Science.gov

Sample records for care program case

  1. Preparing health care organizations for successful case management programs.

    PubMed

    Bonvissuto, C A; Kastens, J M; Atwell, S R

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of four hospital-based providers in varying stages of implementing case management programs. Three of the providers had most of the necessary elements in place to ensure success, such as a mix of reimbursement sources, an effective and integrated information management system, a full range of clinical services, and continuous quality improvement programs. The authors make several suggestions for key activities that must be pursued by any health care organization seeking to implement a case management program in an era of managed care, tightening reimbursement, and consumer demand for quality care. These include the need to (a) organize essential case management functions under a centralized structure; (b) set realistic, quantifiable targets, and (c) design a communications plan for the program.

  2. Louisiana's Ventilator Assisted Care Program: Case Management Services to Link Tertiary with Community-Based Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkhart, Kathryn A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Ventilator Assisted Care Program provides centralized case management services to ventilator-using youths and their families in Louisiana. Case managers develop individualized, comprehensive plans to be implemented locally using community resources; plans are based on needs identified by tertiary care providers and family members and are…

  3. Integrating end-of-life care with disease management programs: a new role for case managers.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, A

    2001-03-01

    Case managers are crucial to any well-designed disease management program. However, in the progressive course of serious illness, patients, their families, and MCOs need the skills of case manager more than ever to help them through end-of-life care choices. The author describes what case managers will need in their "toolbox" to provide insight to these health plan members.

  4. The Business Case for Palliative Care: Translating Research Into Program Development in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Cassel, J Brian; Kerr, Kathleen M; Kalman, Noah S; Smith, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Specialist palliative care (PC) often embraces a "less is more" philosophy that runs counter to the revenue-centric nature of most health care financing in the U.S. A special business case is needed in which the financial benefits for organizations such as hospitals and payers are aligned with the demonstrable clinical benefits for patients. Based on published studies and our work with PC programs over the past 15 years, we identified 10 principles that together form a business model for specialist PC. These principles are relatively well established for inpatient PC but are only now emerging for community-based PC. Three developments that are key for the latter are the increasing penalties from payers for overutilization of hospital stays, the variety of alternative payment models such as accountable care organizations, which foster a population health management perspective, and payer-provider partnerships that allow for greater access to and funding of community-based PC.

  5. Home-based functional walking program for advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although meta-analyses have demonstrated that physical activity can positively impact quality of life outcomes in early stage cancer patients, it is not yet known whether these benefits can be extended to patients with advanced cancer. In a previous pilot survey of patients with advanced cancer with a median survival of 104 days, participants felt willing and able to participate in a physical activity intervention, and reported a strong preference for walking and home-based programming. Here, we report on the initial development and feasibility of a home-based functional walking program in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care. Methods Nine adult patients were recruited from outpatient palliative care clinics and palliative home care. A pilot intervention trial was conducted over a 6-week period. The McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQOL), Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), Seniors Fitness Test, four-test balance scale, and grip strength, were performed pre- and post-intervention. Participants wore activPAL™ accelerometers to monitor ambulatory activity levels. Results Of the nine recruited participants, three participants dropped out prior to baseline testing due to hospital admission and feeling overwhelmed, and three participants dropped out during the intervention due to severe symptoms. Only three participants completed the intervention program, pre- and post-intervention assessments: two reported improvements in total MQOL scores, yet all three shared an overall trend towards worsening symptom and total fatigue scores post-intervention. Two participants passed away within 90 days of completing the intervention. Conclusions This case series demonstrates the challenges of a physical activity intervention in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care. Further feasibility research is required in this patient population. Trial registration This study is

  6. A Study in Child Care (Case Study from Volume II-A): "They Understand." Day Care Programs Reprint Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Brigid

    This day care center, operated by Syracuse University and serving 100 children (birth to 3-year-old), admits only one child per family. The child must be the first or second child in a family where both parents have high school education or less and earn less than $5,000 per year. The program philosophy maintains that quality day care must carry…

  7. A Study in Child Care (Case Study from Volume II-A): "Tacos and Tulips." Day Care Programs Reprint Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Brigid

    The Holland Day Care Center in Michigan serves a diverse community of Anglo children of Dutch ancestry and children of former migrant workers of Chicano, Black, Puerto Rican and Cuban origins who have settled in the area. Located in two churches which are about three blocks apart, the program divides children by ability and age into five…

  8. An interprofessional education pilot program in maternity care: findings from an exploratory case study of undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Meffe, Filomena; Claire Moravac, Catherine; Espin, Sherry

    2012-05-01

    An interprofessional team of maternity care providers and academics developed a pilot interprofessional education (IPE) program in maternity care for undergraduate students in nursing, midwifery and medicine. There are few published studies examining IPE programs in maternity care, particularly at the undergraduate level, that examine long-term outcomes. This paper outlines findings from a case study that explored how participation in an IPE program in maternity care may enhance student knowledge, skills/attitudes, and may promote their collaborative behavior in the practice setting. The program was launched at a Canadian urban teaching hospital and consisted of six workshops and two clinical shadowing experiences. Twenty-five semi-structured, in-depth interviews were completed with nine participants at various time points up to 20 months post-program. Qualitative analysis of transcripts revealed the emergence of four themes: relationship-building, confident communication, willingness to collaborate and woman/family-centered care. Participant statements about their intentions to continue practicing interprofessional collaboration more than a year post-program lend support to its sustained effectiveness. The provision of a safe learning environment, the use of small group learning techniques with mixed teaching strategies, augmented by exposure to an interprofessional faculty, contributed to the program's perceived success.

  9. Physician-Directed Heart Failure Transitional Care Program: A Retrospective Case Review

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Ken S.; Beutler, David S.; Gerkin, Richard D.; Weiss, Jessica L.; Loli, Akil I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite a variety of national efforts to improve transitions of care for patients at risk for rehospitalization, 30-day rehospitalization rates for patients with heart failure have remained largely unchanged. Methods This is a retrospective review of 73 patients enrolled in our hospital-based, physican-directed Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). This study evaluated the 30- and 90- day readmission rates before and after enrollment in the program. The Transitionalist’s services focused on bedside consultation prior to hospital discharge, follow-up home visits within 72 hours of discharge, frequent follow-up phone calls, disease-specific education, outpatient intravenous diuretic therapy, and around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. Results The pre-enrollment 30-day readmission rates for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and all-cause readmission was 26.0% and 28.8%, respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for ADHF and all-cause readmission were 4.1% (P < 0.001) and 8.2% (P = 0.002), respectively. The pre-enrollment 90-day all-cause and ADHF readmission rates were 69.8%, and 58.9% respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for all-cause and ADHF were 27.3% (P < 0.001) and 16.4% (P < 0.001) respectively. Conclusions Our physician-implemented HFTCP reduced rehospitalization risk for patients enrolled in the program. This program may serve as a model to assist other hospital systems to reduce readmission rates of patients with HF. PMID:23976905

  10. Effect of the Brazilian Conditional Cash Transfer and Primary Health Care Programs on the New Case Detection Rate of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Joilda Silva; Pereira, Susan Martins; Rasella, Davide; Penna, Maria Lúcia Fernandes; Aquino, Rosana; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; Barreto, Mauricio Lima; Penna, Gerson Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Background Social determinants can affect the transmission of leprosy and its progression to disease. Not much is known about the effectiveness of welfare and primary health care policies on the reduction of leprosy occurrence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of the Brazilian cash transfer (Bolsa Família Program-BFP) and primary health care (Family Health Program-FHP) programs on new case detection rate of leprosy. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted the study with a mixed ecological design, a combination of an ecological multiple-group and time-trend design in the period 2004–2011 with the Brazilian municipalities as unit of analysis. The main independent variables were the BFP and FHP coverage at the municipal level and the outcome was new case detection rate of leprosy. Leprosy new cases, BFP and FHP coverage, population and other relevant socio-demographic covariates were obtained from national databases. We used fixed-effects negative binomial models for panel data adjusted for relevant socio-demographic covariates. A total of 1,358 municipalities were included in the analysis. In the studied period, while the municipal coverage of BFP and FHP increased, the new case detection rate of leprosy decreased. Leprosy new case detection rate was significantly reduced in municipalities with consolidated BFP coverage (Risk Ratio 0.79; 95% CI  = 0.74–0.83) and significantly increased in municipalities with FHP coverage in the medium (72–95%) (Risk Ratio 1.05; 95% CI  = 1.02–1.09) and higher coverage tertiles (>95%) (Risk Ratio 1.12; 95% CI  = 1.08–1.17). Conclusions At the same time the Family Health Program had been effective in increasing the new case detection rate of leprosy in Brazil, the Bolsa Família Program was associated with a reduction of the new case detection rate of leprosy that we propose reflects a reduction in leprosy incidence. PMID:25412418

  11. Innovation in Diabetes Care: Improving Consumption of Healthy Food Through a “Chef Coaching” Program: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Diana; Abrahamson, Martin J.; Pojednic, Rachele M.; Phillips, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition therapy as part of lifestyle care is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes. However, most people with diabetes do not follow this guideline. Changing eating habits involves obtaining knowledge and building practical skills such as shopping, meal preparation, and food storage. Just as fitness coaches use their specific knowledge base in fitness to enhance the effectiveness of their coaching, credentialed chefs trained as health coaches might combine their culinary expertise with coaching in order to improve clients' food choices and lifestyles. This report documents the case of a 55-year-old white male physician, single and living alone, who was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and reported chronic stress, sedentary behavior, and unhealthy eating habits. He participated in a chef coaching program of 8 weekly one-on-one 30-minute coaching sessions via Skype delivered by a chef trained as a health coach. During the first five meetings, the patient's goals were primarily culinary; however, with his success in accomplishing these goals, the patient progressed and expanded his goals to include other lifestyle domains, specifically exercise and work-life balance. At the end of the program, the patient had improved both his nutritional and exercise habits, his confidence in further self-care improvement, and his health parameters such as HgA1c (8.8% to 6.7%; normal <6.5%). We conclude that chef coaching has the potential to help people with diabetes improve their practical culinary skills and implement them so that they eat better and, further, has the potential to help them improve their overall self-care. We intend to further develop chef coaching and assess its potential as we learn from its implementation. PMID:25568831

  12. Innovation in diabetes care: improving consumption of healthy food through a "chef coaching" program: a case report.

    PubMed

    Polak, Rani; Dill, Diana; Abrahamson, Martin J; Pojednic, Rachele M; Phillips, Edward M

    2014-11-01

    Nutrition therapy as part of lifestyle care is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes. However, most people with diabetes do not follow this guideline. Changing eating habits involves obtaining knowledge and building practical skills such as shopping, meal preparation, and food storage. Just as fitness coaches use their specific knowledge base in fitness to enhance the effectiveness of their coaching, credentialed chefs trained as health coaches might combine their culinary expertise with coaching in order to improve clients' food choices and lifestyles. This report documents the case of a 55-year-old white male physician, single and living alone, who was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and reported chronic stress, sedentary behavior, and unhealthy eating habits. He participated in a chef coaching program of 8 weekly one-on-one 30-minute coaching sessions via Skype delivered by a chef trained as a health coach. During the first five meetings, the patient's goals were primarily culinary; however, with his success in accomplishing these goals, the patient progressed and expanded his goals to include other lifestyle domains, specifically exercise and work-life balance. At the end of the program, the patient had improved both his nutritional and exercise habits, his confidence in further self-care improvement, and his health parameters such as HgA1c (8.8% to 6.7%; normal <6.5%). We conclude that chef coaching has the potential to help people with diabetes improve their practical culinary skills and implement them so that they eat better and, further, has the potential to help them improve their overall self-care. We intend to further develop chef coaching and assess its potential as we learn from its implementation.

  13. Challenges and opportunities in building a sustainable rural primary care workforce in alignment with the Affordable Care Act: the WWAMI program as a case study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Suzanne M; Ballweg, Ruth A; Cosgrove, Ellen M; Engle, Kellie A; Robinson, Lawrence R; Rosenblatt, Roger A; Skillman, Susan M; Wenrich, Marjorie D

    2013-12-01

    The authors examine the potential impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on a large medical education program in the Northwest United States that builds the primary care workforce for its largely rural region. The 42-year-old Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho (WWAMI) program, hosted by the University of Washington School of Medicine, is one of the nation's most successful models for rural health training. The program has expanded training and retention of primary care health professionals for the region through medical school education, graduate medical education, a physician assistant training program, and support for practicing health professionals.The ACA and resulting accountable care organizations (ACOs) present potential challenges for rural settings and health training programs like WWAMI that focus on building the health workforce for rural and underserved populations. As more Americans acquire health coverage, more health professionals will be needed, especially in primary care. Rural locations may face increased competition for these professionals. Medical schools are expanding their positions to meet the need, but limits on graduate medical education expansion may result in a bottleneck, with insufficient residency positions for graduating students. The development of ACOs may further challenge building a rural workforce by limiting training opportunities for health professionals because of competing demands and concerns about cost, efficiency, and safety associated with training. Medical education programs like WWAMI will need to increase efforts to train primary care physicians and increase their advocacy for student programs and additional graduate medical education for rural constituents.

  14. Illinois: Child Care Collaboration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Care Collaboration Program promotes collaboration between child care and other early care and education providers, including Early Head Start (EHS), by creating policies to ease blending of funds to extend the day or year of existing services. While no funding is provided through the initiative, participating programs may take…

  15. Day Care Center Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

    This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

  16. The social costs of the International Monetary Fund's adjustment programs for poverty: the case of health care development in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Anyinam, C A

    1989-01-01

    A primary health care (PHC) strategy was adopted in Ghana in 1978, but the civilian government at the time failed to implement the program designed to achieve health for all Ghanaians. In 1982, the revolutionary military government under Rawlings indicated its commitment to the full implementation of the PHC program. In this article, the author seeks to examine the extent to which the Economic Recovery Program initiated by the Rawlings' regime, its policy of decentralization and mobilization of the masses, and its promise to institute some fundamental organizational and structural changes in the health care delivery system, are contributing to the process of achieving "health for all" Ghanaians.

  17. Understanding Effects of Flexible Spending Accounts on People with Disabilities: The Case of a Consumer-Directed Care Program.

    PubMed

    Lombe, Margaret; Inoue, Megumi; Mahoney, Kevin; Chu, Yoosun; Putnam, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This study set out to explore the saving behavior, barriers, and facilitators along with effects of participating in a consumer-directed care program among people with disabilities in the state of West Virginia (N = 29). Results suggest that respondents were able to save money through the program to enable them to purchase goods and services they needed to enhance their welfare and quality of life. Generally, items saved for fell into 3 broad categories: household equipment, individual functioning, and home modification. Facilitators and barriers to saving were also indicated and so were the benefits of program participation. Program and policy implications are presented.

  18. Problems Associated with Coordination and Role Definitions in Health Care Teams: A Hospice Program Evaluation and Intervention Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berteotti, Carol R.; And Others

    Using an evaluation of a hospital-based hospice as a case study, this paper analyzes problematic issues surrounding health care teams (HCTs) in light of findings revealed in the literature concerning HCT structures and processes. The factors of coordination and role definitions in HCTs and their manifestations in a particular hospice HCT in terms…

  19. Co-location of health care services for homeless veterans: a case study of innovation in program implementation.

    PubMed

    Blue-Howells, Jessica; McGuire, Jim; Nakashima, John

    2008-01-01

    This case study examines how the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System (GLA) improved homeless veteran service utilization through program innovation that addressed service fragmentation. The new program offered same-day co-located mental health, medical, and homeless services with a coordinated intake system. The program is analyzed using a framework proposed by Rosenheck (2001) that has four phases: the decision to implement, initial implementation, sustained maintenance, and termination or transformation. GLA was able to successfully implement a new program that remains in the sustained maintenance phase five years after the initial decision to implement. Key factors from the Rosenheck innovation model in the program's success included coalition building, linking the project to legitimate goals, program monitoring, and developing communities of practicing clinicians. The key lesson from the case study is the need for a coalition to persistently problem solve and act as advocates for the program, even after successful initial implementation. Social work leadership was critical in all phases of program implementation.

  20. A Standardized Certification Program for Case Managers Serving Frail Elderly Texans. Module II: Assessment and Care Plan Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusky, Richard A.; And Others

    This learning module is one of three training modules that were developed for members of the Texas Gerontological Consortium for Continuing Education to use in preparing case managers working in human service professions coordinating community-based programs for frail elderly Texans. Module II deals with the following topics: assessment (role of…

  1. A Lesson in Carefully Managing Resources: A Case Study from an Evaluation of a Music Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Kristin A.; Burkhardt, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A music education program with a goal of enhancing cognitive development of preschool-aged children enrolled in local preschools is evaluated by The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University. The budget for the evaluation was small, and therefore presented several challenges to the evaluation team. Purpose: Through a case study…

  2. The Prenatal Care at School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Carol H.; Nasso, Jacqueline T.; Swider, Susan; Ellison, Brenda R.; Griswold, Daniel L.; Brooks, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    School absenteeism and poor compliance with prenatal appointments are concerns for pregnant teens. The Prenatal Care at School (PAS) program is a new model of prenatal care involving local health care providers and school personnel to reduce the need for students to leave school for prenatal care. The program combines prenatal care and education…

  3. Hospital program weds case, disease management.

    PubMed

    1997-10-01

    To lower its readmission rates and inpatient length of stay for three high-volume chronic conditions, Memorial Hospital in Colorado Springs, CO, developed a program that combines clinical pathways with a cross-continuum disease management program. Community physicians refer patients to the program. Hospital-based care managers guide patients in the acute setting before handing them off to outpatient case managers, who coordinate the patient's transition to home care. Clinicians at Memorial sold administrators on the "care-case management" approach by arguing that increased inpatient efficiency would offset potential revenue shortfalls due to fewer admissions.

  4. The Conceptualization of Self-Care and Integration of Self-Care Education in the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs Accredited Clinical Mental Health Counseling Curriculum: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Nicole L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore how CACREP accredited Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs conceptualize self-care and integrate self-care education into counseling curriculum. Counselor educators in CACREP accredited Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs served as representatives to their programs and were invited to share…

  5. A Study in Child Care (Case Study from Volume II-B): "...While [They Took] Care of Our Children, Theirs Weren't Being Cared For." Day Care Programs Reprint Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Kristine

    The Mecklenburg County Department of Social Services in Charlotte, North Carolina, operates nine child development day care centers and 5 day homes which provide care for 257 Black and Anglo children, 2- to 5-years-old, primarily from low-income homes. The centers are located in churches, schools, and facilities in low income housing projects. The…

  6. Generation: A Corporate-Sponsored Retiree Health Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharlach, Andrew E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes Generation, geriatric clinic program for one company's retirees and dependents. Describes program's multidisciplinary team approach to health and psychosocial assessment, medication review, retiree advisors, health promotion programs, and case management services. Notes that, in addition to traditional medical care, participants receive…

  7. Lessons Learned From Transitioning PEPFAR Track 1.0 Care and Treatment Programs: Case Studies in Financial Management Capacity Building in Zambia and Botswana.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Chuck; Tidwell, George; Vhugen, Jann; Sharma, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the United States government mandated transition of internationally managed HIV care and treatment programs to local country ownership. Three case studies illustrate the US Health Resources Services Administration's fiscal assessment and technical assistance (TA) processes to strengthen local organizations' capabilities to absorb and manage United States government funding. Review of initial, TA and follow-up reports reveal that the 1 Botswanan and 2 Zambian organizations closed 10 of 17 financial capacity gaps, with Health Resources Services Administration assisting on 2. Zambian organizations requested and absorbed targeted TA on the basis of the consultant's desk review, their finance staff revised fiscal policies and procedures, and accordingly trained other staff. In Botswana, delays in integrating recommendations necessitated on-site TA for knowledge building and role modeling. Organizational maturity may explain differences in responsiveness, ownership, and required TA approaches. Clarifying expectations of capacity building, funding agreement, and nonmonetary donor involvement can help new organizations determine and act on intervening actions.

  8. Extending Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Late-Life Anxiety to Home Care: Program Development and Case Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Tolin, David F.; Gilliam, Christina M.; Meunier, Suzanne A.

    2008-01-01

    Data suggesting that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is efficacious for late-life anxiety are accumulating; however, effectiveness has not been well established. Incorporating CBT for anxiety into home care is needed to facilitate access to evidenced-based treatment for a growing population of community-dwelling, functionally impaired elderly…

  9. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  10. A Business Case Analysis of the Direct Health Care Provider Program Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, N.C.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    Medical Center, Fort Bragg, N.C. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Captain Sharon L. Benson 5d...PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Commander, Womack Army Medical Center ATTN...MCXC-RES Bldg 4-2817 Reilly Road Fort Bragg, NC 28310 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES

  11. Shared Heritage: An Intergenerational Child Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkeye Area Community Action Program, Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This report describes ways in which older persons may become involved in the field of home child care. It is intended to provide (1) detailed information on an intergenerational child care (IGCC) program; (2) general information relating to intergenerational contacts and home child care; and (3) "how-to" information for agencies planning…

  12. Influences on Case-Managed Community Aged Care Practice.

    PubMed

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-10-01

    Case management has been widely implemented in the community aged care setting. In this study, we aimed to explore influences on case-managed community aged care practice from the perspectives of community aged care case managers. We conducted 33 semistructured interviews with 47 participants. We drew these participants from a list of all case managers working in aged care organizations that provided publicly funded case management program(s)/packages in Victoria, Australia. We used a multilevel framework that included such broad categories of factors as structural, organizational, case manager, client, and practice factors to guide the data analysis. Through thematic analysis, we found that policy change, organizational culture and policies, case managers' professional backgrounds, clients with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and case management models stood out as key influences on case managers' practice. In the future, researchers can use the multilevel framework to undertake implementation research in similar health contexts.

  13. Who Cares about Caring in Early Childhood Teacher Education Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Abigail; Mercurio, Mia; Peloso, Jeanne M.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to care for oneself, near and distant others, animals, plants, human-made objects, and even ideas is an antidote for violence in its many forms as experienced in childhood as well as adulthood. This article makes a case for facilitating the development of the ability to care as children develop. The authors emphasize the importance of…

  14. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Provided to Persons Living in Long-Term Care Facilities Program data for FY 2013 indicate that long- ... least quarterly Conducted 5,417 training sessions in facilities on such topics as residents’ rights Provided 129, ...

  15. Teaching Primary Care in a Baccalaureate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivern, Diane O.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The baccalaureate nursing program at Herbert H. Lehman College, Bronx, New York prepares students for primary care nursing by structuring the clinical experience to include the essential, interdependent components of: assessment, accountability, leadership, and management. Graduates are expected to be proficient in the primary care role in any…

  16. Health Care for Homeless Veterans program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its medical regulations concerning eligibility for the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program. The HCHV program provides per diem payments to non-VA community-based facilities that provide housing, outreach services, case management services, and rehabilitative services, and may provide care and/or treatment to homeless veterans who are enrolled in or eligible for VA health care. The rule modifies VA's HCHV regulations to conform to changes enacted in the Honoring America's Veterans and Caring for Camp Lejeune Families Act of 2012. Specifically, the rule removes the requirement that homeless veterans be diagnosed with a serious mental illness or substance use disorder to qualify for the HCHV program. This change makes the program available to all homeless veterans who are enrolled in or eligible for VA health care. The rule also updates the definition of homeless to match in part the one used by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The rule further clarifies that the services provided by the HCHV program through non-VA community-based providers must include case management services, including non-clinical case management, as appropriate.

  17. Integrated Care in College Health: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Cary; Sloan, Sarah K.; Vance, Mary; Brownson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This case study describes 1 international student's treatment experience with an integrated health program on a college campus. This program uses a multidisciplinary, mind-body approach, which incorporates individual counseling, primary care, psychiatric consultation, a mindfulness-based cognitive therapy class, and a meditation group.

  18. University Medical Care Programs: Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densen, Paul M.; And Others

    The increasing number of medical centers involved in collaborative and innovative health services in the community is but one reflection of social concerns and pressures for change in the health care system. Medical schools and their affiliated teaching hospitals are trying in various ways to adapt their teaching, research, and service functions…

  19. Exploring impacts of multi-year, community-based care programs for orphans and vulnerable children: a case study from Kenya.

    PubMed

    Larson, Bruce A; Wambua, Nancy; Masila, Juliana; Wangai, Susan; Rohr, Julia; Brooks, Mohamad; Bryant, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    The Community-Based Care for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (CBCO) program operated in Kenya during 2006-2010. In Eastern Province, the program provided support to approximately 3000 orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) living in 1500 households. A primary focus of the program was to support savings and loan associations composed of OVC caregivers (typically elderly women) to improve household and OVC welfare. Cross-sectional data were collected in 2011 from 1500 randomly selected households from 3 populations: program participants (CBCO group, n=500), households in the same villages as program participants but not in the program (the local-community-group = Group L, n=300), and households living in nearby villages where the program did not operate (the adjacent-community-group, Group A, n=700). Primary welfare outcomes evaluated are household food security, as measured by the Household Food Insecurity Access instrument, and OVC educational attainment. We compared outcomes between the CBCO and the subset of Group L not meeting program eligibility criteria (L-N) to investigate disparities within local communities. We compared outcomes between the CBCO group and the subset of Group A meeting eligibility criteria (A-E) to consider program impact. We compared outcomes between households not eligible for the program in the local and adjacent community groups (L-N and A-N) to consider if the adjacent communities are similar to the local communities. In May-June 2011, at the end of the OVC program, the majority of CBCO households continued to be severely food insecure, with rates similar to other households living in nearby communities. Participation rates in primary school are high, reflecting free primary education. Among the 18-22 year olds who were "children" during the program years, relatively few children completed secondary school across all study groups. Although the CBCO program likely provided useful services and benefits to program participants, disparities

  20. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM): A Home Care Case-Mix Model for Children Facing Special Health Care Challenges.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Charles D

    2015-01-01

    Case-mix classification and payment systems help assure that persons with similar needs receive similar amounts of care resources, which is a major equity concern for consumers, providers, and programs. Although health service programs for adults regularly use case-mix payment systems, programs providing health services to children and youth rarely use such models. This research utilized Medicaid home care expenditures and assessment data on 2,578 children receiving home care in one large state in the USA. Using classification and regression tree analyses, a case-mix model for long-term pediatric home care was developed. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM) grouped children and youth in the study sample into 24 groups, explaining 41% of the variance in annual home care expenditures. The P/ECM creates the possibility of a more equitable, and potentially more effective, allocation of home care resources among children and youth facing serious health care challenges.

  1. 76 FR 61103 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care... announces a solicitation for health care payer organizations to participate in the Comprehensive Primary Care initiative (CPC), a multipayer model designed to improve primary care. DATES: Letter of...

  2. Competition and rural primary care programs.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, T C

    1990-04-01

    Rural primary care programs were established in areas where there was thought to be no competition for patients. However, evidence from site visits and surveys of a national sample of subsidized programs revealed a pattern of competitive responses by the clinics. In this study of 193 rural primary care programs, mail and telephone surveys produced uniform data on the organization, operation, finances, and utilization of a representative sample of clinics. The programs were found to compete in terms of: (1) price, (2) service mix, (3) staff availability, (4) structural accessibility, (5) outreach, and (6) targeting a segment of the market. The competitive strategies employed by the clinics had consequences that affected their productivity and financial stability. The strategies were related to the perceived missions of the programs, and depended heavily upon the degree of isolation of the program and the targeting of the services. The competitive strategy chosen by a particular program could not be predicted based on service area population and apparent competitors in the service area. The goals and objectives of the programs had more to do with their competitive responses than with market characteristics. Moreover, the chosen strategies may not meet the demands of those markets.

  3. Money for Day Care Programs in Connecticut.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Fai; Jacob, Stacie

    This pamphlet describes what Title IV-A funding is, who is eligible for it, what Connecticut agencies administer it, and what some of the problems are. This information should prove invaluable to community groups who want to establish new day care programs, as the Federal government is willing to pay for 75 percent of the total cost of day care…

  4. BDA special care case mix model.

    PubMed

    Bateman, P; Arnold, C; Brown, R; Foster, L V; Greening, S; Monaghan, N; Zoitopoulos, L

    2010-04-10

    Routine dental care provided in special care dentistry is complicated by patient specific factors which increase the time taken and costs of treatment. The BDA have developed and conducted a field trial of a case mix tool to measure this complexity. For each episode of care the case mix tool assesses the following on a four point scale: 'ability to communicate', 'ability to cooperate', 'medical status', 'oral risk factors', 'access to oral care' and 'legal and ethical barriers to care'. The tool is reported to be easy to use and captures sufficient detail to discriminate between types of service and special care dentistry provided. It offers potential as a simple to use and clinically relevant source of performance management and commissioning data. This paper describes the model, demonstrates how it is currently being used, and considers future developments in its use.

  5. 5 CFR 792.203 - Child care subsidy programs; eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Child care subsidy programs; eligibility... of Appropriated Funds for Child Care Costs for Lower Income Employees § 792.203 Child care subsidy programs; eligibility. (a)(1) An Executive agency may establish a child care subsidy program in which...

  6. 5 CFR 792.203 - Child care subsidy programs; eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Child care subsidy programs; eligibility... of Appropriated Funds for Child Care Costs for Lower Income Employees § 792.203 Child care subsidy programs; eligibility. (a)(1) An Executive agency may establish a child care subsidy program in which...

  7. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168 Section 440.168 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.168...

  8. Case study discussions contribute to total patient care.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D S

    1979-01-01

    When staff attitudes toward patients in a busy radiology department were becoming somewhat depersonalized, the director of education and training and the department's supervisors put together an educational program to reorient staff members to total patient care. The case study approach taken allowed staff to pinpoint problems and then recommend ways to improve the quality of the department.

  9. 25 CFR 20.506 - What information is required in the foster care case file?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What information is required in the foster care case file... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.506 What information is required in the foster care case file? At a minimum the following information is required: (a)...

  10. 25 CFR 20.506 - What information is required in the foster care case file?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What information is required in the foster care case file... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.506 What information is required in the foster care case file? At a minimum the following information is required: (a)...

  11. 25 CFR 20.506 - What information is required in the foster care case file?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What information is required in the foster care case file... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.506 What information is required in the foster care case file? At a minimum the following information is required: (a)...

  12. 25 CFR 20.506 - What information is required in the foster care case file?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What information is required in the foster care case file... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.506 What information is required in the foster care case file? At a minimum the following information is required: (a)...

  13. 25 CFR 20.506 - What information is required in the foster care case file?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What information is required in the foster care case file... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.506 What information is required in the foster care case file? At a minimum the following information is required: (a)...

  14. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  15. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  16. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  17. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  18. 76 FR 52575 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 63 RIN 2900-AN73 Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program AGENCY: Department of... community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program of the... enrolled in the VA health care system. Through the HCHV program, VA identifies homeless veterans...

  19. 75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 63 RIN 2900-AN73 Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program AGENCY: Department of... contracting with community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program... ``RIN 2900-AN73, Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program.'' Copies of comments received will...

  20. [Abdominal pregnancy care. Case report].

    PubMed

    Morales Hernández, Sara; Díaz Velázquez, Mary Flor; Puello Tamara, Edgardo; Morales Hernández, Jorge; Basavilvazo Rodríguez, Maria Antonia; Cruz Cruz, Polita del Rocío; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino

    2008-10-01

    Abdominal pregnancies are the implantation of gestation in some of the abdominal structures. This kind of pregnancies represents sevenfold maternal death risk than tubarian ectopic pregnancies, and 90-fold death risk than normal ones. Previous cases have erroneously reported as abscess in Douglas punch, and frequently result in obitus or postnatal deaths. We report a case of a patient with 27 years old, and diagnosis of 25.2 weeks of pregnancy, prior placenta and anhidramnios, referred due to difficult in uterine contour delimitation, easy palpation of fetal parts, cephalic pole in left hypochondrious and presence of mass in hypogastria, no delimitations, pain with mobilization, no transvaginal bleed and fetal movements. Interruption of pregnancy is decided by virtue of severe oligohidramnios, retardation in fetal intrabdominal growth, and recurrent maternal abdominal pain. Surgical intervention was carried out for resolution of the obstetrical event, in which was found ectopic abdominal pregnancy with bed placental in right uterine horn that corresponded to a pregnancy of 30 weeks of gestation. Abdominal pregnancy is still a challenge for obstetrics due to its diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis is oriented to prevent an intrabdominal hemorrhage that is the main maternal cause of mortality.

  1. Day Care: A Program in Search of a Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bikales, Gerda

    This report examines current issues relating to day care and challenges many of the policy assumptions that underlie a major public program of subsidized day care for children. A historical perspective of day care is presented and various types of day care are described. The costs and benefits of day care are examined and the relation of day care…

  2. Utilization review of psychiatric care: building a program that works.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P A

    1988-01-01

    Since the early 1970s the federal government, private insurers, and employers have searched for ways to control health care costs. In 1972, Congress, dissatisfied with hospitals' utilization review efforts under the Medicare program created Professional Standards Review Organizations (PSROs). Ten years later when the Medicare reimbursement system underwent radical changes, the utilization review system remained more or less intact but had its name changed to Professional Review Organizations (PROs). The insurance industry has developed and employed, with varying levels of success, several cost-saving tactics, including deductibles and copayments for specialized care, limitation of benefits by diagnosis or facility type, exclusion of specific disorders, inclusion of dollar limits, pre-payment claims review for specific types of service, and post-payment review with retroactive denial of claims. Case management is the latest development in the ever-widening search to put a lid on health care costs. These attempts to measure the effectiveness of care vis a vis the dollar spent for it have been especially difficult for psychiatry, a less measurable science than other fields of medicine. Because psychiatry straddles the disciplines of sociology, psychology, and medicine, it is not easily understood. Inadequate documentation of care, a paucity of outcome studies, and confidentiality issues all combine to make utilization review particularly difficult in psychiatry. This paper will describe a collaboration between Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland and four private psychiatric hospitals in the state that resulted in a workable, effective utilization review program acceptable to providers, payers, and patients.

  3. Competence of birth attendants at providing emergency obstetric care under India’s JSY conditional cash transfer program for institutional delivery: an assessment using case vignettes in Madhya Pradesh province

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to emergency obstetric care by competent staff can reduce maternal mortality. India has launched the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) conditional cash transfer program to promote institutional births. During implementation of the JSY, India witnessed a steep increase in the proportion of institutional deliveries-from 40% in 2004 to 73% in 2012. However, maternal mortality reduction follows a secular trend. Competent management of complications, when women deliver in facilities under the JSY, is essential for reduction in maternal mortality and therefore to a successful program outcome. We investigate, using clinical vignettes, whether birth attendants at institutions under the program are competent at providing appropriate care for obstetric complications. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in three districts of Madhya Pradesh (MP) province. Written case vignettes for two obstetric complications, hemorrhage and eclampsia, were administered to 233 birth attendant nurses at 73 JSY facilities. Their competence at (a) initial assessment, (b) diagnosis, and (c) making decisions on appropriate first-line care for these complications was scored. Results The mean emergency obstetric care (EmOC) competence score was 5.4 (median = 5) on a total score of 20, and 75% of participants scored below 35% of the maximum score. The overall score, although poor, was marginally higher in respondents with Skilled Birth Attendant (SBA) training, those with general nursing and midwifery qualifications, those at higher facility levels, and those conducting >30 deliveries a month. In all, 14% of respondents were competent at assessment, 58% were competent at making a correct clinical diagnosis, and 20% were competent at providing first-line care. Conclusions Birth attendants in the JSY facilities have low competence at EmOC provision. Hence, births in the JSY program cannot be considered to have access to competent EmOC. Urgent efforts are

  4. Supporting Nutrition in Early Care and Education Settings: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Child care centers, Head Start programs, and family child care providers serving young children--as well as after school programs and homeless shelters that reach older children, adults, and families--are supported in providing healthy meals and snacks by reimbursements through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Administered by the…

  5. [Clinical case: Complicated grief in primary care. Care plan].

    PubMed

    Ruymán Brito-Brito, Pedro; Rodríguez-Ramos, Mercedes; Pérez-García-Talavera, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This is the case of a 61-year-old patient woman that visits her nurse in Primary Health Care to get the control of blood pressure and glycemia. In the last two years has suffered the loss of her husband and of two brothers beside having lived through other vital stressful events that have taken her to a situation of complicated grief. The care plan is realized using the M. Gordon assessment system and standardized languages NANDA, NOC and NIC. The principal aims were the improvement of the depression level and the improvement in the affliction resolution. As suggested interventions were proposed to facilitate the grief and the derivation to a mental health unit. A follow-up of the patient was realized in nursing consultation at Primary health care to weekly intervals, in the beginning, and monthly, later. The evaluation of the care plan reflects an improvement in the criteria of Prigerson's complicated grief; an increase of the recreative activities; the retreat of the mourning that still she was guarding; as well as an improvement in the control of the blood pressure numbers. The attention of nurses before a case of complicated grief turns out to be complex. Nevertheless the suitable accomplishment of certain interventions orientated to facilitating the grief, with a follow-up in consultation, shows the efficiency. The difficulty in the boarding of the psychosocial problems meets increased at the moment of are necessary the nursing diagnostics adapted for every individual case. The work in group between nurses could improves the consensus.

  6. The brave new world of health care compliance programs.

    PubMed

    Bartrum, T E; Bryant, L E

    1997-01-01

    The need for corporate compliance programs in health care delivery systems is ever increasing. This article identifies the key items a good program should contain, and addresses issues raised by the existence of a program as well as its implementation.

  7. Health Update: Care of Ill Children in Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses differing opinions about (1) exclusion of ill children from child care; (2) the meaning of fever; (3) appropriate care for ill children; (4) transfer of information about ill children in child care; and (5) written policies and procedures for care of ill children. (NH)

  8. Internships in Nontraditional Health Care Settings: A Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotarba, Joseph A.

    1990-01-01

    Addresses nontraditional health care issues by placing internship students in different health care agencies such as (1) workplace wellness programs; (2) centers for independent living for the physically handicapped; and (3) an Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) intervention program. Examines new problems in health care and the importance…

  9. Defining Group Care Programs: An Index of Reporting Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bethany R.; Barth, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Group care programs, while ubiquitous, are not clearly differentiated despite differences in the population served, size, auspices, and program activities, to name a few. Words like group care, residential care and residential treatment are often used interchangeably in policy, research and practice. This paper introduces reporting standards that…

  10. 76 FR 57637 - TRICARE; Continued Health Care Benefit Program Expansion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 RIN 0720-AB30 TRICARE; Continued Health Care Benefit Program..., some MHS beneficiaries would not be eligible to purchase Continued Health Care Benefit Program (CHCBP... continued health care coverage for eligible beneficiaries who lose their MHS eligibility. It was...

