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Sample records for care transitions program

  1. 75 FR 67751 - Medicare Program: Community-Based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ...] Medicare Program: Community-Based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) Meeting AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... guidance and ask questions about the upcoming Community-based Care Transitions Program. The meeting is open... registration information will be posted on the CMS Care Transitions Web site at http://www.cms.gov/DemoProjects...

  2. 76 FR 21372 - Medicare Program; Solicitation for Proposals for the Medicare Community-Based Care Transitions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ...] Medicare Program; Solicitation for Proposals for the Medicare Community-Based Care Transitions Program... interested parties of an opportunity to apply to participate in the Medicare Community-based Care Transitions Program, which was authorized by section 3026 of the Affordable Care Act. DATES: Proposals will be...

  3. Transitional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Mary; Keating, Stacen A.

    2008-01-01

    Transitional care encompasses a broad range of services and environments designed to promote the safe and timely passage of patients between levels of health care and across care settings. High-quality transitional care is especially important for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and complex therapeutic regimens, as well as for their…

  4. Improving Transitions to Postacute Care for Elderly Patients Using a Novel Video-Conferencing Program: ECHO-Care Transitions.

    PubMed

    Moore, Amber B; Krupp, J Elyse; Dufour, Alyssa B; Sircar, Mousumi; Travison, Thomas G; Abrams, Alan; Farris, Grace; Mattison, Melissa L P; Lipsitz, Lewis A

    2017-10-01

    Within 30 days of hospital discharge to a skilled nursing facility, older adults are at high risk for death, re-hospitalization, and high-cost health care. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a novel videoconference program called Extension for Community Health Outcomes-Care Transitions (ECHO-CT) that connects an interdisciplinary hospital-based team with clinicians at skilled nursing facilities reduces patient mortality, hospital readmission, skilled nursing facility length of stay, and 30-day health care costs. We undertook a prospective cohort study comparing cost and health care utilization outcomes between ECHO-CT facilities and matched comparisons from January 2014-December 2014. Thirty-day readmission rates were significantly lower in the intervention group (odds ratio 0.57; 95% CI, 0.34-0.96; P-value .04), as were the 30-day total health care cost ($2602.19 lower; 95% CI, -$4133.90 to -$1070.48; P-value <.001) and the average length of stay at the skilled nursing facility (-5.52 days; 95% CI, -9.61 to -1.43; P = .001). The 30-day mortality rate was not significantly lower in the intervention group (odds ratio 0.38; 95% CI, 0.11-1.24; P = .11). Patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities participating in the ECHO-CT program had shorter lengths of stay, lower 30-day rehospitalization rates, and lower 30-day health care costs compared with those in matched skilled nursing facilities delivering usual care. ECHO-CT may improve patient transitions to postacute care at lower overall cost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transitional care programs improve outcomes for heart failure patients: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Kelly D; Machado, Monique A; Allen, Nancy A

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with heart failure are frequently rehospitalized owing to a lack of knowledge concerning how to perform their self-care and when to inform their healthcare provider of worsening symptoms. Because there are an overwhelming number of hospital readmissions for individuals with heart failure, efforts are underway to discover how they can be supported and educated during their hospitalization and subsequently followed by a nurse after discharge for continued education and support. The purpose of this integrative review was to critically examine the interventions, quality of life, and readmission rates of individuals with heart failure who are enrolled in a transitional care program. The second aim was to examine the cost-effectiveness of nurse-led transitional care programs. The results of this integrative review (n = 20) showed that transitional care programs for individuals with heart failure can increase a patient's quality of life and decrease the number of readmissions and the overall cost of care. The types of interventions that were most successful in decreasing readmissions used home visits alone or in combination with telephone calls. There is a need for nurse researchers to address gaps in transitional care for heart failure patients by performing studies with larger randomized clinical trials and measuring outcomes such as readmissions at regular intervals over the study period. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will change reimbursement for heart failure readmissions and presents opportunities for healthcare teams to build transitional care programs for patients with conditions such as heart failure. This integrative review can be used to determine effective intervention strategies for transitional care programs and highlights the gaps in research. Healthcare teams that use these programs within their practice may increase continuity of care and quality of life and decrease readmissions and healthcare costs for individuals with heart

  6. 77 FR 14364 - Comment Sought on Funding Pilot Program Participants Transitioning Out of the Rural Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Program Participants Transitioning Out of the Rural Health Care Pilot Program in Funding Year 2012 AGENCY..., the Wireline Competition Bureau seeks comment on whether to fund Rural Health Care Pilot Program... transition them into the permanent Rural Health Care support mechanism (RHC support mechanism). DATES...

  7. Development and Preliminary Evaluation of the Resident Coordinated-Transitional Care (RC-TraC) Program: A Sustainable Option for Transitional Care Education

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, E.; Eastman, A.; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, A.; Vogelman, B.; Kind, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Older adults often face poor outcomes when transitioning from hospital to home. Although physicians play a key role in overseeing transitions, there is a lack of practice-based educational programs that prepare resident physicians to manage care transitions of older adults. An educational intervention to provide residents with real-life transitional care practice was therefore developed – Resident-coordinated Transitional Care (RC-TraC). RC-TraC adapted the evidence-based Coordinated-Transitional Care (C-TraC) nurse role for residents, providing opportunities to follow patients during the peri-hospital period without additional costs to the residency program. Between July 2010 and June 2013, thirty-one Internal Medicine residents participated in RC-TraC, caring for 721 patients. RC-TraC has been a sustainable, low-cost, practice-based education experience that is recognized as transitional care education by residents and continues in operation to this day. RC-TraC is a promising option for geriatric-based transitional care education of resident physicians and could also be adapted for non-physician learners. PMID:27749162

  8. The Use of Transitional Child Care: Analysis and Recommendations for New York City's Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Laura; And Others

    New York City's Transitional Child Care (TCC) program, for families exiting Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), has an application rate of 20 percent. This study sought to determine both the causes of the low rate and possible solutions. The situation was evaluated by means of surveys, interviews, analysis of data collected by the…

  9. Review of State Policies and Programs to Support Young People Transitioning Out of Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworsky, Amy; Havlicek, Judy

    2009-01-01

    This comprehensive review of policies and programs designed to support youth transitioning out of foster care spans all 50 states and the District of Columbia. As part of the review, Chapin Hall administered a web-based survey of state independent living services coordinators to collect up-to-date information about their state's policies and…

  10. An Insurer's Care Transition Program Emphasizes Medication Reconciliation, Reduces Readmissions And Costs.

    PubMed

    Polinski, Jennifer M; Moore, Janice M; Kyrychenko, Pavlo; Gagnon, Michael; Matlin, Olga S; Fredell, Joshua W; Brennan, Troyen A; Shrank, William H

    2016-07-01

    Adverse drug events and the challenges of clarifying and adhering to complex medication regimens are central drivers of hospital readmissions. Medication reconciliation programs can reduce the incidence of adverse drug events after discharge, but evidence regarding the impact of medication reconciliation on readmission rates and health care costs is less clear. We studied an insurer-initiated care transition program based on medication reconciliation delivered by pharmacists via home visits and telephone and explored its effects on high-risk patients. We examined whether voluntary program participation was associated with improved medication use, reduced readmissions, and savings net of program costs. Program participants had a 50 percent reduced relative risk of readmission within thirty days of discharge and an absolute risk reduction of 11.1 percent. The program saved $2 for every $1 spent. These results represent real-world evidence that insurer-initiated, pharmacist-led care transition programs, focused on but not limited to medication reconciliation, have the potential to both improve clinical outcomes and reduce total costs of care. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Developing a rural transitional care community case management program using clinical nurse specialists.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen M; Black, Denice; Hammond, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    This quality improvement project developed a community nursing case management program to decrease preventable readmissions to the hospital and emergency department by providing telephonic case management and, if needed, onsite assessment and treatment by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with prescriptive authority. As more people reach Medicare age, the number of individuals with worsening chronic diseases with dramatically increases unless appropriate disease management programs are developed. Care transitions can result in breakdown in continuity of care, resulting in increased preventable readmissions, particularly for indigent patients. The CNS is uniquely educated to managing care transitions and coordination of community resources to prevent readmissions. After a thorough SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis, we developed and implemented a cost-avoidance model to prevent readmissions in our uninsured and underinsured patients. The project CNS used a wide array of interventions to decrease readmissions. In the last 2 years, there have been a total of 22 less than 30-day readmissions to the emergency department or hospital in 13 patients, a significant decrease from readmissions in these patients prior to the program. Three of them required transfer to a larger hospital for a higher level of care. Using advanced practice nurses in transitional care can prevent readmissions, resulting in cost avoidance. The coordination of community resources during transition from hospital to home is a job best suited to CNSs, because they are educated to work within organizations/systems. The money we saved with this project more than justified the cost of hiring a CNS to lead it. More research is needed into this technology. Guidelines for this intervention need to be developed. Replicating our cost-avoidance transitional care model can help other facilities limit that loss.

