing in the trenches of consumer care: the challenges of understanding and initiating the advance care planning process.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Kristin R; Aultman, Julie; Hazelett, Susan; Palmisano, Barbara; O'Neill, Anne; Ludwick, Ruth; Sanders, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    To better understand how community-based long-term care providers define advance care planning and their role in the process, we conducted 8 focus groups with 62 care managers (social workers and registered nurses) providing care for Ohio's Medicaid waiver program. Care managers shared that most consumers had little understanding of advance care planning. The care managers defined it broadly, including legal documentation, social aspects, medical considerations, ongoing communication, and consumer education. Care managers saw their roles as information providers, healthcare team members, and educators/coaches. Better education, resources, and coordination are needed to ensure that consumer preferences are realized.

  9. Lipid screening in a managed care population.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, K C; Cogswell, M E; Rothenberg, S L; Koplan, J P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the proportion of patients in a managed care setting who were screened and followed up for high blood cholesterol in accordance with the guidelines from the second report of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel II. METHODS: The authors conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of 1004 health plan members ages 40-64 who had been continuously enrolled over a period of five years at one of three Prudential Health-Care sites. RESULTS: Eighty-four percent of patients in the study group had at least one total blood cholesterol level recorded in their medical records; a high density lipoprotein level was recorded for 67%. Cholesterol screening was highest among patients with a diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia (98%), hypertension (96%), or diabetes (94%) and among patients ages 60-64 (94%). Cholesterol screening did not vary by smoking status. More than 86% of those with a diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia were given dietary counseling, medication, or both. CONCLUSIONS: Compliance with national guidelines in this setting exceeded the Year 2000 goals for lipid management and was comparable with compliance reported in other settings. Routine surveillance of prevention efforts can be a useful way to assess quality of medical care in managed care organizations. PMID:9672575

  10. Physician use of disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Wholey, Douglas R; Michail, Nina; Christianson, Jon; Knutson, David

    2005-02-01

    This paper examines differences in availability, use, and perceived usefulness of disease management programs as reported by generalist and specialist physicians functioning as primary care providers in health plans. Implications of these differences are discussed in terms of the three types of purchasers: private insurers, Medicare, and Medicaid. The design is a cross-sectional mail and telephone mixed-mode survey. The data come from 23 health plans in five states (Florida, New York, Colorado, Pennsylvania, and Washington), including six metropolitan areas: Seattle, New York City, Miami, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and Denver. The study participants are 1,244 generalist and specialist physicians who contracted with health plans as primary care providers. They were drawn from a 2001 mail and telephone survey of 2,105 generalist and 1,693 specialist physicians serving commercial, Medicaid, and Medicare patients. Physician responses about use of disease management for their patients in the health plan and how useful they thought it was were regressed on physician, physician organization, and physician-health plan relationship characteristics. While generalist physicians are likely to report having disease management programs available and using them, specialists vary greatly in their response to the disease management programs. In contrast to physicians associated with commercial plans, implementation of disease management programs among physicians associated with Medicaid plans varied across states. Primary care providers trained in generalist areas of practice are more likely than specialists functioning as primary care providers to report that disease management programs are available and to use them. They also find them more useful than do specialists.

  11. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Managing Home Health Care KidsHealth > For Parents > Managing Home Health Care A ... español La atención médica en el hogar Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care ...

  12. Managed care innovation and new product development.

    PubMed

    Clark, C S; Schuster, T B

    1994-01-01

    This article explores recent innovative activity by managed care payor plans nationwide with particular emphasis on emerging, new relationships between the plans and their purchasers, enrollees, provider panels, and competitors. Because they already practice what advocates of health care reform are now preaching, many managed care plans are leading the charge to transform our health care delivery and financing systems.

  13. Economic value evaluation in disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Magnezi, Racheli; Reicher, Sima; Shani, Mordechai

    2008-05-01

    Chronic disease management has been a rapidly growing entity in the 21st century as a strategy for managing chronic illnesses in large populations. However, experience has shown that disease management programs have not been able to demonstrate their financial value. The objectives of disease management programs are to create quality benchmarks, such as principles and guidelines, and to establish a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them. In order to illuminate the essence of disease management and its components, as well as the complexity and the problematic nature of performing economic calculations of their profitability and value, we collected data from several reports that dealt with the economic intervention of disease management programs. The disease management economic evaluation is composed of a series of steps, including the following major categories: data/information technology, information generation, assessment/recommendations, actionable customer plans, and program assessment/reassessment. We demonstrate the elements necessary for economic analysis. Disease management is one of the most innovative tools in the managed care environment and is still in the process of being defined. Therefore, objectives should include the creation of quality measures, such as principles and guidelines, and the establishment of a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them.

  14. Understanding managed care risk sharing arrangements.

    PubMed

    Leigh, J R

    1995-01-01

    A risk sharing agreement between a managed care organization and an employer can be used by employers to either guarantee a managed care plan's short-term success or mitigate its failure. Under such arrangements, the managed care organization financially shares the employer's risk of unfavorable claims experience.

  15. Volunteer Management Support Program Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    This handbook is intended to serve as a guide for governing the operation and management of the Volunteer Management Support Program (VMSP). Outlined in the section on program guidelines are the structure and operations of the VMSP. The remainder of the guide, which deals with volunteer guidelines, explains VMSP volunteer responsibilities,…

  16. 14 CFR 91.1017 - Amending program manager's management specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Amending program manager's management... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1017 Amending program manager's management specifications. (a... specifications; or (2) The program manager applies for the amendment of any management specifications, and the...

  17. iCanCope with Pain™: User-centred design of a web- and mobile-based self-management program for youth with chronic pain based on identified health care needs

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, Jennifer N; Lalloo, Chitra; Harris, Lauren; Isaac, Lisa; Campbell, Fiona; Brown, Stephen; Ruskin, Danielle; Gordon, Allan; Galonski, Marilyn; Pink, Leah R; Buckley, Norman; Henry, James L; White, Meghan; Karim, Allia

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While there are emerging web-based self-management programs for children and adolescents with chronic pain, there is currently not an integrated web- and smartphone-based app that specifically addresses the needs of adolescents with chronic pain. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a needs assessment to inform the development of an online chronic pain self-management program for adolescents, called iCanCope with Pain™. METHODS: A purposive sample of adolescents (n=23; 14 to 18 years of age) was recruited from two pediatric chronic pain clinics in Ontario. Interdisciplinary health care providers were also recruited from these sites. Three focus groups were conducted with adolescents (n=16) and one with pediatric health care providers (n=7). Individual adolescent interviews were also conducted (n=7). RESULTS: Qualitative analysis uncovered four major themes: pain impact; barriers to care; pain management strategies; and transition to adult care. Pain impacted social, emotional, physical and role functioning, as well as future goals. Barriers to care were revealed at the health care system, patient and societal levels. Pain management strategies included support systems, and pharmacological, physical and psychological approaches. Transition subthemes were: disconnect between pediatric and adult systems; skills development; parental role; and fear/anxiety. Based on these identified needs, the iCanCope with Pain™ architecture will include the core theory-based functionalities of: symptom self-monitoring; personalized goal setting; pain coping skills training; peer-based social support; and chronic pain education. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed iCanCope with Pain™ program aims to address the self-management needs of adolescents with chronic pain by improving access to disease information, strategies to manage symptoms and social support. PMID:25000507

  18. The Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Marc B; Holmes, Ann M; Ackermann, Ronald T; Murray, Michael D; Doebbeling, Caroline Carney; Katz, Barry; Li, Jingjin; Zillich, Alan; Prescott, Victoria M; Downs, Stephen M; Inui, Thomas S

    2006-01-01

    The Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program (ICDMP) is intended to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of care for Medicaid members with congestive heart failure (chronic heart failure), diabetes, asthma, and other conditions. The ICDMP is being assembled by Indiana Medicaid primarily from state and local resources and has seven components: (1) identification of eligible participants to create regional registries, (2) risk stratification of eligible participants, (3) nurse care management for high-risk participants, (4) telephonic intervention for all participants, (5) an Internet-based information system, (6) quality improvement collaboratives for primary care practices, and (7) program evaluation. The evaluation involves a randomized controlled trial in two inner-city group practices, as well as a statewide observational design. This article describes the ICDMP, highlights challenges, and discusses approaches to its evaluation.

  19. The Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, Marc B; Holmes, Ann M; Ackermann, Ronald T; Murray, Michael D; Doebbeling, Caroline Carney; Katz, Barry; Li, Jingjin; Zillich, Alan; Prescott, Victoria M; Downs, Stephen M; Inui, Thomas S

    2006-01-01

    The Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program (ICDMP) is intended to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of care for Medicaid members with congestive heart failure (chronic heart failure), diabetes, asthma, and other conditions. The ICDMP is being assembled by Indiana Medicaid primarily from state and local resources and has seven components: (1) identification of eligible participants to create regional registries, (2) risk stratification of eligible participants, (3) nurse care management for high-risk participants, (4) telephonic intervention for all participants, (5) an Internet-based information system, (6) quality improvement collaboratives for primary care practices, and (7) program evaluation. The evaluation involves a randomized controlled trial in two inner-city group practices, as well as a statewide observational design. This article describes the ICDMP, highlights challenges, and discusses approaches to its evaluation. PMID:16529571

  20. Impact of a Telehealth and Care Management Program on All-Cause Mortality and Healthcare Utilization in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Macaulay, Dendy; Birnbaum, Howard G.; Jarvis, John L.; Desai, Urvi S.; Page, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Telehealth has the potential to improve chronic disease management and outcomes, but data regarding direct benefit of telehealth in patients with heart failure (HF) have been mixed. The objective of this study was to determine whether the Health Buddy Program (HBP) (Bosch Healthcare, Palo Alto, CA), a content-driven telehealth system coupled with care management, is associated with improved outcomes in Medicare beneficiaries with HF. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of 623 Medicare beneficiaries with HF offered HBP enrollment compared with a propensity score-matched control group of Medicare beneficiaries with HF from the Medicare 5% sample. Associations between availability of the HBP and all-cause mortality, hospitalization, hospital days, and emergency department visits were evaluated. Results: Beneficiaries offered enrollment in the HBP had 24.9% lower risk-adjusted all-cause mortality over 3 years of follow-up (hazard ratio [HR]=0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63–0.89; p=0.001). Patients who used the HBP at least once (36.9%) had 57.2% lower mortality compared with matched controls (HR=0.43; 95% CI, 0.31–0.60; p<0.001), whereas patients who did not use the HBP had no significant difference in survival (HR=0.96; 95% CI, 0.78–1.19; p=0.69). Patients offered the HBP also had fewer hospital admissions following enrollment (Δ=−0.05 admissions/quarter; p=0.011), which was primarily observed in patients who used the HBP at least once (Δ=−0.10 admissions/quarter; p<0.001). Conclusions: The HBP, a content-driven telehealth system coupled with care management, was associated with significantly better survival and reduced hospitalization in Medicare beneficiaries with HF. Prospective study is warranted to determine the mechanism of this association and opportunities for optimization. PMID:26218252

  1. [Should disease management be feared? (1): hospital care].

    PubMed

    Gaspoz, J M; Rutschmann, O

    2005-11-23

    The goals of disease management are: (1) an integrated health care delivery system; (2) knowledge-based care; (3) elaborate information systems; (4) continuous quality improvement. In-hospital disease management and, more specifically, critical pathways, establish standardized care plans, set goals and time actions to reach these goals. They can reduce variations in practice patterns and resource utilization without compromising quality of care. Such strategies participate to quality improvement programs in hospitals when they involve and empower all actors of a given process of care, are not imposed from outside, and use sound and rigorous development and evaluation methods.

  2. [Should disease management be feared? (2): outpatient care].

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, O; Gaspoz, J M

    2005-11-23

    Outpatient disease management is a multidisciplinary team intervention for managing complex processes of chronic diseases, in order to improve healthcare quality and decrease process variations. Interventions are based on: (1) evidence-based guidelines; (2) educational programs; (3) close patient follow-up. This can be achieved by telephone follow-up, by outpatient clinic programs, or by homecare visits performed by case managers. For the management of patients with chronic heart failure, disease management programs have resulted in a 25% decrease in hospitalization and in reduced costs. In our Swiss health care system, however, a majority of patients are taken care of by private practitioners; thus, the involvement of these physicians in the development and in the realization of disease management programs will be key to their success.

  3. Physicians in health care management: 1. Physicians as managers: roles and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Leatt, P

    1994-01-15

    Physicians are increasingly expected to assume responsibility for the management of human and financial resources in health care, particularly in hospitals. Juggling their new management responsibilities with clinical care, teaching and research can lead to conflicting roles. However, their presence in management is crucial to shaping the future health care system. They bring to management positions important skills and values such as observation, problem-solving, analysis and ethical judgement. To improve their management skills physicians can benefit from management education programs such as those offered by the Physician-Manager Institute and several Canadian universities. To manage in the future environment they must increase their knowledge and skills in policy and political processes, financial strategies and management, human resources management, systems and program quality improvement and organizational design.

  4. Physicians in health care management: 1. Physicians as managers: roles and future challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Leatt, P

    1994-01-01

    Physicians are increasingly expected to assume responsibility for the management of human and financial resources in health care, particularly in hospitals. Juggling their new management responsibilities with clinical care, teaching and research can lead to conflicting roles. However, their presence in management is crucial to shaping the future health care system. They bring to management positions important skills and values such as observation, problem-solving, analysis and ethical judgement. To improve their management skills physicians can benefit from management education programs such as those offered by the Physician-Manager Institute and several Canadian universities. To manage in the future environment they must increase their knowledge and skills in policy and political processes, financial strategies and management, human resources management, systems and program quality improvement and organizational design. PMID:8287339

  5. Integrating Bipolar Disorder Management in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Goodrich, David E.; O’Donnell, Allison N.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing realization that persons with bipolar disorder may exclusively be seen in primary (general medical) care settings, notably because of limited access to mental health care and stigma in seeking mental health treatment. At least two clinical practice guidelines for bipolar disorder recommend collaborative chronic care models (CCMs) to help integrate mental health care to better manage this illness. CCMs, which include provider guideline support, self-management support, care management, and measurement-based care, are well-established in primary care settings, and may help primary care practitioners manage bipolar disorder. However, further research is required to adapt CCMs to support complexities in diagnosing persons with bipolar disorder, and integrate decision-making processes regarding medication safety and tolerability in primary care. Additional implementation studies are also needed to adapt CCMs for persons with bipolar disorder in primary care, especially those seen in smaller practices with limited infrastructure and access to mental health care. PMID:23001382

  6. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.

