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Sample records for care providers pesticides

  1. Review of Pesticide Education Materials for Health Care Providers Providing Care to Agricultural Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiott, Ann E.; Quandt, Sara A.; Early, Julie; Jackson, David S.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Pesticide exposure is an important environmental and occupational health risk for agricultural workers and their families, but health care providers receive little training in it. Objective: To evaluate the medical resources available to providers caring for patients, particularly farmworkers, exposed to pesticides and to recommend a…

  2. Review of Pesticide Education Materials for Health Care Providers Providing Care to Agricultural Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiott, Ann E.; Quandt, Sara A.; Early, Julie; Jackson, David S.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Pesticide exposure is an important environmental and occupational health risk for agricultural workers and their families, but health care providers receive little training in it. Objective: To evaluate the medical resources available to providers caring for patients, particularly farmworkers, exposed to pesticides and to recommend a…

  3. Information for Child Care Providers about Pesticides/Integrated Pest Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about pesticides/integrated pest management, the health effects associated with exposure to pests and pesticides, and the steps that can be taken to use integrated pest management strategies in childcare facilities.

  4. Pesticide exposure seen in primary care.

    PubMed

    Henry, T K

    1997-06-01

    The focus of this article is on recognition of signs and symptoms of pesticide exposure and poisoning in primary care settings. Providers have little problem evaluating clients with an acute exposure to pesticides because the client usually presents with symptoms of poisoning and/or a history of known exposure. The information presented supports the need to consider a history of pesticide exposure in the evaluation of some neurological, dermatologic, reproductive, and other signs and symptoms presented to primary care providers.

  5. Health Care Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Chochinov, Harvey M; McClement, Susan E; Hack, Thomas F; McKeen, Nancy A; Rach, Amanda M; Gagnon, Pierre; Sinclair, Shane; Taylor-Brown, Jill

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients who are facing life-threatening and life-limiting cancer almost invariably experience psychological distress. Responding effectively requires therapeutic sensitivity and skill. In this study, we examined therapeutic effectiveness within the setting of cancer-related distress with the objective of understanding its constituent parts. METHODS Seventy-eight experienced psychosocial oncology clinicians from 24 health care centers across Canada were invited to participate in 3 focus groups each. In total, 29 focus groups were held over 2 years, during which clinicians articulated the therapeutic factors deemed most helpful in mitigating patient psychosocial distress. The content of each focus group was summarized into major themes and was reviewed with participants to confirm their accuracy. Upon completion of the focus groups, workshops were held in various centers, eliciting participant feedback on an empirical model of therapeutic effectiveness based on the qualitative analysis of focus group data. RESULTS Three primary, interrelated therapeutic domains emerged from the data, forming a model of optimal therapeutic effectiveness: 1) personal growth and self-care (domain A), 2) therapeutic approaches (domain B), and 3) creation of a safe space (domain C). Areas of domain overlap were identified and labeled accordingly: domain AB, therapeutic humility; domain BC, therapeutic pacing; and domain AC, therapeutic presence. CONCLUSIONS This empirical model provides detailed insights regarding the elements and pedagogy of effective communication and psychosocial care for patients who are experiencing cancer-related distress. [See editorial on pages 000–000, this issue.] Cancer 2013. © 2013 American Cancer Society. PMID:23341092

  6. Neonicotinoid pesticide exposure impairs crop pollination services provided by bumblebees

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Dara A.; Garratt, Michael P.D.; Wickens, Jennifer B.; Wickens, Victoria J.; Potts, Simon G.; Raine, Nigel E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent concern over global pollinator declines has led to considerable research on the effects of pesticides on bees1-5. Although pesticides are typically not encountered at lethal levels in the field, there is growing evidence indicating that exposure to field-realistic levels can have sub-lethal effects on bees affecting their foraging behaviour1,6,7, homing ability8,9 and reproductive success2,5. Bees are essential for the pollination of a wide variety of crops and the majority of wild flowering plants10-12, but until now research on pesticide impacts has been limited to direct effects on bees themselves and not on the pollination services they provide. Here we show the first evidence that pesticide exposure can reduce the pollination services bumblebees deliver to apples, a crop of global economic importance. Colonies exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide provided lower visitation rates to apple trees and collected pollen less often. Most importantly these pesticide exposed colonies produced apples containing fewer seeds demonstrating a reduced delivery of pollination services. Our results also suggest reduced pollination service delivery is not due to pesticide-induced changes in individual bee behaviour but most likely due to impacts at the colony level. These findings show that pesticide exposure can impair the ability of bees to provide pollination services, with important implications for both the sustained delivery of stable crop yields and the function of natural ecosystems. PMID:26580009

  7. Neonicotinoid pesticide exposure impairs crop pollination services provided by bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dara A; Garratt, Michael P D; Wickens, Jennifer B; Wickens, Victoria J; Potts, Simon G; Raine, Nigel E

    2015-12-24

    Recent concern over global pollinator declines has led to considerable research on the effects of pesticides on bees. Although pesticides are typically not encountered at lethal levels in the field, there is growing evidence indicating that exposure to field-realistic levels can have sublethal effects on bees, affecting their foraging behaviour, homing ability and reproductive success. Bees are essential for the pollination of a wide variety of crops and the majority of wild flowering plants, but until now research on pesticide effects has been limited to direct effects on bees themselves and not on the pollination services they provide. Here we show the first evidence to our knowledge that pesticide exposure can reduce the pollination services bumblebees deliver to apples, a crop of global economic importance. Bumblebee colonies exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide provided lower visitation rates to apple trees and collected pollen less often. Most importantly, these pesticide-exposed colonies produced apples containing fewer seeds, demonstrating a reduced delivery of pollination services. Our results also indicate that reduced pollination service delivery is not due to pesticide-induced changes in individual bee behaviour, but most likely due to effects at the colony level. These findings show that pesticide exposure can impair the ability of bees to provide pollination services, with important implications for both the sustained delivery of stable crop yields and the functioning of natural ecosystems.

  8. Neonicotinoid pesticide exposure impairs crop pollination services provided by bumblebees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Dara A.; Garratt, Michael P. D.; Wickens, Jennifer B.; Wickens, Victoria J.; Potts, Simon G.; Raine, Nigel E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent concern over global pollinator declines has led to considerable research on the effects of pesticides on bees. Although pesticides are typically not encountered at lethal levels in the field, there is growing evidence indicating that exposure to field-realistic levels can have sublethal effects on bees, affecting their foraging behaviour, homing ability and reproductive success. Bees are essential for the pollination of a wide variety of crops and the majority of wild flowering plants, but until now research on pesticide effects has been limited to direct effects on bees themselves and not on the pollination services they provide. Here we show the first evidence to our knowledge that pesticide exposure can reduce the pollination services bumblebees deliver to apples, a crop of global economic importance. Bumblebee colonies exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide provided lower visitation rates to apple trees and collected pollen less often. Most importantly, these pesticide-exposed colonies produced apples containing fewer seeds, demonstrating a reduced delivery of pollination services. Our results also indicate that reduced pollination service delivery is not due to pesticide-induced changes in individual bee behaviour, but most likely due to effects at the colony level. These findings show that pesticide exposure can impair the ability of bees to provide pollination services, with important implications for both the sustained delivery of stable crop yields and the functioning of natural ecosystems.

  9. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care…

  10. Choosing Your Prenatal Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... care is choosing your provider. Who can you go to for prenatal care? You can choose who ... baby if your provider’s not available when you go into labor? What hospital or birthing center does ...

  11. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePlus

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... A PCP is your main health care provider in non-emergency ... and teach healthy lifestyle choices Identify and treat common ...

  12. Care for the Health Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Kunin, Sharon Brown; Kanze, David Mitchell

    2016-03-01

    Pretravel care for the health care provider begins with an inventory, including the destination, length of stay, logistical arrangements, type of lodging, food and water supply, team members, personal medical needs, and the needs of the community to be treated. This inventory should be created and processed well in advance of the planned medical excursion. The key thing to remember in one's planning is to be a health care provider during one's global health care travel and not to become a patient oneself. This article will help demonstrate the medical requirements and recommendations for such planning.

  13. Lead, Allergen, and Pesticide Levels in Licensed Child Care Centers in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    The First National Environmental Health Survey of Child Care Centers was conducted to provide information about lead, allergens, and pesticide levels in licensed U.S. child care centers. Lead levels were measured in settled dust, paint, and play area soil; indoor allergen levels ...

  14. Lead, Allergen, and Pesticide Levels in Licensed Child Care Centers in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    The First National Environmental Health Survey of Child Care Centers was conducted to provide information about lead, allergens, and pesticide levels in licensed U.S. child care centers. Lead levels were measured in settled dust, paint, and play area soil; indoor allergen levels ...

  15. Types of health care providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... have been trained to care for the sick. Registered nurses (RNs) have graduated from a nursing program, have ... of a woman who has given birth. Certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) have training in the field of ...

  16. Group Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Group family day care providers need to create high-quality programs where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the group family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care providers:…

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pheochromocytoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pheochromocytoma? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider uses blood and urine tests that measure ...

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Endometriosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media ... under a microscope, to confirm the diagnosis. 1 Health care providers may also use imaging methods to produce ...

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Hypoparathyroidism?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose hypoparathyroidism? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider will order a blood test to determine ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vaginitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose vaginitis? Skip sharing on social media ... out the cause of a woman's symptoms, her health care provider will Examine the vagina, the vulva, and ...

  1. Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherma, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

  2. Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherma, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This review is devoted to methods for the determination of residues of pesticides and some related industrial chemicals. Topics include: residue methods, sampling, chromatography, organochlorine pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, carbamate insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, pyrethrins, fumigants, and related chemicals. (MVL)

  3. ICU nurses' experiences in providing terminal care.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Laura; Young, Anne; Symes, Lene; Haile, Brenda; Walsh, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    At least 1 in 5 Americans die while using intensive care service-a number that is expected to increase as society ages. Many of these deaths involve withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining therapies. In these situations, the role of intensive care nurses shifts from providing aggressive care to end-of-life care. While hospice and palliative care nurses typically receive specialized support to cope with death and dying, intensive care nurses usually do not receive this support. Understanding the experiences of intensive care nurses in providing care at the end of life is an important first step to improving terminal care in the intensive care unit (ICU). This phenomenological research study explores the experiences of intensive care nurses who provide terminal care in the ICU. The sample consisted of 18 registered nurses delivering terminal care in an ICU that participated in individual interviews and focus groups. Colaizzi's steps for data analysis were used to identify themes within the context of nursing. Three major themes consisted of (1) barriers to optimal care, (2) internal conflict, and (3) coping. Providing terminal care creates significant personal and professional struggles among ICU nurses.

  4. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  5. Family Day Care Provider Support Services Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galblum, Trudi W.; Boyer-Shesol, Cathy

    This directory profiles numerous organizational support services for family day care providers in the Kansas City metropolitan area. The first chapter, on operating a family day care home, concerns licensing and registration, the processes of starting and marketing a day care business, zoning and municipal regulation, and substitute providers. The…

  6. Find a Hospice or Palliative Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... Provider Name: Organization Type: Please select Hospice Multi-Location Hospice Provider Palliative Care Provider or Sitemap Contact Us Privacy Informacion en Español Copyright National Hospice and Palliative ...

  7. Effects of Teaching Health Care Workers on Diagnosis and Treatment of Pesticide Poisonings in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Sibani, Claudia; Jessen, Kristian Kjaer; Tekin, Bircan; Nabankema, Victoria; Jørs, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute pesticide poisoning in developing countries is a considerable problem, requiring diagnosis and treatment. This study describes how training of health care workers in Uganda affects their ability to diagnose and manage acute pesticide poisoning. Method: A postintervention cross-sectional study was conducted using a standardized questionnaire. A total of 326 health care workers in Uganda were interviewed on knowledge and handling of acute pesticide poisoning. Of those, 173 health care workers had received training, whereas 153 untrained health care workers from neighboring regions served as controls. Results: Trained health care workers scored higher on knowledge of pesticide toxicity and handling of acute pesticide poisoning. Stratification by sex, profession, experience, and health center level did not have any influence on the outcome. Conclusions: Training health care workers can improve their knowledge and treatment of pesticide poisonings. Knowledge of the subject is still insufficient among health care workers and further training is needed. PMID:28890656

  8. Effects of Teaching Health Care Workers on Diagnosis and Treatment of Pesticide Poisonings in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Sibani, Claudia; Jessen, Kristian Kjaer; Tekin, Bircan; Nabankema, Victoria; Jørs, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Acute pesticide poisoning in developing countries is a considerable problem, requiring diagnosis and treatment. This study describes how training of health care workers in Uganda affects their ability to diagnose and manage acute pesticide poisoning. A postintervention cross-sectional study was conducted using a standardized questionnaire. A total of 326 health care workers in Uganda were interviewed on knowledge and handling of acute pesticide poisoning. Of those, 173 health care workers had received training, whereas 153 untrained health care workers from neighboring regions served as controls. Trained health care workers scored higher on knowledge of pesticide toxicity and handling of acute pesticide poisoning. Stratification by sex, profession, experience, and health center level did not have any influence on the outcome. Training health care workers can improve their knowledge and treatment of pesticide poisonings. Knowledge of the subject is still insufficient among health care workers and further training is needed.

  9. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cause harm to crops, people, or animals. Pesticides can help get rid of them. Pesticides are not just insect killers. They also include ... mildew, germs, and more. Many household products contain pesticides. Pesticides can protect your health by killing germs, ...

  10. Quantitative comparisons of urgent care service providers.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong; Prybutok, Gayle L; Prybutok, Victor R; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop, validate, and use a survey instrument to measure and compare the perceived quality of three types of US urgent care (UC) service providers: hospital emergency rooms, urgent care centres (UCC), and primary care physician offices. This study develops, validates, and uses a survey instrument to measure/compare differences in perceived service quality among three types of UC service providers. Six dimensions measured the components of service quality: tangibles, professionalism, interaction, accessibility, efficiency, and technical quality. Primary care physicians' offices scored higher for service quality and perceived value, followed by UCC. Hospital emergency rooms scored lower in both quality and perceived value. No significant difference was identified between UCC and primary care physicians across all the perspectives, except for interactions. The homogenous nature of the sample population (college students), and the fact that the respondents were recruited from a single university limits the generalizability of the findings. The patient's choice of a health care provider influences not only the continuity of the care that he or she receives, but compliance with a medical regime, and the evolution of the health care landscape. This work contributes to the understanding of how to provide cost effective and efficient UC services. This study developed and validated a survey instrument to measure/compare six dimensions of service quality for three types of UC service providers. The authors provide valuable data for UC service providers seeking to improve patient perceptions of service quality.

  11. Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... This agency determines how pesticides are applied during farming and how much pesticide residue can remain in ... al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  12. The Family Day Care Providers' Legal Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treadwell, Lujuana Wolfe

    Designed specifically for family day care providers in Alameda County, California, this handbook provides legal and business advice thought to be useful as well to providers throughout the United States. A wide range of legal and business issues is covered in 15 brief chapters. Advice is offered on provider-parent contracts, planning for accidents…

  13. A managed care cycle provides contract oversight.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Paul B; Messinger, Stephen F; Welter, Terri

    2002-03-01

    In response to poor payment performance by health plans, providers are realizing that managed care contracts require systematic, ongoing management rather than a periodic focus. An effective managed care cycle that encompasses strategy development, implementation of the strategy through contracting and operations, and monitoring of contract performance can accomplish this needed oversight. Each phase requires specialized management tools, skills, and staff. Because of the importance of managed care to the provider's financial viability, a wide range of persons should be involved in the managed care cycle, including the board of directors, business office staff, senior management, and finance staff. As providers embrace a more structured approach to managed care, they will increase their chances of receiving accurate contracted payments.

  14. Elder Care for Alzheimer's: Choosing a Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... elder care center for a loved one with Alzheimer's. What should I look for when considering a ... provide an opportunity for your loved one with Alzheimer's to receive assistance and therapeutic activities in a ...

  15. Multicultural Nursing: Providing Better Employee Care.

    PubMed

    Rittle, Chad

    2015-12-01

    Living in an increasingly multicultural society, nurses are regularly required to care for employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds. An awareness of cultural differences focuses occupational health nurses on those differences and results in better employee care. This article explores the concept of culturally competent employee care, some of the non-verbal communication cues among cultural groups, models associated with completing a cultural assessment, and how health disparities in the workplace can affect delivery of employee care. Self-evaluation of the occupational health nurse for personal preferences and biases is also discussed. Development of cultural competency is a process, and occupational health nurses must develop these skills. By developing cultural competence, occupational health nurses can conduct complete cultural assessments, facilitate better communication with employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and improve employee health and compliance with care regimens. Tips and guidelines for facilitating communication between occupational health nurses and employees are also provided.

  16. Neurologists as primary palliative care providers

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Maisha T.; Holloway, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of review: To present current knowledge and recommendations regarding communication tasks and practice approaches for neurologists as they practice primary palliative care, including discussing serious news, managing symptoms, aligning treatment with patient preferences, introducing hospice/terminal care, and using the multiprofessional approach. Recent findings: Neurologists receive little formal palliative care training yet often need to discuss prognosis in serious illness, manage intractable symptoms in chronic progressive disease, and alleviate suffering for patients and their families. Because patients with neurologic disorders often have major cognitive impairment, physical impairment, or both, with an uncertain prognosis, their palliative care needs are particularly challenging and they remain largely uncharacterized and often unmanaged. Summary: We provide an overview of neuropalliative care as a fundamental skill set for all neurologists. PMID:26918202

  17. Effective communication with primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen

    2014-08-01

    Effective communication requires direct interaction between the hospitalist and the primary care provider using a standardized method of information exchange with the opportunity to ask questions and assign accountability for follow-up roles. The discharge summary is part of the process but does not provide the important aspects of handoff, such as closed loop communication and role assignments. Hospital discharge is a significant safety risk for patients, with more than half of discharged patients experiencing at least one error. Hospitalist and primary care providers need to collaborate to develop a standardized system to communicate about shared patients that meets handoff requirements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Providing palliative care in the ambulatory care setting.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Jane; Lyman, Jason A; Blackhall, Leslie J

    2010-04-01

    Palliative care that provides specialized attention to pain and symptom management is important for patients with cancer. Palliative care aims to reduce pain and other symptoms through an interdisciplinary approach involving physicians, nurses, social workers, and other members of the healthcare team. Families are included in care planning. Patients and families benefit from the availability of palliative care services early in the disease process, particularly when symptoms impact quality of life. One way to implement early palliative interventions is the establishment of an ambulatory care clinic dedicated to palliative care. This article describes the experience of an outpatient palliative care clinic at a large teaching hospital by using case studies to highlight the benefits of ambulatory palliative care and concluding with recommendations for research.

  19. Providing Culturally Sensitive Care for Transgender Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguen, Shira; Shipherd, Jillian C.; Harris, Holly N.

    2005-01-01

    Culturally sensitive information is crucial for providing appropriate care to any minority population. This article provides an overview of important issues to consider when working with transgender patients, including clarification of transgender terminology, diagnosis issues, identity development, and appropriate pronoun use. We also review…

  20. Providing Culturally Sensitive Care for Transgender Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguen, Shira; Shipherd, Jillian C.; Harris, Holly N.

    2005-01-01

    Culturally sensitive information is crucial for providing appropriate care to any minority population. This article provides an overview of important issues to consider when working with transgender patients, including clarification of transgender terminology, diagnosis issues, identity development, and appropriate pronoun use. We also review…

  1. Teaching Health Care Providers To Provide Spiritual Care: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Kelly M.; Cadge, Wendy; Balboni, Michael J.; Thiel, Mary Martha; Fitchett, George; Gallivan, Kathleen; VanderWeele, Tyler; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Health care providers' lack of education on spiritual care is a significant barrier to the integration of spiritual care into health care services. Objective: The study objective was to describe the training program, Clinical Pastoral Education for Healthcare Providers (CPE-HP) and evaluate its impact on providers' spiritual care skills. Methods: Fifty CPE-HP participants completed self-report surveys at baseline and posttraining measuring frequency of and confidence in providing religious/spiritual (R/S) care. Four domains were assessed: (1) ability and (2) frequency of R/S care provision; (3) comfort using religious language; and (4) confidence in providing R/S care. Results: At baseline, participants rated their ability to provide R/S care and comfort with religious language as “fair.” In the previous two weeks, they reported approximately two R/S patient conversations, initiated R/S conversations less than twice, and prayed with patients less than once. Posttraining participants' reported ability to provide spiritual care increased by 33% (p<0.001). Their comfort using religious language improved by 29% (p<0.001), and frequency of R/S care increased 75% (p<0.001). Participants reported having 61% more (p<0.001) R/S conversations and more frequent prayer with patients (95% increase; p<0.001). Confidence in providing spiritual care improved by 36% overall, by 20% (p<0.001) with religiously concordant patients, and by 43% (p<0.001) with religiously discordant patients. Conclusions: This study suggests that CPE-HP is an effective approach for training health care providers in spiritual care. Dissemination of this training may improve integration of spiritual care into health care, thereby strengthening comprehensive patient-centered care. PMID:25871494

  2. Midwives as primary care providers for women.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Barger, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Midwives certified by the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB) are prepared to provide primary care to women from menarche across the lifespan and to well newborns to 28 days using consultation, collaboration, and referral to other providers as needed. The scope of midwifery in the United States did not always include primary care for women, although imprecise definitions of primary care make this difficult to study. The expansion of the scope of practice occurred in response to population needs and research on nurse-midwifery practice patterns. The scope of practice of midwifery is tied to educational standards through the regulation and licensure at the state level. Although the current scope of practice includes primary care for women, many certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives are unable to practice to the full extent of their education due to state-level licensure restrictions. We discuss the addition of primary care to midwifery and the current state of AMCB-certified midwives as primary care providers for women.

  3. Nonviolent (empathic) communication for health care providers.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, M; Molho, P

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of Nonviolent or Empathic Communication Training is to facilitate the flow of information necessary for people to work cooperatively and resolve differences effectively. Such training is widely used in medical communities where the communication with patients and the cooperation between team members are of critical importance for the effectiveness of the treatment. Communication skills are of particular importance for health care providers dealing with patients having chronic diseases such as haemophilia. In addition to the difficulties inherent to the chronicity of the disease, the HIV contamination has dramatically impaired the relationships between patients and health care providers, creating a lot of pain, still alive in both parties. The purpose of this presentation is to offer to health care providers and patients some tools to deal with their feelings and restore effective, compassionate and fulfilling communication.

  4. Shipboard women's health care: provider perceptions.

    PubMed

    Schwerin, M J; Sack, D M

    1997-10-01

    Women have served aboard auxiliary U.S. Navy ships as integrated members of the shipboard work force since 1978. In 1994, women first started serving aboard combatant ships with the inclusion of women in the work force of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D Eisenhower (CVN 69). The provision of the highest standard of medical care for both men and women is a priority at all levels in the U.S. Navy. This study assesses the perceptions of shipboard health care providers regarding their ability to provide adequate women's health care. This evaluation was performed by conducting a personal interview with the senior health care provider of each of 32 ships on which women are integrated members of the work force. Medical department representatives reported that most ships have training programs for birth control (90.6%), sexually transmitted diseases (96.9%), and the Navy pregnancy policy (84.4%). Health care providers also reported limitations in available supplies (i.e., contraceptives, pregnancy tests, and sexually transmitted disease tests).

  5. Process utility from providing informal care: the benefit of caring.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Werner B F; van Exel, N Job A; van den Berg, Bernard; van den Bos, Geertruidis A M; Koopmanschap, Marc A

    2005-09-28

    Though economics is usually outcome-oriented, it is often argued that processes matter as well. Utility is not only derived from outcomes, but also from the way this outcome is accomplished. Providing care on a voluntary basis may especially be associated with such process utility. In this paper, we discuss the process utility from providing informal care. We test the hypothesis that informal caregivers derive utility not only from the outcome of informal care, i.e. that the patient is adequately cared for, but also from the process of providing informal care. We present empirical evidence of process utility on the basis of a large sample of Dutch caregivers (n=950). We measure process utility as the difference in happiness between the current situation in which the care recipient is cared for by the caregiver and the hypothetical situation that someone else takes over the care tasks, all other things equal. Other background characteristics on patient and caregiver characteristics, objective and subjective caregiver burden and quality of life are also presented and related to process utility. Our results show that process utility exists and is substantial and therefore important in the context of informal care. Almost half of the caregivers (48.2%) derive positive utility from informal care and on average happiness would decline if informal care tasks were handed over to someone else. Multivariate regression analysis shows that process utility especially relates to caregiver characteristics (age, gender, general happiness, relation to patient and difficulties in performing daily activities) and subjective caregiver burden, whereas it also depends on the number of hours of care provided (objective burden). These results strengthen the idea of supporting the use of informal care, but also that of keeping a close eye on the position of carers.

  6. Organization of primary care practice for providing energy balance care.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Clauser, Steven B; Liu, Benmei; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Huang, Terry T-K; Smith, Ashley Wilder

    2014-01-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) may not adequately counsel or monitor patients regarding diet, physical activity, and weight control (i.e., provide energy balance care). We assessed the organization of PCPs' practices for providing this care. The study design was a nationally representative survey conducted in 2008. The study setting was U.S. primary care practices. A total of 1740 PCPs completed two sequential questionnaires (response rate, 55.5%). The study measured PCPs' reports of practice resources, and the frequency of body mass index assessment, counseling, referral for further evaluation/management, and monitoring of patients for energy balance care. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression modeling were used. More than 80% of PCPs reported having information resources on diet, physical activity, or weight control available in waiting/exam rooms, but fewer billed (45%), used reminder systems (<30%), or received incentive payments (3%) for energy balance care. A total of 26% reported regularly assessing body mass index and always/often providing counseling as well as tracking patients for progress related to energy balance. In multivariate analyses, PCPs in practices with full electronic health records or those that bill for energy balance care provided this care more often and more comprehensively. There were strong specialty differences, with pediatricians more likely (odds ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.51) and obstetrician/gynecologists less likely (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.44) than others to provide energy balance care. PCPs' practices are not well organized for providing energy balance care. Further research is needed to understand PCP care-related specialty differences.

  7. Primary Care Providers and a System Problem

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Sullivan, Donald; Ganzini, Linda; Slatore, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scanning is implemented, an increasing number of people will be diagnosed with pulmonary nodules. Primary care clinicians care for the vast majority of these patients, but their experiences with communication and managing distress in this population are not well understood. METHODS: We conducted qualitative interviews of 15 primary care providers (PCPs) at two academic medical centers who care for patients with pulmonary nodules. We used qualitative description analysis, focusing on clinicians’ information exchange and other communication behaviors. RESULTS: Most PCPs believed they had inadequate information to counsel patients regarding lung nodules, although this information is desired. PCPs were concerned patients could “fall through the cracks” but did not have access to a reliable system to ensure follow-up adherence. They were limited by time, knowledge, and resources in providing the preferred level of care. Most PCPs did not discuss the specific risk a nodule was lung cancer, in part because they did not have ready access to this information. PCPs believed most patients did not have substantial distress as a result of nodule detection. Most PCPs did not include patients when making decisions about the follow-up plan. CONCLUSIONS: PCPs often lack systemic resources to optimize patient-centered approaches when discussing incidental pulmonary nodules with patients. With the advent of lung cancer screening, pulmonologists can assist primary care colleagues by providing accurate information to counsel patients and assisting in managing conversations about the risk of cancer. Pulmonologists should support efforts to implement reliable systems to ensure adherence to follow-up. PMID:25790082

  8. Lawn Care Pesticides. Risks Remain Uncertain While Prohibited Safety Claims Continue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-23

    United States General Accounting Office Report to the Chairman, SubcommitteeGAO on Toxic Substances, Environmental AD -A280 721 Oversight, Research...vides to the public about the safety of its products, federal enforcement actions taken against lawn care pesticide safety advertising claims, and...in reassessing the risks of these pesticides. FIFRA also authorizes EPA to take enforcement action against advertising claims made by pesticide

  9. Managing expectations: Providing palliative care in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Lane, Heather; Philip, Jennifer

    2015-06-01

    To explore the views and experiences of staff from RACFs and community palliative care services (CPCSs) on providing palliative and end-of-life care in RACFs. Qualitative exploratory interviews and focus groups were conducted with staff working in two RACFs and two CPCSs, and, following data saturation, a thematic analysis undertaken. 15 RACF and 15 CPCS staff participated. The overarching theme was of managing expectations in the provision of care. This included low expectations of the care available in RACFs, tensions in addressing complex decision-making and concurrent administrative expectations, and differences between views of RACF and CPCS staff regarding their respective roles. Improved understanding of the needs of RACF staff will improve the care of residents and, in turn, reduce hospitalisations. © 2013 ACOTA.

  10. Genetic education for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Rideout, Andrea L.; Wilson, Brenda J.; Allanson, Judith MD; Blaine, Sean M.; Esplen, Mary Jane; Farrell, Sandra A.; Graham, Gail E.; MacKenzie, Jennifer; Meschino, Wendy; Miller, Fiona; Prakash, Preeti; Shuman, Cheryl; Summers, Anne; Taylor, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To increase primary care providers’ awareness and use of genetic services; increase their knowledge of genetic issues; increase their confidence in core genetic competencies; change their attitudes toward genetic testing for hereditary diseases; and increase their confidence as primary care genetic resources. DESIGN Participants completed a workshop and 3 questionnaires: a baseline questionnaire, a survey that provided immediate feedback on the workshop itself, and a follow-up questionnaire 6 months later. SETTING Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Primary care providers suggested by deans of nursing, midwifery, family medicine, and obstetric programs, as well as coordinators of nurse practitioner programs, in Ontario and by the Ontario College of Family Physicians. INTERVENTION A complex educational intervention was developed, including an interactive workshop and PowerPoint educational modules on genetic topics for participants’ use (available at www.mtsinai.on.ca/FamMedGen/). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Awareness and use of genetic services, knowledge of genetics, confidence in core clinical genetic skills, attitudes toward genetic testing, and teaching activities related to genetics. RESULTS The workshop was attended by 29 participants; of those, 21 completed the baseline questionnaire and the 6-month follow-up questionnaire. There was no significant change found in awareness or reported use of genetic services. There was significant improvement in self-assessed knowledge of (P = .001) and confidence in (P = .005) skills related to adult-onset genetic disorders. There were significant increases in confidence in many core genetic competencies, including assessing risk of hereditary disorders (P = .033), deciding who should be offered referral for genetic counseling (P = .003), discussing prenatal testing options (P = .034), discussing benefits, risks, and limitations of genetic testing (P = .033), and describing what to expect at a genetic counseling session

  11. Health Care Providers' Perception of Their Competence in Providing Spiritual Care for Patients.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Areshtanab, Hossein Namdar; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Khanmiri, Soraya Golipoor

    2017-01-01

    Spiritual care is an important part of health-care provision. Spiritual care can improve patients' health. One of the requirements for providing appropriate spiritual care for patients is having the required competence. This study was conducted to investigate the perception of health-care providers of their own competence in providing spiritual cares for patients hospitalized in medical-educational centers of Iran. This study is a cross-sectional, analytical research conducted on 555 nurses of medical-educational centers in Tabriz, Iran, in 2014. Data were collected using a two-part questionnaire including demographic information and the spiritual care competence scale. Data analysis was performed using descriptive (frequency, percentage, mean, and standard deviation) and inferential (independent t-test, Pearson, Spearman, ANOVA with Tukey test) statistics in SPSS software version 13. Results showed that the mean score for nurses' perception of their competence in providing spiritual care for patients was average, that is, 95.2 ± 14.4. Mean score of nurses' perception of their competence in providing spiritual care in each aspect was significantly higher than average (P < 0.05). The highest score was related to individual support and consulting with patients, that is, 21.1 (4.0), and the lowest score was related to reference to experts, that is, 9.5 (2.3). The type of employment and participation in workshops had significant relationships with nurses' perception of their competence for providing spiritual care (P < 0.05). The findings indicate that authorities and policymakers should take steps in planning for nurses' training for promoting their competence in providing spiritual care for patients; therefore, holding workshops is necessary.

  12. Health Care Providers' Perception of Their Competence in Providing Spiritual Care for Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Areshtanab, Hossein Namdar; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Khanmiri, Soraya Golipoor

    2017-01-01

    Background: Spiritual care is an important part of health-care provision. Spiritual care can improve patients' health. One of the requirements for providing appropriate spiritual care for patients is having the required competence. Aim: This study was conducted to investigate the perception of health-care providers of their own competence in providing spiritual cares for patients hospitalized in medical-educational centers of Iran. Subjects and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional, analytical research conducted on 555 nurses of medical-educational centers in Tabriz, Iran, in 2014. Data were collected using a two-part questionnaire including demographic information and the spiritual care competence scale. Data analysis was performed using descriptive (frequency, percentage, mean, and standard deviation) and inferential (independent t-test, Pearson, Spearman, ANOVA with Tukey test) statistics in SPSS software version 13. Results: Results showed that the mean score for nurses' perception of their competence in providing spiritual care for patients was average, that is, 95.2 ± 14.4. Mean score of nurses' perception of their competence in providing spiritual care in each aspect was significantly higher than average (P < 0.05). The highest score was related to individual support and consulting with patients, that is, 21.1 (4.0), and the lowest score was related to reference to experts, that is, 9.5 (2.3). The type of employment and participation in workshops had significant relationships with nurses' perception of their competence for providing spiritual care (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The findings indicate that authorities and policymakers should take steps in planning for nurses' training for promoting their competence in providing spiritual care for patients; therefore, holding workshops is necessary. PMID:28216864

  13. Providing adolescent sexual health care in the pediatric emergency department: views of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa K; Mollen, Cynthia J; O'Malley, Donna; Owens, Rhea L; Maliszewski, Genevieve A; Goggin, Kathy; Kelly, Patricia

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore health care providers' (HCPs') attitudes and beliefs about adolescent sexual health care provision in the emergency department (ED) and to identify barriers to a health educator-based intervention. We conducted focused, semistructured interviews of HCPs from the ED and adolescent clinic of a children's hospital. The interview guide was based on the theory of planned behavior and its constructs: attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to facilitate care. We used purposive sampling and enrollment continued until themes were saturated. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using directed content analysis. Twenty-nine interviews were required for saturation. Participants were 12 physicians, 12 nurses, 3 nurse practitioners, and 2 social workers; the majority (83%) were female. Intention to facilitate care was influenced by HCP perception of (1) their professional role, (2) the role of the ED (focused vs expanded care), and (3) need for patient safety. Health care providers identified 3 practice referents: patients/families, peers and administrators, and professional organizations. Health care providers perceived limited behavioral control over care delivery because of time constraints, confidentiality issues, and comfort level. There was overall support for a health educator, and many felt the educator could help overcome barriers to care. Despite challenges unique to the ED, HCPs were supportive of the intervention and perceived the health educator as a resource to improve adolescent care and services. Future research should evaluate efficacy and costs of a health educator in this setting.

  14. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  15. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  16. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  17. Building a safe care-providing robot.

    PubMed

    Fotoohi, Leila; Gräser, Axel

    2011-01-01

    A service robot especially a care-providing robot, works in the vicinity of a human body and is sometimes even in direct contact with it. Conventional safety methods and precautions in industrial robotics are not applicable to such robots. This paper presents a safety approach for designing the safe care-providing robot FRIEND. The approach is applied in each step of design iteratively to identify and assess the potential hazards during design. The steps are explained briefly in this work. The main contribution of this paper is verification of safety requirements using the Ramadge-Wonham (RW) framework. The greater complexity of the tasks the robot will perform, the more complex is the identification of safety requirements. Use of this framework led us to analyze the requirements and verify them formally, systematically and on a modular basis. In our approach human-robot interaction (HRI) is also modeled by a set of uncontrolled events that may happen any time during operation. Subsequently the safety requirements are modified to consider these interactions. As a result the safety module behaves like a controller, running in parallel with the system, which maintains the system safe and works according to the safety requirements by enabling the admissible sequences of events.

  18. Community nurses' perceptions of providing bereavement care.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, Sarah; Harrison, Kath; Johnson, Amanda; Chang, Esther

    2013-06-01

    This study explored the perceptions of bereavement support offered to clients and their carers and family by community nurses (CNs) in three community health centres located in a single area health service. In the context of an ageing population, it is pertinent to review CNs' perceptions in providing bereavement services. Early assessment and intervention is likely to prevent complicated grief occurring in the community. The bereavement support provided by CNs, considered here within a person-centred framework, enables identification of complicated grief. Semistructured interviews were held with 10 CNs and were transcribed verbatim. Transcriptions were analysed for major themes, and responses were grouped in relation to the study aims and themes emerging from the interviews. The themes discussed in this paper are as follows: the carer as a focus of palliative care; bereavement support as an outlet for carers; and the ending of the relationship between carers and CNs that is facilitated through bereavement support. The study provides evidence that supports the adoption of a model of bereavement support delivered by CNs as a means of reducing the likelihood of complicated grief occurring in the community. Further, the visits provide an important opportunity for nurses and carers to satisfactorily complete their relationship.

  19. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  20. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  1. Pesticide Registration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site provides resources for an individual or company wanting to register a pesticide active ingredient or pesticide product in the United States. Features: a manual (blue book), other guidance, and coordinated lists of requirements by pesticide type.

  2. Puerto Rico Pesticides Distributors Agree To Come into Compliance with Federal Law and Provide Training To Settle Case Involving Illegal Sale of Methyl Bromide Pesticides In Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA News Release: Puerto Rico Pesticides Distributors Agree To Come into Compliance with Federal Law and Provide Training To Settle Case Involving Illegal Sale of Methyl Bromide Pesticides In Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands

  3. Providing Palliative Care to LGBTQ Patients.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Nina; Wholihan, Dorothy

    2016-09-01

    Nurses should be familiar with and equipped to address the challenges that arise when caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer-identified (LGBTQ) patients. LGBTQ individuals have increased rates of certain physical diseases and are at greater risk of suffering from stress-sensitive mental health issues. Negative social attitudes, widespread discrimination and stigma, physical and psychological victimization, and less social support with aging contribute to the complexity of care for these individuals. Open communication, welcoming and accepting attitudes and environments, and sensitivity to unique multidimensional issues improve care to LGBTQ patients with serious advanced illness. Nursing can reach this vulnerable minority and positively impact the quality of care.

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Klinefelter Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Klinefelter syndrome (KS)? Skip sharing on ... karyotype (pronounced care-EE-oh-type ) test. A health care provider will take a small blood or skin ...

  5. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  6. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  7. Step 3: Provides Culturally Competent Care

    PubMed Central

    Salt, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Step 3 of the Ten Steps of Mother-Friendly Care insures that women receive care that is sensitive and responsive to the specific beliefs, values, and customs of the mother's ethnicity and religion. The rationale for this step and the evidence in support of its value are presented. PMID:18523675

  8. Special Sitters: Teenage Respite Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Penny; Legaz, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    Camp Fire's Special Sitters Project addresses the need for respite care experienced by parents of disabled children. The project trains teenagers to care for young handicapped children and links the teenagers with parents who call for babysitting service. The project has been successfully replicated in five communities. (Author/JDD)

  9. Child Care Services Provided by Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    In an attempt to determine the extent to which hospitals had established child care services for their personnel, a survey was conducted of 3,000 hospitals with 100 beds or more. Out of nearly 2,000 hospitals which responded, 98 were operating child care centers, with about 500 more planning or at least showing interest in such a program. The…

  10. Youth Suicides Unknown to Psychiatric Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runeson, Bo Sigurd

    1992-01-01

    Consecutive suicides (n=58) among adolescents and young adults, studied by psychological autopsy, were classified according to presence of previous psychiatric care. Fifteen of 16 subjects without previous care were males, 6 were diagnosed as having adjustment disorder related to recent event. Unemployment was less common, suicidal processes were…

  11. Lawn Care Pesticide Risks Remain Uncertain While Prohibited Safety Claims Continue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-28

    against prohibited lawn care pesticide safety advertising claims. Nearly 4 years ago we reported to this Subcommittee on EPA’s lack of progress in...being taken against safety advertising claims made by the pesticides industry. 2 In that report, wi concluded that there is considerable uncertainty...Avail and jor Dld Special advertising safety claims. We recommended that EPA take steps to strengthen and improve its program for controlling such claims

  12. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care provider contribution. 54.633... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.633 Health care provider contribution. (a) Health care provider contribution. All health...

  13. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider contribution. 54.633... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.633 Health care provider contribution. (a) Health care provider contribution. All health...

  14. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care provider eligibility. 54.601... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.601 Health care provider eligibility. (a) Eligible health care providers. (1) Only an...

  15. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider eligibility. 54.601... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.601 Health care provider eligibility. (a) Eligible health care providers. (1) Only an...

  16. Providing and financing aged care in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ergas, Henry; Paolucci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the provision and financing of aged care in Australia. Demand for aged care will increase substantially as a result of population aging, with the number of Australians aged 85 and over projected to increase from 400,000 in 2010 to over 1.8 million in 2051. Meeting this demand will greatly strain the current system, and makes it important to exploit opportunities for increased efficiency. A move to greater beneficiary co-payments is also likely, though its extent may depend on whether aged care insurance and other forms of pre-payment can develop. PMID:22312229

  17. Occupational Health for Health Care Providers

    MedlinePlus

    Health care workers are exposed to many job hazards. These can include Infections Needle injuries Back injuries ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ...

  18. Why Do Cuckolded Males Provide Paternal Care?

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Ashleigh S.; Alonzo, Suzanne H.; Cornwallis, Charlie K.

    2013-01-01

    In most species, males do not abandon offspring or reduce paternal care when they are cuckolded by other males. This apparent lack of adjustment of paternal investment with the likelihood of paternity presents a potential challenge to our understanding of what drives selection for paternal care. In a comparative analysis across birds, fish, mammals, and insects we identify key factors that explain why cuckolded males in many species do not reduce paternal care. Specifically, we show that cuckolded males only reduce paternal investment if both the costs of caring are relatively high and there is a high risk of cuckoldry. Under these circumstances, selection is expected to favour males that reduce paternal effort in response to cuckoldry. In many species, however, these conditions are not satisfied and tolerant males have outcompeted males that abandon young. PMID:23555193

  19. Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Laura Y

    2017-10-01

    There is growing evidence about the influence of chemical exposures on specific molecular systems and mechanisms involved in cognitive and mental function. Evidence is also emerging about the negative impact of these chemical exposures on mental health, including depression, suicide, and other risks. Despite the growing appreciation of these factors, however, little attention has been paid to the ethical and social implications of their interactions. Drawing on recent work that argues for an environmental neuroethics approach that explicitly brings together ethics, environment, and conditions of the central nervous system, this article focuses on these critical issues for pesticides specifically.

  20. Root Doctors as Providers of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Van J.

    1983-01-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two “root doctors.” These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  1. Fibromyalgia: management strategies for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Arnold, L M; Gebke, K B; Choy, E H S

    2016-02-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic disorder defined by widespread pain, often accompanied by fatigue and sleep disturbance, affects up to one in 20 patients in primary care. Although most patients with FM are managed in primary care, diagnosis and treatment continue to present a challenge, and patients are often referred to specialists. Furthermore, the lack of a clear patient pathway often results in patients being passed from specialist to specialist, exhaustive investigations, prescription of multiple drugs to treat different symptoms, delays in diagnosis, increased disability and increased healthcare resource utilisation. We will discuss the current and evolving understanding of FM, and recommend improvements in the management and treatment of FM, highlighting the role of the primary care physician, and the place of the medical home in FM management. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of FM by searching PubMed and references from relevant articles, and selected articles on the basis of quality, relevance to the illness and importance in illustrating current management pathways and the potential for future improvements. The implementation of a framework for chronic pain management in primary care would limit unnecessary, time-consuming, and costly tests, reduce diagnostic delay and improve patient outcomes. The patient-centred medical home (PCMH), a management framework that has been successfully implemented in other chronic diseases, might improve the care of patients with FM in primary care, by bringing together a team of professionals with a range of skills and training. Although there remain several barriers to overcome, implementation of a PCMH would allow patients with FM, like those with other chronic conditions, to be successfully managed in the primary care setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Development and Evaluation of an Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkon, Abbey; Kalmar, Evie; Leonard, Victoria; Flint, Mary Louise; Kuo, Devina; Davidson, Nita; Bradman, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Young children and early care and education (ECE) staff are exposed to pesticides used to manage pests in ECE facilities in the United States and elsewhere. The objective of this pilot study was to encourage child care programs to reduce pesticide use and child exposures by developing and evaluating an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Toolkit for…

  3. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary, an...

  4. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary, an...

  5. Who Cares for Kids? A Report on Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Carolyn

    This study offers a profile of child care workers in family day care homes and child care centers, reporting general statistics and examining their wages, benefits, training, working conditions, and turnover rates. In addition, it looks at government regulation and licensing, employer-sponsored programs, child abuse, insurance rates, and federal…

  6. Baseline Management Practices at Providers in Better Jobs Better Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stott, Amy L.; Brannon, S. Diane; Vasey, Joseph; Dansky, Kathryn H.; Kemper, Peter

    2007-01-01

    High turnover and difficult recruitment of direct care workers are challenges for long-term care providers. This study reports the extent and variation of the use of management practices for direct care workers and their supervisors across four long-term care settings in the Better Jobs Better Care demonstration. Overall, there is limited use of…

  7. Health Care Providers' Spirit at Work Within a Restructured Workplace.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Joan I J; Brooks, Denise; Urban, Ann-Marie

    2016-12-01

    Spirit at work (SAW) research emerged as a response to care provider determination to maintain a healthy and productive health care work environment, despite restructuring. The aim of this descriptive mixed-methods research is to present the care provider's perceptions of SAW. SAW is a holistic measure of care provider workplace outcomes, defined as the unique experience of individuals who are passionate about and energized by their work. A mixed group of licensed and unlicensed care providers in a continuing care workplace were surveyed. Eighteen Likert-type scale survey questions were further informed by two open-ended questions. Results indicated that unlicensed continuing care providers' perceptions of SAW are lower than licensed care providers. Responses suggest that open discussion between managers and team members, combined with structured workplace interventions, will lead to enhanced SAW and improved patient care. Further research on SAW within the continuing care workplace is required.

  8. Infants' Attachment Behaviors with Their Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allhusen, Virginia D.; Cochran, Moncrieff M.

    The conditions of day care quality under which infants direct secure attachment behaviors toward their day care providers were examined. Two groups of 12- to 18-month-old infants, who were experiencing either 1:4 or 1:7 caregiver-to-infant ratios, and their day care providers, were observed while they interacted in their day care centers.…

  9. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines health care provider as: (1) A doctor of medicine or... doctor practices; or (2) Any other person determined by the Secretary to be capable of providing...

  10. Interfaith Health Care Ministries, Providence, Rhode Island.

    PubMed

    Parker, D

    1999-01-01

    We enjoy considerable freedom in the creation of programs that meet the spiritual needs of people in the community. We minister in diverse settings--a university medical school, hospital, hospice, eldercare center, mental health center, state hospital, and parish/congregation. We are guided by our deep commitment to make sure that individuals and families whose life journey is hard receive quality spiritual care. We are equally committed to preparing caregivers, whether clergy, physicians, nurses, or laypersons so that they are both clinically competent and spiritually informed. Our ambitions are high and our resources are limited.

  11. Baseline management practices at providers in better jobs better care.

    PubMed

    Stott, Amy L; Brannon, S Diane; Vasey, Joseph; Dansky, Kathryn H; Kemper, Peter

    2007-01-01

    High turnover and difficult recruitment of direct care workers are challenges for long-term care providers. This study reports the extent and variation of the use of management practices for direct care workers and their supervisors across four long-term care settings in the Better Jobs Better Care demonstration. Overall, there is limited use of direct care worker training, career advancement opportunities, and mentoring programs. Participation in care planning, communication about tasks, and direct care worker supervisor training and development practices vary significantly across long-term care settings. The paucity of training, career advancement opportunities, and mentoring programs suggests that government policies may be needed to encourage their use.