  12. Transitioning HIV care and treatment programs in southern Africa to full local management.

    PubMed

    Vermund, Sten H; Sidat, Mohsin; Weil, Lori F; Tique, José A; Moon, Troy D; Ciampa, Philip J

    2012-06-19

    Global AIDS programs such as the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) face a challenging health care management transition. HIV care must evolve from vertically-organized, externally-supported efforts to sustainable, locally controlled components that are integrated into the horizontal primary health care systems of host nations. We compared four southern African nations in AIDS care, financial, literacy, and health worker capacity parameters (2005 to 2009) to contrast in their capacities to absorb the huge HIV care and prevention endeavors that are now managed with international technical and fiscal support. Botswana has a relatively high national income, a small population, and an advanced HIV/AIDS care program; it is well poised to take on management of its HIV/AIDS programs. South Africa has had a slower start, given HIV denialism philosophies of the previous government leadership. Nonetheless, South Africa has the national income, health care management, and health worker capacity to succeed in fully local management. The sheer magnitude of the burden is daunting, however, and South Africa will need continuing fiscal assistance. In contrast, Zambia and Mozambique have comparatively lower per capita incomes, many fewer health care workers per capita, and lower national literacy rates. It is improbable that fully independent management of their HIV programs is feasible on the timetable being contemplated by donors, nor is locally sustainable financing conceivable at present. A tailored nation-by-nation approach is needed for the transition to full local capacitation; donor nation policymakers must ensure that global resources and technical support are not removed prematurely.

  13. Forecasting client transitions in British Columbia's Long-Term Care Program.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, D; Uyeno, D; Stark, A; Gutman, G; McCashin, B

    1987-01-01

    This article presents a model for the annual transitions of clients through various home and facility placements in a long-term care program. The model, an application of Markov chain analysis, is developed, tested, and applied to over 9,000 clients (N = 9,483) in British Columbia's Long Term Care Program (LTC) over the period 1978-1983. Results show that the model gives accurate forecasts of the progress of groups of clients from state to state in the long-term care system from time of admission until eventual death. Statistical methods are used to test the modeling hypothesis that clients' year-over-year transitions occur in constant proportions from state to state within the long-term care system. Tests are carried out by examining actual year-over-year transitions of each year's new admission cohort (1978-1983). Various subsets of the available data are analyzed and, after accounting for clear differences among annual cohorts, the most acceptable model of the actual client transition data occurred when clients were separated into male and female groups, i.e., the transition behavior of each group is describable by a different Markov model. To validate the model, we develop model estimates for the numbers of existing clients in each state of the long-term care system for the period (1981-1983) for which actual data are available. When these estimates are compared with the actual data, total weighted absolute deviations do not exceed 10 percent of actuals. Finally, we use the properties of the Markov chain probability transition matrix and simulation methods to develop three-year forecasts with prediction intervals for the distribution of the existing total clients into each state of the system. The tests, forecasts, and Markov model supplemental information are contained in a mechanized procedure suitable for a microcomputer. The procedure provides a powerful, efficient tool for decision makers planning facilities and services in response to the needs of long

  14. Direct Telephonic Communication in a Heart Failure Transitional Care Program: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Ota, Ken S; Beutler, David S; Sheikh, Hassam; Weiss, Jessica L; Parkinson, Dallin; Nguyen, Peter; Gerkin, Richard D; Loli, Akil I

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the trend of phone calls in the Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center (BGSMC) Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). The primary goal of the HFTCP is to reduce 30-Day readmissions for heart failure patients by using a multi-pronged approach. This study included 104 patients in the HFTCP discharged over a 51-week period who had around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. Cellular phone records were reviewed. This study evaluated the length and timing of calls. A total of 4398 telephone calls were recorded of which 39% were inbound and 61% were outbound. This averaged to 86 calls per week. During the "Weekday Daytime" period, Eighty-five percent of the totals calls were made. There were 229 calls during the "Weekday Nights" period with 1.5 inbound calls per week. The "Total Weekend" calls were 10.2% of the total calls which equated to a weekly average of 8.8. Our experience is that direct, physician-patient telephone contact is feasible with a panel of around 100 HF patients for one provider. If the proper financial reimbursements are provided, physicians may be apt to participate in similar transitional care programs. Likewise, third party payers will benefit from the reduction in unnecessary emergency room visits and hospitalizations.

  15. Direct Telephonic Communication in a Heart Failure Transitional Care Program: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Ken S.; Beutler, David S.; Sheikh, Hassam; Weiss, Jessica L.; Parkinson, Dallin; Nguyen, Peter; Gerkin, Richard D.; Loli, Akil I.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the trend of phone calls in the Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center (BGSMC) Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). The primary goal of the HFTCP is to reduce 30-Day readmissions for heart failure patients by using a multi-pronged approach. Methods This study included 104 patients in the HFTCP discharged over a 51-week period who had around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. Cellular phone records were reviewed. This study evaluated the length and timing of calls. Results A total of 4398 telephone calls were recorded of which 39% were inbound and 61% were outbound. This averaged to 86 calls per week. During the “Weekday Daytime” period, Eighty-five percent of the totals calls were made. There were 229 calls during the “Weekday Nights” period with 1.5 inbound calls per week. The “Total Weekend” calls were 10.2% of the total calls which equated to a weekly average of 8.8. Conclusions Our experience is that direct, physician-patient telephone contact is feasible with a panel of around 100 HF patients for one provider. If the proper financial reimbursements are provided, physicians may be apt to participate in similar transitional care programs. Likewise, third party payers will benefit from the reduction in unnecessary emergency room visits and hospitalizations. PMID:28352437

  16. Physician-directed heart failure transitional care program: a retrospective case review.

    PubMed

    Ota, Ken S; Beutler, David S; Gerkin, Richard D; Weiss, Jessica L; Loli, Akil I

    2013-10-01

    Despite a variety of national efforts to improve transitions of care for patients at risk for rehospitalization, 30-day rehospitalization rates for patients with heart failure have remained largely unchanged. This is a retrospective review of 73 patients enrolled in our hospital-based, physican-directed Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). This study evaluated the 30- and 90- day readmission rates before and after enrollment in the program. The Transitionalist's services focused on bedside consultation prior to hospital discharge, follow-up home visits within 72 hours of discharge, frequent follow-up phone calls, disease-specific education, outpatient intravenous diuretic therapy, and around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. The pre-enrollment 30-day readmission rates for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and all-cause readmission was 26.0% and 28.8%, respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for ADHF and all-cause readmission were 4.1% (P < 0.001) and 8.2% (P = 0.002), respectively. The pre-enrollment 90-day all-cause and ADHF readmission rates were 69.8%, and 58.9% respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for all-cause and ADHF were 27.3% (P < 0.001) and 16.4% (P < 0.001) respectively. Our physician-implemented HFTCP reduced rehospitalization risk for patients enrolled in the program. This program may serve as a model to assist other hospital systems to reduce readmission rates of patients with HF.