    SciTech Connect

    PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

    2002-05-31

    THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

  7. Successful business planning for new programs in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Langland-Orban, B; Krasick, E R

    1991-03-01

    Health care organizations implement business strategies through programs and services, and success depends on careful program design and execution. A conscientious design requires thorough efforts in organizing the planning process, conducting the decision analysis, and obtaining approval for a program. Weak methods and processes in the management of these efforts can result in faulty assumptions and costly errors in the development of new health care ventures, thus preventing the achievement of financial and operating goals. This article reviews the stages of business planning, and the points at which success may be impaired.

  8. Case Study of American Healthways' Diabetes Disease Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Pope, James E.; Hudson, Laurel R.; Orr, Patty M.

    2005-01-01

    Disease management has been defined as a system of coordinated health care interventions and communications for populations with conditions in which patient self-care efforts are significant (Disease Management Association of America, 2005). The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the diabetes disease management program offered by American Healthways (AMHC) and highlight recently reported results of this program (Villagra, 2004a; Espinet et al., 2005). PMID:17288077

  9. Joint Program Management Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    program examples include the Joint Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (JTUAV), Joint Lethal Strike (JLS), V22 Osprey , Joint Sur- veillance Target Attack...military departments, are also con- sidered Components in their own right. In most joint programs, a “lead” Component is designated to cen- trally...all program direction and funding has single source Single-Component program; interest from other Component(s) manifested by their designation of a

  10. Hospital-based integrated diabetes care management: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jeng-Fu; Tu, Shih-Te; Hsu, Shang-Ren; Mao, I-Chieh; Li, Yan-Chi; Lin, Guan-Yi; Tian, Jia-Yu; Syu, Ya-You; Chen, Wen-Hui; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Syu, Bai-Ling; Wu, Tzu-Ying; Cho, Yi-Wen

    2014-12-01

    To provide continuous, accessible, and quality care, a diabetes share-care program has been in place in Taiwan for several years. Lukang Christian Hospital, a member of the diabetes share-care network, endeavors to provide "patient-centered" care aimed at increasing care quality and reducing diabetic complications. Information technology has been employed by the hospital for monitoring care quality and analyzing cost-effectiveness. Structured health-care programs have also been developed to ensure the completeness of diabetes care and to encourage self-management of individuals at high risk for diabetes. The implementation of these strategies has led to progressive improvement in quality measures and spawned novel and creative ways to deliver care services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Linkage, Engagement, and Viral Suppression Rates among HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Care at Medical Case Management Programs in Washington, DC

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Sarah; Castel, Amanda D.; Ahmed, Tashrik; Olejemeh, Christie; Frison, Lawrence; Kharfen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background The District of Columbia Department of Health (DCDOH) funds facilities to provide HIV medical case management (MCM), inclusive of linkage, engagement in care, and treatment adherence support. The objective of this analysis was to identify differences in clinical outcomes among HIV-infected persons receiving care at MCM-funded facilities compared to non-funded facilities. Methods Newly diagnosed and prevalent HIV-infected persons were identified from the DCDOH surveillance system. Clinical outcomes of interest were linkage, retention in care, and viral suppression. Bivariate analyses and random effects logistic regression were used to examine differences in demographics and clinical outcomes of persons receiving care at MCM-funded and non-funded facilities. Results Among 5,631 prevalent cases, 56.7% received care at MCM-funded facilities of which 76.2% were retained in care, and 70.6% achieved viral suppression. Those receiving care in MCM-funded facilities were significantly more likely to be retained in care (aOR 4.13; 95%CI: 1.93-8.85) and as likely (aOR 1.06; 95%CI: 0.68-1.62) to be virally suppressed than persons receiving care in non-funded facilities. Among 789 newly diagnosed persons, those diagnosed in MCM-funded facilities were not significantly more likely to be linked to care within 3 months (aOR 0.50; 95%CI: 0.21-1.18) than those diagnosed in non-funded facilities. Discussion This study provides evidence that medical case management may be beneficial to HIV-infected persons in DC, as it improves retention in care. Further identification of the specific services providing the most benefit to clients is needed, as well as a better understanding of the complex relationship between retention and viral suppression. PMID:23982662

  12. Developing a Management Curriculum for a Cytotechnology Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Maureen E.

    This study reviewed the literature in the field of health care management, particularly that which pertains to the management of the clinical laboratory. The research cited should help cytotechnology educators in planning a management curriculum and developing program objectives to train cytotechnologists in management. The report is an annotated…

  13. Developing a Management Curriculum for a Cytotechnology Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Maureen E.

    This study reviewed the literature in the field of health care management, particularly that which pertains to the management of the clinical laboratory. The research cited should help cytotechnology educators in planning a management curriculum and developing program objectives to train cytotechnologists in management. The report is an annotated…

  14. Managed Care Plans: Getting Good Care for Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting ... Your Community Healthy Children > Family Life > Medical Home > Health Insurance > Managed Care Plans: Getting Good Care for Your ...

  15. [Institutional support as a fundamental aspect for joint management in primary health care: the experience of a program in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Casanova, Angela Oliveira; Teixeira, Mirna Barros; Montenegro, Elyne

    2014-11-01

    This article presents reflections regarding the concepts and praxis of a new feature for health care and management, namely institutional support. It is seen as a management tool for enhancing quality of care, which has the potential to reformulate the hierarchical and authoritarian practices of health coordination and planning. Institutional support is a trigger for change that can enhance the autonomy, accountability, collective practices and new relationships between managers, professionals and users of the health system. These assumptions are aligned with the concepts of comprehensive and participatory Primary Health Care (PHC), which lead us to the conclusion that matricial and institutional support are processes that generate new models of health care and management. To appreciate the modus operandi of this feature, the Teias Escola Manguinhos/ENSP/Fiocruz experience is presented as a case study, one of the main pillars of which is the adoption of institutional support as a strategy for joint accountability and participative management of PHC in a community in the city of Rio de Janeiro.

  16. Communicating Risk to Program Managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivers, C. Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Program Managers (PM) can protect program resources and improve chances of success by anticipating, understanding and managing risks. Understanding the range of potential risks helps one to avoid or manage the risks. A PM must choose which risks to accept to reduce fire fighting, must meet the expectations of stakeholders consistently, and avoid falling into costly "black holes" that may open. A good risk management process provides the PM more confidence to seize opportunities save money, meet schedule, even improve relationships with people important to the program. Evidence of managing risk and sound internal controls can mean better support from superiors for the program by building a trust and reputation from being on top of issues. Risk managers have an obligation to provide the PM with the best information possible to allow the benefits to be realized (Small Business Consortium, 2004). The Institute for Chartered Accountants in England and Wales sees very important benefits for companies in providing better information about what they do to assess and manage key business risks. Such information will: a) provide practical forward-looking information; b) reduce the cost of capital; c) encourage better risk management; and d) improve accountability for stewardship, investor protection and the usefulness of financial reporting. We are particularly convinced that enhanced risk reporting will help listed companies obtain capital at the lowest possible cost (The Institute of Chartered Accountants in England &Wales, June 2002). Risk managers can take a significant role in quantifying the success of their department and communicating those figures to executive (program) management levels while pushing for a broader risk management role. Overall, risk managers must show that risk management work matters in the most crucial place-the bottom line- as they prove risk management can be a profit center (Sullivan, 2004).

  17. Wildlife Management Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, M.B.

    1992-08-01

    This report details activities in administering Savannah River Site public lands for wildlife management. Accomplishments in administering hunts, gathering biological data, and in coordinating land use are described.

  18. [The German program for disease management guidelines--implementation with pathways and quality management].

    PubMed

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Lelgemann, Monika; Kopp, Ina

    2007-07-15

    In Germany, physicians enrolled in disease management programs are legally obliged to follow evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. That is why a Program for National Disease Management Guidelines (German DM-CPG Program) was established in 2002 aiming at implementation of best-practice evidence-based recommendations for nationwide as well as regional disease management programs. Against this background the article reviews programs, methods and tools for implementing DM-CPGs via clinical pathways as well as regional guidelines for outpatient care. Special reference is given to the institutionalized program of adapting DM-CPGs for regional use by primary-care physicians in the State of Hesse.

  19. Developing ambulatory care registered nurse competencies for care coordination and transition management.

    PubMed

    Haas, Sheila; Swan, Beth Ann; Haynes, Traci

    2013-01-01

    The need for care coordination and management of transitions between Patient-Centered Medical Home providers, outpatient and community settings, including the Accountable Care Organization is often overlooked, episodic, and accountability for coordinating care and managing transitions between providers and services is lacking. Recognizing the potential of the RN to contribute to enhanced quality, cost effectiveness, and access to care in ambulatory settings, the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing (AAACN) created a care coordination competencies action plan with three phases to delineate RN competencies and develop an education program for care coordination and transition management in ambulatory care. The first Expert Panel completed a comprehensive, interdisciplinary literature review and analysis focused on care coordination and transition management. The second Expert Panel--representing nu rsing, medicine, and pharmacy--defined the dimensions, identified core competencies, and described the activities linked with each competency for care coordination and transition management in ambulatory settings. The third Expert Panel reviewed, confirmed, and created a table of dimensions, activities, and competencies (including knowledge, skills, attitudes) for ambulatory care RN care coordination and transition management.

  20. Implementing managed care and case management: the neuroscience experience.

    PubMed

    Marr, J A; Reid, B

    1992-10-01

    The case management model for patient care in the neuroscience area was recently implemented in the neurosciences area at a tertiary care hospital. Understanding of the concepts of case management and managed care were essential to the implementation process. Clustering of case types and appointment of group leaders made the development of individual care maps a manageable task. Case management of 2 case types, Parkinson's disease and Guillain Barré syndrome are described, including the rationale for selection, care map development and education. The process of continuing education focused on operational issues regarding utilization of the map and professional issues such as health teaching responsibilities.

  1. Environmental Management Science Program Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This program summary book is a compendium of project summaries submitted by principal investigators in the Environmental Management Science Program and Environmental Management/Energy Research Pilot Collaborative Research Program (Wolf-Broido Program). These summaries provide information about the most recent project activities and accomplishments. All projects will be represented at the workshop poster sessions, so you will have an opportunity to meet with the researchers. The projects will be presented in the same order at the poster session as they are presented in this summary book. Detailed questions about an individual project may be directed to the investigators involved.

  2. Primary and managed care. Ingredients for health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Bindman, A B

    1994-01-01

    The use of primary and managed care is likely to increase under proposed federal health care reform. I review the definition of primary care and primary care physicians and show that this delivery model can affect access to medical care, the cost of treatment, and the quality of services. Because the use of primary care is often greater in managed care than in fee-for-service, I compare the two insurance systems to further understand the delivery of primary care. Research suggests that primary care can help meet the goal of providing accessible, cost-effective, and high-quality care, but that changes in medical education and marketplace incentives will be needed to encourage students and trained physicians to enter this field. PMID:7941522

  3. Risk Management and Litigation Avoidance in Outdoor Recreation Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Glenda

    This paper reviews aspects of Canadian and U.S. law related to liability and negligence of outdoor programs and suggests strategies for risk management. To prove negligence, an individual injured in an outdoor program must prove that the outdoor leader had a duty of care to the participant, standards of care were breached, actual injury was…

  4. Urban-Rural Differences in the Effect of a Medicare Health Promotion and Disease Self-Management Program on Physical Function and Health Care Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Wamsley, Brenda; Liebel, Diane; Dixon, Denise; Eggert, Gerald; Van Nostrand, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a multicomponent health promotion and disease self-management intervention on physical function and health care expenditures among Medicare beneficiaries. To determine if these outcomes vary by urban or rural residence. Design and Methods: We analyzed data from a 22-month randomized controlled trial of a health…

  5. Urban-Rural Differences in the Effect of a Medicare Health Promotion and Disease Self-Management Program on Physical Function and Health Care Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Wamsley, Brenda; Liebel, Diane; Dixon, Denise; Eggert, Gerald; Van Nostrand, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a multicomponent health promotion and disease self-management intervention on physical function and health care expenditures among Medicare beneficiaries. To determine if these outcomes vary by urban or rural residence. Design and Methods: We analyzed data from a 22-month randomized controlled trial of a health…

  6. [Disease management programs in Germany. Current focus and further development].

    PubMed

    Richard, S

    2004-08-01

    The structure of the German healthcare system impedes well-coordinated long-term care of the chronically ill. Based on centrally defined standards, German sickness funds have implemented nationwide disease management programs for patients with diabetes. Breast cancer programs are underway. The programs are evidence based. Performance standards are centrally defined and subject to accreditation by a federal office. The programs are designed to improve the coordination of care between the different sectors, but the associated administration costs are often criticized.

  7. A glossary of managed care terms.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, P L

    1996-10-01

    With health care changing by the nanosecond and managed care entities growing, mixing and mutating even more quickly, the words used to describe, distinguish and categorize various entities and activities are confusing even the most sophisticated professionals. This "article" provides a much-needed dictionary of managed care terms.

  8. Linkage, engagement, and viral suppression rates among HIV-infected persons receiving care at medical case management programs in Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Willis, Sarah; Castel, Amanda D; Ahmed, Tashrik; Olejemeh, Christie; Frison, Lawrence; Kharfen, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The District of Columbia Department of Health funds facilities to provide HIV medical case management (MCM), inclusive of linkage, engagement in care, and treatment adherence support. The objective of this analysis was to identify the differences in the clinical outcomes among HIV-infected persons receiving care at MCM-funded facilities compared with those in nonfunded facilities. Newly diagnosed and prevalent HIV-infected persons were identified from the District of Columbia Department of Health surveillance system. Clinical outcomes of interest were linkage, retention in care, and viral suppression. Bivariate analyses and random effects logistic regression were used to examine the differences in demographics and clinical outcomes of persons receiving care at MCM-funded and nonfunded facilities. Among 5631 prevalent cases, 56.7% received care at MCM-funded facilities of which 76.2% were retained in care, and 70.6% achieved viral suppression. Those receiving care in MCM-funded facilities were significantly more likely to be retained in care [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.13; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93 to 8.85] and as likely (aOR 1.06; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.62) to be virally suppressed than persons receiving care in nonfunded facilities. Among 789 newly diagnosed persons, those diagnosed in MCM-funded facilities were not significantly more likely to be linked to care within 3 months (aOR 0.50; 95% CI: 0.21 to 1.18) than those diagnosed in nonfunded facilities. This study provides evidence that MCM may be beneficial to HIV-infected persons in DC by improving retention in care. Further identification of the specific services providing the most benefit to clients is needed, including a better understanding of the complex relationship between retention and viral suppression.