  12. Buerger’s disease: providing integrated care

    PubMed Central

    Klein-Weigel, Peter; Volz, Theresa Sophie; Zange, Leonora; Richter, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    Buerger’s disease, also known as thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), is a segmental inflammatory disease affecting small- and medium-sized vessels, which is strongly associated with tobacco use. Although the etiology is still unknown, recent studies suggest an immunopathogenesis. Diagnosis is based on clinical and angiomorphologic criteria, including age, history of smoking, clinical presentation with distal extremity ischemia, and the absence of other risk factors for atherosclerosis, autoimmune disease, hypercoagulable states, or embolic disease. Until now, no causative therapy exists for TAO. The most important therapeutic intervention is smoking cessations and intravenous prostanoid infusions (iloprost). Furthermore, effective analgesia is crucial for the treatment of ischemic and neuropathic pain and might be expanded by spinal cord stimulation. Revascularization procedures do not play a major role in the treatment of TAO due to the distal localization of arterial occlusion. More recently, immunoadsorption has been introduced eliminating vasoconstrictive G-protein-coupled receptor and other autoantibodies. Cell-based therapies and treatment with bosentan were also advocated. Finally, a consequent prevention and treatment of wounds and infections are essential for the prevention of amputations. To achieve better clinical results, integrated care in multidisciplinary and trans-sectoral teams with emphasis on smoking cessation, pain control, wound management, and social care by professionals, social workers, and family members is necessary. PMID:27785045

  13. Regulatory requirements for providing adequate veterinary care to research animals.

    PubMed

    Pinson, David M

    2013-09-01

    Provision of adequate veterinary care is a required component of animal care and use programs in the United States. Program participants other than veterinarians, including non-medically trained research personnel and technicians, also provide veterinary care to animals, and administrators are responsible for assuring compliance with federal mandates regarding adequate veterinary care. All program participants therefore should understand the regulatory requirements for providing such care. The author provides a training primer on the US regulatory requirements for the provision of veterinary care to research animals. Understanding the legal basis and conditions of a program of veterinary care will help program participants to meet the requirements advanced in the laws and policies.

  14. Ten Things Lesbians Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... for high blood pressure, cholesterol problems, and diabetes. Health care providers can also offer tips on quitting smoking, ... lesbians experience violence in their intimate relationships. However, health care providers do not ask lesbians about intimate partner ...

  15. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose PCOS? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Your health care provider may suspect PCOS if you have eight ...

  16. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose bacterial vaginosis (BV)? Skip sharing on ... BV requires a vaginal exam by a qualified health care provider and the laboratory testing of fluid collected ...

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose menstrual irregularities? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider diagnoses menstrual irregularities using a combination of ...

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... Rett syndrome may not always be present, so health care providers also need to evaluate the child's symptoms ...

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)? Skip sharing on ... Page Content If OI is moderate or severe, health care providers usually diagnose it during prenatal ultrasound at ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose POI? Skip sharing on social media ... having periods for 4 months or longer, her health care provider may take these steps to diagnose the ...

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Cushing's Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Cushing’s syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... easily recognized when it is fully developed, but health care providers try to diagnose and treat it well ...

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Fragile X Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Fragile X syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers often use a blood sample to diagnose ...

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Turner Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Turner syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers use a combination of physical symptoms and ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI)? Skip sharing ... links Share this: Page Content To diagnose TBI, health care providers may use one or more tests that ...

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Disorders > About > Diagnosis Page Content ​ ​How do health care providers diagnose adrenal gland disorders? Methods for diagnosing ... Tumors To diagnose an adrenal gland tumor, a health care provider may order one or more tests. 3 ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Prader-Willi Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)? Skip sharing ... a "floppy" body and weak muscle tone, a health care provider may conduct genetic testing for Prader-Willi ...

  7. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pregnancy Loss or Miscarriage?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pregnancy loss or miscarriage? Skip sharing ... light spotting, or bleeding, she should contact her health care provider immediately. For diagnosis, the woman may need ...

  8. Skin Diseases: Questions for Your Health Care Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Questions for Your Health Care Provider Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... Sun—Not a good mix / Questions for Your Health Care Provider Fall 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number 4 ...

  9. Health Care Disparities and Diabetes Care: Practical Considerations for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard O.; Beech, Bettina M.; Miller, Stephania

    2011-01-01

    IN BRIEF Disparities in diabetes care are prevalent in the United States. This article provides an overview of these disparities and discusses both potential causes and efforts to address them to date. The authors focus the discussion on aspects relevant to the patient-provider dyad and provide practical considerations for the primary care provider’s role in helping to diminish and eliminate disparities in diabetes care. PMID:21289869

  10. Conditions of Caregiving, Provider Nurturance and Quality Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ann M. Berghout; Lindauer, Shelley L. Knudsen; Rodriguez, Ariel; Norton, Maria L.; Nelson, Farol A. Groutage

    1997-01-01

    Examined relationships of child care provider education, presence of children from economically strained homes, and program structure to providers' self-perception, nurturance, and caregiving conditions in 36 licensed family day care homes. Found that when provider self-perceptions were high, but day care clients experienced economic strain, the…

  11. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines health care provider as: (1) A doctor of medicine or... manual manipulation of the spine to correct a subluxation as demonstrated by X-ray to exist)...

  12. Successful Reentry: The Perspective of Private Correctional Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Greifinger, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Due to public health and safety concerns, discharge planning is increasingly prioritized by correctional systems when preparing prisoners for their reintegration into the community. Annually, private correctional health care vendors provide $3 billion of health care services to inmates in correctional facilities throughout the U.S., but rarely are contracted to provide transitional health care. A discussion with 12 people representing five private nationwide correctional health care providers highlighted the barriers they face when implementing transitional health care and what templates of services health care companies could provide to state and counties to enhance the reentry process. PMID:17131191

  13. Data governance for health care providers.

    PubMed

    Andronis, Katerina; Moysey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Data governance is characterised from broader definitions of governance. These characteristics are then mapped to a framework that provides a practical representation of the concepts. This representation is further developed with operating models and roles. Several information related scenarios covering both clinical and non-clinical domains are considered in information terms and then related back to the data governance framework. This assists the reader in understanding how data governance would help address the issues or achieve a better outcome. These elements together enable the reader to gain an understanding of the data governance framework and how it applies in practice. Finally, some practical advice is offered for establishing and operating data governance as well as approaches for justifying the investment.

  14. Food Safety Training Needs of Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Anne S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A sample of child-care centers and family day-care homes in Michigan was used to identify what care providers need to know about safe food handling. Their primary concern was to become informed about what causes food to become unsafe and how to prevent foodborne illnesses. Providers preferred printed materials to tapes or workshops. (AA)

  15. Teledermatology Consultations Provide Specialty Care for Farmworkers in Rural Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Feldman, Steven R.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Brooks, Thanh; Cabral, Gonzalo; Heck, Judy; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Whalley, Lara E.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural patients have limited access to dermatologic care. Farmworkers have high rates of skin disease and limited access to care. Purpose: This exploratory study assessed whether teledermatology consultations could help meet the needs of health care providers for farmworkers in rural clinics. Methods: Dermatologists provided 79…

  16. Teledermatology Consultations Provide Specialty Care for Farmworkers in Rural Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Feldman, Steven R.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Brooks, Thanh; Cabral, Gonzalo; Heck, Judy; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Whalley, Lara E.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural patients have limited access to dermatologic care. Farmworkers have high rates of skin disease and limited access to care. Purpose: This exploratory study assessed whether teledermatology consultations could help meet the needs of health care providers for farmworkers in rural clinics. Methods: Dermatologists provided 79…

  17. Collaborative communication between psychologists and primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Philip

    2009-03-01

    Psychologists frequently collaborate in the care of patients managed in primary care. Communication with a patient's primary care team is important to ensure coordination and continuity of care. The communication is far from seamless. Although The Health Information Privacy and Portability Act (HIPPA) is designed to promote sharing of clinical information while protecting patient confidentiality, unique problems arise when mental health records are included. Mental health records are subject to different regulations to protect the patient's confidentiality. Thus, what is communicated and how it will be accomplished are challenges. Further, psychologists and primary care providers often view documentation differently, resulting in different styles of documenting that may also impede coordinated care. Increasingly, health care systems are moving toward electronic medical records, creating greater opportunities for an integrated record. Improved communication through the record can keep other providers abreast of the mental health care being provided as well as suggestions they can use to reinforce the mental health care treatment plan.

  18. [Providing studies quality for pesticides risk evaluation in their use according to proper laboratory practice rules].

    PubMed

    Rakitskiy, V N; Bereznyak, I V

    2016-01-01

    The article covers experience of proper laboratory practice in hygienic studies examining air and workers' skin for assessment of exposure levels of pesticides in natural conditions of agricultural production.

  19. Pesticide Use Site Index

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Use Site Index will help a company (or other applicant) identify which data requirements are needed to register a pesticide product. It provides information on pesticide use sites and pesticide major use patterns.

  20. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  1. Self-reported frequency of nurse-provided spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston; Mamier, Iris; Ricci-Allegra, Patricia; Foith, Joanne

    2017-06-01

    To describe how frequently RNs provide 17 spiritual care therapeutics (or interventions) during a 72-80h timeframe. Plagued by conceptual muddiness as well as weak methods, research quantifying the frequency of spiritual care is not only methodologically limited, but also sparse. Secondary analysis of data from four studies that used the Nurse Spiritual Care Therapeutics Scale (NSCTS). Data from US American RNs who responded to online surveys about spiritual care were analyzed. The four studies included intensive care unit nurses in Ohio (n=93), hospice and palliative care nurses across the US (n=104), nurses employed in a Christian health care system (n=554), and nurses responding to an invitation to participate found on a journal website (n=279). The NSCTS mean of 38 (with a range from 17 to 79 [of 85 possible]) suggested respondents include spiritual care therapeutics infrequently in their nursing care. Particularly concerning is the finding that 17-33% (depending on NSCTS item) never completed a spiritual screening during the timeframe. "Remaining present just to show caring" was the most frequent therapeutic (3.4 on a 5-point scale); those who practiced presence at least 12 times during the timeframe provided other spiritual care therapeutics more frequently than those who offered presence less frequently. Findings affirm previous research that suggests nurses provide spiritual care infrequently. These findings likely provide the strongest evidence yet for the need to improve spiritual care education and support for nurses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Low-dose agrochemicals and lawn-care pesticides induce developmental toxicity in murine preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Anne R; Ellis, Tammy M; Berg, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Occupational exposures to pesticides may increase parental risk of infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as spontaneous abortion, preterm delivery, and congenital anomalies. Less is known about residential use of pesticides and the risks they pose to reproduction and development. In the present study we evaluate environmentally relevant, low-dose exposures to agrochemicals and lawn-care pesticides for their direct effects on mouse preimplantation embryo development, a period corresponding to the first 5-7 days after human conception. Agents tested were those commonly used in the upper midwestern United States, including six herbicides [atrazine, dicamba, metolachlor, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)], pendimethalin, and mecoprop), three insecticides (chlorpyrifos, terbufos, and permethrin), two fungicides (chlorothalonil and mancozeb), a desiccant (diquat), and a fertilizer (ammonium nitrate). Groups of 20-25 embryos were incubated 96 hr in vitro with either individual chemicals or mixtures of chemicals simulating exposures encountered by handling pesticides, inhaling drift, or ingesting contaminated groundwater. Incubating embryos with individual pesticides increased the percentage of apoptosis (cell death) for 11 of 13 chemicals (p care herbicides reduced development to blastocyst and mean cell number per embryo (p pesticide-induced injury can occur very early in development, with a variety of agents, and at concentrations assumed to be without adverse health consequences for humans. PMID:15121514

  3. Child Care Providers' Experiences Caring for Sick Children: Implications for Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heymann, S. Jody; Vo, Phuong Hong; Bergstrom, Cara A.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the experiences of preschool and school-age child care providers regarding sick child care. Found that providers repeatedly described sick children whose health problems made it impossible to provide adequate care for sick and well children in their care. Findings pose international public health policy implications for child care and…

  4. Providing perinatal loss care: satisfying and dissatisfying aspects for midwives.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Jennifer; Jennings, Belinda; Downie, Jill; Butt, Janice; Okanaga, Mayumi

    2007-12-01

    There is limited midwifery research that focuses on midwives experiences and attitudes to providing care for women who experience the death of a baby. There is also limited research investigating care components, and evidence to inform the basis of clinical practice in Australia and internationally. This paper presents the qualitative findings of a small study that aimed to investigate midwives experience, confidence and satisfaction with providing care for women who experienced perinatal loss. Eighty-three Western Australian midwives responded to an open ended question asking them to describe the most and least satisfying aspects of their role when providing care to women who experienced a perinatal loss. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. The analysis revealed that Australian midwives gained most satisfaction from providing skilled midwifery care that they considered made a difference to women. This was enabled when midwives were afforded the opportunity to provide continuity of midwifery carer to women throughout the labour, birth and early postnatal period. In terms of the least satisfying aspects of care, midwives identified that they struggled with the emotional commitment needed to provide perinatal loss care, as well as with how to communicate openly and share information with women. Within the context of the study setting, midwifery care for women following perinatal loss reflects the care components espoused in the literature. There are, however, organisational issues within health care that require commitment to continuity of care and further education of practitioners to enhance outcomes for clients.

  5. Difficult Children and Difficult Parents: Constructions by Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Erica; Ring, Gail

    2007-01-01

    As more mothers of young children work, concerns about child care have gained prominence. Analyses of this topic typically address availability, safety, and costs of care, or the impact of care on children's "outcomes." When providers' input is included, it is generally used as an assessment tool to reinforce the researcher's conceptual framework.…

  6. Asthma Information Handbook for Early Care and Education Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Childcare Health Program, 2004

    2004-01-01

    With proper care, most children with asthma can lead normal, active lives and can enter school with the same abilities as other children. For this purpose, the Asthma Information Packet for Early Care and Education Providers was designed to cover the following topics: (1) Basic information; (2) How to improve early care and education environments…

  7. Oral care provided by certified nursing assistants in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Patricia; Watson, Nancy M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the actual daily oral care provided by certified nursing assistants (CNAs) for dentate elderly nursing home (NH) residents who required assistance with oral care. The study was conducted in five nonrandomly selected NHs in upstate New York using real-time observations of CNAs providing morning care to residents, retrospective chart review, and CNA screening interviews. Oral care standards developed and validated by a panel of 10 experts (dentists, dental hygienists, registered nurses) to be appropriate for dentate NH residents were used to evaluate the oral care provided by 47 primary dayshift CNAs to a convenience sample of 67 residents. CNAs were blinded to the study's specific focus on oral care. Adherence to individual standards was low, ranging from a high of 16% to a low of 0%. Teeth were brushed and mouths rinsed with water in 16% of resident observations. One resident had her tongue brushed. Standards never met were brushing teeth at least 2 minutes, flossing, oral assessment, rinsing with mouthwash, and wearing clean gloves during oral care. Most residents (63%) who received oral care assistance were resistive to CNA approaches. For most observations, oral care supplies were not evident. Actual oral care provided to residents contrasts sharply with CNAs' self-reported practices in the literature and suggests that NH residents who need assistance receive inadequate oral health care.

  8. Focus on Dementia Care: Continuing Education Preferences, Challenges, and Catalysts among Rural Home Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.

    2016-01-01

    Home care staff who provide housekeeping and personal care to individuals with dementia generally have lower levels of dementia care training compared with other health care providers. The study's purposes were to determine whether the professional role of home care staff in a predominantly rural region was associated with preferences for delivery…

  9. Focus on Dementia Care: Continuing Education Preferences, Challenges, and Catalysts among Rural Home Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.

    2016-01-01

    Home care staff who provide housekeeping and personal care to individuals with dementia generally have lower levels of dementia care training compared with other health care providers. The study's purposes were to determine whether the professional role of home care staff in a predominantly rural region was associated with preferences for delivery…

  10. Modeling Market Shares of Competing (e)Care Providers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ooteghem, Jan; Tesch, Tom; Verbrugge, Sofie; Ackaert, Ann; Colle, Didier; Pickavet, Mario; Demeester, Piet

    In order to address the increasing costs of providing care to the growing group of elderly, efficiency gains through eCare solutions seem an obvious solution. Unfortunately not many techno-economic business models to evaluate the return of these investments are available. The construction of a business case for care for the elderly as they move through different levels of dependency and the effect of introducing an eCare service, is the intended application of the model. The simulation model presented in this paper allows for modeling evolution of market shares of competing care providers. Four tiers are defined, based on the dependency level of the elderly, for which the market shares are determined. The model takes into account available capacity of the different care providers, in- and outflow distribution between tiers and churn between providers within tiers.

  11. Factors determining choice of health care provider in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Halasa, Y; Nandakumar, A K

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines factors influencing a patient's choice of provider for outpatient health care services in Jordan. Factors including demographic, socioeconomic, insurance status, quality of care, household size and cost of health care were studied using a multinomial logit model applied to a sample of 1031 outpatients from the Jordan heathcare utilization and expenditure survey, 2000. The patient's socioeconomic and demographic characteristics affected provider choice. Insurance was not statistically significant in choosing Ministry of Health facilities over other providers. Patients utilizing the public sector were price sensitive, and therefore any attempt to improve accessibility to health care services in Jordan should take this into consideration.

  12. Providing adolescent sexual health care in the pediatric emergency department: views of health care providers

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa K.; Mollen, Cynthia J.; O’Malley, Donna; Owens, Rhea L.; Maliszewski, Genevieve A.; Goggin, Kathy; Patricia, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to explore health care providers’ (HCPs) attitudes and beliefs about adolescent sexual health care provision in the emergency department (ED) and to identify barriers to a role of a health educator-based intervention. Methods We conducted focused, semi-structured interviews of HCPs from the ED and Adolescent Clinic of a children’s hospital. The interview guide was based on the Theory of Planned Behavior and its constructs: attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to facilitate care. We used purposive sampling and enrollment continued until themes were saturated. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using directed content analysis. Results Twenty-nine interviews were required for saturation. Participants were 12 physicians, 12 nurses, 3 nurse practitioners and 2 social workers; the majority (83%) were female. Intention to facilitate care was influenced by HCP perception of 1) their professional role, 2) the role of the ED (focused vs. expanded care), and 3) need for patient safety. HCPs identified three practice referents: patients/families, peers and administrators, and professional organizations. HCPs perceived limited behavioral control over care delivery because of time constraints, confidentiality issues, and comfort level. There was overall support for a health educator and many felt the educator could help overcome barriers to care. Conclusion Despite challenges unique to the ED, HCPs were supportive of the intervention and perceived the health educator as a resource to improve adolescent care and services. Future research should evaluate efficacy and costs of a health educator in this setting. PMID:24457494

  13. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-14 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  14. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-12 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  15. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-10 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  16. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-13 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  17. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-11 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  18. Caregivers' Level of Trust in Their Children's Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Huey Jen; Boothroyd, Roger A.

    2006-01-01

    Trust in healthcare providers is associated with clinical outcomes among adult patients. Children with disabilities have complex health needs that place stress on caregivers. Consequently, they are increasingly likely to rely on their children's health care providers to ensure children's health care needs are met. However, no studies have explored…

  19. Mexican American Males Providing Personal Care for Their Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Bronwynne C.; Belyea, Michael J.; Ume, Ebere

    2011-01-01

    We know little about Mexican American (MA) family adaptation to critical events in the informal caregiving experience but, in these days of economic and social turmoil, sons must sometimes step up to provide personal care for their aging mothers. This article compares two empirically real cases of MA males who provided such care, in lieu of a…

  20. Mexican American Males Providing Personal Care for Their Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Bronwynne C.; Belyea, Michael J.; Ume, Ebere

    2011-01-01

    We know little about Mexican American (MA) family adaptation to critical events in the informal caregiving experience but, in these days of economic and social turmoil, sons must sometimes step up to provide personal care for their aging mothers. This article compares two empirically real cases of MA males who provided such care, in lieu of a…

  1. An Investigation of Turnover among Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollin, Gail G.

    In an effort to explain the high turnover rate among family day care (FDC) providers, a study of the effects of perceived social support, job satisfaction, and the establishment of boundaries between a family day care provider's nuclear family and her FDC system was conducted. Analysis of data gathered from a mail survey of over 300 currently and…

  2. Nurse practitioner workforce: a substantial supply of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Lucero, Robert; Rauch, Lindsay; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    For about 5 decades, nurse practitioners (NPs) have been utilized to deliver primary care, traditionally in underserved areas or to vulnerable populations. However, over the years, this workforce has experienced a steady growth and has expanded its reach to provide primary care in diverse settings. An additional 32 million patients will have access to primary care with full implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. It is unlikely that the scarce supply of primary care physicians will be able to properly meet the demand and the health care needs of the nation. NPs face challenges but practice, policy, and research recommendations for better utilizing NPs in primary care can mediate the workforce shortages and meet the demand for care.

  3. Design and maintenance considerations for pesticide and fertilizer containment systems used in lawn care and golf course facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hurto, K.A.

    1994-12-31

    The design of pesticide and fertilizer containment facilities for lawn and golf course operations are similar to those designs used for most pesticide handling operations. In lawn care operations, service vehicles are filled from a centralized facility and the diluted mixtures are transported to residential and commercial sites where mixtures are applied to turfgrass areas. Golf course operations involve fewer vehicles and the volume and frequency of spray operations performed are much lower compared to lawn care operations. Rarely are spray mixtures used in golf course operations transported off-site. A golf course operation will involve spray applications to 100 to 200 acres of plantings. Typically, the amount of spray activity conducted averages 3 to 5 days per month, whereas commercial lawn care companies may be providing applications to 10 to 200 acres daily. Because of the potential risk of cross contamination of spray equipment, operations associated with tree and shrub plantings should be segregated from those associated with herbicide and other materials considered toxic to ornamental plants.

  4. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs.

  5. Midwifery care and patient-provider communication in maternity decisions

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Attanasio, Laura B.; Yang, Tony; Avery, Melissa; Declercq, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize reasons women chose midwives as prenatal care providers and to measure the relationship between midwifery care and patient-provider communication in the U.S. context. Methods Retrospective analysis of data from a nationally-representative survey of women who gave birth in 2011–2012 to a single newborn in a U.S. hospital (n=2400). We used multivariate logistic regression models to characterize women who received prenatal care from a midwife, to describe the reasons for this choice, and to examine the association between midwife-led prenatal care and women’s reports about communication. Results Preference for a female clinician and having a particular clinician assigned was associated with higher odds of midwifery care (AOR=2.65, 95% CI=1.70, 4.14 and AOR=1.63, 95% CI=1.04, 2.58). A woman with midwifery care had lower odds of reporting that she held back questions because her preference for care was different from her provider’s recommendation (AOR=0.46, 95% CI=0.23, 0.89) or because she did not want to be perceived as difficult (AOR=0.48, 95% CI=0.28, 0.81). Women receiving midwifery care also had lower odds of reporting that the provider used medical words were hard for them to understand (AOR=0.58, 95% CI=0.37, 0.91) and not feeling encouraged to discuss all their concerns (AOR=0.54, 95% CI=0.34, 0.89). Conclusions Women whose prenatal care was provided by midwives report better communication compared with those cared for by other types of clinicians. Systems-level interventions, such as assigning a clinician, may improve access to midwifery care and the associated improvements in patient-provider communication in maternity care. PMID:25874874

  6. Providing cultural care behind the spotlight at the Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Morse, Janice M; Clark, Lauren; Haynes, Tracii; Noji, Ariko

    2015-03-01

    The Olympic Games constitutes the world's largest sporting event. Nurses play an important, but poorly discussed, role in emergency care, routine clinical care and preventive care for athletes from many cultures as well as an enormous influx of spectators. In this article, we discuss five important considerations when preparing nurses to provide safe care for Olympians: elite athletes as a cultural group; caring for the Olympic family; disaster preparedness and security; infection control; and principles of transcultural nursing. Because of the nature of the sports and types of injuries and the effects of climate, these challenges differ somewhat between the summer and winter Olympics. Nevertheless, the Olympic games provide a tremendous opportunity to experience transcultural nursing and to highlight how nurses play a significant role in the care of the athletes, the Olympic family, and the spectators. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Provider-to-Provider Communication during Transitions of Care from Outpatient to Acute Care: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pitts, Samantha; Petty, Brent; Sawyer, Melinda D; Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl; Boonyasai, Romsai Tony; Maruthur, Nisa M

    2016-04-01

    Most research on transitions of care has focused on the transition from acute to outpatient care. Little is known about the transition from outpatient to acute care. We conducted a systematic review of the literature on the transition from outpatient to acute care, focusing on provider-to-provider communication and its impact on quality of care. We searched the MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases for English-language articles describing direct communication between outpatient providers and acute care providers around patients presenting to the emergency department or admitted to the hospital. We conducted double, independent review of titles, abstracts, and full text articles. Conflicts were resolved by consensus. Included articles were abstracted using standardized forms. We maintained search results via Refworks (ProQuest, Bethesda, MD). Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of the Downs' and Black's tool. Of 4009 citations, twenty articles evaluated direct provider-to-provider communication around the outpatient to acute care transition. Most studies were cross-sectional (65%), conducted in the US (55%), and studied communication between primary care and inpatient providers (62%). Of three studies reporting on the association between communication and 30-day readmissions, none found a significant association; of these studies, only one reported a measure of association (adjusted OR for communication vs. no communication, 1.08; 95% CI 0.92-1.26). The literature on provider-to-provider communication at the transition from outpatient to acute care is sparse and heterogeneous. Given the known importance of communication for other transitions of care, future studies are needed on provider-to-provider communication during this transition. Studies evaluating ideal methods for communication to reduce medical errors, utilization, and optimize patient satisfaction at this transition are especially needed.

  8. Attitudes regarding the safety of health care provider attire.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Kanishka W; Lipira, Lauren; Neradilek, Moni; Fox, Anna; Ali, Fatima; Pottinger, Paul S

    2014-11-01

    The majority of medical providers, nurses, and patients agree that appearance is important for patient care. However, at our institution, concerns regarding providers' white coats as fomites are expressed primarily by providers and nurses, not by patients. We provide a framework for approaching this important issue through a structured quality-improvement process.

  9. Enhancing women's confidence for physiologic birth: Maternity care providers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Saftner, Melissa A; Neerland, Carrie; Avery, Melissa D

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this research study was to explore MCP's beliefs and attitudes about physiologic birth and to identify components of antenatal care that providers believe may impact a woman's confidence for physiologic labor and birth. This qualitative descriptive study included maternity care providers (N=31) in the Midwestern United States. Providers participated in semi-structured interviews to describe their beliefs about physiologic birth, their role in providing information to women and specific care practices to promote women's confidence for physiologic birth. Six themes emerged including: positive beliefs about physiologic birth, trusted relationship with provider, woman centered care, education and knowledge, barriers to confidence, and antenatal practices to enhance confidence. Variations in beliefs occurred amongst providers with different training (i.e., physicians and midwives). Maternity care providers, including midwives, family physicians and obstetrician-gynecologists, overwhelmingly support a physiologic approach to labor and birth. These providers had a number of suggestions about how antenatal care could be enhanced in an effort to increase women's confidence during the antenatal period. Supporting physiologic birth is imperative for providers who wish to enhance outcomes for mothers and babies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nurse education and willingness to provide spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Fen; Tseng, Hui-Chen; Liao, Yu-Chen

    2016-03-01

    Spiritual care is a critical part of holistic care, and nurses require adequate preparation to address the spiritual needs of patients. However, nurses' willingness to provide such care has rarely been reported. Hence, nurses' education, and knowledge of spiritual care, as well as their willingness to provide it require further study. A convenience sample of 200 nurses participated in the study. Quantitative data were collected using a 21-item Spiritual Care Needs Inventory (content validity index=.87; Cronbach's alpha=.96). The majority of participants were female (96.5%, n=193) between 21 and 59years old (mean=35.1years). Moreover, the majority of participants had a Bachelor's degree (74.0%, n=148) and 1-36years of clinical experience (mean=12.13years). Regarding religious beliefs, 63 (31.5%) had no religious belief, and 93 (46.5%) did not engage in any religious activity. Overall, the nurses were willing to provide spiritual care, although only 25 (12.5%) felt that they had received adequate education. The findings of this study indicate the need for further educational preparation in spiritual care for nurses. Specifically, additional teaching materials are required that are more directly related to spiritual care. Greater emphasis should be placed on different subject areas in school-based education, continuing education, and self-learning education according to the needs of nurses. Since spiritual care education needs policy support, in-depth discussions should take place regarding the approach and cultural environment for providing spiritual care in future nursing courses. Moreover, further studies should investigate barriers in providing spiritual nursing care to patients and whether they are the results of a lack of relevant knowledge or other factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spirituality in nursing: nurses' perceptions about providing spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    Providing spiritual care is an important foundation of nursing and is a requirement mandated by accreditation organizations. Spiritual care is essential in all clinical areas but particularly in home care and hospice. Clinicians may be unable to respond to spiritual needs because of inadequate education or the assumption that spiritual needs should be addressed by clergy, chaplains, or other "spiritual" care providers. In reality, clinicians in the home may be in the best position to offer spiritual support when caring for patients at home at end of life. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine relationships between spirituality and nurses' providing spiritual care. Professional nurses (n = 69) working in 2 large healthcare organizations completed the Perceptions of Spiritual Care Questionnaire. Approximately, 33% of the nurses worked in home care. Significant correlations were found among those nurses whose reported nursing education programs adequately prepared them to meet spiritual needs and taught ways to incorporate spiritual care into practice and those who did not.

  12. Providing quality palliative care in end-stage Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Paul A; Ford, James L; Kim, Kye Y

    2013-08-01

    Providing quality palliative care is a daunting task profoundly impacted by diminished patient capacity at the end of life. Alzheimer disease (AD) is a disorder that erases our memories and is projected to increase dramatically for decades to come. By the time the patients with AD reach the end stage of the disease, the ability of patients to provide pertinent subjective complaints of pain and discomfort would have vanished. Historical perspectives of palliative care, exploration of the AD process, ethical issues, and crucial clinical considerations are provided to improve the understanding of disease progression and quality of care for patients with end-stage AD.

  13. Microbial pesticides

    Treesearch

    Michael L. McManus

    1991-01-01

    Interest in the use of microbial pesticides has intensified because of public concern about the safety of chemical pesticides and their impact in the environment. Characteristics of the five groups of entomopathogens that have potential as microbial pesticides are briefly discussed and an update is provided on research and development activities underway to enhance the...

  14. Predictions of Children's Experiences with Latina Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuniga, Stephen A.; Howes, Carollee

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: Relatively little is known about the pre-academic experiences of Latino/a children in family child care. In this work we tested the extent to which previously established relations among provider characteristics, scaffolding and responsive behaviors, total quality (Family Day Care Rating Scale), and children's engagement in…

  15. Predictions of Children's Experiences with Latina Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuniga, Stephen A.; Howes, Carollee

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: Relatively little is known about the pre-academic experiences of Latino/a children in family child care. In this work we tested the extent to which previously established relations among provider characteristics, scaffolding and responsive behaviors, total quality (Family Day Care Rating Scale), and children's engagement in…

  16. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  17. Using the National Provider Identifier for health care workforce evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bindman, Andrew B

    2013-01-01

    The establishment in recent years of a National Provider Identifier (NPI) offers a new method for counting and categorizing physicians and other health care professionals involved in clinical care. In this paper, I describe how the NPI is assigned, the information collected in association with assigning the NPI, potential ways to enhance information on health professionals through data linkages using the NPI, and how the assessment of the health care workforce could be improved by requiring health care professionals to update their information as a part of maintaining their NPI.

  18. Providers' Perceptions of Challenges in Obstetrical Care for Somali Women

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Jalana N.; Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista E.; Davis, Olga I.; Shipp, Michele P.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Background. This pilot study explored health care providers' perceptions of barriers to providing health care services to Somali refugee women. The specific aim was to obtain information about providers' experiences, training, practices and attitudes surrounding the prenatal care, delivery, and management of women with Female Genital Cutting (FGC). Methods. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 obstetricians/gynecologists and nurse midwives in Columbus, Ohio. Results. While providers did not perceive FGC as a significant barrier in itself, they noted considerable challenges in communicating with their Somali patients and the lack of formal training or protocols guiding the management of circumcised women. Providers expressed frustration with what they perceived as Somali patients' resistance to obstetrical interventions and disappointment with a perception of mistrust from patients and their families. Conclusion. Improving the clinical encounter for both patients and providers entails establishing effective dialogue, enhancing clinical and cultural training of providers, improving health literacy, and developing trust through community engagement. PMID:24223041

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Spina Bifida?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Publications How do health care providers diagnose spina bifida? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Doctors diagnose spina bifida before or after the infant is born. Spina ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Publications How do health care providers diagnose neural tube defects? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Neural tube defects are usually diagnosed before the infant ...

  1. Achieving provider engagement: providers' perceptions of implementing and delivering integrated care.

    PubMed

    Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

    2014-12-01

    The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Training Needs of Family Child Care Providers: Seeking Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBord, Karen; And Others

    Licensed and unlicensed providers of child care in Virginia were asked about their training needs. Responses revealed that providers have little time for themselves and their families, and therefore, innovative training methods must be planned to deliver programs that will fit into their lifestyles. It was also found that new providers needed an…

  3. Providing long term care for sex offenders: liabilities and responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Corson, Tyler Rogers; Nadash, Pamela

    2013-11-01

    The high risk for recidivism among sex offenders who need long term care (LTC) raises serious issues when they are cared for alongside frail, vulnerable adults. LTC providers must balance offenders' right to access care with other residents' right to be free from abuse and must assess and manage the risks associated with admitting offenders. This article identifies sources of legal liability that derive from sex offender management and discusses the need for the LTC community to develop reasonable, balanced guidance on how best to mitigate the risks associated with sex offenders, protect the rights of all residents, and reduce provider liabilities.

  4. Providing neurologic care in criminal systems and state mental hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Clark Alan; Wortzel, Hal

    2015-01-01

    Summary As health care laws and payment structures change in the near future, neurologists may pursue other practice settings in which to provide care as a way to diversify their practice. Here we describe the challenges and opportunities involved with working in correctional and state mental hospital systems compared to a typical private practice: logistical challenges, patient and provider safety, patient characteristics, and cultural differences. Neurologists may take these factors into consideration when choosing whether to add this health care setting to their current practice. PMID:26124981

  5. Adequately Addressing Pediatric Obesity: Challenges Faced by Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Shreve, Marilou; Scott, Allison; Vowell Johnson, Kelly

    2017-07-01

    To assess the challenges primary care providers encounter when providing counseling for pediatric patients identified as obese. A survey assessed the current challenges and barriers to the screening and treatment of pediatric obesity for providers in northwest Arkansas who provide care to families. The survey consisted of 15 Likert scale questions and 4 open-ended questions. Time, resources, comfort, and cultural issues were reported by providers as the biggest barriers in screening and the treatment of pediatric obesity. All providers reported lack of time as a barrier to providing the care needed for obese children. Cultural barriers of both the provider and client were identified as factors, which negatively affect the care and treatment of obese children. Primary care providers continue to experience challenges when addressing pediatric obesity. In this study, a lack of adequate time to address obesity was identified as the most significant current barrier and may likely be tied to physician resources. Although reimbursement for obesity is increasing, the level of reimbursement does not support the time or the resources needed to treat patients. Many providers reported their patients' cultural view of obesity influenced how they counsel their patients. Increasing providers' knowledge concerning differences in how weight is viewed or valued may assist them in the assessment and care of obese pediatric patients. The challenges identified in previous research continue to limit providers when addressing obesity. Although progress has been made regarding knowledge of guidelines, continuing effort is needed to tackle the remaining challenges. This will allow for earlier identification and intervention, resulting in improved outcomes in pediatric obesity.

  6. Strategies for providing cultural competent health care for Hmong Americans.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Torry Grantham

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1980's the United States gave the Hmong preferred refugee status and a large number immigrated to the U.S. The Hmong refugees brought with them their language, social structure and customs, religious beliefs and rituals as well as their health care beliefs and practices. They were uprooted from their community and social supports and now live where the culture, language and socioeconomics are vastly different. Despite having learned a great deal about the Hmong culture over the last three decades, providing culturally competent health care for this unique group continues to be a challenge. The purpose of this paper is to enumerate the barriers to providing health care to Hmong Americans and share strategies to respect Hmong culture when providing quality health care. Emphasis is placed on building relationships based on trust and mutual respect. Cultural exchange is encouraged as well as the need for basic cultural awareness.

  7. Mexican-American Males Providing Personal Care for their Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Bronwynne C.; Belyea, Michael J.; Ume, Ebere

    2011-01-01

    We know little about Mexican-American (MA) family adaptation to critical events in the informal caregiving experience but, in these days of economic and social turmoil, sons must sometimes step up to provide personal care for their aging mothers. This article compares two empirically real cases of MA males who provided such care, in lieu of a female relative. The cases are selected from a federally-funded, descriptive, longitudinal, mixed methods study of 110 MA caregivers and their care recipients. In case-oriented research, investigators can generate propositions (connected sets of statements) that reflect their findings and conclusions, and can be tested against subsequent cases: Caregiving strain and burden in MA males may have more to do with physical and emotional costs than financial ones; MA males providing personal care for their mothers adopt a matter-of-fact approach as they act “against taboo”; and this approach is a new way to fulfill family obligations. PMID:21643486

  8. Effective Factors in Providing Holistic Care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Jasemi, Madineh; Valizadeh, Leila; Keogh, Brian; Taleghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Holistic care is a comprehensive model of caring. Previous studies have shown that most nurses do not apply this method. Examining the effective factors in nurses’ provision of holistic care can help with enhancing it. Studying these factors from the point of view of nurses will generate real and meaningful concepts and can help to extend this method of caring. Materials and Methods: A qualitative study was used to identify effective factors in holistic care provision. Data gathered by interviewing 14 nurses from university hospitals in Iran were analyzed with a conventional qualitative content analysis method and by using MAXQDA (professional software for qualitative and mixed methods data analysis) software. Results: Analysis of data revealed three main themes as effective factors in providing holistic care: The structure of educational system, professional environment, and personality traits. Conclusion: Establishing appropriate educational, management systems, and promoting religiousness and encouragement will induce nurses to provide holistic care and ultimately improve the quality of their caring. PMID:26009677

  9. Adolescent confidentiality: Understanding and practices of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Wadman, Ruth; Thul, Deborah; Elliott, April S; Kennedy, Andrea Pritchard; Mitchell, Ian; Pinzon, Jorge L

    2014-02-01

    Adolescent confidentiality may present practice challenges for health care providers related to family, medical, ethical, legal, social and bureaucratic processes. It is unclear how health care providers understand and practice confidentiality with adolescents in Canada. To investigate the knowledge and practice of health care providers at Alberta Children's Hospital (Calgary, Alberta), and to inform practice about the adolescent's right to confidentiality. The present study was a voluntary, anonymous online survey. Invitations to participate were sent through the paediatric facility's electronic mailing list to all currently employed health care providers who potentially engaged in caregiving interactions with adolescents. The survey consisted of 15 closed items and seven open comment items. Closed items were analyzed using descriptive statistics and open comments were analyzed using manifest thematic coding. A total of 389 responses were received, representing health care providers in many disciplines. A variety of practices related to adolescent confidentiality and widespread misunderstanding of this issue were apparent. Respondents' comments revealed individual and team knowledge gaps regarding adolescent and parent/guardian rights, and the difference between the constructs of consent to treatment and the provision of confidential health care for adolescents. While health care providers regard confidentiality as paramount, the present survey revealed a wide variation in understanding and practices regarding confidential care for adolescents. This was revealed in both the qualitative and quantitative data. The authors' recommended strategies to improve the understanding and practice of adolescent confidentiality include: encouraging individuals' examination of beliefs; postsecondary instruction; knowledge-translation strategies within programs; and institution-directed guidelines and policy.

  10. Adolescent confidentiality: Understanding and practices of health care providers

    PubMed Central

    Wadman, Ruth; Thul, Deborah; Elliott, April S; Kennedy, Andrea Pritchard; Mitchell, Ian; Pinzon, Jorge L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adolescent confidentiality may present practice challenges for health care providers related to family, medical, ethical, legal, social and bureaucratic processes. It is unclear how health care providers understand and practice confidentiality with adolescents in Canada. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the knowledge and practice of health care providers at Alberta Children’s Hospital (Calgary, Alberta), and to inform practice about the adolescent’s right to confidentiality. METHODS: The present study was a voluntary, anonymous online survey. Invitations to participate were sent through the paediatric facility’s electronic mailing list to all currently employed health care providers who potentially engaged in caregiving interactions with adolescents. The survey consisted of 15 closed items and seven open comment items. Closed items were analyzed using descriptive statistics and open comments were analyzed using manifest thematic coding. RESULTS: A total of 389 responses were received, representing health care providers in many disciplines. A variety of practices related to adolescent confidentiality and widespread misunderstanding of this issue were apparent. Respondents’ comments revealed individual and team knowledge gaps regarding adolescent and parent/guardian rights, and the difference between the constructs of consent to treatment and the provision of confidential health care for adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: While health care providers regard confidentiality as paramount, the present survey revealed a wide variation in understanding and practices regarding confidential care for adolescents. This was revealed in both the qualitative and quantitative data. The authors’ recommended strategies to improve the understanding and practice of adolescent confidentiality include: encouraging individuals’ examination of beliefs; postsecondary instruction; knowledge-translation strategies within programs; and institution-directed guidelines and policy. PMID

  11. Primary Care Providers' HIV Prevention Practices Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Tracy; Teaster, Pamela B.; Thornton, Alice; Watkins, John F.; Alexander, Linda; Zanjani, Faika

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore primary care providers' HIV prevention practices for older adults. Primary care providers' perceptions and awareness were explored to understand factors that affect their provision of HIV prevention materials and HIV screening for older adults. Design and Method Data were collected through 24 semistructured interviews with primary care providers (i.e., physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners) who see patients older than 50 years. Results Results reveal facilitators and barriers of HIV prevention for older adults among primary care providers and understanding of providers' HIV prevention practices and behaviors. Individual, patient, institutional, and societal factors influenced HIV prevention practices among participants, for example, provider training and work experience, lack of time, discomfort in discussing HIV/AIDS with older adults, stigma, and ageism were contributing factors. Furthermore, factors specific to primary and secondary HIV prevention were identified, for instance, the presence of sexually transmitted infections influenced providers' secondary prevention practices. Implications HIV disease, while preventable, is increasing among older adults. These findings inform future research and interventions aimed at increasing HIV prevention practices in primary care settings for patients older than 50. PMID:25736425

  12. Human Trafficking: The Role of the Health Care Provider

    PubMed Central

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2011-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major public health problem, both domestically and internationally. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The expert assessment and interview skills of providers contribute to their readiness to identify victims of trafficking. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with knowledge on trafficking and give specific tools that they may use to assist victims in the clinical setting. Definitions, statistics, and common health care problems of trafficking victims are reviewed. The role of the health care provider is outlined through a case study and clinical practice tools are provided. Suggestions for future research are also briefly addressed. PMID:20732668

  13. Human trafficking: the role of the health care provider.

    PubMed

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major public health problem, both domestically and internationally. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The expert assessment and interview skills of providers contribute to their readiness to identify victims of trafficking. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with knowledge on trafficking and give specific tools that they may use to assist victims in the clinical setting. Definitions, statistics, and common health care problems of trafficking victims are reviewed. The role of the health care provider is outlined through a case study and clinical practice tools are provided. Suggestions for future research are also briefly addressed.

  14. Using Medicare data to assess nurse practitioner-provided care.

    PubMed

    DesRoches, Catherine M; Gaudet, Jennifer; Perloff, Jennifer; Donelan, Karen; Iezzoni, Lisa I; Buerhaus, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To mitigate shortages of primary care physicians and ensure access to health care services for a growing number of Medicare beneficiaries, some policy makers have recommended expanding the supply and roles of nurse practitioners (NPs). Little is known about the number of NPs billing Medicare or their practice patterns. This study examines the geographic distribution and county characteristics of NPs billing Medicare, compares the types and quantities of primary care services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by NPs and primary care physicians, and analyzes the characteristics of beneficiaries receiving primary care from each type of clinician. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 2008 Medicare administrative data from 959,848 aged and/or disabled beneficiaries continuously enrolled in fee-for-service Medicare during the study period. Outcome measures included geographic distribution of NPs measured by the rate of NPs per 1,000 Medicare beneficiaries by state, average utilization, and patient characteristics. States with the highest rate of NPs billing were rural. Over 80% of the payments received by both NPs and primary care physicians were for evaluation and management services. Beneficiaries assigned to an NP were more likely to be female, to be dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, and to have qualified for Medicare because of a disability. NPs with assigned beneficiaries were significantly more likely than similar primary care physicians to practice in federally designated primary care shortage areas. Approximately 45,000 NPs were providing services to beneficiaries and billing under their own provider numbers in 2008. Aspects of NP practice patterns were different from primary care physicians, and NPs appeared more likely to provide services to disadvantaged Medicare beneficiaries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Otolaryngology Needs in a Free Clinic Providing Indigent Care.

    PubMed

    Hu, Amanda; Sibert, Thomas; Zhao, Wei; Zarro, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    To determine the otolaryngology needs in a free clinic providing care to medically indigent patients, as perceived by the patients and health care providers. Cross-sectional survey. A survey was administered to patients and health care providers of a free clinic from September 2014 through January 2015 in an urban, inner-city location. One hundred and thirty-seven patients (35.8% male, age 50.8 ± 13.0 years) completed the survey. Mean household income was $29,838 ± $10,425; 32.1% spoke English; 54.7% were employed; 10.2% had health insurance; and 37.2% had seen a primary care provider outside of the free clinic. The top three otolaryngology symptoms among patients were sleep apnea/snoring (39.4%), heartburn/reflux (30.7%), and dizziness (29.9%). Eleven health care providers (45% male, age 50.5 ± 15.3 years, 63.6% physician, 36% nurse) completed the survey. Providers perceived the following otolaryngology complaints as the most prevalent, in descending order: cough, nasal congestion, reflux/heartburn, sore throat, and ear infection/otalgia. Providers felt that sleep apnea and hearing loss were the less common otolaryngology complaints, whereas surveyed patients indicated these symptoms with high frequency. The most requested diagnostic tool among patients and providers was chest X-rays. There are unmet otolaryngology needs in a free clinic. Medically indigent patients have significant barriers to accessing health care. Patient and provider perceptions of top otolaryngology complaints differed, but both identified access to chest X-rays as a major unmet need. Knowledge of patient perceptions may help providers elicit the breadth of otolaryngology complaints. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1321-1326, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Developing a web 2.0 diabetes care support system with evaluation from care provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Hsiu; Chen, Rong-Rong; Guo, Sophie Huey-Ming; Chang, Hui-Yu; Chang, Her-Kun

    2012-08-01

    Diabetes is a life-long illness condition that many diabetic patients end up with related complications resulted largely from lacking of proper supports. The success of diabetes care relies mainly on patient's daily self-care activities and care providers' continuous support. However, the self-care activities are socially bounded with patient's everyday schedules that can easily be forgotten or neglected and the care support from providers has yet been fully implemented. This study develops a Web 2.0 diabetes care support system for patients to integrate required self-care activities with different context in order to enhance patient's care knowledge and behavior adherence. The system also supports care managers in a health service center to conduct patient management through collecting patient's daily physiological information, sharing care information, and maintaining patient-provider relationships. After the development, we evaluate the acceptance of the system through a group of nursing staffs.