  17. Physician-Directed Heart Failure Transitional Care Program: A Retrospective Case Review

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Ken S.; Beutler, David S.; Gerkin, Richard D.; Weiss, Jessica L.; Loli, Akil I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite a variety of national efforts to improve transitions of care for patients at risk for rehospitalization, 30-day rehospitalization rates for patients with heart failure have remained largely unchanged. Methods This is a retrospective review of 73 patients enrolled in our hospital-based, physican-directed Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). This study evaluated the 30- and 90- day readmission rates before and after enrollment in the program. The Transitionalist’s services focused on bedside consultation prior to hospital discharge, follow-up home visits within 72 hours of discharge, frequent follow-up phone calls, disease-specific education, outpatient intravenous diuretic therapy, and around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. Results The pre-enrollment 30-day readmission rates for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and all-cause readmission was 26.0% and 28.8%, respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for ADHF and all-cause readmission were 4.1% (P < 0.001) and 8.2% (P = 0.002), respectively. The pre-enrollment 90-day all-cause and ADHF readmission rates were 69.8%, and 58.9% respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for all-cause and ADHF were 27.3% (P < 0.001) and 16.4% (P < 0.001) respectively. Conclusions Our physician-implemented HFTCP reduced rehospitalization risk for patients enrolled in the program. This program may serve as a model to assist other hospital systems to reduce readmission rates of patients with HF. PMID:23976905

  18. Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care. Issue Brief 3: Employment Programs. OPRE Report No. 2014-70

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelstein, Sara; Lowenstein, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why employment services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the…

  19. Effectiveness of a transitional home care program in reducing acute hospital utilization: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Low, Lian Leng; Vasanwala, Farhad Fakhrudin; Ng, Lee Beng; Chen, Cynthia; Lee, Kheng Hock; Tan, Shu Yun

    2015-03-14

    Improving healthcare utilization is essential as health systems around the world grapple with the escalating demands for acute hospital resources. Evidence suggests that transitional care programs are effective to improve utilization of healthcare. However, the evidence for transitional care programs that enhance the home medical care model and provide multi-disciplinary patient-centered care is not well established. We evaluated if a transitional home care program operated by the Singapore General Hospital was effective in reducing acute hospital utilization. We performed a quasi-experimental study using a pre-post design to evaluate the effectiveness of a transitional home care program in reducing hospital admissions and emergency department attendances of medically complex patients enrolled into the program in a tertiary hospital in Singapore. Patients received a comprehensive needs assessment performed by the physician and a nurse case manager in the home setting, followed by an individualized care plan that included medical and nursing care, patient education and coordination of care with hospital specialists and community services. Primary study outcomes were emergency department attendances and hospital admissions to all hospitals. These were extracted from hospital administrative data and national health records. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was used for assess differences in pre and post continuous data. Overall, 262 patients were enrolled into the program and 259 were analyzed. Patients had a 51.6% and 52.8% reduction in hospital admissions in the three-month and six-month post enrollment, respectively. Similarly, a 47.1% and 48.2% reduction was observed for emergency department attendances in the three and six months post enrollment, respectively. The average difference in per patient hospital bed days in the pre- and post-enrollment periods were 12.05 days and 20.03 days at the 3-month and 6-month periods, respectively. Patients enrolled in the

  20. A transition program to primary health care for new graduate nurses: a strategy towards building a sustainable primary health care nurse workforce?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Aggar, Christina; Williams, Anna M; Walker, Lynne; Willcock, Simon M; Bloomfield, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    This debate discusses the potential merits of a New Graduate Nurse Transition to Primary Health Care Program as an untested but potential nursing workforce development and sustainability strategy. Increasingly in Australia, health policy is focusing on the role of general practice and multidisciplinary teams in meeting the service needs of ageing populations in the community. Primary health care nurses who work in general practice are integral members of the multidisciplinary team - but this workforce is ageing and predicted to face increasing shortages in the future. At the same time, Australia is currently experiencing a surplus of and a corresponding lack of employment opportunities for new graduate nurses. This situation is likely to compound workforce shortages in the future. A national nursing workforce plan that addresses supply and demand issues of primary health care nurses is required. Innovative solutions are required to support and retain the current primary health care nursing workforce, whilst building a skilled and sustainable workforce for the future. This debate article discusses the primary health care nursing workforce dilemma currently facing policy makers in Australia and presents an argument for the potential value of a New Graduate Transition to Primary Health Care Program as a workforce development and sustainability strategy. An exploration of factors that may contribute or hinder transition program for new graduates in primary health care implementation is considered. A graduate transition program to primary health care may play an important role in addressing primary health care workforce shortages in the future. There are, however, a number of factors that need to be simultaneously addressed if a skilled and sustainable workforce for the future is to be realised. The development of a transition program to primary health care should be based on a number of core principles and be subjected to both a summative and cost

  1. The impact of transitional care programs on health services utilization in community-dwelling older adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Lori E; Macdonald, Marilyn; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Helwig, Melissa; Bishop, Andrea; Iduye, Damilola F; Moody, Elaine

    2018-02-01

    The objective was to identify and synthesize the best available evidence on the impact of transitional care programs on various forms of health services utilization in community-dwelling older adults. There is growing evidence that transitional care programs can help address important challenges facing health care systems and our increasing older adult population in many countries by reducing unnecessary health service utilization. There is a need for a systematic review of the research evaluating the impact of transitional care programs on hospital and other health service usage. The review included studies on community-dwelling adults age 60 and over with at least one medical diagnosis, and which evaluated the outcomes of transitional care programs on health system utilization of older adults. The outcomes for this review were hospital usage including admissions and readmissions, emergency department usage, primary care/physician usage, nursing home usage, and home health care usage. The review considered experimental and epidemiological study designs including randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies, before and after studies, prospective and retrospective cohort studies, and case-control studies. A three-step search was utilized to find published and unpublished studies conducted in any country but reported in English. Six electronic databases were searched from inception of the database to May, 2016. A search for unpublished studies was also conducted. Methodological quality was assessed independently by two reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal checklist for systematic reviews and research synthesis. Quantitative data were extracted from included studies independently by the two reviewers using the standardized Joanna Briggs Institute data extraction tools. Due to the methodological heterogeneity of the included studies, a comprehensive meta-analysis for all outcomes was not possible

  2. The effect of a collaborative pharmacist-hospital care transition program on the likelihood of 30-day readmission.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Heather S; Clark, Bobby L; Paynter, Jacquelyn; Lewis, Geraint H; Duncan, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The effect of a collaborative pharmacist-hospital care transition program on the likelihood of 30-day readmission was evaluated. This retrospective cohort study was conducted in two acute care hospitals within the same hospital system in the southeastern United States. One hospital initiated a care transition program in January 2011; the other hospital did not have such a program. All patients who were discharged from either hospital to home from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2011, were included in the study. The two key program components included bedside delivery of postdischarge medications and follow-up telephone calls two to three days after discharge. The likelihood of readmission was assessed using multiple logistic regression. Over the 2-year study period, 19,659 unique patients had 26,781 qualifying index admissions, 2,523 of which resulted in a readmission within 30 days of discharge. After adjusting for various demographic and clinical characteristics, the usual care group (i.e., patients who did not participate in the program) had nearly twice the odds of readmission within 30 days (odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35-2.67), compared with the intervention group (i.e., program participants). For patients age 65 years or older, those in the usual care group had a sixfold increase in the odds of a 30-day readmission (OR, 6.05; 95% CI, 1.92-19.00) relative to those in the intervention group. A care transition program was associated with a lower likelihood of readmission and had a greater effect on older patients.