  9. The Marshall Islands Data Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, A.C.; Conrado, C.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report is a resource document of the methods and procedures used currently in the Data Management Program of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Project. Since 1973, over 60,000 environmental samples have been collected. Our program includes relational database design, programming and maintenance; sample and information management; sample tracking; quality control; and data entry, evaluation and reduction. The usefulness of scientific databases involves careful planning in order to fulfill the requirements of any large research program. Compilation of scientific results requires consolidation of information from several databases, and incorporation of new information as it is generated. The success in combining and organizing all radionuclide analysis, sample information and statistical results into a readily accessible form, is critical to our project.

  10. Assessment of an enhanced program for depression management in primary care: a cluster randomized controlled trial. The INDI project (Interventions for Depression Improvement)

    PubMed Central

    Aragonès, Enric; Caballero, Antonia; Piñol, Josep Ll; López-Cortacans, Germán; Badia, Waleska; Hernández, Josep M; Casaus, Pilar; Folch, Sílvia; Basora, Josep; Labad, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Background Most depressed patients are attended at primary care. However, there are significant shortcomings in the diagnosis, management and outcomes of these patients. The aim of this study is to determine whether the implementation of a structured programme for managing depression will provide better health outcomes than usual management. Methods/Design Design: A cluster-randomized controlled trial involving two groups, one of which is the control group consisting of patients who are treated for depression in the usual way and the other is the intervention group consisting of patients on a structured programme for treating depression. Setting: 20 primary care centres in the province of Tarragona (Spain) Sample: 400 patients over 18 years of age who have experienced an episode of major depression (DSM-IV) and who need to initiate antidepressant treatment Intervention: A multi-component programme with clinical, educational and organisational procedures that includes training for the health care provider and evidence-based clinical guidelines. It also includes primary care nurses working as care-managers who provide educational and emotional support for the patients and who are responsible for active and systematic clinical monitoring. The programme aims to improve the primary care/specialized level interface. Measurements: The patients will be monitored by telephone interviews. The interviewer will not know which group the patient belongs to (blind trial). These interviews will be given at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months. Main variables: Severity of the depressive symptoms, response rate and remission rate. Analysis: Outcomes will be analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis and the unit of analysis will be the individual patient. This analysis will take into account the effect of study design on potential lack of independence between observations within the same cluster. Discussion The effectiveness of caring for depression in primary care can be improved by various strategies

  11. NPS TINYSCOPE Program Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor CPT - Comprehensive Performance Test CRC - Cyclic Redundancy Check DME - Data Management Element DoD...greater than five centimeters in diameter in the low earth orbit environment. Kinetic impacts with debris objects could potentially be fatal to the...establishing a command and telemetry link with the ground station for every spacecraft contact. 4.4.4 Data Management Element ( DME ) TR-271 The DME shall

  12. A managed care cycle provides contract oversight.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Paul B; Messinger, Stephen F; Welter, Terri

    2002-03-01

    In response to poor payment performance by health plans, providers are realizing that managed care contracts require systematic, ongoing management rather than a periodic focus. An effective managed care cycle that encompasses strategy development, implementation of the strategy through contracting and operations, and monitoring of contract performance can accomplish this needed oversight. Each phase requires specialized management tools, skills, and staff. Because of the importance of managed care to the provider's financial viability, a wide range of persons should be involved in the managed care cycle, including the board of directors, business office staff, senior management, and finance staff. As providers embrace a more structured approach to managed care, they will increase their chances of receiving accurate contracted payments.

  13. Shared Heritage: An Intergenerational Child Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkeye Area Community Action Program, Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This report describes ways in which older persons may become involved in the field of home child care. It is intended to provide (1) detailed information on an intergenerational child care (IGCC) program; (2) general information relating to intergenerational contacts and home child care; and (3) "how-to" information for agencies planning…

  14. Beyond utilization control: managing care with customers.

    PubMed

    Morath, J

    1998-01-01

    Allina Health System embarked on a rigorous process to better understand the customer's perception of care and service. The milestone for quality is the participation of the patient, member, and family in the health care system to determine care and service quality. The challenge for those in health care is to understand and manage the complex cultural changes this inclusion implies.

  15. Multi-Dimensional Program Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    111[. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS -I963-A - R.. -- f W ______ES W mc"i 2- 0 UNCLAS I SECURITY CLASIFICATION OF THIS...let’s pass them out. * A good idea for teaching interface in Project/Program Management. * Hard to keep program objectives foremost in PM’s mind

  16. Managing respiratory care: where is the science?

    PubMed

    Stewart, Karen J

    2008-07-01

    Managing a respiratory care department is challenging. Health care is one of the few businesses in which the fees for services are dictated by the payers. Recent changes in focus and expectations in the overall health care industry have strongly affected the job of the respiratory care manager. There is now stronger emphasis on improving the management of human resources. Good human-resources management requires understanding the work force, minimizing staff turnover, and finding ways to do more work with fewer employees. Respiratory care managers must: marshal strong evidence and compelling reasoning to compete for funding; make evidence-based (or at least carefully researched) purchasing decisions; implement protocols to optimize patient and clinical outcomes (including work efficiency); implement patient-safety initiatives such as "care bundles," to avoid preventable complications; and vigorously pursue initiatives that optimize the work flow and advance the professional status of respiratory therapists, such as rapid-response teams.

  17. The role of MD and MBA training in the professional development of a physician: a survey of 30 years of graduates from the Wharton Health Care Management Program.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mitesh S; Arora, Vishal; Patel, Mamta S; Kinney, June M; Pauly, Mark V; Asch, David A

    2014-09-01

    The number of medical schools offering MD and MBA training has increased fivefold in the last two decades. The authors evaluated graduates' perceptions of the role of such training on their career and professional development. In 2011, the authors surveyed physician graduates from the Wharton School MBA Program in Heath Care Management at the University of Pennsylvania from 1981 to 2010. Survey responses were analyzed and evaluated using grounded theory. Among 247 eligible graduates, 59.9% (148/247) completed the questionnaire and 89.9% (133/148) of them provided free-text responses. Approximately 85.1% (126/148) of respondents were male and 79.7% (118/148) entered residency training; however, both rates declined slightly over time. Among respondents within their first decade after graduation, 46.2% (24/52) reported clinical practice as their primary work sector compared with 39.5% (15/38) among respondents 11 to 20 years after graduation and 19.2% (5/26) of respondents 21 to 30 years after graduation. Overall, graduates reported mostly positive attitudes and often noted the benefits of career acceleration, professional flexibility, and credibility in multidisciplinary domains. The few negative remarks were focused on the opportunity cost of time and how peers in one discipline may negatively perceive the role of the other discipline's degree. Graduates with an MD and MBA report mostly positive attitudes towards their training, and many are pursuing leadership and primarily nonclinical roles later in their careers. These findings reveal new insights for policies affecting physician workforce. Further study is necessary to evaluate whether similar trends exist more broadly.

  18. Toward population management in an integrated care model.

    PubMed

    Maddux, Franklin W; McMurray, Stephen; Nissenson, Allen R

    2013-04-01

    Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will be the primary mechanism for achieving the dual goals of high-quality patient care at managed per capita costs. To achieve these goals in the newly emerging health care environment, the nephrology community must plan for and direct integrated delivery and coordination of renal care, focusing on population management. Even though the ESRD patient population is a complex group with comorbid conditions that may confound integration of care, the nephrology community has unique experience providing integrated care through ACO-like programs. Specifically, the recent ESRD Management Demonstration Project sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the current ESRD Prospective Payment System with it Quality Incentive Program have demonstrated that integrated delivery of renal care can be accomplished in a manner that provides improved clinical outcomes with some financial margin of savings. Moving forward, integrated renal care will probably be linked to provider performance and quality outcomes measures, and clinical integration initiatives will share several common elements, namely performance-based payment models, coordination of communication via health care information technology, and development of best practices for care coordination and resource utilization. Integration initiatives must be designed to be measured and evaluated, and, consistent with principles of continuous quality improvement, each initiative will provide for iterative improvements of the initiative.

  19. Toward population management in an integrated care model.

    PubMed

    Maddux, Franklin W; McMurray, Stephen; Nissenson, Allen R

    2013-01-01

    Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will be the primary mechanism for achieving the dual goals of high-quality patient care at managed per capita costs. To achieve these goals in the newly emerging health care environment, the nephrology community must plan for and direct integrated delivery and coordination of renal care, focusing on population management. Even though the ESRD patient population is a complex group with comorbid conditions that may confound integration of care, the nephrology community has unique experience providing integrated care through ACO-like programs. Specifically, the recent ESRD Management Demonstration Project sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the current ESRD Prospective Payment System with it Quality Incentive Program have demonstrated that integrated delivery of renal care can be accomplished in a manner that provides improved clinical outcomes with some financial margin of savings. Moving forward, integrated renal care will probably be linked to provider performance and quality outcomes measures, and clinical integration initiatives will share several common elements, namely performance-based payment models, coordination of communication via health care information technology, and development of best practices for care coordination and resource utilization. Integration initiatives must be designed to be measured and evaluated, and, consistent with principles of continuous quality improvement, each initiative will provide for iterative improvements of the initiative. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Electronic managed care: the utilization of information technology in a managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Joan M

    2003-01-01

    Health care managers must use information technology in managed care negotiations with all players in the managed care model-employers, managed care organizations, providers, and patients. Information technology effectuates these negotiations, provides a value added to all those involved in terms of efficiency and communication, and helps managers remain within regulations. This article describes each phase of the managed care model and how information technology is used. It also provides an operational overview of how to integrate the technology into health care settings.

  1. Health-care professionals and management development.

    PubMed

    Loan-Clarke, J

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the impact of a self-governing hospital trust's accredited management development programme designed for health-care professionals responsible for managing natural clinical groups. The programme was a dual qualification: a level 5 national vocational qualification in management, and a diploma in management. Identifies key issues resulting from this type of programme. Discusses participants' evaluation of the two different formats for management development. Highlights the reservations of health-care professionals in respect of competence-based management development, particularly regarding assessment of their work performance. Recognizes that when a group of senior health-care professionals are involved in a long-term in-house management development programme, they may be perceived as a threat by senior management. Concludes that health-care professionals will only engage proactively with management development activities which they perceive to have value for them.

  2. Illinois' nonpoint source management program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Illinois Nonpoint Source (NPS) Management Program (Program) describes the statewide authorities that give the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) responsibility to develop and implement this Program. It provides a brief summary of the results of the States' NPS assessment as reported in the Illinois Water Quality Report. Included are eleven sections correlated to NPS pollution sources, or to an area of water pollution protection initiatives. These sections outline goals and objectives to be implemented in Illinois to abate NPS pollution, when possible the sections include a descriptive narrative. Included in the Program, is the process or mechanism which Illinois uses to prioritize and fund future projects. Finally, this Program identifies the federal programs that the IEPA currently reviews for consistency with statewide goals and objectives. Revisions to the Program will be made in accordance with state and federal program changes and as needed.

  3. A Program Management Framework for Facilities Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The challenge faced by senior facility leaders is not how to execute a single project, but rather, how to successfully execute a large program consisting of hundreds of projects. Senior facilities officers at universities, school districts, hospitals, airports, and other organizations with extensive facility inventories, typically manage project…

  4. Nuclear cardiology in a managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G S; Wolin, D

    1998-01-01

    Health maintenance organizations (HMO) and nuclear cardiology represent mutual threats and mutual opportunities for each other. On the one hand, nuclear cardiology represents a cost center with HMOs exerting tremendous financial pressure on nuclear cardiology programs. On the other hand, nuclear cardiology can act as a sage gatekeeper to the cardiac catheterization laboratory and help HMOs effectively control the health care of an increasing percentage of the population. Through the process of negotiation, of determining each other's needs, an accommodation can take place between the two. The ability to correlate scan results with coronary angiography provides individual nuclear cardiology programs with the opportunity to demonstrate their accuracy. A Nuclear Cardiology Report Card based on these data can be developed for use, with HMOs creating the opportunity to compete not only on price but also on value. Carved out capitation rates for nuclear cardiology can be estimated on the basis of actual experience with an HMO population and by extrapolation from test frequency of the U.S. population. The financial disincentives of capitation and of managed care challenge the physician-patient relationship. Advocacy of the role of nuclear cardiology and an understanding of negotiation strategies can aid nuclear cardiologists in their attempts to provide quality care with commensurate compensation.

  5. Aircrew team management program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerison, Charles; Mccann, Dick; Davies, Rod

    1987-01-01

    The key features of the Aircrew Team Management Workshop which was designed for and in consultation with Trans Australia Airlines are outlined. Five major sections are presented dealing with: (1) A profile of the airline and the designers; (2) Aircrew consultation and involvement; (3) Educational design and development; (4) Implementation and instruction; and (5) Evaluation and assessment. These areas are detailed.

  6. End-of-life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) Training Program: improving palliative care in critical care.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty R; Dahlin, Constance; Campbell, Margaret L; Paice, Judith A; Malloy, Pam; Virani, Rose

    2007-01-01

    The integration of palliative care in critical care settings is essential to improve care of the dying, and critical care nurses are leaders in these efforts. However, lack of education in providing end-of-life (EOL) care is an obstacle to nurses and other healthcare professionals as they strive to deliver palliative care. Education regarding pain and symptom management, communication strategies, care at the end of life, ethics, and other aspects of palliative care are urgently needed. Efforts to increase EOL care education in most undergraduate and graduate nursing curricula are beginning; yet, most critical care nurses have not received formal training in palliative care. Moreover, educational resources such as critical care nursing textbooks often contain inadequate information on palliative care. The ELNEC-Critical Care program provides a comprehensive curriculum that concentrates on the requirements of those nurses who are working in areas of critical care. Extensive support materials include CD-ROM, binder, Web sites, newsletters, textbooks, and other supplemental items. The ultimate goal is to improve EOL care for patients in all critical care settings and enhance the experience of family members witnessing the dying process of their loved ones.

  7. Negotiating or renegotiating managed care contracts.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, R

    1998-01-01

    When negotiating or renegotiating a managed care contract, medical groups need leverage. Medical groups have to offer the managed care company something it can't get anywhere else in order to get the most advantageous contract. Leverage can come by offering a large provider panel, geographic coverage or superior quality, among other things. In every case, physicians benefit by being proactive as they negotiate managed care contracts.