  17. Providing home care services in a for-profit environment.

    PubMed

    Shamansky, S L

    1988-06-01

    It is no surprise that politics and ideology will determine the future of home health and long-term care. Those same forces will also dictate whether home care services will become more or less dependent upon federal support. At the moment the prospects are not promising. Over the last several years our national reimbursement policies have pointed toward more and more stringent use of Medicare home health care benefits, despite the assumptions (and the data) that prospective payment systems might legitimately increase their use. The implementation of tight cost limits, consolidation to ten regional fiscal intermediaries, and increased claim denials have signaled home care agencies that cost containment is the aim of the present conservative administration. Private insurance companies, however, have begun to examine the prospects for long-term care and home care policies. Presently, most home care benefits are available through employment-based policies, which, of course, are nearly useless to the elderly, the major users of home care services. But what if businesses provided more comprehensive health care policies so that their employees could have better protection in the case of long-term illnesses? What if the giant corporation such as IBM, Xerox, General Electric, General Motors, and so forth, established programs to underwrite the cost of long-term care? What if private insurance companies attempted to spread the risks among thousands of policy holders so that long-term care insurance premiums were affordable to most older Americans? Rather than new sources of funding, it is more reasonable to expect that the financing of home care services will be reshaped by innovative reimbursement strategies. The future will probably bring prospective, resource-sensitive, or capitated schemes. There are no easy remedies. We must secure the participation of all sectors of our country--both public and private--in a cooperative endeavor. And at the same time we are struggling

  18. Directly observed daily mouth care provided to care home residents in one area of Kent, UK.

    PubMed

    Zander, A; Boniface, D

    2017-03-01

    To gather accurate data on the daily mouth care provided in care homes including tooth brushing, oral health assessment, and recording of care provided. Direct observation and notes review. Both nursing and 'regular' care homes. 365 Residents living in 16 care homes and their carers underwent observation, notes review or data collection in some form. Provision of mouth morning care. Of 161 residents observed, most (93, 58%) did not have their teeth/dentures brushed. If performed, brushing was often carried out by the resident themselves (36 cases, 53%), rather than by a carer (32 cases, 44%). Carers used a toothbrush to clean inside a resident's mouth in just 7 cases (4.3% of all personal care routines observed). Smaller care homes were no more likely to brush residents teeth than larger care homes, and nursing homes were no more likely to brush teeth than other care homes. Of the 309 sets of notes available for review, 41 (13%) contained a dedicated oral health needs assessment, and 109 (35%) contained a daily oral care chart in some form. Mouth care was often recorded inaccurately (15% of cases). This is the first observational study in the UK to assess oral care actually provided to residents by carers in care homes. The findings reveal a substantially different picture of daily mouth care than was previously understood and suggest that many of the nation's care home residents may not be receiving adequate, or any, oral health care.

  19. Grassroots Organizing: A Handbook for Child Care Teachers and Family Child Care Providers. Revised Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Child Care Workforce, Washington, DC.

    The Center for the Child Care Workforce (formerly the Child Care Employee Project), has provided leadership for a nationwide grassroots effort called the Worthy Wage Campaign, an activist initiative to increase public awareness and to press for a public investment of child care funds directly targeted to improving child care jobs. This handbook…

  20. Recruitment of rural health care providers: a regional recruiter strategy.

    PubMed

    Felix, Holly; Shepherd, Joy; Stewart, M Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Access to care in rural areas is a major problem. Despite more than 20% of the US population residing in these areas, only 9% of physicians practice there. Extensive research has documented multiple issues that affect where physicians decide to locate and maintain practices. Creative strategies have been used to influence these recruitment and retention decisions. An emerging strategy, borne out of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Southern Rural Access Program (SRAP), effectively uses a targeted regional approach to assist rural communities and health care facilities in assessing health care needs and recruiting primary care providers. This article examines the issues surrounding recruitment and retention of primary care providers to rural areas and describes the experiences of the regional recruitment strategy in several states and in particular in the Mississippi Delta region of Arkansas. A case study approach is used to examine the targeted regional recruiter strategy in the Mississippi Delta region of Arkansas. The regional recruiter strategy, which combines traditional recruitment efforts with community development activities, has been successful in recruiting health care providers to rural communities. The cost-effective strategy can be easily replicated in other rural states. Community factors affect provider decisions on practice locations. Addressing community factors in recruitment efforts through community development activities may increase their success.

  1. Chinese primary care providers and motivating factors on performance.

    PubMed

    Hung, Li-Mei; Shi, Leiyu; Wang, Haipeng; Nie, Xiaoyu; Meng, Qingyue

    2013-10-01

    China launched its new health care reform in 2009. One of its goals is to improve primary care system and strengthen primary care workforce. Although it has been studied internationally, motivating factors for primary care workforce have not been examined in China. To provide an overview of major performance motivating factors for primary care providers (PCPs) in China and examine associations between these factors and individual and practice setting characteristics. Data for the study were from the 2011 China Primary Care Workforce Survey that provides the most current assessment of community-based PCPs. Outcome measures were scores indicating performance improvement due to 11 factors. Covariates representing personal and practice characteristics included age, gender, education, location, types of providers and specialties. Outcomes were compared by PCP category and urban/rural setting. Associations were assessed using logistic regressions. The most important motivating factors for PCPs to improve performance were professional development, training opportunities, living environment, benefits, working conditions and income. There were greater needs for improvement in rural than urban settings, especially in living environment. Types of PCPs were associated with needs for improvement in different factors. There were more needs from nurses and village doctors. A new and comprehensive incentive mechanism could be designed and implemented in China, which (i) focuses on more professional development opportunities, enhanced training programs and better compensation and benefits and (ii) targets PCPs practicing in different settings.

  2. Western voodoo: providing mental health care to Haitian refugees.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, M B

    1989-12-01

    This article described certain aspects of Haitian life, voodoo and its role in Haitian society, the quality and quantity of psychiatric and mental health care for Haitians in Haiti, and suggestions for providing appropriate mental health care to Haitian refugees in the United States. Conway and Buchanan (1985) described what has helped Haitian refugees adapt in the transition to life in the United States: the strengths from their cultural heritage, such as fortitude; perseverance in the most arduous circumstances; deep religious faith; high self-respect; reliance on the extended family; and the tradition of sharing. Building on these assets may assist Western mental health-care providers in offering culturally sensitive mental health care to Haitians.

  3. Care coordination and provider stress in primary care management of high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Okunogbe, Adeyemi; Meredith, Lisa S; Chang, Evelyn T; Simon, Alissa; Stockdale, Susan E; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2017-10-02

    Care coordination is a critical component of managing high-risk patients, who tend to have complex and multiple medical and psychosocial problems and are typically at high risk for increased hospitalization and incur high health care expenditures. Primary care models such as the patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) are designed to improve care coordination and reduce care fragmentation. However, little is known about how the burden of care coordination for high-risk patients influences PCMH team members' stress. To evaluate the relationship between provider stress and care coordination time in high-risk patient care and whether availability of help is associated with reduced stress. Multivariable regression analysis of a cross-sectional survey of PCMH primary care providers (PCPs) and nurses. A total of 164 PCPs and 272 nurses in primary care practices at five geographically diverse Veteran Health Administration (VA) medical center health systems. The main outcome variable was provider stress due to high-risk patient care. Independent variables were the reported proportion of high-risk patients in PCP/nurse patient panels, time spent coordinating care for these patients, and provider satisfaction with help received in caring for them. The response rate was 44%. Spending more than 8 h per week coordinating care was significantly associated with a 0.21-point increase in reported provider stress compared to spending 8 h or less per week (95% CI: 0.04-0.39; p = 0.015). The magnitude of the association between stress and care coordination time was diminished when provider satisfaction with help received was included in the model. Perceived provider stress from care of high-risk patients may arise from challenges related to coordinating their care. Our findings suggest that the perception of receiving help for high-risk patient care may be valuable in reducing provider stress.

  4. Camp selection and the role of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Christopher A

    2007-10-01

    The selection of a summer camp that best matches a child's interests, abilities, and developmental level is essential. This article provides information to assist families in their consideration of camp type, location, length of stay, gender composition, and structure. It also outlines the way that health care providers can assist families in selecting the most appropriate camp for their child.

  5. Tips and Tidbits: A Book for Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    This book provides practical information and advice designed to help family day care providers solve problems they confront in their daily work with children. The book is organized into 7 sections. Part I, "Effective Ways to Change Unacceptable Behavior," offers recommendations about discipline, alternatives to punishment, modeling, and…

  6. The role of primary care providers in managing falls.

    PubMed

    Demons, Jamehl L; Duncan, Pamela W

    2014-01-01

    Falls threaten the ability of older adults to live independently in the community. Fortunately, national and state organizations have created tools that allow primary care providers to easily assess fall risk, and small changes in practice patterns can provide patients with the resources necessary to prevent falls, thus helping to reverse a costly, deadly epidemic.

  7. Sex differences in health care provider communication during genital herpes care and patients' health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ports, Katie A; Reddy, Diane M; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L

    2013-01-01

    Research in primary care medicine demonstrates that health care providers' communication varies depending on their sex, and that these sex differences in communication can influence patients' health outcomes. The present study aimed to examine the extent to which sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to the sensitive context of gynecological care for genital herpes and whether these potential sex differences in communication influence patients' herpes transmission prevention behaviors and herpes-related quality of life. Women (N = 123) from the United States recently diagnosed with genital herpes anonymously completed established measures in which they rated (a) their health care providers' communication, (b) their herpes transmission prevention behaviors, and (c) their herpes-related quality of life. The authors found significant sex differences in health care providers' communication; this finding supports that sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to gynecological care for herpes. Specifically, patients with female health care providers indicated that their providers engaged in more patient-centered communication and were more satisfied with their providers' communication. However, health care providers' sex did not predict women's quality of life, a finding that suggests that health care providers' sex alone is of little importance in patients' health outcomes. Patient-centered communication was significantly associated with greater quality-of-life scores and may provide a promising avenue for intervention.

  8. Educating primary care providers about HIV disease: multidisciplinary interactive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Macher, A; Goosby, E; Barker, L; Volberding, P; Goldschmidt, R; Balano, K B; Williams, A; Hoenig, L; Gould, B; Daniels, E

    1994-01-01

    As HIV-related prophylactic and therapeutic research findings continue to evolve, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the Public Health Service has created multidisciplinary mechanisms to disseminate new treatment options and educate primary care providers at rural and urban sites throughout our nation's health care system. HRSA has implemented (a) the International State-of-the-Art HIV Clinical Conference Call Series, (b) the national network of AIDS Education and Training Centers, (c) the nationwide HIV Telephone Consultation Service, and (d) the Clinical Issues Subcommittee of the HRSA AIDS Advisory Committee. These collaborative and comprehensive efforts at HIV information dissemination target physicians, nurses, physician assistants, dentists, clinical pharmacists, mental health care providers, case managers, and allied health professionals. The sites where they provide care include public health clinics; county, State and Federal correctional facilities; private practice offices; community and academic hospitals; military and Veterans Administration facilities; hemophilia centers; schools of medicine, nursing, and dentistry; departments of health; chronic care facilities; visiting nurse and home care agencies; health maintenance organizations; and Indian Health Service clinics and hospitals.

  9. Male nurses' experiences of providing intimate care for women clients.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Madoka; Chapman, Rose; Wynaden, Dianne

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports a study of male nurses' experiences of providing intimate care for women clients. The number of men entering the nursing profession has increased worldwide. As a consequence of the move to a more gender-balanced profession, debate has ensued over how intimate care should be performed when this requires male nurses to be physically close to women clients. As there was little previous work on this topic, we wished to provide nurses, clients and other healthcare professionals with a better understanding of male nurses' experiences of working with women clients and within a healthcare system where they often feel excluded. Semi-structured, open-ended interviews were conducted with male nurses working in various clinical settings in Western Australia. Latent content analysis was used to analyse the interviews, which were carried out between June and July 2004. Three themes were identified: the definition of intimate care, the emotional experience associated with providing intimate care and strategies used to assist in the delivery of intimate care for women clients. Providing intimate care for women clients was a challenging experience for male nurses. Participants described how it required them to invade these clients' personal space. Consequently, they often experienced various negative feelings and used several strategies to assist them during care delivery. Nurse educators should assist male nurses to be better prepared to interact with women clients in various settings. Furthermore, workplace environments need to provide additional support and guidance for male nurses to enable them to develop effective coping strategies to manage challenging situations.

  10. Providing whole-person care: integrating behavioral health into primary care.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jan Sweet

    2015-01-01

    Integrated primary care in a patient-centered medical home is the best way to invite patients to engage in better self-care, to move from provider-based care to team-based care, and to address whole-person needs. However, primary care-whether rural or urban, public or private-cannot become the default mental health system for North Carolinians with severe mental illness.

  11. Teledermatology Consultations Provide Specialty Care for Farmworkers in Rural Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Feldman, Steven R.; Fleischer, Alan B.; Brooks, Thanh; Cabral, Gonzalo; Heck, Judy; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Whalley, Lara E.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural patients have limited access to dermatologic care. Farmworkers have high rates of skin disease and limited access to care. Purpose: This exploratory study assessed whether teledermatology consultations could help meet the needs of healthcare providers for farmworkers in rural clinics. Methods: Dermatologists provided 79 consultations, using store-and-forward teledermatology, to farmworkers who presented with a skin disease to rural North Carolina clinics. Clinic providers rated the value of the consultation. Findings: Most requests for consultations (94%) came from family nurse practitioners or physician assistants. 12% of consultations were rated somewhat helpful, and the remainder helpful or very helpful. After receiving the consultation, providers changed the diagnosis in 13% of cases. The consultation led providers to contact or attempt to contact 21% of patients to change treatment recommendations. Conclusions: Access to expert dermatologic services is needed by rural healthcare providers. Teledermatology consultations may be a helpful tool to meet this need. PMID:19785587

  12. Achieving health care cost containment through provider payment reform that engages patients and providers.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Paul B

    2013-05-01

    The best opportunity to pursue cost containment in the next five to ten years is through reforming provider payment to gradually diminish the role of fee-for-service reimbursement. Public and private payers have launched many promising payment reform pilots aimed at blending fee-for-service with payment approaches based on broader units of care, such as an episode or patients' total needs over a period of time, a crucial first step. But meaningful cost containment from payment reform will not be achieved until Medicare and Medicaid establish stronger incentives for providers to contract in this way, with discouragement of nonparticipation increasing over time. In addition, the models need to evolve to engage beneficiaries, perhaps through incentives for patients to enroll in an accountable care organization and to seek care within that organization's network of providers.

  13. Caring for Patients with Service Dogs: Information for Healthcare Providers

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Michelle

    2016-11-29

    People with disabilities use various assistance devices to improve their capacity to lead independent and fulfilling lives. Service dogs can be crucial lifesaving companions for their owners. As the use of service dogs increases, nurses are more likely to encounter them in healthcare settings. Service dogs are often confused with therapy or emotional support dogs. While some of their roles overlap, service dogs have distinct protection under the American Disabilities Act (ADA). Knowing the laws and proper procedures regarding service dogs strengthens the abilities of healthcare providers to deliver holistic, patient-centered care. This article provides background information about use of dogs, and discusses benefits to patients and access challenges for providers. The author reviews ADA laws applicable to service dog use and potential challenges and risks in acute care settings. The role of the healthcare professional is illustrated with an exemplar, along with recommendations for future research and nursing implications related to care of patients with service dogs.

  14. Rural health care providers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hart, L Gary; Salsberg, Edward; Phillips, Debra M; Lishner, Denise M

    2002-01-01

    One of the most recalcitrant problems of the rural health landscape is the uneven distribution and relative shortage of medical care providers. Despite considerable efforts by federal and state governments over the past three decades to address these problems, rural provider distribution and shortage issues have persisted. The purpose of this article is to identify the challenges for rural health research and policy regarding health provider supply in the first decade of the 21st century. While the emphasis in this article is on physicians, workforce concerns pertaining to nurses, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants are briefly described. Physician supply, geographic and specialty distribution, age, gender, quality of care, recruitment and retention, training, productivity and income, reimbursement and managed care, federal and state ameliorative programs, safety net, and telehealth are discussed. Also highlighted are issues concerning rural health care workforce research, methods, and data as well as a series of policy-relevant questions. Solutions to rural health personnel problems can only be successfully addressed through multifaceted approaches. No vision of the future of rural health can come to fruition if it does not promote stable, rewarding, and fulfilling professional and personal lives for rural health care providers.

  15. The impact of spiritual care education upon preparing undergraduate nursing students to provide spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Katherine L; Chang, Esther; Sheehan, Athena; Johnson, Amanda

    2013-09-01

    Spiritual care is an important component of holistic care. In Australia competency statements relating to nursing practice emphasise the need to provide care that addresses the spiritual as well as other aspects of being. However, many nurses feel they are poorly prepared to provide spiritual care. This is attributed largely to lack a of spiritual care education provided in undergraduate nursing programmes. A few higher education providers have responded to this lack of spiritual care education by incorporating specific content related to this area into their undergraduate nursing programme. Minimal international studies have investigated the impact of spiritual care education on undergraduate nursing students and no Australian studies were identified. This review explores spiritual care education in undergraduate nursing programmes and identifies the need for an Australian study. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Private Companies Providing Health Care Price Data: Who Are They and What Information do They Provide?

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kathryn A.; Labno, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is interest in making health care price information more transparent given the increase in enrollment in high-deductible and consumer-directed health plans, and as policy efforts intensify to engage consumers to obtain high value care. We examine the role of private companies that market price transparency tools, primarily to self-insured employers – an important yet understudied topic. What companies exist? How did they emerge? What information do they provide? Where do they get that information? How does the price and quality information provided compare across companies? PMID:25678764

  17. Providing care to transgender persons: a clinical approach to primary care, hormones, and HIV management.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Transgender (TG) persons have had historically difficult interactions with health care providers, leading to limited care and risks for a broad spectrum of health problems. This is of particular concern for TG persons with or at risk for HIV infection. This article discusses care providers' roles in establishing TG-friendly clinical care sites; conducting appropriate and thorough physical examinations for TG patients; managing hormones, especially in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy; and engaging TG persons in education about prevention and treatment of HIV.

  18. Attitudes of health care providers and students towards tattooed people.

    PubMed

    Stuppy, D J; Armstrong, M L; Casals-Ariet, C

    1998-06-01

    Attitudes of health care providers and medical and nursing students (n = 513) towards tattooed adults and adolescents were examined. No respondent group had mean scores reflecting a positive attitude towards tattooed persons. Overall, physicians (MDs) and registered nurses (RNs) rated tattooed people less positively than did students. Womens' attitudes were consistently less favourable than those of men, especially towards tattooed professional women. Attitudes towards tattooed adolescents were generally less positive than attitudes towards the adult groups. Research has found that negative attitudes impact patient care. This study suggests that tattooed persons, especially adolescents, may be at risk of being negatively perceived when they seek health care. Increased efforts are needed to assure that those with tattoos receive non-judgemental and sensitive care.

  19. Transforming health care service delivery and provider selection.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2011-06-01

    Commoditization pressures in medicine have risked transforming service provider selection from "survival of the fittest" to "survival of the cheapest." Quality- and safety-oriented mandates by the Institute of Medicine have led to the creation of a number of data-driven quality-centric initiatives including Pay for Performance and Evidence-Based Medicine. A synergistic approach to creating quantitative accountability in medical service delivery is through the creation of consumer-oriented performance metrics which provide patients with objective data related to individual service provider quality, safety, cost-efficacy, efficiency, and customer service. These performance metrics could in turn be customized to the individual preferences and health care needs of each individual patient, thereby providing an objective methodology for service provider selection while empowering health care consumers.

  20. Facilitating Survivorship Program Development for Health Care Providers and Administrators

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Uman, Gwen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This manuscript will describe institutional changes observed through goal analysis that occurred following a multidisciplinary education project, aimed at preparing healthcare professionals to meet the needs of the growing numbers of cancer survivors. Method Post course evaluations consisted of quantitative questionnaires and follow up on three goals created by each participating team, during the 3-day educational program. Evaluations were performed 6, 12 and 18 months-post course for percent of goal achievement. Goals were, a priori coded based on the Institute of Medicine’s survivorship care components, along with 2 additional codes related to program development and education. Results Two hundred and four teams participated over the 4 yearly courses. A total of 51.6% of goals were related to program development, 21% to survivorship care interventions, 20.9% on educational goals, and only 4.7% related to coordination of care, 1.4% on surveillance, and 0.4% related to prevention-focused goals. Quantitative measures post course showed significant changes in comfort and effectiveness in survivorship care in the participating institutions. Conclusion During the period 2006–2009, healthcare institutions focused on developing survivorship care programs and educating staff, in an effort to prepare colleagues to provide and coordinate survivorship care, in cancer settings across the country. Implications Goal-directed education provided insight into survivorship activities occurring across the nation. Researchers were able to identify survivorship care programs and activities, as well as the barriers to developing these programs. This presented opportunities to discuss possible interventions to improve follow-up care and survivors’ quality of life. PMID:25216608

  1. Integrated networks and health care provider cooperatives: new models for rural health care delivery and financing.

    PubMed

    Casey, M M

    1997-01-01

    Minnesota's 1994 health care reform legislation authorized the establishment of community integrated service networks (CISNs) and health care provider cooperatives, which were envisioned as new health care delivery models that could be successfully implemented in rural areas of the state. Four CISNs are licensed, and three organizations are incorporated as health care provider cooperatives. Many of the policy issues Minnesota has faced regarding the development of CISNs and health care provider cooperatives in rural areas are similar to those raised by current Medicare reform proposals.

  2. Growing Healthy Bodies: Nutrition Education for Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viebrock, Margaret A.; Berry, Holly

    This booklet discusses the important role that day care providers can play in ensuring that children eat healthy snacks and meals and learn good eating habits. Section one of the booklet examines snack foods, discusses the difference between nutritious and less-nutritious snacks, and recommends snack foods appropriate for different age groups.…

  3. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure was the…

  4. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  5. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure was the…

  6. Primary Care Providers' Views regarding Assessing and Treating Suicidal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Ryan D.; Rudd, M. David; Bryan, Craig J.

    2011-01-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) usually do not explore patient suicidality during routine visits. Factors that predict PCP attitudes toward the assessment and treatment of suicidality were examined via an online survey of 195 practicing PCPs affiliated with medical schools in the United States. PCPs who perceived themselves as competent to work with…

  7. Theory in Practice: Helping Providers Address Depression in Diabetes Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kozak, Cindy; Wagner, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A continuing education (CE) program based on the theory of planned behavior was designed to understand and improve health care providers' practice patterns in screening, assessing, and treating and/or referring patients with diabetes for depression treatment. Methods: Participants completed assessments of attitudes, confidence,…

  8. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section 162.410 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health...

  9. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section 162.410 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health...

  10. Family Day Care: How to Provide it in Your Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Betsy

    Tips, recommendations, ideas, and background information are offered to providers of family day care. After a brief discussion of licensing and registration and a listing of learning activities for young children at home, additional learning activities and materials are described that are considered appropriate for infants, toddlers, preschool…

  11. Increasing Access to Health Care Providers with Nurse Practitioner Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Del Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Emergency department visits increased from 102.8 million to 136.1 million in 2009, resulting in crowding and increased wait times, affecting U.S. hospitals' ability to provide safe, timely patient care resulting in dangerous delays and serious health problems shown by research. The purpose of this project was to determine if competencies developed…

  12. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section 162.410 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Standard Unique Health Identifier...

  13. Contract leveraging: a strategy for provider groups in managed care.

    PubMed

    Mayer, G G; Kuklierus, A

    1998-09-01

    Using one's leverage in health care negotiation does not mean intimidating, threatening, or even demanding a certain percentage of the premium. Leveraging is not a game of who wins and who loses; rather, it is a negotiation technique. The authors explain how to best use the abilities and proficiencies of a provider group to negotiate contracts with MCOs.

  14. Increasing Access to Health Care Providers with Nurse Practitioner Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Del Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Emergency department visits increased from 102.8 million to 136.1 million in 2009, resulting in crowding and increased wait times, affecting U.S. hospitals' ability to provide safe, timely patient care resulting in dangerous delays and serious health problems shown by research. The purpose of this project was to determine if competencies developed…

  15. Promoting Mental Health: A Parent/Child Care Provider Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sale, June Solnit

    This document provides descriptions of simple intervention techniques that day care center staff can use to help working parents and support young children's mental health. Discussion begins with the proposition that when children let adults know through their behavior that they are troubled, the children deserve a joint effort of parents and…

  16. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  17. Theory in Practice: Helping Providers Address Depression in Diabetes Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kozak, Cindy; Wagner, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A continuing education (CE) program based on the theory of planned behavior was designed to understand and improve health care providers' practice patterns in screening, assessing, and treating and/or referring patients with diabetes for depression treatment. Methods: Participants completed assessments of attitudes, confidence,…

  18. A decision model for community nurses providing bereavement care.

    PubMed

    Brownhill, Suzanne; Chang, Esther; Bidewell, John; Johnson, Amanda

    2013-03-01

    Community (district) nurses play a significant role in assisting and supporting bereaved informal carers (family members and friends) of recently decease clients of palliative care. Bereavement care demands a wide range of competencies including clinical decision-making. To date, little has been known about the decision-making role of community nurses in Australia. The aim of this study was to conduct in-depth examination of an existing data set generated from semi-structured interviews of 10 community nurses providing follow-up bereavement care home visits within an area health service of a metropolitan region of Sydney, Australia. A grounded theory approach to data analysis generated a model, which highlights an interaction between 'the relationship','the circumstances' (surrounding the bereavement),'the psychosocial variant', 'the mix of nurses', 'the workload', and 'the support' available for the bereaved and for community nurses, and elements of 'the visit' (central to bereavement care). The role of community nurses in bereavement care is complex, particularly where decision-making is discretionary and contingent on multiple variables that effect the course of the family's grief. The decision model has the potential to inform community nurses in their support of informal carers, to promote reflective practice and professional accountability, ensuring continuing competence in bereavement care.

  19. [Users satisfaction with dental care services provided at IMSS].

    PubMed

    Landa-Mora, Flora Evelia; Francisco-Méndez, Gustavo; Muñoz-Rodríguez, Mario

    2007-01-01

    To determine users' satisfaction with dental care services provided at Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Veracruz. An epidemiological survey was conducted in 14 family medicine clinics located in the northern part of the state of Veracruz. The clinics were selected by stratified-random sampling. All users older than 20 years seeking medical or dental care services were interviewed; previously, their informed consent was obtained. We used the 6-items United Kingdom dental care satisfaction questionnaire (Spanish version) where question number four evaluates user satisfaction. From October to December 2005, 3601 users were interviewed. We excluded 279 questionnaires because the age of the interviewees was <20 years. The final analysis included 3322 interviews (92%); 73% were female with an average age of 45 +/- 16 years old. 82% were satisfied with dental care services and 91% never felt like making a complaint. Waiting time of less than 30 minutes and last visit to the dentist in the last year were the only variables related to satisfaction (p = 0.0001). There is a high level of satisfaction regarding dental care services among Mexican Institute of Social Security users. However, it would be possible to increase the level of satisfaction if the waiting time is reduced and the number of dental care users attending twice a year increases.

  20. Women's and care providers' perspectives of quality prenatal care: a qualitative descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Much attention has been given to the adequacy of prenatal care use in promoting healthy outcomes for women and their infants. Adequacy of use takes into account the timing of initiation of prenatal care and the number of visits. However, there is emerging evidence that the quality of prenatal care may be more important than adequacy of use. The purpose of our study was to explore women's and care providers' perspectives of quality prenatal care to inform the development of items for a new instrument, the Quality of Prenatal Care Questionnaire. We report on the derivation of themes resulting from this first step of questionnaire development. Methods A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 pregnant women and 40 prenatal care providers recruited from five urban centres across Canada. Data were analyzed using inductive open and then pattern coding. The final step of analysis used a deductive approach to assign the emergent themes to broader categories reflective of the study's conceptual framework. Results The three main categories informed by Donabedian's model of quality health care were structure of care, clinical care processes, and interpersonal care processes. Structure of care themes included access, physical setting, and staff and care provider characteristics. Themes under clinical care processes were health promotion and illness prevention, screening and assessment, information sharing, continuity of care, non-medicalization of pregnancy, and women-centredness. Interpersonal care processes themes were respectful attitude, emotional support, approachable interaction style, and taking time. A recurrent theme woven throughout the data reflected the importance of a meaningful relationship between a woman and her prenatal care provider that was characterized by trust. Conclusions While certain aspects of structure of care were identified as being key dimensions of quality prenatal care, clinical and

  1. Breastfeeding peer counselors as direct lactation care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Meier, Paula P; Engstrom, Janet L; Rossman, Beverly

    2013-08-01

    In 2005, the Level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Rush University Medical Center initiated a demonstration project employing breastfeeding peer counselors, former parents of NICU infants, as direct lactation care providers who worked collaboratively with the NICU nurses. This article describes the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of this program and provides templates for other NICUs that wish to incorporate breastfeeding peer counselors with the goal of providing quality, evidence-based lactation care.

  2. The Journey from Babysitter to Child Care Professional: Military Family Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Dianne Miller

    2002-01-01

    Describes the transformation of women from babysitters to child care professionals as a result of becoming a family child care provider in the U.S. military Family Child Care (FCC) program. Discusses application process, orientation training, the use of peer mentors, initial setup, inspections, enrollment, caregiver training, and accreditation.…

  3. Health in Day Care: A Guide for Day Care Providers in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro, Ed.; Messenger, Katherine P., Ed.

    This reference manual and resource guide describes high standards for health policies and day care procedures that reflect current research and recommendations of experts. Chapters 1 and 2, which concern day care's role in health, cover health education in day care and the basics relating to policies, providers, and records. Chapters 3-5 concern…

  4. Trends in diabetes treatment patterns among primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Decker, Sandra L; Burt, Catharine W; Sisk, Jane E

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, logit models tested for trends in the probability that visits by adult diabetes patients to their primary care providers included recommended treatment measures, such as a prescription for an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or an angiotensin-II receptor blocker (ARB), blood pressure measurement, and diet/nutrition or exercise counseling. Results indicated that the probability that visits included prescription of an ACE or ARB and blood pressure measurement increased significantly over the 1997-2005 period, while the probability that visits documented provision of exercise counseling rose since 2001.

  5. Gatekeepers as Care Providers: The Care Work of Patient-centered Medical Home Clerical Staff.

    PubMed

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Ono, Sarah S; Stewart, Kenda R; Lampman, Michelle A; Rosenthal, Gary E; Stewart, Greg L

    2017-03-01

    International implementation of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model for delivering primary care has dramatically increased in the last decade. A majority of research on PCMH's impact has emphasized the care provided by clinically trained staff. In this article, we report our ethnographic analysis of data collected from Department of Veterans Affairs staff implementing PACT, the VA version of PCMH. Teams were trained to use within-team delegation, largely accomplished through attention to clinical licensure, to differentiate staff in providing efficient, patient-centered care. In doing so, PACT may reinforce a clinically defined culture of care that countermands PCMH ideals. Such competing rubrics for care are brought into relief through a focus on the care work performed by clerks. Ethnographic analysis identifies clerks' care as a kind of emotional dirty work, signaling important areas for future anthropological study of the relationships among patient-centered care, stigma, and clinical authority. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  6. The competencies required by professional hospice palliative care spiritual care providers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Dan; Aherne, Michael; Pereira, José

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association (2002) identifies spiritual care of the dying and their families as a core service for Hospice Palliative Care programs. Yet, until the Spiritual Care Development Initiative of the Canadian Pallium Project, there was no published literature indicating systematic profiling of occupationally relevant core competencies or competency-based training programs specific to this specialized field of practice. This article describes a Canadian Community of Practice process to develop an occupational analysis-based competency profile for the Professional Hospice Palliative Care Spiritual Care Provider utilizing a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) methodology. Competency profiles are important contributions to the development of curricula to train care providers who are recognized by other professions and by institutions as possessing the requisite theoretical and clinical expertise, particularly in academic tertiary care settings.

  7. Resistiveness to Care as Experienced by Family Caregivers Providing Care for Someone With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Spigelmyer, Pamela C; Hupcey, Judith E; Smith, Carol A; Loeb, Susan J; Kitko, Lisa

    2017-09-15

    This research explored family caregivers' lived experiences of resistiveness to care when they provided care for people with dementia. The goal was to identify a general meaning of family caregivers' lived experiences to target potential areas for future nursing interventions to help family caregivers manage their caregiving role and provide a base for future research surrounding resistiveness to care. Descriptive phenomenology was used to provide descriptions of eight family caregivers who provided care for someone with dementia and experienced resistiveness to care. Family caregivers were recruited from Alzheimer's support groups from June to November 2014. Caregiver interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using scientific phenomenology to identify essential constituents of the experience. The identified general meaning structure contained five essential constituents. These included self-questioning of abilities; signal for increased future caregiver responsibilities; changed perception of personal self; unexpected emotional responses; and seeing a changed person, not the disease. Study findings represent family caregivers' lived perceptions of resistiveness to care, which are different from current research findings regarding nurses' perceptions of resistiveness to care. The identified meaning structure indicates focus areas for future research and for nursing interventions to help family caregivers manage their distress when experiencing resistiveness to care. Identification of the meaning caregivers ascribe to their lived experience of resistiveness to care (five essential constituents) provides nurses with opportunities to help family caregivers (coproviders of care) holistically. Supporting caregivers in their caregiving role can decrease caregiver distress when resistiveness to care occurs. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  8. Integrating Primary Care Providers in the Care of Cancer Survivors: Gaps in Evidence and Future Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; O’Malley, Denalee M.; Hudson, Shawna V.

    2017-01-01

    For over a decade since the release of the Institute of Medicine report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, there has been a focus on providing coordinated, comprehensive care for cancer survivors that emphasized the role of primary care. Several models of care have been described which primarily focused on primary care providers (PCPs) as receivers of cancer survivors and specific types of information (e.g. survivorship care plans) from oncology based care, and not as active members of the cancer survivorship team. In this paper, we reviewed survivorship models that have been described in the literature, and specifically focused on strategies aiming to integrate primary care providers in caring for cancer survivors across different settings. We offer insights differentiating primary care providers’ level of expertise in cancer survivorship and how such expertise may be utilized. We provide recommendations for education, clinical practice, research and policy initiatives that may advance the integration of primary care providers in the care of cancer survivors in diverse clinical settings. PMID:28049575

  9. Needs assessment and palliative care: the views of providers.

    PubMed

    Clark, D; Malson, H; Small, N; Daniel, T; Mallett, K

    1997-12-01

    A key element within the programme of reform introduced into the UK National Health Service in the 1990s has been the concept of health needs assessment, which must be undertaken by health care purchasers as a guide to the planning process. As part of a wide-ranging study of the impact of the NHS reforms on hospices and specialist palliative care services, providers' perceptions of needs assessment for palliative care were examined, including the extent to which needs assessments had been carried out in local districts, together with the implications. The study comprised two key elements. In spring 1995 a postal survey was conducted among all UK hospices and specialist palliative care in-patient units (n = 203) eliciting factual information concerning needs assessment and contracting, together with perceptions and evaluations of the local impact of the NHS reforms. A total of 128 (63 per cent) questionnaires was completed and returned. In addition to the survey, 12 case studies were conducted with a stratified random sample of NHS, independent and large or small hospices and specialist palliative care units. Each of the 12 case study sites was visited by a member of the research team, who conducted interviews with senior staff and analysed financial, planning and management data. Thus the survey allowed a wide analysis of the impact of the NHS reforms, which was enhanced by the more in-depth qualitative data gathered from the case studies. In the survey 49 per cent of those responding reported that their main purchaser had conducted a needs assessment for palliative care in the last five years. Palliative care needs assessment was seen as valuable by providers: 73 per cent considered it very important and 28 per cent of hospices had gone so far as to request a needs assessment from their health authority. In an open-ended question seeking views on the impact of health needs assessment, 66 per cent of those responding (71/107) stated that the impact had been or

  10. Comparative effectiveness of outpatient cardiovascular disease and diabetes care delivery between advanced practice providers and physician providers in primary care: Implications for care under the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Virani, Salim S; Akeroyd, Julia M; Ramsey, David J; Chan, Winston J; Frazier, Lorraine; Nasir, Khurram; S Rajan, Suja; Ballantyne, Christie M; Petersen, Laura A

    2016-11-01

    The objective was to compare quality of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) care between advanced practice providers (APPs) and physicians in a primary care setting. We identified diabetes (n=1,022,588) and CVD (n=1,187,035) patients receiving primary care between October 2013 and September 2014 in 130 Veterans Affairs facilities. We compared glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c <7%) in diabetic patients, blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mmHg in diabetic or CVD patients, cholesterol control (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol<100 mg/dL, receiving a statin) in diabetic or CVD patients, and those receiving a β-blocker (with history of myocardial infarction in the last 2 years) among patients receiving care from physicians and APPs. We also compared the proportion meeting composite measure (glycemic, BP, and cholesterol control in diabetic patients; BP, cholesterol control, and receipt of β-blocker among eligible CVD patients). Diabetic patients receiving care from APPs were statistically more likely to have glycemic (50% vs 51.4%, odds ratio [OR] 1.06 [1.05-1.08]) and BP control (77.5% vs 78.4%, OR 1.04 [1.03-1.06]), whereas patients receiving care from physicians were more likely to have cholesterol control (receipt of statin 68% vs 66.5%, OR 0.94 [0.93-0.95]) in adjusted models, although these differences are not clinically significant. Similar results were seen in CVD patients. Few patients met the composite measure (27.1% and 27.6% of diabetic and 54.0% and 54.8% of CVD patients receiving care from physicians and APPs, respectively). Diabetes and CVD care quality was comparable between physicians and APPs with clinically insignificant differences. Regardless of provider type, there is a need to improve performance on eligible measures in diabetes or CVD patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Accountability across the Continuum: The Participation of Postacute Care Providers in Accountable Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Colla, Carrie H; Lewis, Valerie A; Bergquist, Savannah L; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-08-01

    To examine the extent to which accountable care organizations (ACOs) formally incorporate postacute care providers. The National Survey of ACOs (N = 269, response rate 66 percent). We report statistics on ACOs' formal inclusion of postacute care providers and the organizational characteristics and clinical capabilities of ACOs that have postacute care. Half of ACOs formally include at least one postacute service, with inclusion at higher rates in ACOs with commercial (64 percent) and Medicaid contracts (70 percent) compared to ACOs with Medicare contracts only (45 percent). ACOs that have a formal relationship with a postacute provider are more likely to have advanced transition management, end of life planning, readmission prevention, and care management capabilities. Many ACOs have not formally engaged postacute care, which may leave room to improve service integration and care management. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. Towards culturally competent paediatric oncology care. A qualitative study from the perspective of care providers.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, J; Lieveld, A; van de Wetering, M; Schouten-van Meeteren, A Y N

    2017-03-28

    In order to gain more insight on the influence of ethnic diversity in paediatric cancer care, the perspectives of care providers were explored. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 12 paediatric oncologists and 13 nurses of two different paediatric oncology wards and were analysed using a framework method. We found that care providers described the contact with Turkish and Moroccan parents as more difficult. They offered two reasons for this: (1) language barriers between care provider and parents hindered the exchange of information; (2) cultural barriers between care provider and parents about sharing the diagnosis and palliative perspective hindered communication. Care providers reported different solutions to deal with these barriers, such as using an interpreter and improving their cultural knowledge about their patients. They, however, were not using interpreters sufficiently and were unaware of the importance of eliciting parents' perspectives. Communication techniques to overcome dilemmas between parents and care providers were not used and care providers were unaware of stereotypes and prejudice. Care providers should be offered insight in cultural barriers they are unaware of. Training in cultural competence might be a possibility to overcome manifest barriers.

  13. Compassion fatigue and secondary traumatization: provider self care on intensive care units for children.

    PubMed

    Meadors, Patrick; Lamson, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Unexpressed grief in health care providers who care for chronically ill children may lead to the development of some symptoms of compassion fatigue. The purpose of this study was to describe the scope of compassion fatigue in health care providers working on critical care units with children. A secondary aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of providing educational seminars on compassion fatigue to health care providers working on critical care units with children. In this quantitative study, 185 providers employed within a Children's Hospital attended an educational seminar and voluntarily completed the questionnaires before and after the seminar. A modified version of the Social Readjustment Rating Scale, Index of Clinical Stress, and a compassion fatigue measure developed by the researchers were used in this study. The researchers found that this educational seminar was successful in raising awareness on compassion fatigue and reducing clinical stress. In addition, the results suggested that providers who experienced higher levels of personal stressors also experienced higher levels of clinical stress and compassion fatigue. Providers working on the intensive care units for children needed to be aware of compassion fatigue symptoms and techniques to manage or minimize their symptoms. Taking care of the providers on a personal and professional level had a significant impact on the amount of stress and compassion fatigue exhibited by health care professionals.

  14. The health of female child care providers: implications for quality of care.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Dee; Gaines, Sherry; Wold, Judith Lupo; Williams, Armenia; Leary, Janie

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the health behaviors and perceived health status of child care providers. Health behaviors and health status were also examined in relation to caring for children and the providers' perceptions of quality child care. A researcher-developed questionnaire, adapted from Williams, Mason, and Wold (2001), was mailed to a random sample of 1,000 child care providers employed in 49 child care centers in Georgia. Results indicated that, overall, the sample was a healthy population with 86.8% rating their health as good to excellent. Seventy-three percent (73%) received a physical exam annually, and 70% reported having health insurance. Despite these ratings, participants reported that they were overweight, were emotionally strained, and did not engage in physical exercise at least 3 times per week. Although most performed breast self-exams, the majority did not fully understand breast health practices. Furthermore, the majority of the child care providers (78.7%) believed that their health does not impact the care that they provide to children. Last, their definitions of quality of care for children suggested a minimal standard of care or less. These findings provide information that can be useful in designing occupational health programs within community child care settings and in promoting healthy behaviors in women.

  15. Occupational health nursing with Navajo workers. Providing culturally competent care.

    PubMed

    Lusk, P; Holst, P

    2001-01-01

    1. Native Americans in the southwestern United States are considered a "vulnerable population." Native Americans have economic difficulties, poor health, and little access to health care. The Navajo nation is the largest Native American reservation in the United States. 2. Occupational health nurses who provide culturally competent care increase the likelihood for Navajo workers to obtain optimal benefits from workplace health services. 3. The nurse uses cultural assessment skills and critical thinking abilities to maximize therapeutic interactions and minimize barriers in communications with workers of other cultural backgrounds. 4. The nurse who is knowledgeable about the Navajo way can help achieve a balance between the traditional ways and Western ways of addressing serious health care issues facing the Navajo worker. This knowledge and cultural awareness also increases the effectiveness of health promotion and health education programs offered to workers, their families, and their communities.

  16. Providing care to children in times of war.

    PubMed

    Cole, Will; Edwards, Mary J; Burnett, Mark W

    2015-06-01

    The Geneva Conventions stipulate that an occupying power must ensure adequate health care delivery to noncombatants. Special emphasis is given to children, who are among the most vulnerable in a conflict zone. Whether short-term pediatric care should be provided by Military Treatment Facilities to local nationals for conditions other than combat-related injury is controversial. A review of 1,197 children without traumatic injury cared for during 10 years in Iraq and Afghanistan was conducted. Mortality rates were less than 1% among patients with surgical conditions and resource utilization was not excessive. In view of international humanitarian law and these outcomes, children with nontraumatic conditions can and should be considered for treatment at Military Treatment Facilities. The ability to correct the condition and availability of resources necessary to do so should be taken into account.

  17. Pharmacy Students' Perceptions of Their Preparedness to Provide Pharmaceutical Care

    PubMed Central

    Friesner, Daniel L.; Miller, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess students' perceptions of their preparedness to perform advanced pharmacy practice competencies. Design The Preparedness to Provide Pharmaceutical Care (PREP) survey was modified and administered to each class at a Midwestern university from 2005-2008. Factor analysis and 1-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons were applied to assess the effectiveness of changes made in the pharmacy curriculum. Assessment Factor analysis yielded patterns similar to those reported in the literature. Students rated themselves highest on the psychological aspects and lowest on the administrative aspects of care. Perceived pharmaceutical care skills grew as students progressed through the curriculum, and changes in coursework were reflected in the competencies. Conclusion Students’ perceived competencies (ie, communication, psychological, technical, administrative) were similar to those at other institutions and perceptions of competencies increased in a manner consistent with actual program outcomes. PMID:20221359

  18. Living Gerontology: Providing Long-Distance, Long-term Care.

    PubMed

    Kivnick, Helen Q

    2017-02-01

    My own living and working through normative family transitions of parent care (as both a professional gerontologist and an intergenerational family member) facilitated five important kinds of growth: (a) providing parent care with optimal integrity; (b) understanding, elaborating, and teaching life-cycle theory with increasing depth; (c) using this theory to enrich practice approaches to long-term care; (d) identifying valuable new research directions; and (e) creating a multidimensional professional life that furthers theoretical development and identifies practice principles that promote individual, familial, and societal experiences of a "good old age." This reflective essay addresses these different kinds of growth, as they emerged from and contribute to the ever-developing gerontological domains of theory and practice.

  19. Caring for Children with Medical Complexity: Perspectives of Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Foster, Carolyn C; Mangione-Smith, Rita; Simon, Tamara D

    2017-03-01

    To describe typical care experiences and key barriers and facilitators to caring for children with medical complexity (CMC) from the perspective of community primary care providers (PCPs). PCPs participating in a randomized controlled trial of a care-coordination intervention for CMC were sent a 1-time cross-sectional survey that asked PCPs to (1) describe their experiences with caring for CMC; (2) identify key barriers affecting their ability to care for CMC; and (3) prioritize facilitators enhancing their ability to provide care coordination for CMC. PCP and practice demographics also were collected. One hundred thirteen of 155 PCPs sent the survey responded fully (completion rate = 73%). PCPs endorsed that medical characteristics such as polypharmacy (88%), multiorgan system involvement (84%), and rare/unfamiliar diagnoses (83%) negatively affected care. Caregivers with high needs (88%), limited time with patients and caregivers (81%), and having a large number of specialists involved in care (79%) were also frequently cited. Most commonly endorsed strategies to improve care coordination included more time with patients/caregivers (84%), summative action plans (83%), and facilitated communication (eg, e-mail, phone meetings) with specialists (83%). Community PCPs prioritized more time with patients and their families, better communication with specialists, and summative action plans to improve care coordination for this vulnerable population. Although this study evaluated perceptions rather than actual performance, it provides insights to improve understanding of which barriers and facilitators ideally might be targeted first for care delivery redesign. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Health care providers' perspectives for providing quality infection control measures at the neonatal intensive care unit, Cairo University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Salem, Marwa Rashad; Youssef, Meray Rene L

    2017-09-01

    Health care-associated infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). This study identified health care providers' perspectives for providing quality infection control measures at a NICU. A qualitative approach was adopted. Participants were selected via a purposive sampling technique. The study group was composed of 3 medical staff who held leadership positions and 10 nurses working in the NICU at Cairo University Hospital. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. Responses were analyzed using a thematic content analysis. The priorities identified by thematic analysis were suggestions and barriers for providing quality infection control measures, from the perspectives of health care providers. All interviewees cited shortage in staffing, especially nurses, lack of time to apply infection control standards, limited opportunities for infection control training, and work overload as the main barriers. All interviewees recommended on-going training and the introduction of audiovisual aids and case study approaches. Lack of time to apply infection control standards, limited opportunities for infection control training, and work overload are the most commonly perceived barriers. The current infection control system in the NICU is likely to remain ineffective unless these underlying barriers are adequately addressed. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oncology nurses' obstacles and supportive behaviors in end-of-life care: providing vital family care.