  3. Australia's first transition to professional practice in primary care program for graduate registered nurses: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aggar, Christina; Bloomfield, Jacqueline; Thomas, Tamsin H; Gordon, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Increases in ageing, chronic illness and complex co-morbidities in the Australian population are adding pressure to the primary care nursing workforce. Initiatives to attract and retain nurses are needed to establish a sustainable and skilled future primary care nursing workforce. We implemented a transition to professional practice program in general practice settings for graduate nurses and evaluated graduate nurse competency, the graduate nurse experience and program satisfaction. This study aimed to determine whether a transition to professional practice program implemented in the general practice setting led to competent practice nurses in their first year post-graduation. A longitudinal, exploratory mixed-methods design was used to assess the pilot study. Data were collected at three times points (3, 6, 12 months) with complete data sets from graduate nurses ( n =  4) and preceptors ( n =  7). We assessed perceptions of the graduates' nursing competency and confidence, satisfaction with the preceptor/graduate relationship, and experiences and satisfaction with the program. Graduate nurse competency was assessed using the National Competency Standards for Nurses in General Practice. Semi-structured interviews with participants at Time 3 sought information about barriers, enablers, and the perceived impact of the program. Graduate nurses were found to be competent within their first year of clinical practice. Program perceptions from graduate nurses and preceptors were positive and the relationship between the graduate nurse and preceptor was key to this development. With appropriate support registered nurses can transition directly into primary care and are competent in their first year post-graduation. While wider implementation and research is needed, findings from this study demonstrate the potential value of transition to professional practice programs within primary care as a nursing workforce development strategy.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of a transitional pharmaceutical care program for patients discharged from the hospital

    PubMed Central

    van der Knaap, Ronald; Bouhannouch, Fatiha; Borgsteede, Sander D.; Janssen, Marjo J. A.; Siegert, Carl E. H.; Egberts, Toine C. G.; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; van Wier, Marieke F.; Bosmans, Judith E.

    2017-01-01

    Background To improve continuity of care at hospital admission and discharge and to decrease medication errors pharmaceutical care programs are developed. This study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of the COACH program in comparison with usual care from a societal perspective. Methods A controlled clinical trial was performed at the Internal Medicine department of a general teaching hospital. All admitted patients using at least one prescription drug were included. The COACH program consisted of medication reconciliation, patient counselling at discharge, and communication to healthcare providers in primary care. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with an unplanned rehospitalisation within three months after discharge. Also, the number of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) was assessed. Cost data were collected using cost diaries. Uncertainty surrounding cost differences and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios between the groups was estimated by bootstrapping. Results In the COACH program, 168 patients were included and in usual care 151 patients. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with unplanned rehospitalisations (mean difference 0.17%, 95% CI -8.85;8.51), and in QALYs (mean difference -0.0085, 95% CI -0.0170;0.0001). Total costs for the COACH program were non-significantly lower than usual care (-€1160, 95% CI -3168;847). Cost-effectiveness planes showed that the program was not cost-effective compared with usual care for unplanned rehospitalisations and QALYs gained. Conclusion The COACH program was not cost-effective in comparison with usual care. Future studies should focus on high risk patients and include other outcomes (e.g. adverse drug events) as this may increase the chances of a cost-effective intervention. Dutch trial register NTR1519 PMID:28445474

  5. Preparing Adolescents With Chronic Disease for Transition to Adult Care: A Technology Program

    PubMed Central

    Terrones, Laura; Tompane, Trevor; Dillon, Lindsay; Pian, Mark; Gottschalk, Michael; Norman, Gregory J.; Bartholomew, L. Kay

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adolescents with chronic disease (ACD) must develop independent disease self-management and learn to communicate effectively with their health care team to transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care systems. Disease-specific interventions have been implemented to aid specific ACD groups through transition. A generic approach might be effective and cost-saving. METHODS: Eighty-one ACD, aged 12 to 20 years, were recruited for a randomized clinical trial evaluating an 8-month transition intervention (MD2Me). MD2Me recipients received a 2-month intensive Web-based and text-delivered disease management and skill-based intervention followed by a 6-month review period. MD2Me recipients also had access to a texting algorithm for disease assessment and health care team contact. The intervention was applicable to adolescents with diverse chronic illnesses. Controls received mailed materials on general health topics. Disease management, health-related self-efficacy, and health assessments were performed at baseline and at 2 and 8 months. Frequency of patient-initiated communications was recorded over the study period. Outcomes were analyzed according to assigned treatment group over time. RESULTS: MD2Me recipients demonstrated significant improvements in performance of disease management tasks, health-related self-efficacy, and patient-initiated communications compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS: Outcomes in ACD improved significantly among recipients of a generic, technology-based intervention. Technology can deliver transition interventions to adolescents with diverse chronic illnesses, and a generic approach offers a cost-effective means of positively influencing transition outcomes. Further research is needed to determine whether improved short-term outcomes translate into an improved transition for ACD. PMID:24843066

  6. Preparing adolescents with chronic disease for transition to adult care: a technology program.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeannie S; Terrones, Laura; Tompane, Trevor; Dillon, Lindsay; Pian, Mark; Gottschalk, Michael; Norman, Gregory J; Bartholomew, L Kay

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents with chronic disease (ACD) must develop independent disease self-management and learn to communicate effectively with their health care team to transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care systems. Disease-specific interventions have been implemented to aid specific ACD groups through transition. A generic approach might be effective and cost-saving. Eighty-one ACD, aged 12 to 20 years, were recruited for a randomized clinical trial evaluating an 8-month transition intervention (MD2Me). MD2Me recipients received a 2-month intensive Web-based and text-delivered disease management and skill-based intervention followed by a 6-month review period. MD2Me recipients also had access to a texting algorithm for disease assessment and health care team contact. The intervention was applicable to adolescents with diverse chronic illnesses. Controls received mailed materials on general health topics. Disease management, health-related self-efficacy, and health assessments were performed at baseline and at 2 and 8 months. Frequency of patient-initiated communications was recorded over the study period. Outcomes were analyzed according to assigned treatment group over time. MD2Me recipients demonstrated significant improvements in performance of disease management tasks, health-related self-efficacy, and patient-initiated communications compared with controls. Outcomes in ACD improved significantly among recipients of a generic, technology-based intervention. Technology can deliver transition interventions to adolescents with diverse chronic illnesses, and a generic approach offers a cost-effective means of positively influencing transition outcomes. Further research is needed to determine whether improved short-term outcomes translate into an improved transition for ACD. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of a transitional home-based palliative care program for patients with end-stage heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; So, Ching; Ng, Alina Yee Man; Lam, Po-Tin; Ng, Jeffrey Sheung Ching; Ng, Nancy Hiu Yim; Chau, June; Sham, Michael Mau Kwong

    2018-02-01

    Studies have shown positive clinical outcomes of specialist palliative care for end-stage heart failure patients, but cost-effectiveness evaluation is lacking. To examine the cost-effectiveness of a transitional home-based palliative care program for patients with end-stage heart failure patients as compared to the customary palliative care service. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial (Trial number: NCT02086305). The costs included pre-program training, intervention, and hospital use. Quality of life was measured using SF-6D. The study took place in three hospitals in Hong Kong. The inclusion criteria were meeting clinical indicators for end-stage heart failure patients including clinician-judged last year of life, discharged to home within the service area, and palliative care referral accepted. A total of 84 subjects (study = 43, control = 41) were recruited. When the study group was compared to the control group, the net incremental quality-adjusted life years gain was 0.0012 (28 days)/0.0077 (84 days) and the net incremental costs per case was -HK$7935 (28 days)/-HK$26,084 (84 days). The probability of being cost-effective was 85% (28 days)/100% (84 days) based on the cost-effectiveness thresholds recommended both by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (£20,000/quality-adjusted life years) and World Health Organization (Hong Kong gross domestic product/capita in 2015, HK$328117). Results suggest that a transitional home-based palliative care program is more cost-effective than customary palliative care service. Limitations of the study include small sample size, study confined to one city, clinic consultation costs, and societal costs including patient costs and unpaid care-giving costs were not included.