  11. The Costs of Critical Care Telemedicine Programs

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Derik M.; Bonello, Robert S.; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Perencevich, Eli; Cram, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background: Implementation of telemedicine programs in ICUs (tele-ICUs) may improve patient outcomes, but the costs of these programs are unknown. We performed a systematic literature review to summarize existing data on the costs of tele-ICUs and collected detailed data on the costs of implementing a tele-ICU in a network of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) hospitals. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of studies published between January 1, 1990, and July 1, 2011, reporting costs of tele-ICUs. Studies were summarized, and key cost data were abstracted. We then obtained the costs of implementing a tele-ICU in a network of seven VHA hospitals and report these costs in light of the existing literature. Results: Our systematic review identified eight studies reporting tele-ICU costs. These studies suggested combined implementation and first year of operation costs for a tele-ICU of $50,000 to $100,000 per monitored ICU-bed. Changes in patient care costs after tele-ICU implementation ranged from a $3,000 reduction to a $5,600 increase in hospital cost per patient. VHA data suggested a cost for implementation and first year of operation of $70,000 to $87,000 per ICU-bed, depending on the depreciation methods applied. Conclusions: The cost of tele-ICU implementation is substantial, and the impact of these programs on hospital costs or profits is unclear. Until additional data become available, clinicians and administrators should carefully weigh the clinical and economic aspects of tele-ICUs when considering investing in this technology. PMID:22797291

  12. Programming, Care, and Troubleshooting of Cochlear Implants for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedley-Williams, Andrea J.; Sladen, Douglas P.; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current cochlear implant technology, programming strategies, troubleshooting, and care techniques. It considers: device components, initial stimulation, speech coding strategies, use and care, troubleshooting, and the classroom environment. (Contains references.) (DB)

  13. Space Station Freedom Environmental Health Care Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Russo, Dane M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the environmental planning and monitoring aspects of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Environmental Health Care Program, which encompasses all phases of the SSF assembly and operation from the first element entry at MB-6 through the Permanent Manned Capability and beyond. Environmental planning involves the definition of acceptability limits and monitoring requirements for the radiation dose barothermal parameters and potential contaminants in the SSF air and water and on internal surfaces. Inflight monitoring will be implemented through the Environmental Health System, which consists of five subsystems: Microbiology, Toxicology, Water Quality, Radiation, and Barothermal Physiology. In addition to the environmental data interpretation and analysis conducted after each mission, the new data will be compared to archived data for statistical and long-term trend analysis and determination of risk exposures. Results of these analyses will be used to modify the acceptability limits and monitoring requirements for the future.

  14. Pricing specialty carve-outs and disease management programs under managed care.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, K T

    1997-01-01

    The drive toward improved efficiency and effectiveness in health care has spawned disease management programs to address the needs of patients with certain conditions. These programs parallel traditional case management programs in monitoring patients, but disease management differs from case management in early assessment of patient risk, with proactive clinical interventions and educational efforts. The most comprehensive programs include a coordinated delivery system that can be "carved out" from other health care benefits. Pricing disease management can benefit from the analysis of detailed, disease-specific and community-specific data from public or private sources.

  15. The Child Care Food Program and Family Day Care: A How-To Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Estelle; Travis, Nancy

    This manual explains what is involved in sponsoring a Child Care Food Program (CCFP) for family day care providers. It draws on the experience of Save the Children's Southern States Office in sponsoring the "Child Care Food Umbrella," a CCFP program serving over 1,000 providers, which Save the Children has operated for 6 years. Chapter 1…

  16. Dare To Care: An Innovative Program Teaching Elementary Students the Importance of Caring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Margaret

    Developed by a third-grade teacher in a Bronx, New York, Catholic elementary school, "Dare to Care" is a school program that teaches elementary school children to develop a caring attitude toward themselves, others, and their environment. This paper describes the elements and institution of the Dare to Care program. Factors contributing…

  17. Effectiveness of a weight loss program in community-cased primary care offices: High-intensity intervention versus low-intensity intervention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the call for primary care providers (PCPs) to offer obese patients intense behavioral therapy for weight loss, few studies have examined the effectiveness of such interventions in real-world, community-based medical practices. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a physician-guided weig...

  18. Pediatric palliative care: starting a hospital-based program.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kaye

    2011-01-01

    The value of palliative care in pediatrics has received significant attention over the past 10 years. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Institute of Medicine published recommendations involving children who have a life-limiting diagnosis in a palliative care program early in their disease process. Palliative care is intended to assure an emphasis on quality of life in addition to the current medical treatment, which may be focused on cure, symptom management, and/or end-of-life care. This article describes one hospital's experience in planning, implementing, and managing a pediatric palliative care program. Implementing a hospital-based palliative care program in a children's hospital can be accomplished through careful planning and analysis of need. Writing an official business plan formalized the request for organizational support for this program, including the mission and vision, plans for how services would be provided, expected financial implications, and initial plans for evaluation of success.

  19. Oregon Child Care Quality Indicators Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Oregon's Child Care Quality Indicators Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  20. Basis And Application Of The CARES/LIFE Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Powers, Lynn M.

    1996-01-01

    Report discusses physical and mathematical basis of Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures LIFE prediction (CARES/LIFE) computer program, described in "Program for Evaluation of Reliability of Ceramic Parts" (LEW-16018).

  1. A Wellness Program for a Life Care Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbaro, Ellen L.; Noyes, Lin E.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a health education program at a life care community, based on Knowles' theory of androgyny. The program significantly affected participants' health behavior which reduced the effects of aging. Planning guidelines, audiovisual considerations, format, and cost are discussed. (JAC)

  2. Language, Literacy and Numeracy in National Training Packages: Case Studies in Aged Care and Hospitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Christine; Brand, Jennie Bickmore

    The implementation and effectiveness of the inclusion of literacy and numeracy in industry training packages was examined in case studies of three programs in Western Australia. Two were certificate programs in cooking and food and beverage as specified in the hospitality training package, and the third was an aged care program based on the…

  3. Development of a hospital-based care coordination program for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Petitgout, Janine M; Pelzer, Daniel E; McConkey, Stacy A; Hanrahan, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    A hospital-based Continuity of Care program for children with special health care needs is described. A family-centered team approach provides care coordination and a medical home. The program has grown during the past 10 years to include inpatients and outpatients from multiple services and outreach clinics. Improved outcomes, including decreased length of stay, decreased cost, and high family satisfaction, are demonstrated by participants in the program. Pediatric nurse practitioners play an important role in the medical home, collaborating with primary care providers, hospital-based specialists, community services, and social workers to provide services to children with special health care needs.

  4. Examining the (False) Dichotomy between "Care" and "Education" in Early Childhood Programs: A Descriptive Case Study of Teacher-Child Relationships within a Standardized Curriculum Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrove, Randi

    2016-01-01

    Public preschool programs using standardized curriculum models are increasing rapidly, and while research has shown that teacher-child relationships have been used successfully as an intervention and compensatory measure, it is unclear what influence the public preschool setting and the use of a curriculum model have on teacher-child…

  5. Implementation and evaluation of Stanford Health Care direct-care teledermatology program

    PubMed Central

    Pathipati, Akhilesh S; Ko, Justin M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Teledermatology has proven to be an effective means of providing dermatologic care. The existing research has primarily evaluated its usefulness in a consultative model. Few academic centers have evaluated a patient-initiated model, and direct-to-consumer services remain the subject of controversy. Stanford Health Care recently launched a direct-care, patient-initiated teledermatology pilot program. This article evaluates the viability and patient satisfaction with this service. Materials and Methods: During the pilot period, patients were able to seek remote dermatologic care using an eVisit tool in their MyHealth account. Patients initiated the consultation, answered questions regarding their complaint, and uploaded a picture if relevant. A Stanford dermatologist reviewed each eVisit and responded with an assessment and plan. The dermatologist noted whether they were able to make a diagnosis and their level of confidence in it. After the study, 10 patients participated in a focus group to provide feedback on the service. Results: In all, 38 patients sought care during the pilot period. A dermatologist was able to make a diagnosis in 36 of 38 (95%) cases, with an average confidence level of 7.9 of 10. The average time to consultation was 0.8 days. Patients indicated high levels of satisfaction with the service although they had suggestions for improvement. Discussion: Patients provided clinically useful images and information in a direct-care teledermatology model. Such services allow dermatology providers to increase access while maintaining high-quality care in an academic medical center. Further research is needed on standalone services that cannot integrate encounters with the patient’s existing medical record. PMID:27493756

  6. School-Age Child Care: Innovative Public School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERS Spectrum, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Innovative school-age day care programs include Tennessee's Extended School Program; Hawaii's After-School Plus program; San Antonio's Kid's Involvement Network (offering middle school supervision); Aurora, Colorado's state-licensed Year-Round School Recreation Plan; and Pomona, California's Child Development Program. These public school programs…

  7. A Guide to Evaluation Research in Terminal Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, Robert W., III; Foley, Susan H.

    1978-01-01

    Pressure for greater accountability is being exerted on programs for care of terminally ill and increasing demand for evaluation research. Components, implications, and limitations of evaluation systems are discussed, and their application in the terminal care setting addressed. Buckingham evaluation of hospice home care service is cited as a…

  8. Crediting Foods in the Child Care Food Program. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Robbinsville, NJ. Mid-Atlantic Regional Office.

    This modified version of a previously published title provides additional information on foods for which reimbursement may be obtained from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) by child care centers and family day care homes participating in the Child Care Food Program. Such foods, called creditable foods, are those that may be…

  9. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM): A Home Care Case-Mix Model for Children Facing Special Health Care Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Case-mix classification and payment systems help assure that persons with similar needs receive similar amounts of care resources, which is a major equity concern for consumers, providers, and programs. Although health service programs for adults regularly use case-mix payment systems, programs providing health services to children and youth rarely use such models. This research utilized Medicaid home care expenditures and assessment data on 2,578 children receiving home care in one large state in the USA. Using classification and regression tree analyses, a case-mix model for long-term pediatric home care was developed. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM) grouped children and youth in the study sample into 24 groups, explaining 41% of the variance in annual home care expenditures. The P/ECM creates the possibility of a more equitable, and potentially more effective, allocation of home care resources among children and youth facing serious health care challenges. PMID:26740744

  10. The Primary Care Extension Program: A Catalyst for Change

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert L.; Kaufman, Arthur; Mold, James W.; Grumbach, Kevin; Vetter-Smith, Molly; Berry, Anne; Burke, Bridget Teevan

    2013-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act authorized, but did not fund, the Primary Care Extension Program (PCEP). Much like the Cooperative Extension Program of the US Department of Agriculture sped the modernization of farming a century ago, the PCEP could speed the transformation of primary care. It could also help achieve other goals such as integrating primary care with public health and translating research into practice. The urgency of these goals and their importance to achieving the Triple Aim for health care should increase interest in rapidly building the PCEP, much as the need to feed the country did a century ago. PMID:23508605

  11. A University Program to Improve Nursing Care to the Aged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marten, Marie Lucille

    1978-01-01

    Proposes a series of university nursing education programs developed to increase knowledge and skills relevant to nursing care of elderly and chronically ill persons who reside in nursing homes. Briefly describes five programs intended for persons engaged in long-term care or in preparation for such roles. (EM)

  12. Certificate Program in Self-Care for Pharmacy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Jerome W.; Popovich, Nicholas G.

    The Purdue University School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences initiated a Certificate Program in Self-Care for Pharmacy Practice. The program aimed to enable pharmacists to develop their practice to better serve the self-care needs of customers. In a pilot group 26 participating pharmacists took a sequence of home study modules and workshops…

  13. Wellness Programs: Preventive Medicine to Reduce Health Care Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martini, Gilbert R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A wellness program is a formalized approach to preventive health care that can positively affect employee lifestyle and reduce future health-care costs. Describes programs for health education, smoking cessation, early detection, employee assistance, and fitness, citing industry success figures. (eight references) (MLF)

  14. 45 CFR 1306.35 - Family child care program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Family child care program option. 1306.35 Section... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD... Family child care program option. (a) Grantee and delegate agency implementation. Grantee and...

  15. Understanding the Impact of Sexual Abuse. Fostering Families. A Specialized Training Program Designed for Foster Care Workers & Foster Care Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Mona Struhsaker; Hartzell, Wenda

    This module is part of a training program for foster parents and foster care workers offered at Colorado State University. The module describes what sexual abuse is, why sexual abuse occurs, and how counties report and investigate cases of alleged sexual abuse. The module's learning objectives address: (1) ways of improving the child placement and…

  16. Beyond bankable dollars: establishing a business case for improving health care.

    PubMed

    Bailit, Michael; Dyer, Mary Beth

    2004-09-01

    To address widespread deficiencies in the quality of health care, the authors argue that health care organizations need to be able to make a "business case" for improving quality--a compelling rationale for financial investment in quality improvement programs. The authors' framework for such a business case is organized around three broad areas: direct financial considerations, strategic considerations, and internal organizational considerations. Within these categories, they offer a total of 10 specific business case arguments, with examples, for investing in quality improvement.

  17. Development and implementation of a pediatric palliative care program.

    PubMed

    Pelant, Diane; McCaffrey, Terri; Beckel, Jean

    2012-08-01

    Palliative care, long-used in the adult setting, is new to the pediatric setting. Research indicates that palliative care reduces length of stay and use of aggressive end-of-life interventions, improves quality of life, and provides hope. It balances provision of coordinated care with building of family memories and preparation for the child's death with celebration of the child's life. We advocate implementation of pediatric palliative care in any hospital that cares for children. This article provides a model outlining critical steps and considerations for establishing a successful pediatric palliative care program.

  18. 75 FR 67751 - Medicare Program: Community-Based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program: Community-Based Care... about the upcoming Community-based Care Transitions Program. The meeting is open to the public, but... will be posted on the CMS Care Transitions Web site at...

  19. Child Care and Other Support Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Latosha; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has come to realize that providing reliable, high-quality child care for service members' children is a key component of combat readiness. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) has invested heavily in child care. The DoD now runs what is by far the nation's largest employer-sponsored child-care system, a sprawling network…

  20. The Quality of Care under a Managed-Care Program for Dual Eligibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Homyak, Patricia; Bershadsky, Boris; Lum, Terry; Flood, Shannon; Zhang, Hui

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective in this study was to compare the quality of care provided under the Minnesota Senior Health Options (MSHO), a special program designed to serve dually eligible older persons, to care provided to controls who received fee-for-service Medicare and Medicaid managed care. Design and Methods: Two control groups were used; one was…

  1. Wicking teaching aged care facilities program: innovative practice.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew; See, Catherine; Lea, Emma; Bramble, Marguerite; Andrews, Sharon; Marlow, Annette; Radford, Jan; McCall, Michael; Eccleston, Claire; Horner, Barbara; McInerney, Fran

    2015-09-08

    This paper reports on the design of a program that aims to prototype teaching aged care facilities in Australia. Beginning in two Tasmanian residential aged care facilities, the intent of the program is to support large-scale inter-professional student clinical placements, positively influence students' attitudes toward working in aged care and drive development of a high-performance culture capable of supporting evidence-based aged care practice. This is important in the context of aged care being perceived as an unattractive career choice for health professionals, reinforced by negative clinical placement experiences. The Teaching Aged Care Facilities Program features six stages configured around an action research/action learning method, with dementia being a key clinical focus.

  2. Family Child Care Programs within the Military System of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Carolyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Military families face challenges not found in other work environments. Shifting work schedules that are often longer than the typical 8-hour day, as well as the ever-present possibility of being deployed anywhere in the world on a moment's notice, require a child care system that is flexible but maintains high-quality standards. The U.S.…

  3. End-of-life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) Training Program: improving palliative care in critical care.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty R; Dahlin, Constance; Campbell, Margaret L; Paice, Judith A; Malloy, Pam; Virani, Rose

    2007-01-01

    The integration of palliative care in critical care settings is essential to improve care of the dying, and critical care nurses are leaders in these efforts. However, lack of education in providing end-of-life (EOL) care is an obstacle to nurses and other healthcare professionals as they strive to deliver palliative care. Education regarding pain and symptom management, communication strategies, care at the end of life, ethics, and other aspects of palliative care are urgently needed. Efforts to increase EOL care education in most undergraduate and graduate nursing curricula are beginning; yet, most critical care nurses have not received formal training in palliative care. Moreover, educational resources such as critical care nursing textbooks often contain inadequate information on palliative care. The ELNEC-Critical Care program provides a comprehensive curriculum that concentrates on the requirements of those nurses who are working in areas of critical care. Extensive support materials include CD-ROM, binder, Web sites, newsletters, textbooks, and other supplemental items. The ultimate goal is to improve EOL care for patients in all critical care settings and enhance the experience of family members witnessing the dying process of their loved ones.

  4. Measuring Success in Health Care Value-Based Purchasing Programs

    PubMed Central

    Damberg, Cheryl L.; Sorbero, Melony E.; Lovejoy, Susan L.; Martsolf, Grant R.; Raaen, Laura; Mandel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Value-based purchasing (VBP) refers to a broad set of performance-based payment strategies that link financial incentives to health care providers' performance on a set of defined measures in an effort to achieve better value. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is advancing the implementation of VBP across an array of health care settings in the Medicare program in response to requirements in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and policymakers are grappling with many decisions about how best to design and implement VBP programs so that they are successful in achieving stated goals. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge about VBP based on a review of the published literature, a review of publicly available documentation from VBP programs, and discussions with an expert panel composed of VBP program sponsors, health care providers and health systems, and academic researchers with VBP evaluation expertise. Three types of VBP models were the focus of the review: (1) pay-for-performance programs, (2) accountable care organizations, and (3) bundled payment programs. The authors report on VBP program goals and what constitutes success; the evidence on the impact of these programs; factors that characterize high– and low–performing providers in VBP programs; the measures, incentive structures, and benchmarks used by VBP programs; evidence on spillover effects and unintended consequences; and gaps in the knowledge base. PMID:28083347

  5. Innovations In Diabetes Care Around the World: Case Studies Of Care Transformation Through Accountable Care Reforms.

    PubMed

    Thoumi, Andrea; Udayakumar, Krishna; Drobnick, Elizabeth; Taylor, Andrea; McClellan, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The rising prevalence, health burden, and cost of chronic diseases such as diabetes have accelerated global interest in innovative care models that use approaches such as community-based care and information technology to improve or transform disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Although evidence on the effectiveness of innovative care models is emerging, scaling up or extending these models beyond their original setting has been difficult. We developed a framework to highlight policy barriers-institutional, regulatory, and financial-to the diffusion of transformative innovations in diabetes care. The framework builds on accountable care principles that support higher-value care, or better patient-level outcomes at lower cost. We applied this framework to three case studies from the United States, Mexico, and India to describe how innovators and policy leaders have addressed barriers, with a focus on important financing barriers to provider and consumer payment. The lessons have implications for policy reform to promote innovation through new funding approaches, institutional reforms, and performance measures with the goal of addressing the growing burdens of diabetes and other chronic diseases.

  6. Get Well Care: Guidelines for Programs Serving Mildly Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanari, Ellen Orton, Ed.

    Although child care programs for mildly ill children are proliferating around the country, very few states have developed regulations for these types of programs, and no states have developed standards or guidelines. Based upon this concern, a group of medical and early childhood professionals, parents, and directors of programs for mildly ill…

  7. Successful business planning for new programs in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Langland-Orban, B; Krasick, E R

    1991-03-01

    Health care organizations implement business strategies through programs and services, and success depends on careful program design and execution. A conscientious design requires thorough efforts in organizing the planning process, conducting the decision analysis, and obtaining approval for a program. Weak methods and processes in the management of these efforts can result in faulty assumptions and costly errors in the development of new health care ventures, thus preventing the achievement of financial and operating goals. This article reviews the stages of business planning, and the points at which success may be impaired.

  8. Evaluation of a mentorship program to support chronic kidney disease care

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jocelyn; Grill, Allan; Bhatt, Monisha; Woodward, Graham L.; Brimble, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Primary care providers (PCPs) are ideally situated to detect and manage patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but they could use more support from nephrologists to accomplish this. Objective of program To improve early detection and management of CKD in primary care, and improve referrals to nephrologists through education and greater partnership between nephrologists and PCPs. Program description Nephrologists provided mentorship to PCPs in Ontario through a collaborative relationship. Nephrologists provided PCPs with educational orientation sessions and need-based advice on patient cases. Conclusion Primary care providers with more than 5 years of experience were more likely to use the program. Primary care providers expressed high satisfaction with the program and reported that it was effective in supporting routine CKD screening efforts, management of early CKD, appropriate referrals, and building a collaborative relationship with nephrologists. PMID:27521409

  9. Medicare program; Medicare Shared Savings Program: Accountable Care Organizations. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-06-09

    This final rule addresses changes to the Medicare Shared Savings Program including provisions relating to the payment of Accountable Care Organizations participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program. Under the Medicare Shared Savings Program, providers of services and suppliers that participate in an Accountable Care Organizations continue to receive traditional Medicare fee-for-service payments under Parts A and B, but the Accountable Care Organizations may be eligible to receive a shared savings payment if it meets specified quality and savings requirements.

  10. Local Access to Care Programs (LACPs): New Developments in the Access to Care for the Uninsured

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Lynn A; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette; Davern, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Context New, locally based health care access programs are emerging in response to the growing number of uninsured, providing an alternative to health insurance and traditional safety net providers. Although these programs have been largely overlooked in health services research and health policy, they are becoming an important local supplement to the historically overburdened safety net. Methods This article is based on a literature review, Internet search, and key actor interviews to document programs in the United States, using a typology to classify the programs and document key characteristics. Findings Local access to care programs (LACPs) fall outside traditional private and publicly subsidized insurance programs. They have a formal enrollment process, eligibility determination, and enrollment fees that give enrollees access to a network of providers that have agreed to offer free or reduced-price health care services. The forty-seven LACPs documented in this article were categorized into four general models: three-share programs, national-provider networks, county-based indigent care, and local provider–based programs. Conclusions New, locally based health access programs are being developed to meet the health care needs of the growing number of uninsured adults. These programs offer an alternative to traditional health insurance and build on the tradition of county-based care for the indigent. It is important that these locally based, alternative paths to health care services be documented and monitored, as the number of uninsured adults is continuing to grow and these programs are becoming a larger component of the U.S. health care safety net. PMID:18798886

  11. Collaboration and Subsidized Early Care and Education Programs in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Zanoni, Wladimir; Barisik, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    As a result of policy changes following welfare reform in 1996 and the costs associated with providing high-quality early care and education for children of low-income working families, agency collaboration in the state of Illinois has become an increasingly salient feature of subsidized early care and education programs (SECE). The authors…

  12. Retrospective Analysis of a Home Care Hospice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brescia, Frank J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Presents a retrospective study of patients who died in a hospice home care program to examine quality of care and differences between patients who died at home and in the hospital. No prediction could be made of which patients could remain at home until death. (JAC)

  13. Evaluating a Hygiene Education Program for Child Care Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petri, Cynthia J.; Winnail, Scott D.; Geiger, Brian F.; Artz, Lynn M.; Mason, J. W.

    Children, parents, and child caregivers are vulnerable to several infectious diseases as a result of contact with child care centers. This pilot program, implemented in a rural county in a southeastern state, was designed to enhance knowledge and skills related to improved hygiene practices in a child care setting. The target audience for the…

  14. 45 CFR 1306.35 - Family child care program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cognitive, socio-emotional, and physical development, including both gross and fine motor. Family child care... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Family child care program option. 1306.35 Section 1306.35 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN...

  15. 45 CFR 1306.35 - Family child care program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cognitive, socio-emotional, and physical development, including both gross and fine motor. Family child care... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Family child care program option. 1306.35 Section 1306.35 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN...

  16. Extended Care Programs in Catholic Schools: Some Legal Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Mary Angela

    This publication addresses issues concerning the application of the law to extended-day Catholic schools. The first chapter provides an overview of extended care. In the second chapter, sources of the law that are applied to extended care programs are described. Canon law affects Catholic schools. Catholic schools are also subject to four types of…

  17. Assessing an interdisciplinary health care model: the Governor's Wellmobile Program.

    PubMed

    Jani, Jayshree S; Tice, Carolyn; Wiseman, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This article assesses the applicability of Bronstein's (2003) generic model of interdisciplinary collaboration in the context of a newly created collaboration providing community-based health care services, the Governor's Wellmobile Program. An analysis of the program's quarterly reports and interviews with faculty and students involved in the collaboration offers an assessment of the model and implications for interdisciplinary social work practice in community health care delivery.

  18. A review of pediatric palliative care service utilization in children with a progressive neuromuscular disease who died on a palliative care program.

    PubMed

    Ho, Charles; Straatman, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies and consensus statements have expressed the need to involve palliative care services in the care of children with progressive neuromuscular diseases (PMD), yet there have been no reviews of the utilization of palliative care services by children who died on a palliative care program. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all children who had a PMD who died on a single-center palliative care program. Twenty cases were identified. Services utilized by these patients included respite care, transition services, pain and symptom management, and end-of-life care. Prominent symptoms in the last 24 hours of life included respiratory distress, pain, nausea/vomiting, and anxiety; however, symptom management was very good. Utilization of services differed depending on the disease trajectory, with respite playing a critical role in the care of children with PMD. Good symptom management can be achieved.

  19. Dogs in the Hall: A Case Study of Affective Skill Development in an Urban Veterinary Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael; Tummons, John; Ball, Anna; Bird, William

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this bounded single case study was to explore how an urban high school veterinary program impacted students' affective skill development. The program was unique because students were required to participate in internships with local animal care businesses and care for animals within the school veterinary laboratory. The…

  20. Vandalism Prevention Programs: A Case Study Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, James; Fallis, Anita

    The objective of this study was to identify, describe, and appraise existing behavior-oriented, vandalism-prevention programs using a case-study approach. This report summarizes an investigation of three programs in Ontario (Canada): Project PRIDE (Pupils Responsible in Determining their own Environment); Operation Aware; and a Diversion program.…

  1. Implementation of adolescent family-based substance use prevention programs in health care settings: Comparisons across conditions and programs

    PubMed Central

    Aalborg, Annette E.; Miller, Brenda A.; Husson, Gail; Byrnes, Hilary F.; Bauman, Karl E.; Spoth, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The majority of knowledge related to implementation of family-based substance use prevention programs is based on programs delivered in school and community settings. The aim of this study is to examine procedures related to implementation effectiveness and quality of two family-based universal substance use prevention programs delivered in health care settings, the Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10–14 (SFP) and Family Matters (FM). These evidence-based programs were delivered as part of a larger random control intervention study designed to assess the influence of program choice vs. assignment on study participation and adolescent substance use outcomes. We also assess the effects of program choice (vs. assignment to program) on program delivery. Methods A mixed method case study was conducted to assess procedures used to maximize implementation quality and fidelity of family-based prevention programs delivered in health care settings. Families with an 11 year old child were randomly selected for study participation from health plan membership databases of 4 large urban medical centers in the San Francisco Bay Area. Eligible families were initially randomized to a Choice study condition (families choose SFP or FM) or Assigned study condition (assigned to FM, SFP or control group); 494 ethnically diverse families were selected for participation in study programs. Results Successful implementation of family prevention programs in health care settings required knowledge of the health care environment and familiarity with established procedures for developing ongoing support and collaboration. Ongoing training of program deliverers utilizing data from fidelity assessment appeared to contribute to improved program fidelity over the course of the study. Families who chose FM completed the program in a shorter period (p<.0001) and spent more time implementing program activities (p=0.02) compared to families assigned to FM. SFP

  2. Application of a Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program in critical care: the royal exchange.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lauren E; Flanders, Sonya A

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses the history of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) and how it is used to foster a culture of safety. CUSP involves interdisciplinary teamwork and empowers nurses at all levels to pioneer changes and develop leadership skills. A case study is presented to show how CUSP was used effectively in critical care to create a standardized handover of patients from the operating room to the intensive care unit.

  3. [A general practitioners' program for primary care in Chile].

    PubMed

    Bass del Campo, Germán Camilo

    2015-03-13

    The public health system in Chile does not have a comprehensive development policy for physician resources in primary care, so there is currently a significant deficit of hours for medical care. The article contains a proposal for a "General Program for Primary Care Physicians", which aims to reduce the gap of general practitioners and specialists in primary care. The program proposes to integrate newly graduated physicians to work in the public medical offices with the subsequent possibility of applying for a scholarship specialty, and consecutively a return period as a specialist in the public health network. The immediate implementation of this program is perfectly feasible given the current availability of doctors, over 1400 medical graduates from universities.

  4. A Predoctoral Program in Dental Care for the Developmentally Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Fred S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In 1980, the State University of New York at Stony Brook began a program, integrated into the program of children's dentistry, to train students in care for the developmentally disabled. Management of developmentally disabled patients is provided over three years, and represents an extension of pediatric behavior management. (MSE)

  5. Components of Quality Community College Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campion, William J.; Kyle, Marybeth

    Community colleges are uniquely positioned and well suited to assist in meeting the increasing demand for child care programs. Although a number of colleges have been reluctant to institute these programs due to the problems of liability, operating expenses, and allegations of child abuse, there are a number of advantages to having on-campus child…

  6. "Adopt-a-School"--Program of Eye Care for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Virginia H.; Truelove, Nancy

    1978-01-01

    Describes a program in which community organizations (such as the Lions Club) adopted 20 Ohio schools for six weeks to teach primary grade children the importance of eye care and safety. Materials used in the program (developed by the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness) are outlined. (PHR)

  7. Nurturing the Future: Implementing Internships in Child Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterangelo, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    One way that child care programs can help prepare future professionals in the field is to offer opportunities for the student to gain real life experience in a program. This is where internships are indispensable. An internship will help a novice develop their skills under the watchful eye of a more seasoned mentor. With internships, not only is…

  8. Developing Healthy Adolescents--A Progressive Health Care Partnership Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griesemer, Bernard A.; Hough, David L.

    1993-01-01

    A 1991 partnership coupling Southwest Missouri State University with Saint John's Regional Health Center spawned the Midwest Sports Medicine Center, originally designed to treat orthopedic injuries. Soon the center developed major educational initiatives, including SportsPACE, a program integrating health care programs into the secondary core…

  9. Military Child Care Programs: Progress Made, More Needed.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    program areas such as nutri- tion, health, child growth and development, educational guidance, and remedial techniques. None of the existing service...activities weakens their programs. The child care staff should know about such things as nutri- tion, health, child growth and development

  10. A Care Coordination Program for Substance-Exposed Newborns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twomey, Jean E.; Caldwell, Donna; Soave, Rosemary; Fontaine, Lynne Andreozzi; Lester, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    The Vulnerable Infants Program of Rhode Island (VIP-RI) was established as a care coordination program to promote permanency for substance-exposed newborns in the child welfare system. Goals of VIP-RI were to optimize parents' opportunities for reunification and increase the efficacy of social service systems involved with families affected by…

  11. Regional palliative care program in Extremadura: an effective public health care model in a sparsely populated region.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Emilio; Rocafort, Javier; De Lima, Liliana; Bruera, Eduardo; García-Peña, Francisco; Fernández-Vara, Guillermo

    2007-05-01

    The Regional Palliative Care Program in Extremadura (RPCPEx) was created and fully integrated into the Public Health Care System in 2002. The local health care authorities of Extremadura (a large sparsely populated region in the west of Spain with 1,083,897 inhabitants) decided to guarantee palliative care as a basic right, offering maximum coverage, availability, and equity, functioning at all levels of assistance and based on the complexity of the case. The program provides full coverage of the region through a network of eight Palliative Care Teams under the direction of a regional coordinator. The mobile teams work in acute hospitals and in the community. This paper describes the program, using qualitative and quantitative indicators of structure, process, and outcome. Qualitative indicators assess, among others, the performance of the regional network, including the outcomes of the quality, training, registry, treatment, and research groups. Quantitative indicators applied consisted of the number of professionals (1/26,436 inhabitants), number of patients (1,635/million inhabitants/year), number of activities/million inhabitants/year (6,183 hospital and 3,869 home visits; 1,863 consultations; 14,748 advising services; 11,539 coordination meetings; and 483 educational meetings), cost of care (2,242,000 Euros per year), and opioid consumption (494,654 daily defined doses/year). Four years after the planning process and three years after becoming operational, the RPCPEx offers an effective and efficient model integrated into the public health care system and is able to offer comprehensive coverage, availability, equity and networking among all the structures and levels of the program. Several structural and organizational tools were developed, which may be adopted by other programs within the scope of public health. The provision of palliative care should not be conditioned by the patient's geographical location, his or her condition or disease or on the ability

  12. The Professionalism of Critical Care Nurse Fellows After Completion of the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship Program.

    PubMed

    Castro, Emily; Click, Elizabeth; Douglas, Sara; Friedman, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is paramount to the formation and functioning of new graduate critical care nurses. In this project, a sample of 110 new graduate nurses used a descriptive self-report electronic survey with Hall's Professionalism Inventory Scale. A great percentage of these new graduate critical care nurse fellows with high professionalism scores may be related to their participation in the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship orientation program. Perhaps, Nursing Professional Development specialists should incorporate classes on professional advancement planning for new graduate nurses.

  13. Facilitating Survivorship Program Development for Health Care Providers and Administrators

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Uman, Gwen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This manuscript will describe institutional changes observed through goal analysis that occurred following a multidisciplinary education project, aimed at preparing healthcare professionals to meet the needs of the growing numbers of cancer survivors. Method Post course evaluations consisted of quantitative questionnaires and follow up on three goals created by each participating team, during the 3-day educational program. Evaluations were performed 6, 12 and 18 months-post course for percent of goal achievement. Goals were, a priori coded based on the Institute of Medicine’s survivorship care components, along with 2 additional codes related to program development and education. Results Two hundred and four teams participated over the 4 yearly courses. A total of 51.6% of goals were related to program development, 21% to survivorship care interventions, 20.9% on educational goals, and only 4.7% related to coordination of care, 1.4% on surveillance, and 0.4% related to prevention-focused goals. Quantitative measures post course showed significant changes in comfort and effectiveness in survivorship care in the participating institutions. Conclusion During the period 2006–2009, healthcare institutions focused on developing survivorship care programs and educating staff, in an effort to prepare colleagues to provide and coordinate survivorship care, in cancer settings across the country. Implications Goal-directed education provided insight into survivorship activities occurring across the nation. Researchers were able to identify survivorship care programs and activities, as well as the barriers to developing these programs. This presented opportunities to discuss possible interventions to improve follow-up care and survivors’ quality of life. PMID:25216608

  14. A Measure of the Child Care Ecology: Day Care Program Compliance with State Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Richard

    Between July 1978 and June 1980 a program evaluation was undertaken in Pennsylvania in order to measure compliance with state day care licensing regulations. The evaluation involved approximately 1000 licensed/approved child care centers and 50,000 children. Statistical data indicate that by the period April to June 1980 the statewide compliance…

  15. Increasing Access to Health Care: Examination of Hospital Community Benefits and Free Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giffords, Elissa D.; Wenze, Linda; Weiss, David M.; Kass, Donna; Guercia, Rosemarie

    2005-01-01

    The present study explored hospital community benefits and free care programs at seven hospitals in Nassau and Suffolk counties in Long Island, New York. There were two components to this project: (1) assessment of information regarding the availability of free care and (2) an analysis of the community benefits information filed with state…

  16. Day Care Legal Handbook: Legal Aspects of Organizing and Operating Day Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikman, William F.

    This guide for providers of day care services presents information on business regulations and other legal considerations affecting for-profit and not-for-profit day care programs. Three basic topics covered are: (1) choosing the type of organization (sole proprietorship, partnership or corporation), (2) forming the organization, and (3) operating…

  17. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  18. The Care-Integrated Concentration Meditation Program for Patients With Weaning Difficulty: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Thinhuatoey, Benjamard; Songwathana, Praneed; Petpichetchian, Wongchan

    2016-01-01

    Because of the multifaceted process of weaning patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation, enhancing weaning success remains a challenge. The Care-Integrated Concentration Meditation Program was developed on the basis of Buddhist philosophy and implemented to determine its procedural feasibility. A qualitative case study with 3 participants was conducted, and the process and initial outcomes were evaluated.

  19. Graduate nurses' perceptions of a critical care nurse internship program.

    PubMed

    Eigsti, Janice E

    2009-01-01

    Graduate nurse internship programs (NIPs) have existed for a number of years as tools for recruiting and retaining nurses. A recent literature review uncovers the rare NIP dedicated to orienting the graduate nurse to a critical care environment. Few have addressed the nurse interns' perceptions of these programs. Ongoing evaluation is vital to improving existing programs and giving credence to other hospitals with similar initiatives. A retrospective descriptive design study with the purpose of disclosing the critical care graduate nurse interns' perceptions of the critical care NIP at Elkhart General Hospital, a 330-bed community hospital in Elkhart, Indiana, provided information for this study. Patricia Benner's novice-to-expert model served as the theoretical framework. The critical care NIP questionnaire provided satisfaction scores for program components. Mean scores between groups were explored using the t test. Mean satisfaction score for the overall program was 5.62 (SD = 0.371), with a retention rate of 76.9% (20 of 26). Statistically significant differences in satisfaction scores were not found in this pilot study between nurse interns currently working in critical care and those who are not.

  20. Caring for Children: Case Studies of Local Government Child Care Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Fern

    This book of case studies highlights 26 municipalities involved in activities related to child care. Cities selected were of different sizes; were located in different parts of the country; and used diverse approaches for developing ways to improve access to affordable, high-quality child care. Each case study was developed through a telephone…

  1. Early mobility and walking program for patients in intensive care units: creating a standard of care.

    PubMed

    Perme, Christiane; Chandrashekar, Rohini

    2009-05-01

    New technologies in critical care and mechanical ventilation have led to long-term survival of critically ill patients. An early mobility and walking program was developed to provide guidelines for early mobility that would assist clinicians working in intensive care units, especially clinicians working with patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation. Prolonged stays in the intensive care unit and mechanical ventilation are associated with functional decline and increased morbidity, mortality, cost of care, and length of hospital stay. Implementation of an early mobility and walking program could have a beneficial effect on all of these factors. The program encompasses progressive mobilization and walking, with the progression based on a patient's functional capability and ability to tolerate the prescribed activity. The program is divided into 4 phases. Each phase includes guidelines on positioning, therapeutic exercises, transfers, walking reeducation, and duration and frequency of mobility sessions. Additionally, the criteria for progressing to the next phase are provided. Use of this program demands a collaborative effort among members of the multidisciplinary team in order to coordinate care for and provide safe mobilization of patients in the intensive care unit.

  2. Better care and better teaching. New model of postpartum care for early discharge programs.

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, M. J.; Russillo, B.; Hyland, C.; Kovacs, L.; McAlister, E.

    2001-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Rapid postpartum discharge has reduced opportunities to detect early newborn or parenting problems and to teach neonatal assessment and maternal postpartum care to medical trainees. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: Development of a program to not only ensure adequate care of mothers and newborns after early hospital discharge, but also to teach outpatient assessment skills to family medicine residents. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: In an urban, secondary care, university-affiliated teaching hospital predominantly training family medicine residents, an interdisciplinary committee created and supervised a neonatal and maternal postpartum assessment program. Newborn infants and their mothers are seen by a family physician, a family medicine resident, and a nurse within 48 hours of discharge, after which care is assumed in the community by the child's primary care physician. An assessment protocol developed by the interdisciplinary group promotes standardized mother and child care and a structured learning experience for trainees. CONCLUSION: Rapid follow up of early discharged infants and their mothers can be facilitated by a program of standardized assessment by a roster of pooled, interacting family physicians and nurses. When this assessment occurs in a teaching milieu, a comprehensive learning experience can be combined with defined objectives that emphasize and encourage newborn and maternal assessment for ambulatory patients. PMID:11723597

  3. The business case for preconception care: methods and issues.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Scott D; Sotnikov, Sergey V; Leatherman, Sheila; Curtis, Michele

    2006-09-01

    Only a limited number of economic evaluations have addressed the costs and benefits of preconception care. In order to persuade health care providers, payers, or purchasers to become actively involved in promoting preconception care, it is important to demonstrate the value of doing so through development of a "business case". Perceived benefits in terms of organizational reputation and market share can be influential in forming a business case. In addition, it is standard to include an economic analysis of financial costs and benefits from the perspective of the provider practice, payer, or purchaser in a business case. The methods, data needs, and other issues involved with preparing an economic analysis of the likely financial return on investment in preconception care are presented here. This is accompanied by a review or case study of economic evaluations of preconception care for women with recognized diabetes. Although the data are not sufficient to draw firm conclusions, there are indications that such care may yield positive financial benefits to health care organizations through reduction in maternal and infant hospitalizations. More work is needed to establish how costs and economic benefits are distributed among different types of organizations. Also, the optimum methods of delivering preconception care for women with diabetes need to be evaluated. Similar assessments should also be conducted for other forms of preconception care, including comprehensive care.