    PubMed

    Beckstrand, Renea L; Collette, Joan; Callister, Lynn; Luthy, Karlen E

    2012-09-01

    To determine the impact of obstacles and supportive behaviors in end-of-life (EOL) care as perceived by hospital-based oncology nurses. A 69-item mailed survey. National random sample. 1,005 nurse members of the Oncology Nursing Society who had provided EOL care for patients with cancer. Three mailings yielded 380 usable responses from 912 eligible respondents, resulting in a 42% return rate. Size and frequency of EOL care obstacles and supportive behaviors for patients with cancer in a hospital setting. Results of this research demonstrate the need for more EOL education and help in forming teams of nurses, social and palliative care workers, and physicians to support high-quality care. Another finding was the need for other nurses at a facility to give the nurse caring for the dying patient more time to support the patient and family. Dealing with the family is vital in providing optimal EOL care to patients dying from cancer. By carefully listening to the experience, concerns, and recommendations of hospital-based oncology nurses, compassionate EOL care can be provided to these patients and their families. Oncology nurses are dedicated to providing the best EOL care to their patients and patients' families. This study helped to identify research-based obstacles and supportive behaviors regarding the provision of high-quality EOL care.

  2. The effect of narrow provider networks on health care use.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Alicia; Lo Sasso, Anthony T

    2016-12-01

    Network design is an often overlooked aspect of health insurance contracts. Recent policy factors have resulted in narrower provider networks. We provide plausibly causal evidence on the effect of narrow network plans offered by a large national health insurance carrier in a major metropolitan market. Our econometric design exploits the fact that some firms offer a narrow network plan to their employees and some do not. Our results show that narrow network health plans lead to reductions in health care utilization and spending. We find evidence that narrow networks save money by selecting lower cost providers into the network.

  3. Providing primary health care with non-physicians.

    PubMed

    Chen, P C

    1984-04-01

    The definition of primary health care is basically the same, but the wide variety of concepts as to the form and type of worker required is largely due to variations in economic, demographic, socio-cultural and political factors. Whatever form it takes, in many parts of the developing world, it is increasingly clear that primary health care must be provided by non-physicians. The reasons for this trend are compelling, yet it is surprisingly opposed by the medical profession in many a developing country. Nonetheless, numerous field trials are being conducted in a variety of situations in several countries around the world. Non-physician primary health care workers vary from medical assistants and nurse practitioners to aide-level workers called village mobilizers, village volunteers, village aides and a variety of other names. The functions, limitations and training of such workers will need to be defined, so that an optimal combination of skills, knowledge and attitudes best suited to produce the desired effect on local health problems may be attained. The supervision of such workers by the physician and other health professionals will need to be developed in the spirit of the health team. An example of the use of non-physicians in providing primary health care in Sarawak is outlined.

  4. Pharmacists as Care Providers for Stroke Patients: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Basaraba, Jade E; Picard, Michelle; George-Phillips, Kirsten; Mysak, Tania

    2017-09-20

    Pharmacists have become an integral member of the multidisciplinary team providing clinical patient care in various healthcare settings. Although evidence supporting their role in the care of patients with other disease states is well-established, minimal literature has been published evaluating pharmacist interventions in stroke patients. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the evidence evaluating the impact of pharmacist interventions on stroke patient outcomes. Study abstracts and full-text articles evaluating the impact of a pharmacist intervention on outcomes in patients with an acute stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) or a history of an acute stroke/TIA were identified and a qualitative analysis performed. A total of 20 abstracts and full-text studies were included. The included studies provided evidence supporting pharmacist interventions in multiple settings, including emergency departments, inpatient, outpatient, and community pharmacy settings. In a significant proportion of the studies, pharmacist care was collaborative with other healthcare professionals. Some of the pharmacist interventions included participation in a stroke response team, assessment for thrombolytic use, medication reconciliation, participation in patient rounds, identification and resolution of drug therapy problems, risk-factor reduction, and patient education. Pharmacist involvement was associated with increased use of evidence-based therapies, medication adherence, risk-factor target achievement, and maintenance of health-related quality of life. Available evidence suggests that a variety of pharmacist interventions can have a positive impact on stroke patient outcomes. Pharmacists should be considered an integral member of the stroke patient care team.

  5. Providing health care to improve community perceptions of protected areas.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Colin A; van Bavel, Bianca; Boodman, Carl; Ghai, Ria R; Gogarten, Jan F; Hartter, Joel; Mechak, Lauren E; Omeja, Patrick A; Poonawala, Sofia; Tuli, Dan; Goldberg, Tony L

    2015-10-01

    Impoverished communities often turn to illegal extraction of resources from protected areas to alleviate economic pressures or to make monetary gains. Such practices can cause ecological damage and threaten animal populations. These communities also often face a high disease burden and typically do not have access to affordable health care. Here we argue that these two seemingly separate challenges may have a common solution. In particular, providing health care to communities adjacent to protected areas may be an efficient and effective way to reduce the disease burden while also improving local perceptions about protected areas, potentially reducing illegal extraction. We present a case study of a health centre on the edge of Kibale National Park, Uganda. The centre has provided care to c. 7,200 people since 2008 and its outreach programme extends to c. 4,500 schoolchildren each year. Contrasting the provision of health care to other means of improving community perceptions of protected areas suggests that health clinics have potential as a conservation tool in some situations and should be considered in future efforts to manage protected areas.

  6. Providing health care to improve community perceptions of protected areas

    PubMed Central

    van Bavel, Bianca; Boodman, Carl; Ghai, Ria R.; Gogarten, Jan F.; Hartter, Joel; Mechak, Lauren E.; Omeja, Patrick A.; Poonawala, Sofia; Tuli, Dan; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2015-01-01

    Impoverished communities often turn to illegal extraction of resources from protected areas to alleviate economic pressures or to make monetary gains. Such practices can cause ecological damage and threaten animal populations. These communities also often face a high disease burden and typically do not have access to affordable health care. Here we argue that these two seemingly separate challenges may have a common solution. In particular, providing health care to communities adjacent to protected areas may be an efficient and effective way to reduce the disease burden while also improving local perceptions about protected areas, potentially reducing illegal extraction. We present a case study of a health centre on the edge of Kibale National Park, Uganda. The centre has provided care to c. 7,200 people since 2008 and its outreach programme extends to c. 4,500 schoolchildren each year. Contrasting the provision of health care to other means of improving community perceptions of protected areas suggests that health clinics have potential as a conservation tool in some situations and should be considered in future efforts to manage protected areas. PMID:26456977

  7. Asthma Care Quality for Children with Minority-Serving Providers

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Alison A.; Smith, Lauren A.; Bokhour, Barbara; Miroshnik, Irina L.; Sawicki, Gregory S.; Glauber, James H.; Hohman, Katherine H.; Gay, Charlene; Lieu, Tracy A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare asthma care quality for children with and without minority-serving providers. Design Cross-sectional telephone survey of parents, linked with a mailed survey of their children’s providers. Setting A Medicaid-predominant health plan and multispecialty provider group in Massachusetts. Participants Children with persistent asthma identified from claims and encounter data. Main Exposure Whether the child’s provider was minority-serving (>25% of patients black or Latino). Outcomes Parent report of whether the child had: 1) ever received inhaled steroids; 2) received influenza vaccination during the past season and 3) received an asthma action plan in the past year. Results The study included 563 children. In unadjusted analyses, Latino children and those with minority-serving providers were more likely to have never received inhaled steroids. In adjusted models, the odds of never receiving inhaled steroids were not significantly different for children with minority-serving providers (OR 1.29, 95% CI 0.63–2.64), or for Latino vs. white children (OR 1.76, 95% CI 0.74–4.18); odds were increased for children receiving care in community health centers (OR 4.88, 95% CI 1.70–14.02) or hospital clinics (OR 4.53, 95% CI 1.09–18.92) vs. multi-specialty practices. Such differences were not seen for influenza vaccinations or action plans. Conclusions Children with persistent asthma were less likely to receive inhaled steroids if they received care in community health centers or hospital clinics. Practice setting mediated initially-observed disparities in inhaled steroid use by Latino children and those with minority-serving providers. No differences by race/ethnicity or minority-serving provider were observed for influenza vaccinations and asthma action plans. PMID:20048240

  8. Exploring Health Care Providers' Views About Initiating End-of-Life Care Communication.

    PubMed

    Nedjat-Haiem, Frances R; Carrion, Iraida V; Gonzalez, Krystana; Ell, Kathleen; Thompson, Beti; Mishra, Shiraz I

    2016-01-01

    Numerous factors impede effective and timely end-of-life (EOL) care communication. These factors include delays in communication until patients are seriously ill and/or close to death. Gaps in patient-provider communication negatively affect advance care planning and limit referrals to palliative and hospice care. Confusion about the roles of various health care providers also limits communication, especially when providers do not coordinate care with other health care providers in various disciplines. Although providers receive education regarding EOL communication and care coordination, little is known about the roles of all health care providers, including nonphysician support staff working with physicians to discuss the possibility of dying and help patients prepare for death. This study explores the perspectives of physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains on engaging seriously ill patients and families in EOL care communication. Qualitative data were from 79 (medical and nonmedical) providers practicing at 2 medical centers in Central Los Angeles. Three themes that describe providers' perceptions of their roles and responsibility in talking with seriously ill patients emerged: (1) providers' roles for engaging in EOL discussions, (2) responsibility of physicians for initiating and leading discussions, and (3) need for team co-management patient care. Providers highlighted the importance of beginning discussions early by having physicians lead them, specifically due to their medical training and need to clarify medical information regarding patients' prognosis. Although physicians are a vital part of leading EOL communication, and are at the center of communication of medical information, an interdisciplinary approach that involves nurses, social workers, and chaplains could significantly improve patient care.

  9. Will emergency health care providers respond to mass casualty incidents?

    PubMed

    Syrett, James I; Benitez, John G; Livingston, William H; Davis, Eric A

    2007-01-01

    Emergency response plans often call on health care providers to respond to the workplace outside of their normal working pattern. Providers will report to work during a mass casualty emergency regardless of family duties, type of incident, or availability of treatment. Survey of emergency personnel needed to respond to a mass casualty incident. Two scenarios were presented: one involving the release of a non-transmissible biological agent with proven treatment and the other the release of a transmissible biological agent with no treatment. At critical time points, participants were asked whether they would report to work. Additional questions considered the effect of commonly used treatment dissemination methods. A total of 186 surveys were issued and returned. (45 physicians, 29 nurses, 86 EMS personnel, and 20 support staff); 6 were incomplete and excluded. Initial commitment rates were 78%. The highest commitment rate identified was 84% and the lowest was 18%. Any treatment dissemination method excluding providers' family members led to decreases in commitment rate, as did agents identified to be transmissible. As an event develops, fewer health care providers will report to work and at no time will all providers report when asked. This conclusion may be generalizable to several types of incidents ranging from pandemic influenza to bioterrorism. Identification of the causative agent is a major decision point for providers to return to or stay away from work. Offering on-site treatment of providers' family increases commitment to work. These factors should be considered in emergency planning.

  10. Will emergency health care providers respond to mass casualty incidents?

    PubMed

    Syrett, James I; Benitez, John G; Livingston, William H; Davis, Eric A

    2007-01-01

    Emergency response plans often call on health care providers to respond to the workplace outside of their normal working pattern. Providers will report to work during a mass casualty emergency regardless of family duties, type of incident, or availability of treatment. Survey of emergency personnel needed to respond to a mass casualty incident. Two scenarios were presented: one involving the release of a nontransmissible biological agent with proven treatment and the other the release of a transmissible biological agent with no treatment. At critical time points, participants were asked whether they would report to work. Additional questions considered the effect of commonly used treatment dissemination methods. A total of 186 surveys were issued and returned. (45 physicians, 29 nurses, 86 EMS personnel, and 20 support staff); 6 were incomplete and excluded. Initial commitment rates were 78%. The highest commitment rate identified was 84% and the lowest was 18%. Any treatment dissemination method excluding providers' family members led to decreases in commitment rate, as did agents identified to be transmissible. As an event develops, fewer health care providers will report to work and at no time will all providers report when asked. This conclusion may be generalizable to several types of incidents ranging from pandemic influenza to bioterrorism. Identification of the causative agent is a major decision point for providers to return to or stay away from work. Offering on-site treatment of providers' family increases commitment to work. These factors should be considered in emergency planning.

  11. The ABCs of Safe and Healthy Child Care: A Handbook for Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Cynthia M.; Polder, Jacquelyn A.

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining a safe and healthy child care setting, this manual for home or center child care providers contains information and guidelines to help providers maintain child health and reduce sickness and injuries. Part 1, "Introduction," describes how diseases are spread and how to prevent and prepare for unintentional…

  12. Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Home Diabetes Telemedicine Care in the IDEATel Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudiver, Fred; Wolff, L. Thomas; Morin, Philip C.; Teresi, Jeanne; Palmas, Walter; Starren, Justin; Shea, Steven; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Few telemedicine projects have systematically examined provider satisfaction and attitudes. Purpose: To determine the acceptability and perceived impact on primary care providers' (PCP) practices of a randomized clinical trial of the use of telemedicine to electronically deliver health care services to Medicare patients with diabetes in…

  13. Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Home Diabetes Telemedicine Care in the IDEATel Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudiver, Fred; Wolff, L. Thomas; Morin, Philip C.; Teresi, Jeanne; Palmas, Walter; Starren, Justin; Shea, Steven; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Few telemedicine projects have systematically examined provider satisfaction and attitudes. Purpose: To determine the acceptability and perceived impact on primary care providers' (PCP) practices of a randomized clinical trial of the use of telemedicine to electronically deliver health care services to Medicare patients with diabetes in…

  14. Health Care Providers and Dying Patients: Critical Issues in Terminal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1988-01-01

    Identifies three major areas of concern in relationship between health care providers and dying patients: (1) nature of difficulties and stresses associated with terminal care; (2) education of providers for work; and (3) influence of organizational structure and institutionalized values on services for dying patients and families. Reviews…

  15. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  16. Teamwork: building healthier workplaces and providing safer patient care.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    A changing healthcare landscape requires nurses to care for more patients with higher acuity during their shift than ever before. These more austere working conditions are leading to increased burnout. In addition, patient safety is not of the quality or level that is required. To build healthier workplaces where safe care is provided, formal teamwork training is recommended. Formal teamwork training programs, such as that provided by the MedTeams group, TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety), or participatory action research programs such as the Healthy Workplace Intervention, have decreased errors in the workplace, increased nurse satisfaction and retention rates, and decreased staff turnover. This article includes necessary determinants of teamwork, brief overviews of team-building programs, and examples of research programs that demonstrate how teamwork brings about healthier workplaces that are safer for patients. Teamwork programs can bring about these positive results when implemented and supported by the hospital system.

  17. Vaccination campaigns in postsocialist Ukraine: health care providers navigating uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Bazylevych, Maryna

    2011-12-01

    Vaccination anxieties grew into a public health issue during the 2008 failed measles and rubella immunization campaign in Ukraine. Here I explore how health care providers bend official immunization policies as they navigate media scares about vaccines, parents' anxieties, public health officials' insistence on the need for vaccination, and their own sense of expertise and authority. New hierarchies are currently being renegotiated, and I follow health care providers as they attempt to parcel out their new position in the Ukrainian society and beyond. Public health control is reframed in a postsocialist context as a condition of acceptance into the European community as a sanitary democracy, and a contestation point between citizens and state. I untangle how relationships between citizens and states shape the construction of medical risk.

  18. Provider workload and quality of care in primary care settings: moderating role of relational climate.

    PubMed

    Mohr, David C; Benzer, Justin K; Young, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Primary care providers are increasingly under pressure to do more with fewer resources. We examined the effect of workload on patients' experiences of quality of care, measured through approximately 44,000 patient experience surveys in a sample of 222 primary care clinics in the Veterans Health Administration. We tested the extent to which relational climate, a measure of teamwork, moderated the relationship between workload and patient ratings of quality of care. Our outcome measures included patient complaints, time spent with provider, and overall visit quality. Workload was negatively associated with patients' quality of care ratings and relational climate moderated the relation between workload and quality of care ratings. Patients seen in clinics with higher workload and greater relational climate reported better care compared with patients in clinics with higher workload but lower relational climate. Findings highlight the importance of relational climate as an important teamwork factor when managing and developing clinic policies, practices, and procedures in resource-constrained settings.

  19. Providing effective and preferred care closer to home: a realist review of intermediate care.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Mark; Hunt, Harriet; Cooper, Chris; Shepperd, Sasha; Pawson, Ray; Anderson, Rob

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate care is one of the number of service delivery models intended to integrate care and provide enhanced health and social care services closer to home, especially to reduce reliance on acute care hospital beds. In order for health and social care practitioners, service managers and commissioners to make informed decisions, it is vital to understand how to implement the admission avoidance and early supported discharge components of intermediate care within the context of local care systems. This paper reports the findings of a theory-driven (realist) review conducted in 2011-2012. A broad range of evidence contained in 193 sources was used to construct a conceptual framework for intermediate care. This framework forms the basis for exploring factors at service user, professional and organisational levels that should be considered when designing and delivering intermediate care services within a particular local context. Our synthesis found that involving service users and their carers in collaborative decision-making about the objectives of care and the place of care is central to achieving the aims of intermediate care. This pivotal involvement of the service user relies on practitioners, service managers and commissioners being aware of the impact that organisational structures at the local level can have on enabling or inhibiting collaborative decision-making and care co-ordination. Through all interactions with service users and their care networks, health and social care professionals should establish the meaning which alternative care environments have for different service users. Doing so means decisions about the best place of care will be better informed and gives service users choice. This in turn is likely to support psychological and social stability, and the attainment of functional goals. At an organisational level, integrated working can facilitate the delivery of intermediate care, but there is not a straightforward relationship between

  20. Primary care managers' perceptions of their capability in providing care planning to patients with complex needs.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Lena Gunvor; Bäck-Pettersson, Siv; Kylén, Sven; Marklund, Bertil; Carlström, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate primary care managers' perceptions of their capability in providing care planning to patients with complex needs. Care planning is defined as a process where the patient, family and health professionals engage in dialogue about the patient's care needs and plan care interventions together. Semi-structured interviews with 18 primary care managers in western Sweden were conducted using Westrin's theoretical cooperation model. Data were analysed using a qualitative deductive method. Results reveal that the managers' approach to care planning was dominated by non-cooperation and separation. The managers were permeated by uncertainty about the meaning of the task of care planning as such. They did not seem to be familiar with the national legislation stipulating that every healthcare provider must meet patients' need for care interventions and participate in the care planning. To accomplish care planning, the process needs to cross - and overcome - both professional and organisational boundaries. There is also a need for incentives to develop working methods that promote local cooperation in order to facilitate optimal care for patients with complex needs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Reduction of Burnout in Mental Health Care Providers Using the Provider Resilience Mobile Application.

    PubMed

    Wood, Amanda Ernst; Prins, Annabel; Bush, Nigel E; Hsia, Jennifer F; Bourn, Laura E; Earley, Michael D; Walser, Robyn D; Ruzek, Josef

    2017-01-10

    This pilot study examined the usability, acceptability, and effectiveness of a free Provider Resilience (PR) mobile application (app) designed by the National Center for Telehealth and Technology to reduce provider burnout. Outpatient mental health providers (N = 30) used the PR app for 1 month. Participants rated the PR app on the System Usability Scale with an overall score of 79.7, which is in the top quartile for usability. Results of paired sample t tests on the Professional Quality of Life Scale indicated significant decreases on the Burnout (t = 3.65, p < .001) and Compassion Fatigue (t = 4.54, p < .001) subscales. The Provider Resilience app shows promise in reducing burnout and compassion fatigue in mental health care providers.

  2. Consumer satisfaction with primary care provider choice and associated trust

    PubMed Central

    Chu-Weininger, Ming Ying L; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2006-01-01

    Background Development of managed care, characterized by limited provider choice, is believed to undermine trust. Provider choice has been identified as strongly associated with physician trust. Stakeholders in a competitive healthcare market have competing agendas related to choice. The purpose of this study is to analyze variables associated with consumer's satisfaction that they have enough choice when selecting their primary care provider (PCP), and to analyze the importance of these variables on provider trust. Methods A 1999 randomized national cross-sectional telephone survey conducted of United States residential households, who had a telephone, had seen a medical professional at least twice in the past two years, and aged ≥ 20 years was selected for secondary data analyses. Among 1,117 households interviewed, 564 were selected as the final sample. Subjects responded to a core set of questions related to provider trust, and a subset of questions related to trust in the insurer. A previously developed conceptual framework was adopted. Linear and logistic regressions were performed based on this framework. Results Results affirmed 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' was significantly (p < .001) associated with provider trust. 'PCP's care being extremely effective' was strongly associated with 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' and 'provider trust'. Having sought a second opinion(s) was associated with lower trust. 'Spoke to the PCP outside the medical office,' 'satisfaction with the insurer' and 'insurer charges less if PCP within network' were all variables associated with 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' (all p < .05). Conclusion This study confirmed the association of 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' with provider trust. Results affirmed 'enough PCP choice' was a strong predictor of provider trust. 'Second opinion on PCP' may indicate distrust in the provider. Data such as 'trust in providers in general' and 'the role of

  3. Health care providers' perspectives on breaking bad news to patients.

    PubMed

    Ptacek, J T; Ellison, N M

    2000-08-01

    This article reports the results of an investigation designed to obtain descriptive information about what typically transpires in bad news transactions between patients and physicians. A sample of 115 health care providers who were attending a 1-day workshop on palliative care issues responded to questions regarding bad news transactions between physicians and patients. Results indicated that giving the news in person, giving the news in a private place, having patient support providers present, and using a warm and caring tone are highly typical of bad news transactions, whereas exploring patient emotional reactions, relying on touch, delivering the news at the patient's pace, and providing written information are less typical. Nurses and physicians diverged in the perceptions about what typically transpires, suggesting that studies focusing only on physician reports or recommendations may be misleading. These data also point to the need to obtain other views of bad news transactions, and they argue for research designed to assess the relation between actual patient-physician encounters and subsequent patient-related outcomes.

  4. Oral self-care habits of dental and healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Zadik, Y; Galor, S; Lachmi, R; Proter, N

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the self-care level of dental and healthcare providers regarding prevention of oral diseases Healthcare providers (dental assistants and surgeons, laboratory personnel, biologists, medics, paramedics, corpsmen, nurses, pharmacists, physicians, physiotherapists, psychologists, social workers, speech therapists, X-ray technicians) and non-health care providing adults (the general population) were asked to respond to a questionnaire regarding their routine measures for maintaining oral health. Three hundred and twenty-six healthcare providers and 95 non-healthcare providers participated in the study. Regarding toothbrushing, flossing, undergoing periodic dental examinations and professional scaling/polishing, dental practitioners have better, but not perfect, maintenance habits than other healthcare providers. Non-dental healthcare providers have better dental habits than the general population, and nurses and medical practitioners have better dental habits than medics, paramedics, corpsmen and para-medical professionals. Among non-dental healthcare providers, nurses have a relatively high frequency of toothbrushing and flossing but a low frequency of periodic examinations and scaling/polishing. Generally, females reported significantly higher frequencies of toothbrushing and flossing than males did. The toothpaste selection of the participants was primarily influenced by dentists' recommendations, the flavour of the toothpaste, and its anti-malodour effect were the most dominant factors. The compliance of health professionals, especially dental practitioners, with appropriate oral health measures is relatively high. However, the dental team cannot always assume that the dental patient, who also happens to be a healthcare provider, has meticulous oral habits. The dental hygienist and surgeon have to educate and motivate their patients, especially healthcare providers because of the influence of the latter on their own patients.

  5. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Zambia: a care provider's perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the 1991 reforms of the health system in Zambia, mental health is still given low priority. This is evident from the fragmented manner in which mental health services are provided in the country and the limited budget allocations, with mental health services receiving 0.4% of the total health budget. Most of the mental health services provided are curative in nature and based in tertiary health institutions. At primary health care level, there is either absence of, or fragmented health services. Aims The aim of this paper was to explore health providers' views about mental health integration into primary health care. Methods A mixed methods, structured survey was conducted of 111 health service providers in primary health care centres, drawn from one urban setting (Lusaka) and one rural setting (Mumbwa). Results There is strong support for integrating mental health into primary health care from care providers, as a way of facilitating early detection and intervention for mental health problems. Participants believed that this would contribute to the reduction of stigma and the promotion of human rights for people with mental health problems. However, health providers felt they require basic training in order to enhance their knowledge and skills in providing health care to people with mental health problems. Recommendations It is recommended that health care providers should be provided with basic training in mental health in order to enhance their knowledge and skills to enable them provide mental health care to patients seeking help at primary health care level. Conclusion Integrating mental health services into primary health care is critical to improving and promoting the mental health of the population in Zambia. PMID:20653981

  6. Health Care Resource Utilization for Outpatient Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Care Delivery Among Advanced Practice Providers and Physician Providers in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Virani, Salim S; Akeroyd, Julia M; Ramsey, David J; Deswal, Anita; Nasir, Khurram; Rajan, Suja S; Ballantyne, Christie M; Petersen, Laura A

    2017-10-10

    Although effectiveness of diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) care delivery between physicians and advanced practice providers (APPs) has been shown to be comparable, health care resource utilization between these 2 provider types in primary care is unknown. This study compared health care resource utilization between patients with diabetes or CVD receiving care from APPs or physicians. Diabetes (n = 1,022,588) or CVD (n = 1,187,035) patients with a primary care visit between October 2013 and September 2014 in 130 Veterans Affairs facilities were identified. Using hierarchical regression adjusting for covariates including patient illness burden, the authors compared number of primary or specialty care visits and number of lipid panels and hemoglobinA1c (HbA1c) tests among diabetes patients, and number of primary or specialty care visits and number of lipid panels and cardiac stress tests among CVD patients receiving care from physicians and APPs. Physicians had significantly larger patient panels compared with APPs. In adjusted analyses, diabetes patients receiving care from APPs received fewer primary and specialty care visits and a greater number of lipid panels and HbA1c tests compared with patients receiving care from physicians. CVD patients receiving care from APPs received more frequent lipid testing and fewer primary and specialty care visits compared with those receiving care from physicians, with no differences in the number of stress tests. Most of these differences, although statistically significant, were numerically small. Health care resource utilization among diabetes or CVD patients receiving care from APPs or physicians appears comparable, although physicians work with larger patient panels.

  7. Providing health care for older persons in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Teo, Peggy; Chan, Angelique; Straughan, Paulin

    2003-06-01

    Health care social policy in Singapore has passed the burden of care to the individual and the family on the rationale that it would enable the state to contain the costs of long-term care by channelling some of its funds to community services and to providing essential health services to all Singaporeans and not just the older group. While a wide array of services has come into existence, there is a lack of integration between the available resources and needs of the individual/family and what has been availed at the community and state levels. Part of the problem lies in the stringent criteria to which the state allows subsidies to be used; the lack of understanding with regard to the profile of users of services; and the case manager approach in offering services. Mapping health care has proven more difficult than anticipated because ageing is a diverse experience, varying by gender, race, income, religion and intergenerational relationships. A social policy does not apply to a 'universal citizen' and services that exist in the public sphere should not exist as merely commodified services which require a great deal of institutional processing.

  8. A Training Program for Pharmacy Students on Providing Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Zeszotarski, Paula; Thai, Anthony; Fuller, RaeAnne; Owusu, Yaw; Tan, Candace; Gomez, Lara; Holuby, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare second- and third-year pharmacy students’ competence, attitudes, and self-confidence in providing diabetes care before and after completing a hand-on diabetes training program and to determine if the program had an impact on students’ attitude and self-confidence based on their year in the curriculum. Design. The program included classroom lectures and hands-on learning sessions in 5 facets of diabetes care. Pre- and post-test instruments measured students’ competence, attitudes, and confidence in diabetes care. Assessment. Students’ competence and the mean overall confidence score significantly improved after completing the program, while mean overall attitude score did not. Third-year students had significantly higher confidence scores than did second-year students on both pre- and post-program tests. No significant difference was found for attitude scores between second- and third-year students. Conclusion. The hands-on learning program was an effective approach to training pharmacy students in diabetes care, improving both their competence and confidence. PMID:24052656

  9. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  10. Shared care involving cancer specialists and primary care providers - What do cancer survivors want?

    PubMed

    Lawn, Sharon; Fallon-Ferguson, Julia; Koczwara, Bogda

    2017-10-01

    Cancer survivors are living longer, prompting greater focus on managing cancer as a chronic condition. Shared care between primary care providers (PCPs) and cancer specialists, involving explicit partnership in how care is communicated, could ensure effective transitions between services. However, little is known about cancer patients' and survivors' preferences regarding shared care. To explore Australian cancer survivors' views on shared care: what cancer survivors need from shared care; enablers and barriers to advancing shared care; and what successful shared care looks like. Community forum held in Adelaide, Australia, in 2015 with 21 participants: 11 cancer survivors, 2 family caregivers, and 8 clinicians and researchers (members of PC4-Primary Care Collaborative Cancer Clinical Trials Group). Qualitative data from group discussion of the objectives. Participants stressed that successful shared care required patients being at the centre, ensuring accurate communication, ownership, and access to their medical records. PCPs were perceived to lack skills and confidence to lead complex cancer care. Patients expressed burden in being responsible for navigating information sharing and communication processes between health professionals and services. Effective shared care should include: shared electronic health records, key individuals as care coordinators; case conferences; shared decision making; preparing patients for self-management; building general practitioners' skills; and measuring outcomes. There was clear support for shared care but a lack of good examples to help guide it for this population. Recognizing cancer as a chronic condition requires a shift in how care is provided to these patients. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Attitudes toward Abortion among Providers of Reproductive Health Care.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Laura E; Haider, Sadia; Hacker, Michele R

    2016-01-01

    Access to abortion continues to decrease in the United States. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes toward abortion among clinicians who provide reproductive health care. Clinician members of several reproductive health professional organizations completed a self-administered survey that assessed their attitudes toward abortion. A total of 278 clinicians who provided clinical reproductive health services within the United States were included. Nearly all strongly agreed that abortion should be available in cases of rape (89.6%), incest (89.2%), life endangerment (93.2%), health endangerment (91.0%), and fetal anomaly (85.9%). Although most strongly disagreed that spousal notification (81.3%) and spousal consent (86.6%) should be required for married women, fewer strongly disagreed that parental notification (57.6%) and parental consent (66.9%) should be required for minors. Respondents were generally supportive of private insurance coverage (70.1% strongly agreed) and Medicaid coverage (65.0% strongly agreed) for abortion services. Support for legal abortion and public funding of abortion were significantly associated with being female (both p ≤ .03) and having no personal religious affiliation (both p ≤ .04). Younger respondents and men were more supportive of third-party involvement and mandatory counseling (all p ≤ .02). Abortion providers were significantly more supportive of abortion access (legality of abortion, public and private funding, no third-party involvement, and no mandated counseling) than nonproviders (all p < .001). Although reproductive health care providers were generally supportive of legal abortion and funding for abortion, lower support among younger respondents may indicate future difficulties in maintaining a clinical workforce that is willing to provide abortion care. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Meaningful use care coordination criteria: Perceived barriers and benefits among primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Genna R

    2016-01-01

    Background Stage 2 and proposed Stage 3 meaningful use criteria ask providers to support patient care coordination by electronically generating, exchanging, and reconciling key information during patient care transitions. Methods A stratified random sample of primary care practices in Michigan (n = 328) that had already met Stage 1 meaningful use criteria was surveyed, in order to identify the anticipated barriers to meeting these criteria as well as the expected impact on patient care coordination from doing so. Results The top three barriers, as identified by >65% of the primary care providers surveyed, were difficulty sending and receiving patient information electronically, a lack of provider and practice staff time, and the complex workflow changes required. Despite these barriers, primary care providers expressed strong agreement that meeting the proposed Stage 3 care coordination criteria would improve their patients’ treatment and ensure they know about their patients’ visits to other providers. Conclusion The survey results suggest the need to enhance policy approaches and organizational strategies to address the key barriers identified by providers and practices in order to realize important care coordination benefits. PMID:26567327

  13. Meaningful use care coordination criteria: Perceived barriers and benefits among primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Genna R; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Stage 2 and proposed Stage 3 meaningful use criteria ask providers to support patient care coordination by electronically generating, exchanging, and reconciling key information during patient care transitions. A stratified random sample of primary care practices in Michigan (n = 328) that had already met Stage 1 meaningful use criteria was surveyed, in order to identify the anticipated barriers to meeting these criteria as well as the expected impact on patient care coordination from doing so. The top three barriers, as identified by >65% of the primary care providers surveyed, were difficulty sending and receiving patient information electronically, a lack of provider and practice staff time, and the complex workflow changes required. Despite these barriers, primary care providers expressed strong agreement that meeting the proposed Stage 3 care coordination criteria would improve their patients' treatment and ensure they know about their patients' visits to other providers. The survey results suggest the need to enhance policy approaches and organizational strategies to address the key barriers identified by providers and practices in order to realize important care coordination benefits. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Health care providers' comfort with and barriers to care of transgender youth.

    PubMed

    Vance, Stanley R; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L; Rosenthal, Stephen M

    2015-02-01

    To explore providers' clinical experiences, comfort, and confidence with and barriers to providing care to transgender youth. An online survey was administered to members of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine and the Pediatric Endocrine Society with items querying about clinical exposure to transgender youth, familiarity with and adherence to existing clinical practice guidelines, perceived barriers to providing transgender-related care, and comfort and confidence with providing transgender-related care. The response rate was 21.9% (n = 475). Of the respondents, 66.5% had provided care to transgender youth, 62.4% felt comfortable with providing transgender medical therapy, and 47.1% felt confident in doing so. Principal barriers to provision of transgender-related care were lack of the following: training, exposure to transgender patients, available qualified mental health providers, and insurance reimbursement. This study suggests that more training in transgender-related care, available qualified mental health providers, and insurance reimbursement for transgender-related care are needed. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical marijuana: Challenges and risk issues for health care providers.

    PubMed

    West, John C

    2017-04-01

    Laws on medical marijuana and recreational use of marijuana are sweeping the country and presenting real dilemmas for health care providers and facilities. However, due to disagreements between federal and state law, there are no easy answers. Additionally, the case law and statutory law on these issues is exceedingly sparse. It may take years for all of the issues to be ironed out, but health care facilities will need to act in the meantime on what may be little more than educated guesses. It may not be appropriate to simply prohibit the use of medical marijuana, but accommodating it also has risk. This article will address what is known about the subject and what is not known about the subject. Each provider and health care facility will need to devise their own approach to the subject based on principles that are presently known, while keeping an eye on the health and safety of all involved. © 2017 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  16. Diabetes care: provider disparities in the US Appalachian region.

    PubMed

    Denham, Sharon A; Wood, Lawrence E; Remsberg, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a devastating and growing problem in the USA and throughout the world. Parts of Appalachia, especially the most rural and economically 'distressed' areas of the region, have disproportionately high levels of diabetes incidence and have had long-standing problems in healthcare access. Little is known about the status of public health infrastructures and expertise available to address the diabetes epidemic, whether in Appalachia or elsewhere. This research examines the availability of professional diabetes care in Appalachia, including the economically distressed areas of the region. A 2006 cross-sectional survey of healthcare providers in the Appalachian Region identified diabetes service needs and availability in Appalachian healthcare facilities. Survey data and socioeconomic data were combined as a means to assess intra-regional variation in service availability. Participants perceived that diabetes prevalence was growing in Appalachia and that they were seeing increasing numbers of persons with diabetes. Healthcare facilities in the region rarely employed specialized health professional providers and the expertise concerning diabetes in some clinicians may be limited. The current and growing diabetes problem in Appalachia underscores the need for appropriate diabetes services and health professionals acquainted with current standards in diabetes care. Such problems in Appalachia have long been identified and linked with insufficient healthcare resources. The identification of ways to assure that local clinicians have current knowledge of diabetes standards of care is warranted.

  17. Primary care providers' willingness to see unaccompanied adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bravender, Terrill; Price, C Nicole; English, Abigail

    2004-01-01

    To describe primary care practitioners' office policies and willingness to provide medical care for unaccompanied adolescents aged 11-17 years. A unique 32-item survey was mailed in June and July, 2001 to 1979 office-based pediatricians and family practitioners randomly selected from the American Medical Association's physician database. The survey included questions regarding demographic information, number of adolescents seen in the practice, office policies regarding adolescents alone in the clinic, and 5-point Likert scales regarding their willingness to see patients in various situations, as well as to see patients in 12 brief clinical scenarios. Predictors of the willingness to see adolescents alone were identified and entered into binomial logistic regression models. Specific policies included on the surveys were coded into groups. Survey responses (n = 710) represented a 36% response rate. This sample included 288 family practitioners and 368 pediatricians; 43.3% of physicians reported having a specific policy regarding seeing adolescents without their parents present. Family practitioners were more likely than pediatricians to report having such a policy (51.3% vs. 38.2%, p =.001,), yet pediatricians reported a higher percentage of adolescents in their practices than family practitioners (22.6% vs. 12.4%, p <.0005). Not having a policy was an independent predictor of "often" or "always" seeing an adolescent alone for routine health maintenance (OR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.91-4.24) and urgent care visits (OR = 3.01, 95% CI 1.90-4.77). Specific policies varied, and many physicians assessed each case on an individual basis. Specific policies are associated with a decreased willingness of physicians to see adolescents who are unaccompanied by a parent. Carefully developed clinic policies that are consistent with legal guidelines should be implemented in order to maximize adolescents' abilities to access care.

  18. Enhancing the primary care team to provide redesigned care: the roles of practice facilitators and care managers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erin Fries; Machta, Rachel M; Meyers, David S; Genevro, Janice; Peikes, Deborah N

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to redesign primary care require multiple supports. Two potential members of the primary care team-practice facilitator and care manager-can play important but distinct roles in redesigning and improving care delivery. Facilitators, also known as quality improvement coaches, assist practices with coordinating their quality improvement activities and help build capacity for those activities-reflecting a systems-level approach to improving quality, safety, and implementation of evidence-based practices. Care managers provide direct patient care by coordinating care and helping patients navigate the system, improving access for patients, and communicating across the care team. These complementary roles aim to help primary care practices deliver coordinated, accessible, comprehensive, and patient-centered care.

  19. A Framework for Fibromyalgia Management for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Lesley M.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Dunegan, L. Jean; Turk, Dennis C.

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic widespread pain disorder commonly associated with comorbid symptoms, including fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. As in the management of other chronic medical disorders, the approach for fibromyalgia management follows core principles of comprehensive assessment, education, goal setting, multimodal treatment including pharmacological (eg, pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran) and nonpharmacological therapies (eg, physical activity, behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, education), and regular education and monitoring of treatment response and progress. Based on these core management principles, this review presents a framework for primary care providers through which they can develop a patient-centered treatment program for patients with fibromyalgia. This proactive and systematic treatment approach encourages ongoing education and patient self-management and is designed for use in the primary care setting. PMID:22560527

  20. Determinants of job satisfaction among selected care providers in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Shah, M A; Chowdhury, R I; al-Enezi, N; Shah, N M

    2001-01-01

    The study reports job satisfaction among a sample of 370 physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and medical laboratory technologists in the Ministry of Health hospitals in Kuwait. Job satisfaction was measured using Dunnette's scale. The respondents in all four categories were satisfied with all aspects of their jobs except salary. The medical laboratory technologists were, however, dissatisfied with professional advancement as well. The physicians were found to be most satisfied, closely followed by nurses and pharmacists, while medical laboratory technologists were least satisfied. Multivariate analysis was used to assess the net effects of background and work environment characteristics on overall job satisfaction. Introduction to job, in-service training, and monthly income had significant positive effects on overall job satisfaction. These findings may have serious implications for health care delivery systems that recruit expatriate care providers.

  1. A framework for fibromyalgia management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M; Clauw, Daniel J; Dunegan, L Jean; Turk, Dennis C

    2012-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic widespread pain disorder commonly associated with comorbid symptoms, including fatigue and nonrestorative sleep. As in the management of other chronic medical disorders, the approach for fibromyalgia management follows core principles of comprehensive assessment, education, goal setting, multimodal treatment including pharmacological (eg, pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran) and nonpharmacological therapies (eg, physical activity, behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, education), and regular education and monitoring of treatment response and progress. Based on these core management principles, this review presents a framework for primary care providers through which they can develop a patient-centered treatment program for patients with fibromyalgia. This proactive and systematic treatment approach encourages ongoing education and patient self-management and is designed for use in the primary care setting. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interventions to improve care coordination between primary healthcare and oncology care providers: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tomasone, Jennifer R; Brouwers, Melissa C; Vukmirovic, Marija; Grunfeld, Eva; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Urquhart, Robin; Walker, Melanie; Webster, Fiona; Fitch, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Coordination of patient care between primary care and oncology care providers is vital to care quality and outcomes across the cancer continuum, yet it is known to be challenging. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate current or new models of care and/or interventions aimed at improving coordination between primary care and oncology care providers for patients with adult breast and/or colorectal cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination were searched for existing English language studies published between January 2000 and 15 May 2015. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised studies were included if they evaluated a specific model/intervention that was designed to improve care coordination between primary care and oncology care providers, for any stage of the cancer continuum, for patients with adult breast and/or colorectal cancer. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Twenty-two studies (5 systematic reviews, 6 RCTs and 11 non-randomised studies) were included and varied with respect to the targeted phase of the cancer continuum, type of model or intervention tested, and outcome measures. The majority of studies showed no statistically significant changes in any patient, provider or system outcomes. Owing to conceptual and methodological limitations in this field, the review is unable to provide specific conclusions about the most effective or preferred model/intervention to improve care coordination. Imprecise results that lack generalisability and definitiveness provide limited evidence to base the development of future interventions and policies. Trial registration number CRD42015025006. PMID:27843639

  3. Geriatric care: ways and means of providing comfort.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Patricia Cruz Pontifice Sousa Valente; Marques, Rita Margarida Dourado; Ribeiro, Marta Pontifice

    2017-01-01

    To know the ways and means of comfort perceived by the older adults hospitalized in a medical service. Ethnographic study with a qualitative approach. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 22 older adults and participant observation of care situations. The ways and means of providing comfort are centered on strategies for promoting care mobilized by nurses and recognized by patients(clarifying/informing, positive interaction/communication, music therapy, touch, smile, unconditional presence, empathy/proximity relationship, integrating the older adult or the family as partner in the care, relief of discomfort through massage/mobilization/therapy) and on particular moments of comfort (the first contact, the moment of personal hygiene, and the visit of the family), which constitute the foundation of care/comfort. Geriatric care is built on the relationship that is established and complete with meaning, and is based on the meeting/interaction between the actors under the influence of the context in which they are inserted. The different ways and means of providing comfort aim to facilitate/increase care, relieve discomfort and/or invest in potential comfort. Conhecer os modos e formas de confortar percecionadas pelos idosos hospitalizados num serviço de medicina. Estudo etnográfico com abordagem qualitativa. Realizamos entrevistas semiestruturadas com 22 doentes idosos e observação participante nas situações de cuidados. Os modos e formas de confortar centram-se em estratégias promotoras de conforto mobilizadas pelo enfermeiro e reconhecidas pelos doentes (informação/esclarecimento, interação/comunicação positiva, toque, sorriso, presença incondicional, integração do idoso/família nos cuidados e o alívio de desconfortos através da massagem/mobilização/terapêutica) e em momentos particulares de conforto (contato inaugural, visita da família., cuidados de higiene e arranjo pessoal), que se constituem como alicerces do cuidar

  4. A need for otolaryngology education among primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Amanda; Sardesai, Maya G.; Meyer, Tanya K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Otolaryngic disorders are very common in primary care, comprising 20–50% of presenting complaints to a primary care provider. There is limited otolaryngology training in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education for primary care. Continuing medical education may be the next opportunity to train our primary care providers (PCPs). The objective of this study was to assess the otolaryngology knowledge of a group of PCPs attending an otolaryngology update course. Methods PCPs enrolled in an otolaryngology update course completed a web-based anonymous survey on demographics and a pre-course knowledge test. This test was composed of 12 multiple choice questions with five options each. At the end of the course, they were asked to evaluate the usefulness of the course for their clinical practice. Results Thirty seven (74%) PCPs completed the survey. Mean knowledge test score out of a maximum score of 12 was 4.0±1.7 (33.3±14.0%). Sorted by area of specialty, the mean scores out of a maximum score of 12 were: family medicine 4.6±2.1 (38.3±17.3%), pediatric medicine 4.2±0.8 (35.0±7.0%), other (e.g., dentistry, emergency medicine) 4.2±2.0 (34.6±17.0%), and adult medicine 3.9±2.1 (32.3±17.5%). Ninety one percent of respondents would attend the course again. Conclusion There is a low level of otolaryngology knowledge among PCPs attending an otolaryngology update course. There is a need for otolaryngology education among PCPs. PMID:22754276

  5. Abortion practice in Mexico: a survey of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Dayananda, Ila; Walker, Dilys; Atienzo, Erika E; Haider, Sadia

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about abortion practice in Mexico postlegalization of abortion in Mexico City in 2007. In 2009, we anonymously surveyed 418 Mexican health care providers at the Colegio Mexicano de Especialistas en Ginecologia y Obstetricia meeting using audio computer-assisted self-interview technology. The majority of respondents were obstetrician gynecologists (376, 90%), Catholic (341, 82%), 35-60 years old (332, 79%) and male (222, 53%) and worked with trainees (307, 74%). Prior to 2007, 11% (46) and 17% (71) provided medical and surgical abortions; now, 15% (62) and 21% (86) provide these services, respectively. Practitioners from Mexico City were more likely to provide services than those from other areas. Most medical abortion providers (50, 81%) used ineffective protocols. Surgical abortion providers mainly used either manual vacuum aspiration (39, 45%) or sharp curettage (27, 32%). Most abortion providers were trained in residency and wanted more training in medical (54, 87%) and surgical (59, 69%) abortion. Among nonproviders, 49% (175) and 27% (89) expressed interest in learning to perform medical and surgical abortion, respectively. Given the interest in learning to provide safe abortion services and the prevalent use of ineffective medical abortion regimens and sharp curettage, abortion training in Mexico should be strengthened. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Educating Health Care Professionals to Provide Institutional Changes in Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Uman, Gwen

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2006 report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition (In M. Hewitt, S. Greenfield and E. Stovall (Eds.), (pp. 9–186). Washington DC: The National Academies Press, 2006) identifies the key components of care that contribute to quality of life for the cancer survivor. As cancer survivorship care becomes an important part of quality cancer care oncology professionals need education to prepare themselves to provide this care. Survivorship care requires a varied approach depending on the survivor population, treatment regimens and care settings. The goal of this program was to encourage institutional changes that would integrate survivorship care into participating centers. An NCI-funded educational program: Survivorship Education for Quality Cancer Care provided multidiscipline two-person teams an opportunity to gain this important knowledge using a goal-directed, team approach. Educational programs were funded for yearly courses from 2006 to 2009. Survivorship care curriculum was developed using the Quality of Life Model as the core around the IOM recommendations. Baseline data was collected for all participants. Teams were followed-up at 6, 12 and 18 months postcourse for goal achievement and institutional evaluations. Comparison data from baseline to 18 months provided information on the 204 multidiscipline teams that participated over 4 years. Teams attended including administrators, social workers, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, physicians and others. Participating centers included primarily community cancer centers and academic centers followed by pediatric centers, ambulatory/physician offices and free standing cancer centers. Statistically significant changes at p=<0.05 levels were seen by 12 months postcourse related to the effectiveness, receptiveness and comfort of survivorship care in participant settings. Institutional assessments found improvement in seven domains of care that related to

  7. Misalignment between medicare policies and depression care in home health care: home health provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley A; Richardson, Joshua E; Bruce, Martha L

    2014-07-01

    Semistructured interviews with nurses working for home health care agencies in five states raise serious questions about the deleterious effects of Medicare policies and procedures on depression care. The agencies have strong incentives to limit nursing time in a given payment episode and to increase volume, making it difficult to provide high-quality depression care for homebound patients. Some nurses felt forced to "abandon" many patients with depression. The authors call for incremental policy changes in several key areas.