  8. Care Coordination and Transitions of Care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngjee

    2017-11-01

    Care coordination and effective transitions of care are essential for high-quality care in cancer survivors. Aspects of care that require coordination include cancer surveillance, managing the effects of cancer and its treatment, and preventive care, including screening for new cancers, with the clinician responsible for each aspect of care clearly defined. There are many barriers to transitioning and coordinating care across cancer specialists and primary care physicians; possible solutions include survivorship care plans and certain care models. Improving these areas, along with survivorship care training and education, may lead to more effective care coordination and transitions in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transition Care for Children With Special Health Care Needs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Alaina M.; Brown, Rebekah F.; Taylor, Julie Lounds; Epstein, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 750 000 children in the United States with special health care needs will transition from pediatric to adult care annually. Fewer than half receive adequate transition care. METHODS: We had conversations with key informants representing clinicians who provide transition care, pediatric and adult providers of services for individuals with special health care needs, policy experts, and researchers; searched online sources for information about currently available programs and resources; and conducted a literature search to identify research on the effectiveness of transition programs. RESULTS: We identified 25 studies evaluating transition care programs. Most (n = 8) were conducted in populations with diabetes, with a smaller literature (n = 5) on transplant patients. We identified an additional 12 studies on a range of conditions, with no more than 2 studies on the same condition. Common components of care included use of a transition coordinator, a special clinic for young adults in transition, and provision of educational materials. CONCLUSIONS: The issue of how to provide transition care for children with special health care needs warrants further attention. Research needs are wide ranging, including both substantive and methodologic concerns. Although there is widespread agreement on the need for adequate transition programs, there is no accepted way to measure transition success. It will be essential to establish consistent goals to build an adequate body of literature to affect practice. PMID:25287460

  10. A Patient-Centered Transitional Care Case Management Program: Taking Case Management to the Streets and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Derenda; Hancock, Diane; Hughes, Sabrina S; Wyche, Phyllis R; Jenkins, Claire; Logan, Cindy

    In 2011, the Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC) in Richmond, VA, had a cumulative readmission rate and emergency department (ED) revisits for discharged Veterans of 1 in 5. In 2012, a transitional care program (TCP) was implemented to improve care coordination and outcomes among Veterans, with an emphasis on geriatric patients with chronic disease. This TCP was created with an interdisciplinary approach using intensive case management interventions, with a goal of reducing Veteran ED and hospital revisits by 30%. To examine the impact of the McGuire VAMC TCP on Veteran ED and hospital utilization and costs. Veterans being discharged to home following an inpatient admission, ED visit, and/or short rehab stay. The primary means of identifying patients for the program is through daily screening of the previous 24-hour admission and ED report, which the inpatient nurse practitioner performs. She completes an extensive review of each Veteran's electronic medical record to determine the number of ED visits and inpatient admissions at the VAMC and in the community. Initial criteria for consideration in the program included the following: more than two hospital admissions and/or ED visits in the past 90 days or at high risk for readmission based on a Care Assessment Need score of greater than 95. Two hundred Veterans participated in the program in fiscal year (FY) 2013, with 146 participating in FY 2014. A retrospective chart review of Veterans participating in the TCP in FYs 2013 and 2014 was conducted, with a focus on number of admissions and ED visits 90 days prior to admission to the TCP and 90 days following TCP admission. Average admission and ED costs for this VA were calculated to determine cost savings from pre- to post-90 days of admission and ED visits. Veterans who obtained TCP services in FYs 2013 and 2014 experienced a 67% decrease in hospital admissions and a 61% decrease in ED visits in the 90 days following participation in

  11. Transitional Employment Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulle, Paul J.; And Others

    The paper examines the need and implementation of transitional employment programs for handicapped youth. Effects on the handicapped of future automation are considered along with the need for school-business cooperation to prepare for the future. The importance of initial success in any innovation is noted. A Chicago transitional employment…

  12. Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care. Issue Brief 2: Financial Literacy and Asset Building Programs. OPRE Report No. 2014-69

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelstein, Sara; Lowenstein, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why financial literacy and asset building services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care,…

  13. 42 CFR 460.52 - Transitional care during termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.52 Transitional care...

  14. 42 CFR 460.52 - Transitional care during termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.52 Transitional care...

  15. Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care. Issue Brief 1: Education Programs. OPRE Report No. 2014-66

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworsky, Amy; Smithgall, Cheryl; Courtney, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Youth transitioning out of foster care and into adulthood need many supports to navigate the challenges they face. Over the past three decades, federal child welfare policy has significantly increased the availability of those supports. In 1999, the Foster Care Independence Act amended Title IV-E of the Social Security Act to create the Chafee…

  16. Bus Rapid Transit Demonstration Program

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-12-31

    This report was prepared by the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) Office of Research, Demonstration and Innovation. It describes the FTA's Bus Rapid Transit Demonstration Program, designed to provide funding and support to transit agencies engag...

  17. 77 FR 45421 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Continuum of Care Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... Re-Housing for Families Demonstration program and the Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing... to quickly rehouse homeless individuals and families while minimizing the trauma and dislocation caused to homeless individuals, families, and communities by homelessness; promote access to and...

  18. Implementation and dissemination of a transition of care program for rural veterans: a controlled before and after study.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Chelsea; Lawrence, Emily; McCreight, Marina; Lippmann, Brandi; Kelley, Lynette; Mayberry, Ashlea; Ladebue, Amy; Gilmartin, Heather; Côté, Murray J; Jones, Jacqueline; Rabin, Borsika A; Ho, P Michael; Burke, Robert

    2017-10-23

    Adapting promising health care interventions to local settings is a critical component in the dissemination and implementation process. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) rural transitions nurse program (TNP) is a nurse-led, Veteran-centered intervention designed to improve transitional care for rural Veterans funded by VA national offices for dissemination to other VA sites serving a predominantly rural Veteran population. Here, we describe our novel approach to the implementation and evaluation = the TNP. This is a controlled before and after study that assesses both implementation and intervention outcomes. During pre-implementation, we assessed site context using a mixed method approach with data from diverse sources including facility-level quantitative data, key informant and Veteran interviews, observations of the discharge process, and a group brainstorming activity. We used the Practical Robust Implementation and Sustainability Model (PRISM) to inform our inquiries, to integrate data from all sources, and to identify factors that may affect implementation. In the implementation phase, we will use internal and external facilitation, paired with audit and feedback, to encourage appropriate contextual adaptations. We will use a modified Stirman framework to document adaptations. During the evaluation phase, we will measure intervention and implementation outcomes at each site using the RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance). We will conduct a difference-in-differences analysis with propensity-matched Veterans and VA facilities as a control. Our primary intervention outcome is 30-day readmission and Emergency Department visit rates. We will use our findings to develop an implementation toolkit that will inform the larger scale-up of the TNP across the VA. The use of PRISM to inform pre-implementation evaluation and synthesize data from multiple sources, coupled with internal and external facilitation, is a

  19. Transitioning to Adulthood from Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Lee, Terry; Morgan, Wynne

    2017-04-01

    Transitional age foster youth do not typically receive the types of family supports their nonfoster peers enjoy. Many foster youth experience multiple adversities and often fare worse than nonfoster peers on long-term functional outcomes. Governments increasingly recognize their responsibility to act as parents for state dependents transitioning to adulthood and the need to provide services to address social/emotional supports, living skills, finances, housing, education, employment, and physical and mental health. More research is needed to inform the development of effective programs. Transitional age foster youth benefit from policies promoting a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive, and integrated transition system of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Better Respiratory Education and Treatment Help Empower (BREATHE) study: Methodology and baseline characteristics of a randomized controlled trial testing a transitional care program to improve patient-centered care delivery among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Aboumatar, H; Naqibuddin, M; Chung, S; Adebowale, H; Bone, L; Brown, T; Cooper, L A; Gurses, A P; Knowlton, A; Kurtz, D; Piet, L; Putcha, N; Rand, C; Roter, D; Shattuck, E; Sylvester, C; Urteaga-Fuentes, A; Wise, R; Wolff, J L; Yang, T; Hibbard, J; Howell, E; Myers, M; Shea, K; Sullivan, J; Syron, L; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Pronovost, P

    2017-11-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a leading cause of hospitalizations. Interventional studies focusing on the hospital-to-home transition for COPD patients are few. In the BREATHE (Better Respiratory Education and Treatment Help Empower) study, we developed and tested a patient and family-centered transitional care program that helps prepare hospitalized COPD patients and their family caregivers to manage COPD at home. In the study's initial phase, we co-developed the BREATHE transitional care program with COPD patients, family-caregivers, and stakeholders. The program offers tailored services to address individual patients' needs and priorities at the hospital and for 3months post discharge. We tested the program in a single-blinded RCT with 240 COPD patients who were randomized to receive the program or 'usual care'. Program participants were offered the opportunity to invite a family caregiver, if available, to enroll with them into the study. The primary outcomes were the combined number of COPD-related hospitalizations and Emergency Department (ED) visits per participant at 6months post discharge, and the change in health-related quality of life over the 6months study period. Other measures include 'all cause' hospitalizations and ED visits; patient activation; self-efficacy; and, self-care behaviors. Unlike 1month transitional care programs that focus on patients' post-acute care needs, the BREATHE program helps hospitalized COPD patients manage the post discharge period as well as prepare them for long term self-management of COPD. If proven effective, this program may offer a timely solution for hospitals in their attempts to reduce COPD rehospitalizations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Psychologists and the Transition From Pediatrics to Adult Health Care.