  8. Natural Resources Management Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-24

    Program, activity, or opportunity dependent on the natural environment. Examples are hunting, fishing, trapping, picnick- ing, birdwatching , off-road...fair market value. d. Planned forest products sales shall continue on land reported as excess until actual disposal or transfer occurs. When forested

  9. A hybrid transitional care program.

    PubMed

    Daley, Cathleen M

    2010-12-01

    Older adults have complex medical conditions and multiple comorbidities that make them extremely vulnerable when discharged from hospital to home or community settings. Discharge failures and communication gaps lead to negative outcomes, both short term and long term (Naylor, Annu Rev Nurs Res. 2003;20:127-147). A 9-month study including 89 heart failure (HF) patients was undertaken. These patients were considered at high risk for rehospitalization using definitive inclusion criterion. This criterion was clinically driven and assessed at point of entry into the hospital. Health literacy screening was done before educational sessions, using "The Newest Vital Sign Assessment Tool." This tool has been validated against previous measures of health literacy such as the TOFHLA (Osborn et al, Am J Health Behav. 2007;31:36-46). Reconciliation of medications upon hospital admission, discharge, and during the 6-month follow-up period ensured that all providers were aware of the patient's medications upon discharge. A follow-up appointment with the patient's cardiologist was also arranged within 7 to 10 days postdischarge. The comparison group was all other HF patients within the same hospital setting. Exclusion criteria also included nursing home residents and anyone who declined enrollment into the study. Continual identification of system or process and communication gaps postdischarge helped improve the continuum of care. Key findings from this study include a 30-day readmission rate for the study group of 15%, with an expected rate of 20%. Observed mortality rate was 2% for the study group with an expected rate of 7%. A successful transitional HF program can reduce readmissions, length of stay, cost of hospitalization, and mortality rates. Adaptation of this model elsewhere should be a consideration.

  10. Spirulina in health care management.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Archana; Zacharia, Anish J; Jarouliya, Urmila; Bhadauriya, Pratiksha; Prasad, G B K S; Bisen, P S

    2008-10-01

    Spirulina is a photosynthetic, filamentous, spiral-shaped and multicellular edible microbe. It is the nature's richest and most complete source of nutrition. Spirulina has a unique blend of nutrients that no single source can offer. The alga contains a wide spectrum of prophylactic and therapeutic nutrients that include B-complex vitamins, minerals, proteins, gamma-linolenic acid and the super anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene, vitamin E, trace elements and a number of unexplored bioactive compounds. Because of its apparent ability to stimulate whole human physiology, Spirulina exhibits therapeutic functions such as antioxidant, anti-bacterial, antiviral, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-diabetic and plethora of beneficial functions. Spirulina consumption appears to promote the growth of intestinal micro flora as well. The review discusses the potential of Spirulina in health care management.

  11. A new model for care population management.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeni

    2013-03-01

    Steps toward building a population management model of care should include: Identifying the population that would be cared for through a population management initiative. Conducting an actuarial analysis for this population, reviewing historical utilization and cost data and projecting changes in utilization. Investing in data infrastructure that supports the exchange of data among providers and with payers. Determining potential exposure to downside risk and organizational capacity to assume this risk. Experimenting with payment models and care delivery approaches Hiring care coordinators to manage care for high-risk patients.

  12. Health Care for Homeless Veterans program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its medical regulations concerning eligibility for the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program. The HCHV program provides per diem payments to non-VA community-based facilities that provide housing, outreach services, case management services, and rehabilitative services, and may provide care and/or treatment to homeless veterans who are enrolled in or eligible for VA health care. The rule modifies VA's HCHV regulations to conform to changes enacted in the Honoring America's Veterans and Caring for Camp Lejeune Families Act of 2012. Specifically, the rule removes the requirement that homeless veterans be diagnosed with a serious mental illness or substance use disorder to qualify for the HCHV program. This change makes the program available to all homeless veterans who are enrolled in or eligible for VA health care. The rule also updates the definition of homeless to match in part the one used by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The rule further clarifies that the services provided by the HCHV program through non-VA community-based providers must include case management services, including non-clinical case management, as appropriate.

  13. Characteristics of effective health care managers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sherryl W

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of traditional and contemporary management theories. Concerns, characteristics, and skills of effective managers are also presented. Further, a self-assessment (survey) of 7 highly effective health care managers in a South Georgia community was conducted to determine their ratings on 6 management indices. The assessment or Scale of Transformational Leadership uses a Likert-type scale to allow for the evaluation of managers. The scale contains 6 management elements for assessment: attention, meaning, trust, self, vision, and feeling. Individual ratings and group summary skills rating are presented. Findings revealed the order of managerial importance of the elements as follows (from highest to lowest): Management of Trust, Management of Attention, Management of Self, Management of Feeling, Management of Meaning, and Management of Risk. As a second tier, the final ratings are corroborated by health care management interns.

  14. Managed care relationships from the physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Mack, J M

    1993-01-01

    In response to health care reform proposals as well as health plans, hospitals and individual physicians are affiliating into models that will favorably position them in the evolving managed care marketplace. The development of integrated delivery vehicles requires a merging of physician and hospital cultures. To manage this process the relationship between hospitals and physicians must receive the greatest attention. This chapter describes physician perceptions of specific aspects in the evolving managed care marketplace. Understanding reactions to various initiatives will enable readers to overcome resistance to change and improve their managed care relationships with physicians.

  15. Blogging and the health care manager.

    PubMed

    Malvey, Donna; Alderman, Barbara; Todd, Andrew D

    2009-01-01

    The use of blogs in the workplace has emerged as a communication tool that can rapidly and simultaneously connect managers with their employees, customers, their peers, and other key stakeholders. Nowhere is this connection more critical than in health care, especially because of the uncertainty surrounding health care reform and the need for managers to have access to timely and authentic information. However, most health care managers have been slow to join the blogging bandwagon. This article examines the phenomenon of blogging and offers a list of blogs that every health care manager should read and why. This article also presents a simplified step-by-step process to set up a blog.

  16. Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

    PubMed

    Delon, Sandra; Mackinnon, Blair

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.

  17. Ethics in Program Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    trading scandal , and a plethora of large corporate scandals involving companies like Enron , Tyco, and WorldCom. Troubling scandals have emerged...management Dr. Owen C. Gadeken The defense acquisition community, as well as society at large, seems to continually experience highly visible ethics scandals ...way they are led. It seems that every few years, the defense acquisition community is rocked by a highly visible ethics scandal . The latest involves Ms

  18. Program and Project Management Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Cassandra D.

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a framework and system architecture for integrating program and project management tools that may be applied consistently throughout Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to optimize planning, cost estimating, risk management, and project control. Project management methodology used in building interactive systems to accommodate the needs of the project managers is applied as a key component in assessing the usefulness and applicability of the framework and tools developed. Research for the project included investigation and analysis of industrial practices, KSC standards, policies, and techniques, Systems Management Office (SMO) personnel, and other documented experiences of project management experts. In addition, this project documents best practices derived from the literature as well as new or developing project management models, practices, and techniques.

  19. Meeting Abstracts - Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy Nexus 2017.

    PubMed

    2017-10-01

    The AMCP Abstracts program provides a forum through which authors can share their insights and outcomes of advanced managed care practice through publication in AMCP's Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy (JMCP). Abstracts that have been reviewed are published in the JMCP Meeting Abstracts supplement. Poster presentations for AMCP Nexus 2017 are scheduled for Wednesday, October 18, from 12:00 pm to 2:45 pm. For each poster, at least 1 author is available during the poster presentations to discuss findings. Posters will also be displayed on Tuesday, October 17, from 4:15 pm to 6:15 pm, during the opening night reception in the Exchange. The AMCP Nexus 2017 meeting in Dallas, Texas, is expected to attract more than 2,400 managed care pharmacists and other health care professionals who manage and evaluate drug therapies, develop and manage networks, and work with medical managers and information specialists to improve the care of all individuals enrolled in managed care programs.

  20. Models for Designing Long-Term Care Service Plans and Care Programs for Older People

    PubMed Central

    Tsuru, Satoko; Iizuka, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a system for providing appropriate long-term care services for older people is a national issue in Japan, and it will likely become a worldwide issue in the years to come. Under Japanese Long-term Care Insurance System, long-term care is provided based on long-term care programs, which were designed by care providers on the basis of long-term care service plans, which were designed by care managers. However, defined methodology for designing long-term care service plans and care programs has not been established yet. In this paper, we propose models for designing long-term care service plans and care programs for older people, both by incorporating the technical issues from previous studies and by redesigning the total methodology according to these studies. Our implementation model consists of “Function,” “Knowledge Structure,” and “Action Flow.” In addition, we developed the concrete knowledgebases based on the Knowledge Structure by visualizing, summarizing, and structuring the inherent knowledge of healthcare/welfare professionals. As the results of the workshop and retrospective verification, the adequacy of the models was suggested, while some further issues were pointed. Our models, knowledgebases, and application make it possible to ensure the quality of long-term care for older people. PMID:23589773

  1. A Standardized Certification Program for Case Managers Serving Frail Elderly Texans. Module III: Implementation, Monitoring, Reassessment & Care Plan Adjustment, Closure, and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusky, Richard A.; And Others

    This learning module is one of three training modules that were developed for members of the Texas Gerontological Consortium for Continuing Education to use in preparing case managers working in human service professions coordinating community-based programs for frail elderly Texans. Module III deals with the following topics: implementation (case…

  2. An Analysis of the Assessment of Glycated Hemoglobin Using A1cNow+™ Point-of-Care Device Compared to Central Laboratory Testing—an Important Addition to Pharmacist-Managed Diabetes Programs?

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    The diabetes epidemic is accelerating rapidly. If no progress is made in early detection, then early intervention and treatment-to-goal diabetes care will become an overwhelming burden on our health care system. Better utilization of self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes not on insulin could be achieved with regular review of hemoglobin A1c (A1C) values. Educating patients about the importance of diet, exercise, and medication compliance is enhanced when evidence of average blood glucose control can be presented to the patient directly. Affordable, accurate point-of-care testing of A1C with A1cNow+™ (Bayer HealthCare, Terrytown, NY) utilized in pharmacist-managed outpatient diabetes programs may prove to be an important clinical tool for improving patient outcomes and reducing the cost of the expanding diabetes epidemic. PMID:19885268

  3. Preliminary Data on a Care Coordination Program for Home Care Recipients.

    PubMed

    Dean, Katie M; Hatfield, Laura A; Jena, Anupam B; Cristman, David; Flair, Michael; Kator, Kylie; Nudd, Geoffrey; Grabowski, David C

    2016-09-01

    Home care recipients are often hospitalized for potentially avoidable reasons. A pilot program (Intervention in Home Care to Improve Health Outcomes (In-Home)) was designed to help home care providers identify acute clinical changes in condition and then manage the condition in the home and thereby avoid a costly hospitalization. Caregivers answer simple questions about the care recipient's condition during a telephone-based "clock-out" at the end of each shift. Responses are electronically captured in the agency management software that caregivers use to "clock-in," manage care, and "clock-out" on every shift. These are transmitted to the agency's care manager, who follows up on the change in condition and escalates appropriately. A description of the In-Home model is presented, and pilot data from 22 home care offices are reported. In the pilot, caregivers reported a change in condition after 2% of all shifts, representing an average of 1.9 changes per care recipient in a 6-month period. Changes in behavior and skin condition were the most frequently recorded domains. Interviews with participating caregivers and care managers suggested positive attitudes regarding the intervention; challenges included resistance to change on the part of home care staff and difficulties in applying a uniform intervention to individuals with varying needs in home care offices with varying capacities. In an ongoing randomized trial, the success of the overall program will be measured primarily according to the potential reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of home care recipients and the effect this potential reduction has on spending and healthcare outcomes.

  4. First German Disease Management Program for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    The first disease management program contract for breast cancer in Germany was signed in 2002 between the Association of Regional of Physicians in North-Rhine and the statutory health insurance companies in Rhineland. At the heart of this unique breast cancer disease management program is a patient-centered network of health care professionals. The program's main objectives are: (1) to improve the quality of treatment and post-operative care for breast cancer patients, (2) to provide timely information and consultation empowering the patient to participate in decisionmaking, (3) to improve the interface between inpatient and outpatient care, and (4) to increase the number of breast-conserving surgeries. PMID:17288079

  5. Prevention and Management of Infusion-Associated Reactions in the Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif(®) Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis (CARE-MS) Program.

    PubMed

    Caon, Christina; Namey, Marie; Meyer, Cathy; Mayer, Lori; Oyuela, Pedro; Margolin, David H; Rizzo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody approved in several countries for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This report summarizes the experience with infusion-associated reactions (IARs) in two phase 3 trials of alemtuzumab in RRMS and examines skilled nursing interventions in IAR prevention and management. In the Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif(®) Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis (CARE-MS) studies, patients with RRMS (treatment naive [CARE-MS I] or with inadequate response [defined as at least one relapse] to previous therapy [CARE-MS II]) received intravenous infusions of alemtuzumab 12 mg/day on 5 consecutive days at baseline and on 3 consecutive days 12 months later. Patients were monitored for IARs during and after each infusion. An IAR was defined as any adverse event occurring during any infusion or within 24 hours after infusion. The IARs affected 90.1% of patients receiving alemtuzumab. The most common IARs were headache, rash, pyrexia, nausea, and flushing; most were mild to moderate in severity. Management of IARs consisted of infusion interruption or rate reduction, pharmacologic therapies, and continual patient education and support. Medication administration before and during alemtuzumab infusion reduced IAR severity. Forty-five of 972 alemtuzumab-treated patients (4.6%) required interruption of the first treatment course (ie, infusions did not occur on consecutive days); of these, 24 (53.3%) were still able to complete the first and second full treatment courses. Nurses played an invaluable role in the detection and management of IARs in the CARE-MS studies. Best practices for management of IARs associated with alemtuzumab include patient and caregiver education, medication to lessen IAR severity, infusion monitoring, and discharge planning.

  6. Design and implementation of population-based specialty care programs.

    PubMed

    Botts, Sheila R; Gee, Michael T; Chang, Christopher C; Young, Iris; Saito, Logan; Lyman, Alfred E

    2017-09-15

    The development, implementation, and scaling of 3 population-based specialty care programs in a large integrated healthcare system are reviewed, and the role of clinical pharmacy services in ensuring safe, effective, and affordable care is highlighted. The Kaiser Permanente (KP) integrated healthcare delivery model allows for rapid development and expansion of innovative population management programs involving pharmacy services. Clinical pharmacists have assumed integral roles in improving the safety and effectiveness of high-complexity, high-cost care for specialty populations. These roles require an appropriate practice scope and are supported by an advanced electronic health record with disease registries and electronic surveillance tools for care-gap identification. The 3 specialty population programs described were implemented to address variation or unrecognized gaps in care for at-risk specialty populations. The Home Phototherapy Program has leveraged internal partnerships with clinical pharmacists to improve access to cost-effective nonpharmacologic interventions for psoriasis and other skin disorders. The Multiple Sclerosis Care Program has incorporated clinical pharmacists into neurology care in order to apply clinical guidelines in a systematic manner. The KP SureNet program has used clinical pharmacists and data analytics to identify opportunities to prevent drug-related adverse outcomes and ensure timely follow-up. Specialty care programs improve quality, cost outcomes, and the patient experience by appropriating resources to provide systematic and targeted care to high-risk patients. KP leverages an integration of people, processes, and technology to develop and scale population-based specialty care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Saranto, Kaija; Kinnunen, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process.