  8. Family-Provided Health Care for Children With Special Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Romley, John A; Shah, Aakash K; Chung, Paul J; Elliott, Marc N; Vestal, Katherine D; Schuster, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    Many children with special health care needs (CSHCN) receive health care at home from family members, but the extent of this care is poorly quantified. This study's goals were to create a profile of CSHCN who receive family-provided health care and to quantify the extent of such care. We analyzed data from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, a nationally representative sample of 40 242 parents/guardians of CSHCN. Outcomes included sociodemographic characteristics of CSHCN and their households, time spent by family members providing health care at home to CSHCN, and the total economic cost of such care. Caregiving hours were assessed at (1) the cost of hiring an alternative caregiver (the "replacement cost" approach), and (2) caregiver wages (the "foregone earnings" approach). Approximately 5.6 million US CSHCN received 1.5 billion hours annually of family-provided health care. Replacement with a home health aide would have cost an estimated $35.7 billion or $6400 per child per year in 2015 dollars ($11.6 billion or $2100 per child per year at minimum wage). The associated foregone earnings were $17.6 billion or $3200 per child per year. CSHCN most likely to receive the greatest amount of family-provided health care at home were ages 0 to 5 years, were Hispanic, lived below the federal poverty level, had no parents/guardians who had finished high school, had both public and private insurance, and had severe conditions/problems. US families provide a significant quantity of health care at home to CSHCN, representing a substantial economic cost. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Hospitals as Child Care Providers. An Interview with Diane Schulz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Interviews Diane Schulz, president of Child Care in Health Care, discussing the status of on-site or near-site child care for hospital employees. Considers the trend in hospital-based care, organization, support, customers, and challenges faced by these day care centers. (JPB)

  10. Evaluation of Care Provided to Terminally Ill Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Margaret T.; Williams, T. Franklin

    1983-01-01

    Studied the quality of terminal care in 40 patients in an acute care facility and a chronic care facility. Minimial difficulty was observed in making the transition from active to comfort care. An evaluation method and a model of terminal care emphasizing improved communication and emotional support are proposed. (Author/JAC)

  11. Use of placebo interventions among Swiss primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Fässler, Margrit; Gnädinger, Markus; Rosemann, Thomas; Biller-Andorno, Nikola

    2009-08-10

    Placebo interventions can have meaningful effects for patients. However, little is known about the circumstances of their use in clinical practice. We aimed to investigate to what extent and in which way Swiss primary care providers use placebo interventions. Furthermore we explored their ideas about the ethical and legal issues involved. 599 questionnaires were sent to general practitioners (GPs) and paediatricians in private practice in the Canton of Zurich in Switzerland. To allow for subgroup analysis GPs in urban, suburban, and rural areas as well as paediatricians were selected in an even ratio. 233 questionnaires were completed (response rate 47%). 28% of participants reported that they never used placebo interventions. More participants used impure placebos therapeutically than pure placebos (57% versus 17%, McNemar's chi(2) = 78, p < 0.001). There is not one clear main reason for placebo prescription. Placebo use was communicated to patients mostly as being "a drug or a therapy" (64%). The most frequently chosen ethical premise was that they "can be used as long as the physician and the patient work together in partnership" (60% for pure and 75% for impure placebos, McNemar's chi(2) = 12, p < 0.001). A considerable number of participants (11-38%) were indecisive about statements regarding the ethical and legal legitimacy of using placebos. The data obtained from Swiss primary care providers reflect a broad variety of views about placebo interventions as well as a widespread uncertainty regarding their legitimacy. Primary care providers seem to preferentially use impure as compared to pure placebos in their daily practice. An intense debate is required on appropriate standards regarding the clinical use of placebo interventions among medical professionals.

  12. Use of placebo interventions among Swiss primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Fässler, Margrit; Gnädinger, Markus; Rosemann, Thomas; Biller-Andorno, Nikola

    2009-01-01

    Background Placebo interventions can have meaningful effects for patients. However, little is known about the circumstances of their use in clinical practice. We aimed to investigate to what extent and in which way Swiss primary care providers use placebo interventions. Furthermore we explored their ideas about the ethical and legal issues involved. Methods 599 questionnaires were sent to general practitioners (GPs) and paediatricians in private practice in the Canton of Zurich in Switzerland. To allow for subgroup analysis GPs in urban, suburban, and rural areas as well as paediatricians were selected in an even ratio. Results 233 questionnaires were completed (response rate 47%). 28% of participants reported that they never used placebo interventions. More participants used impure placebos therapeutically than pure placebos (57% versus 17%, McNemar's χ2 = 78, p < 0.001). There is not one clear main reason for placebo prescription. Placebo use was communicated to patients mostly as being "a drug or a therapy" (64%). The most frequently chosen ethical premise was that they "can be used as long as the physician and the patient work together in partnership" (60% for pure and 75% for impure placebos, McNemar's χ2 = 12, p < 0.001). A considerable number of participants (11–38%) were indecisive about statements regarding the ethical and legal legitimacy of using placebos. Conclusion The data obtained from Swiss primary care providers reflect a broad variety of views about placebo interventions as well as a widespread uncertainty regarding their legitimacy. Primary care providers seem to preferentially use impure as compared to pure placebos in their daily practice. An intense debate is required on appropriate standards regarding the clinical use of placebo interventions among medical professionals. PMID:19664267

  13. Realignment of incentives for health-care providers in China.

    PubMed

    Yip, Winnie Chi-Man; Hsiao, William; Meng, Qingyue; Chen, Wen; Sun, Xiaoming

    2010-03-27

    Inappropriate incentives as part of China's fee-for-service payment system have resulted in rapid cost increase, inefficiencies, poor quality, unaffordable health care, and an erosion of medical ethics. To reverse these outcomes, a strategy of experimentation to realign incentives for providers with the social goals of improvement in quality and efficiency has been initiated in China. This Review shows how lessons that have been learned from international experiences have been improved further in China by realignment of the incentives for providers towards prevention and primary care, and incorporation of a treatment protocol for hospital services. Although many experiments are new, preliminary evidence suggests a potential to produce savings in costs. However, because these experiments have not been scientifically assessed in China, evidence of their effects on quality and health outcome is largely missing. Although a reform of the provider's payment can be an effective short-term strategy, professional ethics need to be re-established and incentives changed to alter the profit motives of Chinese hospitals and physicians alike. When hospitals are given incentives to achieve maximum profit, incentives for hospitals and physicians must be separated.

  14. Barriers to communication regarding end-of-life care: perspectives of care providers.

    PubMed

    Anselm, Anjali H; Palda, Valerie; Guest, Cameron B; McLean, Richard F; Vachon, Mary L S; Kelner, Merrijoy; Lam-McCulloch, Jenny

    2005-09-01

    Communication regarding end-of-life care is frequently perceived as suboptimal, despite the intent of both health care providers and patients. We interviewed health care providers to determine their perspective regarding these barriers to communication. Eleven focus groups with a total of 10 attending physicians, 24 residents, and 33 nurses were convened to explore barriers to end-of-life discussions on the Internal Medicine service at a 600-bed tertiary care hospital in Toronto, Canada. An interview schedule was designed to elicit information regarding the process of end-of-life discussions, barriers to these discussions, and possible interventions for limiting such barriers. Transcripts were qualitatively analyzed by 6 raters who independently identified "themes." Themes were refined using the Delphi technique and classified under broader "categories." Four main categories of barriers emerged, relating to (1) patients, (2) the health care system, (3) health care providers, and (4) the nature of this dialogue. Attending physicians and residents most frequently identified patient-related factors as barriers to discussions, followed by system, dialogue, and provider barriers (43%, 39%, 10%, and 8%, respectively, for attending physicians; 40%, 34%, 13%, and 13%, respectively, for residents). Nurses similarly identified patient-related and system barriers most frequently, but provider barriers were discussed more often than dialogue barriers (46%, 28%, 22%, and 4%, respectively). Attending physicians, residents, and nurses perceive the recipients of their care, and the system within which they provide this care, to be the major source of barriers to communication regarding end-of-life care. This finding may impact on the effectiveness of quality-improvement initiatives in end-of-life care.

  15. Family Child Care Health and Safety Checklist: A Packet for Family Child Care Providers [with Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro; Gravell, Joanne

    This checklist and accompanying video are designed to help family child care providers assess the health and safety of the child care home. The checklist includes suggestions for conducting the self-evaluation and for creating a safer, healthier home environment. The areas of the checklist are: your home, out of bounds areas, gates and guards,…

  16. We Are Not Babysitters: Family Child Care Providers Redefine Work and Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuominen, Mary C.

    Drawing on in-depth interviews with 20 family child care providers of diverse race, ethnicity, immigrant status, and social class, this book explores the social, political, and economic forces and processes that draw women into the work of family child care. The articles dispel not only myths about why women choose to be family child care…

  17. We Are Not Babysitters: Family Child Care Providers Redefine Work and Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuominen, Mary C.

    Drawing on in-depth interviews with 20 family child care providers of diverse race, ethnicity, immigrant status, and social class, this book explores the social, political, and economic forces and processes that draw women into the work of family child care. The articles dispel not only myths about why women choose to be family child care…

  18. Family Child Care Health and Safety Checklist: A Packet for Family Child Care Providers [with Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro; Gravell, Joanne

    This checklist and accompanying video are designed to help family child care providers assess the health and safety of the child care home. The checklist includes suggestions for conducting the self-evaluation and for creating a safer, healthier home environment. The areas of the checklist are: your home, out of bounds areas, gates and guards,…

  19. Ranked motives of long-term care providing family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Beneken Genaamd Kolmer, Deirdre; Tellings, Agnes; Gelissen, John; Garretsen, Henk; Bongers, Inge

    2008-03-01

    Family caregivers provide long-term care to their chronically ill loved ones and as a consequence they experience physical, relational and financial problems. This study investigates how long-term family caregivers rank 12 motives for caregiving. Motives are derived from the views of four philosophical anthropologists and are related to self-reported stress and joy and to several different background characteristics of respondents. Motives that focus on feelings concerning the relationship between caregiver and care recipient are more popular as a first choice than motives stemming from feelings of obligation or a general feeling of happiness and are also more popular than more self-directed motives. An analysis of full ranking data shows that two groups can be distinguished, one group of family caregivers with mixed motives and one group of family caregivers with motives that focus on reciprocal mutually equal relationships. The latter are mainly women taking care for a partner or a child, the former report high levels of stress. Implications for intervention programmes and health policy are being discussed.

  20. Spiritual Care Training Provided to Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Paal, Piret; Helo, Yousef; Frick, Eckhard

    2015-03-01

    This systematic review was conducted to assess the outcomes of spiritual care training. It outlines the training outcomes based on participants' oral/written feedback, course evaluation and performance assessment. Intervention was defined as any form of spiritual care training provided to healthcare professionals studying/working in an academic and/or clinical setting. An online search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, ERIC, PsycINFO, ASSIA, CSA, ATLA and CENTRAL up to Week 27 of 2013 by two independent investigators to reduce errors in inclusion. Only peer-reviewed journal articles reporting on training outcomes were included. A primary keyword-driven search found 4912 articles; 46 articles were identified as relevant for final analysis. The narrative synthesis of findings outlines the following outcomes: (1) acknowledging spirituality on an individual level, (2) success in integrating spirituality in clinical practice, (3) positive changes in communication with patients. This study examines primarily pre/post-effects within a single cohort. Due to an average study quality, the reported findings in this review are to be seen as indicators at most. Nevertheless, this review makes evident that without attending to one'the repeliefs and needs, addressing spirituality in patients will not be forthcoming. It also demonstrates that spiritual care training may help to challenge the spiritual vacuum in healthcare institutions.

  1. Health Care Providers Inventory: a method for evaluating nursing aides.

    PubMed

    Beach, D A

    1988-01-01

    The Health Care Providers Inventory (HCPI) is a 70-item questionnaire containing five primary scales and a validity scale. It is a pre-employment instrument designed to evaluate American nursing aides. In this study, I determined that the HCPI is a reliable, non-discriminatory test. Concurrent, construct, and predictive validity data are reported, which indicate that the HCPI measures significant personality characteristics, and is of value to administrators in their hiring of suitable applicants and in the reduction of employee turnover in nursing homes.

  2. The implications of domestic violence for home care providers.

    PubMed

    Attala, J M; Weaver, T L; Duckett, D; Draper, V

    2000-01-01

    The effects of domestic violence are revealed in shelters for battered women, but with more emphasis on prevention, cues to violence may first be detected in home settings. The most common injury sites involve the upper body. Based on a 2-year record (N = 153) review at a shelter for battered women, prevalence of injuries, health conditions and substance use were examined. Most women (82%) reported injuries, and most had past injuries severe enough to require surgery or hospitalization. This article educates home care providers about the types of abuse they are likely to find in women from violent homes and their health implications.

  3. Developing ambulatory care clinics: nurse practitioners as primary providers.

    PubMed

    Lamper-Linden, C; Goetz-Kulas, J; Lake, R

    1983-12-01

    While hospitals evaluate ambulatory clinics as a revenue-generating service alternative, nursing executives develop new areas for nursing practice in nurse-managed clinics. The authors describe the five-year growth of a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic providing primary health care to those aged 55 and older. The discussion explains nurse practitioner leadership and practice, and accountability between professions. The concept and structure of services and marketing strategies are elated to the people served. Financial feasibility, cost containment, and other factors demonstrate the clinic's contribution to its sponsoring hospital.

  4. Care of nestlings by wild female starlings exposed to an organophosphate pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grue, C.E.; Powell, G.V.N.; McChesney, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    (1) Our objective was to determine the effect of exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (OP), dicrotophos (3-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyl-cis-scrotonamide dimethyl phosphate), on care of nestlings by wild female starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)....(2) We selected twelve pairs of active nests based on synchrony in the reproductive cycle. When nestlings were 10 days old (day 10), adult males were captured and killed and brood size was adjusted to four. The frequency and temporal distribution of sorties made by each pair of females to feed their young were recorded for 2 h at 18.00 hours on day 11 and 06.00 hours on day 12. One female from each pair was given a single oral dose of dicrotophos (2.5 mg/kg of body weight) dissolved in corn oil; the second female received an equivalent exposure of pure corn oil. Birds were released and their nestlings weighed. Parental care was again monitored between 18.00 and 20.00 hours on day 12 and 06.00 and 08.00 hours on day 13. Females were then captured and they with their young were weighed and killed. Changes in parental care in OP-dosed and control females were compared using paired t-tests. ....(3) The OP-dosed females made significantly (P < 0.5) fewer sorties to feed their young and remained away from their boxes for longer periods of time than controls. Nestlings of OP-treated females lost significantly more weight (X = 9.3%) than nestlings of controls (X = 3.2%). Brain ChE activity in OP-treated females was inhibited an average of 50.7% compared with controls. Weight changes in OP-dosed (X = -8.9%) and control females (X = -8.3%) were similar.....(4) Results indicate that parental care may be significantly reduced in songbirds receiving severe but sublethal exposure to organophosphate pesticides. The potential for a reduction or modification in parental care to alter reproductive success in passerines is discussed..... (5) Techniques utilized, or modifications thereof, may be useful in collecting the additional data needed to

  5. To provide care and be cared for in a multiple-bed hospital room.

    PubMed

    Persson, Eva; Määttä, Sylvia

    2012-12-01

    To illuminate patients' experiences of being cared for and nurses' experiences of caring for patients in a multiple-bed hospital room. Many patients and healthcare personnel seem to prefer single-bed hospital rooms. However, certain advantages of multiple-bed hospital rooms (MBRs) have also been described. Eight men and eight women being cared for in a multiple-bedroom were interviewed, and two focus-group interviews (FGI) with 12 nurses were performed. A qualitative content analysis was used. One theme--Creating a sphere of privacy--and three categories were identified based on the patient interviews. The categories were: Being considerate, Having company and The patients' area. In the FGI, one theme--Integrating individual care with care for all--and two categories emerged: Experiencing a friendly atmosphere and Providing exigent care. Both patients and nurses described the advantages and disadvantages of multiple-bed rooms. The patient culture of taking care of one another and enjoying the company of room-mates were considered positive and gave a sense of security of both patients and nurses. The advantages were slight and could easily become disadvantages if, for example, room-mates were very ill or confused. The patients tried to maintain their privacy and dignity and claimed that there were small problems with room-mates listening to conversations. In contrast, the nurses stressed patient integrity as a main disadvantage and worked to protect the integrity of individual patients. Providing care for all patients simultaneously had the advantage of saving time. The insights gained in the present study could assist nurses in reducing the disadvantages and taking advantage of the positive elements of providing care in MBRs. Health professionals need to be aware of how attitudes towards male and female patients, respectively, could affect care provision. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. [Care for skin cancer in Germany : Provision and providers].

    PubMed

    Augustin, M; Anastasiadou, Z; Schaarschmidt, M L; Krensel, M; Schäfer, I; Reusch, M

    2016-07-01

    Treatment for skin cancer is a major component of dermatological care in western countries. The purpose of this work is to analyze health care provision and providers for skin cancer care in Germany. From the complete claims data set from 2007-2009 of the German statutory health insurance DAK (approximately 6.1 million insured persons), insurees with skin cancer and melanocytic naevi were extracted by ICD-10 codes. Surgical procedures and physician specialties were identified by specific codes. Data from the German statistical agency (Destatis) were derived from public domain for the years 2008-2010. Among the annual ambulatory surgical treatments (n = 6695) for melanoma, 83.6 % were conducted by dermatologists, followed by general surgeons (11.1 %), and facial surgeons (3.0 %). In melanocytic naevi (n = 51,659), 79.1 % were treated by dermatologists, followed by general surgeons (15.5 %), facial surgeons (3.6 %), and general practitioners (1.1 %), while in epithelial cancers (ICD-10 C44), 76.4 % were operated by dermatologists, followed by general surgeons (12.7 %) and facial surgeons (7.9 %). Overall, related to Germany, about 830,000 ambulatory operations for skin cancer were conducted in 2009 which is about 40 % more than in 2007. In hospitalized patients, 79,448 out of 195,558 inpatient cases (45.5 %) were treated in dermatological departments in the year 2012. Average annual growth rates of the inpatient cases in the DAK between 2007 and 2010 were 8.9 % for MM and 11.1 % for SCC/BCC. Skin cancer is associated with a significant and still growing need for surgical care in which dermatology has a leading role in Germany. Thus, there is an increasing need for dermato-surgical specialist training.

  7. Barriers and facilitators of adolescent behavioral health in primary care: Perceptions of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Bitar, George W; Springer, Paul; Gee, Robert; Graff, Chad; Schydlower, Manuel

    2009-12-01

    Several major policy reports describe the central role of primary care in improving the delivery of behavioral health care services to children and adolescents. Although primary care providers are uniquely positioned to provide these services, numerous obstacles hinder the integration of these services, including time, clinic management and organization issues, training, and resources. Although many of these obstacles have been described in the literature, few studies have investigated these issues from the first-person perspective of front-line providers. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to provide an in-depth description of primary care providers' attitudes and perceptions of adolescent behavioral health care across a diversity of primary care settings (i.e., Federally Qualified Health Center [FQHC], FQHC-Look Alike, school-based, military). Sixteen focus groups were conducted at 5 primary care clinics. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the focus group data. Obstacles to integration are presented as well as strategies to overcome these challenges, using training and education, working groups, and community collaboratives.

  8. Integrated model for mental health care. Are health care providers satisfied with it?

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, S.; Kates, N.; Crustolo, A. M.; Nikolaou, L.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether health care providers are satisfied with an integrated program of mental health care. DESIGN: Surveys using a mailed questionnaire. Surveys were developed for each of the three disciplines; each survey had 30 questions. SETTING: Thirty-six primary care practices in Hamilton, Ont, participating in the Hamilton-Wentworth Health Service Organization's Mental Health Program. PARTICIPANTS: Family physicians, psychiatrists, and mental health counselors providing mental health care in primary care settings. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Satisfaction as shown on 5-point Likert scales. RESULTS: High levels of satisfaction with the model were recorded. Family physicians increased their skills, felt more comfortable with handling mental health problems, and were satisfied with the benefit to their patients. Psychiatrists and counselors were gratified that they were accepted by other members of the primary care team. Areas for improvement included finding space in primary care settings and better scheduling to allow for optimal communication. CONCLUSION: Family physicians, counselors, and psychiatrists expressed great satisfaction with a shared mental health care program based in primary care. PMID:11785279

  9. Examining pediatric care for newly immigrated families: Perspectives of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, David; Fleming-Carroll, Bonnie; Durrant, Michele; Hellmann, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Respect for the ethnicity and cultural background of families are important components of health care delivery. However, the needs of new immigrants in pediatric care systems remain under-addressed in the literature. This study utilized a qualitative approach of interpretive description to elicit the pediatric health care experiences and needs of new immigrants to Canada, from the perspective of health care providers who worked extensively with newcomers. Two focus groups of multidisciplinary health care providers were conducted in a tertiary-level pediatric hospital. Results identify that the needs of new immigrant families are often insufficiently met by existing pediatric care practices. Needs include subsistence requirements such as income, transportation, and family understanding about the complex processes of health care in the new society. Newly immigrated families reportedly experience emotional adjustment and social support struggles and needs. Information and support to navigate the health care system are warranted. These formidable challenges invite proactive approaches, including navigation and resource finding supports as well as culturally responsive family-centered care.

  10. Transforming care teams to provide the best possible patient-centered, collaborative care.

    PubMed

    Sevin, Cory; Moore, Gordon; Shepherd, John; Jacobs, Tracy; Hupke, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Patient experience of care is now a crucial parameter in assessing the quality of healthcare delivered in the United States. Continuity, patient-driven access to care, and being "known" by a provider or practice, particularly for patients with chronic diseases, have been shown to enhance patient satisfaction with care and health outcomes. Healthcare systems are challenged to effectively meet the wants and needs of patients by tailoring interventions based on each person's unique set factors-his or her strengths, preferences, and personal and social context. Creating care teams, a coordinated multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals, enables a practice to take advantage of the skill sets represented and redesign care delivery with the patient and community as the focal point. This article describes the attributes of highly functioning care teams, how to measure them, and guidance on creating them. A case example illustrates how these ideas work in practice.

  11. Patients' and Health Care Providers' Perception of Stressors in the Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Abuatiq, Alham

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study is first, to investigate intensive care patients' perceptions of stressors; second, to investigate the health care provider's perception of what constitutes a stressor from the patient's perspective; and third, to describe how health care providers manage their patients' stressors. This was a mixed-methods study; the quantitative section replicated Cornock's 1998 study of stress in the intensive care unit (ICU), with difference in sampling to include all health care providers in the ICU, in addition to nurses. The qualitative section added information to the current literature by describing how health care providers manage their patient's stressors. This article reports the quantitative findings of this study, as the qualitative section is presented in a separate article. It is important to describe ICU patients' stressful experiences to assess patient's stressors, provide holistic care to eliminate stressors, and provide feedback to health care providers. There is a need to describe the clinical practice related to stress perception and management of stressors in the critical care environment. A mixed-methods comparative descriptive design was used for the quantitative section, and a phenomenological approach guided the qualitative section. Lazarus and Folkman's theory formed the bases for integrating all variables investigated in this study. The sample included 70 ICU patients and 70 ICU health care providers. After consenting to participate in this study, subjects were given a demographic form and a paper-based tool, the Environmental Stressors graphic data form Questionnaire. Questionnaires were filled out by subjects anonymously in the ICU and returned to the researcher in the same setting. Descriptive statistics were analyzed using SPSS data analysis software. The top 3 most stressful items ranked by the patients included "being in pain," followed by "not being able to sleep" and "financial worries"; on the other hand, health care

  12. The influence of care provider access to structural empowerment on individualized care in long-term-care facilities.

    PubMed

    Caspar, Sienna; O'Rourke, Norm

    2008-07-01

    Implementing management initiatives that enable formal caregivers to provide quality, individualized care to older adults in long-term-care (LTC) facilities is increasingly important given that the number of LTC residents is projected to triple by 2031. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between care provider access to structural empowerment and the provision of individualized care in LTC. We computed structural equation models separately for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses (n = 242) and care aides (n = 326) to examine the relationship between access to empowerment structures (i.e., informal power, formal power, information, support, resources, opportunity) and the provision of individualized care. We subsequently undertook invariance analyses to determine if the association between empowerment structures and reported provision of individualized care differed between caregiver groups. Access to structural empowerment had a statistically significant, positive association with provision of individualized care for both groups. For registered nurses/licensed practical nurses and care aides, empowerment explained 50% and 45% of observed variance in individualized care, respectively. These notable percentages did not differ significantly between caregiver groups. Of the empowerment structures, support, especially in the form of access to educational opportunities and recognition for a job well done, seems to be particularly significant to care providers. Findings from this study suggest that provision of individualized care in LTC may be enhanced when formal caregivers have appreciable access to empowerment structures.

  13. Exploring the Role of Farm Animals in Providing Care at Care Farms

    PubMed Central

    Hassink, Jan; De Bruin, Simone R.; Berget, Bente; Elings, Marjolein

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary This paper provides insight into the role of farm animals in farm-based programs and their importance to different types of participants. Farm animals provide real work, close relationships, challenging tasks and opportunities for reflection. They also contribute to a welcoming atmosphere for various types of participants. Abstract We explore the role of farm animals in providing care to different types of participants at care farms (e.g., youngsters with behavioural problems, people with severe mental problems and people with dementia). Care farms provide alternative and promising settings where people can interact with animals compared to a therapeutic healthcare setting. We performed a literature review, conducted focus group meetings and carried out secondary data-analysis of qualitative studies involving care farmers and different types of participants. We found that farm animals are important to many participants and have a large number of potential benefits. They can (i) provide meaningful day occupation; (ii) generate valued relationships; (iii) help people master tasks; (iv) provide opportunities for reciprocity; (v) can distract people from them problems; (vi) provide relaxation; (vii) facilitate customized care; (viii) facilitate relationships with other people; (ix) stimulate healthy behavior; (x) contribute to a welcoming environment; (xi) make it possible to experience basic elements of life; and (xii) provide opportunities for reflection and feedback. This shows the multi-facetted importance of interacting with animals on care farms. In this study the types of activities with animals and their value to different types of participants varied. Farm animals are an important element of the care farm environment that can address the care needs of different types of participants. PMID:28574435

  14. Improving education and resources for health care providers.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, M; Welch, L

    1993-01-01

    Workers and citizens are turning increasingly to the health care system for information about occupational and environmental reproductive hazards, yet most primary care providers and specialists know little about the effects of occupational/environmental toxicants on the reproductive system or how to evaluate and manage patients at potential risk. Although it is unrealistic to expect all clinicians to become experts in this area, practitioners should know how to take a basic screening history, identify patients at potential risk, and make appropriate referrals. At present, occupational and environmental health issues are not well integrated into health professional education in the United States, and clinical information and referral resources pertaining to reproductive hazards are inadequate. In addressing these problems, the conference "Working Group on Health Provider Education and Resources" made several recommendations that are detailed in this report. Short-term goals include enhancement of existing expertise and resources at a regional level and better integration of information on occupational/environmental reproductive hazards into curricula, meetings, and publications of medical and nursing organizations. Longer term goals include development of a comprehensive, single-access information and referral system for clinicians and integration of occupational and environmental medicine into formal health professional education curricula at all levels. PMID:8243391

  15. [Development of a position on sexuality in health care providers].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Juan; Viniegra-Velázquez, Leonardo

    2009-01-01

    two attitudes were considered about sexual practice; one is centered in the reproduction, attaching to as a natural thing and intolerance to different expressions of sexuality. The other view according to prevent damage and sexual practices without guilt, bashful attitudes and intolerance. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of an educational intervention, upon the development of the position on sexuality in health care providers. study of comparative intervention. Two experimental groups and one control group with initial and final measurements were used. To compare two groups we used the U tests of Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis. the initial median of the experimental group 1 (GE1) and the witness (GT) were equal and significantly different from the experimental group 2 (GE2); in this one, only 31% of its members initiated without position, as opposed to the 100% of the GE1, and of 93 % of the GT. a high proportion of health care providers had no posture on sexuality. A position was not reached with the accumulating information; it develops through the questioning of their experience, the educational perspective being an essential factor to achieving it.

  16. Organizational and cultural changes for providing safe patient care.

    PubMed

    Odwazny, Richard; Hasler, Scott; Abrams, Richard; McNutt, Robert

    2005-01-01

    To describe an approach and experience with fostering a culture of patient safety. (1) Organizational Change-The Department of Medicine established a patient safety committee (PSC) and charged it with reviewing adverse events. (2) Cultural Change-PSC sponsors and participants work to promote a culture of collaboration, study, learning, and prevention versus a culture of blame. (3) Collaboration-The PSC includes chief residents and members from medical informatics, nursing, pharmacy, quality assurance, risk management, and utilization management. (4) Evolution-The duties of the PSC progressed from merely learning from adverse event reports to implementing patient safety and quality improvement projects. (5) Standardization-The PSC uses standard definitions and procedures when reviewing cases of adverse events, and when conducting patient safety and quality improvement projects. (1) Developed an online adverse event reporting system, shortening the average report collection time by 2 days and increasing the number of adverse events reported. (2) Established a model for change using (a) safety rounds with residents, (b) e-mail safety alerts, and, in some cases, (c) decision alerts using electronic order entry. These changes in culture and capability led to improvements in care and improved financial results. Senior management support of a culture of learning and prevention and an organizational structure that promotes collaboration has provided an environment in which patient safety initiatives can flourish by providing not only safer and higher quality patient care but also a positive financial return on investment.

  17. Quality of Care Provided by a Comprehensive Dementia Care Comanagement Program.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Lee A; Tan, Zaldy; Wenger, Neil S; Cook, Erin A; Han, Weijuan; McCreath, Heather E; Serrano, Katherine S; Roth, Carol P; Reuben, David B

    2016-08-01

    Multiple studies have shown that quality of care for dementia in primary care is poor, with physician adherence to dementia quality indicators (QIs) ranging from 18% to 42%. In response, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Health System created the UCLA Alzheimer's and Dementia Care (ADC) Program, a quality improvement program that uses a comanagement model with nurse practitioner dementia care managers (DCM) working with primary care physicians and community-based organizations to provide comprehensive dementia care. The objective was to measure the quality of dementia care that nurse practitioner DCMs provide using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE-3) and Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement QIs. Participants included 797 community-dwelling adults with dementia referred to the UCLA ADC program over a 2-year period. UCLA is an urban academic medical center with primarily fee-for-service reimbursement. The percentage of recommended care received for 17 dementia QIs was measured. The primary outcome was aggregate quality of care for the UCLA ADC cohort, calculated as the total number of recommended care processes received divided by the total number of eligible quality indicators. Secondary outcomes included aggregate quality of care in three domains of dementia care: assessment and screening (7 QIs), treatment (6 QIs), and counseling (4 QIs). QIs were abstracted from DCM notes over a 3-month period from date of initial assessment. Individuals were eligible for 9,895 QIs, of which 92% were passed. Overall pass rates of DCMs were similar (90-96%). All counseling and assessment QIs had pass rates greater than 80%, with most exceeding 90%. Wider variation in adherence was found among QIs addressing treatments for dementia, which patient-specific criteria triggered, ranging from 27% for discontinuation of medications associated with mental status changes to 86% for discussion about acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Comprehensive

  18. Quality of Care Provided by a Comprehensive Dementia Care Co-management Program

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Lee A.; Tan, Zaldy; Wenger, Neil S.; Cook, Erin A.; Han, Weijuan; McCreath, Heather E.; Serrano, Katherine S.; Roth, Carol P.; Reuben, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that quality of care for dementia in primary care is poor with physician adherence to dementia quality indicators (QIs) ranging from 18-42%. In response, the University of California, Los Angeles Health System created the UCLA Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care (ADC) Program, a quality improvement program that uses a co-management model with a nurse practitioner dementia care manager (DCM) working with primary care physicians and community-based organizations to provide comprehensive dementia care. Our objective was to measure the quality of dementia care provided by nurse practitioner DCMs using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE-3) and Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement QIs. Participants included 797 community-dwelling adults with dementia referred to the UCLA ADC program over a two-year period. UCLA is an urban academic medical center with primarily fee-for-service reimbursement. We measured the percentage of recommended care received for 17 dementia QIs. The primary outcome was aggregate quality of care for the UCLA ADC cohort calculated as the total number of recommended care processes received divided by the total number of eligible quality indicators. Secondary outcomes included aggregate quality of care in three domains of dementia care: assessment and screening (7 QIs), treatment (6 QIs), and counseling (4 QIs). QIs were abstracted from DCM notes over a three-month period from date of initial assessment. Patients were eligible for 9,895 QIs, of which 92% were passed. Overall pass-rates among DCMs were similar (range 90% to 96%). All counseling and assessment QIs had pass-rates >80% with most exceeding 90%. Wider variation in adherence was found among QIs addressing treatments for dementia, which were triggered by patient-specific criteria, ranging from 27% for discontinuation of medications associated with mental status changes to 86% for discussion about acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Comprehensive

  19. Private ownership of primary care providers associated with patient perceived quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaolin; Yin, Jia; Wong, Samuel Y.S.; Griffiths, Sian M.; Zou, Guanyang; Shi, Leiyu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ownership of primary care providers varies in different cities in China. Shanghai represented the full public ownership model of primary providers; Shenzhen had public-owned but private-operated providers; and Hong Kong represented the full private ownership. The study aims to assess the association of primary care ownership and patient perceived quality of care in 3 Chinese megacities. We conducted multistage stratified random surveys in 2013 in the 3 cities. Quality scores of primary care were measured using the validated primary care assessment tools. Multivariate linear regression models were used to compare quality scores after controlling potential confounders of patient demographic, socioeconomic, and healthcare utilization factors. Overall, 797 primary care users in Shanghai, 802 in Shenzhen, and 1325 in Hong Kong participated in the study. The mean total quality scores were reported the highest in Shanghai (28.39), followed by Shenzhen (25.82) and then Hong Kong (25.21) (P < 0.001). Shanghai participants reported the highest scores for 1st contact accessibility, coordination of information, comprehensiveness of service availability, and culture competence, while Hong Kong participants reported the lowest for these domains (P < 0.001). Hong Kong participants from rich households reported higher total scores than those from poor households (P < 0.05); however, this was not found in Shanghai and Shenzhen. The study suggests that private primary care ownership may be associated with lower quality and less equitable care distribution. In China, it suggests that it may be beneficial to promote public-owned and nonprofit providers. Promoting privatization in primary care may be at the cost of quality and equity of primary care. PMID:28072718

  20. Misalignment between Medicare Policies and Depression Care in Home Health Care: Home health provider perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley; Richardson, Joshua; Bruce, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Objective Depression affects one in four older adults receiving home health care. Medicare policies are influential in shaping home health practice. This study aims to identify Medicare policy areas that are aligned or misaligned with depression care quality improvement in home health care. Methods Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with nurses and administrators from five home health agencies in five states (n=20). Digitally recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using the grounded theory method. A multi-disciplinary team iteratively developed a codebook from interview data to identify themes. Results Several important Medicare policies are largely misaligned with depression care quality improvement in home health care: Medicare eligibility requirements for patients to remain homebound and to demonstrate a need for skilled care restrict nurses’ abilities to follow up with depressed patients for sufficient length of time; the lack of explicit recognition of nursing time and quality of care in the home health Prospective Payment System (PPS) provides misaligned incentives for depression care; incorporation of a two-item depression screening tool in Medicare-mandated comprehensive patient assessment raised clinician awareness of depression; however, inclusion of the tool at Start-of-Care only but not any other follow-up points limits its potential in assisting nurses with depression care management; under-development of clinical decision support for depression care in vendor-developed electronic health records constitutes an important barrier to depression quality improvement in home health care. Conclusions Several influential Medicare policies and regulations for home health practice may be misaligned with evidence-based depression care for home health patients. PMID:24632686

  1. Retention in Care Services Reported by HIV Care Providers in the United States, 2013 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Craw, Jason A; Bradley, Heather; Gremel, Garrett; West, Brady T; Duke, Christopher C; Beer, Linda; Weiser, John

    Evidence-based guidelines recommend that HIV care providers offer retention-in-care services, but data are needed to assess service provision. We surveyed a probability sample of 1234 HIV care providers to estimate the percentage of providers whose practices offered 5 recommended retention services and describe providers' perceptions of barriers to care among patients. An estimated 21% of providers' practices offered all 5 retention services. Providers at smaller (<50 versus >400 patients), private, and non-Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP)-funded practices, and practices without on-site case management were significantly less likely to provide patient navigation services or do systematic monitoring of retention. Providers' most commonly perceived barriers to care among patients were mental health (40%), substance abuse (36%), and transportation (34%) issues. Deficiencies in the provision of key retention services are substantial. New strategies may be needed to increase the delivery of recommended retention services, especially among private, non-RWHAP-funded, and smaller facilities.

  2. Modelling catchment areas for secondary care providers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon; Wardlaw, Jessica; Crouch, Susan; Carolan, Michelle

    2011-09-01

    Hospitals need to understand patient flows in an increasingly competitive health economy. New initiatives like Patient Choice and the Darzi Review further increase this demand. Essential to understanding patient flows are demographic and geographic profiles of health care service providers, known as 'catchment areas' and 'catchment populations'. This information helps Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to review how their populations are accessing services, measure inequalities and commission services; likewise it assists Secondary Care Providers (SCPs) to measure and assess potential gains in market share, redesign services, evaluate admission thresholds and plan financial budgets. Unlike PCTs, SCPs do not operate within fixed geographic boundaries. Traditionally, SCPs have used administrative boundaries or arbitrary drive times to model catchment areas. Neither approach satisfactorily represents current patient flows. Furthermore, these techniques are time-consuming and can be challenging for healthcare managers to exploit. This paper presents three different approaches to define catchment areas, each more detailed than the previous method. The first approach 'First Past the Post' defines catchment areas by allocating a dominant SCP to each Census Output Area (OA). The SCP with the highest proportion of activity within each OA is considered the dominant SCP. The second approach 'Proportional Flow' allocates activity proportionally to each OA. This approach allows for cross-boundary flows to be captured in a catchment area. The third and final approach uses a gravity model to define a catchment area, which incorporates drive or travel time into the analysis. Comparing approaches helps healthcare providers to understand whether using more traditional and simplistic approaches to define catchment areas and populations achieves the same or similar results as complex mathematical modelling. This paper has demonstrated, using a case study of Manchester, that when estimating

  3. Umbilical cord blood banking: implications for perinatal care providers.

    PubMed

    Armson, B Anthony

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the risks and benefits of umbilical cord blood banking for future stem cell transplantation and to provide guidelines for Canadian perinatal care providers regarding the counselling, procedural, and ethical implications of this potential therapeutic option. Selective or routine collection and storage of umbilical cord blood for future autologous (self) or allogenic (related or unrelated) transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells to treat malignant and nonmalignant disorders in children and adults. Maternal and perinatal morbidity, indications for umbilical cord blood transplantation, short- and long-term risks and benefits of umbilical cord blood transplantation, burden of umbilical cord blood collection on perinatal care providers, parental satisfaction, and health care costs. MEDLINE and PubMed searches were conducted from January 1970 to October 2003 for English-language articles related to umbilical cord blood collection, banking, and transplantation; the Cochrane library was searched; and committee opinions of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists were obtained. The evidence collected was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal/Fetal Medicine Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), and recommendations were made using the evaluation of evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam. Umbilical cord blood is a readily available source of hematopoietic stem cells used with increasing frequency as an alternative to bone marrow or peripheral stem cells for transplantation in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant conditions in children and adults. Umbilical cord blood transplantation provides a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells with several advantages, including prompt availability, decreased risk of transmissible viral infections and graft

  4. Evaluating primary care providers' views on survivorship care plans generated by an electronic health record system.

    PubMed

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Sesto, Mary E; Hahn, David L; Buhr, Kevin A; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Sosman, James M; Andreason, Molly J; Wiegmann, Douglas A; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2015-05-01

    Survivorship care plans for cancer survivors may facilitate provider-to-provider communication. Primary care provider (PCP) perspectives on care plan provision and use are limited, especially when care plans are generated by an electronic health record (EHR) system. We sought to examine PCPs' perspectives regarding EHR-generated care plans. PCPs (N = 160) who were members of the Wisconsin Research and Education Network listserv received a sample 10-page plan (WREN cohort). PCPs (n = 81) who had or were currently seeing survivors enrolled onto one of our survivorship clinical trials received a copy of the survivor's personalized care plan (University of Wisconsin [UW] cohort). Both cohorts received a survey after reviewing the plan. All plans were generated within an EHR. Forty-six and 26 PCPs participated in the WREN and UW cohorts, respectively. PCPs regarded EHR-generated plans as useful in coordinating care (88%), understanding treatments (94%), understanding treatment adverse effects (89%), and supporting clinical decisions (82%). Few felt using EHR-generated plans would disrupt clinic workflow (14%) or take too much time (11%). Most (89%) preferred receiving the plan via EHR. PCPs reported consistent provision (81%) and standard location in the medical record (89%) as key factors facilitating their use of survivorship care plans. Important facilitators of care plan use included a more abbreviated plan, ideally one to three pages (32%), and/or a plan specifically tailored to PCP use (57%). Plans were viewed as useful for coordinating care and making clinical decisions. However, PCPs desired shorter, clinician-oriented plans, accessible within an EHR and delivered and located in a standardized manner. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Evaluating Primary Care Providers' Views on Survivorship Care Plans Generated by an Electronic Health Record System

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Sesto, Mary E.; Hahn, David L.; Buhr, Kevin A.; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.; Sosman, James M.; Andreason, Molly J.; Wiegmann, Douglas A.; Tevaarwerk, Amye J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Survivorship care plans for cancer survivors may facilitate provider-to-provider communication. Primary care provider (PCP) perspectives on care plan provision and use are limited, especially when care plans are generated by an electronic health record (EHR) system. We sought to examine PCPs' perspectives regarding EHR-generated care plans. Methods: PCPs (N = 160) who were members of the Wisconsin Research and Education Network listserv received a sample 10-page plan (WREN cohort). PCPs (n = 81) who had or were currently seeing survivors enrolled onto one of our survivorship clinical trials received a copy of the survivor's personalized care plan (University of Wisconsin [UW] cohort). Both cohorts received a survey after reviewing the plan. All plans were generated within an EHR. Results: Forty-six and 26 PCPs participated in the WREN and UW cohorts, respectively. PCPs regarded EHR-generated plans as useful in coordinating care (88%), understanding treatments (94%), understanding treatment adverse effects (89%), and supporting clinical decisions (82%). Few felt using EHR-generated plans would disrupt clinic workflow (14%) or take too much time (11%). Most (89%) preferred receiving the plan via EHR. PCPs reported consistent provision (81%) and standard location in the medical record (89%) as key factors facilitating their use of survivorship care plans. Important facilitators of care plan use included a more abbreviated plan, ideally one to three pages (32%), and/or a plan specifically tailored to PCP use (57%). Conclusion: Plans were viewed as useful for coordinating care and making clinical decisions. However, PCPs desired shorter, clinician-oriented plans, accessible within an EHR and delivered and located in a standardized manner. PMID:25804989

  6. Providing Care Beyond the Hospital: Perspective of a Tertiary Care Hospital from a Developing Country.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saad Akhtar; Waqas, Muhammad; Ujjan, Badar Uddin; Salim, Adnan; Javed, Gohar; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Surani, Malikah; Khan, Marium

    2016-04-01

    Neurorehabilitation is an important aspect of continuing care for neurosurgical patients with functional disability. In developing countries, where formal home nursing frequently is unavailable, ensuring care after discharge is a difficult task. Training attendants to provide nursing care is an alternate option. In this study, we compared the outcomes of patients nursed by family members versus those looked after by a professional nurse. This was a retrospective observational study conducted at the Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi. The study consisted of 2 groups. Group 1 (consisting of patients cared for by a professional nurse) included 94 patients and group 2 (patients cared for by family members) included 102. All these patients had activity of daily living score of ≥3. Glasgow Outcomes Scale score, time to decannulation, development/worsening of bedsores, and mortality were recorded and compared between the groups at follow-up. The study included 196 patients. Traumatic brain injury was the most common diagnosis. Nursing requirements were similar between the 2 groups and included tracheostomy care, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube care, peripherally inserted central catheter line care, care of patients with no bone flap, and log-rolling. The outcomes of the 2 groups were comparable and included bedsore development/worsening of grade, Glasgow Outcomes Scale score at follow-up, time to decannulation, and 30-day mortality. There was no statistically significant difference in outcomes of patients nursed by family members compared with the patients looked after by professional nurses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: what every provider of gynecologic oncology care should know.

    PubMed

    Duska, Linda R; Engelhard, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. While initial implementation of the law began shortly thereafter, the full implementation will take place over the next few years. With respect to cancer care, the act was intended to make care more accessible, affordable, and comprehensive across different parts of the country. For our cancer patients and our practices, the ACA has implications that are both positive and negative. The Medicaid expansion and access to insurance exchanges are intended to increase the number of insured patients and thus improve access to care, but many states have decided to opt out of the Medicaid program and in these states access problems will persist. Screening programs will be put in place for insured patients but may supplant federally funded programs that are currently in place for uninsured patients and may not follow current screening guidelines. Both hospice and home health providers will be asked to provide more services with less funding, and quality measures, including readmission rates, will factor into reimbursement. Insured patients will have access to all phases of clinical trial research. There is a need for us as providers of Gynecologic Oncology care to be active in the implementation of the ACA in order to ensure that our patients and our practices can survive and benefit from the changes in health care reimbursement, with the ultimate goals of improving access to care and quality while reducing unsustainable costs.

  8. Sudden infant death syndrome: review for the obstetric care provider.

    PubMed

    Van Nguyen, Julie My; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2013-10-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death among infants aged 1 to 12 months. In this article, we review risk factors that may predispose infants to increased vulnerability. Maternal characteristics, including nonmodifiable and modifiable factors, antenatal medical conditions, labor and delivery events, and infant characteristics, are reviewed, with the purpose of helping obstetric care providers target risk reduction efforts. We have reviewed over 85 case-control, retrospective, and prospective cohort studies published between 1975 and 2011. Major modifiable risk factors include maternal and paternal smoking, drug use, alcohol use, and insufficient prenatal care. Infants at increased risk include males, premature infants, infants of low birth weight or growth-restricted infants, and infants in multiple gestations. By targeting modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors, it may be possible to decrease the incidence of SIDS. Efforts should be put on decreasing high-risk behaviors and encouraging sufficient antenatal follow-up. In view of recent increases in ethnic and social disparity with SIDS, it is essential that risk reduction guidelines, which have recently been expanded by the American Association of Pediatrics, be explained in a culturally sensitive manner.