    PubMed

    Gray, Wendy N; Monaghan, Maureen C; Gilleland Marchak, Jordan; Driscoll, Kimberly A; Hilliard, Marisa E

    2015-11-01

    Guidelines for optimal transition call for multidisciplinary teams, including psychologists, to address youth and young adults' multifactorial needs. This study aimed to characterize psychologists' roles in and barriers to involvement in transition from pediatric to adult health care. Psychologists were invited via professional listservs to complete an online survey about practice settings, roles in transition programming, barriers to involvement, and funding sources. Participants also responded to open-ended questions about their experiences in transition programs. One hundred participants responded to the survey. Involvement in transition was reported at multiple levels from individual patient care to institutional transition programming, and 65% reported more than one level of involvement. Direct clinical care (88%), transition-related research (50%), and/or leadership (44%) involvement were reported, with 59% reporting more than one role. Respondents often described advocating for their involvement on transition teams. Various sources of funding were reported, yet, 23% reported no funding for their work. Barriers to work in transition were common and included health care systems issues such as poor coordination among providers or lack of a clear transition plan within the clinic/institution. Psychologists assume numerous roles in the transition of adolescents from pediatric to adult health care. With training in health care transition-related issues, psychologists are ideally positioned to partner with other health professionals to develop and implement transition programs in multidisciplinary settings, provided health care system barriers can be overcome. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. American Psychiatric Nurses Association-Transitions in Practice Certificate Program: Bridging the Knowledge Gap in Caring for Psychiatric Patients Within the General Nursing Workforce.

    PubMed

    Adams, Susie M; Black, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to publicize an important new Web-based educational program. Recognizing the growing gap in psychiatric-mental health knowledge and the need to better prepare new graduates and nurses transitioning from other service lines into psychiatric inpatient nursing settings, the American Psychiatric Nurses Association developed a 15-hour, modularized curriculum to provide foundational psychiatric-mental health knowledge. This modularized curriculum, called American Psychiatric Nurses Association Transitions in Practice (ATP) focuses on the knowledge and skills to insure the success of nurses new to psychiatric-mental health nursing settings and to improve the overall care for persons with mental health and substance use disorders. The ATP program is also proving to be useful content for nurses in emergency departments, hospitals, and other health settings to improve their care of patients with psychiatric and mental health needs. A summary of the program modules and a toolkit with suggested measures for nurses, patients, and agency outcomes is described. Feedback from participants completing the ATP program within the first 6 months is overwhelmingly positive and holds promise for widespread application across a variety of health care settings.

  3. Transit management certificate program.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-07-01

    TTI worked closely with the Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning Department : (LAUP) of Texas A&M University (TAMU) to develop a transit management certificate : focus for the current Graduate Certificate in Transportation Planning (CTP) housed ...

  4. Transition Room Program, 1967 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassner, Leonard E.

    The Transition Room Program of the Pittsburgh Schools was defined and evaluated by the staff, the administration, and a program evaluator from the Office of Research. The definition included general objectives, anticipated outcomes, student criteria and characteristics, staff qualifications and functions, media, student activities, and staff…

  5. Pharmacists’ Recommendations to Improve Care Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Katherine Taylor; Oberne, Alison; Cawthon, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasingly, hospitals are implementing multi-faceted programs to improve medication reconciliation and transitions of care, often involving pharmacists. Objective To help delineate the optimal role of pharmacists in this context, this qualitative study assessed pharmacists’ views on their roles in hospital-based medication reconciliation and discharge counseling. We also provide pharmacists’ recommendations for improving care transitions. Methods Eleven study pharmacists at two hospitals who participated in the Pharmacist Intervention for Low Literacy in Cardiovascular Disease (PILL-CVD) study completed semi-structured one-on-one interviews, which were coded systematically in NVivo. Pharmacists provided their perspectives on admission and discharge medication reconciliation, in-hospital patient counseling, provision of simple medication adherence aids (e.g., pill box, illustrated daily medication schedule), and telephone follow-up. Results Pharmacists considered medication reconciliation, though time-consuming, to be their most important role in improving care transitions, particularly through detection of errors in the admission medication history that required correction. They also identified patients with poor understanding of their medications, who required additional counseling. Providing adherence aids was felt to be highly valuable for patients with low health literacy, though less useful for patients with adequate health literacy. Pharmacists noted that having trained administrative staff conduct the initial post-discharge follow-up call to screen for issues and triage which patients needed pharmacist follow-up was helpful and an efficient use of resources. Pharmacists’ recommendations for improving care transitions included clear communication among team members, protected time for discharge counseling, patient and family engagement in discharge counseling, and provision of patient education materials. Conclusion Pharmacists are well

  6. Transitioning Former Military Medics to Civilian Health Care Jobs: A Novel Pilot Program to Integrate Medics Into Ambulatory Care Teams for High-Risk Patients.

    PubMed

    Watts, Brook; Lawrence, Renée H; Schaub, Kimberley; Lea, Erin; Hasenstaub, Mary; Slivka, Judy; Smith, Todd I; Kirsh, Susan

    2016-11-01

    Despite their medical training, record of military service, and the unmet needs within the health care sector, numerous challenges face veterans who seek to leverage their health care skills for employment after leaving the military. Creative solutions are necessary to successfully leverage these skills into jobs for returning medics that also meet the needs of health care systems. To achieve this goal, we created a novel ambulatory care health technician position on the basis of existing literature and modeled after a program which incorporates former military medics in emergency departments. Through a quality improvement approach, a position description, interview process, training program with clinical competencies, and team integration plan were developed and implemented. To date, two medics have been hired, successfully trained on relevant skill sets, and are currently caring for medical outpatients (under the supervision of licensed clinical personnel) as crucial interdisciplinary team members. Taken together, a multifaceted approach is required to effectively harness military medics' skills and experiences to meet identified health delivery needs. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. Harnessing Protocolized Adaptation in Dissemination: Successful Implementation and Sustainment of the Veterans Affairs Coordinated-Transitional Care Program in a Non-Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kind, Amy J H; Brenny-Fitzpatrick, Maria; Leahy-Gross, Kris; Mirr, Jacquelyn; Chapman, Elizabeth; Frey, Brooke; Houlahan, Beth

    2016-02-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Coordinated-Transitional Care (C-TraC) program is a low-cost transitional care program that uses hospital-based nurse case managers, inpatient team integration, and in-depth posthospital telephone contacts to support high-risk patients and their caregivers as they transition from hospital to community. The low-cost, primarily telephone-based C-TraC program reduced 30-day rehospitalizations by one-third, leading to significant cost savings at one VA hospital. Non-VA hospitals have expressed interest in launching C-TraC, but non-VA hospitals differ in important ways from VA hospitals, particularly in terms of context, culture, and resources. The objective of this project was to adapt C-TraC to the specific context of one non-VA setting using a modified Replicating Effective Programs (REP) implementation theory model and to test the feasibility of this protocolized implementation approach. The modified REP model uses a mentored phased-based implementation with intensive preimplementation activities and harnesses key local stakeholders to adapt processes and goals to local context. Using this protocolized implementation approach, an adapted C-TraC protocol was created and launched at the non-VA hospital in July 2013. In its first 16 months, C-TraC successfully enrolled 1,247 individuals with 3.2 full-time nurse case managers, achieving good fidelity for core protocol steps. C-TraC participants experienced a 30-day rehospitalization rate of 10.8%, compared with 16.6% for a contemporary comparison group of similar individuals for whom C-TraC was not available (n = 1,307) (P < .001). The new C-TraC program continues in operation. Use of a modified REP model to guide protocolized adaptation to local context resulted in a C-TraC program that was feasible and sustained in a real-world non-VA setting. A modified REP implementation framework may be an appropriate foundational step for other clinical programs seeking to harness

  8. Transit Reliability Information Program Participants Guidelines

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-03-01

    The document provides guidelines for participation in the Transit Reliability Information Program (TRIP). TRIP is a government-initiated program designed to assist the transit industry in satisfying its need for transit equipment reliability data. TR...