  4. Enrollee satisfaction with three Florida Medicaid managed care programs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hsou-mei; Duncan, R Paul; Porter, Colleen K

    2003-05-01

    A study was undertaken to compare adult enrollees' satisfaction with three Medicaid Programs operating in South Florida: (1) the provider service network (PSN), (2) MediPass, and (3) Medicaid HMOs. The Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Study 2.0 Medicaid Adult instrument was used to collect information on four global ratings and five composite ratings. MediPass enrollees were satisfied with their overall health care, whereas PSN enrollees gave only average scores for their doctors, specialists, overall health care, provider communication, and staff helpfulness. The HMO enrollees were satisfied with their specialists, health plan, access to care, promptness of care, staff helpfulness, and member/customer service. Improvements in satisfaction would require different interventions in each of the programs.

  5. Diabetes Care and Treatment Program: A Joslin Telemedicine Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-05-2-0018 TITLE: Diabetes Care and Treatment Program: A Joslin...01-01-2006 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-01-2005 to 31-12-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Diabetes Care and Treatment ... treatments and appropriate management. Reduction or prevention of costly diabetes -related complications requires blood glucose levels be kept as close as

  6. 76 FR 43254 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  7. 78 FR 45176 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2013 Through June 30, 2014 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  8. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2010 Through June 30, 2011 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  9. Teaching Interdisciplinary Geriatrics Ambulatory Care: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brent C.; Remington, Tami L.; Foulk, Mariko A.; Whall, Ann L.

    2006-01-01

    Interdisciplinary health care training is advocated by numerous government and philanthropic organizations. Educators in the health professions are increasingly offering training in interdisciplinary health care in a variety of contexts, including ambulatory settings. This paper describes a three-year program to teach skills in interdisciplinary…

  10. Home care and technology: a case study.

    PubMed

    Stroulia, Eleni; Nikolaidisa, Ioanis; Liua, Lili; King, Sharla; Lessard, Lysanne

    2012-01-01

    Health care aides (HCAs) are the backbone of the home care system and provide a range of services to people who, for various reasons related to chronic conditions and aging, are not able to take care of themselves independently. The demand for HCA services will increase and the current HCA supply will likely not keep up with this increasing demand without fundamental changes in the current environment. Information and communication technology (ICT) can address some of the workflow challenges HCAs face. In this project, we conducted an ethnographic study to document and analyse HCAs' workflows and team interactions. Based on our findings, we designed an ICT tool suite, integrating easily available existing and newly developed (by our team) technologies to address these issues. Finally, we simulated the deployment of our technologies, to assess the potential impact of these technological solutions on the workflow and productivity of HCAs, their healthcare teams and client care.

  11. Preliminary Data on a Care Coordination Program for Home Care Recipients.

    PubMed

    Dean, Katie M; Hatfield, Laura A; Jena, Anupam B; Cristman, David; Flair, Michael; Kator, Kylie; Nudd, Geoffrey; Grabowski, David C

    2016-09-01

    Home care recipients are often hospitalized for potentially avoidable reasons. A pilot program (Intervention in Home Care to Improve Health Outcomes (In-Home)) was designed to help home care providers identify acute clinical changes in condition and then manage the condition in the home and thereby avoid a costly hospitalization. Caregivers answer simple questions about the care recipient's condition during a telephone-based "clock-out" at the end of each shift. Responses are electronically captured in the agency management software that caregivers use to "clock-in," manage care, and "clock-out" on every shift. These are transmitted to the agency's care manager, who follows up on the change in condition and escalates appropriately. A description of the In-Home model is presented, and pilot data from 22 home care offices are reported. In the pilot, caregivers reported a change in condition after 2% of all shifts, representing an average of 1.9 changes per care recipient in a 6-month period. Changes in behavior and skin condition were the most frequently recorded domains. Interviews with participating caregivers and care managers suggested positive attitudes regarding the intervention; challenges included resistance to change on the part of home care staff and difficulties in applying a uniform intervention to individuals with varying needs in home care offices with varying capacities. In an ongoing randomized trial, the success of the overall program will be measured primarily according to the potential reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of home care recipients and the effect this potential reduction has on spending and healthcare outcomes.

  12. Impact of a Palliative Care Program on End-of-life Care in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Younge, Noelle; Smith, P. Brian; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Brandon, Debra H.; Simmons, Catherine; Cotten, C. Michael; Bidegain, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate changes in end-of-life care following initiation of a Palliative Care Program in a neonatal intensive care unit. Study Design Retrospective study comparing infant deaths before and after implementation of a Palliative Care Program comprised of medication guidelines, an individualized order set, a nursing care plan, and staff education. Result 82 infants died before (Era 1) and 68 infants died after implementation of the program (Era 2). Morphine use was similar [88% vs. 81%; p=0.17], while benzodiazepines use increased in Era 2 [26% vs. 43%; p=0.03]. Withdrawal of life support (73% vs. 63%; p=0.17) and do-not-resuscitate orders (46% vs. 53%; p=0.42) were similar. Do-not-resuscitate orders and family meetings were more frequent among Era 2 infants with activated palliative care orders (n=21) compared to infants without activated orders (n=47). Conclusion End-of-life family meetings and benzodiazepine use increased following implementation of our program, likely reflecting adherence to guidelines and improved communication. PMID:25341195

  13. Health Center Professional Programs and Primary Care Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Aysola, Jaya; Groves, DaShawn; Hicks, LeRoi S

    2016-01-01

    Background Current policy promotes health center professional training and pipeline programs as solutions to bolster primary care workforce in shortage areas, despite the paucity of evidence. Methods We analyzed data from US health centers we surveyed from March to June 2010, merged with federal health center data, to estimate associations between health center training and pipeline programs and provider recruitment and retention. Results Of the 976 surveyed, 391 health centers responded. Health centers with career ladder programs compared to those without had higher adjusted rates of no/minimal difficulty in recruitment of primary care providers. (17.6% vs. 10.6%; p=.01) and close to double the adjusted rates of reporting no/minimal difficulty in retention of primary care providers (39.4% vs. 21.2%; p=.0001). Discussion There remains a need for further evaluation of health professional programs in order to expand models, such as career ladder programs, that demonstrate effectiveness in improving the primary care workforce in shortage areas. PMID:27891532

  14. Increasing the educational value of medical care evaluation: a model program.

    PubMed

    Bashook, P G; Maxwell, J A; Sandlow, L J

    1982-09-01

    A model medical care evaluation (MCE) program, designed to increase the educational value of MCE activities, was implemented in three clinical departments at the Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center. The program was evaluated by means of quantitative and qualitative observational techniques, questionnaires, and interviews and by comparing committees for which the implementation was highly successful with those for which it was less successful. The results confirmed the educational value of the following features of the model program: (a) a focus on the process of care rather than standards of care, (b) prior review of records and their presentation as case problems, (c) educational emphasis by the committee chairperson, and (d) attendance by at least four physicians. Implications for other types of hospital quality assurance or educational activities are discussed.

  15. Redesigned nursing practice: a case management model for critical care.

    PubMed

    Ritter, J; Fralic, M F; Tonges, M C; McCormac, M

    1992-03-01

    Changes within the health care system necessitate changes in nursing practice. Given the financial environment and the need to balance the cost/quality equation, case management will become increasingly important and has the potential to become the predominant care delivery system of the 1990s. This transition represents a tremendous opportunity for nursing. The CCM role offers many potential advantages and benefits for individual nurses and the profession as a whole. Nurses practicing as case managers have the opportunity to function in a highly professional, independent manner with a great deal of interdisciplinary collaboration. In addition to the challenges and satisfactions of the work itself, the nurse case manager may also enjoy a higher salary and more scheduling control and flexibility. The broader advantages of case management include its benefits to patients and institutions and its fit with current trends in the health care environment. Nurse case managers manage hospital systems to produce optimal clinical outcomes for patients in the shortest time using as few resources as possible. This approach to care delivery places nurses in a position to demonstrate the tremendous contribution they can make to achieving the institution's goal of delivering high-quality, cost-effective care. Thus, case management fits extremely well with current trends in health care financing and outcome measurement. The model described in this article illustrates one approach to implementing these important concepts in a critical care setting.

  16. Linking pediatric primary care obesity management to community programs.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adolfo J; Hartman, Jennifer; Grodecki, Jennifer; Clavier, Alejandro; Ghaey, Kamala; Elsner, Mary; Moore, Chantal; Reina, Olga Ochoa; Binns, Helen J

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for obesity management in primary care call for linking to community services. The Promoting Health Project (PHP) was a multi-component, practice-based intervention aimed at improving care of obese children, including referrals to community services. Promoting Health Project staff identified and interviewed representatives of 40 nutrition or physical activity services/programs. Quality improvement (QI) teams at three practices worked to improve overweight/obesity identification and care and implement practice-to-community connections that used the information gathered from the programs/ services. A practice community coordinator (PCC) facilitated interactions between practices, community programs and families. Researchers tracked patients referred, PCC to family interactions, and time spent. They surveyed parents of referred patients and interviewed key clinicians. Forty-six patients participated in programs. Substantial efforts were necessary to create smooth referral systems. Family motivation was perceived as a limiting factor in program attendance. Clinicians were satisfied with systems established. Effectively linking practitioners to community programs requires the use of additional resources.

  17. Congenital toxoplasmosis and prenatal care state programs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Control programs have been executed in an attempt to reduce vertical transmission and the severity of congenital infection in regions with a high incidence of toxoplasmosis in pregnant women. We aimed to evaluate whether treatment of pregnant women with spiramycin associated with a lack of monitoring for toxoplasmosis seroconversion affects the prognosis of patients. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study with 246 newborns (NB) at risk for congenital toxoplasmosis in Goiânia (Brazil) between October 2003 and October 2011. We analyzed the efficacy of maternal treatment with spiramycin. Results A total of 40.7% (66/162) of the neonates were born seriously infected. Vertical transmission associated with reactivation during pregnancy occurred in 5.5% (9/162) of the NB, with one showing severe infection (systemic). The presence of specific immunoglobulins (fetal IgM and NB IgA) suggested the worst prognosis. Treatment of pregnant women by spiramycin resulted in reduced vertical transmission. When infected pregnant women did not undergo proper treatment, the risk of severe infection (neural-optical) in NB was significantly increased. Fetal IgM was associated with ocular impairment in 48.0% (12/25) of the fetuses and neonatal IgA-specific was related to the neuro-ophthalmologic and systemic forms of the disease. When acute toxoplasmosis was identified in the postpartum period, a lack of monitoring of seronegative pregnant women resulted in a higher risk of severe congenital infection. Conclusion Treatment of pregnant women with spiramycin reduces the possibility of transmission of infection to the fetus. However, a lack of proper treatment is associated with the onset of the neural-optical form of congenital infection. Primary preventive measures should be increased for all pregnant women during the prenatal period and secondary prophylaxis through surveillance of seroconversion in seronegative pregnant woman should be introduced to reduce the

  18. Program To Address Sociocultural Barriers to Health Care in Hispanic Communities. National Program Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mike; Heroux, Janet

    Many members of the Hispanic community are separated from the larger community by language barriers and different cultures and belief systems. These factors can affect Hispanic Americans' ability to seek and gain access to the health care system. The Program To Address Sociocultural Barriers to Health Care in the Hispanic Community, known as…

  19. Better Federal Program Administration Can Contribute to Improving State Foster Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare Act of 1980 provides for annual federal incentive payments to states if they improve foster care programs by (1) avoiding unnecessary removal of children from their homes; (2) preventing extended stays in foster care; and (3) reunifying children with their families or placing them for adoption. To be…

  20. Constructing a conflict resolution program for health care.

    PubMed

    Porter-O'Grady, Tim

    2004-01-01

    Resolving conflict throughout organizations requires a programmatic infrastructure and a committed management team. Leaders must recognize the need to approach conflict by building a format for learning, creating and managing an effective conflict management program. Careful attention to the elements of design and the stages of development can make all the difference in building a sustainable and useful conflict management approach.

  1. R. I. Caregivers. Caring: A Training Program for Family Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Elderly Affairs, Providence.

    This document presents a training manual to help caregivers who provide care to older family members and friends at home. The program, which offers a practical approach to caregiving and a realistic view of the aging process, is intended to clarify the problems confronting caregivers of older people, serve as a basic source manual for training…

  2. Administration of Child Care Programs: Business Management. Student Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    Designed as a laboratory experience guide and workbook, this manual exposes postsecondary students to the general competencies and business management aspects of child care program administration. The four units cover general competencies (functions of management, leadership, and board of directors), regulations and legal concerns, personnel…

  3. Administration of Child Care Programs: Business Management. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    Designed for use by postsecondary child development instructors, this guide is organized into four units that expose students to the general competencies and business management aspects of child care program administration. Introductory materials discuss the use of the materials and provide guidelines for evaluating students. The four units cover…

  4. Can object technology meet health care's programming needs?

    PubMed

    McCormack, J

    1997-02-01

    Although object technology is just starting to make inroads in programming for health care applications, some observers predict it will drive information systems into the next century and beyond. Objects technology could play a major role in quicker development of the computer-based patient record and in easing the creation of links between systems.

  5. Increasing access to health care: examination of hospital community benefits and free care programs.

    PubMed

    Giffords, Elissa D; Wenze, Linda; Weiss, David M; Kass, Donna; Guercia, Rosemarie

    2005-08-01

    The present study explored hospital community benefits and free care programs at seven hospitals in Nassau and Suffolk counties in Long Island, NewYork. There were two components to this project: (1) assessment of information regarding the availability of free care and (2) an analysis of the community benefits information filed with state regulatory offices. Results show that not one of the seven hospitals consistently informed surveyors that free care was available to low-income, uninsured people. Surveyors had difficulty obtaining written free care policies. The article concludes with suggestions for government agencies, hospital administrators, social workers, and other advocates on how to get involved in efforts to increase access to health care for the uninsured population.

  6. [DEVELOPMENTAL CARE IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT ACCORDING TO NEWBORN INDIVIDUALIZED DEVELOPMENTAL CARE AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (NIDCAP)].

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Dalia; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2016-01-01

    During hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the brain of the preterm infant undergoes a particularly vulnerable and sensitive period of development. Brain development might be negatively influenced by direct injury as well as by complications of prematurity. Over the past few years, stress has come to be increasingly recognized as a potential risk factor. The NICU environment contains numerous stress factors due to maternal deprivation and over-stimulation, such as light, sound and pain, which conflict with the brain's developmental requirements. Developmental care is a caregiving approach that addresses the early developmental needs of the preterm infant as an integral component of quality neonatal care. NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) is a comprehensive program that aims to reduce environmental stress, to support the infant's neuro-behavioral maturation and organization, and to promote early parent-infant relationships. The implementation of developmental care based on NIDCAP principles is a gradual, in-depth systems change process, which affects all aspects of care in the NICU. This review describes the theoretical basis of the NIDCAP approach, summarizes the scientific evidence and addresses some of the implications of the transition from a traditional to a developmental care NICU.

  7. Identifying the Unique Aspects of Adolescent and Young Adult Palliative Care: A Case Study to Propel Programmatic Changes in Pediatric Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Lisa; Dell, Mary Lynn

    2015-09-01

    Using a case study, in this article we seek to highlight how the distinct developmental needs of adolescent and young adult patients facing a life-threatening condition require a different approach to patient care by pediatric health care workers. The case underscores pitfalls in using a pediatric construct of care in areas of pain management, social stressors, and advanced care planning, and suggests programs to implement for improvement, including partnership with psychiatry, substance abuse, and palliative care specialists.

  8. Examples of Nonconservatism in the CARE 3 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Kelly J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents parameter regions in the CARE 3 (Computer-Aided Reliability Estimation version 3) computer program where the program overestimates the reliability of a modeled system without warning the user. Five simple models of fault-tolerant computer systems are analyzed; and, the parameter regions where reliability is overestimated are given. The source of the error in the reliability estimates for models which incorporate transient fault occurrences was not readily apparent. However, the source of much of the error for models with permanent and intermittent faults can be attributed to the choice of values for the run-time parameters of the program.

  9. The role of the case manager in a disease management program.

    PubMed

    Huston, Carol J

    2002-01-01

    Disease management programs provide new opportunities and roles for case managers to provide population-based healthcare to the chronically ill. This article identifies common components of disease management programs and examines roles assumed by case managers in disease management programs such as baseline assessment, performing economic analyses of diseases and their respective associated resource utilization, developing and/or implementing care guidelines or algorithms, educational interventions, disease management program implementation, and outcomes assessment. Areas of expertise needed to be an effective case manager in a disease management program are also identified.

  10. The role of the case manager in a disease management program.

    PubMed

    Huston, C J

    2001-01-01

    Disease management programs provide new opportunities and roles for case managers to provide population-based healthcare to the chronically ill. This article identifies common components of disease management programs and examines roles assumed by case managers in disease management programs such as baseline assessment, performing economic analyses of diseases and their respective associated resource utilization, developing and/or implementing care guidelines or algorithms, educational interventions, disease management program implementation, and outcomes assessment. Areas of expertise needed to be an effective case manager in a disease management program are also identified.

  11. 7 CFR 250.61 - Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). 250.61... National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and Other Child Nutrition Programs § 250.61 Child and Adult Care Food... CACFP to distributing agencies, which provide them to child care and adult care...

  12. 7 CFR 250.61 - Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). 250.61... National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and Other Child Nutrition Programs § 250.61 Child and Adult Care Food... CACFP to distributing agencies, which provide them to child care and adult care...

  13. 7 CFR 250.61 - Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). 250.61... National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and Other Child Nutrition Programs § 250.61 Child and Adult Care Food... CACFP to distributing agencies, which provide them to child care and adult care...

  14. 7 CFR 250.61 - Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). 250.61... National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and Other Child Nutrition Programs § 250.61 Child and Adult Care Food... CACFP to distributing agencies, which provide them to child care and adult care...

  15. Heart failure management: optimal health care delivery programs.

    PubMed

    Moser, D K

    2000-01-01

    Heart failure is the single most costly health care expenditure in the United States. The major proportion of these costs is attributable to rehospitalizations, and by many estimates the majority of rehospitalizations might be preventable with better health care delivery. The past 5 years have seen an explosion in the number of heart failure disease management programs put in place across the country to try to decrease the economic burden of heart failure and improve patient outcomes. Yet few of these are based on programs tested by researchers, let alone tested in randomized, controlled trials. This chapter summarizes findings from studies of heart failure disease management programs from 1980 to the present, critiques those studies, and offers suggestions for future research in this area.

  16. Improving Diabetes Care in the Military Primary Care Clinic: Case Study Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-23

    required application of innovative and creative strategies to improve self-management. The cases are representative of some common themes within the patient with type 2 diabetes in a military primary care clinic.

  17. American Organization of Nurse Executives Care Innovation and Transformation program: improving care and practice environments.

    PubMed

    Oberlies, Amanda Stefancyk

    2014-09-01

    The American Organization of Nurse Executives conducted an evaluation of the hospitals participating in the Care Innovation and Transformation (CIT) program. A total of 24 hospitals participated in the 2-year CIT program from 2012 to 2013. Reported outcomes include increased patient satisfaction, decreased falls, and reductions in nurse turnover and overtime. Nurses reported statistically significant improvements in 4 domains of the principles and elements of a healthful practice environment developed by the Nursing Organizations Alliance.

  18. Managed care and ERISA: synopsis and case law review.

    PubMed

    Gerbasi, Joan B

    2003-01-01

    Managed care organizations (MCOs) have become the predominant health care model in the United States. Through cost containment arrangements with providers, incentives for patients to pursue less costly care and reductions in the provision of unnecessary care, MCOs are more intimately involved in the delivery of health care than their former fee-for-service insurance company counterparts. However, this new role has not implied increased liability, largely because of The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). This article provides an overview of ERISA and a review of the important legal cases in this area, including the three most recent Supreme Court cases. Courts have struggled with interpreting ERISA, and decisions have been difficult to reconcile. Frustration with this statute and the failure of the U.S. Congress to amend it, has led to more liberal interpretations of ERISA in recent years.

  19. Service-Learning at Dementia Care Programs: An Orientation and Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert-Shute, Jennifer J.; Jarrott, Shannon E.; Fruhauf, Christine A.

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes a project that addresses the unique challenge service-learners face at dementia care programs. The project was conducted in conjunction with two courses on aging that offer students a service-learning (S-L) option at a university adult day service (ADS) program that accepts service-learners from these courses. The…

  20. The Americans with Disabilities Act and Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardeck, John T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the major components of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 applicable to day care facilities. Offers guidelines for admitting disabled children, and for determining whether an accommodation is reasonable or an unreasonable burden. Considers an ADA case involving discrimination against a diabetic child for insights into the…

  1. Day Care in Caracas: A Day Care Homes Program Evaluation Report. Volume I: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruesta, Maria Carlota; de Vidal, Amalia Barrios

    This document provides a summary of a formative evaluation research project concerning the neighborhood day care homes program in Caracas, Venezuela. The evaluation included nine lines of study: (1) an assessment of sociodemographic conditions of Venezuelan preschool age children, legal and employment status of Venezuelan women, and general social…

  2. Implementation of Advanced Health Care Technology into Existing Competency-Based Health Care Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemovage, Shirley

    A project was undertaken to develop new curriculum materials that could be incorporated into an existing health assistant program to cover recent advances in health care technology. Area physicians' offices were toured and meetings were held with administrators of local hospitals in order to discover what kinds of advances in health care…

  3. Veterans Affairs Geriatric Scholars Program: Enhancing Existing Primary Care Clinician Skills in Caring for Older Veterans.

    PubMed

    Kramer, B Josea; Creekmur, Beth; Howe, Judith L; Trudeau, Scott; Douglas, Joseph R; Garner, Kimberly; Bales, Connie; Callaway-Lane, Carol; Barczi, Steven

    2016-11-01

    The Veterans Affairs Geriatric Scholars Program (GSP) is a continuing professional development program to integrate geriatrics into the clinical practices of primary care providers and select associated health professions that support primary care teams. GSP uses a blended program educational format, and the minimal requirements are to attend an intensive course in geriatrics, participate in an interactive workshop on quality improvement (QI), and initiate a local QI project to demonstrate application of new knowledge to benefit older veterans. Using a retrospective post/pre survey design, the effect of GSP on clinical practices and behaviors and variation of that effect on clinicians working in rural and nonrural settings were evaluated. Significant improvement was found in the frequency of using evidence-based brief standardized assessments, clinical decision-making, and standards of care. Significant subgroup differences were observed in peer-to-peer information sharing between rural and nonrural clinicians. Overall, 77% of the sample reported greater job satisfaction after participating in GSP. The program is a successful model for advancing postgraduate education in geriatrics and a model that might be replicated to increase access to quality health care, particularly in rural areas.

  4. A retrospective evaluation of the Perfecting Patient Care University training program for health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Morganti, Kristy Gonzalez; Lovejoy, Susan; Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Haviland, Amelia M; Haas, Ann C; Farley, Donna O

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated how the Perfecting Patient Care (PPC) University, a quality improvement (QI) training program for health care leaders and clinicians, affected the ability of organizations to improve the health care they provide. This training program teaches improvement methods based on Lean concepts and principles of the Toyota Production System and is offered in several formats. A retrospective evaluation was performed that gathered data on training, other process factors, and outcomes after staff completed the PPC training. A majority of respondents reported gaining QI competencies and cultural achievements from the training. Organizations had high average scores for the success measures of "outcomes improved" and "sustainable monitoring" but lower scores for diffusion of QI efforts. Total training dosage was significantly associated with the measures of QI success. This evaluation provides evidence that organizations gained the PPC competencies and cultural achievements and that training dosage is a driver of QI success.

  5. Medical care delivery in the US space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Donald F.

    1991-01-01

    The stated goal of this meeting is to examine the use of telemedicine in disaster management, public health, and remote health care. NASA has a vested interest in providing health care to crews in remote environments. NASA has unique requirements for telemedicine support, in that our flight crews conduct their job in the most remote of all work environments. Compounding the degree of remoteness are other environmental concerns, including confinement, lack of atmosphere, spaceflight physiological deconditioning, and radiation exposure, to name a few. In-flight medical care is a key component in the overall support for missions, which also includes extensive medical screening during selection, preventive medical programs for astronauts, and in-flight medical monitoring and consultation. This latter element constitutes the telemedicine aspect of crew health care. The level of in-flight resources dedicated to medical care is determined by the perceived risk of a given mission, which in turn is related to mission duration, planned crew activities, and length of time required for return to definitive medical care facilities.

  6. Tennessee Star-Quality Child Care Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Tennessee's Star-Quality Child Care Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  7. Caring for high-need, high-cost patients: what makes for a successful care management program?

    PubMed

    Hong, Clemens S; Siegel, Allison L; Ferris, Timothy G

    2014-08-01

    Provider groups taking on risk for the overall costs of care in accountable care organizations are developing care management programs to improve care and thereby control costs. Many such programs target "high-need, high-cost" patients: those with multiple or complex conditions, often combined with behavioral health problems or socioeconomic challenges. In this study we compared the operational approaches of 18 successful complex care management programs in order to offer guidance to providers, payers, and policymakers on best practices for complex care management. We found that effective programs customize their approach to their local contexts and caseloads; use a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods to identify patients; consider care coordination one of their key roles; focus on building trusting relationships with patients as well as their primary care providers; match team composition and interventions to patient needs; offer specialized training for team members; and use technology to bolster their efforts.

  8. AdvoCaring: A Cocurricular Program to Provide Advocacy and Caring to Underserved Populations in Baltimore

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Michelle A; Culver, Nathan; Culhane, Nicole; Lin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To incorporate direct patient care and service components throughout a 4-year pharmacy program to enable students to apply knowledge learned in the classroom and develop the human and caring dimensions of Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning. Design. Groups of 10-12 students and a faculty advisor partnered with a local agency serving an underserved population of the greater Baltimore area to provide seven hours of service per student each semester. Activities were determined based on students’ skills and agency needs. Assessment. Over 10 000 hours of care were provided from fall 2009 through spring 2014 for clients at 12 partner agencies. Student feedback was favorable. Conclusion. Cocurricular learning enables students to use their skills to benefit local communities. Through an ongoing partnership, students are able to build on experiences and sustain meaningful care initiatives. PMID:27756934

  9. The Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) with Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC): Comprehensive Care for Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Als, Heidelise; McAnulty, Gloria B.

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art Newborn Intensive Care Units (NICUs), instrumental in the survival of high-risk and ever-earlier-born preterm infants, often have costly human repercussions. The developmental sequelae of newborn intensive care are largely misunderstood. Developed countries eager to export their technologies must also transfer the knowledge-base that encompasses all high-risk and preterm infants’ personhood as well as the neuro-essential importance of their parents. Without such understanding, the best medical care, while assuring survival jeopardizes infants’ long-term potential and deprives parents of their critical role. Exchanging the womb for the NICU environment at a time of rapid brain growth compromises preterm infants’ early development, which results in long-term physical and mental health problems and developmental disabilities. The Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) aims to prevent the iatrogenic sequelae of intensive care and to maintain the intimate connection between parent and infant, one expression of which is Kangaroo Mother Care. NIDCAP embeds the infant in the natural parent niche, avoids over-stimulation, stress, pain, and isolation while it supports self-regulation, competence, and goal orientation. Research demonstrates that NIDCAP improves brain development, functional competence, health, and life quality. It is cost effective, humane, and ethical, and promises to become the standard for all NICU care. PMID:25473384

  10. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G.; MacDonald, M.

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  11. A Case Report: Cornerstone Health Care Reduced the Total Cost of Care Through Population Segmentation and Care Model Redesign.

    PubMed

    Green, Dale E; Hamory, Bruce H; Terrell, Grace E; O'Connell, Jasmine

    2017-01-20

    Over the course of a single year, Cornerstone Health Care, a multispecialty group practice in North Carolina, redesigned the underlying care models for 5 of its highest-risk populations-late-stage congestive heart failure, oncology, Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibles, those with 5 or more chronic conditions, and the most complex patients with multiple late-stage chronic conditions. At the 1-year mark, the results of the program were analyzed. Overall costs for the patients studied were reduced by 12.7% compared to the year before enrollment. All fully implemented programs delivered between 10% and 16% cost savings. The key area for savings factor was hospitalization, which was reduced by 30% across all programs. The greatest area of cost increase was "other," a category that consisted in large part of hospice services. Full implementation was key; 2 primary care sites that reverted to more traditional models failed to show the same pattern of savings.

  12. The Impact of a Home-Based Palliative Care Program in an Accountable Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Mudra, Mitchell; Romano, Carole; Lukoski, Ed; Chang, Andy; Mittelberger, James; Scherr, Terry; Cooper, David

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: People with advanced illness usually want their healthcare where they live—at home—not in the hospital. Innovative models of palliative care that better meet the needs of seriously ill people at lower cost should be explored. Objectives: We evaluated the impact of a home-based palliative care (HBPC) program implemented within an Accountable Care Organization (ACO) on cost and resource utilization. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis to quantify cost savings associated with a HBPC program in a Medicare Shared Savings Program ACO where total cost of care is available. We studied 651 decedents; 82 enrolled in a HBPC program compared to 569 receiving usual care in three New York counties who died between October 1, 2014, and March 31, 2016. We also compared hospital admissions, ER visits, and hospice utilization rates in the final months of life. Results: The cost per patient during the final three months of life was $12,000 lower with HBPC than with usual care ($20,420 vs. $32,420; p = 0.0002); largely driven by a 35% reduction in Medicare Part A ($16,892 vs. $26,171; p = 0.0037). HBPC also resulted in a 37% reduction in Medicare Part B in the final three months of life compared to usual care ($3,114 vs. $4,913; p = 0.0008). Hospital admissions were reduced by 34% in the final month of life for patients enrolled in HBPC. The number of admissions per 1000 beneficiaries per year was 3073 with HBPC and 4640 with usual care (p = 0.0221). HBPC resulted in a 35% increased hospice enrollment rate (p = 0.0005) and a 240% increased median hospice length of stay compared to usual care (34 days vs. 10 days; p < 0.0001). Conclusion: HBPC within an ACO was associated with significant cost savings, fewer hospitalizations, and increased hospice use in the final months of life. PMID:27574868

  13. [Economic evaluation of health care program for hepatitis C virus antibody screening].

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, M

    1999-06-01

    We made a trial of introducing a health care program for hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody screening in Saga prefecture, where mortality rate of hepatoma is one of the highest in Japan. The program started in 1992 and covered nearly the entire population older than 30 years in this prefecture. This was the first implementation in Japan. In the present study, we performed a cost-benefit analysis of this program. It included three steps; early detection of hepatitis C cases in the free-living population; implementation of interferon (IFN) therapy for detected chronic active hepatitis cases; follow-up of the cases who underwent IFN therapy. We counted, as cost, expenditure for primary screening, that for subsequent clinical examinations, that for IFN therapy, that for follow-up of detected HCV carriers, and loss of earned income during a leave of absence from work for the IFN therapy. On the other hand, we counted as benefit the medical expenditures saved, and gained earned income by reduction of hepatoma, cirrhosis and hepatitis due to medical intervention, both of which would have sustained losses had the health care program not been implemented. The employed model assumed age and gender specific natural histories for hepatitis C. The benefit/cost ratio was found to be in 1.71 to 2.32, suggesting economic validity of the proposed health care program. We further evaluated the economic validity by sensitivity analysis by changing rates of HCV carriers, discounting rates, rates of "complete responder" of chronic active hepatitis cases to IFN therapy, and detection rate of otherwise submerged chronic active hepatitis cases. Benefit/cost ratios were found to be greater than unity, given that the population rate of HCV carriers is higher than 1%.

  14. Evaluation of quality in social care: aplus program.

    PubMed

    Dutrénit, Jean-Marc

    2005-10-01

    France is not advanced regarding evaluation in social work, despite a law established in January 2002 making evaluation a legal obligation every 5 years. This article presents a software program to help social services evaluate on both individual and group levels. Automatic dashboard results of the program with special emphasis on the main qualities social work would usually present reciprocity and social competence, client ability development, and social care treatment components. The last point is an automatic selection of most efficient treatment components of ability development.

  15. Stability of Subsidy Participation and Continuity of Care in the Child Care Assistance Program in Minnesota. Minnesota Child Care Choices Research Brief Series. Publication #2014-55

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elizabeth E.; Krafft, Caroline; Tout, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The Minnesota Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) provides subsidies to help low-income families pay for child care while parents are working, looking for work, or attending school. The program can help make quality child care affordable and is intended both to support employment for low-income families and to support the development and…

  16. A preconception care program for women in a college setting.

    PubMed

    Wade, Gail Holland; Herrman, Judy; McBeth-Snyder, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Preconception healthcare is a way to enhance positive pregnancy outcomes by encouraging women to engage in healthy lifestyles before they become pregnant. Because approximately 50% of pregnancies are unplanned, fetal development may be affected before a woman receives prenatal care. Young women are especially vulnerable to poor outcomes due to risky behaviors. Education about preconception health is not common practice. This article describes a peer education preconception health program for college women that provided a basis for an expanded program with larger, more diverse populations. Nursing students as peer educators presented the program to over 100 young women using the mnemonic REFRAMED PLUS to address eight preconception risk areas and reproductive life planning. Materials to augment the program, developed by peer educators, included a brochure on preconception health, a risk assessment tool, a DVD with stories of young women who experienced unplanned pregnancies, and a Reproductive Life Plan book. Peer educators administered a pretest, showed the DVD, guided discussions, assessed each woman's health risks and administered a posttest. The risk assessment revealed that young women have several preconception health risks. Following the preconception program, posttest scores indicated increased knowledge of preconception health. For preconception healthcare to be successful, preconception risk assessments, education and counseling must be addressed by nurses every time a young woman receives care. When possible, peer educators should be used to disseminate the message to all women of childbearing age.

  17. Integrated dementia care in The Netherlands: a multiple case study of case management programmes.

    PubMed

    Minkman, Mirella M N; Ligthart, Suzanne A; Huijsman, Robbert

    2009-09-01

    The number of dementia patients is growing, and they require a variety of services, making integrated care essential for the ability to continue living in the community. Many healthcare systems in developed countries are exploring new approaches for delivering health and social care. The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse a new approach in extensive case management programmes concerned with long-term dementia care in The Netherlands. The focus is on the characteristics, and success and failure factors of these programmes.A multiple case study was conducted in eight regional dementia care provider networks in The Netherlands. Based on a literature study, a questionnaire was developed for the responsible managers and case managers of the eight case management programmes. During 16 semistructured face-to-face interviews with both respondent groups, a deeper insight into the dementia care programmes was provided. Project documentation for all the cases was studied. The eight programmes were developed independently to improve the quality and continuity of long-term dementia care. The programmes show overlap in terms of their vision, tasks of case managers, case management process and the participating partners in the local dementia care networks. Differences concern the targeted dementia patient groups as well as the background of the case managers and their position in the local dementia care provider network. Factors for success concern the expert knowledge of case managers, investment in a strong provider network and coherent conditions for effective inter-organizational cooperation to deliver integrated care. When explored, caregiver and patient satisfaction was high. Further research into the effects on client outcomes, service use and costs is recommended in order to further analyse the impact of this approach in long-term care. To facilitate implementation, with a focus on joint responsibilities of the involved care providers, policy

  18. [Are artificial disorders common in palliative care? A Case report].

    PubMed

    Porstner, Dagmar; Masel, Eva K; Heck, Ursula

    2015-12-01

    The main task of palliative care specialists is to focus on symptom control such as pain, nausea or fatigue. Thorough anamnesis, physical examination, laboratory examination, and differential diagnosis can ensure appropriate treatment. In an increasing number of cases psychiatric conditions like depression or anxiety increase also occur so palliative care physicians need to be more prepared to handle them. The question of this case report is, how a palliative care specialist can distinguish between a malignant disease or neurological disease progression and a presentation primarily psychiatric in etiology, as is the case in factitious disorders. We are also interested in the incidence rate of such factitious disorders. Our case study demonstrates that it is rare but not impossible that a doctor will encounter factitious symptoms in the palliative setting. This suggest being aware of evidence of psychiatric origins even in discharge letters and referrals that indicate palliative care needs, to ensure that palliative care really is the best treatment option for the patient. We do believe such cases to be rare in a palliative setting, however.

  19. Palliative Care in Your Nursing Home: Program Development and Innovation in Transitional Care.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Each year in the United States, 31% of elders who die do so in hospitals, accounting for over half a million deaths often involving expensive and unnecessary treatments (Zhao & Encinosa, 2010 ). Re-hospitalizations of frail elders with end-stage illnesses are a concern for the hospitals that have discharged them and for the facilities in which they live. In 2011, Schervier Nursing Care Center, a 364-bed skilled nursing and rehabilitation facility in the Bronx, NY, looked at its re-hospitalization rates. It was discovered that a large percentage of the residents being sent to the hospital were from the long-term and subacute populations with end-stage diseases that were no longer responding to treatment. This article describes the development of two innovative programs whose goals were to increase the number of residents receiving palliative care, increase the number of completed advance directives, reduce re-hospitalizations, and increase hospital referrals to the nursing home for palliative care. The key components of both programs and their outcomes are described. The development and implementation of these programs were the author's capstone project for the Zelda Foster Social Work Leadership Fellowship in Palliative and End-of-Life Care.

  20. The Case for Community Based Programs that Inform and Motivate Black Male Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Ronald F.

    A case is made for establishing more community-based socialization programs for 10- to 15-year-old black males from disadvantaged families in poor neighborhoods. It is argued that effectively run neighborhood-based programs can accomplish the following: (1) establish caring and nurturing relationships that earn youths' attention and trust; (2)…

  1. Prematurity and programming: contribution of neonatal Intensive Care Unit interventions.

    PubMed

    Kalhan, S C; Wilson-Costello, D

    2013-04-01

    Contemporary clinical practice for the care of the prematurely born babies has markedly improved their rates of survival so that most of these babies are expected to grow up to live a healthy functional life. Since the clinical follow-up is of short duration (years), only limited data are available to relate non-communicable diseases in adult life to events and interventions in the neonatal period. The major events that could have a programming effect include: (1) intrauterine growth restriction; (2) interruption of pregnancy with change in redox and reactive oxygen species (ROS) injury; (3) nutritional and pharmacological protocols for clinical care; and (4) nutritional care in the first 2 years resulting in accelerated weight gain. The available data are discussed in the context of perturbations in one carbon (methyl transfer) metabolism and its possible programming effects. Although direct evidence for genomic methylation is not available, clinical and experimental data on impact of redox and ROS, of low protein intake, excess methionine load and vitamin A, on methyl transfers are reviewed. The consequences of antenatal and postnatal administration of glucocorticoids are presented. Analysis of the correlates of insulin sensitivity at older age, suggests that premature birth is the major contributor, and is compounded by gain in weight during infancy. We speculate that premature interruption of pregnancy and neonatal interventions by affecting one carbon metabolism may cause programming effects on the immature baby. These can be additive to the effects of intrauterine environment (growth restriction) and are compounded by accelerated growth in early infancy.