  9. Assessing and Enhancing Health Care Providers' Response to Domestic Violence

    PubMed Central

    Leppäkoski, Tuija; Paavilainen, Eija

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine possible changes from 2008 to 2012 in the skills of health care staff in identifying and intervening in domestic violence (DV). A longitudinal descriptive study design with volunteer samples (baseline; n = 68, follow-up; n = 100) was used to acquire information regarding the present state and needs of the staff in practices related to DV. The results of the baseline survey were used as a basis for planning two interventions: staff training and drafting practical guidelines. Information was collected by questionnaires from nurses, physicians, and social workers and supplemented by responses from the interviews. The data were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A chi-square test was used to test the statistical significance of the data sets. In addition, participants' quotes are used to describe specific phenomena or issues. The comparison showed that overall a small positive change had taken place between the study periods. However, the participants were aware of their own shortcomings in identifying and intervening in DV. Changes happen slowly, and administrative support is needed to sustain such changes. Therefore, this paper offers recommendations to improve health care providers' response to DV. Moreover, there is a great need for evaluating the training programme used. PMID:24864205

  10. The Effect of Primary Care Provider Turnover on Patient Experience of Care and Ambulatory Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Ashok; Pollack, Craig E.; Asch, David A.; Canamucio, Anne; Werner, Rachel M.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Primary care provider (PCP) turnover is common and can disrupt patient continuity of care. Little is known about the effect of PCP turnover on patient care experience and quality of care. OBJECTIVE To measure the effect of PCP turnover on patient experiences of care and ambulatory care quality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational, retrospective cohort study of a nationwide sample of primary care patients in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We included all patients enrolled in primary care at the VHA between 2010 and 2012 included in 1 of 2 national data sets used to measure our outcome variables: 326 374 patients in the Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (SHEP; used to measure patient experience of care) associated with 8441 PCPs and 184 501 patients in the External Peer Review Program (EPRP; used to measure ambulatory care quality) associated with 6973 PCPs. EXPOSURES Whether a patient experienced PCP turnover, defined as a patient whose provider (physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant) had left the VHA (ie, had no patient encounters for 12 months). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Five patient care experience measures (from SHEP) and 11 measures of quality of ambulatory care (from EPRP). RESULTS Nine percent of patients experienced a PCP turnover in our study sample. Primary care provider turnover was associated with a worse rating in each domain of patient care experience. Turnover was associated with a reduced likelihood of having a positive rating of their personal physician of 68.2% vs 74.6% (adjusted percentage point difference, −5.3; 95% CI, −6.0 to −4.7) and a reduced likelihood of getting care quickly of 36.5% vs 38.5% (adjusted percentage point difference, −1.1; 95% CI, −2.1 to −0.1). In contrast, PCP turnover was not associated with lower quality of ambulatory care except for a lower likelihood of controlling blood pressure of 78.7% vs 80.4% (adjusted percentage point difference, −1.44; 95

  11. The Effect of Primary Care Provider Turnover on Patient Experience of Care and Ambulatory Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ashok; Pollack, Craig E; Asch, David A; Canamucio, Anne; Werner, Rachel M

    2015-07-01

    Primary care provider (PCP) turnover is common and can disrupt patient continuity of care. Little is known about the effect of PCP turnover on patient care experience and quality of care. To measure the effect of PCP turnover on patient experiences of care and ambulatory care quality. Observational, retrospective cohort study of a nationwide sample of primary care patients in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We included all patients enrolled in primary care at the VHA between 2010 and 2012 included in 1 of 2 national data sets used to measure our outcome variables: 326,374 patients in the Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (SHEP; used to measure patient experience of care) associated with 8441 PCPs and 184,501 patients in the External Peer Review Program (EPRP; used to measure ambulatory care quality) associated with 6973 PCPs. Whether a patient experienced PCP turnover, defined as a patient whose provider (physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant) had left the VHA (ie, had no patient encounters for 12 months). Five patient care experience measures (from SHEP) and 11 measures of quality of ambulatory care (from EPRP). Nine percent of patients experienced a PCP turnover in our study sample. Primary care provider turnover was associated with a worse rating in each domain of patient care experience. Turnover was associated with a reduced likelihood of having a positive rating of their personal physician of 68.2% vs 74.6% (adjusted percentage point difference, -5.3; 95% CI, -6.0 to -4.7) and a reduced likelihood of getting care quickly of 36.5% vs 38.5% (adjusted percentage point difference, -1.1; 95% CI, -2.1 to -0.1). In contrast, PCP turnover was not associated with lower quality of ambulatory care except for a lower likelihood of controlling blood pressure of 78.7% vs 80.4% (adjusted percentage point difference, -1.44; 95% CI, -2.2 to -0.7). In 9 measures of ambulatory care quality, the difference between patients who experienced no

  12. Reproductive health under managed care: expanding provider obligations.

    PubMed

    Gates, E A

    1998-06-01

    The discussion of ethical issues in managed care can be focused on two general areas. The first of these is the impact of the shift toward managed care on the fiduciary relationship between health care professional and patient, including the issue of trust, the potential for conflict of interest, and the impact of cost-saving strategies on the clinician's ability to address a patient's health care needs. The second is the attention to justice that managed care demands. Health care professionals must take issues in both areas into account, attempting to balance obligations to individual patients with obligations to patients collectively. Strategies for doing so are discussed.

  13. Opinion & Special Articles: neurologist: specialized primary care provider vs consultant.

    PubMed

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Schwindt, Mitchel; Alshareef, Bashar N; Tepper, Deborah; Mays, Maryann

    2013-07-02

    As per the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) current proposal, many specialties including neurology are not eligible for the increase in Medicare reimbursements that will be allocated to other cognitive specialties, such as the 7% increase for family physicians, 5% for internists, and 4% for geriatric specialists.(1,2) Other specialties such as anesthesiology, radiology, and cardiology are scheduled for a 3%-4% decrease in reimbursement in order to pay for the increases outlined above. Current estimates show that neurologists provide a significant amount of primary care for complex patients and yet these services are not eligible for increased payments. It is estimated that up to 60% of neurologists' services to these complex patients are ineligible for increased payments.(3.)

  14. Primary Care Provider Perspectives on Electronic Medication Refill History.

    PubMed

    Comer, Dominique; Mearns, Elizabeth; Olivere, Lindsey; Elliott, Daniel J

    Improvements in health information technology have made aggregate multipayer pharmacy claims data increasingly available through the electronic health record (EHR). The objective of this study was to assess the current awareness, utilization, and impact of pharmacy history data available in the EHR on primary care provider (PCP) decision making. A 14-question survey was distributed to all PCPs in a large medical practice. Of the 55/72 responding PCPs, 47 (85.5%) were aware of the EHR medication history function, and 36 (65.5%) had used it previously. Respondents indicated the medication history could be most useful when considering prescribing a narcotic (33/36, 92%) and when addressing nonadherence concerns (28/35, 80%). Barriers included delays in data loading and the time pressures of clinical practice. Access to aggregate multipayer pharmacy history data has the potential to affect medication reconciliation, yet future implementation should focus on making these data complete and easily available in routine practice.

  15. Cost-accounting techniques for health care providers.

    PubMed

    Pelfrey, S

    1995-12-01

    The author reviews cost-accounting techniques and systems used by manufacturing companies. Some of the concepts and techniques used by for-profit companies can be implemented for health care institutions. Nurse executives can learn many lessons in product cost accounting from these for-profit companies. Understanding the various cost-accounting methodologies and techniques that are available can help nurse executives design, implement, and use a cost accounting system that will identify the costs associated with products and services provided. The author also reviews and explains standard costing systems. These systems can serve as valuable tools for budgeting, evaluating, and controlling departmental costs. When used in these instances, they can prove useful, and they furnish important information that is necessary for pricing products, determining alternatives or substitute services, and controlling costs.

  16. Exploring children's secondhand smoke exposure with early child care providers.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jennifer R; Sloan, Phyllis; Allen, Michele; Okuyemi, Kolawole S

    2010-12-01

    Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is a contributor to the increased morbidity and mortality experienced by inner-city African-American children. Limited evidence-based programming exists regarding how to address the negative effects of SHS in this community. A collaboration with an early child care center provided an opportunity to explore factors related to young children's SHS exposure as the first step in developing strategies to reduce exposure. Survey data were obtained between 2008 and 2009 from 63 African-American parents of infants and children aged ≤ 5 years at two early child care centers located in an urban Minneapolis neighborhood. Forty-three of these children had salivary cotinine levels assessed. Parents living below the poverty level were more likely to report that their children were regularly exposed to SHS by family/friends (p = 0.01). Sixty-eight percent of participants reported complete home smoking restrictions, which was significantly correlated with advice from the child's health provider (p = 0.001). Nonsmokers and older parents were less likely to receive advice (p = 0.03). Of the 43 children in whom cotinine levels were assessed, 39.5% had levels > 0.64 ng/ml, which suggests high SHS exposure. Lower cotinine levels were significantly correlated with living in detached houses. Exposure to SHS was common for children in this study. These findings, if supported by additional research, can be used to develop and disseminate targeted health messages about childhood SHS sources/negative effects and strategies to reduce exposure. Copyright © 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Providing patient care in community pharmacies in Australia.

    PubMed

    Benrimoj, Shalom I; Roberts, Alison S

    2005-11-01

    To describe Australia's community pharmacy network in the context of the health system and outline the provision of services. The 5000 community pharmacies form a key component of the healthcare system for Australians, for whom health expenditures represent 9% of the Gross Domestic Product. A typical community pharmacy dispenses 880 prescriptions per week. Pharmacists are key partners in the Government's National Medicines Policy and contribute to its objectives through the provision of cognitive pharmaceutical services (CPS). The Third Community Pharmacy Agreement included funding for CPS including medication review and the provision of written drug information. Funding is also provided for a quality assurance platform with which the majority of pharmacies are accredited. Fifteen million dollars (Australian) have been allocated to research in community pharmacy, which has focused on achieving quality use of medicines (QUM), as well as developing new CPS and facilitating change. Elements of the Agreements have taken into account QUM principles and are now significant drivers of practice change. Although accounting for 10% of remuneration for community pharmacy, the provision of CPS represents a significant shift in focus to view pharmacy as a service provider. Delivery of CPS through the community pharmacy network provides sustainability for primary health care due to improvement in quality presumably associated with a reduction in healthcare costs. Australian pharmacy practice is moving strongly in the direction of CPS provision; however, change does not occur easily. The development of a change management strategy is underway to improve the uptake of professional and business opportunities in community pharmacy.

  18. Learning to deal constructively with troubled conscience related to care providers' perceptions of not providing sufficient activities for residents.

    PubMed

    Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Strandberg, Gunilla

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate an intervention process to assist care providers in municipal care of older people to constructively deal with their troubled conscience generated from their perceived shortcomings about not providing sufficient activities for residents. The study design was grounded in participatory action research. Twelve care providers and their manager participated in intervention sessions. Content analysis was used to analyze the transcriptions. By sharing their experiences with each other, care providers became aware of, and confirmed in one another, what types of activities were meaningful for residents and actions were taken to provide such activities. The importance of being attentive and relying on residents' responses, that is, providing person-centered activities, was found to be satisfying to residents and eased the care providers' troubled conscience. An enlightened conscience can be an important asset, which may prevent ill-health and improve quality of care. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Dental auxiliaries for dental care traditionally provided by dentists.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Tom A; Brocklehurst, Paul; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Davies, Linda; Tickle, Martin; Issac, Ansy; Robinson, Peter G

    2014-08-20

    Poor or inequitable access to oral health care is commonly reported in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Although the severity of these problems varies, a lack of supply of dentists and their uneven distribution are important factors. Delegating care to dental auxiliaries could ease this problem, extend services to where they are unavailable and liberate time for dentists to do more complex work. Before such an approach can be advocated, it is important to know the relative effectiveness of dental auxiliaries and dentists. To assess the effectiveness, costs and cost effectiveness of dental auxiliaries in providing care traditionally provided by dentists. We searched the following electronic databases from their inception dates up to November 2013: the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group's Specialised Register; Cochrane Oral Health Group's Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 11, 2013); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness; five other databases and two trial registries. We also undertook a grey literature search and searched the reference list of included studies and contacted authors of relevant papers. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled clinical trials (NRCTs), interrupted time series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies (CBAs) evaluating the effectiveness of dental auxiliaries compared with dentists in undertaking clinical tasks traditionally performed by a dentist. Three review authors independently applied eligibility criteria, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each included study and two review authors assessed the quality of the evidence from the included studies, according to The Cochrane Collaboration's procedures. Since meta-analysis was not possible, we gave a narrative description of the results. We identified five studies (one cluster

  20. An integrative review of parent satisfaction with care provided in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Butt, Michelle L; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Samra, Haifa Abou; Gupta, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    To synthesize findings from the published empirical literature on parent satisfaction with care provided in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Electronic databases including CINAHL, Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, Sociological Abstracts, the Cochrane Library, and the Campbell Library were searched for relevant research dating from January 1990 to the beginning of October 2011. The reference lists of all studies were reviewed and the personal files of the authors were also searched for relevant studies. Twelve studies (nine quantitative descriptive, two qualitative descriptive, and one mixed methods) were identified that met the review inclusion criteria. Only studies written in English were selected. Whittemore and Knafl's methodology for integrative reviews guided the data extraction and subsequent analysis. Studies meeting the review inclusion criteria were analyzed sequentially. Data were extracted and organized under the following headings: author, year, and country; study purpose and design; sample size and setting; study variables and data collection; study findings; and limitations. Studies examining parent satisfaction with the care provided in the NICU were synthesized under four main themes: (a) parents' degree of satisfaction with care, (b) factors associated with parents' satisfaction with care, (c) elements of care parents view as important, and (d) discrepancies between parent expectations and actual ratings of care. The vast majority of parents were highly satisfied with the care they and their infants received in the NICU. However, other evidence points to less-than-optimal NICU care that is not meeting parents' expectations. These findings provide some direction as to what is important and satisfying to parents whose children must reside in the NICU. However, given the quality and dearth of the evidence, gaps remain in our understanding, and additional, more rigorous research is needed. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric

  1. A novel paradigm for providing improved care to chronic patients in cardiac intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Xiomara; Sachdeva, Ritu; Swearingen, Christopher J; Kane, Janie; Haber, Hillary; Bhutta, Adnan T; Prodhan, Parthak

    2012-01-01

    Evaluate the impact of chronic cardiac care team (CCCT) on hospital course of patients, their families, and nursing staff. Retrospective observational study in children with hospital stay of ≥6 weeks in a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) at a tertiary care children's hospital. Before and after care, survey of the nurses and patients family was also performed. The CCCT provided care for 68 patients of which 44 survived to discharge. Median age at admission was 19 days (range 0-20.6 years); 18 (26%) were admitted at birth. Cardiac diagnosis included single ventricle in 27, heart failure/cardiac transplantation in 37, others in 6. The CCCT was involved in follow-up for vitamin and endocrine deficiencies, updating immunization status, optimizing nutritional intake, growth parameters, assess feeding issues, and providing end-of-life discussions in all those who died. One year after implementation, 85% nurses indicated improved understanding of patient problems, 57% reported improved working relationship with families, and 87% reported improved team communication. Family survey indicated that implementation of the model led to significantly improved opinion of parents in their ability to participate in the plan of care (28% vs. 70%, P = 0.019) and better relationship with the CICU staff caring for their child (57% vs. 100%, P = 0.008). The CCCT provides a new team-based paradigm for improving continuity of care in chronic CICU patients by supplementing medical care and facilitates end-of-life discussions. The CCCT bridges communication gap between CICU staff and families. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Vietnamese Health Care Providers' Preferences Regarding Recommendation of HPV Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Asiedu, Gladys B; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Kremers, Walter K; Ngo, Quang V; Nguyen, Nguyen V; Barenberg, Benjamin J; Tran, Vinh D; Dinh, Tri A

    2015-01-01

    Physician recommendation is an important predictor of HPV vaccine acceptance; however, physician willingness and preferences regarding HPV vaccination may be influenced by factors including patient age, vaccine type, and cost. A cross-sectional survey was administered to a convenience sample of health care providers in Da Nang, Vietnam, to evaluate awareness, perceptions about HPV and HPV vaccines, and willingness to vaccinate a female patient. Willingness to vaccinate was evaluated using a full-factorial presentation of scenarios featuring the following factors: vaccine cost (free vs 1,000,000 VND), patient age (12, 16, or 22 years), and HPV vaccine type (bivalent vs quadrivalent). Responses from 244 providers were analyzed; providers had a mean age of 34±11.9 years; a majority were female, married, and had children of their own. Thirty-six percent specialized in obstetrics/gynecology and 24% were providers in family medicine. Of the three factors considered in conjoint analysis, vaccine cost was the most important factor in willingness to vaccinate, followed by patient age, and vaccine type. The most favorable scenario for vaccinating a female patient was when the vaccine was free, the patient was 22 years of age, and the HPV4 vaccine was described. In multivariable analysis, older age, being a physician, being married, and having children were all associated with increased willingness to recommend HPV vaccination (p<0.05). Provider willingness is an important aspect of successful HPV vaccination programs; identifying preferences and biases in recommendation patterns will highlight potential areas for education and intervention.

  3. AdvoCaring: A Cocurricular Program to Provide Advocacy and Caring to Underserved Populations in Baltimore.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Michelle A; Culver, Nathan; Culhane, Nicole; Thigpen, Jonathan; Lin, Anne

    2016-09-25

    Objective. To incorporate direct patient care and service components throughout a 4-year pharmacy program to enable students to apply knowledge learned in the classroom and develop the human and caring dimensions of Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning. Design. Groups of 10-12 students and a faculty advisor partnered with a local agency serving an underserved population of the greater Baltimore area to provide seven hours of service per student each semester. Activities were determined based on students' skills and agency needs. Assessment. Over 10 000 hours of care were provided from fall 2009 through spring 2014 for clients at 12 partner agencies. Student feedback was favorable. Conclusion. Cocurricular learning enables students to use their skills to benefit local communities. Through an ongoing partnership, students are able to build on experiences and sustain meaningful care initiatives.

  4. AdvoCaring: A Cocurricular Program to Provide Advocacy and Caring to Underserved Populations in Baltimore

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Michelle A; Culver, Nathan; Culhane, Nicole; Lin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To incorporate direct patient care and service components throughout a 4-year pharmacy program to enable students to apply knowledge learned in the classroom and develop the human and caring dimensions of Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning. Design. Groups of 10-12 students and a faculty advisor partnered with a local agency serving an underserved population of the greater Baltimore area to provide seven hours of service per student each semester. Activities were determined based on students’ skills and agency needs. Assessment. Over 10 000 hours of care were provided from fall 2009 through spring 2014 for clients at 12 partner agencies. Student feedback was favorable. Conclusion. Cocurricular learning enables students to use their skills to benefit local communities. Through an ongoing partnership, students are able to build on experiences and sustain meaningful care initiatives. PMID:27756934

  5. Organic foods contain higher levels of certain nutrients, lower levels of pesticides, and may provide health benefits for the consumer.

    PubMed

    Crinnion, Walter J

    2010-04-01

    The multi-billion dollar organic food industry is fueled by consumer perception that organic food is healthier (greater nutritional value and fewer toxic chemicals). Studies of the nutrient content in organic foods vary in results due to differences in the ground cover and maturity of the organic farming operation. Nutrient content also varies from farmer to farmer and year to year. However, reviews of multiple studies show that organic varieties do provide significantly greater levels of vitamin C, iron, magnesium, and phosphorus than non-organic varieties of the same foods. While being higher in these nutrients, they are also significantly lower in nitrates and pesticide residues. In addition, with the exception of wheat, oats, and wine, organic foods typically provide greater levels of a number of important antioxidant phytochemicals (anthocyanins, flavonoids, and carotenoids). Although in vitro studies of organic fruits and vegetables consistently demonstrate that organic foods have greater antioxidant activity, are more potent suppressors of the mutagenic action of toxic compounds, and inhibit the proliferation of certain cancer cell lines, in vivo studies of antioxidant activity in humans have failed to demonstrate additional benefit. Clear health benefits from consuming organic dairy products have been demonstrated in regard to allergic dermatitis.

  6. 78 FR 10117 - Use of Medicare Procedures To Enter Into Provider Agreements for Extended Care Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ..., palliative care, and noninstitutional hospice care services as extended care services, when provided as an... health care; noninstitutional palliative care, noninstitutional hospice care, and home health care when... would avert a nursing home placement. We also propose to include noninstitutional palliative...

  7. ME Cares: a statewide system engaging providers in disease management.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Richard; Bean, Claudette; Ito, Diane; Kopp, Zoe; LaCasse, John A; Rea, Vicki

    2004-01-01

    ME Cares (Maine Cares) is a coalition of 32 Maine hospitals that offer community-based, telephonic care support (disease management) programs for patients with heart failure and/or coronary heart disease. We describe the steps, challenges, and lessons learned in coalition development and maintenance. We also present a pre- and post-analysis of our clinical outcomes after enrolling 2145 patients.

  8. An Effective Training Approach for Child Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Melissa G.; Smock, Sue Marx

    Controversy exists in the field of child day care concerning the training of child care workers. Becker (1979) states that trainers should be child care professionals who help to engage workers in an educational/developmental process, as opposed to "outside" trainers from other professions who view training as a mechanism to "add…

  9. Extracts from Field Margin Weeds Provide Economically Viable and Environmentally Benign Pest Control Compared to Synthetic Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Mkenda, Prisila; Mwanauta, Regina; Stevenson, Philip C.; Ndakidemi, Patrick; Mtei, Kelvin; Belmain, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Plants with pesticidal properties have been investigated for decades as alternatives to synthetics, but most progress has been shown in the laboratory. Consequently, research on pesticidal plants is failing to address gaps in our knowledge that constrain their uptake. Some of these gaps are their evaluation of their efficacy under field conditions, their economic viability and impact on beneficial organisms. Extracts made from four abundant weed species found in northern Tanzania, Tithonia diversifolia, Tephrosia vogelii, Vernonia amygdalina and Lippia javanica offered effective control of key pest species on common bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) that was comparable to the pyrethroid synthetic, Karate. The plant pesticide treatments had significantly lower effects on natural enemies (lady beetles and spiders). Plant pesticide treatments were more cost effective to use than the synthetic pesticide where the marginal rate of return for the synthetic was no different from the untreated control, around 4USD/ha, compared to a rate of return of around 5.50USD/ha for plant pesticide treatments. Chemical analysis confirmed the presence of known insecticidal compounds in water extracts of T. vogelii (the rotenoid deguelin) and T. diversifolia (the sesquiterpene lactone tagitinin A). Sesquiterpene lactones and the saponin vernonioside C were also identified in organic extracts of V. amygdalina but only the saponin was recorded in water extracts which are similar to those used in the field trial. Pesticidal plants were better able to facilitate ecosystem services whilst effectively managing pests. The labour costs of collecting and processing abundant plants near farm land were less than the cost of purchasing synthetic pesticides. PMID:26599609

  10. Extracts from Field Margin Weeds Provide Economically Viable and Environmentally Benign Pest Control Compared to Synthetic Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Mkenda, Prisila; Mwanauta, Regina; Stevenson, Philip C; Ndakidemi, Patrick; Mtei, Kelvin; Belmain, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Plants with pesticidal properties have been investigated for decades as alternatives to synthetics, but most progress has been shown in the laboratory. Consequently, research on pesticidal plants is failing to address gaps in our knowledge that constrain their uptake. Some of these gaps are their evaluation of their efficacy under field conditions, their economic viability and impact on beneficial organisms. Extracts made from four abundant weed species found in northern Tanzania, Tithonia diversifolia, Tephrosia vogelii, Vernonia amygdalina and Lippia javanica offered effective control of key pest species on common bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) that was comparable to the pyrethroid synthetic, Karate. The plant pesticide treatments had significantly lower effects on natural enemies (lady beetles and spiders). Plant pesticide treatments were more cost effective to use than the synthetic pesticide where the marginal rate of return for the synthetic was no different from the untreated control, around 4USD/ha, compared to a rate of return of around 5.50USD/ha for plant pesticide treatments. Chemical analysis confirmed the presence of known insecticidal compounds in water extracts of T. vogelii (the rotenoid deguelin) and T. diversifolia (the sesquiterpene lactone tagitinin A). Sesquiterpene lactones and the saponin vernonioside C were also identified in organic extracts of V. amygdalina but only the saponin was recorded in water extracts which are similar to those used in the field trial. Pesticidal plants were better able to facilitate ecosystem services whilst effectively managing pests. The labour costs of collecting and processing abundant plants near farm land were less than the cost of purchasing synthetic pesticides.

  11. Health care providers' perspective of the gender influences on immigrant women's mental health care experiences.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Joyce M; Donnelly, Tamphd T

    2007-10-01

    The number of immigrants coming to Canada has increased in the last three decades. It is well documented that many immigrant women suffer from serious mental health problems such as depression, schizophrenia, and post migration stress disorders. Evidence has shown that immigrant women experience difficulties in accessing and using mental health services. Informed by the post-colonial feminist perspective, this qualitative exploratory study was conducted with seven health care providers who provide mental health services to immigrant women. In-depth interviews were used to obtain information about immigrant women's mental health care experiences. The primary goal was to explore how contextual factors intersect with race, gender, and class to influence the ways in which immigrant women seek help and to increase awareness and understanding of what would be helpful in meeting the mental health care needs of the immigrant women. The study's results reveal that (a) immigrant women face many difficulties accessing mental health care due to insufficient language skills, unfamiliarity/unawareness of services, and low socioeconomic status; (b) participants identified structural barriers and gender roles as barriers to accessing the available mental health services; (c) the health care relationship between health care providers and women had profound effects on whether or not immigrant women seek help for mental health problems.

  12. Pregnant at work: time for prenatal care providers to act.

    PubMed

    Karkowsky, Chavi Eve; Morris, Liz

    2016-09-01

    Fifty years ago, when a woman became pregnant, she was expected to stop working. Today, however, most women who work are the primary, sole, or co-breadwinner for their families, and their earnings during pregnancy are often essential to their families' economic well-being. Medical data about working during pregnancy are sparse but generally show that both low-risk and high-risk women can tolerate work-related duties well, although some work accommodations (eg, providing a chair for sitting, allowing snacks, or modifying the work schedule) may be necessary. However, some employers refuse to accommodate pregnant women who need adjustments. This can result in a woman being forced to make the choice between working without accommodations and losing her income and health insurance or even her job. Prenatal care providers can play an important role by implementing changes in their own practice, shaping public policy, and conducting research to increase protections for pregnant women and to ensure that they receive medically recommended accommodations while continuing to earn income for their growing families.

  13. Violence in institutional care for elderly people from the perspective of involved care providers.

    PubMed

    Sandvide, Asa; Aström, Sture; Norberg, Astrid; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2004-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe violent events as narrated by care providers involving themselves. During a 12-month period, care providers reported 149 violent events. Using consecutive purposive sampling with maximum variation, 61 events were further investigated using narrative interviews with involved care providers. They were involved either as victims, perpetrators or as witnesses. The narratives were analysed using a qualitative descriptive analysis. The presentation of the result includes contextual aspects and three themes: 'misunderstanding each other', 'invasion of personal space' and 'acceptance of violence in work'. These themes represent a process of violence in the narratives. Mutual misunderstanding may be seen as an antecedent to violent events. Invasion of personal space is a theme revealing what violence is about. Acceptance of violence seems to be a natural consequence for the caregivers because the events are seen as unavoidable, impossible to solve and as a constituent of daily work.

  14. [Intercultural health care policy from the perspective of health care providers and Mapuche clients].

    PubMed

    Alarcón, Ana María; Astudillo, Paula; Barrios, Sara; Rivas, Edith

    2004-09-01

    Intercultural health is becoming an emergent topic in the design of health care programs for Mapuche people of Chile. This process faces important challenges such as the scarce theoretical support about the meaning of intercultural health and their practical consequences for providers and clients. To explore the perception in providers and Mapuche clients about intercultural health. A survey performed in 11 counties with the highest concentration of Mapuche people, of the IX region of Chile. The perception about the development of a new health policy specially designed for Mapuche patients was surveyed in 399 Mapuche patients and 64 providers of primary health care centers. Mapuche clients considered, as the main regional challenges, the indifference and discrimination of health care teams towards Mapuche patients, aggravated by the indifference of authorities. Providers considered that the main problem was a lack of knowledge about Mapuche culture and skills to deal with this ethnic group. Patients and providers agreed on the need to use Mapuche dialect in health care attentions, to coordinate actions with traditional healers and to accept ethnical therapeutic practices. There is scarce agreement between providers and Mapuche clients about the need for an special intercultural health policy, its contents, and the regional conditions for its implementation and development.

  15. [Prenatal care at the first level of care: characteristics of providers that affect users' satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Bronfman-Pertzovsky, Mario Norberto; López-Moreno, Sergio; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Moreno-Altamirano, Alejandra; Rutstein, Shea

    2003-01-01

    To assess the satisfaction level attained by prenatal care users in primary health services in Mexico, and to compare the level of satisfaction according to characteristics of the provider and the service. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to analyze data from 217 care provider-user pairs. Interviews were carried out in 95 primary care units in eight Mexican states. The information was collected through a) direct observation of the medical encounter, b) interviews with providers and users, and c) a questionnaire and knowledge examination to providers. Users' satisfaction was analyzed according to providers' clinical ability and the treatment received during the visit. Summary and dispersion measures of the main issues were calculated, as well as bivariate and trends analysis. User satisfaction in prenatal care is associated with the treatment received during the visit and to the waiting time before being attended, but not with the provider's clinical ability, nor with his or her age or gender. The treatment received during the visit was also associated with the user's socioeconomic level, where the poorer users received the worst treatment. Health services should assess users' satisfaction according with the type of medical encounter, particularly where resources are scarce and where economic disparities are present. In such cases, the provision of healthcare services may intensify inequality, with greater impact on the poorest. The English version of this paper is available at:http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.

  16. Are primary care providers implementing evidence-based care for breast cancer survivors?

    PubMed Central

    Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Aiken, Alice; McColl, Mary Ann; Tranmer, Joan; Langley, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the implementation of key best practice guideline recommendations for posttreatment breast cancer survivorship care by primary care providers (PCPs). Design Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Setting Southeastern Ontario. Participants Eighty-two PCPs: 62 family physicians (FPs) and 20 primary health care nurse practitioners (PHCNPs). Main outcome measures Twenty-one “need-to-know” breast cancer survivorship care guideline recommendations rated by participants as “implemented routinely,” “aware of guideline recommendation but not implemented routinely,” or “not aware of guideline recommendation.” Results Overall, FPs and PHCNPs in our sample reported similar practice patterns in terms of implementation of breast cancer survivorship guideline recommendations. The PCPs reported routinely implementing approximately half (46.4%, 9.7 of 21) of the key guideline recommendations with breast cancer survivors in their practices. Implementation rates were higher for recommendations related to prevention and surveillance aspects of survivorship care, such as mammography and weight management. Knowledge and practice gaps were highest for recommendations related to screening for and management of long-term effects such as fatigue and distress. There were only a few minor differences reported between FPs and PHCNPs. Conclusion There are knowledge and practice gaps related to implementation of the key guideline recommendations for breast cancer survivorship care in the primary care setting that could be targeted for improvement through educational or other interventions. PMID:26889509

  17. Are primary care providers implementing evidence-based care for breast cancer survivors?

    PubMed

    Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Aiken, Alice; McColl, Mary Ann; Tranmer, Joan; Langley, Hugh

    2015-11-01

    To describe the implementation of key best practice guideline recommendations for posttreatment breast cancer survivorship care by primary care providers (PCPs). Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Southeastern Ontario. Eighty-two PCPs: 62 family physicians (FPs) and 20 primary health care nurse practitioners (PHCNPs). Twenty-one “need-to-know” breast cancer survivorship care guideline recommendations rated by participants as “implemented routinely,” “aware of guideline recommendation but not implemented routinely,” or “not aware of guideline recommendation.” Overall, FPs and PHCNPs in our sample reported similar practice patterns in terms of implementation of breast cancer survivorship guideline recommendations. The PCPs reported routinely implementing approximately half (46.4%, 9.7 of 21) of the key guideline recommendations with breast cancer survivors in their practices. Implementation rates were higher for recommendations related to prevention and surveillance aspects of survivorship care, such as mammography and weight management. Knowledge and practice gaps were highest for recommendations related to screening for and management of long-term effects such as fatigue and distress. There were only a few minor differences reported between FPs and PHCNPs. There are knowledge and practice gaps related to implementation of the key guideline recommendations for breast cancer survivorship care in the primary care setting that could be targeted for improvement through educational or other interventions.

  18. Health care decision-making capacity: a legal perspective for long-term care providers.

    PubMed

    Zimring, Stuart D

    2006-06-01

    While federal law establishes guidelines that designated facilities must follow in providing information about a patient's rights regarding self-determination in the health care decision-making process, state law determines the decision-making process and the legal requirements pertaining thereto. A person's capacity to make health care decisions or to have the authority and capacity to delegate the right to make such decisions is a legal conclusion based on statutory and common law principles. This article discusses the legal perspective of capacity in health care decision making and the legal framework of the question of whether or not a person has the capacity to make health care decisions. Western civilization's concepts of personal autonomy and self-determination are at the core of health care decision making, but health care providers must be aware that other cultures do not always share that value system. Sensitivity to multicultural diversity in this context is imperative to maintain individual self-esteem and respect, both for the patient and the patient's family.

  19. The acceptability of humor between palliative care patients and health care providers.

    PubMed

    Ridley, Julia; Dance, Derry; Pare, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Humor frequently occurs in palliative care environments; however, the acceptability of humor, particularly between patients and health care providers has not been previously examined. To explore the importance and acceptability of humor to participants who are patients in a palliative care context, the study determines if demographics are correlated with the degree of acceptability, and examines the acceptance of humor by patients with advanced illness when interacting with nurses or physicians. One hundred participants admitted to a palliative care unit or residential hospice were surveyed. Basic demographic data were collected, as well as responses on a five-point Likert scale to a variety of questions regarding the participants' attitudes about humor before and after their illness and the acceptability of humor in a palliative setting. Participants were also given the opportunity to comment freely on the topic of humor and the palliative experience. A large majority of participants valued humor highly both prior to (77%) and during (76%) their illness experience. Despite this valuation, the frequency of laughter in their daily lives diminished significantly as patients' illness progressed. Most participants remembered laughing with a nurse (87%) and a doctor (67%) in the week prior to the survey, and found humor with their doctors (75%) and nurses appropriate (88%). The vast majority of participants found humorous interactions with their health care providers acceptable and appropriate, and this may indicate a opportunity for enhanced and more effective end-of-life care in the future.

  20. Health effects of common home, lawn, and garden pesticides.

    PubMed

    Karr, Catherine J; Solomon, Gina M; Brock-Utne, Alice C

    2007-02-01

    Children encounter pesticide products and their residues where they live and play and in the food supply. Pesticide exposure affects pediatric health both acutely and chronically; effects range from mild and subtle to severe. Pediatricians play an important role in identifying and reducing significant pesticide exposure in their patients by taking an exposure history to clarify the extent and types of exposures that may have occurred during acute care and preventive care visits. Developing knowledge about the toxicity of various chemicals, identifying reliable resources for pesticide information, and providing a common-sense approach toward recommending the safest practical alternatives is necessary.

  1. Comorbid condition care quality in cancer survivors: role of primary care and specialty providers and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Claire F; Frick, Kevin D; Herbert, Robert J; Blackford, Amanda L; Neville, Bridget A; Lemke, Klaus W; Carducci, Michael A; Wolff, Antonio C; Earle, Craig C

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate provider specialty, care coordination, and cancer survivors' comorbid condition care. This retrospective cross-sectional Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare study included cancer survivors diagnosed in 2004, 2-3 years post-cancer diagnosis, in fee-for-service Medicare. We examined (1) provider specialties (primary care providers (PCPs), oncology specialists, other specialists) visited post-hospitalization, (2) role of provider specialties in chronic and acute condition management, and (3) an ambulatory care coordination measure. Outcome measures covered (1) visits post-hospitalization for nine conditions, (2) chronic disease management (lipid profile, diabetic eye exam, diabetic monitoring), and (3) acute condition management (electrocardiogram (EKG) for congestive heart failure (CHF), imaging for CHF, EKG for transient ischemic attack, cholecystectomy, hip fracture repair). Among 8661 cancer survivors, patients were more likely to visit PCPs than oncologists or other specialists following hospitalizations for 8/9 conditions. Patients visiting a PCP (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care for 3/3 chronic and 1/5 acute condition indicators. Patients visiting a nother specialist (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care for 3/3 chronic and 2/5 acute condition indicators. Patients visiting an oncology specialist (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care on 2/3 chronic indicators and less likely to receive recommended care on 1/5 acute indicators. Patients at greatest risk for poor coordination were more likely to receive appropriate care on 4/6 indicators. PCPs are central to cancer survivors' non-cancer comorbid condition care quality. Implications for Cancer Survivors PCP involvement in cancer survivors' care should be promoted.

  2. Can We Help Care Providers Communicate More Effectively With Persons Having Dementia Living in Long-Term Care Homes?

    PubMed

    McGilton, Katherine S; Rochon, Elizabeth; Sidani, Souraya; Shaw, Alexander; Ben-David, Boaz M; Saragosa, Marianne; Boscart, Veronique M; Wilson, Rozanne; Galimidi-Epstein, Karmit K; Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen

    2017-02-01

    Effective communication between residents with dementia and care providers in long-term care homes (LTCHs) is essential to resident-centered care. To determine the effects of a communication intervention on residents' quality of life (QOL) and care, as well as care providers' perceived knowledge, mood, and burden. The intervention included (1) individualized communication plans, (2) a dementia care workshop, and (3) a care provider support system. Pre- and postintervention scores were compared to evaluate the effects of the intervention. A total of 12 residents and 20 care providers in an LTCH participated in the feasibility study. The rate of care providers' adherence to the communication plans was 91%. Postintervention, residents experienced a significant increase in overall QOL. Care providers had significant improvement in mood and perceived reduced burden. The results suggest that the communication intervention demonstrates preliminary evidence of positive effects on residents' QOL and care providers' mood and burden.

  3. Damage control and point of injury care: extending the care continuum to military prehospital providers.

    PubMed

    Hetzler, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Damage control principles are well founded, well proven, and have been incorporated into many specialties of clinical care in both military and civilian practice. Theories regarding hemostatic and hypovolemic resuscitation and preventing the Lethal Triad have had profound effects on the survival of wounded during the present conflicts. As we continue to refine these practices, implementation of this theory should be extended to military prehospital providers. The impacts of damage control practices from those providing initial treatment could complete the continuity of care, prime patients for additional success, and affect overall morbidity and mortality. The basic tenets of damage control theory are easily transferred to the Role I provider in the field and may even address their unique requirements more appropriately. Understanding the working concept of damage control would improve decision-making skills in both therapeutics and evacuation while managing casualties in the uncontrolled environment of combat. Military prehospital damage control differs greatly from in-hospital use, in that the principles must incorporate both medical and tactical considerations for care of the wounded. Introducing damage control principles to established casualty care guidelines will recognize and unite an often underappreciated level of care into a successful practice.

  4. Racial disparities in reported prenatal care advice from health care providers.

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, M D; Kotelchuck, M; Alexander, G R; Johnson, W E

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The relationship between certain maternal behaviors and adverse pregnancy outcomes has been well documented. One method to alter these behaviors is through the advice of women's health care providers. Advice from providers may be particularly important in minority populations, who have higher rates of infant mortality and prematurity. This study examines racial disparities according to women's self-report of advice received from health care providers during pregnancy in four areas: tobacco use, alcohol consumption, drug use, and breast-feeding. METHODS. Health care providers' advice to 8310 White non-Hispanic and Black women was obtained from the National Maternal and Infant Health Survey. RESULTS. After controlling for sociodemographic, utilization, and medical factors, Black women were more likely to report not receiving advice from their prenatal care providers about smoking cessation and alcohol use. The difference between Blacks and Whites also approached significance for breast-feeding. No overall difference was noted in advice regarding cessation of drug use, although there was a significant interaction between race and marital status. CONCLUSIONS. These data suggest that Black women may be at greater risk for not receiving information that could reduce their chances of having an adverse pregnancy outcome. PMID:8279618

  5. Critical care in the austere environment: providing exceptional care in unusual places.

    PubMed

    Venticinque, Steven G; Grathwohl, Kurt W

    2008-07-01

    War and other disasters are inexorably linked to illness and injury. As a consequence of this, healthcare providers will be challenged to provide advanced physiological support to preserve human life. Given the mobility and modularity of modern medical systems, the ability to provide critical care outside of the confines of traditional hospitals under such circumstances has become not only a reality and periodic necessity, but an expectation. Austerity amplifies the complexity of providing high-level critical care, because resources are frequently limited, providers are asked to fill unexpected roles determined by necessity, security may be threatened, and the population at risk and their afflictions can be highly diverse. Our current deployed military medical experience and a review of published literature pertaining to civilian medical disaster response efforts support these stated challenges. The fundamentals of successful critical care practice in unusual settings include proper planning with an emphasis on attention to detail, the careful management of all resources, using the proper equipment, leveraging aeromedical evacuation assets, and employing the right people with the right skills. Adherence to sound, evidence-based, routine practice, within bounds of the circumstances, must underscore everything.

  6. Culture and religion in nursing: providing culturally sensitive care.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Aysha

    Last month, Aysha Mendes discussed the impact on care of personal beliefs held by both nurses and patients. This month, she delves into the aspects of culture and religion, which form important pieces of this puzzle, as well as the importance of culturally appropriate care provision in nursing practice.

  7. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  8. Choosing the right health care provider for pregnancy and childbirth

    MedlinePlus

    ... take care of your newborn after delivery. Certified Nurse-Midwives (CNM) Certified nurse-midwives (CNM) are trained in nursing and midwifery. ... midwifery Are certified by the American College of Nurse-Midwives Nurse midwives care for women during pregnancy, ...

  9. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  10. Providing emergency care for patients with ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Valesia; Sharma, Rahul

    2015-05-01

    Emergency medicine clinicians who care for patients with ventricular assist devices (VADs) must have basic knowledge of the device mechanics, population-specific patient assessment techniques, and specific hospital recommendations for care of these patients. This case report illustrates a systematic approach that can be used in the ED for evaluating patients with VADs.

  11. Determination of pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and pesticides in surface and treated waters: method development and survey.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Bolzan, Cátia Marian; Guilherme, Juliana Rocha; Silveira, Maria Angelis Kisner; Escarrone, Ana Laura Venquiaruti; Primel, Ednei Gilberto

    2013-08-01

    Water is fundamental to the existence of life since it is essential to a series of activities, such as agriculture, power generation, and public and industrial supplies. The residual water generated by these activities is released into the environment, reaches the water systems, and becomes a potential risk to nontarget organisms. This paper reports the development and validation of a quantitative method, based on solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, for the simultaneous analysis of 18 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and 33 pesticides in surface and drinking waters. The accuracy of the method was determined by calculating the recoveries, which ranged from 70 to 120 % for most pesticides and PPCPs, whereas limits of quantification ranged from 0.8 to 40 ng/L. After the validation step, the method was applied to drinking and surface waters. Pesticides and PPCPs were found in concentrations lower than 135.5 ng/L. The evaluation of different water sources with regard to contamination by pesticides and PPCPs has been quite poor in southern Brazil.

  12. Reframing Conscientious Care: Providing Abortion Care When Law and Conscience Collide.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Mara; Lassiter, Dragana; Mercier, Rebecca; Bryant, Amy; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    2016-01-01

    Much of the debate on conscience has addressed the ethics of refusal: the rights of providers to refuse to perform procedures to which they object and the interests of the patients who might be harmed by their refusals. But conscience can also be a positive force, grounding decision about offering care.

  13. Reframing Conscientious Care: Providing Abortion Care When Law and Conscience Collide

    PubMed Central

    Lassiter, Dragana; Mercier, Rebecca; Bryant, Amy; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    2016-01-01

    While the concept of conscience has broad philosophical underpinnings relating to moral judgment, agency, and discernments of right and wrong, debates in bioethics have tended to engage the concept primarily vis-à-vis rights of conscientious refusal. Here, we suggest a broader frame for thinking about claims of conscience in healthcare. Drawing on empirical findings from our research with abortion providers in North Carolina, we elucidate an empirically grounded approach to ethically justified care when healthcare providers face legal or institutional policy mandates that raise possible moral conflicts. We highlight, in particular, how providers may be motivated by matters of conscience, including relational concerns, in the active provision of certain forms of care. In so doing, we challenge the dichotomy between conscientious refusal and morally compromised action, demonstrating how providers may work within the constraints of laws or institutional policies that raise moral challenges and act in accordance with conscience. PMID:27120281

  14. Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

    2014-01-01

    Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

  15. Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

    2014-01-01

    Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

  16. Derivative financial instruments and nonprofit health care providers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Louis J; Owhoso, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the extent of derivative financial instrument use among US nonprofit health systems and the impact of these financial instruments on their cash flows, reported operating results, and financial risks. Our examination is conducted through a case study of New Jersey hospitals and health systems. We review the existing literature on interest rate derivative instruments and US hospitals and health systems. This literature describes the design of these derivative financial instruments and the theoretical benefits of their use by large health care provider organizations. Our contribution to the literature is to provide an empirical evaluation of derivative financial instruments usage among a geographically limited sample of US nonprofit health systems. We reviewed the audited financial statements of the 49 community hospitals and multi-hospital health systems operating in the state of New Jersey. We found that 8 percent of New Jersey's nonprofit health providers utilized interest rate derivatives with an aggregate principle value of $229 million. These derivative users combine interest rate swaps and caps to lower the effective interest costs of their long-term debt while limiting their exposure to future interest rate increases. In addition, while derivative assets and liabilities have an immaterial balance sheet impact, derivative related gains and losses are a material component of their reported operating results. We also found that derivative usage among these four health systems was responsible for generating positive cash flows in the range of 1 percent to 2 percent of their total 2001 cash flows from operations. As a result of our admittedly limited samples we conclude that interest rate swaps and caps are effective risk management tools. However, we also found that while these derivative financial instruments are useful hedges against the risks of issuing long-term financing instruments, they also expose derivative users to credit, contract

  17. Preconception care: the perfect opportunity for health care providers to advise lifestyle changes for hypertensive women.

    PubMed

    Bombard, Jennifer M; Robbins, Cheryl L; Dietz, Patricia M; Valderrama, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    To provide estimates for prevalence of health care provider advice offered to reproductive-aged women and to assess their association with behavior change. Cross-sectional study using the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Setting. Nineteen states/areas. Women aged 18 to 44 years with a self-reported history of hypertension or current antihypertensive medication use (n = 2063). Self-reported hypertension; sociodemographic and health care access indicators; and provider advice and corresponding self-reported behavior change to improve diet, limit salt intake, exercise, and reduce alcohol use. We estimated prevalence and prevalence ratios for receipt of provider advice and action to change habits. We calculated 95% confidence interval (CI) and used χ(2) tests to assess associations. Overall, 9.8% of reproductive-aged women had self-reported hypertension; most reported receiving advice to change eating habits (72.9%), reduce salt intake (74.6%), and exercise (82.1%), and most reported making these changes. Only 44.7% reported receiving advice to reduce alcohol intake. Women who received provider advice were more likely to report corresponding behavior change compared to those who did not (prevalence ratios ranged from 1.3 [95% CI, 1.2-1.5, p < .05] for exercise to 1.6 [95% CI, 1.4-1.8, p < .05] for reducing alcohol use. Health care providers should routinely advise hypertensive reproductive-aged women about lifestyle changes to reduce blood pressure and improve pregnancy outcomes.

  18. Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland.

  19. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What requirements must foster care providers meet? 20.507... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child needs foster care, the social services worker must select care...

  20. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What requirements must foster care providers meet? 20.507... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child needs foster care, the social services worker must select care...

  1. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What requirements must foster care providers meet? 20.507... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child needs foster care, the social services worker must select care...