  9. Exposing Baccalaureate Nursing Students to Transitional Care.

    PubMed

    OʼConnor, Melissa; Arcamone, Angelina; Amorim, Frances; Hoban, Mary Beth; Boyd, Regina M; Fowler, Lauren; Marcelli, Theresa; Smith, Jacalyn; Nassar, Kathleen; Fitzpatrick, M Louise

    2016-10-01

    Management and facilitation of care transitions from hospital to alternative settings requires skill and attention to avoid adverse events. Several interprofessional organizations and nurse leaders have called for the expansion and redesign of undergraduate nursing curricula to include care transitions. Yet there is little evidence describing how undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students are educated on this critical topic or how successful they are in improving student knowledge about care transitions. To address this gap, an in-classroom and clinical experience was implemented to prepare students to manage and facilitate care transitions from the hospital to alternative settings-including the home. Perceptions of undergraduate nursing students and home healthcare nurse preceptors were assessed via an electronic survey that was emailed to participants. Forty-eight responses to the survey were received. Students agreed this experience contributed to their understanding of caring for adults and older adults who are experiencing a care transition and they had a good understanding of care transitions to apply to their future nursing courses. Home healthcare nurse preceptors agreed they were able to demonstrate transitional care and that students were engaged. Future work should include expanding transitional care immersion to other care settings as well as the inclusion of additional healthcare disciplines in care transition education.

  10. The transition to value-based care.

    PubMed

    Ray, Jordan C; Kusumoto, Fred

    2016-10-01

    Delivery of medical care is evolving rapidly worldwide. Over the past several years in the USA, there has been a rapid shift in reimbursement from a simple fee-for-service model to more complex models that attempt to link payment to quality and value. Change in any large system can be difficult, but with medicine, the transition to a value-based system has been particularly hard to implement because both quality and cost are difficult to quantify. Professional societies and other medical groups are developing different programs in an attempt to define high value care. However, applying a national standard of value for any treatment is challenging, since value varies from person to person, and the individual benefit must remain the central tenet for delivering best patient-centered medical care. Regardless of the specific operational features of the rapidly changing healthcare environment, physicians must first and foremost always remain patient advocates.

  11. Association of a Bundled Hospital-at-Home and 30-Day Postacute Transitional Care Program With Clinical Outcomes and Patient Experiences.

    PubMed

    Federman, Alex D; Soones, Tacara; DeCherrie, Linda V; Leff, Bruce; Siu, Albert L

    2018-06-25

    more likely to rate their hospital care highly (68.8% [119] vs 45.3% [67]; difference, 23.5%; 95% CI, 12.9% to 34.1%; weighted P < .001). There were no differences in referrals to certified home health agencies. HaH care bundled with a 30-day postacute transitional care episode was associated with better patient outcomes and ratings of care compared with inpatient hospitalization. This model warrants consideration for addition to Medicare's current portfolio of shared savings programs.

  12. Lessons Learned From Transitioning PEPFAR Track 1.0 Care and Treatment Programs: Case Studies in Financial Management Capacity Building in Zambia and Botswana.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Chuck; Tidwell, George; Vhugen, Jann; Sharma, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the United States government mandated transition of internationally managed HIV care and treatment programs to local country ownership. Three case studies illustrate the US Health Resources Services Administration's fiscal assessment and technical assistance (TA) processes to strengthen local organizations' capabilities to absorb and manage United States government funding. Review of initial, TA and follow-up reports reveal that the 1 Botswanan and 2 Zambian organizations closed 10 of 17 financial capacity gaps, with Health Resources Services Administration assisting on 2. Zambian organizations requested and absorbed targeted TA on the basis of the consultant's desk review, their finance staff revised fiscal policies and procedures, and accordingly trained other staff. In Botswana, delays in integrating recommendations necessitated on-site TA for knowledge building and role modeling. Organizational maturity may explain differences in responsiveness, ownership, and required TA approaches. Clarifying expectations of capacity building, funding agreement, and nonmonetary donor involvement can help new organizations determine and act on intervening actions.

  13. Implementation of Transition in Care and Relationship Based Care to Reduce Preventable Rehospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Burt, Susan; Berry, Donna; Quackenbush, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Home healthcare agencies are accountable for preventing rehospitalization, yet many struggle to make progress with this metric. The purpose of this article is to share how our organization turned to two frameworks, Transitions in Care and Relationship-Based Care, to prevent unnecessary rehospitalizations. Appreciative inquiry, motivational interviewing, and action plans are used by our Transitional Care Nurses to engage and motivate patients to manage chronic diseases and achieve desirable health outcomes. Implementation of a Transitional Care Program has led our organization to improve the health of our patients and to decrease rehospitalization rates.

  14. Compendium of Programs to Assist the Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    Program Description The Interagency Placement Assistance Program (IPAP) offices maintain computerized listings of data on employees faced with...possible reduction in force (RIF) separations. Program Objective To provide placement assistance to employees faced with possible RIF separations by making... employees . 23 2/93 TRANSITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Short Name of Program TAP Program Description Begun in 1991, TAP is a joint program of

  15. Transitional Child Care: State Experiences and Emerging Policies under the Family Support Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebb, Nancy; And Others

    This guide is designed to provide information about transitional child care (TCC) program policies and operations and to offer recommendations to policymakers and advocates. Transitional child care is a new federal child care program that every state must implement by April 1, 1990. Established by the Family Support Act (FSA) of 1988, TCC is…

  16. Planning and Decision Making for Care Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Silvia; Mak, Wingyun; Pinquart, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The need to plan for future health care and residential adjustments increases with age, growing frailty, and restrictions in coverage of long-term care and will continue to grow with population aging. Older adults’ lack of financial preparation for health care costs, insufficient knowledge about available options, and inadequate communication about care-related values has become an increasing public health challenge. This chapter describes a model of Preparation for Future Care (PFC), which encompasses different levels and domains of planning. Research about the extent to which planning is helpful in navigating care transitions is reviewed, and barriers and facilitators of planning including individual, familial, cultural, and national long-term care policy factors are discussed. Planning in the context of dementia and practical approaches that can be taken to enhance PFC is addressed, as well as recommendations for future research in the area of planning and decision making in the context of care transitions. PMID:26207079

  17. Pediatric Renal Transplantation: Focus on Current Transition Care and Proposal of the "RISE to Transition" Protocol.

    PubMed

    Raina, Rupesh; Wang, Joseph; Krishnappa, Vinod; Ferris, Maria

    2018-01-16

    The transition from pediatric to adult medical services is an important time in the life of an adolescent or young adult with a renal transplant. Failure of proper transition can lead to medical non-adherence and subsequent loss of graft and/or return to dialysis. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and survey to assess the challenges and existing practices in transition of renal transplant recipient children to adult services, and to develop a transition protocol. We conducted a literature review and performed a survey of pediatric nephrologists across the United States to examine the current state of transition care. A structured transition protocol was developed based on these results. Our literature review revealed that a transition program has a positive impact on decline in renal function and acute rejection episodes, and may improve long-term graft outcomes in pediatric kidney transplant patients. With a response rate of 40% (60/150) from nephrologists in 56% (49/87) of centers, our survey shows inconsistent use of validated tools despite their availability, inefficient communication between teams, and lack of use of dedicated clinics. To address these issues, we developed the "RISE to Transition" protocol, which relies on 4 competency areas: Recognition, Insight, Self-reliance, and Establishment of healthy habits. The transition program decreases acute graft rejection episodes, and the main challenges in transition care are the communication gap between health care providers and inconsistent use of transition tools. Our RISE to transition protocol incorporates transition tools, defines personnel, and aims to improve communication between teams.