  2. The Role of Mobile Technologies in Health Care Processes: The Case of Cancer Supportive Care

    PubMed Central

    Cucciniello, Maria; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care systems are gradually moving toward new models of care based on integrated care processes shared by different care givers and on an empowered role of the patient. Mobile technologies are assuming an emerging role in this scenario. This is particularly true in care processes where the patient has a particularly enhanced role, as is the case of cancer supportive care. Objective This paper aims to review existing studies on the actual role and use of mobile technology during the different stages of care processes, with particular reference to cancer supportive care. Methods We carried out a review of literature with the aim of identifying studies related to the use of mHealth in cancer care and cancer supportive care. The final sample size consists of 106 records. Results There is scant literature concerning the use of mHealth in cancer supportive care. Looking more generally at cancer care, we found that mHealth is mainly used for self-management activities carried out by patients. The main tools used are mobile devices like mobile phones and tablets, but remote monitoring devices also play an important role. Text messaging technologies (short message service, SMS) have a minor role, with the exception of middle income countries where text messaging plays a major role. Telehealth technologies are still rarely used in cancer care processes. If we look at the different stages of health care processes, we can see that mHealth is mainly used during the treatment of patients, especially for self-management activities. It is also used for prevention and diagnosis, although to a lesser extent, whereas it appears rarely used for decision-making and follow-up activities. Conclusions Since mHealth seems to be employed only for limited uses and during limited phases of the care process, it is unlikely that it can really contribute to the creation of new care models. This under-utilization may depend on many issues, including the need for it to be embedded

  3. Kansas Primary Care Weighs In: A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Chronic Care Model Program for Obesity in 3 Rural Kansas Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Andrea C.; Banitt, Angela; Befort, Christie; Hou, Qing; Rhode, Paula C.; Grund, Chrysanne; Greiner, Allen; Jeffries, Shawn; Ellerbeck, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Context: Obesity is a chronic disease of epidemic proportions in the United States. Primary care providers are critical to timely diagnosis and treatment of obesity, and need better tools to deliver effective obesity care. Purpose: To conduct a pilot randomized trial of a chronic care model (CCM) program for obesity care in rural Kansas primary…

  4. The Evolution of an Eye Care Program at a University Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Frederick H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A program was developed in comprehensive eye care for a university community. Topics discussed include: (1) history of the program; (2) staffing and staff responsibilities; (3) quality assessment; (4) consumer surveys; and (5) implications for health care providers. (JN)

  5. Medicare program; Medicare Shared Savings Program: Accountable Care Organizations. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-11-02

    This final rule implements section 3022 of the Affordable Care Act which contains provisions relating to Medicare payments to providers of services and suppliers participating in Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) under the Medicare Shared Savings Program. Under these provisions, providers of services and suppliers can continue to receive traditional Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) payments under Parts A and B, and be eligible for additional payments if they meet specified quality and savings requirements.

  6. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY... Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation for Providers of Inpatient... ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

  7. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  8. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  9. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  10. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  11. Veterans Health Administration's MOVE! Weight Management Program: Primary Care Clinicians' Perceptions of Program Implementation.

    PubMed

    Arigo, Danielle; Funderburk, Jennifer; Hooker, Stephanie; Dundon, Margaret; Evans-Hudnall, Gina; Dubbert, Patricia; Dickinson, Eva-Maria; Catanese, Sarah; O'Donohue, Jenny

    2015-10-01

    The Veterans Health Administration's MOVE! Program is the largest health care-delivered weight loss intervention in the United States. As a referring clinician's perceptions and knowledge of health programs may impact implementation, examining perceptions of MOVE! may inform improvements to this and other programs. This study investigated primary care clinician perceptions of MOVE! (n = 754, 50% nurses). Perceived effectiveness ratings were highest for groups with 11 to 25 group members (p < 0.01) and for a combined lecture and support group format (p = 0.026), though session length and several other aspects of delivery were not associated with perceptions of effectiveness. MOVE! staff also rated the program as more effective than did other clinicians (p < 0.01). Many respondents lacked knowledge about program specifics, especially those not involved with MOVE! delivery (vs. those directly involved; p < 0.01). These findings indicate that variety in group size and format is related to perceptions of MOVE! effectiveness. Also, clinicians not involved with MOVE! may lack knowledge about the program and underestimate its effectiveness, which could negatively affect referral likelihood or enthusiasm expressed to referred patients. Findings highlight opportunities for clarifying perceptions of a weight control program among clinicians in a large health care system.

  12. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early…

  13. Implementation and Evaluation of the Safety Net Specialty Care Program in the Denver Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Meredith P; Namba, Lynnette M; Dutcher, Sarah; Copeland, Tracy; Bermingham, Neysa; Fellenz, Chris; Lantz, Deborah; Reusch, John J; Bayliss, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: In response to limited access to specialty care in safety-net settings, an integrated delivery system and three safety-net organizations in the Denver, CO, metropolitan area launched a unique program in 2013. The program offers safety-net providers the option to electronically consult with specialists. Uninsured patients may be seen by specialists in office visits for a defined set of services. This article describes the program, identifies aspects that have worked well and areas that need improvement, and offers lessons learned. Methods: We quantified electronic consultations (e-consults) between safety-net clinicians and specialists, and face-to-face specialist visits between May 2013 and December 2014. We reviewed and categorized all e-consults from November and December 2014. In 2015, we interviewed 21 safety-net clinicians and staff, 12 specialists, and 10 patients, and conducted a thematic analysis to determine factors facilitating and limiting optimal program use. Results: In the first 20 months of the program, safety-net clinicians at 23 clinics made 602 e-consults to specialists, and 81 patients received face-to-face specialist visits. Of 204 primary care clinicians, 103 made e-consults; 65 specialists participated in the program. Aspects facilitating program use were referral case managers’ involvement and the use of clear, concise questions in e-consults. Key recommendations for process improvement were to promote an understanding of the different health care contexts, support provider-to-provider communication, facilitate hand-offs between settings, and clarify program scope. Conclusion: Participants perceived the program as responsive to their needs, yet opportunities exist for continued uptake and expansion. Communitywide efforts to assess and address needs remain important. PMID:28241908

  14. Evaluation of an Assertive Continuing Care Program for Hispanic Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Strunz, Eric; Jungerman, Joanna; Kinyua, Juliet; Frew, Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated an Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach (A-CRA) and Assertive Continuing Care (ACC) program targeting Hispanic adolescents at risk for substance abuse. Method: The Clinic for Education, Treatment, and Prevention of Addiction (CETPA, Inc.), a behavioral health provider offering culturally appropriate substance use and mental health services, carried out the intervention. We examined longitudinal substance use data in relation to time spent in the program and possible confounders. Results: We analyzed data from 72 adolescent clients collected between 2010 and 2012. Self-reported data were evaluated to determine if time spent in the program was associated with substance use reduction. The data were correlated, zero-inflated, and overdispersed; consequently, we employed a mixed-effects zero-inflated negative-binomial model. Time spent in CETPA’s program was significantly associated with reductions in the number of days of substance use (p = .039), but not with the likelihood of fully abstaining from use (p = .290). For non-abstinent participants who spend a year in the program, our models revealed an average decline of 46% in reported days of substance use. Conclusions: A culturally tailored and age-appropriate substance abuse program for Hispanic adolescents resulted in a significant reduction of the numbers of days using alcohol, drugs, or other illicit substances. The A-CRA/ACC approach can yield successful results in culturally diverse settings. PMID:26156933

  15. Impact of an intensive care unit telemedicine program on a rural health care system.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Edward T; Herr, Patricia; Larson, Deanna; Fromm, Robert; Kapaska, David; Erickson, David

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated the impact of a 15-hospital, rural, multi-state intensive care unit (ICU) telemedicine program. Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE III) scores, raw mortality rates, and actual-to-predicted length of stay (LOS) ratios and mortality ratios were used. Surveys evaluated program impact in smaller facilities and satisfaction of the physicians staffing the remote center. Smaller facilities' staff reported improvements in the quality of critical care services and reduced transfers. In regional hospitals, acuity scores increased (retention of sicker patients) while raw mortality was the same or lower. Length of stay ratios were reduced in these hospitals. In the tertiary hospital, actual-to-predicted ICU and hospital mortality and LOS ratios decreased.

  16. Impact of a home-based social welfare program on care for palliative patients in the Basque Country (SAIATU Program)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background SAIATU is a program of specially trained in-home social assistance and companionship which, since February 2011, has provided support to end-of-life patients, enabling the delivery of better clinical care by healthcare professionals in Osakidetza (Basque Health Service), in Guipúzcoa (Autonomous Community of the Basque Country). In January 2012, a retrospective observational study was carried out, with the aim of describing the characteristics of the service and determining if the new social service and the associated socio-health co-ordination had produced any effect on the use of healthcare resources by end-of-life patients. The results of a comparison of a cohort of cases and controls demonstrated evidence that the program could reduce the use of hospital resources and promote the continuation of living at home, increasing the home-based activity of primary care professionals. The objective of this study is to analyse whether a program of social intervention in palliative care (SAIATU) results in a reduction in the consumption of healthcare resources and cost by end-of-life patients and promotes a shift towards a more community-based model of care. Method/design Comparative prospective cohort study, with randomised selection of patients, which will systematically measure patient characteristics and their consumption of resources in the last 30 days of life, with and without the intervention of a social support team trained to provide in-home end-of-life care. For a sample of approximately 150 patients, data regarding the consumption of public healthcare resources, SAIATU activity, home hospitalisation teams, and palliative care will be recorded. Such data will also include information dealing with the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients and attending carers, as well as particular characteristics of patient outcomes (Karnofsky Index), and of the outcomes of palliative care received (Palliative Outcome Scale). Ethical

  17. Dental Pipeline Program: a national program linking dental schools with the issue of access to care.

    PubMed

    Formicola, Allan J

    2008-01-01

    The Dental Pipeline Program grew out of work at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine in the 1990s designed to address access to oral healthcare needs in New York City. Since then the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, and The California Endowment have combined to fund the largest dental education program in history. The Dental Pipeline Program has involved 23 dental schools in two phases. The goal of the program is to address issues of access (a) by providing dental care with volunteers in communities in need, (b) by seeking either full- or part-time positions in community health facilities, and (c) by preparing dentists to be advocates for the needs of the underserved. This is a preliminary report of the types of curricular changes that have been introduced and some promising results in terms of oral health care provided, minority enrollments in dental schools, and expressed intentions to practice in underserved areas.

  18. Identifying wound prevalence using the Mobile Wound Care program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Judi; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Mitchell, Eleanor; Steers, Nicole; Khalil, Hanan

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the prevalence of wounds within health care systems is a challenging and complex undertaking. This is often compounded by the clinicians' training, the availability of the required data to collect, incomplete documentation and lack of reporting of this type of data across the various health care settings. To date, there is little published data on wound prevalence across regions or states. This study aims to identify the number and types of wounds treated in the Gippsland area using the Mobile Wound Care (MWC™) program. The MWC program has enabled clinicians in Gippsland to collect data on wounds managed by district nurses from four health services. The main outcomes measured were patient characteristics, wound characteristics and treatment characteristics of wounds in Gippsland. These data create several clinical and research opportunities. The identification of predominant wound aetiologies in Gippsland provides a basis on which to determine a regional wound prospective and the impact of the regional epidemiology. Training that incorporates best practice guidelines can be tailored to the most prevalent wound types. Clinical pathways that encompass the Australian and New Zealand clinical practice guidelines for the management of venous leg ulcers can be introduced and the clinical and economical outcomes can be quantitatively measured. The MWC allows healing times (days) to be benchmarked both regionally and against established literature, for example, venous leg ulcers.

  19. The costs of a family practice residency ambulatory care program.

    PubMed

    Pawlson, L G; Watkins, R

    1979-12-01

    The cost of patient care service and education occurring in a family practice residency unit of a community based prepaid health program was determined from accounting records. The cost of producing the same number of patient visits in comparable family practice units which did not have residents on-site was determined in a similar manner. The cost per visit in the residency unit was $15.53 while that in the nonresidency unit was $13.92. There was an excess cost of $1.61 per visit in the residency, or, based on the number of residents present, a net cost of $7 per resident per day. None of the costs of central residency program administration or of ambulatory based subspecialty rotations were included. While a small increase (ten percent) in productivity or efficiency would result in the residency patient care unit itself being self-sustaining, this study casts considerable doubt on the ability of the model family practice residency unit to offset the full costs of the ambulatory care portion of family practice residency training.

  20. 76 FR 44573 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 Correction In notice document 2011... page 43255, the table labeled ``Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of...

  1. Expanding physician education in health care fraud and program integrity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shantanu; Tarzy, Bruce; Hunt, Lauren; Taitsman, Julie; Budetti, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Program integrity (PI) spans the entire spectrum of improper payments from fraud to abuse, errors, and waste in the health care system. Few physicians will perpetrate fraud or abuse during their careers, but nearly all will contribute to the remaining spectrum of improper payments, making preventive education in this area vital. Despite the enormous impact that PI issues have on government-sponsored and private insurance programs, physicians receive little formal education in this area. Physicians' lack of awareness of PI issues not only makes them more likely to submit inappropriate claims, generate orders that other providers and suppliers will use to submit inappropriate claims, and document improperly in the medical record but also more likely to become victims of fraud schemes themselves.In this article, the authors provide an overview of the current state of PI issues in general, and fraud in particular, as well as a description of the state of formal education for practicing physicians, residents, and fellows. Building on the lessons from pilot programs conducted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and partner organizations, the authors then propose a model PI education curriculum to be implemented nationwide for physicians at all levels. They recommend that various stakeholder organizations take part in the development and implementation process to ensure that all perspectives are included. Educating physicians is an essential step in establishing a broader culture of compliance and improved integrity in the health care system, extending beyond Medicare and Medicaid.

  2. History of the Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    NASA has a rich history of scientific research that has been conducted throughout our numerous manned spaceflight programs. This scientific research has included animal test subjects participating in various spaceflight missions, including most recently, Space Shuttle mission STS-131. The Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is multi-faceted and unique in scope compared to other centers within the agency. The animal care program at JSC has evolved from strictly research to include a Longhorn facility and the Houston Zoo's Attwater Prairie Chicken refuge, which is used to help repopulate this endangered species. JSC is home to more than 300 species of animals including home of hundreds of white-tailed deer that roam freely throughout the center which pose unique issues in regards to population control and safety of NASA workers, visitors and tourists. We will give a broad overview of our day to day operations, animal research, community outreach and protection of animals at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  3. Impact of an activities-based adult dementia care program

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Margaret; Koch, Kathleen; Hynan, Linda S; Carr, Sandra; Byrnes, Kathleen; Weiner, Myron F

    2005-01-01

    The investigators studied over one year the impact of a newly established once-a-week activity-based day care program for dementia patients combined with 17 educational sessions for caregivers held at the same facility. Outcome measures were patient and caregiver quality of life (QOL), patient behavioral disturbance, and use of community-based resources. Of the 37 enrollees, 3 chose not to start the program and 13 dropped out before the end of one year, largely due to health-related issues. Of the initial group, 21 attended for the entire year. The average patient Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) score at entry was 16, indicating a moderate level of dementia. Average score on the CERAD Behavior Rating Scale for Dementia (BRSD) was 30.1, indicating a mild level of behavioral disturbance. Attendance at day care was 91%; at the caregiver educational sessions, 74%. Patient and caregiver enthusiasm for the program was high and all wanted to continue attendance beyond the study period despite the fact that patients reported no change in QOL. Caregivers rated patients as having significantly less QOL, and rated their own QOL as unchanged. Symptomatic patient behaviors, as measured by the BRSD, increased significantly over the period of study. Caregivers reported greater use of community resources. PMID:18568062

  4. Case Report: Red Urine After Day Care Strabismus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Caroline, Pregardien; Marie-Cécile, Nassogne; Demet, Yuksel; Francis, Veyckemans

    2017-02-15

    In the absence of surgery on the urinary tract, the emission of red urine after anesthesia should be considered as a diagnostic emergency because it can be a sign of hematuria, hemoglobinuria, blood transfusion reaction, significant myoglobinuria, or porphyria.This case describes the management of a 12-year-old boy who presented red urine at the day care unit after strabismus surgery.

  5. Transforming Cultures of Care: A Case Study in Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis, Karyn; Cross, David; Jones, Daren; Buff, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The authors report on a small organizational case study highlighting the dimensions of trauma-informed care, the processes of organizational change, and the growth of caregiver expertise. The article is framed by the notion of caregiving cultures, which refers to the beliefs, languages, and practices of caregivers and caregiving organizations.…

  6. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III

    EPA Science Inventory

    This booklet, ETV Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III contains two case studies, addressing verified environmental technologies for decentalized wastewater treatment and converting animal waste to energy. Each case study contains a brief description ...

  7. Expanded HIV Testing and Linkage to Care: Conventional vs. Point-of-Care Testing and Assignment of Patient Notification and Linkage to Care to an HIV Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Bares, Sara; Eavou, Rebecca; Bertozzi-Villa, Clara; Taylor, Michelle; Hyland, Heather; McFadden, Rachel; Shah, Sachin; Pho, Mai T.; Walter, James; Badlani, Sameer; Schneider, John; Prachand, Nik; Benbow, Nanette

    2016-01-01

    Objective The University of Chicago Medicine (UCM) led the Expanded Testing and Linkage to Care (X-TLC) program for disproportionately affected populations on the South Side of Chicago. The X-TLC program aimed to expand routine HIV testing to high-prevalence communities with disproportionately affected populations (i.e., minority men and women, men who have sex with men, and intravenous drug users) according to CDC guidelines at multiple clinical sites. Methods The X-TLC program used standard blood-based laboratory testing vs. point-of-care rapid testing or rapid laboratory testing with point-of-care results notification. Site coordinators and the linkage-to-care coordinator at UCM oversaw testing, test notification, and linkage to care. Results From February 1, 2011, through December 31, 2013, the X-TLC program completed 75,345 HIV tests on 67,153 unique patients. Of the total tests, 48,044 (63.8%) were performed on patients who self-identified as African American and 6,606 (8.8%) were performed on patients who self-identified as Hispanic. Of the 67,153 patients tested, 395 (0.6%) tested positive and 176 (0.3%) were previously unaware of their HIV-positive status. Seroprevalence was even higher for EDs, where 127 of 12,957 patients tested positive for HIV (1.0% seroprevalence), than for other patient care sites, including for new diagnoses, where 50 of 12,957 patients tested positive for HIV (0.4% seroprevalence). Of the 176 newly diagnosed patients, 166 of 173 (96.0%) patients who were still alive when testing was complete received their test results, and 148 of the 166 patients who were eligible for care (89.0%) were linked to care. Patients linked to X-TLC physicians did well with respect to the continuum of care: 77 of 123 (62.6%) patients achieved HIV viral load of <200 copies/milliliter. Conclusion Lead organizations such as UCM were able to assist and oversee HIV screening and linkage to care for HIV patients diagnosed at community sites. HIV screening and

  8. Feminist health care in a hostile environment: a case study of the Womancare Health Center.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Cheryl A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the Womancare Health Center in order to illustrate the development of and challenges to the feminist health movement in the United States. Specific attention is placed on the legislative, fiscal, and direct actions by the New Right against this organization. Analysis focuses on the means through which Womancare survived. The repercussions of constant intimidation and harassment for women's health programs and for health care policy overall are discussed.

  9. Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

    1975-01-01

    Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

  10. The business case for health-care quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Stephen J; Dilling, James A; Mc Carty, Patrick M; Bolton, Jeffrey W; Harper, Charles M

    2013-03-01

    The business case for health-care quality improvement is presented. We contend that investment in process improvement is aligned with patients' interests, the organization's reputation, and the engagement of their workforce. Four groups benefit directly from quality improvement: patients, providers, insurers, and employers. There is ample opportunity, even in today's predominantly pay-for-volume (that is, evolving toward value-based purchasing) insurance system, for providers to deliver care that is in the best interest of the patient while improving their financial performance.

  11. Helping cancer patients across the care continuum: the navigation program at the Queen's Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Allison, Amanda L; Ishihara-Wong, Debra D M; Domingo, Jermy B; Nishioka, Jocelyn; Wilburn, Andrea; Tsark, JoAnn U; Braun, Kathryn L

    2013-04-01

    Research suggests that cancer patient navigation improves care, but few reports describe the variety of patients managed by a hospital-based navigation program. Differences in navigated patients by the intensity (low, medium, or high) of navigation services they received were examined. The 835 clients seen by the navigators in a hospital-based cancer center were first stratified by quarter and by four ethnic groups. Randomized selection from each group assured there would be equal representation for analysis of Hawaiians, Filipinos, Japanese, and Whites and even numbers over all time intervals. Five professionals extracted data from these case records on demographics, type/stage of cancer, diagnosis and treatment dates, barriers, and navigator actions. Clients had breast (30.0%), lung (15.8%), esophageal (6.7%), colon (5.8%), ovarian (4.2%), prostate (3.3%), and other cancers (34.2%). The median number of actions taken on behalf of a client was 4 (range 1-83), and the median number of days a case was open was 14 (range 1-216). High intensity cases (those receiving more assistance over longer periods of time) were more likely than low-intensity cases to need help with education and reassurance, transportation, care coordination, and covering costs. Although there were no demographic differences across intensity groups, Neighbor Island patients from Hawai'i, Maui, Moloka'i, Lana'i and Kaua'i were more likely to need help with arranging travel, care coordination, and costs associated with getting treatment (all at P=.05), and patients on public insurance were more likely to have stage 4 cancer (P=.001) and to need help with costs (P=.006). Findings suggest that this hospital-based navigation program is filling a real need of patients across the cancer care continuum. A triage protocol and an integrated data capture system could help improve the targeting and documentation of cancer patient navigation services.

  12. What do practitioners think? A qualitative study of a shared care mental health and nutrition primary care program

    PubMed Central

    Paquette-Warren, Jann; Vingilis, Evelyn; Greenslade, Jaimi; Newnam, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop an in-depth understanding of a shared care model from primary mental health and nutrition care practitioners with a focus on program goals, strengths, challenges and target population benefits. Design Qualitative method of focus groups. Setting/Participants The study involved fifty-three practitioners from the Hamilton Health Service Organization Mental Health and Nutrition Program located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Method Six focus groups were conducted to obtain the perspective of practitioners belonging to various disciplines or health care teams. A qualitative approach using both an editing and template organization styles was taken followed by a basic content analysis. Main findings Themes revealed accessibility, interdisciplinary care, and complex care as the main goals of the program. Major program strengths included flexibility, communication/collaboration, educational opportunities, access to patient information, continuity of care, and maintenance of practitioner and patient satisfaction. Shared care was described as highly dependent on communication style, skill and expertise, availability, and attitudes toward shared care. Time constraint with respect to collaboration was noted as the main challenge. Conclusion Despite some challenges and variability among practices, the program was perceived as providing better patient care by the most appropriate practitioner in an accessible and comfortable setting. PMID:17041680

  13. Children, Food, and Family Day Care: A Manual for Sponsorship of the Child Care Food Program in Licensed Family Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Konski, Gerry, Ed.

    This manual provides detailed information on how local non-profit organizations can sponsor licensed family day care homes for participation in the federally funded Child Care Food Program. This program subsidizes the provision of nutritious meals to children who are not in school. The introductory section of the manual answers basic questions…

  14. Welfare reform and child care: evidence from 10 experimental welfare-to-work programs.

    PubMed

    Robins, Philip K

    2007-10-01

    This article examines the employment and child care responses of families participating in 10 experimental welfare reform programs conducted in the United States between 1989 and 2002. For the programs analyzed, child care use increases by about the same amount as the increase in employment. Most of the increased child care comprises informal care by a relative, particularly care by a sibling or a grandparent. Although there are significant differences in the child care responses across the various programs tested, there are no significant differences in the impacts for persons leaving welfare versus persons staying on welfare.

  15. Augmenting Predictive Modeling Tools with Clinical Insights for Care Coordination Program Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tracy L.; Brewer, Daniel; Estacio, Raymond; Vlasimsky, Tara; Durfee, Michael J.; Thompson, Kathy R.; Everhart, Rachel M.; Rinehart, Deborath J.; Batal, Holly

    2015-01-01

    Context: The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) awarded Denver Health’s (DH) integrated, safety net health care system $19.8 million to implement a “population health” approach into the delivery of primary care. This major practice transformation builds on the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) and Wagner’s Chronic Care Model (CCM) to achieve the “Triple Aim”: improved health for populations, care to individuals, and lower per capita costs. Case description: This paper presents a case study of how DH integrated published predictive models and front-line clinical judgment to implement a clinically actionable, risk stratification of patients. This population segmentation approach was used to deploy enhanced care team staff resources and to tailor care-management services to patient need, especially for patients at high risk of avoidable hospitalization. Developing, implementing, and gaining clinical acceptance of the Health Information Technology (HIT) solution for patient risk stratification was a major grant objective. Findings: In addition to describing the Information Technology (IT) solution itself, we focus on the leadership and organizational processes that facilitated its multidisciplinary development and ongoing iterative refinement, including the following: team composition, target population definition, algorithm rule development, performance assessment, and clinical-workflow optimization. We provide examples of how dynamic business intelligence tools facilitated clinical accessibility for program design decisions by enabling real-time data views from a population perspective down to patient-specific variables. Conclusions: We conclude that population segmentation approaches that integrate clinical perspectives with predictive modeling results can better identify high opportunity patients amenable to medical home-based, enhanced care team interventions. PMID:26290884

  16. The HIV Primary Care Workforce of Tomorrow: The UCSF Integrated HIV/AIDS Primary Care Capacity Nurse Practitioner Program.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Carmen J; Stringari-Murray, Suzan; Fox, Christopher B; Monasterio, Erica; Rose, Carol Dawson

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for primary care services and the current health care workforce shortage is predicted to cause drastic reductions in the number of clinicians who are competent to provide HIV care. For the past decade, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing has provided HIV specialty education for Advanced Practice Nursing students in the Master's curriculum. In 2013, UCSF was funded by the Health Resources Services Administration to establish a nurse practitioner (NP) HIV primary care education program to expand the number of NPs prepared to provide culturally appropriate comprehensive HIV primary care. To this end, UCSF faculty have developed and validated a set of HIV Primary Care entry-level NP competencies, integrated general HIV knowledge into the NP curriculum, and enhanced our current HIV Specialty curriculum and clinical training. Described herein is UCSF's Integrated HIV/AIDS Primary Care Capacity Nurse Practitioner Program.

  17. The National Child Care Research Program: First Year Executive Summary & Findings of the Initial Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergan, John R.; Feld, Jason K.

    Two institutions initiated a long-term National Child Care Research Program in 1990. The program has two components: (1) examining the comprehensiveness of services offered by licensed center-based child care; and (2) documenting the development of children in licensed center-based child care. This publication reports the results of the first…

  18. Helping Churches Mind the Children: A Guide for Church-Housed Child Care Programs. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Margery, Ed.

    This manual provides information for pastors, parents, and church members who are starting a child care program in their church, and for churches that are changing or expanding their child care program. Chapter 1 reports the results of a 1982 survey of child care in local parishes by the National Council of Churches. Chapter 2 explains four steps…

  19. 76 FR 67567 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and Extended Care Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and Extended Care Services Coinsurance Amounts... Services RIN 0938-AQ14 Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and Extended Care... extended care services coinsurance amounts for services furnished in calendar year (CY) 2012 under...

  20. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... 0938-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident... Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term...

  1. Goals and Characteristics of Long-Term Care Programs: An Analytic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Rose, Charles L.

    1989-01-01

    Used medico-social analytic model to compare five long-term care programs: Skilled Nursing Facility-Intermediate Care Facility (SNF-ICF) homes, ICF homes, foster homes, day hospitals, and home care. Identified similarities and differences among programs. Preliminary findings suggest that model is useful in the evaluation and design of long-term…

  2. Risk Factors Associated with Children Lost to Care in a State Early Childhood Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannoni, Peggy P.; Kass, Philip H.

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted to identify risk factors associated with children lost to care, and their families, compared to those not lost to care within the California Early Start Program. The cohort included data on 8987 children enrolled in the Early Start Program in 1998. This cohort consisted of 2443 children lost to care, 6363…

  3. Evaluating a Transitional Living Program for Homeless, Former Foster Care Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rashid, Sonja

    2004-01-01

    The goals of this study were to (a) assess the outcomes of former foster care youth using transitional living programs and (b) compare outcomes achieved by former foster care youth who participated in an employment training program with similar youth who did not. The study sampled 23 former foster care youth using transitional living services in…

  4. 78 FR 58291 - TRICARE; Fiscal Year 2014 Continued Health Care Benefit Program Premium Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE; Fiscal Year 2014 Continued Health Care Benefit Program Premium Update AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Updated Continued Health Care Benefit Program Premiums for Fiscal Year 2014. SUMMARY: This notice provides the updated Continued Health Care...

  5. 76 FR 5222 - Notice of Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program Open Season

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... MANAGEMENT Notice of Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program Open Season AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of Federal Long Term Care Insurance Open Season. SUMMARY: The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is announcing an Open Season for the Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP)....

  6. [Acute care nursing pathology: case report of odynophagia].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fabà, Eva; Sanfeliu-Julià, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Since 2008, the Institut Catala de la Salut (ICS) introduced the nurses management plan for acute pathology, in primary care centres. In the implementation of this system of organization, the ICS introduced various diseases protocols with performance algorithms. To raise awareness of the the practice of acute pathology, we present a clinical case. An urgent consultation of a 30 year-old male, with fever, sore throat and cough, which was managed and resolved by a nurse. The aim of this new management plan is that nursing is the first health professional to take care of patient coming to primary care centre without a scheduled visit, to avoid saturating the general clinic or hospital emergencies. This new organisational system involves an increase in the responsibilities of nursing in the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

  7. Implementing a Palliative Care Nurse Leadership Fellowship Program in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Downing, Julia; Leng, Mhoira; Grant, Liz

    2016-05-01

    Global oncology and palliative care needs are increasing faster than the available capacity to meet these needs. This is particularly marked in sub-Saharan Africa, where healthcare capacity and systems are limited and resources are stretched. Uganda, a country of 35.6 million people in eastern Africa, faces the challenges of a high burden of communicable disease and a rising number of cases of non-communicable disease, including cancer. The vast majority of patients in Uganda are diagnosed with cancer too late for curative treatment to be an option because of factors like poor access to healthcare facilities, a lack of health education, poverty, and delays resulting from seeking local herbal or other traditional remedies. This article describes an innovative model of nurse leadership training in Uganda to improve the delivery of palliative care. The authors believe this model can be applicable to other low- and middle-income countries, where health resources are constrained and care needs are great.
.

  8. 77 FR 17143 - Medicaid Program; Eligiblity Changes Under the Affordable Care Act of 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ...This final rule implements several provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act). The Affordable Care Act expands access to health insurance coverage through improvements to the Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance (CHIP) programs, the establishment of......

  9. Study protocol: translating and implementing psychosocial interventions in aged home care the lifestyle engagement activity program (LEAP) for life

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tailored psychosocial activity-based interventions have been shown to improve mood, behaviour and quality of life for nursing home residents. Occupational therapist delivered activity programs have shown benefits when delivered in home care settings for people with dementia. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of LEAP (Lifestyle Engagement Activity Program) for Life, a training and practice change program on the engagement of home care clients by care workers. Secondary aims are to evaluate the impact of the program on changes in client mood and behaviour. Methods/design The 12 month LEAP program has three components: 1) engaging site management and care staff in the program; 2) employing a LEAP champion one day a week to support program activities; 3) delivering an evidence-based training program to care staff. Specifically, case managers will be trained and supported to set meaningful social or recreational goals with clients and incorporate these into care plans. Care workers will be trained in and encouraged to practise good communication, promote client independence and choice, and tailor meaningful activities using Montessori principles, reminiscence, music, physical activity and play. LEAP Champions will be given information about theories of organisational change and trained in interpersonal skills required for their role. LEAP will be evaluated in five home care sites including two that service ethnic minority groups. A quasi experimental design will be used with evaluation data collected four times: 6-months prior to program commencement; at the start of the program; and then after 6 and 12 months. Mixed effect models will enable comparison of change in outcomes for the periods before and during the program. The primary outcome measure is client engagement. Secondary outcomes for clients are satisfaction with care, dysphoria/depression, loneliness, apathy and agitation; and work satisfaction for care workers. A process

  10. New Pathways for Primary Care: An Update on Primary Care Programs From the Innovation Center at CMS

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Those in practice find that the fee-for-service system does not adequately value the contributions made by primary care. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Innovation Center) was created by the Affordable Care Act to test new models of health care delivery to improve the quality of care while lowering costs. All programs coming out of the Innovation Center are tests of new payment and service delivery models. By changing both payment and delivery models and moving to a payment model that rewards physicians for quality of care instead of volume of care, we may be able to achieve the kind of health care patients want to receive and primary care physicians want to provide. PMID:22412007

  11. [Case management. The nursing business of care or cost].

    PubMed

    Sandhu, B K; Duquette, A; Kérouac, S; Rouillier, L

    1992-01-01

    Less money spent on health services, cost-effectiveness, better productivity and more efficiency are some of the driving forces of contemporary "neo-liberalism" and political trends. How can nursing services and the profession's human values adapt in this difficult context? The authors describe the newest modality of patient care delivery system: nursing case management. They examine the factors and assumptions that led up to its development and point out the validity of asking some serious questions before embarking on the euphoria of case management.

  12. 76 FR 33306 - Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model, Request for Applications; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Care Organization Model: Request for Applications.'' FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maria Alexander... http://innovations.cms.gov/areas-of-focus/seamless-and-coordinated-care-models/pioneer-aco... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable...

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial of Primary Care Pediatric Parenting Programs

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Brockmeyer, Carolyn A.; Berkule-Silberman, Samantha B.; Huberman, Harris S.; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether pediatric primary care–based programs to enhance parenting and early child development reduce media exposure and whether enhanced parenting mediates the effects. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Urban public hospital pediatric primary care clinic. Participants A total of 410 mother-newborn dyads enrolled after childbirth. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions, the Video Interaction Project (VIP) and Building Blocks (BB) interventions, or to a control group. The VIP intervention comprised 1-on-1 sessions with a child development specialist who facilitated interactions in play and shared reading through review of videotapes made of the parent and child on primary care visit days; learning materials and parenting pamphlets were also provided. The BB intervention mailed parenting materials, including age-specific newsletters suggesting activities to facilitate interactions, learning materials, and parent-completed developmental questionnaires (Ages and Stages questionnaires). Outcome Measures Electronic media exposure in the home using a 24-hour recall diary. Results The mean (SD) exposure at 6 months was 146.5 (125.0) min/d. Exposure to VIP was associated with reduced total duration of media exposure compared with the BB and control groups (mean [SD] min/d for VIP, 131.6 [118.7]; BB, 151.2 [116.7]; control, 155.4 [138.7]; P=.009). Enhanced parent-child interactions were found to partially mediate relations between VIP and media exposure for families with a ninth grade or higher literacy level (Sobel statistic=2.49; P=.01). Conclusion Pediatric primary care may represent an important venue for addressing the public health problem of media exposure in young children at a population level. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00212576 PMID:21199979

  14. Preventive adolescent health care in family practice: a program summary.

    PubMed

    Knishkowy, Barry; Schein, Moshe; Kiderman, Alexander; Velber, Aliza; Edman, Richard; Yaphe, John

    2006-06-07

    The AMA Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS) has been the cornerstone of preventive care for teenagers since its publication in 1994. Despite this, there has been little documentation of their implementation in the family medicine literature. This article gives an overview of a family practice-based adolescent preventive health program based on GAPS recommendations, and reports on compliance, feasibility and health issues. A Community-Oriented Primary Care (COPC) program targeted all adolescent patients aged 12-18 years in two Israeli family practices. 321 teenagers were invited to participate. Every 7th and 10th grader was invited for a preventive health visit with the family physician and nurse. The visits included a medical evaluation, screening and counseling regarding health issues recommended by GAPS, and counseling regarding personal health concerns. Parents were also invited to meet with the staff. 184 (57%) of the adolescents invited for health visits attended. The overall visit time was 47 minutes, including 12 minutes for a questionnaire and 35 minutes with providers. Common biomedical problems included overweight, acne and dysmenorrhea. Health risk behaviors and psychosocial problems included cigarette or alcohol use, dieting, infrequent/never seat belt use, and feeling depressed. 78% wanted to discuss at least one personal health issue. 27% were invited for follow-up visits. Only 3% of the parents came for visits. A community-oriented approach facilitates bringing adolescents for preventive health visits. Many previously undetected health issues, particularly psychosocial and behavioral, are revealed during these visits. A concerns checklist aids in addressing personal health concerns.

  15. A disease management program for heart failure: collaboration between a home care agency and a care management organization.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa A; Johnson, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative approach to manage patients with heart failure between a home care agency and a care management agency. The resulting disease management program used a combination of home visits and phone contact. Care management plans emphasized patient education on increasing adherence to medical and diet regimens, and recognizing early symptoms of exacerbation that could lead to rehospitalization. Clinician activities and patient outcomes are described.

  16. The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program in the Age of Health Care Reform.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Sean R; Mayer, Kenneth H; Boswell, Stephen L

    2015-06-01

    Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, thousands of people living with HIV who have received Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program-funded care are now eligible for Medicaid or subsidized insurance. The protection against insurance discrimination on the basis of preexisting conditions is increasing health care access for many, but this does not mean that the Ryan White Program is no longer needed. Services essential to improving outcomes on the continuum of HIV care are not supported by any other source. Because of the growing number of people living with HIV, we must increase funding for the Ryan White Program and increase the number of HIV care providers.

  17. Innovative solutions: using case studies to generate increased nurse's clinical decision-making ability in critical care.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Sheila; Krom, Zachary R; O'Connor, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Learning to care for critically ill patients requires a high level of critical thinking, clinical decision-making ability, and a substantial knowledge base. At this nursing school, an elective Critical Care Nursing course for last-semester seniors was designed to include active learning strategies, focusing on the use of case studies to facilitate learning. Results indicate significantly improved final examination scores for those involved with the case-study pedagogy. In addition, students identified enhanced communication skills. Two complex cases are presented for others to use with their educational programs.

  18. 75 FR 21301 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services; Elder Care Initiative Long-Term Care Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Office of Clinical and Preventive Services; Elder Care Initiative Long-Term Care Grant Program Announcement Type: New. Funding Announcement Number: HHS-2010-IHS-EHC-0001... Service (IHS) announces the availability of up to $600,000 for competitive grants through the Elder...