  2. Can health care providers recognise a fibromyalgia personality?

    PubMed

    Da Silva, José A P; Jacobs, Johannes W G; Branco, Jaime C; Canaipa, Rita; Gaspar, M Filomena; Griep, Ed N; van Helmond, Toon; Oliveira, Paula J; Zijlstra, Theo J; Geenen, Rinie

    2017-01-01

    To determine if experienced health care providers (HCPs) can recognise patients with fibromyalgia (FM) based on a limited set of personality items, exploring the existence of a FM personality. From the 240-item NEO-PI-R personality questionnaire, 8 HCPs from two different countries each selected 20 items they considered most discriminative of FM personality. Then, evaluating the scores on these items of 129 female patients with FM and 127 female controls, each HCP rated the probability of FM for each individual on a 0-10 scale. Personality characteristics (domains and facets) of selected items were determined. Scores of patients with FM and controls on the eight 20-item sets, and HCPs' estimates of each individual's probability of FM were analysed for their discriminative value. The eight 20-item sets discriminated for FM, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve ranging from 0.71-0.81. The estimated probabilities for FM showed, in general, percentages of correct classifications above 50%, with rising correct percentages for higher estimated probabilities. The most often chosen and discriminatory items were predominantly of the domain neuroticism (all with higher scores in FM), followed by some items of the facet trust (lower scores in FM). HCPs can, based on a limited set of items from a personality questionnaire, distinguish patients with FM from controls with a statistically significant probability. The HCPs' expectation that personality in FM patients is associated with higher levels for aspects of neuroticism (proneness to psychological distress) and lower scores for aspects of trust, proved to be correct.

  3. The STI and HIV testing practices of primary care providers.

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Mitchell; Solorio, M. Rosa

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV testing practices of primary care providers (PCPs) practicing in predominantly Hispanic communities. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. PCPs were identified by matching ZIP codes of physician directories with ZIP codes of Los Angeles County areas that have a population that is > 50% Hispanic (N = 191). PCPs were mailed a survey that assessed their frequencies for asking patients about sexual history, offering STI and safe sex advice, total number of HIV tests ordered in the past six months and their perceived barriers to STI counseling. The survey response rate was 45% (N = 85). RESULTS: Although 73% of PCPs took sexual histories from patients regularly (daily-to-weekly), only 41% offered STI or safe sex advice regularly. PCPs who were white were less likely than those who were Hispanic/Asian/African American/other to take sexual histories from their patients regularly (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The total number of HIV tests ordered for patients by PCPs at their practice locations in the past six months were: none (6%), 1-10 tests (27%), 11-20 tests (24%) and > 20 tests (36%). Thirty-six percent of PCPs reported > or = 1 positive HIV test in the past six months. PCPs' perceived barriers to STI counseling included patient's young age (< 16 years), language and presence of patient's relative/partner in consultation room at time of visit. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest a need for interventions with PCPs practicing in predominantly Hispanic communities to improve their STI and HIV practice patterns. PMID:17393950

  4. The providers' coordination of care: a model for collaboration across the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Maria E

    2008-01-01

    With guidance from Health Services Advisory Group, the Arizona Medicare Quality Improvement Organization, a Prescott, Arizona, workgroup consisting of a hospital, nursing home, and 2 home health agencies have come together to improve continuity of care as related to pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. Weekly, then monthly, meetings were held to develop recommendations for practice standardization, a treatment grid for easy reference, an educational module with posttests, and standardized physicians' orders, which were developed and disseminated to the local provider community. More than 200 staff members were educated at Yavapai Regional Medical Center (YRMC), local skilled nursing facilities, and home health agencies. In addition, new employees and nursing students are now educated on the Providers' Coordination of Care Educational Module at YRMC. The Module has been placed on the hospital's Web site and offered free to all interested parties. With pressure being mounted by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG), and the general public, the role of the case manager (in all practice settings) will increasingly become more crucial. Through development of a network of local venues of care, the case manager can facilitate care transitions throughout the healthcare system with the goal of improved outcomes for the patient regardless of setting. Providing the right care, in the right setting to improve patient care, can only benefit our aging and declining populations. Cross-setting work will become more essential as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services goal of pay-for-performance is realized across all care settings. As a national priority, pressure ulcer prevention and treatment needs to be embraced by all settings. It serves the patient, as well as the healthcare providers, to improve care regardless of setting or competition. Positive results can be accomplished if the best interests of the patient are kept

  5. The Impact of Technology on Patients, Providers, and Care Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagerhaugh, Shizuko; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Examines the problems technical innovation has brought to health care professionals, administrators, and patients from the standpoints of increased specialization, equipment obsolescence, bureaucracy, retraining, regulations, high costs of services, depersonalization, and ethical dilemmas. (CT)

  6. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: Patient Response to a Primary Care Provider Communication Training.

    PubMed

    Green, Bonnie L; Saunders, Pamela A; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2016-01-01

    Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders and health outcomes; yet there is little training of primary care providers about trauma's effects, and how to better interact with trauma survivors. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), to evaluate its feasibility and preliminary efficacy. We randomized four primary care sites to training or wait-list conditions; PCPs at wait-list sites were trained after reassessment. Primary care providers (PCPs) were Family Medicine residents (n = 17; 2 sites) or community physicians (n = 13; 2 sites). Outcomes reported here comprised a survey of 400 actual patients seen by the PCPs in the study. Patients, mostly minority, completed surveys before or after their provider received training. Patients rated PCPs significantly higher after training on a scale encompassing partnership issues. Breakdowns showed lower partnership scores for those with trauma or posttraumatic stress symptoms. Future studies will need to include more specific trauma-related outcomes. Nevertheless, this training is a promising initial approach to teaching trauma-informed communication skills to PCPs.

  7. Native American Death Taboo: Implications for Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Colclough, Yoshiko Yamashita

    2017-07-01

    This study was conducted to highlight Native American (NA) perspectives on death taboo in order to examine the cultural appropriateness of hospice services for NA patients, if any. Searching literature that addressed taboo and death from historical, psychological, sociological, and anthropological aspects, a comparison of death perspectives was made between NAs and European Americans. A culturally sensitive transition from palliative care to hospice care was suggested for NA patients and their family.

  8. Acute antimicrobial pesticide-related illnesses among workers in health-care facilities - California, Louisiana, Michigan, and Texas, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    2010-05-14

    Antimicrobial pesticides (e.g., sterilizers, disinfectants, and sanitizers) are chemicals used to destroy or suppress the growth of harmful microorganisms on inanimate objects and surfaces. Health-care facilities use antimicrobial pesticides to prevent pathogen transmission from contaminated environmental surfaces. Occupational exposures to antimicrobial pesticides are known to cause adverse health effects. To assess the nature and frequency of such exposures in health-care settings, CDC analyzed data from pesticide poisoning surveillance programs in California, Louisiana, Michigan, and Texas (the only four states that regularly collect data on antimicrobial pesticide-related illness) for the period 2002-2007. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which identified 401 cases of work-related illness associated with antimicrobial pesticide exposures in health-care facilities. Most cases were identified through workers compensation systems (61%) and occurred among females (82%) and persons aged 25-54 years (73%). The most frequent occupations reported were janitors/housekeepers (24%) and nursing/medical assistants (16%). The reported mechanism of injury usually was splashes/spills (51%). The eyes were the most common organ/system affected (55%); only 15% of the 265 persons who had exposures while handling antimicrobial pesticides reported using eye protection. Reported symptoms were mostly mild and temporary. One fatality due to acute asthma and subsequent cardiopulmonary collapse was identified. Health-care facilities should educate workers about antimicrobial pesticide hazards, promote the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) as appropriate, and implement effective risk communication strategies for antimicrobial pesticide use to prevent bystander exposure. Improved design of handling equipment might prevent handler and bystander exposure.

  9. The association of spiritual care providers' activities with family members' satisfaction with care after a death in the ICU*.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeffrey R; Engelberg, Ruth A; Nielsen, Elizabeth L; Kross, Erin K; Smith, Nicholas L; Hanada, Julie C; Doll O'Mahoney, Sean K; Curtis, J Randall

    2014-09-01

    Spiritual distress is common in the ICU, and spiritual care providers are often called upon to provide care for patients and their families. Our goal was to evaluate the activities spiritual care providers' conduct to support patients and families and whether those activities are associated with family satisfaction with ICU care. Prospective cohort study. Three hundred fifty-bed tertiary care teaching hospital with 65 ICU beds. Spiritual care providers and family members of patients who died in the ICU or within 30 hours of transfer from the ICU. None. Spiritual care providers completed surveys reporting their activities. Family members completed validated measures of satisfaction with care and satisfaction with spiritual care. Clustered regression was used to assess the association between activities completed by spiritual care providers and family ratings of care. Of 494 eligible patients, 275 family members completed surveys (response rate, 56%). Fifty-seven spiritual care providers received surveys relating to 268 patients, completing 285 surveys for 244 patients (response rate, 91%). Spiritual care providers commonly reported activities related to supporting religious and spiritual needs (≥ 90%) and providing support for family feelings (90%). Discussions about the patient's wishes for end-of-life care and a greater number of spiritual care activities performed were both associated with increased overall family satisfaction with ICU care (p < 0.05). Discussions about a patient's end-of-life wishes, preparation for a family conference, and total number of activities performed were associated with improved family satisfaction with decision-making in the ICU (p < 0.05). Spiritual care providers engage in a variety of activities with families of ICU patients; several are associated with increased family satisfaction with ICU care in general and decision-making in the ICU specifically. These findings provide insight into spiritual care provider activities and

  10. Can We Help Care Providers Communicate More Effectively With Persons Having Dementia Living in Long-Term Care Homes?

    PubMed Central

    Rochon, Elizabeth; Sidani, Souraya; Shaw, Alexander; Ben-David, Boaz M.; Saragosa, Marianne; Boscart, Veronique M.; Wilson, Rozanne; Galimidi-Epstein, Karmit K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effective communication between residents with dementia and care providers in long-term care homes (LTCHs) is essential to resident-centered care. Purpose: To determine the effects of a communication intervention on residents’ quality of life (QOL) and care, as well as care providers’ perceived knowledge, mood, and burden. Method: The intervention included (1) individualized communication plans, (2) a dementia care workshop, and (3) a care provider support system. Pre- and postintervention scores were compared to evaluate the effects of the intervention. A total of 12 residents and 20 care providers in an LTCH participated in the feasibility study. Results: The rate of care providers’ adherence to the communication plans was 91%. Postintervention, residents experienced a significant increase in overall QOL. Care providers had significant improvement in mood and perceived reduced burden. Conclusion: The results suggest that the communication intervention demonstrates preliminary evidence of positive effects on residents’ QOL and care providers’ mood and burden. PMID:27899433

  11. Providers' Perspectives on Barriers and Facilitators to Connecting Women Veterans to Alcohol-Related Care From Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Traci H; Lewis, Eleanor T; Cucciare, Michael A

    2017-09-01

    Unhealthy drinking is relatively common among women U.S. military Veterans. Primary care is often the setting where patients first come into contact with the health care system, and providers in this setting play a critical role in connecting unhealthy drinkers to appropriate care. Little is known about primary care providers' perspectives on factors that affect whether women Veterans presenting to primary care with unhealthy drinking connect to alcohol-related care. Understanding factors that affect whether patients connect to alcohol-related care may improve providers' ability to support women Veterans with unhealthy drinking get needed care. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with 14 providers from two Veterans Administration Women's Health primary care clinics, including nurses, nurse practitioners, physicians' assistants, and physicians, and colocated mental health providers. The interviews were transcribed, and themes pertaining to providers' perspectives on barriers and facilitators to connecting women Veterans' with unhealthy drinking to alcohol-related care were identified through template analysis. Primary care providers perceived numerous provider- and clinic-level factors as relevant to their ability to connect women Veterans to alcohol-related care. Barriers providers described were insufficient care resources, provider prioritization of alcohol-related care, insufficient knowledge of care options or the referral process among providers, time constraints during routine clinical visits, and the referral process for alcohol-related care. They also described resources available in primary care, primary care provider behaviors, and initiatives at the Veterans Administration as helpful. Although primary care providers are gatekeepers to specialty treatment services, ongoing education, and colocated mental health staff could help reduce barriers to these services, ultimately improving health outcomes for women Veterans and others with

  12. Marketing a Resource and Referral Resource Room to Child Care Providers and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eder, Sandra

    Recognizing the importance of providing parents and child care providers with current information on early childhood education, care, and support, this practicum project evaluated the design and implementation of a 10-week strategy to market a child care resource and referral agency resource room to child care providers and parents. Observations,…

  13. Roles of perceived provider cultural sensitivity and health care justice in African American/Black patients' satisfaction with provider.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Carolyn M; Moradi, Bonnie; Wall, Whitney; Nghiem, Khanh

    2014-09-01

    The present study tests a refined first component of the Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care (PC-CSHC) Model-the evidence supported component that links perceived provider cultural sensitivity to patient satisfaction with provider care and identifies trust of provider as the mediator of this linkage. The refined first component of the PC-CSHC Model tested in the present study is novel in that it includes the three dimensions of provider cultural sensitivity and includes perceived provider impartiality (fairness), a core aspect of perceived health care justice, as a mediator in addition to trust of provider (the other core aspect of perceived health care justice). Study participants were 298 African American/Black primary care clinic patients with low household incomes. Mediation analyses revealed that the three dimensions of patients' perceived provider cultural sensitivity were significant predictors of the participating patients' reported satisfaction with their provider, and that some of these predictive relationships were partially mediated by (1) patients' perceived provider impartiality (fairness), and (2) patients' trust of their provider. Implications of these findings for providers' interactions with patients, development of the PC-CSHC Model, and the roles of psychologists in facilitating patient-provider interactions are discussed.

  14. Do primary care providers who speak Chinese improve access to mental health care of Chinese immigrants?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alice W; Kazanjian, Arminée

    2009-01-01

    Background The utilization of health care providers who share the language and culture of their patients has been advocated as a strategy to improve access to the mental health care of immigrants. This study examines the relationship between patients receiving primary care from health care providers who speak Chinese and the rate of mental health diagnosis and consultation among Chinese immigrants in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods The study analyzed 3 linked administrative databases: an immigration database, BC’s health databases and BC’s physician register. The study population consisted of more than 270 000 recent Chinese immigrants to BC, with sex and age-matched comparison subjects. We calculated the odds ratios (ORs) of being diagnosed with common mental health conditions and the rate ratios (RRs) of mental health visits per year of health plan registration, by proportion of general care received from Chinese-speaking physicians; this was done using logistic regression and generalized linear models, adjusting for sex, age and time registered in the health plan. Results Among Chinese immigrants, a higher proportion of care received from Chinese-speaking general practitioners (GPs) was associated with a lower probability of being diagnosed with neurotic disorders (OR = 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80–0.95), drug dependence (OR = 0.22; 95% CI 0.14–0.35), adjustment reaction (OR = 0.39; 95% CI 0.33–0.46) and depressive disorder not elsewhere classified (OR = 0.47; 95% CI 0.42–0.52), as well as a lower rate of mental health service utilization (RR = 0.65%; 95% CI 0.61–0.69). Among the comparison group, a higher proportion of primary care received from Chinese-speaking GPs was associated with a lower probability of being diagnosed with affective psychoses (OR = 0.53; 95% CI 0.47–0.59), neurotic disorders (OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.47–0.51), drug dependence (OR = 0.28; 95% CI 0.24–0.32), acute reaction to stress

  15. Costs of accountable care organization participation for primary care providers: early stage results.

    PubMed

    Hofler, Richard A; Ortiz, Judith

    2016-07-28

    Little is known about the impact of joining an Accountable Care Organization (ACO) on primary care provider organization's costs. The purpose of this study was to determine whether joining an ACO is associated with an increase in a Rural Health Clinic's (RHC's) cost per visit. The analyses focused on cost per visit in 2012 and 2013 for RHCs that joined an ACO in 2012 and cost per visit in 2013 for RHCs that joined an ACO in 2013. The RHCs were located in nine states. Data were obtained from Medicare Cost Reports. The analysis was conducted taking a treatment effects approach where the treatment is joining an ACO. Propensity-score matching was employed to provide multiple single and pooled estimates of the average treatment effect on the treated. Four-hundred thirty four to 544 RHCs (depending on the type of analysis and the variables used) were used in the several analyses. Seven of the RHCs joined an ACO in 2012 and 14 joined an ACO in 2013. The mean cost per visit for RHCs that did not join an ACO rose 4.40 % from 2011 to 2012 whereas the mean cost per visit for RHCs that joined an ACO rose by triple: 13.5 %. All of the pooled estimates of the average treatment effect on the treated from the propensity-score matching showed that joining an ACO was associated with higher mean cost per visit. The range of the estimated mean cost per visit differences was $17.19 (p value = 0.00) to $25.19 (p value = 0.00). This study is one of the first to describe the cost of ACO participation from the perspective of primary care provider organizations. It appears that for at least one type of primary care provider - the RHC - there are substantial costs associated with ACO participation during the first two years.

  16. Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCHS Publications and Electronic Media Errata List Listservs Data and Statistics Data Visualization Gallery FastStats MMWR QuickStats ... care, other nonsurgical procedures, and other surgical procedures. Data sources and methods All estimates are from NAMCS— ...

  17. [Pregnancy in adolescence description and analysis of care provided].

    PubMed

    de Caminha, Náira Oliveira; Freitas, Lydia Vieira; Lima, Thaís Marques; Gomes, Linicarla Fabíole de Souza; Herculano, Marta Maria Soares; Damasceno, Ana Kelve de Castro

    2012-09-01

    This work is aimed at describing and analyzing prenatal care to teenage women through the Brazilian Prenatal and Birth Humanization Program (BPBHP). It's a descriptive quantitative study conducted between March and July 2009 based on a form and interview with 200 teenage women during the postpartum period in a maternity ward of Sistema Unico de Satúde (Brazilian Unified Health System), which is considered a reference in obstetric care. The young women received prenatal care through the public service (96.4%) which began during the first trimester (47.4%), they didn't have the minimum medical appointments required (52.6%), took iron supplements (96.9%), received tetanus immunization (80.5%) and didn't have enough orientation (46.0%). The laboratory tests were performed during their first medical appointment (80.0%), but only a third were repeated in the third trimester. Therefore, the BPBHP doesn't meet all the standards set by the Ministéio da Saúde (Ministry of Health), and there are improvements to be made in the early service phase, ongoing care, demand for second exam samples and availability of orientation.

  18. NPs vs other healthcare providers in end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Tyree, Tammy L; Long, Carol O; Greenberg, Edward A

    2005-01-01

    As nurse practitioners become more vital to primary care, they are also more apt to play a role in end-of-life care. In order to be proficient providers, NPs must familiarize themselves with issues surrounding EOL care.

  19. Pesticide-related illness reported to and diagnosed in Primary Care: implications for surveillance of environmental causes of ill-health

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Lesley; Mann, Vera

    2009-01-01

    Background In Great Britain (GB), data collected on pesticide associated illness focuses on acute episodes such as poisonings caused by misuse or abuse. This study aimed to investigate the extent and nature of pesticide-related illness presented and diagnosed in Primary Care and the feasibility of establishing a routine monitoring system. Methods A checklist, completed by General Practitioners (GP) for all patients aged 18+ who attended surgery sessions, identified patients to be interviewed in detail on exposures and events that occurred in the week before their symptoms appeared. Results The study covered 59320 patients in 43 practices across GB and 1335 detailed interviews. The annual incidence of illness reported to GPs because of concern about pesticide exposure was estimated to be 0.04%, potentially 88400 consultations annually, approximately 1700 per week. The annual incidence of consultations where symptoms were diagnosed by GPs as likely to be related to pesticide exposure was 0.003%, an annual estimate of 6630 consultations i.e. about 128 per week. 41% of interviewees reported using at least one pesticide at home in the week before symptoms occurred. The risk of having symptoms possibly related to pesticide exposure compared to unlikely was associated with home use of pesticides after adjusting for age, gender and occupational pesticide exposure (OR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.51 – 2.35). Conclusion GP practices were diverse and well distributed throughout GB with similar symptom consulting patterns as in the Primary Care within the UK. Methods used in this study would not be feasible for a routine surveillance system for pesticide related illness. Incorporation of environmental health into Primary Care education and practice is needed. PMID:19580646

  20. Medicaid Personal Care Services for Children with Intellectual Disabilities: What Assistance Is Provided? When Is Assistance Provided?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Timothy R.; Patnaik, Ashweeta; Naiser, Emily; Fournier, Constance J.; McMaughan, Darcy K.; Dyer, James A.; Phillips, Charles D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nature and timing of services provided to children with an intellectual disability (ID) identified by a new comprehensive assessment and care planning tool used to evaluate children's needs for Medicaid Personal Care Services (PCS) in Texas. The new assessment procedure resulted from a legal settlement with the advocacy community.…

  1. Medicaid Personal Care Services for Children with Intellectual Disabilities: What Assistance Is Provided? When Is Assistance Provided?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Timothy R.; Patnaik, Ashweeta; Naiser, Emily; Fournier, Constance J.; McMaughan, Darcy K.; Dyer, James A.; Phillips, Charles D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nature and timing of services provided to children with an intellectual disability (ID) identified by a new comprehensive assessment and care planning tool used to evaluate children's needs for Medicaid Personal Care Services (PCS) in Texas. The new assessment procedure resulted from a legal settlement with the advocacy community.…

  2. Delayed or forgone care and dissatisfaction with care for children with special health care needs: the role of perceived cultural competency of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Kerfeld, Cheryl I; Hoffman, Jeanne M; Ciol, Marcia A; Kartin, Deborah

    2011-05-01

    To better understand if reported delayed/forgone care and dissatisfaction with care for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are associated with the parent's perception of health care providers' cultural competency. National survey. Fifty United States and the District of Columbia yielding 750 families per state and District of Columbia with CSHCN ≤ 18 years participated in the 2005-06 National Survey of CSHCN. Outcome measures were delayed/forgone care in the past 12 months (yes or no) and dissatisfaction (very dissatisfied to very satisfied). Demographic/clinical characteristics and the parent's perception of health care providers' cultural competency were examined. Perception of cultural competency was defined by questions related to time spent with child, respect for family values, listening to the family, sense of partnership, and information provided. Delayed/forgone care and dissatisfaction with care were associated with perceived health care provider cultural competency. Parents whose children were older, whose children's condition affected their ability to do things, whose interviews were not conducted in English, and were from certain racial and ethnic groups reported more delayed or forgone care and were more dissatisfied with their children's health care. Delayed/forgone care and dissatisfaction with care were associated with perceived cultural competency of health care providers. This did not appear to differ consistently by racial or ethnic group. Further research using more refined instruments and longitudinal designs is needed to assess the effects of health care providers' cultural competency and other cultural factors on the delayed/forgone care for CSHCN and on the dissatisfaction with care of parents with CSHCN.

  3. Making It Happen: Training health-care providers in emergency obstetric and newborn care.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Charles A; van den Broek, Nynke

    2015-11-01

    An estimated 289,000 maternal deaths, 2.6 million stillbirths and 2.4 million newborn deaths occur globally each year, with the majority occurring around the time of childbirth. The medical and surgical interventions to prevent this loss of life are known, and most maternal and newborn deaths are in principle preventable. There is a need to build the capacity of health-care providers to recognize and manage complications during pregnancy, childbirth and the post-partum period. Skills-and-drills competency-based training in skilled birth attendance, emergency obstetric care and early newborn care (EmONC) is an approach that is successful in improving knowledge and skills. There is emerging evidence of this resulting in improved availability and quality of care. To evaluate the effectiveness of EmONC training, operational research using an adapted Kirkpatrick framework and a theory of change approach is needed. The Making It Happen programme is an example of this. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Trauma-informed medical care: CME communication training for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Green, Bonnie L; Saunders, Pamela A; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2015-01-01

    Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders, medical morbidity, and health care costs. Yet trauma-related impacts have not received sufficient attention in primary care provider (PCP) training programs. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), and evaluated its efficacy. We randomized PCPs to training or wait-list (delay) conditions; wait-list groups were trained after reassessment. The primary outcome assessing newly acquired skills was a patient-centeredness score derived from Roter Interactional Analysis System ratings of 90 taped visits between PCPs and standardized patients (SPs). PCPs were family medicine residents (n=17) and community physicians (n=13, 83% family medicine specialty), from four sites in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. Immediately trained PCPs trended toward a larger increase in patient centeredness than did the delayed PCPs, with a moderate effect size (.66). The combined trained PCP groups showed a significant increase in patient centeredness from before to after training. This is a promising approach to supporting relationship-based trauma-informed care among PCPs to help promote better patient health and higher compliance with medical treatment plans.

  5. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child needs foster care, the social services worker must select care that meets the physical, behavioral, and emotional needs of the child. Foster care is intended to be short...

  6. Pesticide Registration Information System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PRISM provides an integrated, web portal for all pesticide related data, communications, registrations and transactions for OPP and its stakeholders, partners and customers. PRISM supports Strategic Goal 4 by automating pesticide registration processes.

  7. Antenatal and obstetric care in Afghanistan – a qualitative study among health care receivers and health care providers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite attempts from the government to improve ante- and perinatal care, Afghanistan has once again been labeled “the worst country in which to be a mom” in Save the Children’s World’s Mothers’ Report. This study investigated how pregnant women and health care providers experience the existing antenatal and obstetric health care situation in Afghanistan. Methods Data were obtained through one-to-one semi-structured interviews of 27 individuals, including 12 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth, seven doctors, five midwives, and three traditional birth attendants. The interviews were carried out in Kabul and the village of Ramak in Ghazni Province. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and analyzed according to the principles of Giorgi’s phenomenological analysis. Results Antenatal care was reported to be underused, even when available. Several obstacles were identified, including a lack of knowledge regarding the importance of antenatal care among the women and their families, financial difficulties, and transportation problems. The women also reported significant dissatisfaction with the attitudes and behavior of health personnel, which included instances of verbal and physical abuse. According to the health professionals, poor working conditions, low salaries, and high stress levels contributed to this matter. Personal contacts inside the hospital were considered necessary for receiving high quality care, and bribery was customary. Despite these serious concerns, the women expressed gratitude for having even limited access to health care, especially treatment provided by a female doctor. Health professionals were proud of their work and enjoyed the opportunity to help their community. Conclusion This study identified several obstacles which must be addressed to improve reproductive health in Afghanistan. There was limited understanding of the importance of antenatal care and a lack of family support. Financial and

  8. Neonatal nurse practitioners provide quality, cost-effective care.

    PubMed

    Geiss, Donna M; Cavaliere, Terri A

    2003-09-01

    Loretta Ford, the pioneer of nurse practitioners, was the recipient of the Crystal Trailblazer Award from the American College of Nurse Practitioners in February 2003. In her acceptance speech, the stated that "in some ways, the profession had expanded beyond my wildest dreams," but cautioned against the medicalization of the NP role: "The profession is rooted in nursing ... and we enhance, advance, and influence through nursing." She added: "Medical and nursing interdependency sets the stage for the highest level of care. No one profession can deliver comprehensive health care themselves." NNPs, functioning collaboratively with neonatologists as part of a multidisciplinary team, illustrate the truth of Ford's words. They have clearly and unequivocally made significant strides during the past 20 years. Their achievements and contributions have been many but their potential has yet to be reached.

  9. Vibrational angioedema: considerations for oral health care providers.

    PubMed

    Aloyouny, Ashwag; Stoopler, Eric T

    2016-11-01

    Vibratory angioedema (VA) is a rare, inherited type of physical urticaria characterized by acute onset of mucosal and / or cutaneous edema that is triggered by vibration. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman with VA elicited by use of mechanized (vibratory) dental equipment. To our knowledge, this is the first report of VA induced by mechanical dental equipment. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access.

  11. Diabetes Care Provided to Children Displaced by Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Quast, Troy; Mortensen, Karoline

    2015-10-01

    Although previous studies have examined the impact of Hurricane Katrina on adults with diabetes, less is known about the effects on children with diabetes and on those displaced by the storm. We analyzed individual-level enrollment and utilization data of children with diabetes who were displaced from Louisiana and were enrolled in the Texas Medicaid Hurricane Katrina emergency waiver (TexKat). We compared the utilization and outcomes of children displaced from Louisiana with those of children who lived in areas less affected by Hurricane Katrina. Data from both before and after the storm were used to calculate difference-in-difference estimates of the effects of displacement on the children. We analyzed 4 diabetes management procedures (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1C] tests, eye exams, microalbumin tests, and thyroid tests) and a complication from poor diabetes management (diabetic ketoacidosis). Children enrolled in the waiver generally did not experience a decrease in care relative to the control group while the waiver program was in effect. After the waiver ended, however, we observed a drop in care and an increase in complications relative to the control group. Although the waiver appeared to have been largely successful immediately following Katrina, future waivers may be improved by ensuring that enrollees continue to receive care after the waivers expire.

  12. Care Transitions: Using Narratives to Assess Continuity of Care Provided to Older Patients after Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carolyn; Hogan, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Background A common scenario that may pose challenges to primary care providers is when an older patient has been discharged from hospital. The aim of this pilot project is to examine the experiences of patients’ admission to hospital through to discharge back home, using analysis of patient narratives to inform the strengths and weaknesses of the process. Methods For this qualitative study, we interviewed eight subjects from the Sheldon M. Chumir Central Teaching Clinic (CTC). Interviews were analyzed for recurring themes and phenomena. Two physicians and two resident learners employed at the CTC were recruited as a focus group to review the narrative transcripts. Results Narratives generally demonstrated moderate satisfaction among interviewees with respect to their hospitalization and follow-up care in the community. However, the residual effects of their hospitalization surprised five patients, and five were uncertain about their post-discharge management plan. Conclusion Both secondary and primary care providers can improve on communicating the likely course of recovery and follow-up plans to patients at the time of hospital discharge. Our findings add to the growing body of research advocating for the implementation of quality improvement measures to standardize the discharge process. PMID:27729948

  13. Occurrence of Selected Pharmaceuticals, Personal-Care Products, Organic Wastewater Compounds, and Pesticides in the Lower Tallapoosa River Watershed near Montgomery, Alabama, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oblinger, Carolyn J.; Gill, Amy C.; McPherson, Ann K.; Meyer, Michael T.; Furlong, Edward T.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic and natural organic compounds derived from agricultural operations, residential development, and treated and untreated sanitary and industrial wastewater discharges can contribute contaminants to surface and ground waters. To determine the occurrence of these compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed, Alabama, new laboratory methods were used that can detect human and veterinary antibiotics; pharmaceuticals; and compounds found in personal-care products, food additives, detergents and their metabolites, plasticizers, and other industrial and household products in the environment. Well-established methods for detecting 47 pesticides and 19 pesticide degradates also were used. In all, 186 different compounds were analyzed by using four analytical methods. The lower Tallapoosa River serves as the water-supply source for more than 100,000 customers of the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board. Source-water protection is a high priority for the Board, which is responsible for providing safe drinking water. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board, conducted this study to provide baseline data that could be used to assess the effects of agriculture and residential development on the occurrence of selected organic compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Twenty samples were collected at 10 sites on the Tallapoosa River and its tributaries. Ten samples were collected in April 2005 during high base streamflow, and 10 samples were collected in October 2005 when base streamflow was low. Thirty-two of 186 compounds were detected in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Thirteen compounds, including atrazine, 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT), hexazinone, metalaxyl, metolachlor, prometryn, prometon, simazine, azithromycin, oxytetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and tylosin, had measurable concentrations above their laboratory reporting levels

  14. Quality in Family Child Care Networks: An Evaluation of All Our Kin Provider Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Toni; Reiman, Kayla; Nelson, Christina; Sager, Jessica; Wagner, Janna

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings from a quasi-experimental evaluation of quality with a sample of 28 family child care providers in the All Our Kin Family Child Care Network, a staffed family child care network which offers a range of services including relationship-based intensive consultation, and 20 family child care providers who had no…

  15. Quality in Family Child Care Networks: An Evaluation of All Our Kin Provider Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Toni; Reiman, Kayla; Nelson, Christina; Sager, Jessica; Wagner, Janna

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings from a quasi-experimental evaluation of quality with a sample of 28 family child care providers in the All Our Kin Family Child Care Network, a staffed family child care network which offers a range of services including relationship-based intensive consultation, and 20 family child care providers who had no…

  16. A point of care clinical documentation system for hospice care providers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyusuk; Bell, Ralph; Lee, Dennis

    2006-02-01

    This article identifies two areas of hospice care that may benefit the most from a point-of-care (POC) clinical documentation system: documentation for recertification and symptom/pain management. Applications as solutions for the hospice POC clinical documentation system need two documentation support tools: (1) knowledge-based external or internal reference data available to physicians or medical staff right at the bedside and (2) assisting medical staff in filling out electronic forms for clinical measurements by providing real-time prompts, clues, alerts, or other types of feedback, along with the common features such as pre-defined values in specific fields. Our study may encourage more software vendors to include clinical documentation support tools in their solutions.

  17. Evaluation of the South Dakota fitCare child care provider training program targeting nutrition and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Chad M; Haskins, Derrick D; Loo, Ryan K; Ahrendt, Linda J

    2014-08-01

    Early childhood obesity is a significant health problem that has serious short- and long-term consequences. Recognizing the influence child care providers have on children, state programs have been created through federal funding initiatives to improve childhood health and reduce obesity rates. In 2011, South Dakota Department of Health received a five-year Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Community Transformation grant to improve healthy eating and active living. Grant funds were used to implement the fitCare Child Care Provider Training Program. Child care providers in South Dakota volunteered to participate in fitCare training. Surveys were conducted among fitCare and non-fitCare participants to assess South Dakota child care provider implementation of proper nutrition and physical activities in child care settings. Survey findings showed that 52 percent of all providers surveyed have children, newborn to 2 years old, at their day care for more than 40 hours per week. Non-fitCare providers were more likely to provide additional servings of fruit than fitCare providers. Statistically significant findings showed that fitCare providers were more likely than non-fitCare providers to offer structured physical activity (p = < 0.001). Rural Urban Commuting Area analysis was also performed showing differences between rural and urban areas. Conclusions suggest that the physical activity components of fitCare training have a stronger impact on providers than the nutrition components. Future research should focus on strengthening the nutrition component of fitCare as well as increasing access to healthy foods. Suggestions are offered for improving the fitCare curriculum and training.

  18. Adaptations to Health Care Barriers as Reported by Rural and Urban Providers

    PubMed Central

    Chipp, Cody L.; Johnson, Mark E.; Brems, Christiane; Warner, Teddy D.; Roberts, Laura W.

    2008-01-01

    Barriers to ethical and effective health care in rural communities have been well-documented; however, less is known about strategies rural providers use to overcome such barriers. is study compared adaptations by rural and urban health care providers. Physical and behavioral health care providers were randomly selected from licensure lists for eight groups to complete a survey; 1,546 (52%) responded. Replies indicated that health care providers from small rural and rural communities were more likely to integrate community resources, individualize treatment recommendations, safeguard client confidentiality, seek out additional expertise, and adjust treatment styles than were providers from small urban and urban communities. Behavioral health care providers were more likely than physical health care providers to integrate community resources, individualize treatment recommendations, safeguard client confidentiality, and adjust their treatment styles; physical health care providers were more likely than behavioral health care providers to make attempts or have options to seek out additional expertise. PMID:18469424

  19. Physician-targeted financial incentives and primary care physicians' self-reported ability to provide high-quality primary care.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jong-Deuk; Xirasagar, Sudha; Stoskopf, Carleen H; Seidman, Robert L

    2013-07-01

    High-quality primary care is envisaged as the centerpiece of the emerging health care delivery system under the Affordable Care Act. Reengineering the US health care system into a primary care-driven model will require widespread, rapid changes in the management and organization of primary care physicians (PCPs). Financial incentives to influence physician behavior have been attempted with various approaches, without empirical evidence of their effectiveness in improving care quality. This study examines the above research question adjusting for the patient-centeredness of the practice climate, a major contextual factor affecting PCPs' ability to provide high-quality care. Secondary data on a sample of salaried PCPs (n = 1733) from the nation-wide Community Tracking Study Physician Survey 2004-2005 were subject to generalized multinomial logit modeling to examine associations between financial incentives and PCPs' self-reported ability to provide quality care. After adjusting for patient-centered medical home (PCMH)-consistent practice environment, financial incentive aligned with care quality/care content is positively associated with PCPs' ability to provide high-quality care. An encouraging finding was that financial incentives aligned with clinic productivity/profitability do not to impede high-quality care in a PCMH practice environment. Financial incentives targeted to care quality or content indicators may facilitate rapid transformation of the health system to a primary care-driven system. The study provides empirical evidence of the utility of practically deployable financial incentives to facilitate high-quality primary care.

  20. Role ambiguity among women providing care for ex-husbands.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Teresa M; Proulx, Christine M; Snyder-Rivas, Linley A; Benson, Jacquelyn J

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-one women were interviewed regarding their caregiving experiences for ill or dying ex-husbands. Emergent in the analyses was the variety of ways in which they experienced role ambiguity as ex-wife caregivers. This article describes the role ambiguity ex-wife caregivers encountered interpersonally through interactions with network members, institutionally in dealing with professionals and the workplace, and intrapersonally in confusion over their roles and feelings. Consequences of role ambiguity are discussed, and recommendations for policy and practice are made in light of the aging population, changing family forms, and women's care roles.

  1. Can we select health professionals who provide safer care.

    PubMed

    Firth-Cozens, J; Cording, H; Ginsburg, R

    2003-12-01

    In order to improve patient safety, health services are looking to other industries' experiences and as a result are adopting a systems approach to learning from error, rather than simply focusing the blame on the individual. However, in health care the individual will remain an important contributor to safety and this paper looks at other literatures besides health to consider a number of individual characteristics and the role they might play in terms of work practices that affect patient safety. It considers the effects of a variety of personality profiles including sensation seeking, Type A, and those with high self esteem; looks at our ability to select for psychological wellbeing; and discusses the ways that psychometrics have been used in medicine to predict performance. It concludes that although rarely used, psychometrics has been shown to be useful in predicting some aspects of performance in medicine and suggests that this is an area well worth further study for the benefit of patient care. Nevertheless, we are a long way away from being able to select safer staff and should instead be developing this knowledge to enable us to recognise and address potential difficulties.

  2. Cancer Survivors' Reported Discussions with Health Care Providers About Follow-Up Care and Receipt of Written Care Plans.

    PubMed

    Reed, Sarah C; Walker, Rod; Ziebell, Rebecca; Rabin, Borsika; Nutt, Stephanie; Chubak, Jessica; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2017-05-08

    Prior studies reveal gaps in cancer survivors' discussions with health care providers about follow-up care and receipt of care plans; however, whether survivorship care planning may vary by cancer type is not known. We surveyed 615 survivors of breast, colorectal, prostate, lung cancer, and melanoma enrolled in three health plans to examine cancer survivors' self-reported discussions of follow-up care, including the need for surveillance, late and long-term effects, emotional needs, and health behaviors. We assessed whether cancer survivors received a written treatment summary and post-treatment care instructions. Most (92%) survivors reported having a discussion about the need for surveillance; 75%, late and long-term effects; 69%, lifestyle and health behaviors; and 53%, emotional and social needs. Most (88%) reported receiving post-treatment care instructions and 47%, a treatment summary. While there was little difference among survivors' receipt of surveillance or health behavior recommendations by cancer type (p = 0.85 and p = 0.66, respectively), discussions of late and long-term effects occurred among 82% of prostate, 78% of breast, 73% of melanoma, 72% of colorectal, and 67% of lung survivors (p = 0.06). Approximately half of survivors reported discussions of emotional needs, with modest differences by cancer type (p = 0.08). Our findings indicate that most patient-provider discussions cover information on surveillance, with less emphasis on late and long-term effects, lifestyle and health behaviors, and substantially less focusing on emotional and social needs. No or modest differences in discussions occurred by cancer type. Whether tailoring information to individual cancer survivor needs is beneficial should be examined.

  3. Provision of dental care in aged care facilities NSW Australia- Part 2 as perceived by the carers (care providers).

    PubMed

    Webb, Bettine C; Whittle, Terry; Schwarz, Eli

    2015-12-01

    To investigate carers' perception of the provision of dental care in aged care facilities (ACFs) New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Carers are responsible for 'hands-on, day-to-day' care of residents, including dental care, yet there were no specific figures available concerning their role in NSW ACFs. Questionnaires were mailed to 406 NSW directors of nursing (DONs) requesting completion by a carer who was proficient in English and without the influence of the DON. The 23-item questionnaire was presented in 4 sections, and the data qualitatively analysed. 211 questionnaires were completed and returned, giving a response rate of 52%. Carers were mostly female (91.9%) in the 40-50 and >50 age groups. Oral health training had been received by 66.7% of carers, and although 73.2% thought that their training was adequate, carers in general requested further training. Long waiting periods for government dental services (69.4%) and resident unable to communicate oral health problems (69.2%) were seen as the most frequent barriers to dental care. Almost all carers reported the availability of electric tooth brushes, fluoride gel, disclosing tablets/gel, interdental brushes and the use of a foam mouth prop, while few reported the use of other dental care products. As carers provided almost all of oral health care for residents, emphasis should be placed on training in geriatric dental care techniques and use of dental products. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The effect of financial incentives on the quality of health care provided by primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Scott, Anthony; Sivey, Peter; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Willenberg, Lisa; Naccarella, Lucio; Furler, John; Young, Doris

    2011-09-07

    The use of blended payment schemes in primary care, including the use of financial incentives to directly reward 'performance' and 'quality' is increasing in a number of countries. There are many examples in the US, and the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QoF) for general practitioners (GPs) in the UK is an example of a major system-wide reform. Despite the popularity of these schemes, there is currently little rigorous evidence of their success in improving the quality of primary health care, or of whether such an approach is cost-effective relative to other ways to improve the quality of care. The aim of this review is to examine the effect of changes in the method and level of payment on the quality of care provided by primary care physicians (PCPs) and to identify:i) the different types of financial incentives that have improved quality;ii) the characteristics of patient populations for whom quality of care has been improved by financial incentives; andiii) the characteristics of PCPs who have responded to financial incentives. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, HealthSTAR, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychLIT, and ECONLIT. Searches of Internet-based economics and health economics working paper collections were also conducted. Finally, studies were identified through the reference lists of retrieved articles, websites of key organisations, and from direct contact with key authors in the field. Articles were included if they were published from 2000 to August 2009. Randomised controlled trials (RCT), controlled before and after studies (CBA), and interrupted time series analyses (ITS) evaluating the impact of different financial interventions on the quality of care delivered by primary healthcare physicians (PCPs). Quality of care was defined as patient reported outcome

  5. Health care provider attitudes and beliefs about people living with HIV: Initial validation of the Health Care Provider HIV/AIDS Stigma Scale (HPASS).

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anne C; Hart, Trevor A; McShane, Kelly E; Margolese, Shari; Girard, Todd A

    2014-12-01

    HIV stigma is a pressing concern for people living with HIV, and particularly when it is perpetuated by health care providers, as it may affect quality of life and access to health care services. The current study describes the development and initial validation of a contextually appropriate HIV stigma scale for health care providers in North America. A ground-up qualitative approach was used to develop the scale, and it was assessed psychometrically with health care trainees across Canada. The measure demonstrates excellent internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability, as well as convergent and divergent validity. The study supports a tripartite model of HIV stigma consisting of stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. The scale provides a new tool to assess HIV stigma in health care providers and can be used to inform training, intervention and self-evaluation of stigmatizing attitudes, beliefs and behaviors among providers.

  6. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? You should first make a list of ...

  7. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? Here are some ways to find a ...

  8. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart and Circulation For Women Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes Did ... attacks. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ...

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Precocious Puberty and Delayed Puberty?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose precocious puberty & delayed puberty? Skip sharing ... and analyzing his or her medical history, a health care provider may perform tests to diagnose precocious puberty, ...

  10. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Preeclampsia, Eclampsia, and HELLP Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose preeclampsia, eclampsia, and HELLP syndrome? Skip ... social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider should check a pregnant woman's blood pressure ...

  11. Effects of Guided Care on Providers' Satisfaction with Care: A Three-Year Matched-Pair Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yea-Jen; Wen, Mei; Wolff, Jennifer; Frick, Kevin; Reider, Lisa; Scharfstein, Daniel; Boyd, Cynthia; Leff, Bruce; Schwartz, Lindsay; Karm, Lya; Boult, Chad

    2013-01-01

    Abstract It is important to understand the effects of a new care model on health professionals' satisfaction, which may help inform organizations' decisions regarding the adoption of the model. This study evaluates the effect of the Guided Care model of primary care on physicians', Guided Care Nurses' and practice staff satisfaction with processes of care for chronically ill older patients. In Guided Care, a specially educated registered nurse works with 2–5 primary care physicians, performing 8 clinical activities for 50–60 chronically ill older patients. This model was tested in a 3-year matched-pair cluster-randomized controlled trial with 14 pods (teams of physicians and staff) randomly assigned, within pairs, to provide Guided Care or usual care. Physicians and Guided Care Nurses were surveyed at baseline and annually for 3 years. Staff were surveyed at baseline and 2 years later. Physicians' satisfaction with chronic care processes, knowledge of patients, and care coordination were measured, as well as Guided Care Nurses' satisfaction with chronic care processes and staff perceptions of quality of care. Findings suggest that Guided Care improved physician satisfaction with patient/family communication and management of chronic care, and it may bolster staff beliefs that care is patient oriented. Differences in other aspects of care were not statistically significant. (Population Health Management 2013;16:317–325) PMID:23560515

  12. GPs' assessment of cooperation with other health care providers involved in cancer care-a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Koné, I; Klein, G; Siebenhofer, A; Dahlhaus, A; Güthlin, C

    2017-10-06

    Cancer is a complex disease requiring the involvement of several health care providers. A possible constant in the cancer care process is the general practitioner (GP). The aim of this project was to evaluate GPs' satisfaction with cooperation with other health care providers in the cancer care process of their patients and to explore which variables are associated with higher satisfaction with cooperation with other health care providers. We considered the following health care providers: outpatient oncology specialists, physicians in relatively small hospitals (≤400 beds), physicians in relatively large hospitals (>400 beds), home care services, outpatient psycho(onco)logists/psychotherapists, hospice/palliative care units and specialised palliative home care. The cross-sectional study was carried out as a postal survey all over Germany. Data were analysed descriptively and by means of logistic regression. Overall satisfaction with cooperation with other health care providers involved in cancer care was rather high. Only cooperation with outpatient psycho(onco)logists/psychotherapists was rated as not assessable/irrelevant by a majority of GPs. For all other health care providers under review, both communication and the transfer of sufficient information in good time were associated with overall satisfaction with cooperation. Little association was found between GP and practice variables and overall satisfaction with cooperation with the considered health care providers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Hearing care and quality of life among workers exposed to pesticides].

    PubMed

    de Sena, Tereza Raquel Ribeiro; Vargas, Marlizete Maldonado; Oliveira, Cristiane Costa da Cunha

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between exposure to pesticides and the occurrence of hearing loss among rural workers of Povoado Colônia Treze, Lagarto, State of Sergipe, Brazil. A total of 351 adult workers aged 18 to 59 years were selected, with current or past work activity in rural areas, with or without use of pesticides. The hearing evaluation included a form to record air-borne tonal thresholds using normality criteria recommended by Merluzzi 1979. The instrument used for assessing the quality of life was the Brazilian version of Short Form 36 (SF-36). Statistical analysis was performed (chi-square c², nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test, Cramer's V and Cohen's d) with a significance level of 95% (p <0.05). The results related the use of pesticide with the degree of toxicity in the presence of hearing loss and indices of quality of life (p <0.001). This study proved that agricultural workers, users of pesticides showed the worst levels of quality of life when compared with those who have not handled them. The use of pesticides and their toxicity class interfered in a most striking way in the classification of hearing loss presented in this group and further studies are recommended to assess other impacts on this population.