  8. Care coordination experiences of people with disabilities enrolled in medicaid managed care.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Anne; Owen, Randall; Heller, Tamar

    2017-10-01

    To understand the impact of experience and contacts with care coordinators on Medicaid Managed Care (MMC) enrollees with disabilities. Primary data was collected from a random sample of 6000 out of the 100,000 people with disabilities enrolled in one state's mandatory MMC program. Surveys were conducted through the mail, telephone, and Internet; 1041 surveys were completed. The sample used for analysis included 442 MMC enrollees who received care coordination. Regression analyses were conducted with the outcomes of number of unmet health care needs and enrollee appraisal of the health services they received. Race, age, gender, and disability variables controlled for demographic differences, and the independent variables included enrollee experience with a care coordinator (coordinator knowledge of enrollee medical history and whether the coordinator took into account enrollee wishes and input) and frequency of contact with a care coordinator. Positive enrollee experiences with care coordinators significantly related to more positive enrollee health service appraisals and fewer unmet health care needs; frequency of contact did not have any significant impacts. People with mental health disabilities and intellectual/developmental disabilities had significantly lower health service appraisals. People with mental health disabilities had significantly more unmet needs. Quality of care coordination, but not frequency of contact alone, is associated with better health outcomes for MMC enrollees. Implications for rehabilitation Care coordination is a core component of managed care and facilitates effective healthcare management for people with complex chronic conditions and disabilities. Better experiences with care coordinators is related to fewer unmet healthcare needs and more positive health care service appraisals for Medicaid managed care enrollees. The continuous development of person-centered care coordination strategies and training programs emphasizing quality

  9. Child Nutrition Programs: Child and Adult Care Food Program. Family Day Care Home Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This handbook details requirements for family day care homes in Oklahoma for providing child nutrition through the Child and Adult Care Food Program. The handbook includes contact information for state consultants. The basic responsibilities for sponsors of family day care home child nutrition programs are outlined, and the sponsoring organization…

  10. Evaluation of an intra-institutional diabetes disease management program for the glycemic control of elderly long-term care diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Wainstein, Julio; Marinov, Galina; Yarovoy, Alexandra; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2014-04-01

    Increasing numbers of nursing home elderly patients suffer from diabetes requiring individually optimized glycemic control. This is a complicated challenge because of their high comorbidity level, and heterogeneous and changing eating status varying from independent to dysphagia and enteral feeding. In order to cope with these complex needs, we developed and implemented a diabetes disease management program. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate this program. We used the point prevalence approach by checking for fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin and other routine biochemical tests. Eating status was evaluated by the Functional Outcome Swallowing Scale. Details about the diabetes disease management program are given in the text. A total of 86 (36%) of the 234 patients on the study day were diabetics. Of these, 80 were eligible for the study. Their mean fasting blood glucose was 143.1 ± 60.6 mg/dL. The mean glycated hemoglobin level was 7.23 ± 1.39%. No case of hypoglycemia was detected on the examination day, or during the preceding 3 weeks. No significant difference was found among the different Functional Outcome Swallowing Scale categories. These results are within satisfactory range for this category of patients suggesting that our diabetes disease management program contributes to a better glycemic control. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. Managed care and ethical conflicts: anything new?

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, C

    1999-01-01

    Does managed care represent the death knell for the ethical provision of medical care? Much of the current literature suggests as much. In this essay I argue that the types of ethical conflicts brought on by managed care are, in fact, similar to those long faced by physicians and by other professionals. Managed care presents new, but not fundamentally different, factors to be considered in medical decision making. I also suggest ways of better understanding and resolving these conflicts, in part by distinguishing among conflicts of interest, of bias and of obligation. PMID:10536762

  12. Primary care physicians’ experiences with case finding for practice-based care management

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Tobias; Wensing, Michel; Geißler, Stefan; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Mahler, Cornelia; Boyd, Cynthia M.; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Objective The identification of patients most likely to benefit from care management programs case finding – is a crucial determinant of their effectiveness regarding improved health outcomes and reduced costs. Until now, research has mainly focused on claims data-based case finding. This study aimed to explore how primary care physicians (PCPs) select patients for practice-based care management and how risk prediction may complement their case finding. Study design Qualitative study Methods We performed 12 semi-structured interviews with PCPs from 10 small- to middle-sized primary care practices in Germany. The interviews focused on their criteria for selecting patients as potential participants of an on-site care management program and how PCPs evaluate claims data-based risk prediction as a case finding tool. All interviews were transcribed verbatim. We performed qualitative content analysis using the ATLAS.ti software. Results Three major categories emerged from the physicians interviewed: 1) the physicians’ interpretation of the program’s eligibility criteria, 2) physician-related criteria and 3) patient-related criteria. The physician-related criteria included “sympathy/aversion” and “knowing the patient”. Patient-related criteria concerned care sensitivity in terms of “willingness to participate”, “ability to participate” (e.g. sufficient language skills, cognitive status) and “manageable care needs”. PCPs believed that their case finding can be supported by additional information from claims-data based risk prediction. Conclusions Case finding for care management programs in primary care may benefit from a structured approach combining clinical judgement by PCPs and claims-data based risk modelling. However, further research is needed to identify the optimal case finding strategy for practice-based care management. PMID:22554041

  13. Impact of Managed Care in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Mary Ann; Huffman, Nancy P.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the integration of health care and education in the schools with the advent of managed care. Effects of these changes, such as schools billing health care third-party payors and the expansion of speech language services to areas such as dysphagia and alternative/augmentative communication, are discussed. (DB)

  14. Impact of Managed Care in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Mary Ann; Huffman, Nancy P.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the integration of health care and education in the schools with the advent of managed care. Effects of these changes, such as schools billing health care third-party payors and the expansion of speech language services to areas such as dysphagia and alternative/augmentative communication, are discussed. (DB)

  15. Managing Complaints in Multilingual Care Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansson, Gunilla; Wadensjö, Cecilia; Plejert, Charlotta

    2017-01-01

    Troubles-telling and complaints are common in contexts of care for older people and need to be managed by care staff in a respectful manner. This paper examines the handling of an older person's complaints in multilingual care encounters that involve participants who do not share a common language. The data consist of video-recordings and…

  16. The impact of care management information technology model on quality of care after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: "Bridging the Divides".

    PubMed

    Weintraub, William S; Elliott, Daniel; Fanari, Zaher; Ostertag-Stretch, Jennifer; Muther, Ann; Lynahan, Margaret; Kerzner, Roger; Salam, Tabassum; Scherrer, Herbert; Anderson, Sharon; Russo, Carla A; Kolm, Paul; Steinberg, Terri H

    2017-06-21

    Reducing readmissions and improving metrics of care are a national priority. Supplementing traditional care with care management may improve outcomes. The Bridges program was an initial evaluation of a care management platform (CareLinkHub), supported by information technology (IT) developed to improve the quality and transition of care from hospital to home after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery (CABG) and reduce readmissions. CareLink is comprised of care managers, patient navigators, pharmacists and physicians. Information to guide care management is guided by a middleware layer to gather information, PLR (ColdLight Solutions, LLC) and presented to CareLink staff on a care management platform, Aerial™ (Medecision). In addition there is an analytic engine to help evaluate and guide care, Neuron™ (Coldlight Solutions, LLC). The "Bridges" program enrolled a total of 716 CABG patients with 850 admissions from April 2013 through March 2015. The data of the program was compared with those of 1111 CABG patients with 1203 admissions in the 3years prior to the program. No impact was seen with respect to readmissions, Blood Pressure or LDL control. There was no significant improvement in patients' reported outcomes using either the CTM-3 or any of the SAQ-7 scores. Patient follow-up with physicians within 1week of discharge improved during the Bridges years. The CareLink hub platform was successfully implemented. Little or no impact on outcome metrics was seen in the short follow-up time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Can disease management reduce health care costs by improving quality?

    PubMed

    Fireman, Bruce; Bartlett, Joan; Selby, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Disease management (DM) promises to achieve cost savings by improving the quality of care for chronic diseases. During the past decade the Permanente Medical Group in Northern California has implemented extensive DM programs. Examining quality indicators, utilization, and costs for 1996-2002 for adults with four conditions, we find evidence of substantial quality improvement but not cost savings. The causal pathway--from improved care to reduced morbidity to cost savings--has not produced sufficient savings to offset the rising costs of improved care. We conclude that the rationale for DM programs, like the rationale for any medical treatments, should rest on their effectiveness and value.

  18. Negotiating in a managed care world.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Barbara F; Roettele, Steve

    2005-10-01

    Medical managed care, once thought to be a passing influence affecting large urban markets only, has proven to be a dominating factor in virtually every medical practice in the country. Discounted rates, steerage, utilization management, pay for performance, and other managed care strategies are likely to be a provider's reality for the foreseeable future. It is imperative that physicians develop negotiating skills and educate themselves about how to negotiate not only rates but also the other components discussed herein that ultimately determine the economic viability of a managed care agreement.

  19. Managed care and the nurse's ethical obligations to patients.

    PubMed

    Erlen, J A; Mellors, M P

    1995-01-01

    The goal of managed care is to control health care costs by such means as keeping people healthy and decreasing the length of hospital stays. This change in health care delivery has resulted in work redesign programs, lay-offs, cross-training, and the use of an increasing number of nonprofessional care providers. The challenge for nursing, as a result of these changes, is how to fulfill its obligations of fidelity and due care. The authors discuss these ethical responsibilities and the impact that managed care is having on the fiduciary relationship between nurse and patient. Four strategies that nurses can use to fulfill their obligations include engaging in personal reflection, communicating and collaborating, protecting patient's rights, and evaluating patient outcomes.

  20. WeCareAdvisor™: The Development of a Caregiver-focused, Web-based Program to Assess and Manage Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia.

    PubMed

    Kales, Helen C; Gitlin, Laura N; Stanislawski, Barbara; Marx, Katherine; Turnwald, Molly; Watkins, Daphne C; Lyketsos, Constantine G

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are nearly universal in dementia and associated with multiple negative outcomes. Current real-world management is largely pharmacologic, despite poor risk/benefit. The WeCareAdvisor was designed to enable family caregivers to assess, manage, and track BPSD using nonpharmacologic strategies. In-depth qualitative data were collected from family caregivers of people with dementia to inform: (1) style of approach and "look and feel" of the tool, and (2) the types of psychoeducation most needed by caregivers. We conducted 4 focus groups and a technology survey (n=26) as well as additional individual semistructured interviews (n=12) with family caregivers. Main themes of the qualitative work included: (1) need to minimize difficulty and training time; (2) importance of "one-stop shopping" for information; and (3) necessity for information to be tailored to the caregiver and person with dementia. This information was then combined with effective existing evidence-based behavioral strategies to create a web-based tailored caregiver-support tool. The WeCareAdvisor was designed with input on functionality and content by end-users, family caregivers. The randomized controlled trial of WeCareAdvisor will test whether the tool improves outcomes including caregiver upset and burden and frequency and severity of BPSD.

  1. A pilot randomized control trial to evaluate the feasibility of an Internet-based self-management and transitional care program for youth with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Breakey, V R; Ignas, D M; Warias, A V; White, M; Blanchette, V S; Stinson, J N

    2014-11-01

    Adolescents with haemophilia must assume responsibility for their health and management of their disease. An online self-management program was developed to support adolescents during this transition. To determine the feasibility of the program using a randomized control trial (RCT) design in terms of accrual/attrition rates, willingness to be randomized, compliance with the program/outcome measures and satisfaction. Adolescents, ages 13-18, were enrolled in a pilot RCT (NCT01477437) and randomized to either the intervention (8-week program with telephone coaching) or the control arm (no access to the website, weekly telephone call as attention-strategy). All participants completed pre/post-outcome measures. Twenty-nine teens participated (intervention n = 16, control n = 13). Participants in the intervention arm spent an average of 50 min on the website per week and completed the modules in an average of 14 weeks (SD = 4.9). Attrition was higher in the control group compared to the intervention group (54% vs. 25%). 17/18 (94%) who completed the program also completed the poststudy measures. Teens on the intervention arm showed significant improvement in disease-specific knowledge (P = 0.004), self-efficacy (P = 0.007) and transition preparedness (P = 0.046). There was a statistically significant improvement in knowledge in the intervention group when compared to the control group (P = 0.01). Overall, the teens found the website to be informative, comprehensive and easy to use and were satisfied with the program. This pilot RCT study suggests benefit to the program and indicates an RCT design to be feasible with minor adjustments to the protocol.

  2. NASA's management concept for the Space Shuttle Program.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the Shuttle Program organization and management concepts suggests the necessity of careful measurements of contractor schedules, cost and technical performance, and program modification control to keep both the development and operating cost of the Program at the lowest possible level. Maximum use of the contractors' own management systems and the utilization of new technologies, procedures and materials during space operations are also envisaged as contributors to the reduction of costs per flight to acceptable limits.

  3. Hazardous Materials Management Program Report- 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2005-06-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Hazardous Materials Management Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  4. Management strategies for palliative care: promoting quality, growth and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Herbst, L H; Cetti, J

    2001-01-01

    Over 20 years ago, hospice in the United States evolved to provide end-of-life care for terminally ill patients. However, three major barriers exist, which limit access to hospice care. The first two, cultural and regulatory barriers, are not under the direct control of hospices, although programs can be adapted to minimize their influence. The third, management focus, is controlled by hospice programs and has the greatest influence on access to care and quality of care. Under the influence of the Medicare Hospice Benefit and the peer pressure of managed care, many hospice programs use reimbursability as at least one criterion for determination of coverage of services. The fear is that limited reimbursement will cause some services and therapies to bring the programs to financial ruin. This case study shows the outcome of changing management focus away from restrictive policies about therapies and patient selection toward management of productivity and working capital. Some programs have contributed to growth and stability; the revenue thus produced has supported the new innovations. San Diego Hospice is now growing more than 30 percent per year in spite of competition and a fairly flat death rate in the community. This growth is attributed to finding and meeting unmet needs and making all decisions based on the right thing to do. Every staff member understands and supports the mission. The many programs within the agency contribute to fulfillment of the goal to transform end-of-life care. They are presented here as an example of what can be done with mission-based management.