  19. Creating and Maintaining a Wellness Environment in Child Care Centers Participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofton, Kristi L.; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study identifies issues associated with creating and maintaining a wellness environment in child care centers (CCCs) participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Methods: Structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with CCC professionals and state agency personnel to develop a survey to assess…

  20. Connecting Veterans at Risk for Suicide to Care Through the HOME Program.

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, Bridget B; Farro, Samantha A; Billera, Melodi; Forster, Jeri E; Kemp, Janet E; Brenner, Lisa A

    2017-02-02

    The Home-Based Mental Health Evaluation (HOME) program, which engages veterans in care following psychiatric hospitalization, was evaluated. Thirty-four veterans who participated in the HOME program were compared to 34 veterans from a matched archival control group on treatment engagement and implementation outcomes. Veterans who participated in the HOME program were significantly more likely to engage in care, engaged in care more quickly, and attended significantly more individual mental health appointments. Veterans reported high levels of satisfaction. Results suggest that the HOME program is effective at engaging veterans in care during the high-risk period of time following psychiatric hospitalization.

  1. The success story of an intermediate care area nurse internship program.

    PubMed

    McGohan, Ladonna D; Twedell, Diane M; Fahje, Carol J; Sanchez, Anna L R; Bohn, Lisa C; Carr, Christy J

    2005-01-01

    Mayo Clinic Rochester Hospitals have experienced significant growth in the number of patients requiring the specialized nursing care offered in intermediate care areas (ICAs). To ensure quality nursing care for ICA level patients, a standardized educational program was developed. The Mayo Intermediate Care Area Nurse Internship Program was a tuition-free education program that provided additional knowledge, insights, and skills needed to develop a highly competent ICA nurse. This article will describe how the concept of an ICA nurse internship program was taken from birth of an idea to fruition.

  2. Cognitive systems at the point of care: The CREDO program.

    PubMed

    Fox, John

    2017-02-13

    CREDO is a framework for understanding human expertise and for designing and deploying systems that support cognitive tasks like situation and risk assessment, decision-making, therapy planning and workflow management. The framework has evolved through an extensive program of research on human decision-making and clinical practice. It draws on concepts from cognitive science, and has contributed new results to cognitive theory and understanding of human expertise and knowledge-based AI. These results are exploited in a suite of technologies for designing, implementing and deploying clinical services, early versions of which were reported by Das, Fox et al [9] and Fox and Das [26]. A practical outcome of the CREDO program is a technology stack, a key element of which is an agent specification language (PROforma: Sutton and Fox, [55]) which has proved to be a versatile tool for designing point of care applications in many clinical specialties and settings. Since software became available for implementing and deploying PROforma applications many kinds of applications have been successfully built and trialed, some of which are in large-scale routine use. This retrospective describes the cognitive foundations of the CREDO approach, summarizes the main theoretical, technical and clinical contributions and discusses benefits of the cognitive approach.

  3. Fetal programming of adult disease: implications for prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Lau, Christopher; Rogers, John M; Desai, Mina; Ross, Michael G

    2011-04-01

    The obesity epidemic, including a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity among pregnant women, represents a critical public health problem in the United States and throughout the world. Over the past two decades, it has been increasingly recognized that the risk of adult health disorders, particularly metabolic syndrome, can be markedly influenced by prenatal and infant environmental exposures (ie, developmental programming). Low birth weight, together with infant catch-up growth, is associated with a significant risk of adult obesity and cardiovascular disease, as well as adverse effects on pulmonary, renal, and cerebral function. Conversely, exposure to maternal obesity or high birth weight also represents an increased risk for childhood and adult obesity. In addition, fetal exposure to select chemicals (eg, phytoestrogens) or environmental pollutants (eg, tobacco smoke) may affect the predisposition to adult disease. Animal models have confirmed human epidemiologic findings and provided insight into putative programming mechanisms, including altered organ development, cellular signaling responses, and epigenetic modifications (ie, control of gene expression without modification of DNA sequence). Prenatal care is transitioning to incorporate goals of optimizing maternal, fetal, and neonatal health to prevent or reduce adult-onset diseases. Guidelines regarding optimal pregnancy nutrition and weight gain, management of low- and high-fetal-weight pregnancies, use of maternal glucocorticoids, and newborn feeding strategies, among others, have yet to fully integrate long-term consequences on adult health.

  4. Midwifery care: a perinatal mental health case scenario.

    PubMed

    Marnes, Joanne; Hall, Pauline

    2013-12-01

    The establishment of the National Perinatal Depression Initiative (NPDI, 2008-2013) has brought a focus across Australia for the need to identify women at risk of perinatal mental health disorders, suggesting that routine screening by relevant health professionals may aid earlier detection, better care and improved outcomes. Midwives are frequently the primary point of contact in the perinatal period and thus ideally placed to identify, interpret and manage complex situations, including screening for perinatal mental health disorders. This paper offers strategies that could be implemented into daily midwifery practice in order to achieve the goals consistent with the National Perinatal Depression Initiative. A case study (Jen) and discussion, guided by recommendations from the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Competency standards and beyondblue Clinical Practice Guidelines, are used to demonstrate how midwifery care can be provided. In accordance with her legal obligations, the midwife should act within her scope of practice to undertake a series of psychosocial and medical assessments in order to best determine how midwifery care and support can be of benefit to Jen, her infant and her family. Suggestions described include administration of validated screening questionnaires, clinical interview, physical assessment, discussion with partner, awareness of the mother-infant interactions and questioning around baby's sleep and feeding. Based on evaluation of the information gained from a bio-psycho-social assessment, suggestions are made as to the midwifery care options that could be applied.

  5. Trigeminal neuralgia and chiropractic care: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rodine, Robert J; Aker, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The following case describes a 68 year-old woman with a 7½ year history of worsening head and neck pain diagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia following surgical resection of a brain tumor. After years of unsuccessful management with medication and physical therapies, a therapeutic trial of chiropractic was carried out. Chiropractic care included ultrasound, manual therapies (manipulation and mobilization), soft tissue therapies, and home stretching exercises. After an initial treatment period followed by 18 months of supportive care the patient reported satisfactory improvement. It became evident that there were at least three sources of her symptoms: mechanical and/or degenerative neck pain, temporomandibular joint syndrome, and trigeminal neuralgia. While never completely pain-free, the patient continued to report that her pains reduced to minimal at times. At the most recent follow-up, the pain had not returned to pre-treatment intractable levels. This case study demonstrates the importance of diagnosing and treating multiple sources of pain and the positive role chiropractic care can have in the management of patients with these clinical conditions. The potential for convergence of sensory input from the upper three cervical segments and the trigeminal nerve via the trigeminocervical nucleus is discussed. PMID:20808617

  6. What Causes Care Coordination Problems? A Case for Microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Wayne; Maulitz, Russell Charles; Zachary, Drew A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Care coordination (CC) is an important fulcrum for pursuing a range of health care goals. Current research and policy analyses have focused on aggregated data rather than on understanding what happens within individual cases. At the case level, CC emerges as a complex network of communications among providers over time, crossing and recrossing many organizational boundaries. Micro-level analysis is needed to understand where and how CC fails, as well as to identify best practices and root causes of problems. Coordination Process Diagramming: Coordination Process Diagramming (CPD) is a new framework for representing and analyzing CC arcs at the micro level, separating an arc into its participants and roles, communication structure, organizational structures, and transitions of care, all on a common time line. Conclusion: Comparative CPD analysis across a sample of CC arcs identifies common CC problems and potential root causes, showing the potential value of the framework. The analyses also suggest intervention strategies that could be applied to attack the root causes of CC problems, including organizational changes, education and training, and additional health information technology development. PMID:27563685

  7. The role of practitioner self-efficacy, training, program and workplace factors on the implementation of an evidence-based parenting intervention in primary care.

    PubMed

    Turner, Karen M T; Nicholson, Jan M; Sanders, Matthew R

    2011-04-01

    This study examines factors affecting the implementation by primary care practitioners (nursing, education, allied health, and medical) of a brief parenting and family support intervention (the Primary Care Triple P-Positive Parenting Program) following professional training. It assesses the impact of prior experience, self-efficacy, program supports, program barriers, satisfaction with training, and workplace characteristics on reported extent of program use. The majority of practitioners (97%) reported using Triple P following training. Implementation was assessed as the proportion of cases seen who received the full program. Program supports (quality of format and materials) and barriers (management difficulties and lack of fit) impacted on practitioner self-efficacy, and higher self-efficacy was positively associated with implementation. Prior professional experience, satisfaction with training, and workplace factors were not significant predictors. These results highlight the importance of promoting practitioners' sense of competence or mastery of a program for facilitating the implementation of evidence-based programs in primary care settings.

  8. Challenges to Providing End-of-Life Care to Low-Income Elders with Advanced Chronic Disease: Lessons Learned from a Model Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Betty J.; Auer, Casey

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the challenges in providing end-of-life care to low-income elders with multiple comorbid chronic conditions in a fully "integrated" managed care program, and it highlighted essential recommendations. Design and Methods: A case-study design was used that involved an extensive analysis of qualitative data from five focus…

  9. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Chile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoso, Patricio; Gajardo, Marcela

    This document contains two case studies of adult education programs in Chile. Both case studies begin with a "face sheet" on which is recorded basic information about the program and the description. The first case study, prepared by Patricio Donoso, reports on Centro El Canelo de Nos, an inservice center for educators who work with…

  10. [Nursing care in patients undergoing radiological surgery. A case report].

    PubMed

    Armero-Barranco, David; Ruiz-Mateos, María; Alcaraz-Baños, Miguel; Bernal-Páez, Fernando Luis

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old man with medical diagnoses of long-standing diabetes mellitus, chronic ischemia of the lower limbs and intermittent claudication, for which the patient had been treated with minimally invasive radiological surgery. On arrival at the radiology unit, the patient had nursing diagnoses of anxiety and fear. Intraoperatively, the client had nursing diagnoses of pain, urine retention and infection risk. At discharge, a collaboration problem was detected and hemorrhagic risk. The patient received individualized nursing care. Interventions were planned following the nursing intervention classification (NIC) and the expected results for these interventions followed the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) taxonomy. The application of an appropriate nursing care plan contributes to making the patient's hospital stay easier, more comfortable and less traumatic.

  11. Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-09-30

    This final rule makes regulatory changes to the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) based on the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 2014. These changes strengthen requirements to protect the health and safety of children in child care; help parents make informed consumer choices and access information to support child development; provide equal access to stable, high-quality child care for low-income children; and enhance the quality of child care and the early childhood workforce.

  12. Health Services and Health Care Needs Fulfilled by Structured Clinical Programs for Children with Medical Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Dennis Z.; Berry, Jay G.; Glader, Laurie; Morin, Melinda J.; Johaningsmeir, Sarah; Gordon, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe family-reported health service needs of children with medical complexity, and to assess which needs are more often addressed in a tertiary care center-based structured clinical program for children with medical complexity. Study design Mailed survey to families of children with medical complexity enrolled in a structured-care program providing care coordination and oversight at one of three children’s hospitals. Outcomes included receipt of 14 specific health service needs. Paired t-tests compared unmet health care needs prior to and following program enrollment. Results 441 of 968 (46%) surveys were returned and analyzed. Respondents reported their children had a mean age of 7 (standard deviation 5) years. A majority of respondents reported the child had developmental delay (79%) and feeding difficulties (64%). Of respondents, 56% regarded the primary care provider as the primary point of contact for medical issues. Respondents reported an increase in meeting all fourteen health services needs after enrollment in a tertiary care center-based structured clinical program, including primary care checkups (82% v 96%), therapies (78% v 91%), mental health care (34% v 58%), respite care (56% v 75%), and referrals (51% v 83%) (all p<.001). Conclusions Tertiary care center-based structured clinical care programs for children with medical complexity may address and fulfill a broad range of health service needs that are not met in the primary care setting. PMID:26526361

  13. Impact of Medicare Shared Savings Program Accountable Care Organizations at Screening Mammography: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Anand K; Harvey, Susan C; Durand, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of accountable care organizations (ACOs) on use of screening mammography in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), the largest value-based reimbursement program in U.S.

  14. Pediatric Oncology Clinic Care Model: Achieving Better Continuity of Care for Patients in a Medium-sized Program.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Donna L; Halton, Jacqueline; Bassal, Mylène; Klaassen, Robert J; Mandel, Karen; Ramphal, Raveena; Simpson, Ewurabena; Peckan, Li

    2016-10-25

    Providing the best care in both the inpatient and outpatient settings to pediatric oncology patients is all programs goal. Using continuous improvement methodologies, we changed from a solely team-based physician care model to a hybrid model. All patients were assigned a dedicated oncologist. There would then be 2 types of weeks of outpatient clinical service. A "Doc of the Day" week where each oncologist would have a specific day in clinic when their assigned patients would be scheduled, and then a "Doc of the Week" week where one physician would cover clinic for the week. Patient satisfaction surveys done before and 14 months after changing the model of care showed that patients were very satisfied with the care they received in both models. A questionnaire to staff 14 months after changing showed that the biggest effect was increased continuity of care, followed by more efficient clinic workflow and increased consistency of care. Staff felt it provided better planning and delivery of care. A hybrid model of care with a primary physician for each patient and assigned clinic days, alternating with weeks of single physician coverage is a feasible model of care for a medium-sized pediatric oncology program.

  15. Effects of interferential care: A community-based care program for persons with severe problems on several life areas

    PubMed Central

    van de Goor, Ien AM; Voogt, Margot CM; van Assen, Marcel ALM; Garretsen, Henk FL

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Interferential care differs from the current community-based care programs in that it targets a larger, heterogeneous group and combines brokerage and full service elements in a multi-organizational care team. The team provides all the services itself, but with the aim to prepare clients within a few months for referral to regular (ambulant) healthcare services. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of interferential care. Methods: In a multisite, pretest–posttest design, 523 patients of three interferential care teams were followed. Quality of life, problem severity, problems with referral and engagement were assessed at baseline, at referral and again after 6 months. Analyses were performed using linear mixed modeling. Results: Interferential care showed moderate to strong effects on quality of life and problem severity. These effects persisted (quality of life) or further improved (problem severity) until follow-up 6 months after referral to regular services. There were also small effects on both engagement and problems with referral. Conclusion: Interferential care offers significant improvements in quality of life and problem severity in persons who have severe problems on several life areas and who are currently not reached by healthcare services. It is a promising community-based care program for healthcare systems in which regular care already contains many elements of home-based practice. PMID:24221098

  16. The INTERACT Quality Improvement Program: An Overview for Medical Directors and Primary Care Clinicians in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Ouslander, Joseph G.; Bonner, Alice; Herndon, Laurie; Shutes, Jill

    2014-01-01

    INTERACT is a publicly available quality improvement program that focuses on improving the identification, evaluation, and management of acute changes in condition of nursing home residents. Effective implementation has been associated with substantial reductions in hospitalization of nursing home residents. Familiarity with and support of program implementation by medical directors and primary care clinicians in the nursing home setting are essential to effectiveness and sustainability of the program over time. In addition to helping nursing homes prevent unnecessary hospitalizations and their related complications and costs, and thereby continuing to be or becoming attractive partners for hospitals, health care systems, managed care plans, and ACOs, effective INTERACT implementation will assist nursing homes in meeting the new requirement for a robust QAPI program which is being rolled out by the federal government over the next year. PMID:24513226

  17. Delivery of integrated diabetes care using logistics and information technology--the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation (JADE) program.

    PubMed

    Chan, Juliana C N; Ozaki, Risa; Luk, Andrea; Kong, Alice P S; Ma, Ronald C W; Chow, Francis C C; Wong, Patrick; Wong, Rebecca; Chung, Harriet; Chiu, Cherry; Wolthers, Troels; Tong, Peter C Y; Ko, Gary T C; So, Wing-Yee; Lyubomirsky, Greg

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes is a global epidemic, and many affected individuals are undiagnosed, untreated, or uncontrolled. The silent and multi-system nature of diabetes and its complications, with complex care protocols, are often associated with omission of periodic assessments, clinical inertia, poor treatment compliance, and care fragmentation. These barriers at the system, patient, and care-provider levels have resulted in poor control of risk factors and under-usage of potentially life-saving medications such as statins and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. However, in the clinical trial setting, use of nurses and protocol with frequent contact and regular monitoring have resulted in marked differences in event rates compared to epidemiological data collected in the real-world setting. The phenotypic heterogeneity and cognitive-psychological-behavioral needs of people with diabetes call for regular risk stratification to personalize care. Quality improvement initiatives targeted at patient education, task delegation, case management, and self-care promotion had the largest effect size in improving cardio-metabolic risk factors. The Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation (JADE) program is an innovative care prototype that advocates a change in clinic setting and workflow, coordinated by a doctor-nurse team and augmented by a web-based portal, which incorporates care protocols and a validated risk engine to provide decision support and regular feedback. By using logistics and information technology, supported by a network of health-care professionals to provide integrated, holistic, and evidence-based care, the JADE Program aims to establish a high-quality regional diabetes database to reflect the status of diabetes care in real-world practice, confirm efficacy data, and identify unmet needs. Through collaborative efforts, we shall evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and cost-effectiveness of this "high tech, soft touch" model to make diabetes and chronic disease care more

  18. Health care expenditures and gross domestic product: the Turkish case.

    PubMed

    Sülkü, Seher Nur; Caner, Asena

    2011-02-01

    Our study examines the long-term relationship among per capita gross domestic product (GDP), per capita health expenditures and population growth rate in Turkey during the period 1984-2006, employing the Johansen multivariate co-integration technique. Related previous studies on OECD countries have mostly excluded Turkey-itself an OECD country. The only study on Turkey examines the period 1984-1998. However, after 1998, major events and policy changes that had a substantial impact on income and health expenditures took place in Turkey, including a series of reforms to restructure the health and social security system. In contrast to earlier findings in the literature, we find that the income elasticity of total health expenditures is less than one, which indicates that health care is a necessity in Turkey during the period of analysis. According to our results, a 10% increase in per capita GDP is associated with an 8.7% increase in total per capita health expenditures, controlling for population growth. We find that the income elasticity of public health expenditures is less than one. But, in the case of private health care expenditures, the elasticity is greater than one, meaning that private health care is a luxury good in Turkey.

  19. 42 CFR 1001.201 - Conviction relating to program or health care fraud.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Others being convicted or excluded from Medicare, Medicaid or any of the other Federal health care... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conviction relating to program or health care fraud. 1001.201 Section 1001.201 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  20. 42 CFR 1001.201 - Conviction relating to program or health care fraud.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Others being convicted or excluded from Medicare, Medicaid or any of the other Federal health care... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conviction relating to program or health care fraud. 1001.201 Section 1001.201 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  1. 42 CFR 1001.201 - Conviction relating to program or health care fraud.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Others being convicted or excluded from Medicare, Medicaid or any of the other Federal health care... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conviction relating to program or health care fraud. 1001.201 Section 1001.201 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  2. 42 CFR 1001.201 - Conviction relating to program or health care fraud.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Others being convicted or excluded from Medicare, Medicaid or any of the other Federal health care... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conviction relating to program or health care fraud. 1001.201 Section 1001.201 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. 42 CFR 1001.201 - Conviction relating to program or health care fraud.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Others being convicted or excluded from Medicare, Medicaid or any of the other Federal health care... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conviction relating to program or health care fraud. 1001.201 Section 1001.201 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. 78 FR 49249 - Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Program; Reopening of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 98 Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Program; Reopening of Comment... comments on the proposed rule for the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), published in the Federal... proposed rule for the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) in the Federal Register on May 20, 2013 (78...

  5. 75 FR 18138 - Health Care Eligibility Under the Secretarial Designee Program and Related Special Authorities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 108 Health Care Eligibility Under the Secretarial Designee Program and... proposed action would establish policies and assign responsibilities for health care eligibility under the... reimbursement for inpatient health care provided in the United States to foreign military or...

  6. The Effect of Home Caregiving Program for Family Members Providing Care for Chronically Ill Relative Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Hussein Jassim; Kamel, Andaleeb Abu

    2015-01-01

    Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Family members and friends haven't knowledge and skills to become caregivers as many studies found that, the need to involve in such program to enhance their ability to be…

  7. 75 FR 30267 - Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program: Eligibility Changes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... 3206-AL92 Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program: Eligibility Changes AGENCY: U.S. Office of... a final regulation to expand eligibility to apply for coverage under the Federal Long Term Care... 46937-46938) to expand eligibility to apply for coverage under the Federal Long Term Care...

  8. 76 FR 29249 - Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model: Request for Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Pioneer Accountable Care... participate in the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Model for a period beginning in 2011 and ending...://innovations.cms.gov/areas-of-focus/seamless-and-coordinated-care-models/pioneer-aco . Application...

  9. Smallfry Smiles: A Guide for Teaching Dental Health in Community Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Alice; And Others

    This publication has been designed to help nurses, teachers, volunteers, health administrators, social workers, and other individuals in the community in improving dental care instruction for the children in a community dental care program. The publication is based on the premise that availability of dental care services does not necessarily…

  10. Vender/Voucher Systems: A Parent Selected Child Care Subsidy Program That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freis, Ruth; Miller, Miriam

    The vendor/voucher, or purchase of service, system for child care delivery is discussed as a logical model for communities which are looking for a method of developing a new system or have outgrown their current program. Discussion initially focuses on the increasing need for child care, cost/benefit aspects of child care, the regulation of child…

  11. Nutrition and Meal Planning in Child-Care Programs: A Practical Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelstein, Sari

    Designed to assist child care center managers in planning nutritious meals for children in centers or licensed home day care programs, this guide presents information on the nutritional requirements of infants and children, sample menus for child care centers, and resources for further information. The first part of the guide details the…

  12. Decision-making in palliative care: a reflective case study.

    PubMed

    Birchall, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    Critical examination of the processes by which we as nurses judge and reach clinical decisions is important. It facilitates the maintenance and refinement of good standards of nursing care and the pinpointing of areas where improvement is needed. In turn this potentially could support broader validation of nurse expertise and contribute to emancipation of the nursing profession. As pure theory, clinical decision-making may appear abstract and alien to nurses struggling in 'the swampy lowlands' (Schon 1983) of the realities of practice. This paper explores some of the key concepts in decision-making theory by introducing, then integrating, them in a reflective case study. The case study, which examines a 'snapshot' of the patient and practitioner's journey, interwoven with theory surrounding clinical decision-making, may aid understanding and utility of concepts and theories in practice.

  13. Lymphoedema treatment in palliative care: a case study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Garry

    This article will focus on the evidence to support the treatment of a palliative patient who was diagnosed with cancer-related secondary lymphoedema. A case study approach has been adopted, which focuses on the anatomy and physiology of lymphoedema and how this is treated through an analysis of the treatment regimens. To establish the effectiveness of these treatment regimes, the use of objective and subjective tools will also be analysed to ascertain their importance within care. The findings of this case study and the supporting evidence indicate a positive correlation between the use of lymphoedema treatment methods in both limb volume reduction and quality-of-life outcomes. However, robust evidence is required to expand the importance of each treatment used in the area of lymphoedema management.

  14. Sepsis requiring intensive care following intramuscular injections: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Matzaroglou, Charis; Kalogeropoulou, Christina; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Filos, Kriton

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Intramuscular injections can rarely result in serious infectious complications such as abscesses which may progress to bacteraemia and generalized sepsis. These complications are rare, but can be life threatening, as they can lead to multi-organ failure associated with high morbidity and mortality. Case presentation In this report we present two patients who developed life-threatening infections after intramuscular injections. They were admitted to the hospital, had prompt surgical drainage, required ICU admission for severe sepsis, were treated with an early goal-directed therapy protocol and had a good outcome. Conclusion Sepsis is a rare, potentially life-threatening complication after intramuscular injections. Timely surgical drainage followed by appropriate ICU care and early goal directed therapy is crucial and may contribute to a good outcome in these rare cases. PMID:19918523

  15. Developing Memory Clinics in Primary Care: An Evidence-Based Interprofessional Program of Continuing Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Linda; Weston, W. Wayne; Hillier, Loretta M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care is challenged to meet the needs of patients with dementia. A training program was developed to increase capacity for dementia care through the development of Family Health Team (FHT)-based interprofessional memory clinics. The interprofessional training program consisted of a 2-day workshop, 1-day observership, and 2-day…

  16. 42 CFR 1001.601 - Exclusion or suspension under a Federal or State health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... suspended from a Federal or State health care program. (2) Any of the following factors may be considered... could have had, a significant adverse impact on Federal or State health care programs or the... the exclusion. (3) Only if any of the aggravating factors set forth in paragraph (b)(2) of...

  17. Evaluation of the Person-Centered Care Essentials Program: Importance of Trainers in Achieving Targeted Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Scott P.; O'Brien, Catherine J.; Edelman, Perry; Fazio, Sam

    2011-01-01

    A person-centered care (PCC) training program was developed and disseminated to 84 institutes for retired religious persons across the United States. The program was delivered via a train-the-trainer model wherein institute trainers attended a 2-day training conference, then taught the material to direct care workers (DCWs) at their respective…

  18. 78 FR 31530 - Applications for New Awards; Child Care Access Means Parents in School Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Parents in School Program AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information: Child Care Access Means Parents in School (CCAMPIS) Program Notice inviting... parents in postsecondary education through provision of campus-based child care services. Priorities:...

  19. Promoting Inclusion by Improving Child Care Quality in Inner-City Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Philippa; Milbourne, Suzanne; Silverman, Christine; Feller, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    An innovative training program to improve the quality of child care for all children including those with disabilities was developed, implemented, and evaluated over a 5-year time span with child caregivers working primarily in inner city child care programs. A total of 283 directors and child caregivers participated in 1 of 15 courses that used…

  20. Nutrition Standards for Child Care Programs: Meeting Children's Nutrition and Education Needs. Nutrition, Health and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briley, Margaret E.; Grey, Cynthia R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents information on standards for American child care and early education programs participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Topics discussed include meal plans, nutritional requirements, food preparation and food service, cultural diversity, food safety and sanitation, nutrition education, and emotional climate at mealtimes. (KB)

  1. Reliability of an interactive computer program for advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Schubart, Jane R; Levi, Benjamin H; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83-0.95, and 0.86-0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time.

  2. Integrating Advanced Practice Nurses in Home Care. Recommendations for a Teaching Home Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitty, Ethel; Mezey, Mathy

    1998-01-01

    A telephone survey of home care agencies and providers revealed a need for the following: evidence of the effectiveness of nurse practitioners in home care, regulatory and financial support for nurse practitioner home care, and development of home care agencies as clinical sites for training. (SK)

  3. Child Care You Can Count On: Model Programs and Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD.

    This document is composed of an overview of the 1998 Kids Count data book, a pocket guide summarizing findings, and information sheets on various aspects of child care. The overview discusses the need for child care, examines its cost, presents information on the quality of available child care, describes potential solutions to make child care…

  4. Equity in health care financing: The case of Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chai Ping; Whynes, David K; Sach, Tracey H

    2008-01-01

    Background Equitable financing is a key objective of health care systems. Its importance is evidenced in policy documents, policy statements, the work of health economists and policy analysts. The conventional categorisations of finance sources for health care are taxation, social health insurance, private health insurance and out-of-pocket payments. There are nonetheless increasing variations in the finance sources used to fund health care. An understanding of the equity implications would help policy makers in achieving equitable financing. Objective The primary purpose of this paper was to comprehensively assess the equity of health care financing in Malaysia, which represents a new country context for the quantitative techniques used. The paper evaluated each of the five financing sources (direct taxes, indirect taxes, contributions to Employee Provident Fund and Social Security Organization, private insurance and out-of-pocket payments) independently, and subsequently by combined the financing sources to evaluate the whole financing system. Methods Cross-sectional analyses were performed on the Household Expenditure Survey Malaysia 1998/99, using Stata statistical software package. In order to assess inequality, progressivity of each finance sources and the whole financing system was measured by Kakwani's progressivity index. Results Results showed that Malaysia's predominantly tax-financed system was slightly progressive with a Kakwani's progressivity index of 0.186. The net progressive effect was produced by four progressive finance sources (in the decreasing order of direct taxes, private insurance premiums, out-of-pocket payments, contributions to EPF and SOCSO) and a regressive finance source (indirect taxes). Conclusion Malaysia's two tier health system, of a heavily subsidised public sector and a user charged private sector, has produced a progressive health financing system. The case of Malaysia exemplifies that policy makers can gain an in depth

  5. Making primary health care work: the case of Fundacao Esperanca.

    PubMed

    Offenheiser, R C

    1986-01-01

    For the past 15 years, the Fundac Esperanca, a private organization founded in Santarem by a North American Franciscan priest, has been working to provide the widely scattered rural residents in the mid-Amazon region of Brazil with effective health care. Early efforts focused on Esperanca's hospital boat, which traveled up and down the river to reach the remote settlements. During the 1st decade of operation, Esperanca vaccinated some 150,000 people and provided general medical and surgical services to countless others. Yet, by the late 1970s, the program's staff were beginning to question the longterm effectiveness of their efforts. In 1979, Esperanca decided it could have a longer lasting impact on health in the mid-Amazon region if it could mobilize rural communities to improve family diets and sanitary practices and carry out comprehensive vaccination campaigns. Supported by a grant from Private Agencies Collaborating Together (PACT), it launched its own primary health care program. This initiative began with a health survey of the region. The studies revealed that 1/3 of the children under age 6 were malnourished, 90% had untreated cavities, and 2/3 of the 10,000 people tested showed evidence of parasitosis. There were higher than normal incidences of malaria, anemia, tuberculosis, diphtheria, uterine cancer in women, smallpox, and visual problems. The social, cultural, and demographic characteristics of the region also were discouraging. Most people lived in widely scattered river villages and were illiterate, with little understanding of hygiene, nutrition, or public health. None of the settlements had formal health care systems. Esperanca chose to make the community paramedic the keystone of its program, stating clearly that the outreach worker is the conduit to clinical services in Santarem. In time, it was decided to phase out the hospital boat's activities. It had come to signal the wrong message, i.e., the doctors were coming and good health was on the

  6. Towards a new health care paradigm. Patient-focused care. The case of Kingston Hospital Trust.

    PubMed

    Newman, K

    1997-01-01

    Patient-focused care (PFC) and business process re-engineering (BPR) have been advocated in the academic literature as techniques to improve both quality of service and reduce costs. Seeks to separate and delineate the components of PFC and BPR and, using the case study method, describe the adoption and implementation process of PFC in medicine and maternity by one London NHS Trust Hospital. Reports the impact of this innovation on service delivery, staff reconfiguration and multi-skilling. Identifies preconditions and key success factors and indicates lessons for the future.

  7. An Evaluation of the AirCare Program Based on Cost-Benefit and Cost-Effectiveness Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bi, Hsiaotao T.; Wang, Dianle

    2006-01-01

    A cost-benefit analysis of the AirCare program in the province of British Columbia on the basis of emissions cost factors from the literature showed a benefit outweighing the cost. Furthermore, a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the AirCare program with a hybrid-car rebate program revealed that the AirCare program is more effective in…

  8. The Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program: A Public Health Framework

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Sarah C.; Judge, Christine M.; Taube, Robert L.; Blanchfield, Bonnie B.; Swain, Stacy E.; Koh, Howard K.

    2010-01-01

    During the past 25 years, the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program has evolved into a service model embodying the core functions and essential services of public health. Each year the program provides integrated medical, behavioral, and oral health care, as well as preventive services, to more than 11 000 homeless people. Services are delivered in clinics located in 2 teaching hospitals, 80 shelters and soup kitchens, and an innovative 104-bed medical respite unit. We explain the program's principles of care, describe the public health framework that undergirds the program, and offer lessons for the elimination of health disparities suffered by this vulnerable population. PMID:20558804

  9. Primary health care and donor dependency: a case study of nongovernment assistance in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Maclure, R

    1995-01-01

    Primary health care assistance has become prominent in the rural development programs of many nongovernment organizations throughout sub-Saharan Africa. By emphasizing education and the promotion of new participatory health systems, most such programs aim to enhance the conditions of women as principal community care givers. Yet village-level health assistance in Africa is not without shortcomings. This is exemplified in a case study of two nongovernment programs in Burkina Faso's Namentenga Province. Although both programs have contributed to maternal health and infant survival, they have also induced new ties of donor dependency. This appears to present a conundrum for the sponsoring agencies which espouse self-reliance as a development assistance goal. In fact, however, where the intervention of nongovernment organizations helps to improve rural health, new dimensions of dependency may prove to be a positive first stage in the mobilization of women and the development of locally managed health systems. For this to be so, much is contingent on the capacity of these organizations to integrate local participation in their own planning and management processes, and to augment the professional status of indigenous health workers.

  10. Service learning at dementia care programs: an orientation and training program.

    PubMed

    Lambert-Shute, Jennifer J; Jarrott, Shannon E; Fruhauf, Christine A

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes a project that addresses the unique challenge service-learners face at dementia care programs. The project was conducted in conjunction with two courses on aging that offer students a service-learning (S-L) option at a university adult day service (ADS) program that accepts service-learners from these courses. The intervention consisted of two elements: (a) an orientation and follow- up sessions in which students learned about the causes of dementia, the behavioral characteristics exhibited by persons with dementia, and the best methods of interacting effectively with cognitively impaired persons; and (b) a structured scrapbook project for service-learners to exercise their new knowledge and skills. The authors designed the project to increase students' comfort in the dementia care setting and to facilitate students' knowledge of the elderly. The following sections describe the project and its procedures, benefits, and challenges. Recommendations for continuing the project and for adapting the project to other dementia sites are provided.

  11. Learning by doing. Training health care professionals to become facilitator of moral case deliberation.

    PubMed

    Stolper, Margreet; Molewijk, Bert; Widdershoven, Guy

    2015-03-01

    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a dialogue among health care professionals about moral issues in practice. A trained facilitator moderates the dialogue, using a conversation method. Often, the facilitator is an ethicist. However, because of the growing interest in MCD and the need to connect MCD to practice, healthcare professionals should also become facilitators themselves. In order to transfer the facilitating expertise to health care professionals, a training program has been developed. This program enables professionals in health care institutions to acquire expertise in dealing with moral questions independent of the expertise of an (external) ethicist. Over the past 10 years, we developed a training program with a specific mix of theory and practice, aiming to foster the right attitude, skills and knowledge of the trainee. The content and the didactics of the training developed in line with the philosophy of MCD: pragmatic hermeneutics, dialogical ethics and Socratic epistemology. Central principles are: 'learning by doing', 'reflection instead of ready made knowledge', and 'dialogue on dialogue'. This paper describes the theoretical background and the didactic content of the current training. Furthermore, we present didactic tools which we developed for stimulating active learning. We also go into lessons we learned in developing the training. Next, we provide some preliminary data from evaluation research of the training program by participants. The discussion highlights crucial aspects of educating professionals to become facilitators of MCD. The paper ends with concluding remarks and a plea for more evaluative evidence of the effectiveness and meaning of this training program for doing MCD in institutions.

  12. Healthcare organization-education partnerships and career ladder programs for health care workers.

    PubMed

    Dill, Janette S; Chuang, Emmeline; Morgan, Jennifer C

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concerns about quality of care and workforce shortages have motivated health care organizations and educational institutions to partner to create career ladders for frontline health care workers. Career ladders reward workers for gains in skills and knowledge and may reduce the costs associated with turnover, improve patient care, and/or address projected shortages of certain nursing and allied health professions. This study examines partnerships between health care and educational organizations in the United States during the design and implementation of career ladder training programs for low-skill workers in health care settings, referred to as frontline health care workers. Mixed methods data from 291 frontline health care workers and 347 key informants (e.g., administrators, instructors, managers) collected between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed using both regression and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (QCA). Results suggest that different combinations of partner characteristics, including having an education leader, employer leader, frontline management support, partnership history, community need, and educational policies, were necessary for high worker career self-efficacy and program satisfaction. Whether a worker received a wage increase, however, was primarily dependent on leadership within the health care organization, including having an employer leader and employer implementation policies. Findings suggest that strong partnerships between health care and educational organizations can contribute to the successful implementation of career ladder programs, but workers' ability to earn monetary rewards for program participation depends on the strength of leadership support within the health care organization.

  13. An Online Educational Program Improves Pediatric Oncology Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Spiritual Care Competence.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Cheryl L; Callahan, Margaret Faut; McCarthy, Donna O; Hughes, Ronda G; White-Traut, Rosemary; Bansal, Naveen K

    This study evaluated the potential impact of an online spiritual care educational program on pediatric nurses' attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and their competence to provide spiritual care to children with cancer at the end of life. It was hypothesized that the intervention would increase nurses' positive attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and increase nurses' level of perceived spiritual care competence. A positive correlation was expected between change in nurses' perceived attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and change in nurses' perceived spiritual care competence. A prospective, longitudinal design was employed, and analyses included one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance, linear regression, and partial correlation. Statistically significant differences were found in nurses' attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and nurses' perceived spiritual care competence. There was a positive relationship between change scores in nurses' attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and nurses' spiritual care competence. Online spiritual care educational programs may exert a lasting impact on nurses' attitudes toward and knowledge of spiritual care and their competence to provide spiritual care to children with cancer at the end of life. Additional studies are required to evaluate the direct effects of educational interventions patient outcomes.

  14. The influence of managed care on U.S. baccalaureate nursing education programs.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Susan E

    2006-02-01

    The transformation of health care into managed care has raised many issues and concerns for nurse educators. The milieu in which nurses currently practice reflects the restructuring shaped by managed care principles. The shift from acute care to expanded community services has changed the way health care is provided within hospital settings. The organization of nursing programs has been affected by this shift, and the ramifications of these external forces on curriculum structure have altered the way nursing students are educated. This article presents research demonstrating the changes in the structure of the curricula for baccalaureate nursing education in 2001, which were caused by health care reform in effect since 1994.

  15. Effects of a Safe Patient Handling and Mobility Program on Patient Self-Care Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shiyko, Mariya; Margulis, Heather; Campo, Marc

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a safe patient handling and mobility (SPHM) program on patient self-care outcomes. METHOD. We used a retrospective cohort design. Data were obtained from the electronic medical records of 1,292 patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. Self-care scores from the FIM™ for patients who participated in rehabilitation before implementation of an SPHM program were compared with the scores of patients who participated after implementation of the program. RESULTS. Patients who received inpatient rehabilitation services with an SPHM program were as likely to achieve at least modified independence in self-care as those who received inpatient rehabilitation services without an SPHM program. CONCLUSION. SPHM programs may not affect self-care performance in adults receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. However, more work must be done to define specific and effective methods for integrating patient handling technologies into occupational therapy practice. PMID:25184472

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM CASE STUDIES: DEMONSTRATING PROGRAM OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This bookle...

  17. Environmental Technology Verification Program - ETV - Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This cd con...

  18. CASE--A PROGRAM FOR SIMULATION OF CONCEPT LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAKER, FRANK B.

    THE "CASE" PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED TO PROVIDE A VEHICLE FOR UNDERSTANDING THE PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES INVOLVED IN CONCEPT LEARNING BY MEANS OF COMPUTER SIMULATION TECHNIQUES. BECAUSE THE MAJORITY OF PUBLISHED "SIMULATION OF CONCEPT LEARNING" PROGRAMS PROVIDED FEW INSIGHTS INTO THE LEARNING PROCESS, THE "CASE" PROGRAM…

  19. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Hungary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Mihaly; Durko, Matyas

    This document contains two case studies which provide an idea of the types of adult education programs available in Hungary. The first case study, prepared by Mihaly Sari, describes "The Month of Protecting Our Environment," a program developed in the small town of Puspokladany by a club of amateur anglers, a society for propagating…

  20. Non-Credit Community Arts Programs: A Comparative Case Study of Three Programs within Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Toro, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of "Non-credit community arts programs: A comparative case study of three programs within research universities" is to examine the perceptions of the various stakeholders of non-credit community arts programs to determine the perceived benefits received by all stakeholders from the non-credit program, the university, and its…

  1. The Influence of Skill Development Training Program for Spiritual Care of Elderly Individual on Elderly Care Technician Students' Perception of Spiritual Support.