  14. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: A CME Communication Training for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bonnie L.; Saunders, Pamela A.; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders, medical morbidity, and healthcare costs. Yet trauma-related impacts have not received sufficient attention in primary care provider (PCP) training programs. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), and evaluated its efficacy. METHODS: We randomized PCPs to training or wait-list (delay) conditions; waitlist groups were trained after reassessment. The primary outcome assessing newly acquired skills was a patient-centeredness score derived from Roter Interactional Analysis System ratings of 90 taped visits between PCPs and standardized patients (SPs). PCPs were Family Medicine residents (n=17) and community physicians (n=13; 83% Family Medicine specialty), from four sites in the Washington DC metropolitan area. RESULTS: Immediately trained PCPs trended toward a larger increase in patient-centeredness than did the delayed PCPs (p < .09), with a moderate effect size (.66). The combined trained PCP groups showed a significant increase in patient-centeredness pre to post training, p < .01, Cohen’s D = .61. CONCLUSIONS: This is a promising approach to supporting relationship-based trauma-informed care among PCPs to help promote better patient health and higher compliance with medical treatment plans. PMID:25646872

  15. Rural Suicide Rates and Availability of Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, Amy; Gatz, Margaret; Hannell, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Suicide rates are higher in rural than in urban areas in the United States. One explanation that is frequently offered is scarcity of health and mental health treatment providers in rural areas. The current study tested whether number of providers per capita would explain differences in urban and rural suicide rates within the counties of…

  16. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Pesticides Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Antimicrobial Pesticides EPA regulates pesticides under the statutory authority of ...

  17. An explorative study of experiences of healthcare providers posing as simulated care receivers in a 'care-ethical' lab.

    PubMed

    Vanlaere, Linus; Timmermann, Madeleine; Stevens, Marleen; Gastmans, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In recent approaches to ethics, the personal involvement of health care providers and their empathy are perceived as important elements of an overall ethical ability. Experiential working methods are used in ethics education to foster, inter alia, empathy. In 2008, the care-ethics lab 'sTimul' was founded in Flanders, Belgium, to provide training that focuses on improving care providers' ethical abilities through experiential working simulations. The curriculum of sTimul focuses on empathy sessions, aimed at care providers' empathic skills. The present study provides better insight into how experiential learning specifically targets the empathic abilities of care providers. Providing contrasting experiences that affect the care providers' self-reflection seems a crucial element in this study. Further research is needed to provide more insight into how empathy leads to long-term changes in behaviour.

  18. Family Child Care Providers' Perspectives regarding Effective Professional Development and Their Role in the Child Care System: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Jane D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines family child care providers' perspectives regarding effective professional development and their role in the early learning and care system. Four focus groups were conducted annually for 3 years involving a total of 54 licensed family child care providers. Supportive social relationships emerged as an important dimension of…

  19. Transition Planning for Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs and Disabilities: A Guide for Health Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Stephanie; Freeman, Linda; Griffin, Lynne Reeves

    Designed for Massachusetts health care providers, this booklet provides information on transition planning for adolescents with special health care needs and disabilities. It includes resources and strategies to guide interventions with families and to focus their attention on four key facets of adulthood: health care, education, employment, and…

  20. Primary care professionals providing non-urgent care in hospital emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Khangura, Jaspreet K; Flodgren, Gerd; Perera, Rafael; Rowe, Brian H; Shepperd, Sasha

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries emergency departments (EDs) are facing an increase in demand for services, long-waits and severe crowding. One response to mitigate overcrowding has been to provide primary care services alongside or within hospital EDs for patients with non-urgent problems. It is not known, however, how this impacts the quality of patient care, the utilisation of hospital resources, or if it is cost-effective. Objectives To assess the effects of locating primary care professionals in the hospital ED to provide care for patients with non-urgent health problems, compared with care provided by regular Emergency Physicians (EPs), Search methods We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialized register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane library, 2011, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1950 to March 21 2012); EMBASE (1980 to April 28 2011); CINAHL (1980 to April 28 2011); PsychINFO (1967 to April 28 2011); Sociological Abstracts (1952 to April 28 2011); ASSIA (1987 to April 28 2011); SSSCI (1945 to April 28 2011); HMIC (1979 to April 28 2011), sources of unpublished literature, reference lists of included papers and relevant systematic reviews. We contacted experts in the field for any published or unpublished studies, and hand searched ED conference abstracts from the last three years. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials, non-randomised studies, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies that evaluated the effectiveness of introducing primary care professionals to hospital EDs to attend to non-urgent patients, as compared to the care provided by regular EPs. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias for each included study. We contacted authors of included studies to obtain additional data. Dichotomous outcomes are presented as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and continuous

  1. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  2. 76 FR 51381 - Supplemental Awards to Seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... Care Providers AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement, ACF, HHS. ACTION: The Office of Refugee... Shelter Care Providers. CFDA Number: 93.676. Statutory Authority: Awards announced in this notice are... supplement grants to seven unaccompanied alien shelter care providers for a total of $5,016,218....

  3. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon submitting a...

  4. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  5. Better Together: Co-Location of Dental and Primary Care Provides Opportunities to Improve Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Pourat, Nadereh; Martinez, Ana E; Crall, James J

    2015-09-01

    Community Health Centers (CHCs) are one of the principal safety-net providers of health care for low-income and uninsured populations. Co-locating dental services in primary care settings provides an opportunity to improve access to dental care. Yet this study of California CHCs that provide primary care services shows that only about one-third of them co-located primary and dental care services on-site. An additional one-third were members of multisite organizations in which at least one other site provided dental care. The remaining one-third of CHC sites had no dental care capacity. Policy options to promote co-location include requiring on-site availability of dental services, providing infrastructure funding to build and equip dental facilities, and offering financial incentives to provide dental care and recruit dental providers.

  6. Patient choice, mobility and competition among health care providers.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Kurt R; Gravelle, Hugh; Siciliani, Luigi; Straume, Odd Rune

    2014-01-01

    Policymakers are increasingly designing policies that encourage patient choice and therefore mobility across providers. Since prices are regulated (fixed) in most countries, providers need to compete on quality to attract patients. This chapter reviews the current theoretical and empirical literature on patient choice and quality competition in health markets. The theoretical literature identifies key factors affecting incentives to provide quality. These include: altruistic motives, cost structure, number of providers, demand responsiveness, GP gatekeeping, degree of specialization, profit constraints and soft budgets. We also review the theoretical literature on choice across different countries (e.g. within the EU) or regions within the same countries. The chapter reviews selected empirical studies that investigate whether demand responds to quality and waiting times, the role of patient's mobility and the effect of competition on quality.

  7. Providing effective trauma care: the potential for service provider views to enhance the quality of care (qualitative study nested within a multicentre longitudinal quantitative study).

    PubMed

    Beckett, Kate; Earthy, Sarah; Sleney, Jude; Barnes, Jo; Kellezi, Blerina; Barker, Marcus; Clarkson, Julie; Coffey, Frank; Elder, Georgina; Kendrick, Denise

    2014-07-08

    To explore views of service providers caring for injured people on: the extent to which services meet patients' needs and their perspectives on factors contributing to any identified gaps in service provision. Qualitative study nested within a quantitative multicentre longitudinal study assessing longer term impact of unintentional injuries in working age adults. Sampling frame for service providers was based on patient-reported service use in the quantitative study, patient interviews and advice of previously injured lay research advisers. Service providers' views were elicited through semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Participants were recruited from a range of settings and services in acute hospital trusts in four study centres (Bristol, Leicester, Nottingham and Surrey) and surrounding areas. 40 service providers from a range of disciplines. Service providers described two distinct models of trauma care: an 'ideal' model, informed by professional knowledge of the impact of injury and awareness of best models of care, and a 'real' model based on the realities of National Health Service (NHS) practice. Participants' 'ideal' model was consistent with standards of high-quality effective trauma care and while there were examples of services meeting the ideal model, 'real' care could also be fragmented and inequitable with major gaps in provision. Service provider accounts provide evidence of comprehensive understanding of patients' needs, awareness of best practice, compassion and research but reveal significant organisational and resource barriers limiting implementation of knowledge in practice. Service providers envisage an 'ideal' model of trauma care which is timely, equitable, effective and holistic, but this can differ from the care currently provided. Their experiences provide many suggestions for service improvements to bridge the gap between 'real' and 'ideal' care. Using service provider views to inform service design

  8. Influenza vaccination and decisional conflict among regulated and unregulated direct nursing care providers in long-term-care homes.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Shannon M; Pierrynowski-Gallant, Donna; Chambers, Larry; O'Connor, Annette; Bowman, Sherry; McNeil, Shelly; Strang, Robert; Knoefel, Frank

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether direct nursing care providers have decisional conflict about receiving influenza vaccinations and characteristics associated with decisional conflict. The researchers used a self-administered questionnaire mailed to direct nursing care providers in two long-term-care organizations. Most direct nursing care providers in both organizations (80% and 93%, respectively) intended to get the influenza vaccine. Unregulated direct nursing care providers had more decisional conflict than regulated providers, especially related to feeling uninformed about the pros and cons of influenza vaccination. Unclear valuing of the pros and cons of influenza vaccination was related to the age of the direct care providers in both organizations. Decisional conflict and influenza vaccination practices may be determined, in part, by age and by the culture of a health care organization. A decision aid to improve knowledge and clarify values may improve decision quality and increase influenza vaccination rates.

  9. Primary care providers' perceptions of home diabetes telemedicine care in the IDEATel project.

    PubMed

    Tudiver, Fred; Wolff, L Thomas; Morin, Philip C; Teresi, Jeanne; Palmas, Walter; Starren, Justin; Shea, Steven; Weinstock, Ruth S

    2007-01-01

    Few telemedicine projects have systematically examined provider satisfaction and attitudes. To determine the acceptability and perceived impact on primary care providers' (PCP) practices of a randomized clinical trial of the use of telemedicine to electronically deliver health care services to Medicare patients with diabetes in federally designated medically underserved areas of upstate New York, primarily those in rural areas and small towns with limited access to primary care. A longitudinal phone survey was completed by 116 PCPs with patients with diabetes in the treatment arm of the trial, and conducted 12 and 24 months after a PCP's first patient was randomized to the home telemedicine arm of the trial. The 36-item survey included measures of acceptability (to PCPs, time required), impact (on patient knowledge, confidence, perceived health outcomes), and communication. Six open-ended questions were analyzed qualitatively. The quantitative data indicated positive responses in terms of acceptability of the telemedicine intervention to the PCPs and of the impact on the PCPs' patients. This was most evident in issues critical to good control of diabetes: patient knowledge, ability to manage diabetes, confidence, and compliance in managing diabetes. Key qualitative themes, on the positive end, were more patient control and motivation, helpfulness of having extra patient data, and involvement of nurses and dieticians. Negative themes were excessive paperwork and duplication taking more PCP time, and conflicting advice and management decisions from the telemedicine team, some without informing the PCP but none involving medications. Telemedicine was reported to be a positive experience for predominantly rural PCPs and their Medicare-eligible patients from medically underserved areas; several inefficiencies need to be refined.

  10. When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, Friends, or Others Involved in Your Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... THE HIPAA P RIVACY R ULE : When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, Friends, or Others Involved In Your Care U.S. Department of Health and Human Services • Office ...

  11. Providing effective trauma care: the potential for service provider views to enhance the quality of care (qualitative study nested within a multicentre longitudinal quantitative study)

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Kate; Earthy, Sarah; Sleney, Jude; Barnes, Jo; Kellezi, Blerina; Barker, Marcus; Clarkson, Julie; Coffey, Frank; Elder, Georgina; Kendrick, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore views of service providers caring for injured people on: the extent to which services meet patients’ needs and their perspectives on factors contributing to any identified gaps in service provision. Design Qualitative study nested within a quantitative multicentre longitudinal study assessing longer term impact of unintentional injuries in working age adults. Sampling frame for service providers was based on patient-reported service use in the quantitative study, patient interviews and advice of previously injured lay research advisers. Service providers’ views were elicited through semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Setting Participants were recruited from a range of settings and services in acute hospital trusts in four study centres (Bristol, Leicester, Nottingham and Surrey) and surrounding areas. Participants 40 service providers from a range of disciplines. Results Service providers described two distinct models of trauma care: an ‘ideal’ model, informed by professional knowledge of the impact of injury and awareness of best models of care, and a ‘real’ model based on the realities of National Health Service (NHS) practice. Participants’ ‘ideal’ model was consistent with standards of high-quality effective trauma care and while there were examples of services meeting the ideal model, ‘real’ care could also be fragmented and inequitable with major gaps in provision. Service provider accounts provide evidence of comprehensive understanding of patients’ needs, awareness of best practice, compassion and research but reveal significant organisational and resource barriers limiting implementation of knowledge in practice. Conclusions Service providers envisage an ‘ideal’ model of trauma care which is timely, equitable, effective and holistic, but this can differ from the care currently provided. Their experiences provide many suggestions for service improvements to bridge the gap

  12. Survival Strategies for Michigan's Health Care Safety Net Providers

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Peter D; Dalton, Vanessa K; Berson-Grand, Julie; Weisman, Carol S

    2005-01-01

    Objective To understand key adaptive strategies considered by health care safety net organizations serving uninsured and underinsured populations in Michigan. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected through interviews at community-based free clinics, family planning clinics, local public health departments, and Federally Qualified Health Centers from 2002 to 2003. Research Design In each of six service areas in Michigan, we conducted a multiple-site case study of the four organizations noted above. We conducted interviews with the administrator, the medical or clinical director, the financial or marketing director, and a member of the board of directors. We interviewed 74 respondents at 20 organizations. Principal Findings Organizations perceive that unmet need is expanding faster than organizational capacity; organizations are unable to keep up with demand. Other threats to survival include a sicker patient population and difficulty in retaining staff (particularly nurses). Most clinics are adopting explicit business strategies to survive. To maintain financial viability, clinics are: considering or implementing fees; recruiting insured patients; expanding fundraising activities; reducing services; or turning away patients. Collaborative strategies, such as partnerships with hospitals, have been difficult to implement. Clinics are struggling with how to define their mission given the environment and threats to survival. Conclusions Adaptive strategies remain a work in progress, but will not be sufficient to respond to increasing service demands. Increased federal funding, or, ideally, a national health insurance program, may be the only viable option for expanding organizational capacity. PMID:15960698

  13. Benchmarking facilities providing care: An international overview of initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Thonon, Frédérique; Watson, Jonathan; Saghatchian, Mahasti

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature review of existing benchmarking projects of health facilities to explore (1) the rationales for those projects, (2) the motivation for health facilities to participate, (3) the indicators used and (4) the success and threat factors linked to those projects. We studied both peer-reviewed and grey literature. We examined 23 benchmarking projects of different medical specialities. The majority of projects used a mix of structure, process and outcome indicators. For some projects, participants had a direct or indirect financial incentive to participate (such as reimbursement by Medicaid/Medicare or litigation costs related to quality of care). A positive impact was reported for most projects, mainly in terms of improvement of practice and adoption of guidelines and, to a lesser extent, improvement in communication. Only 1 project reported positive impact in terms of clinical outcomes. Success factors and threats are linked to both the benchmarking process (such as organisation of meetings, link with existing projects) and indicators used (such as adjustment for diagnostic-related groups). The results of this review will help coordinators of a benchmarking project to set it up successfully. PMID:26770800

  14. Money illusion among health care providers: should we adjust for inflation in analyses of provider behavior?

    PubMed

    Mayer, M L; Rozier, R G

    2000-08-01

    This analysis questions the appropriateness of inflation adjustment in analyses of provider behavior by comparing results from estimations using adjusted financial variables with those from estimations using unadjusted financial variables. Using Medicaid claims from 1984-1991, we explored the effects of Medicaid reimbursement increases on dentists' participation. Using results from inflation adjusted analyses, we would conclude that a 23% nominal increase in Medicaid reimbursement rates yields no increase in the number of Medicaid children seen by dentists. In contrast, estimations based on unadjusted reimbursement rates suggest that this same 23% nominal increase in reimbursement leads to an expected 16-person (15.4%) increase in the number of Medicaid patients seen per provider per year. These analyses demonstrate that results are sensitive to adjustment for inflation. While adjusting for inflation is a generally accepted practice in health services research, doing so without evidence that providers respond to adjusted reimbursement may be unjustified. More research is needed to determine the appropriateness of inflation adjustment in analyses of provider behavior, and the circumstances under which it should or should not be done.

  15. Mission Impossible? Providing Direction for Your Child Care Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Gary; Myers, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Managers of early childhood education programs know that it is imperative that their organization's collective energy be focused in a single direction, one that has been envisioned and determined by the organization's leadership, with input from all who will affect or be affected by it. A mission statement provides a constant reminder within an…

  16. Mission Impossible? Providing Direction for Your Child Care Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Gary; Myers, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Managers of early childhood education programs know that it is imperative that their organization's collective energy be focused in a single direction, one that has been envisioned and determined by the organization's leadership, with input from all who will affect or be affected by it. A mission statement provides a constant reminder within an…

  17. Pathways of Adult Children Providing Care to Older Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Amanda E.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by life course and stress process theory, this study investigated pathways of adult child caregivers' family (caregiving, marital, parenting) and nonfamily (employment) roles. Eight waves of data from the Health and Retirement Study were analyzed for 1,300 adult child caregivers. Latent class analysis provided strong evidence for a 4-class…

  18. Brand name changes help health care providers win market recognition.

    PubMed

    Keesling, G

    1993-01-01

    As the healthcare industry continues to recognize the strategic implications of branding, more providers will undertake an identity change to better position themselves in competitive markets. The paper examines specific healthcare branding decisions, the reasons prompting brand name decisions and the marketing implications for a change in brand name.

  19. Pathways of Adult Children Providing Care to Older Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Amanda E.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by life course and stress process theory, this study investigated pathways of adult child caregivers' family (caregiving, marital, parenting) and nonfamily (employment) roles. Eight waves of data from the Health and Retirement Study were analyzed for 1,300 adult child caregivers. Latent class analysis provided strong evidence for a 4-class…

  20. Comparison of Goals of Care Between Hemodialysis Patients and Their Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Ariel; Henry, Blair; Bottoms, Jennifer; Myers, Jeffery; Naimark, David M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient-centered care requires knowledge of patients’ goals of care (GoC) on the part of health care providers (HCPs). Whether HCPs caring for in-center hemodialysis patients meet this criterion is uncertain. Objective: We designed and conducted a GoC survey among patients and HCPs within a single in-center hemodialysis (ICHD) program to determine whether HCPs have an understanding of their patients’ GoC. Design: This was a prospective comparative quantitative survey study. Setting: The study included a single Canadian maintenance ICHD center. Participants: These included hemodialysis patients and their primary nephrologists, nurses, social workers, pharmacists, and dietitians. Methods and Measurements: Two surveys, one for patients and another for primary HCPs, were designed, piloted, and administered. For each participating patient, HCPs consisted of the primary nephrologist, nurse, social worker, pharmacist, and dietitian. Surveys included questions pertaining to 7 GoC themes. Patient-HCP agreement on the importance of each domain individually and the most important domain overall was assessed with kappa statistics. Factors influencing agreement were assessed with logistic regression in a secondary analysis. Results: A total of 173 patients were invited to participate, of whom 137 (79%) completed surveys. Fifty HCPs completed 623 corresponding surveys: 132 by physicians, 112 by nurses, 126 by pharmacists, 127 by social workers, and 126 by dietitians. A total of 70.1% and 78.8% of patients agreed with the importance of and would feel comfortable having GoC discussions, respectively, with their HCPs; 42.7% of physicians reported not having provided prognostic information to the corresponding patient. Patient-HCP agreement regarding GoC was poor (all κ < .25, all P values > .05). In adjusted analyses, only patients choosing “Be Cured” as the most important GoC was significantly associated with poorer HCP-patient agreement than expected (odds

  1. Turning the Lens Inward: Cultural Competence and Providers' Values in Health Care Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chettih, Mindy

    2012-01-01

    The population of older adults in the United States is growing in size and diversity, presenting challenges to health care providers and patients in the context of health care decision making (DM), including obtaining informed consent for treatment, advance care planning, and deliberations about end-of-life care options. Although existing…

  2. Child Care for Children with and without Disabilities: The Provider, Observer, and Parent Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoche, Lisa; Peterson, Carla A.; Edwards, Carolyn Pope; Jeon, Hyun-Joo

    2006-01-01

    This three-phase study, part of a larger study conducted by the Midwest Child Care Research Consortium (MCCRC), investigated the characteristics of child care providers in inclusive and non-inclusive center-based classrooms and family child care homes, the observed quality of care in a subset of these programs, and families' perceptions of quality…

  3. Health Care Marketing: Opinions of Providers. North Dakota Economic Studies, Number 46.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Donald G.; And Others

    The health care industry in the United States has undergone tremendous change. Health care providers must view their health care delivery organizations as businesses and must use the tools of business, including marketing. Most research on health care marketing has focused on the practices of large, urban facilities. Little work has been…

  4. Lessons Learned from Home Visiting with Home-Based Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Lisa A.; Peterson, Shira M.; Baker, Amy C.; Dumka, Marsha; Brach, Mary Jo; Webb, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Caring for Quality and Partners in Family Child Care are home visiting programs designed to improve the quality of home-based child care. This article describes the experiences of two different home visitors to demonstrate how programs such as these can help providers improve the overall quality of care, increase children's development, and lead…

  5. Turning the Lens Inward: Cultural Competence and Providers' Values in Health Care Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chettih, Mindy

    2012-01-01

    The population of older adults in the United States is growing in size and diversity, presenting challenges to health care providers and patients in the context of health care decision making (DM), including obtaining informed consent for treatment, advance care planning, and deliberations about end-of-life care options. Although existing…

  6. Transcultural nursing: providing culturally congruent care to the Hausa of Northwest Africa.

    PubMed

    Chmielarczyk, V

    1991-01-01

    Research around the world is now beginning to validate the theory of Cultural Care as an important means to provide culturally congruent care to clients, families, and groups of diverse cultures. Knowledge of Leininger's Theory of Cultural Care Diversity and Universality can provide meaningful care to clients who have different traditional and current beliefs and values. The Leininger Sunrise Model can serve as a valuable guide to discover care meanings and practices related to the theory, and to provide practical and meaningful culture specific care decisions and actions by nurses. The three major modes of action, namely, cultural care maintenance or preservation, accommodation or negotiation, and repatterning or restructuring, are important differential means to provide culturally congruent care to clients within their own cultural setting. This article considers the application of such care for the Hausa of Northwest Africa.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Patients' and providers' perspectives on bibliotherapy in primary care.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Grainne; Hevey, David; Martin, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Bibliotherapy is a form of self-administered treatment in which structured materials provide a means to alleviate distress. Although the treatment has evidence of effectiveness, evaluations of bibliotherapy have typically focused on outcomes, and the perspectives of both the client and the service provider have been understudied. In the present study, eleven users of a bibliotherapy scheme were interviewed regarding their experiences of bibliotherapy. In addition, five referring practitioners to the scheme were also interviewed. Thematic analyses revealed three super-ordinate themes in the transcripts: participants' personal experiences of the bibliotherapy scheme factors that facilitate change and the influence of the professionals involved. The implications of these findings for bibliotherapy schemes are considered.

  8. Improving Health Care Provider Availability through Information Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-15

    only the actual healthcare costs to be adjusted. An example of a warranted BPA is the occurrence of a higher number of network referrals than the number... network services is a critical task for the MTF commander/chief executive officer. In order to minimize the use of network service, the MTF must increase...be able to monitoring the amount of time a physician spends performing functions that effect productivity. UCAPERS provides this data, but the process

  9. Patients' perceptions of patient care providers with tattoos and/or body piercings.

    PubMed

    Westerfield, Heather V; Stafford, Amy B; Speroni, Karen Gabel; Daniel, Marlon G

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated patients' perceptions of patient care providers with visible tattoos and/or body piercings. As tattooing and body piercing are increasingly popular, research that informs nursing administrators regarding policies on patient care providers having visible tattoos and body piercings is warranted. A total of 150 hospitalized adult patients compared pictures of male and female patient care providers in uniform with and without tattoos and/or nonearlobe body piercings. Patient care providers with visible tattoos and/or body piercings were not perceived by patients in this study as more caring, confident, reliable, attentive, cooperative, professional, efficient, or approachable than nontattooed or nonpierced providers. Tattooed female providers were perceived as less professional than male providers with similar tattoos. Female providers with piercings were perceived as less confident, professional, efficient, and approachable than nonpierced female providers. Nursing administrators should develop and/or evaluate policies regarding patient care providers with visible tattoos and/or body piercings.

  10. Electronic cigarettes and thirdhand tobacco smoke: two emerging health care challenges for the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Kuschner, Ware G; Reddy, Sunayana; Mehrotra, Nidhi; Paintal, Harman S

    2011-02-01

    PRIMARY CARE PROVIDERS SHOULD BE AWARE OF TWO NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN NICOTINE ADDICTION AND SMOKING CESSATION: 1) the emergence of a novel nicotine delivery system known as the electronic (e-) cigarette; and 2) new reports of residual environmental nicotine and other biopersistent toxicants found in cigarette smoke, recently described as "thirdhand smoke". The purpose of this article is to provide a clinician-friendly introduction to these two emerging issues so that clinicians are well prepared to counsel smokers about newly recognized health concerns relevant to tobacco use. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that convert nicotine into a vapor that can be inhaled. The World Health Organization has termed these devices electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). The vapors from ENDS are complex mixtures of chemicals, not pure nicotine. It is unknown whether inhalation of the complex mixture of chemicals found in ENDS vapors is safe. There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are effective treatment for nicotine addiction. ENDS are not approved as smoking cessation devices. Primary care givers should anticipate being questioned by patients about the advisability of using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation device. The term thirdhand smoke first appeared in the medical literature in 2009 when investigators introduced the term to describe residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Thirdhand smoke is a hazardous exposure resulting from cigarette smoke residue that accumulates in cars, homes, and other indoor spaces. Tobacco-derived toxicants can react to form potent cancer causing compounds. Exposure to thirdhand smoke can occur through the skin, by breathing, and by ingestion long after smoke has cleared from a room. Counseling patients about the hazards of thirdhand smoke may provide additional motivation to quit smoking.

  11. Exploring sensitive boundaries in nursing education: attitudes of undergraduate student nurses providing intimate care to patients.

    PubMed

    Crossan, M; Mathew, T K

    2013-07-01

    Nursing students often feel challenged and intimidated to provide intimate care to patients in the health care setting. Student nurses in particular are faced with social, professional, academic and peer expectations and experience high levels of stress when providing this intimate care. Explore student nurses attitudes to providing intimate care. Year two and year three students of a three year undergraduate nursing programme completed a descriptive Nursing Students Intimate Care (NSIC) survey with open ended questions. This study discusses student responses to the question: Did you feel it was appropriate for a nurse to provide intimate care to a patient of the opposite sex? Three major themes were identified: societal and self-determined role expectations, comfort and discomfort providing intimate care, and age and gender of the carer and recipient. Student nurses face numerous challenges when having to provide intimate care to patients. These challenges are influenced by the age, gender, levels of comfort of the nurse and the patient and is related to the nature of intimate care being provided. Student nurses will benefit from pre-clinical simulated training experiences in providing intimate care. This training needs to specifically consider being sensitive to the needs of the patient, maintaining patient dignity, negotiating, accommodating and implementing plan of care while being competent and professional in their approach to providing intimate care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mental health provider perspectives regarding integrated medical care for patients with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Greenwald, Devra E; Bauer, Mark S; Charns, Martin P; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2012-11-01

    Integrated care for medical conditions is essential for persons with serious mental illness (SMI). This qualitative study describes mental health provider perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators of integrated care for patients with SMI. We interviewed providers from a national sample of Veterans Health Administration facilities that scored in the top or bottom percentile in medical care quality. Providers from high-performing sites reported substantial in-person contacts with general medical providers, while providers from low-performing sites reported stigma and limited communication with medical providers as major concerns. Interventions to improve mental health and medical provider communication may facilitate integrated care for persons with SMI.

  13. The Mental Health Education Gap among Primary Care Providers in Rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Bibhav; Hirachan, Soniya; Mandel, Jeffery S; van Dyke, Craig

    2016-08-01

    In low- and middle-income countries, the majority of individuals with mental illness go untreated largely because of a severe shortage of mental health professionals. Global initiatives to close the mental health treatment gap focus on primary care providers delivering this care. For this to be effective, primary care providers require the skills to assess, diagnose, and treat patients with mental illness. To assess primary care providers' training and experience in caring for mental health patients, the authors conducted five focus groups at three isolated district hospitals in rural Nepal where there was no access to mental health professionals. Primary care providers reported limited training, lack of knowledge and skills, and discomfort in delivering mental health care. To address the mental health education gap, primary care providers in Nepal, and perhaps other low- and middle-income countries, require more training during both undergraduate and graduate medical education.

  14. [Internationalized medical care services increase need of health care providers to improve English communication skills].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chia-Ling

    2011-02-01

    English is the most important language used in international communication. Nurses today have significantly more opportunities to come into contact with clients of different nationalities. Therefore, English communication abilities are a critical to the effective care of foreign clients. Miscommunication due to language barriers can endanger the health and safety of foreign clients and hinder their access to healthcare resources. Basic English communicate skills allow nurses to better understand the feelings of foreign clients and to affect their satisfaction with healthcare services provided. The majority of clinical nurses in Taiwan are inadequately prepared to communicate with foreign clients or use English when delivering nursing care services. Although English is not an official language in Taiwan, strengthening English communication skills is necessary for Taiwan's healthcare service system. Faced with increasing numbers of foreign clients in their daily work, first-line nursing staffs need more training to improve English proficiency. In order to do so, support from the hospital director is the first priority. The second priority is to motivate nursing staffs to learn English; the third is to incorporate different English classes into the medical system and schedule class times to meet nurse scheduling needs; and the fourth is to establish international medical wards, with appropriate incentives in pay designed to attract and retain nursing staff proficient in English communication.

  15. Planning for health promotion in low-income preschool child care settings: focus groups of parents and child care providers.

    PubMed

    Taveras, Elsie M; LaPelle, Nancy; Gupta, Ruchi S; Finkelstein, Jonathan A

    2006-01-01

    To identify potentially successful strategies, barriers, and facilitators for health promotion in preschool child care settings. We conducted 6 focus groups including each of the following: parents of children attending child care centers and home-based family child care (2 in English, 1 in Spanish) and directors of child care centers and family child care providers (2 in English, 1 in Spanish). Systematic thematic analysis was conducted to generate themes to address study questions. A total of 24 parents and 45 child care providers, serving predominantly urban, low-income children in Boston, participated. Parents and child care providers agreed that in-person group discussions would be the most effective strategy for providing health education information to parents. Several barriers that could affect implementation emerged. First, some providers expressed frustration toward parents' attitudes about child safety and health. Second, there was diversity of opinion among providers on whether conducting health promotion activities was consistent with their training and role. In addition, literacy, language, and cultural barriers were identified as potential barriers to health promotion in child care. In order to be successful, health promotion strategies in child care settings will need to overcome tensions between providers and parents, allow professional growth of child care providers to serve in a health promotion role, and better integrate external health resources and personnel. Group sessions and peer learning opportunities that are culturally and linguistically sensitive are potentially successful strategies for implementation of health promotion interventions for many parents.

  16. Exploring nurses' experiences of providing high dependency care in children's wards.

    PubMed

    Doman, Maggie; Prowse, Morag; Webb, Christine

    2004-09-01

    The care of critically ill children has received much attention in the past decade, and many of the recommendations from reports relating to the provision of paediatric intensive care have been addressed. In comparison, high dependency care has received less attention. This level of care is often provided on 'general' children's wards, yet its impact on nursing staff and care delivery have received little attention. This article presents a study which explores nurses' experiences of providing high dependency care on children's wards using focus groups. Following analysis, six categories emerged: definitions and perceptions of high dependency care; having a high dependency unit; problems in district general hospitals; the skills needed for high dependency care; team working; and staffing for high dependency care. These findings have implications for current clinical, managerial and educational practice and for future developments in the field of high dependency care for children.

  17. The Effectiveness of a Brief Asthma Education Intervention for Child Care Providers and Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Getch, Yvette Q.

    2016-01-01

    Limited information exists about management of asthma in child care settings and primary school classrooms. The goal of this study was to evaluate a brief asthma management intervention for child care providers and primary school teachers. Child care providers and primary school teachers were recruited to participate in two 3-h workshops on asthma…

  18. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  19. 77 FR 72738 - Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 51 RIN 2900-AO57 Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care... agreements with State homes for the nursing home care of certain disabled veterans. This rulemaking is... 2900-AO57--Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care.'' Copies of...

  20. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers... services and hospice care. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA has specifically contracted, this rulemaking will only affect home health and hospice care providers who do...

  1. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... care and home health aide services. In those states that reimburse separately for homemaker services... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers... methodology for non-VA providers of home health services and hospice care. The proposed rulemaking would...

  2. The Effectiveness of a Brief Asthma Education Intervention for Child Care Providers and Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuharth-Pritchett, Stacey; Getch, Yvette Q.

    2016-01-01

    Limited information exists about management of asthma in child care settings and primary school classrooms. The goal of this study was to evaluate a brief asthma management intervention for child care providers and primary school teachers. Child care providers and primary school teachers were recruited to participate in two 3-h workshops on asthma…

  3. Delaware FIRST: Implementing Handicapped Infant/Toddler Curriculum through Families and Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deiner, Penny L.; Whitehead, Linda C.

    The Delaware FIRST Program is designed to meet the needs of handicapped infants and toddlers through trained family day care providers. The program is based on a developmental family systems approach. It strives to provide families with ongoing support by offering mainstreamed family day care or respite care, by developing and/or facilitating an…

  4. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Telecommunications Program § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care...

  5. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Telecommunications Program § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care...

  6. Partnership working by default: district nurses and care home staff providing care for older people.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Claire; Robb, Nadia; Drennan, Vari; Woolley, Rosemary

    2005-11-01

    Older people residents in care homes that only offer residential care rely on primary health care services for medical and nursing needs. Research has investigated the demands that care homes staff and residents make on general practice, but not the involvement of other members of the primary health care team. This paper describes two consecutive studies completed in 2001 and 2003 that involved focus groups and survey methods of enquiry conducted in two settings: an England shire and inner London. The research questions that both studies had in common were (1) What is the contribution of district nursing and other primary care services to care homes that do not have on-site nursing provision? (2) What strategies promote participation and collaboration between residents, care home staff and NHS primary care nursing staff? and (3) What are the current obstacles and aids to effective partnership working and learning? A total of 74 community-based nurses and care home managers and staff took part in 10 focus groups, while 124 care home managers (73% of the 171 surveyed) and 113 district nurse team leaders (80% of the 142 surveyed) participated in the surveys. Findings from both studies demonstrated that nurses were the most frequent NHS professional visiting care homes. Although care home managers and district nurses believed that they had a good working relationship, they had differing expectations of what the nursing contribution should be and how personal and nursing care were defined. This influenced the range of services that older people had access to and the amount of training and support care home staff received from district nurses and the extent to which they were able to develop collaborative and reciprocal patterns of working. Findings indicate that there is a need for community-based nursing services to adopt a more strategic approach that ensures older people in care homes can access the services they are entitled to and receive equivalent health care to

  7. New Zealand palliative care nurses experiences of providing spiritual care to patients with life-limiting illness.

    PubMed

    Walker, Hannah; Waterworth, Susan

    2017-01-02

    Internationally it is recognised that providing spiritual care is essential to reduce spiritual distress, particularly in patients who are facing a life-limiting illness. This study sought to explore palliative care nurses experiences providing spiritual care to their patients who are facing a life-limiting illness. This study used a qualitative approach: interviews took place with nine nurses working across three hospices in New Zealand in 2013. Nine palliative care nurses participated in the study. Their average age was 53 years and palliative care experience ranged from 3-22 years, with an average of 9 years. The narrative descriptions of nine palliative care nurses were demonstrated under the categories of the assessment of spiritual needs: recognition of spiritual distress, provision of spiritual care and documentation of spiritual care. Additionally, eight sub-categories: individuality and respect; connection; love and compassion; meaning, touching and presence; communication; divine-related spiritual care provision and referral; death preparation and post-modern spiritual care were identified under the category of provision of spiritual care. There are challenges in identifying and defining spiritual distress and there is complexity in the provision of spiritual care. However, for the nurses in this study, focusing on the individual patient and developing a relationship that enabled the patient's unique spiritual needs to be met was highly valued. Creating a culture where nurses, and other health professionals involved in the patient's care, share their experiences of spiritual care provision and discussion about how this can be documented is needed.

  8. Coordination of Care for Breast Reconstruction Patients: A Provider Survey.

    PubMed

    Milucky, Jennifer L; Deal, Allison M; Anders, Carey; Wu, Rebecca; McNally, Richard Sean; Lee, Clara N

    2017-04-01

    Communication between medical oncologists (MOs) and plastic surgeons (PSs) is important to optimize outcomes for patients with breast cancer seeking breast reconstruction. We sought to evaluate the knowledge MOs and PSs have of each others' fields, roles expected of each other, and frequency of communication. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a convenience sample of MOs and PSs. The survey included knowledge questions about reconstruction and chemotherapy, questions about provider and patient responsibilities for timely chemotherapy initiation, and questions about communication with other specialties. MOs and PSs had similar knowledge scores (MOs, 59%; PSs, 56%; P = .5), but both lacked knowledge about aspects of the other specialty's field related to breast reconstruction. The MOs and PSs agreed on the MOs' degree of responsibility for timely chemotherapy initiation (MOs mean, 4.6; PSs mean, 4.4 (out of 5); P = .2). However, they disagreed about the PS's responsibility for timely chemotherapy initiation (MOs mean, 3.8; PSs mean, 3.0; P = .01). Communication occurred about 2.5 times more often for patients with complications than patients without complications (P < .0001). MOs and PSs have deficits in knowledge about each other fields and differ in their opinion regarding the burden of responsibility in ensuring timely chemotherapy initiation, suggesting room for improvement in communication and understanding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Time To Talk with Your Health Care Providers: 4 Tips to Start the Conversation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Y Z 4 Tips: Start Talking With Your Health Care Providers About Complementary Health Approaches Share: When patients ... fully informed and can help patients make wise health care decisions. Here are 4 tips to help you ...

  10. 42 CFR 440.60 - Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.60 Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners. (a) “Medical care or... § 405.232(b) of this chapter; and (2) Consists of treatment by means of manual manipulation of the...

  11. 42 CFR 440.60 - Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.60 Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners. (a) “Medical care or... § 405.232(b) of this chapter; and (2) Consists of treatment by means of manual manipulation of the...

  12. 42 CFR 440.60 - Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.60 Medical or other remedial care provided by licensed practitioners. (a) “Medical care or... § 405.232(b) of this chapter; and (2) Consists of treatment by means of manual manipulation of the...

  13. Human trafficking: Role of oral health care providers.

    PubMed

    Nuzzolese, E

    2014-11-30

    Trafficking in human beings is a modern form of slavery and is a well-known phenomenon throughout the European Union and beyond. After drug dealing and the weapons industry, human trafficking is the second largest criminal activity in the world today and it is a growing crime. The aim of governmental and non-governmental agencies, which are either directly or indirectly involved in combating trafficking in human beings, is the identification and referral of victims of trafficking and also to encourage self-referrals. Identification is the most important step to provide protection and assistance to victims of trafficking. Victims often have a variety of physical and mental health needs, including psychological trauma, injuries from violence, head and neck trauma, sexually transmitted infections and other gynaecological problems, dental/oral problems and have poor nutrition. The author's experience in the field of community dentistry in presented within. Volunteer dental services are offered to non-European Union patients held in a centre for asylum seekers in Bari (Italy). Dental professionals can, in fact, contribute to the identification, assistance and protection of trafficked persons, as well as offering forensic services to assist the police investigation in order to identify crimes and find the criminal organizations behind them. As for domestic violence and child abuse cases, there are ethical concerns involved in the identification and protection of the trafficked persons, as well as the need for interdisciplinary work and awareness. Adequate training in behavioural science and intercultural learning is paramount in order to avoid misunderstandings and increase sensitivity.

  14. Provider Perspectives on Advance Care Planning for Patients with Kidney Disease: Whose Job Is It Anyway?

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Ann M; Szarka, Jackie; McFarland, Lynne V; Taylor, Janelle S; Sudore, Rebecca L; Trivedi, Ranak; Reinke, Lynn F; Vig, Elizabeth K

    2016-05-06

    There is growing interest in efforts to enhance advance care planning for patients with kidney disease. Our goal was to elicit the perspectives on advance care planning of multidisciplinary providers who care for patients with advanced kidney disease. Between April and December of 2014, we conducted semistructured interviews at the Department of Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System with 26 providers from a range of disciplines and specialties who care for patients with advanced kidney disease. Participants were asked about their perspectives and experiences related to advance care planning in this population. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed inductively using grounded theory. The comments of providers interviewed for this study spoke to significant system-level barriers to supporting the process of advance care planning for patients with advanced kidney disease. We identified four overlapping themes: (1) medical care for this population is complex and fragmented across settings and providers and over time; (2) lack of a shared understanding and vision of advance care planning and its relationship with other aspects of care, such as dialysis decision making; (3) unclear locus of responsibility and authority for advance care planning; and (4) lack of active collaboration and communication around advance care planning among different providers caring for the same patients. The comments of providers who care for patients with advanced kidney disease spotlight both the need for and the challenges to interdisciplinary collaboration around advance care planning for this population. Systematic efforts at a variety of organizational levels will likely be needed to support teamwork around advance care planning among the different providers who care for patients with advanced kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Provider Perspectives on Advance Care Planning for Patients with Kidney Disease: Whose Job Is It Anyway?

    PubMed Central

    Szarka, Jackie; McFarland, Lynne V.; Taylor, Janelle S.; Sudore, Rebecca L.; Trivedi, Ranak; Reinke, Lynn F.; Vig, Elizabeth K.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives There is growing interest in efforts to enhance advance care planning for patients with kidney disease. Our goal was to elicit the perspectives on advance care planning of multidisciplinary providers who care for patients with advanced kidney disease. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Between April and December of 2014, we conducted semistructured interviews at the Department of Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System with 26 providers from a range of disciplines and specialties who care for patients with advanced kidney disease. Participants were asked about their perspectives and experiences related to advance care planning in this population. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed inductively using grounded theory. Results The comments of providers interviewed for this study spoke to significant system–level barriers to supporting the process of advance care planning for patients with advanced kidney disease. We identified four overlapping themes: (1) medical care for this population is complex and fragmented across settings and providers and over time; (2) lack of a shared understanding and vision of advance care planning and its relationship with other aspects of care, such as dialysis decision making; (3) unclear locus of responsibility and authority for advance care planning; and (4) lack of active collaboration and communication around advance care planning among different providers caring for the same patients. Conclusions The comments of providers who care for patients with advanced kidney disease spotlight both the need for and the challenges to interdisciplinary collaboration around advance care planning for this population. Systematic efforts at a variety of organizational levels will likely be needed to support teamwork around advance care planning among the different providers who care for patients with advanced kidney disease. PMID:27084877

  16. The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

  17. Critical care nurses' perceptions of obstacles, supports, and knowledge needed in providing quality end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Crump, Saundra K; Schaffer, Marjorie A; Schulte, Evie

    2010-01-01

    In response to critical care nurses' perceptions of increasing stress and conflict in difficult end-of-life (EOL) situations, the researchers conducted a study to identify perceived obstacles, supports, and knowledge needed to provide quality EOL care. The conclusions were as follows: (1) families and patients need clear, direct, and consistent information to make EOL decisions; (2) physician-related issues affect nurses' ability to provide quality EOL care; (3) critical care nurses need more knowledge, skill, and a sense of cultural competency to provide quality care; and (4) having properly completed advance directives can reduce confusion about the goals of care. Recommendations for improving EOL care were made as a result of the study.

  18. Workers' opinions on the effect of contact with health care providers on sickness absence duration.

    PubMed

    Steenbeek, Romy

    2014-01-01

    Because of the aging working population and the increasing age of retirement the number of workers with chronic illnesses and disabilities is growing. It is important that workers with health complaints receive efficient health care in order to remain fully or at least partly productive. To explore workers' opinions about the effectiveness of contact with health care providers in shortening sickness absence duration. Data come from a four-wave study from 2005 to 2008 among Dutch workers (n=1,424). Data were obtained on visits to health care providers, sickness absence and workers' opinions on whether and how their absence could have been shortened. A third of the workers were of the opinion that the health care provider (most often the general practitioner, GP) had played a role in preventing sickness absence and 35% were of the opinion that the health care provider had limited their absence. Most often the physical therapist (71%) and mental health therapist (61%) shortened sickness absence duration, in contrast to the occupational physician (OP, 25%) and GP (32%). The effectiveness of the health care providers' treatment was associated with the cause of sickness absence. Approximately 15% of the workers reported that their sickness absence could have been shortened if health care providers had provided the proper treatment and if waiting times had been reduced. Health care providers differ in their potential to shorten sickness absence duration. Health care providers can further reduce sickness absence and health care costs by providing the proper treatment and by reducing waiting times.

  19. Security of children's relationships with nonparental care providers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahnert, Lieselotte; Pinquart, Martin; Lamb, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    Meta-analysis aggregated results of 40 investigations involving 2,867 children who averaged 29.6 (SD = 8.6) months of age when their attachments to care providers were assessed using either the Strange Situation (SS) or the Attachment Q-Set (AQS). As opposed to parents, secure attachments to nonparental care providers were less likely (using SS) or equally likely (using AQS), respectively. Secure child-care provider attachments were more likely in home- than center-based care, when the children were assessed longer after enrollment, and when they were girls. Whereas care providers' sensitivity to individual children predicted attachment security only in the small groups that characterize home-based settings, group-related sensitivity was a reliable predictor of secure child-care provider attachment, especially in child care centers.

  20. Sickness presenteeism among health care providers in an academic tertiary care center in Riyadh.

    PubMed

    Al Nuhait, Mohammed; Al Harbi, Khaled; Al Jarboa, Amjad; Bustami, Rami; Alharbi, Shmaylan; Albekairy, Abdulkareem; Almodaimegh, Hind

    2017-03-23

    The term sickness presenteeism (SP) has been described as the act of going to work despite having a state of health that may be regarded as poor enough to justify sick leave. SP has been observed to be prevalent among three-quarters of health care providers (HCPs). Working while sick not only puts patients at risk but also decreases productivity and increases the probability of medical errors. Moreover, SP has been identified as a risk factor for many negative health outcomes among the HCPs themselves, such as depression, burnout, and serious cardiac events. The aim of this study was to identify the reasons for and prevalence of SP and perceptions of the impact of this practice on patient safety among HCPs. A cross-sectional study was conducted, including 279 purposively selected healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, dentists, pharmacists and other health care professionals) working at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs-King Abdulaziz Medical City (MNGHA-KAMC). While nearly all of the participants (91%) believed that working while sick exposed patients to risk, the rate of SP during the past year was reported as 74%, and one fourth of respondents reported working while sick 3-4 times during the past year. More than half of the participants were not aware of the existence of a departmental policy regarding sick leave. The most common reasons reported for working while sick were not wanting to burden co-workers (71%), feelings of duty toward patients (67%), and avoiding an increased future workload caused by absence (59%). A lack of awareness regarding the existing rules and polices related to sick leave was reported by more than half of the participants. Several predisposing and enabling factors were reported as determinants influencing SP, e.g., observation of the practice of SP by peers and feelings of sympathy towards coworkers, including not wanting to overburden them, were reported to be determinants informing the decision of whether to work