  5. Indoor Air Quality Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Annapolis, MD.

    In an effort to provide Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) management guidance, Anne Arundel County Public Schools was selected by the Maryland State Department of Education to develop a program that could be used by other school systems. A major goal was to produce a handbook that was "user friendly." Hence, its contents are a mix of history,…

  6. Indoor Air Quality Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Annapolis, MD.

    In an effort to provide Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) management guidance, Anne Arundel County Public Schools was selected by the Maryland State Department of Education to develop a program that could be used by other school systems. A major goal was to produce a handbook that was "user friendly." Hence, its contents are a mix of history,…

  7. Using systems science for population health management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Kong, Nan; Lawley, Mark A; Pagán, José A

    2014-10-01

    Population health management is becoming increasingly important to organizations managing and providing primary care services given ongoing changes in health care delivery and payment systems. The objective of this study is to show how systems science methodologies could be incorporated into population health management to compare different interventions and improve health outcomes. The New York Academy of Medicine Cardiovascular Health Simulation model (an agent-based model) and data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to evaluate a lifestyle program that could be implemented in primary care practice settings. The program targeted Medicare-age adults and focused on improving diet and exercise and reducing weight. The simulation results suggest that there would be significant reductions projected in the proportion of the Medicare-age population with diabetes after the implementation of the proposed lifestyle program for a relatively long term (3 and 5 years). Similar results were found for the subpopulations with high cholesterol, but the proposed intervention would not have a significant effect in the proportion of the population with hypertension over a time period of <5 years. Systems science methodologies can be useful to compare the health outcomes of different interventions. These tools can become an important component of population health management because they can help managers and other decision makers evaluate alternative programs in primary care settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. The effect of managed care on the incomes of primary care and specialty physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, C J; Dranove, D; White, W D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of managed care growth on the incomes of primary care and specialist physicians. DATA SOURCES: Data on physician income and managed care penetration from the American Medical Association, Socioeconomic Monitoring System (SMS) Surveys for 1985 and 1993. We use secondary data from the Area Resource File and U.S. Census publications to construct geographical socioeconomic control variables, and we examine data from the National Residency Matching Program. STUDY DESIGN: Two-stage least squares regressions are estimated to determine the effect of local managed care penetration on specialty-specific physician incomes, while controlling for factors associated with local variation in supply and demand and accounting for the potential endogeneity of managed care penetration. DATA COLLECTION: The SMS survey is an annual telephone survey conducted by the American Medical Association of approximately one percent of nonfederal, post-residency U.S. physicians. Response rates average 60-70 percent, and analysis is weighted to account for nonresponse bias. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The incomes of primary care physicians rose most rapidly in states with higher managed care growth, while the income growth of hospital-based specialists was negatively associated with managed care growth. Incomes of medical subspecialists were not significantly affected by managed care growth over this period. These findings are consistent with trends in postgraduate training choices of new physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence is consistent with a relative increase in the demand for primary care physicians and a decline in the demand for some specialists under managed care. Market adjustments have important implications for health policy and physician workforce planning. PMID:9685122

  9. University Medical Care Programs: Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densen, Paul M.; And Others

    The increasing number of medical centers involved in collaborative and innovative health services in the community is but one reflection of social concerns and pressures for change in the health care system. Medical schools and their affiliated teaching hospitals are trying in various ways to adapt their teaching, research, and service functions…

  10. MIGRANT DAY CARE PROGRAM, 1961.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NAYLOR, NAOMI L.

    WITH THE COOPERATION OF VARIOUS COMMUNITY AGENCIES AND WITH FEDERAL AID FROM THE PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT, SEVERAL MIGRANT CHILD CARE CENTERS WERE ESTABLISHED BY PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY IN THE CENTRAL PART OF THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA. STAFFS WERE COMPOSED OF DIRECTORS AND EXPERIENCED TEACHERS FROM PRESCHOOL AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION.…

  11. Integrated, automated revenue management for managed care contracts.

    PubMed

    Burckhart, Kent

    2002-04-01

    Faced with increasing managed care penetration and declining net revenue in recent years, healthcare providers increasingly are emphasizing revenue management. To streamline processes and reduce costs in this area, many healthcare providers have implemented or are considering automated contract management systems. When selecting such a system, healthcare financial managers should make certain that the system can interface with both patient-accounting and decision-support systems of the organization. This integration enhances a healthcare provider's financial viability by providing integrated revenue-management capabilities to analyze projected performance of proposed managed care contracts and actual performance of existing contracts.

  12. Developing a strategic marketing plan for physical and occupational therapy services: a collaborative project between a critical access hospital and a graduate program in health care management.

    PubMed

    Kash, Bita A; Deshmukh, A A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a marketing plan for the Physical and Occupational Therapy (PT/OT) department at a Critical Access Hospital (CAH). We took the approach of understanding and analyzing the rural community and health care environment, problems faced by the PT/OT department, and developing a strategic marketing plan to resolve those problems. We used hospital admissions data, public and physician surveys, a SWOT analysis, and tools to evaluate alternative strategies. Lack of awareness and negative perception were key issues. Recommended strategies included building relationships with physicians, partnering with the school district, and enhancing the wellness program.

  13. Economic and ethical considerations in managed care.

    PubMed

    Howard, C; Phou, A; Spann, J

    1997-01-01

    The growth of managed care has had a significant impact on the way hospitals provide medical services, the relationships between hospitals and physicians, and the relationships between providers and patients. This impact arises primarily from the economic constraints that managed care places on the provider. As hospital employees or contractors, and as consumers of health care services, clinical engineering personnel need to understand the effects of managed care on the hospital and the physician. Beyond general information, this knowledge can play a useful role in understanding the impact of managed care on the acquisition and use of medical technology, and the increasing role that clinical engineering can play in guiding investment in, use and maintenance of hospital medical equipment. Ironically, this potential for increased value occurs at a time when clinical engineering services and departments themselves are under increased scrutiny for their more measurable costs and value.

  14. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be a... knowledge and skills necessary to manage care requirements in the home. Adult day health care is principally... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for...

  15. Caring for children with special healthcare needs in the managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Michelle R; Diehl-Svrjcek, Beth; Dunbar, Linda J

    2006-01-01

    Dramatic medical and technological advances over the past 15 years have resulted in the survival into adulthood of children with chronic health conditions. As this population subset has increased, the demand of caring for these children in the managed care arena has become challenging from a clinical, fiscal, and member satisfaction perspective. A disease management program was designed for children, ages birth through age 18, identified as having special needs at the time of birth or at any point throughout childhood related to disease processes such as diabetes, sickle cell disease, genetic aberrations, or the multiple complications of extreme prematurity. Components of the program included identification of the population, coordinated risk assessment, and ongoing case management interventions. Most important, outcome indicators were tracked to demonstrate program effectiveness. The formulation and function of a dedicated disease management database is also discussed.

  16. No exodus: physicians and managed care networks.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ann S; Reschovsky, James D

    2006-05-01

    After remaining stable since 1996-97, the percentage of U.S. physicians who do not contract with managed care plans rose from 9.2 percent in 2000-01 to 11.5 percent in 2004-05, according to a national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). While physicians have not left managed care networks in large numbers, this small but statistically significant increase could signal a trend toward greater out-of-pocket costs for patients and a decline in patient access to physicians. The increase in physicians without managed care contracts was broad-based across specialties and other physician and practice characteristics. Compared with physicians who have one or more managed care contracts, physicians without managed care contracts are more likely to have practiced for more than 20 years, work part time, lack board certification, practice solo or in two-physician groups, and live in the western United States. The study also found substantial variation in the proportion of physicians without managed care contracts across communities, suggesting that local market conditions influence decisions to contract with managed care plans.

  17. Managed Care, Professional Autonomy, and Income

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Jeffrey J; Hargraves, J Lee; Reed, Marie; Vratil, Alison

    2001-01-01

    CONTEXT Career satisfaction among physicians is a topic of importance to physicians in practice, physicians in training, health system administrators, physician organization executives, and consumers. The level of career satisfaction derived by physicians from their work is a basic yet essential element in the functioning of the health care system. OBJECTIVE To examine the degree to which professional autonomy, compensation, and managed care are determinants of career satisfaction among physicians. DESIGN Cross-sectional analysis using data from 1996–97 Community Tracking Study physician telephone survey. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS A nationally representative sample of 12,385 direct patient care physicians. The survey response rate was 65%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Overall career satisfaction among U.S. physicians. RESULTS Bivariate results show that physicians with low managed care revenues are significantly more likely to be “very satisfied” than are physicians with high managed care revenue (P < .05), and that physicians with low managed care revenues are significantly more likely to report higher levels of clinical freedom than are physicians with high managed care revenue (P < .05). Multivariate analyses demonstrate that, among our measures, traditional core professional values and autonomy are the most important determinants of career satisfaction after controlling for all other factors. Relative income is also an important independent predictor. Multiple dimensions of professional autonomy hold up as strong, independent predictors of career satisfaction, while the effect of managed care does not. Managed care appears to exert its effect on satisfaction through its impact on professional autonomy, not through income reduction. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that when managed care (or other influences) erode professional autonomy, the result is a highly negative impact on physician career satisfaction. PMID:11679035

  18. Strategic security management: risk assessments in the environment of care.

    PubMed

    Vellani, Karim H

    2006-01-01

    Securing the environment of care is a challenging and continuous effort for most healthcare security managers, who face unique challenges in balancing the open campus environment with the protection needs of the hospital's patients, employees, and other assets. By conducting a comprehensive risk assessment, hospital security managers can prioritize identified risks, develop an effective hospital security program, and reduce risk to a manageable and acceptable level. This article discusses a 5-step risk assessment process that enhances the hospital security program by effectively mitigating risks to the hospital.

  19. Managed care in four managed competition OECD health systems.

    PubMed

    Shmueli, Amir; Stam, Piet; Wasem, Jürgen; Trottmann, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Managed care emerged in the American health system in the 1980s as a way to manage suppliers' induced demand and to contain insurers' costs. While in Israel the health insurers have always been managed care organizations, owning health care facilities, employing medical personnel or contracting selectively with independent providers, European insurers have been much more passive, submitting themselves to collective agreements between insurers' and providers' associations, accompanied by extensive government regulation of prices, quantities, and budgets. With the 1990s reforms, and the introduction of risk-adjusted "managed competition", a growing pressure to allow the European insurers to manage their own care - including selective contracting with providers - has emerged, with varying speed of the introduction of policy changes across the individual countries. This paper compares experiences with managed care in Israel, The Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland since the 1990s. After a brief description of the health insurance markets in the four countries, we focus comparatively on the emergence of managed care in the markets for ambulatory care and inpatient market care. We conclude with an evaluation of the current situation and a discussion of selected health policy issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [The hospital perspective: disease management and integrated health care].

    PubMed

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2003-06-01

    Disease Management is a transsectoral, population-based form of health care, which addresses groups of patients with particular clinical entities and risk factors. It refers both to an evidence-based knowledge base and corresponding guidelines, evaluates outcome as a continuous quality improvement process and usually includes active participation of patients. In Germany, the implementation of disease management is associated with financial transactions for risk adjustment between health care assurances [para. 137 f, Book V of Social Code (SGB V)] and represents the second kind of transsectoral care, besides a program designed as integrated health care according to para. 140 a ff f of Book V of Social Code. While in the USA and other countries disease management programs are made available by several institutions involved in health care, in Germany these programs are offered by health care insurers. Assessment of disease management from the hospital perspective will have to consider three questions: How large is the risk to compensate inadequate quality in outpatient care? Are there synergies in internal organisational development? Can the risk of inadequate funding of the global "integrated" budget be tolerated? Transsectoral quality assurance by valid performance indicators and implementation of a quality improvement process are essential. Internal organisational changes can be supported, particularly in the case of DRG introduction. The economic risk and financial output depends on the kind of disease being focussed by the disease management program. In assessing the underlying scientific evidence of their cost effectiveness, societal costs will have to be precisely differentiated from hospital-associated costs.

  1. Developing an Information and Records Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Juli G.; Kartis, Alexia M.

    1984-01-01

    The need for information controls for college records management programs and the elements of program organization, planning, and management are discussed. Conditions at institutions that indicate a flaw in information control are identified, along with the benefits of a sound records management program. The management of an information and…

  2. Sport Management Graduate Programs: Characteristics of Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ming; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the characteristics that enable graduate sport management programs to achieve their objectives. Surveys of sport management educators found they agreed on 11 characteristics that indicated a sport management program's effectiveness. Respondents believed an effective program should produce sport managers, not…

  3. Developing an Information and Records Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Juli G.; Kartis, Alexia M.

    1984-01-01

    The need for information controls for college records management programs and the elements of program organization, planning, and management are discussed. Conditions at institutions that indicate a flaw in information control are identified, along with the benefits of a sound records management program. The management of an information and…

  4. Risk Management Programs for Defense Acquisition Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The audit objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of risk management programs for Defense acquisition systems. Specifically, we determined whether DoD risk management policies and procedures for Defense acquisition systems were effectively implemented and what impact risk management programs bad on reducing program risks and costs. We also reviewed management controls as they applied to the audit objectives.

  5. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This new collection of papers on aerospace management issues contains a history of NASA program and project management, some lessons learned in the areas of management and budget from the Space Shuttle Program, an analysis of tools needed to keep large multilayer programs organized and on track, and an update of resources for NASA managers. A wide variety of opinions and techniques are presented.

  6. Making It Local: Beacon Communities Use Health Information Technology to Optimize Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Amy; Des Jardins, Terrisca R.; Heider, Arvela; Kanger, Chatrian R.; Lobach, David F.; McWilliams, Lee; Polello, Jennifer M.; Schachter, Abigail A.; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Tulikangas, Megan C.; Turske, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Care management aims to provide cost-effective, coordinated, non-duplicative care to improve care quality, population health, and reduce costs. The 17 communities receiving funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology through the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program are leaders in building and strengthening their health information technology (health IT) infrastructure to provide more effective and efficient care management. This article profiles 6 Beacon Communities' health IT-enabled care management programs, highlighting the influence of local context on program strategy and design, and describing challenges, lessons learned, and policy implications for care delivery and payment reform. The unique needs (eg, disease burden, demographics), community partnerships, and existing resources and infrastructure all exerted significant influence on the overall priorities and design of each community's care management program. Though each Beacon Community needed to engage in a similar set of care management tasks—including patient identification, stratification, and prioritization; intervention; patient engagement; and evaluation—the contextual factors helped shape the specific strategies and tools used to carry out these tasks and achieve their objectives. Although providers across the country are striving to deliver standardized, high-quality care, the diverse contexts in which this care is delivered significantly influence the priorities, strategies, and design of community-based care management interventions. Gaps and challenges in implementing effective community-based care management programs include: optimizing allocation of care management services; lack of available technology tailored to care management needs; lack of standards and interoperability; integrating care management into care settings; evaluating impact; and funding and sustainability. (Population Health Management 2014;17:149–158) PMID

  7. Managed health care companies' lobbying frenzy.

    PubMed

    Watzman, N; Woodall, P

    1995-01-01

    The top dozen national managed health care companies and two industry trade groups spent at least $2,023,041 on lobbying expenses and campaign contributions to key lawmakers during last year's health care debate, according to an analysis of Federal Election Commission data and federal lobbying disclosure forms. Five of the top six spenders are large insurance companies that are rapidly transferring their business from traditional indemnity insurance to HMOs. Over half--52 percent--of campaign donations from the top managed care companies' and trade associations' PACs and employees went to members sitting on the five Congressional committees with jurisdiction over health care reform.