    PubMed

    Bulduk, Serap; Usta, Esra; Dinçer, Yeliz

    2017-06-01

    Spiritual care means helping an individual protect, maintain and gain all the dimensions of his/her existence. Elderly care technicians face numerous cases or crisis situations in which elderly individuals from different backgrounds question the meaning and value of life. Elderly care technicians must acknowledge that the spirituality is an important element in the way an elderly individual receives healthcare and they must be equipped for this matter. This study was conducted in order to examine the influence of "Skill Development Training Program for Spiritual Care of Elderly Individual," which was carried out with students from elderly care program, on the perception of spirituality support in a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study design with control group. As the data collection form, "Spiritual Support Perception" (SSP) scale was used. The mean scores of the intervention group after the training and after one month are 50.39 ± 5.34 and 51.13 ± 4.98, respectively, and those of the control group are 43.16 ± 4.83 and 42.72 ± 4.48. A statistically significant difference was found between the mean scores of the intervention group from the pretest and the posttests immediately after the training and one month after the training (f = 94.247, p = 0.001). In the control group, however, there was no significant change in the SSP mean scores (f = 0.269, p = 0.77). As a result, this study pointed out the necessity of such training programs for healthcare professionals to make a distinction between their professional duties and their own personalities in order to offer spiritual care to the elderly individual.

  2. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayagopal, R.; Burns, E. P.

    Four adult education programs being conducted in India are described in the case studies in this packet. Two of the projects involve literacy; the third promotes literacy as one part of its community development program, and the fourth trains workers in hotel management and catering technology. The literacy programs are (1) development of a…

  3. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Portugal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares de Melo, Alvaro; Cristovao, Artur F. A. C.

    The case descriptions of two adult education programs in Portual contained in this document are part of a set that reflects a cooperative effort by adult educators to increase international understanding of various educational programs for adults in their societal context. A face sheet for each program provides this information: name,…

  4. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Yugoslavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebesko, Branco; And Others

    These eight case descriptions of adult education programs in Yugoslavia are part of a set that reflects a cooperative effort by adult educators to increase international understanding of various educational programs for adults in their societal context. A face sheet for each program provides this information: name, organization, and address of the…

  5. Community residential care program and contract program for veterans with alcohol and drug dependence disorders--VA. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1996-12-02

    This document updates the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations concerning the Community Residential Care Program and the Contract Program for Veterans with Alcohol and Drug Dependence Disorders by incorporating by reference relevant portions of the latest editions of the National Fire Protection Association Life Safety Code entitled "NFPA 101, Life Safety Code" and "NFPA 101A, Guide on Alternative Approaches to life Safety." This is intended to ensure that buildings used for treatment and residential services for veterans meet appropriate fire and safety standards. Also, this document amends the regulations for such programs by delegating authority to each of the Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) Directors of the Veterans Health Administration to grant certain equivalencies or variances to building standards of the Life Safety Code. Further, this final rule does not adopt the portion of the proposed rule concerning the Adult Day Health Care Program since the Adult Day Health Care Program and the corresponding regulations are no longer in existence.

  6. A Business Case Analysis for the Vulture Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT A Business Case Analysis for the Vulture Program By...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED MBA Professional Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Business Case Analysis for the Vulture Program 6. AUTHOR(S) Jered...for public release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The Vulture program is an initiative being

  7. The team approach to home-based primary care: restructuring care to meet individual, program, and system needs.

    PubMed

    Reckrey, Jennifer M; Soriano, Theresa A; Hernandez, Cameron R; DeCherrie, Linda V; Chavez, Silvia; Zhang, Meng; Ornstein, Katherine

    2015-02-01

    Team-based models of care are an important way to meet the complex medical and psychosocial needs of the homebound. As part of a quality improvement project to address individual, program, and system needs, a portion of a large, physician-led academic home-based primary care practice was restructured into a team-based model. With support from an office-based nurse practitioner, a dedicated social worker, and a dedicated administrative assistant, physicians were able to care for a larger number of patients. Hospitalizations, readmissions, and patient satisfaction remained the same while physician panel size increased and physician satisfaction improved. The Team Approach is an innovative way to improve interdisciplinary, team-based care through practice restructuring and serves as an example of how other practices can approach the complex task of caring for the homebound.

  8. The Team Approach to Home-Based Primary Care: Restructuring Care to Meet Patient, Program, and System Needs

    PubMed Central

    Reckrey, Jennifer M.; Soriano, Theresa A.; Hernandez, Cameron R.; DeCherrie, Linda V.; Chavez, Silvia; Zhang, Meng; Ornstein, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Team-based models of care are an important way to meet the complex medical and psychosocial needs of the homebound. As part of a quality improvement project to address patient, program, and system needs, we restructured a portion of our large, physician-led academic home-based primary care practice into a team-based model. With support from an office-based nurse practitioner, a dedicated social worker, and a dedicated administrative assistant, physicians were able to care for a larger number of patients. Hospitalizations, readmissions, and patient satisfaction remained the same while physician panel size increased and physician satisfaction improved. Our Team Approach is an innovative way to improve interdisciplinary, team-based care though practice restructuring and serves as an example of how other practices can approach the complex task of caring for the homebound. PMID:25645568

  9. Effective ABE Programming: Nine Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjogren, Douglas; Jacobson, Larry

    The document presents an indepth study of nine selected exemplary adult basic education (ABE) programs in Region 8: Volunteers Clearing House, Fort Collins, Colorado; Utah Navajo Development Council, Blanding, Utah; Adult Education Tutorial Program, Denver, Colorado; Project SAVE, Lemmon, South Dakota; Gates Rubber Company, Denver, Colorado;…

  10. Coeliac disease in primary care: case finding study

    PubMed Central

    Hin, Harold; Bird, Graham; Fisher, Peter; Mahy, Nick; Jewell, Derek

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To provide evidence of underdiagnosis of coeliac disease and to describe the main presenting symptoms of coeliac disease in primary care. Design Case finding in a primary care setting by testing for coeliac disease by using the endomysial antibody test. Setting Nine surgeries in and around a market town in central England, serving a population of 70 000. Participants First 1000 patients screened from October 1996 to October 1997. Outcome measures Determination of endomysial antibody titre of patients fulfilling the study criteria, followed by small intestine biopsy of those with positive results. Results The 30 patients (out of 1000 samples) with positive results on the endomysial antibody test all had histological confirmation on small intestine biopsy. The commonest mode of presentation (15/30) was anaemia of varying severity. Most patients (25/30) presented with non-gastrointestinal symptoms. Specificity of the endomysial antibody test was 30/30. Conclusions Underdiagnosis and misdiagnosis of coeliac disease are common in general practice and often result in protracted and unnecessary morbidity. Serological screening in primary care will uncover a large proportion of patients with this condition and should be made widely available and publicised. Coeliac disease should be considered in patients who have anaemia or are tired all the time, especially when there is a family history of the disease. Key messagesGeneral practitioners currently see many people with undiagnosed coeliac diseaseThe most likely presentation is a combination of microcytic anaemia, past or present, a family history of the disease, and feeling tired all the timeEstimations of endomysial antibody and IgA are reliable diagnostic toolsThe prevalence of coeliac disease in Britain is higher than the accepted figure of 1:1000 populationIncreased awareness of the extra intestinal manifestations of coeliac disease, coupled with a low threshold for serological testing, will uncover a

  11. Dissemination and implementation science in program evaluation: A telemental health clinical consultation case example.

    PubMed

    Arora, Prerna G; Connors, Elizabeth H; Blizzard, Angela; Coble, Kelly; Gloff, Nicole; Pruitt, David

    2017-02-01

    Increased attention has been placed on evaluating the extent to which clinical programs that support the behavioral health needs of youth have effective processes and result in improved patient outcomes. Several theoretical frameworks from dissemination and implementation (D&I) science have been put forth to guide the evaluation of behavioral health program implemented in the context of real-world settings. Although a strong rationale for the integration of D&I science in program evaluation exists, few examples exist available to guide the evaluator in integrating D&I science in the planning and execution of evaluation activities. This paper seeks to inform program evaluation efforts by outlining two D&I frameworks and describing their integration in program evaluation design. Specifically, this paper seeks to support evaluation efforts by illustrating the use of these frameworks via a case example of a telemental health consultation program in pediatric primary care designed to improve access to behavioral health care for children and adolescents in rural settings. Lessons learned from this effort, as well as recommendations regarding the future evaluation of programs using D&I science to support behavioral health care in community-based settings are discussed.

  12. The ephemeral accountable care organization-an unintended consequence of the Medicare shared savings program.

    PubMed

    Harvey, H Benjamin; Gowda, Vrushab; Gazelle, G Scott; Pandharipande, Pari V

    2014-02-01

    A fundamental element of health care payment reform under the Affordable Care Act is the development of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). The ACO model employs shared-risk contracts to better align the interests of health care providers and payers with the intent of driving efficiency and quality in care. The Medicare Shared Savings Program is the most popular of the Medicare ACO programs, with over 200 health systems across the nation participating at this time. However, a pitfall in the way that the Medicare Shared Savings Program is structured, specifically the benchmarking and rebasing method, could make it difficult for even top-performing ACOs to achieve sustained success, thereby threatening the long-term viability of the program. In this paper, we present this pitfall to the radiology community as well as potential solutions that can be considered by CMS moving forward.

  13. Quality of Care for Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in a Managed Care Medicaid Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zima, Bonnie T.; Bussing, Regina; Tang, Lingqi; Zhang, Lily; Ettner, Susan; Belin, Thomas R.; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether clinical severity is greater among children receiving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) care in primary care compared with those in specialty mental health clinics, and to examine how care processes and clinical outcomes vary by sector across three 6-month time intervals. Method: This was a longitudinal…

  14. Creditable Foods Guide for Child Care Centers on the Child Care Food Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    This manual provides information on creditable and noncreditable foods in child care centers, before-and-after-school centers, family day care homes, and adult day care centers. Creditable foods are foods that may be counted toward meeting the requirements for a reimbursable meal. Foods are determined to be creditable according to guidelines…

  15. Short and long term improvements in quality of chronic care delivery predict program sustainability.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-01-01

    Empirical evidence on sustainability of programs that improve the quality of care delivery over time is lacking. Therefore, this study aims to identify the predictive role of short and long term improvements in quality of chronic care delivery on program sustainability. In this longitudinal study, professionals [2010 (T0): n=218, 55% response rate; 2011 (T1): n=300, 68% response rate; 2012 (T2): n=265, 63% response rate] from 22 Dutch disease-management programs completed surveys assessing quality of care and program sustainability. Our study findings indicated that quality of chronic care delivery improved significantly in the first 2 years after implementation of the disease-management programs. At T1, overall quality, self-management support, delivery system design, and integration of chronic care components, as well as health care delivery and clinical information systems and decision support, had improved. At T2, overall quality again improved significantly, as did community linkages, delivery system design, clinical information systems, decision support and integration of chronic care components, and self-management support. Multilevel regression analysis revealed that quality of chronic care delivery at T0 (p<0.001) and quality changes in the first (p<0.001) and second (p<0.01) years predicted program sustainability. In conclusion this study showed that disease-management programs based on the chronic care model improved the quality of chronic care delivery over time and that short and long term changes in the quality of chronic care delivery predicted the sustainability of the projects.

  16. The effect of social health insurance on prenatal care: the case of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Abrokwah, Stephen O; Moser, Christine M; Norton, Edward C

    2014-12-01

    Many developing countries have introduced social health insurance programs to help address two of the United Nations' millennium development goals-reducing infant mortality and improving maternal health outcomes. By making modern health care more accessible and affordable, policymakers hope that more women will seek prenatal care and thereby improve health outcomes. This paper studies how Ghana's social health insurance program affects prenatal care use and out-of-pocket expenditures, using the two-part model to model prenatal care expenditures. We test whether Ghana's social health insurance improved prenatal care use, reduced out-of-pocket expenditures, and increased the number of prenatal care visits. District-level differences in the timing of implementation provide exogenous variation in access to health insurance, and therefore strong identification. Those with access to social health insurance have a higher probability of receiving care, a higher number of prenatal care visits, and lower out-of-pocket expenditures conditional on spending on care.

  17. Orientation to Multicultural Health Care in Migrant Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Robert T., II

    This guide furnishes health care providers serving migrant and seasonal farmworkers with information to cope with the complexities of health care delivery in a multiethnic, multicultural environment. Section I provides an introduction to basic cultural concepts that influence the outcome of interactions between providers and their migrant…

  18. Health Care of Incarcerated Youth: State Programs & Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Linda S.; Sheahan, Paula M.

    This report presents the analysis and results of a survey of states' progress in meeting the goals and objectives of their state action plans on the health care of incarcerated youth. The survey questioned 48 juvenile justice professionals, health care professionals, and university faculty from across the nation concerning state progress toward…

  19. Interdisciplinary Programs Focused Populations: The Case of Health Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Yavich, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The Ariel University has a unique interdisciplinary program in healthcare management that targets experienced healthcare professionals who wish to earn an academic degree. Only one academic study has been held so far on the integration of graduates of an academic university-level school in healthcare management in the field. In the current study,…

  20. Brazil's National Program for Improving Primary Care Access and Quality (PMAQ)

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Matthew J.; Rocha, Marcia Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Despite some remarkable achievements, there are several challenges facing Brazil's Family Health Strategy (FHS), including expanding access to primary care and improving its quality. These concerns motivated the development of the National Program for Improving Primary Care Access and Quality (PMAQ). Although voluntary, the program now includes nearly 39 000 FHS teams in the country and has led to a near doubling of the federal investment in primary care in its first 2 rounds. In this article, we introduce the PMAQ and advance several recommendations to ensure that it continues to improve primary care access and quality in Brazil. PMID:28252498

  1. The national Area Health Education Center program and primary care residency training.

    PubMed

    Bacon, T J; Baden, D J; Coccodrilli, L D

    2000-01-01

    The Area Health Education Center (AHEC) program was established in 1972 to improve the supply, distribution, retention and quality of primary care and other health practitioners in medically underserved areas. Through academic/community partnerships, regional AHECs offer a broad array of educational programs for students, residents and practicing health professionals. With primary care medical education a core part of AHEC programs, AHECs have been involved in decentralized residency training from the outset, with particular attention to family medicine. This paper provides an overview of the national AHEC program, its core components and its support for primary care residency training. Although AHECs have achieved considerable success in training primary care physicians for their respective states, continued refinements of programs are needed to address the needs of the most rural and underserved communities.

  2. English Language and Skills Training for Entry-Level Health Care Jobs. Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidya, Elma

    The guide describes a vocational English-as-a-Second-Language program for pre-employment training of Southeast Asians seeking work in entry-level health care jobs. The program was conducted in cooperation with a hospital in Massachusetts. The guide describes the program and its four instructional units in detail, and includes lesson plans,…

  3. Effect of an Extramural Program on Student Attitudes toward Dental Care for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Marvin J.; Walken, Jennifer W.

    1980-01-01

    A program in dental care for the handicapped offered at the University of North Carolina is described. Results of a survey of program participants over a five-year period indicates that the program results in decreased fear and anxiety about treating handicapped patients. (JMF)

  4. Expanding a Continuum of Care: Outcomes of a Partial Day Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Kristin E.

    A study investigated the outcomes of the Acute Children's Extended Services (ACES) program, a Salt Lake City, Utah, program designed to help children with emotional and behavioral disabilities reintegrate into the community from inpatient or residential care. The study examined outcomes of the ACES program within four domains: access, clinical…

  5. Parental Decision Making about Technology and Quality in Child Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Katherine K.; Vittrup, Brigitte; Leveridge, Tinney

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigated parental decision making about non-parental child care programs based on the technological and quality components of the program, both child-focused and parent-focused. Child-focused variables related to children's access to technology such as computers, educational television programming, and the internet.…

  6. The Potential Contribution of Mentor Programs to Relational Permanency for Youth Aging out of Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Rosemary J.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes published research regarding the effectiveness of mentor programs in general, and for youth in foster care specifically, as a basis for evidence-based practice in child welfare. It examines the pros and cons of mentor programs and characteristics of programs that are more or less effective for achieving specific social…

  7. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Respiratory Care Technology Programs (CIP: 51.0908--Respiratory Therapy Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the respiratory care technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and…

  8. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Health Care Assistant (Program CIP: 51.1614--Nursing Assistant/Aide). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the health care assistant program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the nurse…

  9. Case History of an 8-Block Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemons, Molly J.

    1997-01-01

    Offers a brief overview of the process undertaken by one school district in Missouri to explore and then implement a schedule change (in particular a block program)--a process involving parents, teachers, administrators, school board members, and students. (SR)

  10. Socio-political constraints on primary health care: a case study from Java.

    PubMed

    Williams, G; Satoto

    1980-01-01

    The Alma-Ata 1978 conference emphasized the importance of the concept of primary health care in the health system and overall socioeconomic development of the community. However, theories of development generally do not allow for the complexity of human conditions, and the relevance of contact with the village people. This paper presents the experience of a PHC (primary health care) project on the northern coast of central Java. The case illustrates some of the institutional and sociopolitical constraints which the Indonesian government may face in implementing a PHC program in the next few years, such as village politics; the reluctance of men to allow women to participate in the decision-making process of the program, and; the reluctance of land-owning farmers to allow landless villagers in the decision-making process. The following conditions would create a most favorable sociopolitical climate for starting a PHC program in Indonesia: 1) at the village level, non-pamong desa (village elders), women and landless villagers are encouraged to participate in decision-making processes which affect their interests and to take on positions of responsibility in village affairs; 2) there is a process of frank, 2-way communication marked by mutual respect between government agencies at regency and subdistrict levels village-level organization, and 3) supra-village authorities allow village institution to develop at their own pace, intervening only when interests of poor and underprivileged groups are endangered.

  11. 5 CFR 792.225 - May an agency disburse funds to an organization that administers the child care subsidy program...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... organization that administers the child care subsidy program prior to the time the employee receives the child... organization that administers the child care subsidy program prior to the time the employee receives the child care services? The agency may disburse funds to an organization that administers the child care...

  12. 5 CFR 792.225 - May an agency disburse funds to an organization that administers the child care subsidy program...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... organization that administers the child care subsidy program prior to the time the employee receives the child... organization that administers the child care subsidy program prior to the time the employee receives the child care services? The agency may disburse funds to an organization that administers the child care...

  13. 5 CFR 792.225 - May an agency disburse funds to an organization that administers the child care subsidy program...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... organization that administers the child care subsidy program prior to the time the employee receives the child... organization that administers the child care subsidy program prior to the time the employee receives the child care services? The agency may disburse funds to an organization that administers the child care...

  14. Exploring Robust Methods for Evaluating Treatment and Comparison Groups in Chronic Care Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Hamar, Brent; Bradley, Chastity; Gandy, William M.; Harrison, Patricia L.; Sidney, James A.; Coberley, Carter R.; Rula, Elizabeth Y.; Pope, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of chronic care management (CCM) programs is necessary to determine the behavioral, clinical, and financial value of the programs. Financial outcomes of members who are exposed to interventions (treatment group) typically are compared to those not exposed (comparison group) in a quasi-experimental study design. However, because member assignment is not randomized, outcomes reported from these designs may be biased or inefficient if study groups are not comparable or balanced prior to analysis. Two matching techniques used to achieve balanced groups are Propensity Score Matching (PSM) and Coarsened Exact Matching (CEM). Unlike PSM, CEM has been shown to yield estimates of causal (program) effects that are lowest in variance and bias for any given sample size. The objective of this case study was to provide a comprehensive comparison of these 2 matching methods within an evaluation of a CCM program administered to a large health plan during a 2-year time period. Descriptive and statistical methods were used to assess the level of balance between comparison and treatment members pre matching. Compared with PSM, CEM retained more members, achieved better balance between matched members, and resulted in a statistically insignificant Wald test statistic for group aggregation. In terms of program performance, the results showed an overall higher medical cost savings among treatment members matched using CEM compared with those matched using PSM (-$25.57 versus -$19.78, respectively). Collectively, the results suggest CEM is a viable alternative, if not the most appropriate matching method, to apply when evaluating CCM program performance. (Population Health Management 2013;16:35–45) PMID:22788834

  15. The patient perspective: arthritis care provided by Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care program-trained clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Warmington, Kelly; Kennedy, Carol A; Lundon, Katie; Soever, Leslie J; Brooks, Sydney C; Passalent, Laura A; Shupak, Rachel; Schneider, Rayfel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess patient satisfaction with the arthritis care services provided by graduates of the Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC) program. Materials and methods This was a cross-sectional evaluation using a self-report questionnaire for data collection. Participants completed the Patient–Doctor Interaction Scale, modified to capture patient–practitioner interactions. Participants completed selected items from the Group Health Association of America’s Consumer Satisfaction Survey, and items capturing quality of care, appropriateness of wait times, and a comparison of extended-role practitioner (ERP) services with previously received arthritis care. Results A total of 325 patients seen by 27 ERPs from 15 institutions completed the questionnaire. Respondents were primarily adults (85%), female (72%), and living in urban areas (79%). The mean age of participants was 54 years (range 3–92 years), and 51% were not working. Patients with inflammatory (51%) and noninflammatory conditions (31%) were represented. Mean (standard deviation) Patient–Practitioner Interaction Scale subscale scores ranged from 4.50 (0.60) to 4.63 (0.48) (1 to 5 [greater satisfaction]). Overall satisfaction with the quality of care was high (4.39 [0.77]), as was satisfaction with wait times (referral to appointment, 4.27 [0.86]; in clinic, 4.24 [0.91]). Ninety-eight percent of respondents felt the arthritis care they received was comparable to or better than that previously received from other health care professionals. Conclusion Patients were very satisfied with and amenable to arthritis care provided by graduates of the ACPAC program. Our findings provide early support for the deployment and integration of ACPAC ERPs into the Ontario health care system and should inform future evaluation at the patient level. PMID:27790044

  16. The performance of integrated health care networks in continuity of care: a qualitative multiple case study of COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Waibel, Sina; Vargas, Ingrid; Aller, Marta-Beatriz; Gusmão, Renata; Henao, Diana; Vázquez, M. Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated health care networks (IHN) are promoted in numerous countries as a response to fragmented care delivery by providing a coordinated continuum of services to a defined population. However, evidence on their effectiveness and outcome is scarce, particularly considering continuity across levels of care; that is the patient's experience of connected and coherent care received from professionals of the different care levels over time. The objective was to analyse the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients’ perceptions of continuity of clinical management and information across care levels and continuity of relation in IHN of the public health care system of Catalonia. Methods A qualitative multiple case study was conducted, where the cases are COPD patients. A theoretical sample was selected in two stages: (1) study contexts: IHN and (2) study cases consisting of COPD patients. Data were collected by means of individual, semi-structured interviews to the patients, their general practitioners and pulmonologists and review of records. A thematic content analysis segmented by IHN and cases with a triangulation of sources and analysists was carried out. Results COPD patients of all networks perceived that continuity of clinical management was existent due to clear distribution of roles for COPD care across levels, rapid access to care during exacerbations and referrals to secondary care when needed; nevertheless, patients of some networks highlighted too long waiting times to non-urgent secondary care. Physicians generally agreed with patients, however, also indicated unclear distribution of roles, some inadequate referrals and long waiting times to primary care in some networks. Concerning continuity of information, patients across networks considered that their clinical information was transferred across levels via computer and that physicians also used informal communication mechanisms (e-mail, telephone); whereas physicians

  17. Fostering Supportive Learning Environments in Long-Term Care: The Case of WIN A STEP UP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Jennifer Craft; Haviland, Sara B.; Woodside, M. Allyson; Konrad, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    The education of direct care workers (DCWs) is key to improving job quality and the quality of care in long-term care (LTC). This paper describes the successful integration of a supervisory training program into a continuing education intervention (WIN A STEP UP) for DCWs, identifies the factors that appear to influence the integration of the…

  18. Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

  19. Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Fire Safety Requirements for Certain Health Care Facilities. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-04

    This final rule will amend the fire safety standards for Medicare and Medicaid participating hospitals, critical access hospitals (CAHs), long-term care facilities, intermediate care facilities for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ICF-IID), ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs), hospices which provide inpatient services, religious non-medical health care institutions (RNHCIs), and programs of all-inclusive care for the elderly (PACE) facilities. Further, this final rule will adopt the 2012 edition of the Life Safety Code (LSC) and eliminate references in our regulations to all earlier editions of the Life Safety Code. It will also adopt the 2012 edition of the Health Care Facilities Code, with some exceptions.

  20. A declaration of healthy dependence: the case of home care.

    PubMed

    Palm, Elin

    2014-12-01

    Aging populations have become a major concern in the developed world and are expected to require novel care strategies. Public policies, health-care regimes and technology developers alike stress the need for a more individualized care to meet the increased demand for care services in response to demographic change. Increasingly, care services are offered to individuals with diseases and or disabilities in their homes by means of Personalized Health-Monitoring (PHM) technologies. PHM-based home care is typically portrayed as the key to a cost-effective future care that better can accommodate the needs of an aging population and promote care recipients' independence. In light of the emerging technology-based home care, this article sets forth to investigate the significance and implications of a strong emphasis on independence in relation to this novel care form. Notions of independence as used by care planners, care providers and technology developers are examined in relation to ICT-based home care and the reasonableness of independence as an aim for future health-care is critically discussed. In conclusion, the need for a shift from a strong emphasis on independence to a right to healthy dependence is advocated.

  1. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians' 2016 Veterinary Medical Care Guidelines for Spay-Neuter Programs.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Brenda; Bushby, Philip A; McCobb, Emily; White, Sara C; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Appel, Leslie D; Makolinski, Kathleen V; Wilford, Christine L; Bohling, Mark W; Eddlestone, Susan M; Farrell, Kelly A; Ferguson, Nancy; Harrison, Kelly; Howe, Lisa M; Isaza, Natalie M; Levy, Julie K; Looney, Andrea; Moyer, Michael R; Robertson, Sheilah Ann; Tyson, Kathy

    2016-07-15

    As community efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned cats and dogs have increased, many veterinarians have increasingly focused their clinical efforts on the provision of spay-neuter services. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of spay-neuter programs have been developed to increase delivery of services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, community cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to promote consistent, high-quality care across the broad range of these programs, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. These guidelines consist of recommendations for general patient care and clinical procedures, preoperative care, anesthetic management, surgical procedures, postoperative care, and operations management. They were based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, infection control, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs regardless of location, facility, or type of program. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians envisions that these guidelines will be used by the profession to maintain consistent veterinary medical care in all settings where spay-neuter services are provided and to promote these services as a means of reducing sheltering and euthanasia of cats and dogs.

  2. A risk-adjusted approach to comparing the return on investment in health care programs.

    PubMed

    Sendi, Pedram; Al, Maiwenn J; Zimmermann, Heinz

    2004-09-01

    The league table approach to rank ordering health care programs according to the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is a common method to guide policy makers in setting priorities for resource allocation. In the presence of uncertainty, however, ranking programs is complicated by the degree of variability associated with each program. Confidence intervals for cost-effectiveness ratios may be overlapping. Moreover, confidence intervals may include negative ratios and the interpretation of negative cost-effectiveness ratios is ambiguous. We suggest to rank mutually exclusive health care programs according to their rate of return which is defined as the net monetary benefit over the costs of the program. However, how does a program with a higher expected return but higher uncertainty compare to a program with a lower expected return but lower risk? In the present paper we propose a risk-adjusted measure to compare the return on investment in health care programs. Financing a health care program is treated as an investment in a risky asset. The risky asset is combined with a risk-free asset in order to construct a combined portfolio. The weights attributed to the risk-free and risky assets are chosen in such a manner that all programs under consideration exhibit the same degree of uncertainty. We can then compare the performance of the individual programs by constructing a risk-adjusted league table of expected returns.

  3. Availability of antidotes and key emergency drugs in tertiary care hospitals of Punjab and assessment of the knowledge of health care professionals in the management of poisoning cases.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Naheed; Khiljee, Sonia; Bakhsh, Allah; Ashraf, Muhammad; Maqsood, Iram

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the availability of antidotes/key emergency drugs in tertiary care hospitals of the Punjab province, and to assess the knowledge of health care professionals in the stocking and administration of antidotes in the proper management of poisoning cases. Seventeen (n=17) tertiary care hospitals of Punjab Pakistan were selected. Two performas (A and B) were designed for 26 antidotes/key emergency drugs and given to the hospital pharmacists and physicians respectively. It was observed that Activated Charcoal, being the universal antidote was found only in 6 hospitals (41%). Digoxin Immune Fab, Edentate Calcium disodium and Glucagon were not available in emergency department of any hospital and even not included in the formulary of any hospital. About 80% pharmacists were aware of the method of preparation of Activated Charcoal and 85% physicians were familiar with its route of administration. Data showed that tertiary care hospitals of Punjab do not stock antidotes according to national drug policy. Moreover the study strongly suggests the development of health care centers and professional by organizing antidote awareness programs, continuous education and record keeping of poisonous cases and availability of emergency drugs around the clock.

  4. Parenting the Poorly Attached Teenager. Fostering Families. A Specialized Training Program Designed for Foster Care Workers & Foster Care Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Mona Struhsaker; Faust, Timothy Philip

    This module is part of a training program for foster parents and foster care workers offered at Colorado State University. The module explores the attachment process and the long-term effects of attachment difficulties in the first years of a child's life. The module's learning objectives address: (1) ways of identifying the basic concepts…

  5. Drinking, Drugs & Youth: Use and Abuse. Fostering Families. A Specialized Training Program Designed for Foster Care Workers & Foster Care Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Mona Struhsaker; And Others

    This module is part of a training program for foster parents and foster care workers offered at Colorado State University. The module examines substance abuse by children aged 10 years and above. The module's learning objectives address: (1) family rules and coping mechanisms relevant to substance-abusing youth; (2) characteristics of adolescent…

  6. [Continuity of medical care. Evaluation of a collaborative program between hospital and Primary Care].

    PubMed

    Fernández Moyano, A; García Garmendia, J L; Palmero Palmero, C; García Vargas-Machuca, B; Páez Pinto, J M; Alvarez Alcina, M; Aparicio Santos, R; Benticuaga Martines, M; Delgado de la Cuesta, J; de la Rosa Morales, R; Escorial Moya, C; Espinosa Calleja, R; Fernández Rivera, J; González-Becerra, C; López Herrero, E; Marín Fernández, Y; Mata Martín, A M; Ramos Guerrero, A; Romero Rivero, M J; Sánchez-Dalp, M; Vallejo Maroto, I

    2007-11-01

    The patients being treated in our health care system are becoming increasingly older and have a greater prevalence of chronic diseases. Due to these factors, these patients require greater and easier accessibility to the system as well as continuity of medical care. Collaboration between the different levels of health care has been instrumental in the success of the system and has produced changes in the hospital medical care protocol. Our hospital has developed a care model oriented towards the patient's needs, resulting in a higher grade of satisfaction among the medical professionals. In this paper, we have given a detailed description of part of our medical model, illustrating its different components and indicating several parameters of its evaluation. We have also reviewed the current state of the various models published on this topic. In summary, we believe that this medical care model presents a different approach to management that benefits patients, medical professionals and the health system alike.

  7. German diabetes management programs improve quality of care and curb costs.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stephanie; Drabik, Anna; Büscher, Guido; Graf, Christian; Ullrich, Walter; Gerber, Andreas; Lauterbach, Karl W; Lüngen, Markus

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports the results of a large-scale analysis of a nationwide disease management program in Germany for patients with diabetes mellitus. The German program differs markedly from "classic" disease management in the United States. Although it combines important hallmarks of vendor-based disease management and the Chronic Care Model, the German program is based in primary care practices and carried out by physicians, and it draws on their personal relationships with patients to promote adherence to treatment goals and self-management. After four years of follow-up, overall mortality for patients and drug and hospital costs were all significantly lower for patients who participated in the program compared to other insured patients with similar health profiles who were not in the program. These results suggest that the German disease management program is a successful strategy for improving chronic illness care.

  8. Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs: Implications for physics programs and why you should care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    The content of undergraduate physics programs has not changed appreciably in 50 years, however, the jobs our students take have changed dramatically. Preparing students for careers they are likely to encounter requires physics programs to rethink and in some cases retool to provide an education that will not only educate an individual in the habits of mind and keen sense of how to solve complex technical problems, but also what related skills they will need to be effective in those careers. Do you teach your student how to read or create a budget? How about dealing with a low-performing member of an R&D team? This talk will explore driving forces behind this report, potential implications for physics departments, and practical steps faculty members can take to continue to consider improvements in experiences for our students. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF-1540570).

  9. Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Programs (KP-MCP)

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Research within KP-MCP conducts, publishes, and disseminates high-quality epidemiologic and health services research to improve the health and medical care of Kaiser Permanente members and the society at large.

  10. Implementing family-integrated care in the NICU: engaging veteran parents in program design and delivery.

    PubMed

    Macdonell, Kristy; Christie, Kristen; Robson, Kate; Pytlik, Kasia; Lee, Shoo K; OʼBrien, Karel

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and evaluate how "veteran" parents were engaged as experts in the design and implementation of a family-integrated care program in a Canadian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Three parents of preterm infants previously discharged from the NICU participated in the design and implementation of a family-integrated care pilot program. The steering committee for the program included 5 staff members (a physician, a NICU nurse, a parent education nurse, a lactation consultant, and a social worker) and the parent volunteers. This article includes a total of 42 mothers of infants born at 35-week gestation or less were enrolled in the pilot program. A detailed description and qualitative evaluation of the engagement of veteran parents in the design and implementation of the family-integrated care program. The effectiveness of engaging veteran parents in developing this model of care was evaluated by written feedback from the veteran parents and the other steering committee members. In addition, a structured interview at discharge with the 42 mothers enrolled in the pilot study was used to assess their experiences of the peer-to-peer support provided by veteran parents. Veteran NICU parents brought a wealth of wisdom and expertise developed through personal experience to the design and implementation of the family-integrated care program. The veteran parents played a significant role in both the initial development of the program and in the provision of peer-to-peer support during program implementation. Engagement of parents with prior experience of the NICU care environment is a critical step in the design and implementation of a program of family-integrated care.

  11. [Family Health Program and children palliative care: listening the relatives of technology dependent children].

    PubMed

    Rabello, Cláudia Azevedo Ferreira Guimarães; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique de Almeida

    2010-03-01

    This study discusses the creation of a new children palliative care program based on the Family Health Program, considering the level of care at home and yielding to family requests. The study focused on eighteen members of nine families of technology dependent children (TDC) who were hospital patients at Instituto Fernandes Figueira (IFF): four who are being assisted by its palliative care program Programa de Assistência Domiciliar Interdisciplinar (PADI); three who were inpatients waiting for inclusion in the Program, and finally two inpatients already included in PADI. PADI was chosen because it is the only child palliative care program in Brazil. The results are positive in regards to the connection established between the families and the health care team, the reception of the children, the explanation to the family concerning the disease, and the functional dynamics between the PADI and IFF. As negative points, difficulties arose as a result of the implementation of the program, from its continuity to the worsening or illness of the entire family. In conclusion, although the PADI is the IFF's way of discharging patients, the domiciliary cares taken by the Family Health Program, well articulated with the healthcare system, would be ideal for being the adequate assistance for such.

  12. Using Video Cases to Scaffold Mentoring Competencies: A Program Design from the Young Women Leaders Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Bryan Rossiter

    2013-01-01

    This capstone project conducted an intervention using video cases to scaffold traditional methods of concept presentation in a youth mentoring program. Video cases delivered online were chosen as a methodology to strengthen the support and practitioner aspects indicative of mentoring program success rates (D. L. DuBois, Holloway, Valentine, &…

  13. Monitoring of health care personnel employee and occupational health immunization program practices in the United States.

    PubMed

    Carrico, Ruth M; Sorrells, Nikka; Westhusing, Kelly; Wiemken, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have identified concerns with various elements of health care personnel immunization programs, including the handling and management of the vaccine. The purpose of this study was to assess monitoring processes that support evaluation of the care of vaccines in health care settings. An 11-question survey instrument was developed for use in scripted telephone surveys. State health departments in all 50 states in the United States and the District of Columbia were the target audience for the surveys. Data from a total of 47 states were obtained and analyzed. No states reported an existing monitoring process for evaluation of health care personnel immunization programs in their states. Our assessment indicates that vaccine evaluation processes for health care facilities are rare to nonexistent in the United States. Identifying existing practice gaps and resultant opportunities for improvements may be an important safety initiative that protects patients and health care personnel.

  14. The Case for Independent Writing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meagher, Eileen M.

    One educator with much experience as a teacher and director of composition at a state university believes that academia simply has to have independent writing programs. Her conviction rests on two issues: the nature of the curriculum and the professional/psychological well-being of writing/rhetoric faculty. The process movement in writing pedagogy…

  15. A Case for Consolidated Civil Augmentation Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-10

    Coca - Cola and Chrysler. While government and business organization are not always parallel, there is a greater linkage, I believe, in the realm of...article on infrastructure repair in “post-conflict” Iraq addresses the fact that “civil affairs programs have been a common ingredient of foreign

  16. How to Choose the Best Day-Care Program for Your Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Peggy

    1984-01-01

    When selecting a day-care program, parents should observe the center personally and talk with other parents for references. Suggestions for evaluating curriculum, staff, physical space, and family-school relations are offered. (DF)

  17. Ceramic material life prediction: A program to translate ANSYS results to CARES/LIFE reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonhermann, Pieter; Pintz, Adam

    1994-01-01

    This manual describes the use of the ANSCARES program to prepare a neutral file of FEM stress results taken from ANSYS Release 5.0, in the format needed by CARES/LIFE ceramics reliability program. It is intended for use by experienced users of ANSYS and CARES. Knowledge of compiling and linking FORTRAN programs is also required. Maximum use is made of existing routines (from other CARES interface programs and ANSYS routines) to extract the finite element results and prepare the neutral file for input to the reliability analysis. FORTRAN and machine language routines as described are used to read the ANSYS results file. Sub-element stresses are computed and written to a neutral file using FORTRAN subroutines which are nearly identical to those used in the NASCARES (MSC/NASTRAN to CARES) interface.

  18. The Importance of Curriculum in Achieving Quality Child Day Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Diane Trister

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the components of high quality child day care curricula, focusing on educational philosophy, program goals and objectives, the physical environment, the role of teachers and administrators, and partnerships with families. (MDM)

  19. The chronic care model versus disease management programs: a transaction cost analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jennifer; Mark, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The present article applies transaction cost analysis as a framework for better understanding health plans' decisions to improve chronic illness management by using disease management programs versus redesigning care within physician practices.

  20. Medical care epidemiology and unwarranted variation: the Israeli case.

    PubMed

    Goodman, David C; Goodman, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    In an article in this Journal, Mendlovic and colleagues report on regional variation in medical care across Israeli regions. This study joins a growing literature demonstrating generally high variation in the provision of health care services within developed countries. This commentary summarizes the status of medical care epidemiology and its studies of unwarranted variation in health care, and provides a conceptual framework to guide future studies. Recommendations are offered for advancing studies in Israel that could guide policy development and clinical improvement.

  1. Health Partners of Western Ohio: Integrated Care Case Study.

    PubMed

    Taflinger, Kimberly; West, Elizabeth; Sunderhaus, Janis; Hilton, Irene V

    2016-03-01

    Health centers are unique health care delivery organizations in which multiple disciplines, such as primary care, dental, behavioral health, pharmacy, podiatry, optometry and alternative medicine, are often located at the same site. Because of this characteristic, many health centers have developed systems of integrated care. This paper describes the characteristics of health centers and highlights the integrated health care delivery system of one early adopter health center, Health Partners of Western Ohio.

  2. Teaching the spiritual dimension of nursing care: a survey of U.S. baccalaureate nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Corinne

    2002-11-01

    One hundred thirty-two randomly selected baccalaureate nursing programs in the Unites States responded to a survey exploring how the spiritual dimension of nursing care currently is being taught. The majority of programs included the concept of the spiritual dimension in curricula, but few programs had definitions of spirituality or spiritual nursing care. Content addressed most consistently by programs included assessment of spiritual needs, the needs of dying individuals, and the spiritual dimension as a component of holism or culture. There appeared to be a lack of clarity in the understanding of the concept of spirituality, as well as uncertainty about levels of faculty knowledge and comfort with teaching this topic.

  3. Considerations in the implementation of drug holiday programs in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, S K

    1984-05-01

    Drug holiday programs have been implemented in many long-term care facilities in North America to reduce drug use, decrease nursing time in drug administration, and assess the need for drugs in elderly patients. Before the program begins, adequate preparation of staff and discussions among patients and families are encouraged. The pharmacist's role is to coordinate inservice programs for nursing and medical staff, develop policies and procedures, dispense drugs as prescribed and assist in program evaluation.

  4. Successfully integrating aged care services: a review of the evidence and tools emerging from a long-term care program

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael J.; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Providing efficient and effective aged care services is one of the greatest public policy concerns currently facing governments. Increasing the integration of care services has the potential to provide many benefits including increased access, promoting greater efficiency, and improving care outcomes. There is little research, however, investigating how integrated aged care can be successfully achieved. The PRISMA (Program of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy) project, from Quebec, Canada, is one of the most systematic and sustained bodies of research investigating the translation and outcomes of an integrated care policy into practice. The PRISMA research program has run since 1988, yet there has been no independent systematic review of this work to draw out the lessons learnt. Methods Narrative review of all literature emanating from the PRISMA project between 1988 and 2012. Researchers accessed an online list of all published papers from the program website. The reference lists of papers were hand searched to identify additional literature. Finally, Medline, Pubmed, EMBASE and Google Scholar indexing databases were searched using key terms and author names. Results were extracted into specially designed spread sheets for analysis. Results Forty-five journal articles and two books authored or co-authored by the PRISMA team were identified. Research was primarily concerned with: the design, development and validation of screening and assessment tools; and results generated from their application. Both quasi-experimental and cross sectional analytic designs were used extensively. Contextually appropriate expert opinion was obtained using variations on the Delphi Method. Literature analysis revealed the structures, processes and outcomes which underpinned the implementation. PRISMA provides evidence that integrating care for older persons is beneficial to individuals through reducing incidence of functional decline and

  5. Establishing a culturally sensitive palliative care program in rural Alaska Native American communities.

    PubMed

    DeCourtney, Christine A; Jones, Kristina; Merriman, Melanie P; Heavener, Nina; Branch, P Kay

    2003-06-01

    End-of-life programs that provide an option for patients to die at home are available in most U.S. communities. However, Alaska Natives living in remote Alaska villages often die alone in hospitals and nursing homes hundreds of miles away from home. The Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation (BBAHC), a tribal organization, is the sole provider of comprehensive primary care services to 34 Alaska Native villages located within a 46,000 square mile area in southwest Alaska. The closest tertiary care hospital is 329 air miles away in Anchorage. Because of the high cost of, and difficulties encountered in trying to deliver end-of-life care services to remote communities, a village-focused, culturally sensitive, volunteer and primary care program combined with a regionally based physician and home health nurse to deliver multi-disciplinary palliative care was developed. The Helping Hands Program blends cultural practices with contemporary palliative care medicine to allow Alaska Natives and others living in remote communities to be cared for at home through the end of life. Since the program was implemented in 1999, the percentage of home deaths for selected causes has changed from 33% in 1997 to 77% in 2001. The Anchorage-based Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) and the Alaska Native Medical Center (ANMC) have recognized the importance and success of the BBAHC program and are investigating expanding the program to other parts of Alaska. Centralizing the program in Anchorage will allow staff trained in palliative care to travel to regional Alaska Native hospitals to help train health care professionals.

  6. Implementing what works: a case study of integrated primary health care revitalisation in Timor-Leste

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Revitalising primary health care (PHC) and the need to reach MDG targets requires developing countries to adapt current evidence about effective health systems to their local context. Timor-Leste in one of the world’s newest developing nations, with high maternal and child mortality rates, malaria, TB and malnutrition. Mountainous terrain and lack of transport pose serious challenges for accessing health services and implementing preventive health strategies. Methods We conducted a non-systematic review of the literature and identified six components of an effective PHC system. These were mapped onto three countries’ PHC systems and present a case study from Timor-Leste’s Servisu Integrado du Saude Comunidade (SISCa) focussing on MDGs. Some of the challenges of implementing these into practice are shown through locally collected health system data. Results An effective PHC system comprises 1) Strong leadership and government in human rights for health; 2) Prioritisation of cost-effective interventions; 3) Establishing an interactive and integrated culture of community engagement; 4) Providing an integrated continuum of care at the community level; 5) Supporting skilled and equipped health workers at all levels of the health system; 6) Creating a systems cycle of feedback using data to inform health care. The implementation case study from Timor-Leste (population 1 million) shows that in its third year, limited country-wide data had been collected and the SISCa program provided over half a million health interactions at the village level. However, only half of SISCa clinics were functional across the country. Attendances included not only pregnant women and children, but also adults and older community members. Development partners have played a key role in supporting this implementation process. Conclusion The SISCa program is a PHC model implementing current best practice to reach remote communities in a new developing country. Despite limited

  7. Alternative Learning Programs Evaluation: Part 3 Report. Case Studies of Alternative Schools and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Caronly; Brewer, Delores; Bauman, Amy; Groves, Paula; Rayle, Joesph; Noblit, George

    In 1996, North Carolina began a 5-year evaluation of alternative learning programs (ALPs). This report contains in-depth case studies of four ALPs during the 1996-97 school year. The ALPs were selected to represent different types of programs in the state, and include one middle school, two high school, and one elementary school programs. The case…

  8. The Case for Quality Health Care for the Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ethel D.

    1978-01-01

    This article shows that, while there has been a modification of health care facilities and new approaches to medical care, little change has been effected in the interrelationship between the poor and the delivery of quality medical care. (Author/GC)

  9. Analysis of an electronic consultation program at an academic medical centre: Primary care provider questions, specialist responses, and primary care provider actions.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, Katherine; Catschegn, Sereina; Cruz, Marisa; Gleason, Nathaniel; Gonzales, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Electronic consultations (eConsults) increase access to specialty care, but little is known about the types of questions primary care providers (PCPs) ask through eConsults, and how they respond to specialist recommendations. Methods This is a retrospective descriptive analysis of the first 200 eConsults completed in the UCSF eConsult program. Participating PCPs were from eight adult primary care sites at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), USA. Medicine subspecialties participating were Cardiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology/hepatology, Hematology, Infectious diseases, Nephrology, Pulmonary medicine, Rheumatology, and Sleep medicine. We categorized eConsult questions into "diagnosis," "treatment," and/or "monitoring." We performed medical record reviews to determine the percentage of specialist recommendations PCPs implemented, and the proportion of patients with a specialist visit in the same specialty as the eConsult, emergency department visit, or hospital admission during the subsequent six months. Results PCP questions related to diagnosis in 71% of cases, treatment in 46%, and monitoring in 21%. Specialist responses related to diagnosis in 76% of cases, treatment in 64%, and monitoring in 40%. PCPs ordered 79% of all recommended laboratory tests, 86% of recommended imaging tests and procedures, 65% of recommended new medications, and 73% of recommended medication changes. In the six months after the eConsult, 14% of patients had a specialist visit within the UCSF system in the same specialty as the eConsult. Discussion eConsults provide guidance to PCPs across the spectrum of patient care. PCPs implement specialists' recommendations in the large majority of cases, and few patients subsequently require in-person specialty care related to the reason for the eConsult.

  10. Minding the Children: Ford Foundation Assistance to Child-Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford Foundation, New York, NY.

    This report describes child care related programs which have received major grants from the Ford Foundation since 1969. Specific information and referral services such as the Children's Council of San Francisco Childcare Switchboard, the Cambridge/Somerville Child Care Resource Center in Massachusetts, the Pre-School Association of the West Side…

  11. A Program to Improve Access to Health Care Among Mexican Immigrants in Rural Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Perez, Maria de Jesus; Farley, Tillman; Cabanis, Clara Martin

    2004-01-01

    Migration to the United States from Mexico is increasing every year. Mexican immigrants tend to be poor, uninsured, monolingual Spanish speakers without adequate access to appropriate medical care. As a further barrier, many are also undocumented. This article describes a program developed to improve access to health care among Mexican immigrants…

  12. The Refugee Health Care System: A Background Paper on Policies, Programs and Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Susan; Lidsker, Carol

    This paper provides background information on existing refugee health policy as spelled out in the Refugee Act of 1980, consideration that issues in health and health care have received, and significant program development that has occurred in addressing health care problems. Following the introduction, Section II describes the following: (1)…

  13. Nutrition Education for Preschoolers: A Resource Guide for Use in the Child Care Food Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batko, Margaret W.; And Others

    Developed to assist child care providers in starting or maintaining a nutrition education program, this guide lists resources primarily directed toward adults who care for young children (2 to 5 years of age) and toward the children themselves. Over 90 entries concerning nutrition education materials have been included. Each resource has been…

  14. Respite Care: An Overview of Federal, Selected State, and Private Programs. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This report examines respite care services that provide temporary relief to family members and other caretakers of children at risk of abuse or neglect including children who are mentally retarded, behaviorally disturbed, physically disabled, or chronically or terminally ill. In 1988 the 25 states surveyed funded 111 respite care programs as did…

  15. Financial Reporting and Cost Analysis Manual for Day Care Centers, Head Start, and Other Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedger, Jean E.; And Others

    This manual is designed to provide fundamental directions for systematic financial reporting and cost analysis for the administrators, accountants, bookkeepers, and staff of day care, Project Head Start, and other programs. The major aims of the manual are to induce day care directors to adopt uniform bookkeeping procedures and to analyze costs…

  16. Iterations of the SafeCare Model: An Evidence-Based Child Maltreatment Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Anna; Lutzker, John R.

    2008-01-01

    SafeCare is an evidenced-based parenting program for at-risk and maltreating parents that addresses the social and family ecology in which child maltreatment occurs. SafeCare home visitors focus on behavioral skills that are trained to predetermined performance criteria. Recent research has stressed the importance of successful dissemination and…

  17. Evaluation of Multidisciplinary Tobacco Cessation Training Program in a Large Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Timothy C.; Hamlett-Berry, Kim W.; Watanabe, Jonathan H.; Bounthavong, Mark; Zillich, Alan J.; Christofferson, Dana E.; Myers, Mark G.; Himstreet, Julianne E.; Belperio, Pamela S.; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health care professionals can have a dramatic impact by assisting patients with tobacco cessation but most have limited training. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of a 4-hour tobacco cessation training program. Methods: A team of multidisciplinary health care professionals created a veteran-specific tailored version of the Rx for…

  18. Creating a Child Care Center in a Nursing Home and Implementing an Intergenerational Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Karen B.

    The success of the Champaign County Nursing Home Child Care Center (CCNHCCC) in Illinois provides a model for the establishment of child care centers in nursing homes. Needs assessment, financial support, licensing, staff hiring and training are all important factors that need to addressed in the start up and running of such a program. The…

  19. The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program as an Educational Tool and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabe, Darren W.; Bailie, George R.; Manley, Harold J.; Yeaw, Barbara F.

    1998-01-01

    The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program provides early clinical education for pharmacy students and clinical services for patients. Six students were assigned to visit 12-15 hemodialysis patients monthly under preceptor supervision. Topics covered include approach to patient, medical information retrieval, pharmaceutical care philosophy,…

  20. Partnership and empowerment program: a model for patient-centered, comprehensive, and cost-effective care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Corinne; Bornstein, Elizabeth; Wilcox, Catina

    2012-02-01

    The Partnership and Empowerment Program model offers a comprehensive, patient-centered, and cost-effective template for coordinating care for underinsured and uninsured patients with cancer. Attention to effective coordination, including use of internal and external resources, may result in decreased costs of care and improved patient compliance and health outcomes.

  1. The Child and Adult Care Food Program and the Nutrition of Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenman, Sanders; Abner, Kristin S.; Kaestner, Robert; Gordon, Rachel A.

    2013-01-01

    Children spend a considerable amount of time in preschools and child care centers. As a result, these settings may have an influence on their diet, weight, and food security, and are potentially important contexts for interventions to address nutritional health. The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is one such intervention. No national…

  2. Effects of the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly on Hospital Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meret-Hanke, Louise A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study evaluates the effects of the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) on hospital use. PACE's capitated financing creates incentives to reduce the use of costly services. Furthermore, its emphasis on preventative care and regular monitoring by provides a mechanism for reducing unnecessary hospital use…

  3. Implementation of a Program of Outcomes Research in Residential Care Settings: Outcomes for Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portwood, Sharon G.; Boyd, A. Suzanne; Murdock, Tamera B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a need to examine behavioral and mental health outcomes for children in out-of-home care across settings. Objective: Using a participatory research approach, researchers and agency personnel aimed to implement a program of scientific outcomes research in residential care settings. Data were used to examine children's…

  4. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific...

  5. 78 FR 15882 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ...-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific...

  6. Trials and tribulations: a small pilot telehealth home care program for medicare patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Maureen; Coleman, John R

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a home care agency's experience initiating the technology of a telehealth program for a selected view of its home care patients. The goal of the telehealth program was to improve patient outcomes by augmenting patients' regularly scheduled in-home skilled nursing visits with video-conferencing encounters. Patient selection, costs, projected savings, patient satisfaction, and the technical, clinical, and patient problems with the telehealth system are discussed.

  7. Revisioning the Process: A Case Study in Feminist Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beardsley, Rebecca M.; Miller, Michelle Hughes

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a case study of the evaluation of a women's substance abuse prevention program and identified three key aspects of negotiated evaluation. Discusses the processes involved in feminist evaluation, including collaborative agenda setting and cooperative teamwork. (SLD)

  8. Leveraging External Resources To Grow and Sustain Your Palliative Care Program: A Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Kathleen M.; Kutner, Jean S.; Ferris, Frank D.; Rathfon, Megan A.; Rabow, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Hospital-based palliative care is becoming increasingly prevalent. There is growing evidence that it is having a positive impact on patients and their loved ones. In 2008, national data indicated that 58.5% of hospitals with 50 or more beds had a palliative care program. Data from a 2008 survey of California acute care hospitals showed that although 33% of sites had inpatient consultation services, one in five had been operational for only one year. As nascent palliative care programs grow, new issues arise and needs and plans change. Just as palliative care programs benefit from marketing and education plans, they also benefit from a plan to leverage external resources. Largely a missed opportunity, external resources such as organizations, networks, and experts can help palliative care service (PCS) leaders and team members gain information on everything from best practices to funding opportunities, while serving as sources for personal and professional support. The growing number of active PCSs and the increasing availability of support and expertise ensure that new programs no longer have to face challenges alone. Further, the steady increase in the number of new programs has created opportunities for those who are more experienced to serve as mentors for peers who are navigating the challenges of growing and sustaining a clinical service. The authors encourage both mentors and mentees to seek support from or provide support to others in the field. Leveraging the collective expertise and experiences in our field can ensure that palliative care continues to thrive and grow. PMID:22165898

  9. Integrated telehealth and care management program for Medicare beneficiaries with chronic disease linked to savings.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurence C; Johnson, Scott J; Macaulay, Dendy; Birnbaum, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Treatment of chronically ill people constitutes nearly four-fifths of US health care spending, but it is hampered by a fragmented delivery system and discontinuities of care. We examined the impact of a care coordination approach called the Health Buddy Program, which integrates a telehealth tool with care management for chronically ill Medicare beneficiaries. We evaluated the program's impact on spending for patients of two clinics in the US Northwest who were exposed to the intervention, and we compared their experience with that of matched controls. We found significant savings among patients who used the Health Buddy telehealth program, which was associated with spending reductions of approximately 7.7-13.3 percent ($312-$542) per person per quarter. These results suggest that carefully designed and implemented care management and telehealth programs can help reduce health care spending and that such programs merit continued attention by Medicare. Meanwhile, mortality differences in the treatment and control groups suggest that the intervention may have produced noticeable changes in health outcomes, but we leave it to future research to explore these effects fully.

  10. Organizing health care within political turmoil: the Palestinian case.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Motasem; Defever, Mia; Abdeen, Ziad

    2003-01-01

    Palestinians were given control over their own health services in late 1994. Since then they have been facing the challenge of reorganizing disordered health services into a cohesive, regulated and sustainable health care system. This paper focuses on the experience of organizing health care during political instability. It considers the ways that health care is currently provided and funded in the Palestinian Territories. The patterns of accessibility to health care services in terms of insurance coverage and provision (physical allocation) of services are discussed. Finally, the major health care policy changes in this transitional period are examined.

  11. Implementation of a Chronic Illness Model for Diabetes Care in a Family Medicine Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, Robin

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION While the Chronic Care Model (CCM) has been shown to improve the care of patients with chronic illnesses, primary care physicians have been unprepared in its use, and residencies have encountered challenges in introducing it into the academic environment. AIM Our residency program has implemented a diabetes management program modeled on the CCM to evaluate its impact on health outcomes of diabetic patients and educational outcomes of residents. SETTING University-affiliated, community-based family medicine residency program. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Six residents, two faculty clinicians, and clinic staff formed a diabetes management team. We redesigned the outpatient experience for diabetic patients by incorporating elements of the CCM: multidisciplinary team care through planned and group visits; creation of a diabetes registry; use of guidelines-based flow sheets; and incorporation of self-management goal-setting. Residents received extensive instruction in diabetes management, quality improvement, and patient self-management. PROGRAM EVALUATION We achieved overall improvement in all metabolic and process measures for patients, with the percentage achieving HbA1c, LDL, and BP goals simultaneously increasing from 5.7% to 17.1%. Educational outcomes for residents, as measured by compliance with review of provider performance reports and self-management goal-setting with patients, also significantly improved. DISCUSSION Through a learning collaborative experience, residency programs can successfully incorporate chronic care training for residents while addressing gaps in care for patients with diabetes. PMID:20737237

  12. CARES/LIFE Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-01-01

    This manual describes the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction (CARES/LIFE) computer program. The program calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/or proof test loading. CARES/LIFE is an extension of the CARES (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program. The program uses results from MSC/NASTRAN, ABAQUS, and ANSYS finite element analysis programs to evaluate component reliability due to inherent surface and/or volume type flaws. CARES/LIFE accounts for the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth (SCG) by utilizing the power law, Paris law, or Walker law. The two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function is used to characterize the variation in component strength. The effects of multiaxial stresses are modeled by using either the principle of independent action (PIA), the Weibull normal stress averaging method (NSA), or the Batdorf theory. Inert strength and fatigue parameters are estimated from rupture strength data of naturally flawed specimens loaded in static, dynamic, or cyclic fatigue. The probabilistic time-dependent theories used in CARES/LIFE, along with the input and output for CARES/LIFE, are described. Example problems to demonstrate various features of the program are also included.

  13. CARES/LIFE Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-02-01

    This manual describes the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction (CARES/LIFE) computer program. The program calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/or proof test loading. CARES/LIFE is an extension of the CARES (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program. The program uses results from MSC/NASTRAN, ABAQUS, and ANSYS finite element analysis programs to evaluate component reliability due to inherent surface and/or volume type flaws. CARES/LIFE accounts for the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth (SCG) by utilizing the power law, Paris law, or Walker law. The two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function is used to characterize the variation in component strength. The effects of multiaxial stresses are modeled by using either the principle of independent action (PIA), the Weibull normal stress averaging method (NSA), or the Batdorf theory. Inert strength and fatigue parameters are estimated from rupture strength data of naturally flawed specimens loaded in static, dynamic, or cyclic fatigue. The probabilistic time-dependent theories used in CARES/LIFE, along with the input and output for CARES/LIFE, are described. Example problems to demonstrate various features of the program are also included.

  14. Impact of a Patient Incentive Program on Receipt of Preventive Care

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Ateev; An, Ruopeng; Patel, Deepak N.; Sturm, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Patient financial incentives are being promoted as a mechanism to increase receipt of preventive care, encourage healthy behavior, and improve chronic disease management. However, few empirical evaluations have assessed such incentive programs. Study Design In South Africa, a private health plan has introduced a voluntary incentive program which costs enrollees approximately $20 per month. In the program, enrollees earn points when they receive preventive care. These points translate into discounts on retail goods such as airline tickets, movie tickets, or cell phones. Methods We compared the change in 8 preventive care services over the years 2005–11 between those who entered the incentive program and those that did not. We used multivariate regression models with individual random effects to try to address selection bias. Results Of the 4,186,047 unique individuals enrolled in the health plan, 65.5% (2,742,268) voluntarily enrolled in the incentive program. Joining the incentive program was associated with a statistically higher odds of receiving all 8 preventive care services. The odds ratio and estimated percentage point increase for receipt of cholesterol testing was 2.70 (8.9%), glucose testing 1.51 (4.7%), glaucoma screening 1.34 (3.9%), dental exam 1.64 (6.3%), HIV test 3.47 (2.6%), prostate specific antigen testing 1.39 (5.6%), Papanicolaou screening 2.17 (7.0%), and mammogram 1.90 (3.1%) (p<0.001 for all eight services). However, preventive care rates among those in the incentive program was still low. Conclusions Voluntary participation in a patient incentive program was associated with a significantly higher likelihood of receiving preventive care, though receipt of preventive care among those in the program was still lower than ideal. PMID:25180436

  15. Examining Quality Improvement Programs: The Case of Minnesota Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Olson, John R; Belohlav, James A; Cook, Lori S; Hays, Julie M

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine if there is a hierarchy of improvement program adoption by hospitals and outline that hierarchy. Data Sources Primary data were collected in the spring of 2007 via e-survey from 210 individuals representing 109 Minnesota hospitals. Secondary data from 2006 were assembled from the Leapfrog database. Study Design As part of a larger survey, respondents were given a list of improvement programs and asked to identify those programs that are used in their hospital. Data Collection/Data Extraction Rasch Model Analysis was used to assess whether a unidimensional construct exists that defines a hospital's ability to implement performance improvement programs. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the relationship of the Rasch ability scores with Leapfrog Safe Practices Scores to validate the research findings. Principal Findings The results of the study show that hospitals have widely varying abilities in implementing improvement programs. In addition, improvement programs present differing levels of difficulty for hospitals trying to implement them. Our findings also indicate that the ability to adopt improvement programs is important to the overall performance of hospitals. Conclusions There is a hierarchy of improvement programs in the health care context. A hospital's ability to successfully adopt improvement programs is a function of its existing capabilities. As a hospital's capability increases, the ability to successfully implement higher level programs also increases. PMID:18761677

  16. "I Screamed for Help": A Case Study of One Grandmother's Experience with Voluntary Kinship Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly; Law, Matthew G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative single case study is to explore one grandmother's experience with voluntary kinship care and child welfare services. Voluntary kinship care is pursued as a viable option when out-of-home placement is imminent. Research indicates that voluntary kinship care, as an alternative living arrangement, helps to maintain…

  17. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Norway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksjoberg, Tore

    The case description of an adult education program in Norway contained in this document is part of a set that reflects a cooperative effort by adult educators to increase international understanding of various educational programs for adults in their societal context. A face sheet provides this information: name, organization, and address of the…

  18. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Ghana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansere, Joe K.; Mensah, Eric A.

    This document contains two case studies, one by J. K. Ansere, concerning the modular program of distance education to prepare teachers in Ghana and the other, by E.A. Mensah, reporting on a research experiment that compared teaching methods used to teach the course of study at a Ghanian worker's college. The modular program described by Ansere is…

  19. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balde, Maatje; And Others

    Twenty adult education programs being conducted in the Netherlands are described in the case studies in this packet. The courses range from adult basic education to continuing education courses in languages, from basic nursing courses to advanced neurology. The following programs are profiled: (1) open school (Balde); (2) study house for adults…

  20. Sustainability of Social Programs: A Comparative Case Study Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savaya, Riki; Spiro, Shimon; Elran-Barak, Roni

    2008-01-01

    The article reports on the findings of a comparative case study of six projects that operated in Israel between 1980 and 2000. The study findings identify characteristics of the programs, the host organizations, and the social and political environment, which differentiated programs that are sustained from those that are not. The findings reaffirm…

  1. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassett, Michael; And Others

    Fifteen adult education programs being conducted in Ireland are described in the case studies in this packet. The courses range from adult basic education to university degree courses in management and industrial relations, from marriage preparation to inservice teacher education. The following programs are profiled: (1) certificate in farming…

  2. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Italy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federighi, Paolo; And Others

    Nine adult education programs being conducted in Italy are described in the case studies in this packet. The courses range from adult basic education to continuing education courses in languages and management. Most are described in connection with the area of the country in which they are offered. The following programs are profiled: (1) public…

  3. Office ergonomics programs. A case study of North American corporations.

    PubMed

    Moore, J S

    1997-12-01

    Subject matter experts from 13 North American corporations provided detailed descriptions of the historical development and the current components and operations of their office ergonomics programs. Results were summarized across corporations and presented for the following programmatic topics: backgrounds of key people, initial awareness and preliminary needs assessment, program development, program implementation, program monitoring and evaluation, program components, education and training, workstation and job analysis, early identification of cases, case management, and alternate office environments. The subject matter experts also provided comments about the strengths of their programs, their advice to others, and lessons they learned. These observations suggested the need for an office ergonomics program, and possibly other occupational health programs, to fit into a corporation's culture and capitalize on its infrastructure. Most corporations used multidisciplinary task forces or teams to develop their programs. Communication, which included training, awareness, advertising, and feedback, was also an important issue. Flexibility and simplicity were important attributes of these programs. It is hoped that this descriptive information will be helpful to some occupational health managers interested in or concerned about managerial perspectives and skills related to the development and implementation of programs within their own corporations.

  4. DISASTER MEDICAL CARE AND SHELTER—The Federal Program

    PubMed Central

    Dearing, W. Palmer

    1960-01-01

    The role of the physician in event of natural disaster or overwhelming (perhaps nuclear) attack by an enemy is: To assist the layman in preparing to meet his own health needs in a disaster situation until organized health services can reach him. To prepare and plan for the provision of organized medical care when conditions permit. To extend his own capability to render medical care outside his normal specialty. To assist in the training of allied and professional health workers and laymen for specific mobilization assignments in health services. PMID:18732323

  5. Implementing a medical surveillance program for animal care staff.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Debra

    2009-08-01

    In animal research facilities, personnel may develop allergies or serious health problems as a result of exposure to chemical or biological agents. Medical surveillance is essential for evaluating the health of prospective or current employees and determining their risk of exposure to occupational hazards. The author discusses the role of institutional medical surveillance programs and presents considerations for implementing such programs.

  6. Evaluation of Quality in Social Care: Aplus Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutrenit, Jean-Marc

    2005-01-01

    France is not advanced regarding evaluation in social work, despite a law established in January 2002 making evaluation a legal obligation every 5 years. This article presents a software program to help social services evaluate on both individual and group levels. Automatic dashboard results of the program with special emphasis on the main…

  7. Who Cares? How Teachers Can Scaffold Children's Ability to Care: A Case for Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Abigail; Mercurio, Mia Lynn

    2007-01-01

    Academic inquiry has focused recently on how to create caring classrooms and school communities--that is, classrooms and school communities that encourage children to continue to develop caring feelings, thoughts, and behaviors, or to feel, think, and practice them anew. After reviewing research on caring and attachment, this article discusses how…

  8. The case for open computer programs.

    PubMed

    Ince, Darrel C; Hatton, Leslie; Graham-Cumming, John

    2012-02-22

    Scientific communication relies on evidence that cannot be entirely included in publications, but the rise of computational science has added a new layer of inaccessibility. Although it is now accepted that data should be made available on request, the current regulations regarding the availability of software are inconsistent. We argue that, with some exceptions, anything less than the release of source programs is intolerable for results that depend on computation. The vagaries of hardware, software and natural language will always ensure that exact reproducibility remains uncertain, but withholding code increases the chances that efforts to reproduce results will fail.

  9. Leasing Commercial Space for Your Child Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Keith

    1987-01-01

    Covers leasing of commercial space for child care centers, either as an enhancement to a developer's project or on a commercial basis in competition with other types of commercial development. Discusses different negotiating psychologies and key negotiating points to be used in each leasing situation. (NH)

  10. Guidelines for Migrant Infant and Toddler Day Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birckmayer, Jennifer; Willis, Anne

    Constant, unpredictable change is a condition of daily life for children of migrant workers; this factor affects much of the care that should be given them. Predictability in the child's daily experience with the same basic routines, toys, bed, and caretakers helps stabilize his world and allows him to build up experiences and make sense of them.…

  11. 78 FR 36449 - State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    .... Functions and Responsibilities of the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman G. State Agency Responsibilities... for Aging in areas related to: 1. The roles, responsibilities and relationship of the State agency on... the individual roles and responsibilities of the Ombudsman (or representatives of the Office)...

  12. Participation of plans and providers in Medicaid and SCHIP managed care. State Children's Health Insurance Program.

    PubMed

    Gold, Marsha; Mittler, Jesslca; Draper, Debra; Rousseau, David

    2003-01-01

    For Medicaid and SCHIP managed care programs to succeed, they must attract enough and the right kinds of plans and providers to meet access and care goals. In 2001 we analyzed practices and perceptions that bear on these goals by surveying managed care plans participating in Medicaid or SCHIP, or both, in eleven states. Participating plans appear supportive of both programs and are largely able to secure providers to participate, too. To date, SCHIP has not attracted many plans not already participating in Medicaid. While perceptions were positive in 2001, maintaining current plan and provider relationships in an environment that has become much more budget constrained will be challenging.

  13. Care and Respect for Elders in Emergencies program: a preliminary report of a volunteer approach to enhance care in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Sanon, Martine; Baumlin, Kevin M; Kaplan, Shari Sirkin; Grudzen, Corita R

    2014-02-01

    Older adults who present to an emergency department (ED) generally have more-complex medical conditions with complicated care needs and are at high risk for preventable adverse outcomes during their ED visit. The Care and Respect for Elders with Emergencies (CARE) volunteer initiative is a geriatric-focused volunteer program developed to help prevent avoidable complications such as falls, delirium and use of restraints, and functional decline in vulnerable elders in the ED. The CARE program consists of bedside volunteer interventions ranging from conversation to various short activities designed to engage and reorient high-risk, older, unaccompanied individuals in the ED. This article describes the development and characteristics of the CARE program, the services provided, the experiences of the elderly patients and their volunteers, and the growth of the program over time. CARE volunteers provide elders with the additional attention needed in an often chaotic, unfamiliar environment by enhancing their care, improving satisfaction, and preventing potential decline.

  14. Evaluating Experiential Learning Programs: The Case Study Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrates how case study evaluation concentrates on a single situation to present a holistic view of an experiential learning program and reveals unique and unanticipated features. Outlines steps of planning, gathering, analyzing, synthesizing, and reporting data and considers the advantages and disadvantages of the case study approach. (LFL)

  15. Person-Centered Care for Older Adults With Serious Mental Illness and Substance Misuse Within a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Cacchione, Pamela Z; Eible, Lisa; Gill, Le'Roi L; Huege, Steven F

    2016-05-01

    Providing person-centered care (PCC) to older adults with dual diagnosis, co-occurring serious mental illness (SMI), and substance misuse is complex and requires an interprofessional team. Older adults, who qualify for both Medicaid and Medicare (i.e., dual-eligibles) are overrepresented in the population of older adults with SMI and substance misuse. Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) exist to support community living needs of nursing home-eligible older adults and are increasingly in a position to serve older adults with SMI and substance misuse issues. PACE programs provide integrated person-centered mental health care to address the serious medical, social, and emotional complications posed by having SMI and substance misuse disorders. The case study presented illustrates PCC provided to a dual-diagnosis PACE participant, illustrating the impact of recent and past trauma on current psychopathology and substance misuse. Finally, recommendations for addressing PCC of dual diagnosis within the PACE model are provided. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(5), 11-17.].

  16. Development and formative evaluation of a foot self-care program for African Americans with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ledda, M A; Walker, E A; Basch, C E

    1997-01-01

    African Americans with diabetes have a higher rate of lower-extremity amputation due to diabetic foot complications than the general public. Education about proper foot care can help prevent serious diabetic foot complications and assist in early detection of problems. The purpose of this project was to develop, formatively evaluate, and pilot test a self-care, take-home program for the prevention of foot problems in African Americans with diabetes. The program included a brief, one-on-one orientation session and a take-home foot self-care packet. Through telephone follow-up subjects reported the following: good to excellent overall rating of the program, favorable reactions to the patient instruction booklet, an overwhelming positive response to the large hand mirror, and a positive effect on their daily foot-care practices. The Afrocentricity of the patient education materials was preferred by younger subjects; older subjects found this approach too restrictive.

  17. The History of the Animal Care Program at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Animal Care Program (ACP). Animals have been used early in space exploration to ascertain if it were possible to launch a manned spacecraft. The program is currently involved in many studies that assist in enhancing the scientific knowledge of the effect of space travel. The responsibilities of the ACP are: (1) Organize and supervise animal care operations & activities (research, testing & demonstration). (2) Maintain full accreditation by the International Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC) (3) Ensure protocol compliance with IACUC recommendations (4) Training astronauts for in-flight animal experiments (5) Maintain accurate & timely records for all animal research testing approved by JSC IACUC (6) Organize IACUC meetings and assist IACUC members (7) Coordinate IACUC review of the Institutional Program for Humane Care and Use of Animals (every 6 mos)

  18. In-Home Continuing Care Services for Substance-Affected Families: The Bridges Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Kenneth J.; Fleetwood, Thomas W.; Herring, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a preliminary view of a continuing care substance abuse recovery services program designed to assist the substance-affected family. The program focuses on helping substance abusers and their families achieve relapse prevention by addressing functioning in four domains: individual actions and cognitions; individual recovery actions; family…

  19. 5 CFR 792.200 - What are the benefits of the child care subsidy program law?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... subsidy program law? 792.200 Section 792.200 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... subsidy program law? Sec. 630 of Public Law 107-67 permits executive agencies to use appropriated funds to improve the affordability of child care for lower income Federal employees. The law applies to child...

  20. An Assessment of Social Diffusion in the Respecting Choices Advance Care Planning Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Sara M.; Carr, Deborah; Kirchhoff, Karin T.; Hammes, Bernard J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the potential social diffusion effects of the Respecting Choices advance care planning program administered in La Crosse, Wisconsin, since 1991. The program produces educational materials for patients, trains facilitators to help patients prepare for end of life, and ensures that advance directives are connected to patients'…

  1. Caring for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities: A Continuing Education Program for Nurses. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Corinne W.; Kniest, Barbara A.

    This final report discusses activities and outcomes of "Caring for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities: A Continuing Education Program for Nurses (CFIT Nurses)," a Virginia program designed to develop and implement a model of training to ensure that nurse practitioners and registered nurses have the information and skills needed to be…

  2. Evolution of a Family Nurse Practitioner Program to Improve Primary Care Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrus, Len Hughes; Fenley, Mary D.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a Family Nurse Practitioner Program that has effectively improved the distribution of primary health care manpower in rural areas. Program characteristics include selection of personnel from areas of need, decentralization of clinical and didactic training sites, competency-based portable curriculum, and circuit-riding institutionally…

  3. Impacts of Art Museum-Based Dementia Programming on Participating Care Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamar, Katherine L.; Luke, Jessica J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the impacts of art museum-based dementia programming on participating care partners (CPs). Data were collected through telephone interviews with 29 caregivers who participated in one of three dementia programs: "here: now" at The Frye Art Museum, Seattle; "Meaningful Moments" at the…

  4. Increasing the Educational Value of Medical Care Evaluation: A Model Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashook, P. G.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A model medical care evaluation (MCE) program was implemented at the Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center. The program was evaluated by quantitative and qualitative observational techniques, questionnaires, and interviews, and by comparing committees for which the implementation was highly successful with those less successful. (Author/MLW)

  5. Rural Health: The Story of Outreach. A Program of Cooperation in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Rural Health Policy.

    Rural Health Outreach is a federal program of demonstration grants designed to encourage organizations to cooperate in delivering health care services to rural Americans. Thirteen programs utilizing innovative collaborations between state agencies, schools, nonprofit organizations, hospitals, volunteers, and the private sector are described a year…

  6. Teaching the Spiritual Dimension of Nursing Care: A Survey of U.S. Baccalaureate Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemmer, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 132 baccalaureate nursing programs indicated that the majority include spiritual dimensions in program philosophy and curriculum, but few had definitions of spirituality and nursing care. Content typically addressed patients' spiritual needs, dying, and holism. Respondents were uncertain about faculty preparation to teach about…

  7. Evaluation of Portland Public Schools Extended Day Care Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sposito, Patricia J.

    The Extended Day Program (EDP) provides before and after school day care service to children in public school buildings. This summative evaluation judges the degree to which EDP has met its goals and served its clients, and provides recommendations for program improvement. The evaluator observed each center over a 6-month period; distributed a…

  8. Early Careerist Interest and Participation in Health Care Leadership Development Programs.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jon M; Temple, April

    2015-01-01

    Health care organizations are increasingly embracing leadership development programs. These programs include a variety of specific activities, such as formally structured leadership development, as well as mentoring, personal development and coaching, 360-degree feedback, and job enlargement, in order to increase the leadership skills of managers and high-potential staff. However, there is a lack of information on how early careerists in health care management view these programs and the degree to which they participate. This article reports on a study undertaken to determine how early careerists working in health care organizations view leadership development programs and their participation in such programs offered by their employers. Study findings are based on a survey of 126 early careerists who are graduates of an undergraduate health services administration program. We found varying levels of interest and participation in specific leadership development activities. In addition, we found that respondents with graduate degrees and those with higher compensation were more likely to participate in selected leadership development program activities. Implications of study findings for health care organizations and early careerists in the offering of, and participation in, leadership development programs are discussed.

  9. 5 CFR 792.209 - What is the definition of child care subsidy program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the definition of child care subsidy program? 792.209 Section 792.209 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... and reporting to OPM information such as total cost and employee use of the program....