  8. Perils of Pioneering: Monitoring Medicaid Managed Care

    PubMed Central

    Wooldridge, Judith; Hoag, Sheila D.

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews Federal and State oversight of section 1115 Medicaid managed care demonstrations in Hawaii, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Tennessee from 1994 to 1998. Under Medicaid managed care, the Federal Government and States have had to shift their focus and resources into oversight functions that barely existed in fee-for-service (FFS) Medicaid. We find that managed care monitoring was slow to begin and not always adequate in these demonstrations. While State and Federal monitoring have improved over time, monitoring is not yet at the point of ensuring access and quality. PMID:12500321

  9. Future developments in health care performance management

    PubMed Central

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. PMID:24255600

  10. Strategic renegotiation of managed care contracts.

    PubMed

    Scotti, D J; Gregory, D A

    2001-11-01

    Given the myriad revenue and cost pressures faced by today's organizational providers, it behooves healthcare financial managers to identify opportunities to improve the terms of their managed care agreements when renewal time is near. Selection of a contract renegotiation strategy should be preceded by a focused analysis of situational variables and followed by conscientious performance monitoring. Through careful consideration of the compatibility to their goals, core values, and operational capabilities, healthcare providers and managed care organizations can craft agreements with the potential for sustaining meaningful long-term partnerships.

  11. Building an Outpatient Kidney Palliative Care Clinical Program.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Jennifer S; Wright, Rebecca; Blaum, Caroline S; Wall, Stephen P

    2017-08-09

    A diagnosis of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), or end stage renal disease (ESRD) represents a significant life change for patients and families. Individuals often experience high symptom burden, decreased quality of life, increased health care utilization, and end-of-life care discordant with their preferences. Early integration of palliative care with standard nephrology practice in the outpatient setting has the potential to improve quality of life through provision of expert symptom management, emotional support, and facilitation of advance care planning that honors the individual's values and goals. This special report describes application of participatory action research (PAR) methods to develop an outpatient integrated nephrology and palliative care program. Stakeholder concerns were thematically analyzed to inform translation of a known successful model of outpatient kidney palliative care to a practice in a large, urban medical center in the United States. Stakeholder needs and challenges to meeting these needs were identified. We uncovered a shared understanding of the clinical need for palliative care services in nephrology practice, but apprehension towards practice change. Action steps to modify the base model were created in response to stakeholder feedback. The development of a model of care that provides a new approach to clinical practice requires attention to relevant stakeholder concerns. PAR is a useful methodological approach that engages stakeholders and builds partnerships. This creation of shared ownership can facilitate innovation and practice change. We synthesized stakeholder concerns to build a conceptual model for an integrated nephrology and palliative care clinical program. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Managing the body work of home care.

    PubMed

    England, Kim; Dyck, Isabel

    2011-02-01

    Body work is a key element of home healthcare. Recent restructuring of health and social care services means the home is increasingly a key site of long-term care. While there is a growing literature on the social dynamics between care recipients and their family caregivers, less is known about the formal work dynamic between paid care workers and care recipients and family caregivers. Drawing on interview data from an Ontario-based study of long-term home care, we explore how body work is negotiated through the embodied practices of care in the home and through care relationships associated with home care. In particular we focus on how the practices of intimate body care (such as bathing, toileting, and catheter management) show the diverse dynamics of care work through which caregivers, care recipients and homespace are constituted. We argue that the practices of care are shaped by a complex interweaving of regulatory mechanisms associated with home care along with the physical and affective dimensions of intimate body work. In turn this suggests the need for new ways of understanding body work in contemporary landscapes of care.

  13. Using care plans to better manage multimorbidity.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Mark Aj; Coates, Michael J; Dunbar, James A

    2015-01-01

    The health care for patients having two or more long-term medical conditions is fragmented between specialists, allied health professionals, and general practitioners (GPs), each keeping separate medical records. There are separate guidelines for each disease, making it difficult for the GP to coordinate care. The TrueBlue model of collaborative care to address key problems in managing patients with multimorbidity in general practice previously reported outcomes on the management of multimorbidities. We report on the care plan for patients with depression, diabetes, and/or coronary heart disease that was embedded in the TrueBlue study. A care plan was designed around diabetes, coronary heart disease, and depression management guidelines to prompt implementation of best practices and to provide a single document for information from multiple sources. It was used in the TrueBlue trial undertaken by 400 patients (206 intervention and 194 control) from 11 Australian general practices in regional and metropolitan areas. Practice nurses and GPs successfully used the care plan to achieve the guideline-recommended checks for almost all patients, and successfully monitored depression scores and risk factors, kept pathology results up to date, and identified patient priorities and goals. Clinical outcomes improved compared with usual care. The care plan was used successfully to manage and prioritise multimorbidity. Downstream implications include improving efficiency in patient management, and better health outcomes for patients with complex multimorbidities.

  14. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168 Section 440.168 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.168...

  15. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Portfolio Management 2008

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for program portfolio management, including the program portfolio management process, program analysis, performance assessment, stakeholder interactions, and cross-cutting issues.

  16. Association Between Health Plan Exit From Medicaid Managed Care and Quality of Care, 2006-2014.

    PubMed

    Ndumele, Chima D; Schpero, William L; Schlesinger, Mark J; Trivedi, Amal N

    2017-06-27

    State Medicaid programs have increasingly contracted with insurers to provide medical care services for enrollees (Medicaid managed care plans). Insurers that provide these plans can exit Medicaid programs each year, with unclear effects on quality of care and health care experiences. To determine the frequency and interstate variation of health plan exit from Medicaid managed care and evaluate the relationship between health plan exit and market-level quality. Retrospective cohort of all comprehensive Medicaid managed care plans (N = 390) during the interval 2006-2014. Plan exit, defined as the withdrawal of a managed care plan from a state's Medicaid program. Eight measures from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set were used to construct 3 composite indicators of quality (preventive care, chronic disease care management, and maternity care). Four measures from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems were combined into a composite indicator of patient experience, reflecting the proportion of beneficiaries rating experiences as 8 or above on a 0-to-10-point scale. Outcome data were available for 248 plans (68% of plans operating prior to 2014, representing 78% of beneficiaries). Of the 366 comprehensive Medicaid managed care plans operating prior to 2014, 106 exited Medicaid. These exiting plans enrolled 4 848 310 Medicaid beneficiaries, with a mean of 606 039 beneficiaries affected by plan exits annually. Six states had a mean of greater than 10% of Medicaid managed care recipients enrolled in plans that exited, whereas 10 states experienced no plan exits. Plans that exited from a state's Medicaid market performed significantly worse prior to exiting than those that remained in terms of preventive care (57.5% vs 60.4%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, 0.3% to 5.5%]), maternity care (69.7% vs 73.6%; difference, 3.8% [95% CI, 1.7% to 6.0%]), and patient experience (73.5% vs 74.8%; difference, 1.3% [95% CI, 0.6% to 1

  17. Chronic disease management in primary care: from evidence to policy.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Sarah M; Zwar, Nicholas; Griffiths, Rhonda; Roland, Martin; Hasan, Iqbal; Powell Davies, Gawaine; Harris, Mark

    2008-04-21

    To review the effectiveness of chronic disease management interventions for physical health problems in the primary care setting, and to identify policy options for implementing successful interventions in Australian primary care. We conducted a systematic review with qualitative data synthesis, using the Chronic Care Model as a framework for analysis between January 1990 and February 2006. Interventions were classified according to which elements were addressed: community resources, health care organisation, self-management support, delivery system design, decision support and/or clinical information systems. Our major findings were discussed with policymakers and key stakeholders in relation to current and emerging health policy in Australia. The interventions most likely to be effective in the context of Australian primary care were engaging primary care in self-management support through education and training for general practitioners and practice nurses, and including self-management support in care plans linked to multidisciplinary team support. The current Practice Incentives Payment and Service Incentives Payment programs could be improved and simplified to encourage guideline-based chronic disease management, integrating incentives so that individual patients are not managed as if they had a series of separate chronic diseases. The use of chronic disease registers should be extended across a range of chronic illnesses and used to facilitate audit for quality improvement. Training should focus on clear roles and responsibilities of the team members. The Chronic Care Model provides a useful framework for understanding the impact of chronic disease management interventions and highlights the gaps in evidence. Consultation with stakeholders and policymakers is valuable in shaping policy options to support the implementation of the National Chronic Disease Strategy in primary care.

  18. Overview of the Tribal Waste Management Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA’s Tribal Waste Management Program encourages environmentally sound waste management practices that promote resource conservation through recycling, recovery, reduction, clean up, and elimination of waste.

  19. Principal's Preparation Program: Managing the Learning Environment Using ELCC Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tubbs, J. Eric; Heard, Michael S.; Epps, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    School principals need to be well prepared to manage school facilities assigned to their care. Educational leadership programs can make best use of the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) Standards to develop a course of study to address school facility management issues. Every standard has its facility implications that lead to…

  20. Negotiating the new health system: purchasing publicly accountable managed care.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, S

    1998-04-01

    The transformation to managed care is one of the most important and complex changes ever to take place in the American health system. One key aspect of this transformation is its implications for public health policy and practice. Both public and private buyers purchase managed care; increasingly, public programs that used to act as their own insurers (i.e., Medicare, Medicaid and CHAMPUS) are purchasing large quantities of managed care insurance from private companies. The transformation to managed care is altering the manner in which public health policy makers conceive of and carry out public health activities (particularly activities that involve the provision of personal health services). The degree to which managed care changes public health and in turn is altered by public health will depend in great measure on the extent to which public and private policy makers understand the implications of their choices for various aspects of public health and take steps to address them. Because both publicly and privately managed care arrangements are relatively deregulated, much of the dialogue between public health and managed care purchasers can be expected to take place within the context of the large service agreements that are negotiated between buyers and sellers of managed care products. This is particularly true for Medicaid because of the importance of Medicaid coverage, payment and access policies to public health policy makers, and because of the public nature of the Medicaid contracting process. A nationwide study of Medicaid managed care contracts offers the first detailed analysis of the content and structure of managed care service agreements and the public health issues they raise. Four major findings emerge from a review of the contracts. First, most of the agreements fail to address key issues regarding which Medicaid-covered services and benefits are the contractor's responsibility and which remain the residual responsibility of the state agency

  1. Making it local: Beacon Communities use health information technology to optimize care management.

    PubMed

    Allen, Amy; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Heider, Arvela; Kanger, Chatrian R; Lobach, David F; McWilliams, Lee; Polello, Jennifer M; Rein, Alison L; Schachter, Abigail A; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Tulikangas, Megan C; Turske, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    Care management aims to provide cost-effective, coordinated, non-duplicative care to improve care quality, population health, and reduce costs. The 17 communities receiving funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology through the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program are leaders in building and strengthening their health information technology (health IT) infrastructure to provide more effective and efficient care management. This article profiles 6 Beacon Communities' health IT-enabled care management programs, highlighting the influence of local context on program strategy and design, and describing challenges, lessons learned, and policy implications for care delivery and payment reform. The unique needs (eg, disease burden, demographics), community partnerships, and existing resources and infrastructure all exerted significant influence on the overall priorities and design of each community's care management program. Though each Beacon Community needed to engage in a similar set of care management tasks--including patient identification, stratification, and prioritization; intervention; patient engagement; and evaluation--the contextual factors helped shape the specific strategies and tools used to carry out these tasks and achieve their objectives. Although providers across the country are striving to deliver standardized, high-quality care, the diverse contexts in which this care is delivered significantly influence the priorities, strategies, and design of community-based care management interventions. Gaps and challenges in implementing effective community-based care management programs include: optimizing allocation of care management services; lack of available technology tailored to care management needs; lack of standards and interoperability; integrating care management into care settings; evaluating impact; and funding and sustainability.

  2. Labor characteristics and program costs of a successful diabetes disease management program.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Russell L; So, Stephanie A; Shin, John; Malone, Robert M; Bryant, Betsy; Dewalt, Darren A; Pignone, Michael P; Dittus, Robert S

    2006-05-01

    Organizations have invested in disease management programs to improve quality and to reduce costs, but little is known about the labor characteristics and the program costs necessary to implement a program. To examine the labor characteristics and the program costs of a successful diabetes disease management program. We performed a labor and cost analysis within a randomized controlled trial of a primary care-based diabetes disease management intervention. Participants included 217 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and poor glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin levels, > or = 8.0%). The intervention group received 12 months of intensive management from clinical pharmacists and a diabetes care coordinator who provided education, applied algorithms for medication management, and addressed barriers to care. The control group attended a single session led by pharmacists, followed by usual care from their primary providers. The process outcomes included the number of patient care-related activities, time spent per patient, and number of drug titrations or additions. The program costs were calculated based on Bureau of Labor Statistics wage data using a sensitivity analysis. The disease management team performed a mean of 4.0 care-related activities for a mean of 38.6 minutes per patient per month for intervention patients and performed a mean of 1.1 care-related activities for a mean of 10.7 minutes per patient per month for control patients (P < .001). Intervention patients had a median of 7 drug titrations or additions during the study. The incremental program cost for the intervention was 36.97 dollars (sensitivity analysis, 6.22 dollars-88.56 dollars) per patient per month. A successful diabetes disease management program can be integrated into an academic clinic for modest labor and cost.

  3. Managed care aspects of managing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gary M

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system usually diagnosed in the second or third decade of life; MS is more common among women than men by a ratio of 3 to 1. With its relatively early age of onset and symptoms that impair patients' quality of life, MS requires lifelong, dynamic treatment, and places a substantial economic burden on individuals, healthcare systems, and society. The costs associated with providing benefits for MS therapy are growing rapidly and the increasing complexity of the MS market is impacting disease management for payers. Employers are also increasingly aware of the costs associated with MS and are asking health plans to advise on the most appropriate and cost-effective ways to manage both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies for MS. Health plans, by necessity, must therefore balance appropriate access to treatments for MS with the need to manage rising treatment costs. To meet this goal, payers require population-based solutions, guidelines, and treatment algorithms for the management of MS that can be used in clinical and formulary management decision making in the context of an evolving therapeutic landscape. Further, comparative studies are necessary for payers to determine which agents may work best on a population basis. Due to the current lack of appropriate clinical guidance and insufficient head-to-head data on disease-modifying drugs, strategies for health plans and clinical management have been designed using the best available evidence. Undoubtedly, management of this class will continue to evolve with the launch of newer agents.