  10. Educators' Curriculum Guide. Quality Assurance and Animal Care: Youth Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busboom, Jan R.; Newman, Jerry A.; Shulaw, William P.; Jeffreys, J. Bradford

    This curriculum guide contains a six-unit, two-level program combining animal science and veterinary care for youth club leaders and members in grades three through twelve. The Facilitator and Educator/Leader Introductions describe the program, the goals, and the students who will participate. The six lesson plans contain what the lesson is about,…

  11. Case Report Writing in a Doctor of Physical Therapy Education Program: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillyaw, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Case reports are an established form of scholarship used for teaching and learning in medicine and health care, but there are few examples of the teaching and learning activities used to prepare students to write a case report. This report describes the implementation of two courses that prepare physical therapy students to write and disseminate a…

  12. A new "loyalty rewards" program in health care customer relationships.

    PubMed

    Macstravic, Scott

    2006-01-01

    "Loyalty rewards" in sponsored DM and HRM programs can apply to both providers and consumers. Physicians and hospitals can be paid to "loyally" adhere to payers' guidelines for managing diseases and risks. Many payer and their outsourced vendor programs include significant efforts to create collaborations between payer and provider, rather than relying on unilateral efforts. And growing numbers are rewarding providers for their efforts and results achieved.

  13. The business case for quality: economic analysis of the Michigan Keystone Patient Safety Program in ICUs.

    PubMed

    Waters, Hugh R; Korn, Roy; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Berenholtz, Sean M; Goeschel, Christine A; Needham, Dale M; Pham, Julius C; Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Watson, Sam R; Posa, Patricia; Pronovost, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Health care-associated infections affect an estimated 5% of hospitalized patients and represent one of the leading causes of illness and death in the United States. This study calculates the costs and benefits of a patient safety program in intensive care units in 6 hospitals that were part of the Michigan Keystone ICU Patient Safety Program. On average, 29.9 catheter-related bloodstream infections and 18.0 cases of ventilator-associated pneumonia were averted per hospital on an annual basis. The average cost of the intervention is $3375 per infection averted, measured in 2007 dollars. The cost of the intervention is substantially less than estimates of the additional health care costs associated with these infections, which range from $12 208 to $56 167 per infection episode. These results do not take into account the additional effect of the Michigan Keystone program in terms of reducing cases of sepsis or its effects in terms of preventing mortality, improving teamwork, and reducing nurse turnover.

  14. Spirometry in primary care: An analysis of spirometry test quality in a regional primary care asthma program

    PubMed Central

    Licskai, Christopher J; Sands, Todd W; Paolatto, Lisa; Nicoletti, Ivan; Ferrone, Madonna

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care office spirometry can improve access to testing and concordance between clinical practice and asthma guidelines. Compliance with test quality standards is essential to implementation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of spirometry performed onsite in a regional primary care asthma program (RAP) by health care professionals with limited training. METHODS: Asthma educators were trained to perform spirometry during two 2 h workshops and supervised during up to six patient encounters. Quality was analyzed using American Thoracic Society (ATS) 1994 and ATS/European Respiratory Society (ERS) 2003 (ATS/ERS) standards. These results were compared with two regional reference sites: a primary care group practice (Family Medical Centre [FMC], Windsor, Ontario) and a teaching hospital pulmonary function laboratory (London Health Sciences Centre [LHSC], London, Ontario). RESULTS: A total of 12,815 flow-volume loops (FVL) were evaluated: RAP – 1606 FVL in 472 patient sessions; reference sites – FMC 4013 FVL in 573 sessions; and LHSC – 7196 in 1151 sessions. RAP: There were three acceptable FVL in 392 of 472 (83%) sessions, two reproducible FVL according to ATS criteria in 428 of 469 (91%) sessions, and 395 of 469 (84%) according to ATS/ERS criteria. All quality criteria – minimum of three acceptable and two reproducible FVL according to ATS criteria in 361 of 472 (77%) sessions and according to ATS/ERS criteria in 337 of 472 (71%) sessions. RAP met ATS criteria more often than the FMC (388 of 573 [68%]); however, less often than LHSC (1050 of 1151 [91%]; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Health care providers with limited training and experience operating within a simple quality program achieved ATS/ERS quality spirometry in the majority of sessions in a primary care setting. The quality performance approached pulmonary function laboratory standards. PMID:22891184

  15. Practicing End-of-Life Conversations: Physician Communication Training Program in Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Bronwyn; Browning, David M

    2015-01-01

    A Physician Communication Training Program (PCTP) utilizing scripts based on actual family conferences with patients, families, and the health care team was developed at one medical center in the Northeast. The program was designed, adapted, and directed by a palliative care social worker. The primary goal of the program is to help residents and attending physicians build better communication skills in establishing goals of care and in end-of-life planning. The scripts focus on improving physicians' basic skills in conducting family meetings, discussing advance directives, prognosis, brain death, and withdrawal of life support. Excerpts from the scripts utilized in the program are included. Feedback from participants has been positive, with all respondents indicating improvement in their capacity to take part in these challenging conversations.

  16. Social Workers in Home Care: The Israeli Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayalon, Liat; Baum, Nehami

    2010-01-01

    In Israel, the government partially supports personal home care services (grooming, feeding, assistance with transfers) as a means to maintain frail individuals in their home environment for as long as possible. Social workers capture a prominent position in these arrangements as initiators and supervisors of personal home care services. This…

  17. The multidisciplinary team in palliative care: a case reflection.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Liza

    2014-05-01

    This essay is a reflection on the multidisciplinary team in palliative care, from the perspective of a final year MBBS student from the UK spending one month with an Indian pain and palliative care team at Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital (IRCH), AIIMS, New Delhi.

  18. Female Leadership and the Ethic of Care: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kropiewnicki, Mary I.; Shapiro, Joan P.

    A study explored the ethical framework of care as a leadership attribute in three female principals at an elementary school, a junior high school, and a high school in northeast Pennsylvania. Recent studies of educational administrators reveal that new leadership models and attributes, identified as the ethic of care, are emerging among both male…

  19. An effective, efficient elder care program. Providence ElderPlace focuses on maintaining the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Gorshe, N

    1993-04-01

    Providence ElderPlace, Portland, OR, is an innovative long-term care health maintenance organization. The program is a type of integrated delivery network, offering comprehensive benefits and coordinating the delivery of healthcare services in a specific geographic market. Providence ElderPlace is based on the Program for All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), which was developed 20 years ago by On Lok Health Services of San Francisco. PACE helps frail elderly persons remain in their homes as long as possible. PACE is financed through an integrated funding pool of Medicare, Medicaid, and private fees. To be eligible for PACE, an individual must be in need of nursing home care but able to live in the community, with support. Providence ElderPlace provides all healthcare, community-based, and long-term care support services from an adult day healthcare setting. Participants usually attend the day center three times a week. When participants are not at the center, a team of workers visit their homes to observe participants and provide personal and chore support services.

  20. A Scoping Review of Intimate Partner Violence Screening Programs for Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Sheila; Slobogean, Gerard P.; Spurr, Hayley; McKay, Paula; Scott, Taryn; Arseneau, Erika; Memon, Muzammil; Bhandari, Mohit; Swaminathan, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Between 38 and 59 percent of women presenting to health care professionals have experienced intimate partner violence. Consequently, multiple intimate partner violence identification or screening programs within health care settings have been developed; however, substantial variations in program content and interpretation of program effectiveness has resulted in conflicting practice guidelines. The purpose of our scoping review is to broadly identify and synthesize the available literature evaluating intimate partner violence identification programs within health care settings to identify key areas for potential evidence-based recommendations and to focus research priorities in the field. Materials and Methods We conducted a search of MEDLINE, Embase, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and psycINFO. We used broad eligibility criteria to identify studies that evaluated intimate partner violence identification programs in health care settings. We completed all screening and data extraction independently and in duplicate. We used descriptive statistics to summarize all data. Results We identified 59 eligible studies evaluating intimate partner violence identification programs within health care settings. The most commonly reported outcome themes were IPV disclosure (69%, n = 35), number of patients screened (39%, n = 20), HCP opinions towards screening (37%, n = 19), and patient opinions towards screening (29%, n = 15). The majority of studies (36 studies (70.6%)) reported positive program evaluation results. Discussion The majority of studies reported positive program evaluation results. This may suggest that many different intimate partner violence identification programs are beneficial for identifying victims of abuse, however, it remains unknown as to whether identification programs prevent future episodes of abuse. Additionally, the

  1. 76 FR 624 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0476).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E... their satisfaction with the quality of services/care provided by home care program staff. An agency...

  2. 78 FR 79201 - Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse; Electronic Health Records Safe Harbor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... 1001 Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse; Electronic Health Records Safe Harbor... Inspector General 42 CFR Part 1001 RIN 0991-AB33 Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse... and technologies in the health care industry. In accordance with this authority, OIG published a...

  3. I CARE: an organization-wide customer service education program.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Kathryn Gillow

    2003-01-01

    When a survey indicated that patients recently discharged from The Brant Community Healthcare System (BCHS) believed that customer service across the organization could be enhanced, planning to enhance the quality of service for both internal and external customers began immediately. This article describes the measures taken to realize this improvement. It describes the cultural change required, important things to consider when planning customer service programs in healthcare settings, and some of the content of the customer service education program that was ultimately delivered to leaders, staff, physicians, and volunteers throughout the organization.

  4. A Computer Services Program for Residents of a Continuing Care Retirement Community: Needs Assessment and Program Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grad, Jane; Berdes, Celia

    2005-01-01

    Preparatory to establishing a computer services program for residents, Presbyterian Homes, a multi-campus continuing care retirement community, conducted an assessment of residents' computer needs, ownership, and usage. Based on the results of the needs assessment, computer resource rooms were established at each facility, with computer hardware…

  5. Developing a Comprehensive Animal Care Occupational Health and Safety Program at a Land-Grant Institution.

    PubMed

    Goodly, Lyndon J; Jarrell, Vickie L; Miller, Monica A; Banks, Maureen C; Anderson, Thomas J; Branson, Katherine A; Woodward, Robert T; Peper, Randall L; Myers, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    The Public Health Service Policy on the Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and sound ethical practices require institutions to provide safe working environments for personnel working with animals; this mandate is achieved in part by establishing an effective animal care Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP). Land-grant institutions often face unique organizational challenges in fulfilling this requirement. For example, responsibilities for providing health and safety programs often have historically been dispersed among many different divisions scattered around the campus. Here we describe how our institutional management personnel overcame organizational structure and cultural obstacles during the formation of a comprehensive campus-wide animal care OHSP. Steps toward establishing the animal care OHSP included assigning overall responsibility, identifying all stakeholders, creating a leadership group, and hiring a fulltime Animal Care OHSP Specialist. A web-based portal was developed, implemented, and refined over the past 7 y and reflected the unique organizational structures of the university and the needs of our research community. Through this web-based portal, hazards are identified, risks are assessed, and training is provided. The animal care OHSP now provides easy mandatory enrollment, supports timely feedback regarding hazards, and affords enrollees the opportunity to participate in voluntary medical surveillance. The future direction and development of the animal care OHSP will be based on the research trends of campus, identification of emerging health and safety hazards, and ongoing evaluation and refinement of the program.

  6. Incorporating human rights into reproductive health care provider education programs in Nicaragua and El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Reyes, H Luz McNaughton; Zuniga, Karen Padilla; Billings, Deborah L; Blandon, Marta Maria

    2013-07-01

    Health care providers play a central role in the promotion and protection of human rights in patient care. Consequently, the World Medical Association, among others, has called on medical and nursing schools to incorporate human rights education into their training programs. This report describes the efforts of one Central American nongovernmental organization to include human rights - related content into reproductive health care provider training programs in Nicaragua and El Salvador. Baseline findings suggest that health care providers are not being adequately prepared to fulfill their duty to protect and promote human rights in patient care. Medical and nursing school administrators, faculty, and students recognize the need to strengthen training in this area and are enthusiastic about incorporating human rights content into their education programs. Evaluation findings suggest that exposure to educational materials and methodologies that emphasize the relationship between human rights and reproductive health may lead to changes in health care provider attitudes and behaviors that help promote and safeguard human rights in patient care.

  7. Negotiating case decisions in substance abuse managed care.

    PubMed

    Sosin, Michael R

    2002-09-01

    In substance abuse managed care, the number of treatment sessions that a provider can deliver is constrained by the policies and procedures of the specialized managed care organizations (MCOs) that typically administer the substance abuse portions of healthcare plans. Managed care organizations commonly are alleged to control treatment providers through rules, but they also might rely on a particular patterned authorization of discretion, whereby they determine when and how frequently to respond to providers' appeals of rule-based decisions. The current paper uses data from a national random sample of managed care contracts between MCOs and substance abuse providers to test the hypotheses that (1) managed care organizations' "logics" about the types of provider discretion to allow affect the rate to which they concede to appeals, and (2) the rate of conceding to appeals, in turn, affects the providers' duration of substance abuse treatment. Results from generalized linear estimation models support the hypotheses and suggest that many MCOs pattern discretion to balance strict rules with concern about the quality or cost of care. The results more generally suggest that MCOs use discretion in planned ways, and thus that the patterns of control are more complex and sophisticated than commonly described in the literatures on managed care, transaction cost economics, or other perspectives.

  8. Children with special health care needs program: urban/rural comparisons.

    PubMed

    Saywell, R M; Zollinger, T W; Schafer, M E; Schmit, T M; Ladd, J K

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) describe both the urban and rural clients who received services from the Indiana Children with Special Health Care Needs program (CSHCN) including both demographic and clinical characteristics; (2) conduct a health care needs assessment of the CSHCN program clients in both urban and rural areas; and (3) measure the perceived quality and adequacy of the CSHCN program services. A survey instrument was developed and mailed to all 6,459 families who participated in the Indiana CSHCN program from July 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991. Of the 2,722 questionnaires used in the analysis, 1,624 clients (59.7%) resided in urban counties and 1,098 (40.3%) resided in rural counties. The most frequently noted conditions for program eligibility were asthma, ear infections, hearing impairments, heart defects, and convulsions and seizures. Asthma had greater prevalence among the urban clients while cleft lip/palate, epilepsy, and heart defects were more common among the rural clients. The majority of program clients perceived their medical needs as being met. However, significant numbers of clients perceived unmet needs for mental health services, support groups, information about community services, resources to pay for uncovered medical expenses, and respite care. Of the 23 listed services, five were reported at significantly lower rates by rural clients as not being met: regular medical care, recreation, child care/day care, parent support group services, and speech therapy. Quality of medical services was generally perceived as being "excellent or good," while services related to information about community programs, child's rights in school, resources available to pay for uncovered medical expenses, as well as communication between the treatment center and the child's school were more often rated as "fair or poor." A smaller proportion of rural clients rated physician care and availability of staff nurses as fair or poor. A larger percentage of

  9. AED's HIV/AIDS Prevention, Care, and Support Programs: International

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Founded in 1961, the Academy for Educational Development (AED) is a nonprofit organization working globally to improve health, education, and economic opportunity--the foundation of thriving societies. With a global staff of more than 2,000 focusing on the underserved, AED implements more than 250 programs serving people in all 50 U.S. states and…

  10. AED's HIV/AIDS Prevention, Care, and Support Programs: Domestic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Founded in 1961, the Academy for Educational Development (AED) is a nonprofit organization working globally to improve health, education, and economic opportunity--the foundation of thriving societies. With a global staff of more than 2,000 focusing on the underserved, AED implements more than 250 programs serving people in all 50 U.S. states and…

  11. Home Centered Care: Designing a Family Day Care Program. A Guide for Caregivers and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Ronda

    Consistent in its approach to child development and caregiving concepts, this guide for parents and child caregivers explores aspects of family day care in five sections. Section I discusses the design of physically safe environments for children. Section II describes the developing likes and needs of infants, toddlers, preschool children, and…

  12. Comprehensive Reproductive System Care Program - Clinical Breast Care Project (CRSCP-CBCP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    of Imprinted Genes in Association with Triple-Negative Hormone Receptor Status in Invasive breast cancer ." Max Planck Freiburg Epigenetics Meeting...breast disorders. The project will utilize a multidisciplinary approach as the standard of care for treating breast diseases and breast cancer ...breast cancer among American women. 15. SUBJECT TERMS- Tissue Banking, Biomedical Informatics, Focused Research, Translational Research, Genomics

  13. Quality care improvement program in a community-based participatory research project: example of Project DIRECT.

    PubMed Central

    Din-Dzietham, Rebecca; Porterfield, Deborah S.; Cohen, Stuart J.; Reaves, Janet; Burrus, Barri; Lamb, Betty M.

    2004-01-01

    A continuous quality care improvement program (CQIP) was built into Project DIRECT (Diabetes Interventions Reaching and Educating Communities Together) to improve providers' patterns of diabetes care and patients' glycemic control. Project DIRECT consisted of a comprehensive program aimed at reducing the burden of diabetes in the vulnerable high-risk African-American population of southeast Raleigh, NC. Forty-seven providers caring for this target population of adult diabetes patients were included in this quasi-experimental study. At the initial session, providers learned about the CQIP components, completed a planning worksheet, and chose a CQIP coordinator. Educational events included continuing education in practices and through conferences by experts, and guideline distribution. Follow-up was accomplished through phone calls and visits. Effectiveness was measured by a change in prevalence of selected patterns of care abstracted from 1,006 medical charts. Appropriate statistical methods were used to account for the cluster design and repeated measures. At the fourth follow-up year, approximately 40% of providers still participated in the program. Among the providers who stayed in the program for the whole study period, most selected quality care patterns showed significant upward trends. Glycemic control indicators did not change, however, despite an increased number of hemoglobin A1c tests per year. A diabetes CQI program can be effectively implemented in a community setting. Improved performance measures were not associated with improved outcomes. These results suggest that a patient-centered component should reinforce the provider-centered component. PMID:15540882

  14. The German National Program on Psoriasis Health Care 2005-2015: results and experiences.

    PubMed

    Augustin, M; Eissing, L; Langenbruch, A; Enk, A; Luger, T; Maaßen, D; Mrowietz, U; Reich, K; Reusch, M; Strömer, K; Thaçi, D; von Kiedrowski, R; Radtke, M A

    2016-08-01

    In 2005, the first national psoriasis survey in Germany revealed large deficits in health care particularly in patients with moderate to severe disease. The consecutive goal was to improve health care for psoriasis countrywide. For this, a large-scale national program was initiated starting with a comprehensive analysis of structures and processes of care for psoriasis. Patient burden, economic impact and barriers to care were systematically analyzed. In order to optimize routine care, a S3 guideline, a set of outcomes measures and treatment goals, were developed. Implementation was enforced by the German Psoriasis Networks (PsoNet) connecting the most dedicated dermatologists. The annual National Conference on Health Care in Psoriasis established in 2009 consented National Health Care Goals in Psoriasis 2010-2015 and defined a set of quality indicators, which are monitored on a regular basis. Currently 28 regional networks including more than 800 dermatologists are active. Between 2005 and 2014 7 out of 8 quality indicators have markedly improved, and regional disparities were resolved. e.g., mean PASI (Psoriasis Area Severity Index) dropped from 11.4 to 8.1 and DLQI (Dermatology Life Quality Index) from 8.6 to 5.9. A decade of experience indicates that a coordinated nationwide psoriasis program based on goal orientation can contribute to better quality of care and optimized outcomes.

  15. Bereavement photography for children: program development and health care professionals' response.

    PubMed

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Blehart, Kathleen; Hochberg, Todd; James, Kristin

    2013-07-01

    Reports of in-hospital bereavement photography focus largely on stillborns and neonates. Empiric data regarding the implementation of bereavement photography in pediatrics beyond the neonatal period and the impact of such programs on healthcare professionals (HCPs) is lacking. The authors describe the implementation of a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) bereavement photography program and use questionnaire data from HCPs to describe HCPs' reflections on the program and to identify program barriers. From July 2007 through April 2070, families of 59 (36%) of the 164 patients who died in the PICU participated in our bereavement photography program. Forty questionnaires from 29 HCPs caring for 39 participating patients/families indicated that families seemed grateful for the service (n = 34; 85%) and that the program helped HCPs feel better about their role (n = 30; 70%). Many HCPs disagreed that the program consumed too much of his/her time (n = 34; 85%) and that the photographer made his/her job difficult (n = 37; 92.5%). Qualitative analysis of responses to open-ended questions revealed 4 categories: the program's general value; positive aspects of the program; negative aspects of the program; and suggestions for improvements. Implementing bereavement photography in the PICU is feasible though some barriers exist. HCPs may benefit from such programs.

  16. South Texas Veterans Health Care System Mobile Health Clinic: Business Case Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-11

    has an active ambulatory care program with VA-staffed satellite outpatient clinics and contract Community Based Clinics located throughout San...geriatric evaluation and management, and palliative care to an estimated 16,000 veterans residing in the "Texas Hill Country." The Valley/Coastal...Bend Division (V/CBD) includes primary care outpatient clinics located in Harlingen, McAllen, Corpus Christi, and Laredo. The new Harlingen facility

  17. Coordinating Mental Health Care across Primary Care and Schools: ADHD as a Case Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Thomas J.; Blum, Nathan J.; Guevara, James P.; Jones, Heather A.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2013-01-01

    Although primary care practices and schools are major venues for the delivery of mental health services to children, these systems are disconnected, contributing to fragmentation in service delivery. This paper describes barriers to collaboration across the primary care and school systems, including administrative and fiscal pressures, conceptual…

  18. Making the Case for Public-Private Child Care Partnerships: Child Care Partnership Project. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finance Project, Washington, DC.

    The quality of child care in the United States has important implications for school preparedness, welfare reform, economic vitality, and the quality of family life. In this 8-minute videotape, business leaders describe why child care makes good business sense. Visuals explain the importance of early childhood for school and life success, and the…

  19. Prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Bracco, Mário M; Florindo, Alex Antonio; Mielke, Gregore Iven; Parra, Diana C; Lobelo, Felipe; Simoes, Eduardo J; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assessment of prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units within Brazil’s health system. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study based on telephone interviews with managers of primary care units. Of a total 42,486 primary health care units listed in the Brazilian Unified Health System directory, 1,600 were randomly selected. Care units from all five Brazilian macroregions were selected proportionally to the number of units in each region. We examined whether any of the following five different types of health promotion programs was available: physical activity; smoking cessation; cessation of alcohol and illicit drug use; healthy eating; and healthy environment. Information was collected on the kinds of activities offered and the status of implementation of the Family Health Strategy at the units. RESULTS Most units (62.0%) reported having in place three health promotion programs or more and only 3.0% reported having none. Healthy environment (77.0%) and healthy eating (72.0%) programs were the most widely available; smoking and alcohol use cessation were reported in 54.0% and 42.0% of the units. Physical activity programs were offered in less than 40.0% of the units and their availability varied greatly nationwide, from 51.0% in the Southeast to as low as 21.0% in the North. The Family Health Strategy was implemented in most units (61.0%); however, they did not offer more health promotion programs than others did. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed that most primary care units have in place health promotion programs. Public policies are needed to strengthen primary care services and improve training of health providers to meet the goals of the agenda for health promotion in Brazil. PMID:25372175

  20. Efficacy of the end-of-life nursing care continuing education program for nurses in general wards in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Saori; Moriyama, Michiko; Ohno, Yumiko

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to examine effectiveness of the End-of-life nursing care continuing education program for general ward nurses. A nonrandomized, before-after trial was conducted. The program was implemented for 25 nurses. The contents of the program consisted of the family assessment, general symptom management and practical use of theories and models regarding end-of-life nursing care. The primary outcome, implementation ability of end-of-life nursing care, was significantly improved after the program; improvements continued even at 2 months after. Similar results were obtained for nurses' confidence and knowledge concerning end-of-life nursing care. As for attitude toward end-of-life care, participants' scores were further elevated after the program. The participants rated the usefulness of the program as high. The effectiveness of the program was suggested from these results. In the future, this program should be widely used for in-service training.

  1. Postpartum depression screening in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: program development, implementation, and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Amanda S; Blucker, Ryan T; Thornberry, Timothy S; Hetherington, Carla; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this project were to describe the development of a postpartum depression screening program for mothers of infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and assess the implementation of the screening program. Methods Screening began at 14 days postpartum and was implemented as part of routine medical care. A nurse coordinator facilitated communication with mothers for increasing screen completion, review of critical self-harm items, and making mental health referrals. During the 18-month study period, 385 out of 793 eligible mothers completed the screen. Results Approximately 36% of mothers had a positive screen that resulted in a mental health referral and an additional 30% of mothers had screening results indicating significant symptoms. Conclusion Several barriers were identified, leading to adjustments in the screening process, and ultimately recommendations for future screening programs and research. Development of a postpartum depression screening process in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit involves support, training, implementation, and coordination from administrators, medical staff, new mothers, and mental health specialists. Several predictable challenges to program development require ongoing assessment and response to these challenges. Relevance This study highlights the expanding role of the psychologist and behavioral health providers in health care to intervene as early as possible in the life of a child and family with medical complications through multidisciplinary program development and implementation, as well as key considerations for institutions initiating such a program. PMID:26937199

  2. The Hours We Can't Be Home: Developing a School Age Child Care Program. A Handbook for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eller, Carole L.; And Others

    This handbook suggests to parents ways to plan, develop, and implement an after school child care program. Following a description of the initial child care needs assessment in the community, guidance for deciding the appropriate program type and step-by-step administrative instructions for establishing the program as a business are given. The…

  3. 77 FR 14364 - Comment Sought on Funding Pilot Program Participants Transitioning Out of the Rural Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Comment Sought on Funding Pilot Program Participants Transitioning Out of the Rural Health Care... to fund Rural Health Care Pilot Program (Pilot Program) participants who will exhaust funding... year to provide time to establish a process to transition them into the permanent Rural Health...

  4. Caring for Kids in Communities: Using Mentorship, Peer Support, & Student Leadership Programs in Schools. Counterpoint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Julia; Small-McGinley, Jan; De Fabrizio, Lucy

    This book invites schools to consider the use of mentorship, peer support, and student leadership programs to positively support the growth and learning of all students. It presents research on successful K-12 programs and case studies of individual programs and people. Eighteen chapters are: (1) "Introduction and Overview"; (2)…

  5. A case completion curriculum for clinical dental education: replacing numerical requirements with patient-based comprehensive care.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang E; Timothé, Peggy; Nalliah, Romesh; Karimbux, Nadeem Y; Howell, T Howard

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the development and implementation of a case completion curriculum as a new clinical education model for the predoctoral program at Harvard School of Dental Medicine. In this innovative model, students conduct patient-based comprehensive care and complete assigned patient cases on which their performance is assessed, in contrast with a traditional model based on procedural numerical requirements. In our new model, senior tutors, who are full-time faculty members, act as group leaders responsible for patient assignment, treatment planning, monitoring of student performance, and verification of patient care. The number of completed patient cases in this new comprehensive care system increased from a previous average of 12.8 cases per student prior to graduation to 22.8 cases. Additionally, the number of patients who had to be transferred due to outstanding or pending treatment when their student provider graduated or because of students' need to fulfill discipline requirements has decreased from an average of 16.4 to 4.6.

  6. A Strength Training Program for Primary Care Patients, Central Pennsylvania, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vijay A.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Messina, Dino A.; Stuckey, Heather L.; Curry, William J.; Chuang, Cynthia H.; Sherwood, Lisa L.; Hess, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Primary care providers can recommend strength training programs to use “Exercise as Medicine,” yet few studies have examined the interest of primary care patients in these programs. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of primary care patients in central Pennsylvania. Interest in participating in free group-based strength training and weight control programs was assessed, in addition to patient demographics, medical history, and quality of life. Results Among 414 patients, most (61.0%) were aged 54 or older, and 64.0% were female. More patients were interested in a strength training program (55.3%) than in a weight control program (45.4%). Nearly three-quarters (72.8%) of those reporting 10 or more days of poor physical health were interested in a strength training program compared with 49.5% of those reporting no days of poor physical health. After adjusting for potential confounders, those reporting poorer physical health had 2.7 greater odds (95% confidence interval, 1.4–5.1) of being interested in a strength training program compared with those reporting better physical health. Patients with hypertension, diabetes, or high cholesterol were not more interested in a strength training program than those without these conditions. Conclusion Primary care practices may consider offering or referring patients to community-based strength training programs. This study observed high levels of interest in these widely available programs. Practices may also consider screening and referring those with poorer physical health, as they may be the most interested and have the most to gain from participating. PMID:24967829

  7. Reforming Cardiovascular Care in the United States towards High-Quality Care at Lower Cost with Examples from Model Programs in the State of Michigan.

    PubMed

    Alyeshmerni, Daniel; Froehlich, James B; Lewin, Jack; Eagle, Kim A

    2014-07-01

    Despite its status as a world leader in treatment innovation and medical education, a quality chasm exists in American health care. Care fragmentation and poor coordination contribute to expensive care with highly variable quality in the United States. The rising costs of health care since 1990 have had a huge impact on individuals, families, businesses, the federal and state governments, and the national budget deficit. The passage of the Affordable Care Act represents a large shift in how health care is financed and delivered in the United States. The objective of this review is to describe some of the economic and social forces driving health care reform, provide an overview of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), and review model cardiovascular quality improvement programs underway in the state of Michigan. As health care reorganization occurs at the federal level, local and regional efforts can serve as models to accelerate improvement toward achieving better population health and better care at lower cost. Model programs in Michigan have achieved this goal in cardiovascular care through the systematic application of evidence-based care, the utilization of regional quality improvement collaboratives, community-based childhood wellness promotion, and medical device-based competitive bidding strategies. These efforts are examples of the direction cardiovascular care delivery will need to move in this era of the Affordable Care Act.

  8. Reforming Cardiovascular Care in the United States towards High-Quality Care at Lower Cost with Examples from Model Programs in the State of Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Alyeshmerni, Daniel; Froehlich, James B.; Lewin, Jack; Eagle, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its status as a world leader in treatment innovation and medical education, a quality chasm exists in American health care. Care fragmentation and poor coordination contribute to expensive care with highly variable quality in the United States. The rising costs of health care since 1990 have had a huge impact on individuals, families, businesses, the federal and state governments, and the national budget deficit. The passage of the Affordable Care Act represents a large shift in how health care is financed and delivered in the United States. The objective of this review is to describe some of the economic and social forces driving health care reform, provide an overview of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), and review model cardiovascular quality improvement programs underway in the state of Michigan. As health care reorganization occurs at the federal level, local and regional efforts can serve as models to accelerate improvement toward achieving better population health and better care at lower cost. Model programs in Michigan have achieved this goal in cardiovascular care through the systematic application of evidence-based care, the utilization of regional quality improvement collaboratives, community-based childhood wellness promotion, and medical device-based competitive bidding strategies. These efforts are examples of the direction cardiovascular care delivery will need to move in this era of the Affordable Care Act. PMID:25120917

  9. Perceived value of stroke outcome measures across the post-acute care continuum: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Danzl, Megan M; Hunter, Elizabeth G

    2013-04-01

    Connecting the continuum of post-acute care stroke services may be important for easing patients' transition between settings and facilitating recovery and community reintegration. The use of outcome measures is suggested as one means of connecting the continuum. The purpose of this qualitative case study is to describe administrators' and physiotherapists' perceived value of an outcomes program across the post-acute care stroke continuum at a rehabilitation hospital. Data were collected through individual interviews and focus groups with 18 participants. Three themes emerged on the value of the outcomes program: 1) enhanced communication; 2) supports clinical decision-making; and 3) value of objective data. These findings lend support for the use of standardized outcome measures by physiotherapists in stroke rehabilitation. Findings from this study may be useful for organizations and physiotherapists who wish to integrate outcome measures into practice.

  10. Comprehensive Reproductive Systems Care Program (CRSCP) Clinical Breast Care Project (CBCP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    multidisciplinary approach as the standard of care for treating breast diseases and breast cancer . This multidisciplinary model integrates prevention...tissue banking and research. These efforts focus on decreasing the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer among American women. Tissue Banking...subset of patients with breast cancer and other breast diseases to broaden our knowledge of the etiology and pathology of breast disease. Leverage the

  11. Comprehensive Reproductive System Care Program - Clinical Breast Care Project (CRSCP-CBCP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    the standard of care for treating breast diseases and breast cancer . This multidisciplinary model integrates prevention, screening, diagnosis...research. These efforts focus on decreasing the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer among American women. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Tissue Banking...biospecimens from a broad subset of patients with breast cancer and other breast diseases to broaden our knowledge of the etiology and pathology of breast

  12. Comprehensive Reproductive System Care Program - Clinical Breast Care Project (CRSCP-CBCP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    of having an evaluation or treatment intervention for breast disease. • Create and maintain an environment (medical, physical , psychological ...informatics companion to the prospective serum I breast tissue bank. 5. Clinical Care: • Decrease the negative psychological impact on the patient ...longitudinally assess the patient’s psychological response to evaluation and intervention , and base modifications on those results. 5 WSJXWH-05-2-0053

  13. Comprehensive Reproductive System Care Program - Clinical Breast Care Project (CRSCP-CBCP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    every patient undergoing a breast biopsy and/or breast surgery at the former WRAMC, (Walter Reed Army Medical Center) now WRNMMC, (Walter Reed...General Surgery Clinic at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and now present to the Breast Care and Research Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical...sites for research purposes of tissue garnered from all breast surgeries being preformed at both locations. The robust IRB- approved protocol that

  14. Transitioning HIV care and treatment programs in southern Africa to full local management.

    PubMed

    Vermund, Sten H; Sidat, Mohsin; Weil, Lori F; Tique, José A; Moon, Troy D; Ciampa, Philip J

    2012-06-19

    Global AIDS programs such as the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) face a challenging health care management transition. HIV care must evolve from vertically-organized, externally-supported efforts to sustainable, locally controlled components that are integrated into the horizontal primary health care systems of host nations. We compared four southern African nations in AIDS care, financial, literacy, and health worker capacity parameters (2005 to 2009) to contrast in their capacities to absorb the huge HIV care and prevention endeavors that are now managed with international technical and fiscal support. Botswana has a relatively high national income, a small population, and an advanced HIV/AIDS care program; it is well poised to take on management of its HIV/AIDS programs. South Africa has had a slower start, given HIV denialism philosophies of the previous government leadership. Nonetheless, South Africa has the national income, health care management, and health worker capacity to succeed in fully local management. The sheer magnitude of the burden is daunting, however, and South Africa will need continuing fiscal assistance. In contrast, Zambia and Mozambique have comparatively lower per capita incomes, many fewer health care workers per capita, and lower national literacy rates. It is improbable that fully independent management of their HIV programs is feasible on the timetable being contemplated by donors, nor is locally sustainable financing conceivable at present. A tailored nation-by-nation approach is needed for the transition to full local capacitation; donor nation policymakers must ensure that global resources and technical support are not removed prematurely.

  15. Creating self-care units in the acute care setting: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shendell-Falik, N

    1990-02-01

    Creating an environment in which patient's responsibility for self is fostered and nurses can practice professional and autonomous nursing practice is a challenge in today's hospitals. Innovative systems and structures need to be developed to assure quality of patient care and a high quality work environment. Newark Beth Israel Medical Center responded to the many demands of the mid-1980s, including increasing acuity of patients hospitalized, personnel shortages in nursing, physical therapy and other disciplines, and diminishing dollars available to the health care institution, through the creation of Self-Care Units. This article reviews how they came about, the way in which Self-Care Units function within the acute care setting and the management philosophy and structure which make them work. The experience at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center demonstrates that the potential exists to put control back at the bedside with the patient and the health care team working with the patient to achieve mutual goals. The focus of care has shifted from a "doing for" to a "working with" patients to identify interventions which promote active participation in hospitalization and a sense of self responsibility.

  16. Partnership long-term care insurance: lessons for CLASS program development.

    PubMed

    Meiners, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    The Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS) Act was a voluntary public insurance strategy intended to help people pay for long-term care. CLASS was passed as part of health reform to overcome aspects of private long-term care insurance market failure but came under close scrutiny from both its supporters and its detractors. Experience with the long-term care insurance market and State Partnership Programs provide insights about how to make CLASS fiscally viable. A CLASS program that offered one set of options to cover front-end risk (e.g., 1 to 3 years) and another set to cover catastrophic risk (after a high deductible) could have been offered as an alternative to the basic CLASS "long and lean" benefit model with all enrollees joined into a single risk pool. This would have broadened the risk pool and lowered premium costs under the program.

  17. Lifetime Reliability Evaluation of Structural Ceramic Parts with the CARES/LIFE Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1993-01-01

    The computer program CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program. CARES/LIFE accounts for the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth (SCG) by utilizing the power law, Paris law, or Walker equation. The two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function is used to characterize the variation in component strength. The effects of multiaxial stresses are modeled using either the principle of independent action (PIA), Weibull's normal stress averaging method (NSA), or Batdorf's theory. Inert strength and fatigue parameters are estimated from rupture strength data of naturally flawed specimens loaded in static, dynamic, or cyclic fatigue. Two example problems demonstrating cyclic fatigue parameter estimation and component reliability analysis with proof testing are included.

  18. 76 FR 19527 - Medicare Program; Medicare Shared Savings Program: Accountable Care Organizations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Guidance Relating to Tax Exempt Organization 3. Antitrust Policy Statement 4. Prohibition Against the... Innovation CMP Civil Monetary Penalties CMS Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services CNM Certified Nurse... new approach to the delivery of health care aimed at: (1) Better care for individuals; (2)...

  19. Developing the DESCARTE Model: The Design of Case Study Research in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Carolan, Clare M; Forbat, Liz; Smith, Annetta

    2016-04-01

    Case study is a long-established research tradition which predates the recent surge in mixed-methods research. Although a myriad of nuanced definitions of case study exist, seminal case study authors agree that the use of multiple data sources typify this research approach. The expansive case study literature demonstrates a lack of clarity and guidance in designing and reporting this approach to research. Informed by two reviews of the current health care literature, we posit that methodological description in case studies principally focuses on description of case study typology, which impedes the construction of methodologically clear and rigorous case studies. We draw from the case study and mixed-methods literature to develop the DESCARTE model as an innovative approach to the design, conduct, and reporting of case studies in health care. We examine how case study fits within the overall enterprise of qualitatively driven mixed-methods research, and the potential strengths of the model are considered.

  20. Development of the Serious Illness Care Program: a randomised controlled trial of a palliative care communication intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bernacki, Rachelle; Hutchings, Mathilde; Vick, Judith; Smith, Grant; Paladino, Joanna; Lipsitz, Stuart; Gawande, Atul A; Block, Susan D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ensuring that patients receive care that is consistent with their goals and values is a critical component of high-quality care. This article describes the protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial of a multicomponent, structured communication intervention. Methods and analysis Patients with advanced, incurable cancer and life expectancy of <12 months will participate together with their surrogate. Clinicians are enrolled and randomised either to usual care or the intervention. The Serious Illness Care Program is a multicomponent, structured communication intervention designed to identify patients, train clinicians to use a structured guide for advanced care planning discussion with patients, ‘trigger’ clinicians to have conversations, prepare patients and families for the conversation, and document outcomes of the discussion in a structured format in the electronic medical record. Clinician satisfaction with the intervention, confidence and attitudes will be assessed before and after the intervention. Self-report data will be collected from patients and surrogates approximately every 2 months up to 2 years or until the patient's death; patient medical records will be examined at the close of the study. Analyses will examine the impact of the intervention on the patient receipt of goal-concordant care, and peacefulness at the end of life. Secondary outcomes include patient anxiety, depression, quality of life, therapeutic alliance, quality of communication, and quality of dying and death. Key process measures include frequency, timing and quality of documented conversations. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Institutional Review Board. Results will be reported in peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number Protocol identifier NCT01786811; Pre-results. PMID:26443662