  4. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Managed care and the infectious diseases specialist.

    PubMed

    Tice, A D; Slama, T G; Berman, S; Braun, P; Burke, J P; Cherney, A; Gross, P A; Harris, P; Reid-Hatton, M; Hoffman, R; Joseph, P; Lawton, S; Massanari, R M; Miller, Z I; Osheroff, W J; Poretz, D; Shalowitz, M; Simmons, B; Turner, J P; Wade, B; Nolet, B R

    1996-08-01

    There is growing demand to contain health care costs and to reassess the value of medical services. The traditional hospital, academic, and research roles of the infectious disease (ID) specialist are threatened, yet there is an increasing need for expertise because of growing antimicrobial resistance and emerging pathogens. Opportunities exist to develop and expand services for the care of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus and in infection control, epidemiology, outcomes research, outpatient intravenous therapy, and resource management. It is important for ID physicians to appreciate the principles involved in managed care and the areas in which ID services can be valuable. To be effective, physicians need to know about tools such as practice guidelines, physician profiling, outcomes monitoring, computerized information management, risk sharing, networking, and marketing, as well as related legal issues. With a positive attitude toward learning, application, and leadership, ID physicians can redefine their role and expand their services through managed care.

  6. Medicare Managed Care Spillovers and Treatment Intensity.

    PubMed

    Callison, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggests that the share of Medicare managed care enrollees in a region affects the costs of treating traditional fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare beneficiaries; however, little is known about the mechanisms through which these 'spillover effects' operate. This paper examines the relationship between Medicare managed care penetration and treatment intensity for FFS enrollees hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of AMI. I find that increased Medicare managed care penetration is associated with a reduction in both the costs and the treatment intensity of FFS AMI patients. Specifically, as Medicare managed care penetration increases, FFS AMI patients are less likely to receive surgical reperfusion and mechanical ventilation and to experience an overall reduction in the number of inpatient procedures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Family perspective on a family care program.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Helena Eri; Rosales, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the family's perspective on a family care program to better understand the challenges and potential capacities for changing the health care model. A qualitative study was carried out to assess the Family Health Program in the city of São Sebastião, Brasília, Brazil. Data was collected through direct systematic observations of the workflow developed by the program's team, and through focal groups with family members. The discourse of the collective subject was used in data analysis and showed that health prevention and promotion actions and the relationship between providers and consumers were positively evaluated while access to health services, drugs and providers was negatively evaluated. There is no assurance of comprehensive and continuous care to the family, which points to the need of reviewing the strategies of health service organization for more effective involvement of the community to meet their health needs.

  8. Safer medicines management in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Anthony J; Sheikh, Aziz; Hurwitz, Brian; Smeaton, Lesley; Chen, Yen-Fu; Howard, Rachel; Cantrill, Judy; Royal, Simon

    2002-01-01

    Errors in the medicines management process represent an important source of iatrogenic harm in primary care. Most errors result from underlying systems-based problems that are amenable to intervention and potentially preventable. In this paper, we seek to identify the frequency of medication-related morbidity in primary care, understand the underlying systemic reasons that increase risk of medication-related errors and iatrogenic harm, and suggest strategies for improving the safety of medicines management. PMID:12389765

  9. 3 steps to profitable managed care contracts.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David B; Malloy, Michael; McCoy, Jim; Turner, Melody

    2004-05-01

    An effective managed care contract negotiation strategy should be founded on: Internal analysis that compares performance of your current managed care contracts in terms of volume versus discount rates and volume versus profit. External analysis that compares your current contracts with those of competitors and assesses prevailing market rates, contract language and provisions, and premium trends Payment performance analysis that identifies payment promptness and accuracy and associated penalty dollars for each payer.

  10. Health technology assessment of asthma disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Steuten, Lotte; Lemmens, Karin; Vrijhoef, Bert

    2007-06-01

    To provide a critical opinion on the extent to which asthma disease management programs currently improve the effectiveness and efficiency of care and directions for future policy and research. The methodological quality of health technology assessment of asthma disease management programs remains moderate. Asthma disease management programs are predominantly educational and organizational in nature and focus either on children or on adults. Paediatric disease management programs make more effort to outreach into patients' living environments and show higher participation rates than those targeting adults. Reductions in asthma-related hospitalization, emergency department, and unplanned clinic visits range from 0 to 85%, 87% and 71%, respectively. Aspects of self-management and organization of care improved after the implementation of disease management programs. Almost no impact on asthma symptoms, lung function or the use of long-term control medication was found. There is accumulating 'circumstantial' evidence that disease management programs reduce resource utilization. The analytical rigor and uniformity of health technology assessment of asthma disease management programs has improved, but the generalizability of results remains uncertain. Practical, multicentre, clinical trials including broad representative study samples should be performed in different settings to increase methodological quality and substantiate current findings.

  11. Home audit program: management manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Many public power systems have initiated home energy audit programs in response to the requests of their consumers. The manual provides smaller public power systems with the information and specific skills needed to design and develop a program of residential energy audits. The program is based on the following precepts: locally owned public systems are the best, and in many cases the only agencies available to organize and coordinate energy conservation programs in many smaller communities; consumers' rights to energy conservation information and assistance should not hinge on the size of the utility that serves them; in the short run, public power systems of all sizes should offer residential energy conservation assistance to their consumers, because such assistance is desirable, necessary, and in the public interest; and in the long run, such programs will complement national energy goals and will produce economic benefits for both consumers and the public power system. A detailed description of home audit program planning, organization, and management are given. (MCW)

  12. Achieving a competitive advantage in managed care.

    PubMed

    Stahl, D A

    1998-02-01

    When building a competitive advantage to thrive in the managed care arena, subacute care providers are urged to be revolutionary rather than reactionary, proactive rather than passive, optimistic rather than pessimistic and growth-oriented rather than cost-reduction oriented. Weaknesses must be addressed aggressively. To achieve a competitive edge, assess the facility's strengths, understand the marketplace and comprehend key payment methods.

  13. Total quality management in behavioral health care.

    PubMed

    Sluyter, G V

    1998-01-01

    The literature on total quality management or continuous quality improvement in the behavioral health care field is just beginning to emerge. Although most of the evidence on its effectiveness remains anecdotal, it seems clear that it can work in behavioral health care organizations with strong leadership support and a long-term commitment.

  14. Financial management in leading health care systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, D G; Wheeler, J R; Rivenson, H L; Reiter, K L

    2000-01-01

    To understand better the financial management practices and strategies of modern health care organizations, we conducted interviews with chief financial officers (CFOs) of several leading health care systems. In this introduction, we present an overview of the project and summary responses on corporate financial structures and strategic challenges facing CFOs.

  15. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  16. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  17. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  18. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  19. Improving quality in Medicaid: the use of care management processes for chronic illness and preventive care.

    PubMed

    Rittenhouse, Diane R; Robinson, James C

    2006-01-01

    Care management processes (CMPs), tools to improve the efficiency and quality of primary care delivery, are particularly important for low-income patients facing substantial barriers to care. To measure the adoption of CMPs by medical groups, Independent Practice Associations, community clinics, and hospital-based clinics in California's Medicaid program and the factors associated with CMP adoption. Telephone survey of every provider organization with at least 6 primary care physicians and at least 1 Medi-Cal HMO contract, Spring 2003. One hundred twenty-three organizations participated, accounting for 64% of provider organizations serving Medicaid managed care in California. We surveyed 30 measures of CMP use for asthma and diabetes, and for child and adolescent preventive services. The mean number of CMPs used by each organization was 4.5 for asthma and 4.9 for diabetes (of a possible 8). The mean number of CMPs for preventive services was 4.0 for children and 3.5 for adolescents (of a possible 7). Organizations with more extensive involvement in Medi-Cal managed care used more CMPs for chronic illness and preventive service. Community clinics and hospital-based clinics used more CMPs for asthma and diabetes than did Independent Practice Associations (IPAs), and profitable organizations used more CMPs for child and adolescent preventive services than did entities facing severe financial constraints. The use of CMPs by Medicaid HMOs and the presence of external (financial and nonfinancial) incentives for clinical performance were strongly associated with use of care management by provider organizations. Physician and provider organizations heavily involved in California's Medicaid program are extensively engaged in preventive and chronic care management programs.

  20. Investigation of health care waste management in Binzhou District, China

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoyan, Gai; Xu Lingzhong; Li Huijuan; Zhou Chengchao; He Jiangjiang; Yoshihisa, Shirayama; Tang Wei; Chushi, Kuroiwa

    2010-02-15

    In China, national regulations and standards for health care waste management were implemented in 2003. To investigate the current status of health care waste management at different levels of health care facilities (HCF) after the implementation of these regulations, one tertiary hospital, one secondary hospital, and four primary health care centers from Binzhou District were visited and 145 medical staff members and 24 cleaning personnel were interviewed. Generated medical waste totaled 1.22, 0.77, and 1.17 kg/bed/day in tertiary, secondary, and primary HCF, respectively. The amount of medical waste generated in primary health care centers was much higher than that in secondary hospitals, which may be attributed to general waste being mixed with medical waste. This study found that the level of the HCF, responsibility for medical waste management in departments and wards, educational background and training experience can be factors that determine medical staff members' knowledge of health care waste management policy. Regular training programs and sufficient provision of protective measures are urgently needed to improve occupational safety for cleaning personnel. Financing and administrative monitoring by local authorities is needed to improve handling practices and the implementation of off-site centralized disposal in primary health care centers.

  1. Telemedicine and telepresence for trauma and emergency care management.

    PubMed

    Latifi, R; Weinstein, R S; Porter, J M; Ziemba, M; Judkins, D; Ridings, D; Nassi, R; Valenzuela, T; Holcomb, M; Leyva, F

    2007-01-01

    The use of telemedicine is long-standing, but only in recent years has it been applied to the specialities of trauma, emergency care, and surgery. Despite being relatively new, the concept of teletrauma, telepresence, and telesurgery is evolving and is being integrated into modern care of trauma and surgical patients. This paper will address the current applications of telemedicine and telepresence to trauma and emergency care as the new frontiers of telemedicine application. The University Medical Center and the Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) in Tucson, Arizona have two functional teletrauma and emergency telemedicine programs and one ad-hoc program, the mobile telemedicine program. The Southern Arizona Telemedicine and Telepresence (SATT) program is an inter-hospital telemedicine program, while the Tucson ER-link is a link between prehospital and emergency room system, and both are built upon a successful existing award winning ATP and the technical infrastructure of the city of Tucson. These two programs represent examples of integrated and collaborative community approaches to solving the lack of trauma and emergency care issue in the region. These networks will not only be used by trauma, but also by all other medical disciplines, and as such have become an example of innovation and dedication to trauma care. The first case of trauma managed over the telemedicine trauma program or "teletrauma" was that of an 18-month-old girl who was the only survival of a car crash with three fatalities. The success of this case and the pilot project of SATT that ensued led to the development of a regional teletrauma program serving close to 1.5 million people. The telepresence of the trauma surgeon, through teletrauma, has infused confidence among local doctors and communities and is being used to identify knowledge gaps of rural health care providers and the needs for instituting new outreach educational programs.

  2. DoD Pest Management Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-24

    Pest Management Program,’ to revise policy and procedures for the...DoD Pest Management Program; authorizes the publication of DoD 4150.7-R, ’DoD Pest Management Program,’ and DoD 4150.7-M, ’Plan for Certification of...DoD directive 5025.1, ’Department of Defense Directives System,’ and cancels reference (c) Defense Environmental Quality Program Policy Memorandum (DEQPPM) 80-10, ’Department of Defense Pest Management

  3. MEDICARE PAYMENTS AND SYSTEM-LEVEL HEALTH-CARE USE: The Spillover Effects of Medicare Managed Care.

    PubMed

    Baicker, Katherine; Robbins, Jacob A

    2015-01-01

    The rapid growth of Medicare managed care over the past decade has the potential to increase the efficiency of health-care delivery. Improvements in care management for some may improve efficiency system-wide, with implications for optimal payment policy in public insurance programs. These system-level effects may depend on local health-care market structure and vary based on patient characteristics. We use exogenous variation in the Medicare payment schedule to isolate the effects of market-level managed care enrollment on the quantity and quality of care delivered. We find that in areas with greater enrollment of Medicare beneficiaries in managed care, the non-managed care beneficiaries have fewer days in the hospital but more outpatient visits, consistent with a substitution of less expensive outpatient care for more expensive inpatient care, particularly at high levels of managed care. We find no evidence that care is of lower quality. Optimal payment policies for Medicare managed care enrollees that account for system-level spillovers may thus be higher than those that do not.

  4. Health care without managed care in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yuen, P P

    1995-10-01

    Although managed care may be more effective than fee-for-service in containing health care costs in the United States, it is less effective in countries with a national health service. In Hong Kong, costs have been contained despite the fact that 95% of general practitioners still practice on a solo, fee-for-service basis. The author describes in detail how the system of tax-based hospitals guarantees universal access without escalating costs.

  5. Management of a coordinated parts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    The organization of the management of a parts program is discussed. The organizational structure faced by the parts manager and the advantages and disadvantages of managing a coordinated parts program are analyzed. The reliable operation of an instrument is the key to the success of the mission, together with the management of the parts program. The analysis led to the conclusion that the setting up of the decision support model will aid the parts manager in the decision making and the process control.

  6. Environmental Restoration Program Management Control Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This Management Control Plan has been prepared to define the Energy Systems approach to managing its participation in the US DOE's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program in a manner consistent with DOE/ORO 931: Management Plan for the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge, Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; and the Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Contract Management Plan (CMP). This plan discusses the systems, procedures, methodology, and controls to be used by the program management team to attain these objectives.

  7. Fibromyalgia: management strategies for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Arnold, L M; Gebke, K B; Choy, E H S

    2016-02-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic disorder defined by widespread pain, often accompanied by fatigue and sleep disturbance, affects up to one in 20 patients in primary care. Although most patients with FM are managed in primary care, diagnosis and treatment continue to present a challenge, and patients are often referred to specialists. Furthermore, the lack of a clear patient pathway often results in patients being passed from specialist to specialist, exhaustive investigations, prescription of multiple drugs to treat different symptoms, delays in diagnosis, increased disability and increased healthcare resource utilisation. We will discuss the current and evolving understanding of FM, and recommend improvements in the management and treatment of FM, highlighting the role of the primary care physician, and the place of the medical home in FM management. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of FM by searching PubMed and references from relevant articles, and selected articles on the