  18. The Transition from Child Care to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde, Margaret

    Child care in New Zealand and Australia has become a crucial part of the child-rearing system, and most preschool children spend a prolonged period in at least one away-from-home environment for a substantial part of the day. Because so many preschool children are exposed to a child care environment before entering school, the transition from…

  19. Health care transition for youth living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Dowshen, Nadia; D'Angelo, Lawrence

    2011-10-01

    There are ~1 million people in the United States living with HIV/AIDS, and >50,000 new infections occur each year. With an estimated 13% of all new infections occurring among young people aged 13 to 24 years and an increasing number of perinatally infected youth surviving to adulthood, there is now an increasing need to transition both perinatally and behaviorally infected youth to the adult health care setting. Recently, pediatric providers and professional societies have prioritized the development of transition programs for adolescents with chronic disease to address the many challenges these youth face in the process. Although multiple position papers have called for continuous, coordinated, culturally appropriate, compassionate, family-centered transition programs for youth with special health care needs and have recognized the need for evidence-based models, few data exist on what strategies are most effective. To date, published data on health care transition for HIV-positive youth are limited and include only 2 studies, which considered behaviorally infected youth. In this state-of-the-art review, we discuss the unique transition challenges to consider for this population, including socioeconomic and health insurance status, the special role of the pediatric or adolescent provider as family, stigma and disclosure issues, cognitive development and mental health issues, medication adherence, and sexual, reproductive, and gender health concerns. Future research will need to include the experiences of transition in low-resource settings and examine clinical outcomes and factors that may predict success or failure of the transition process.

  20. Evaluating the Efficacy of a Pre-Kindergarten Program: Transitional Needs of Young Children between Systems of Care and Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lausch, John Michael

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a South Central Pennsylvania public school's pre-kindergarten program in preparing young children for the transition to kindergarten. Despite the growing interest in pre-kindergarten education, no researcher had yet seriously examined the efficacy of providing a minimal amount of…

  1. Fundamental Elements of Transition Program Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmelita, Courtney

    2017-01-01

    Adult learners require supports and services to help them successfully transition into taking on the demands and expectations of college students. Transition programs have grown in popularity as a means to aid adult learners as they transition to higher education. Unfortunately, previous research on adult learner participation in transition…

  2. Investigation of Health Care Components in Transition IEPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, Jeanne B.; Jaress, Jennifer; Lindsey, Jenna; Bae, Jungah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the inclusion of health care components in transition Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for students diagnosed with Other Health Impaired (OHI). In this study, we analyzed 50 IEPs of students with an OHI diagnosis to establish whether there are health-related components or other common health care…

  3. Transition Program for Equipment Manufacturers (TPEM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In order to provide flexibility for small equipment manufacturers that must comply with new regulations, EPA created the Transition Program for Equipment Manufacturers, better known as “TPEM” or “flexibility program.”

  4. Overview of Transition Programs: Policies and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    There is recent, widespread activity in Australian education and training sectors to improve the transition of young people from initial education to further education and training and employment. Many jurisdictions have conducted high-level reviews of the institutional arrangements underpinning the transition process. The focus has been mainly on…

  5. Transition to intensive care nursing: establishing a starting point.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Martin; Butcher, Rand; Conyers, Vicki; Kendrick, Tina; MacNamara, Mary; Lang, Susie

    2008-11-01

    There is a shortage of intensive care (IC) nurses. A supported transition to IC nursing has been identified as a key strategy for recruitment and retention. In 2004 a discussion document relating to transition of IC nurses was presented to the New South Wales (NSW) Chief Nursing Officer (CNO). A workshop was held with key stakeholders and a Steering Group was established to develop a state-wide transition to IC nursing program. To survey orientation programs and educational resources and develop definitions, goals, learning objectives and clinical competencies relating to transition to IC nursing practice. A questionnaire and a draft document of definitions, target group, goals, learning objectives and clinical competencies for IC transition was distributed to 43 NSW IC units (ICUs). An iterative process of anonymous feedback and modification was undertaken to establish agreement on content. Responses were received from 29 units (return rate of 67%). The survey of educational resources indicated ICUs had access to educational support and there was evidence of a lack of a common standard or definition for "orientation" or "transition". The definitions, target group, goals and competency statements from the draft document were accepted with minor editorial change. Seventeen learning objectives or psychomotor skills were modified and an additional 19 were added to the draft as a result of the process. This work has established valid definitions, goals, learning objectives and clinical competencies that describe transition to intensive care nursing.

  6. Adult Transition Program without Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberg, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Best practices in adult transition special education for moderate to severe students suggest student-centered planning that maximizes independence in adult life. Based on the above sources, school districts and governing boards would best serve moderate to severe transition special education students with increasing integration into the community…

  7. Illinois: Child Care Collaboration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Care Collaboration Program promotes collaboration between child care and other early care and education providers, including Early Head Start (EHS), by creating policies to ease blending of funds to extend the day or year of existing services. While no funding is provided through the initiative, participating programs may take…

  8. Organizing Safe Transitions from Intensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Häggström, Marie; Bäckström, Britt

    2014-01-01

    Background. Organizing and performing patient transfers in the continuum of care is part of the work of nurses and other staff of a multiprofessional healthcare team. An understanding of discharge practices is needed in order to ultimate patients' transfers from high technological intensive care units (ICU) to general wards. Aim. To describe, as experienced by intensive care and general ward staff, what strategies could be used when organizing patient's care before, during, and after transfer from intensive care. Method. Interviews of 15 participants were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The results showed that the categories secure, encourage, and collaborate are strategies used in the three phases of the ICU transitional care process. The main category; a safe, interactive rehabilitation process, illustrated how all strategies were characterized by an intention to create and maintain safety during the process. A three-way interaction was described: between staff and patient/families, between team members and involved units, and between patient/family and environment. Discussion/Conclusions. The findings highlight that ICU transitional care implies critical care rehabilitation. Discharge procedures need to be safe and structured and involve collaboration, encouraging support, optimal timing, early mobilization, and a multidiscipline approach. PMID:24782924

  9. Supporting Children's Transition to School Age Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2016-01-01

    While a great deal of research has focused on children's experiences as they start school, less attention has been directed to their experiences--and those of their families and educators--as they start school age care. This paper draws from a recent research project investigating practices that promote positive transitions to school and school…

  10. Older Persons’ Transitions in Care (OPTIC): a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in health status, triggered by events such as infections, falls, and geriatric syndromes, are common among nursing home (NH) residents and necessitate transitions between NHs and Emergency Departments (EDs). During transitions, residents frequently experience care that is delayed, unnecessary, not evidence-based, potentially unsafe, and fragmented. Furthermore, a high proportion of residents and their family caregivers report substantial unmet needs during transitions. This study is part of a program of research whose overall aim is to improve quality of care for frail older adults who reside in NHs. The purpose of this study is to identify successful transitions from multiple perspectives and to identify organizational and individual factors related to transition success, in order to inform improvements in care for frail elderly NH residents during transitions to and from acute care. Specific objectives are to: 1. define successful and unsuccessful elements of transitions from multiple perspectives; 2. develop and test a practical tool to assess transition success; 3. assess transition processes in a discrete set of transfers in two study sites over a one year period; 4. assess the influence of organizational factors in key practice locations, e.g., NHs, emergency medical services (EMS), and EDs, on transition success; and 5. identify opportunities for evidence-informed management and quality improvement decisions related to the management of NH – ED transitions. Methods/Design This is a mixed-methods observational study incorporating an integrated knowledge translation (IKT) approach. It uses data from multiple levels (facility, care unit, individual) and sources (healthcare providers, residents, health records, and administrative databases). Discussion Key to study success is operationalizing the IKT approach by using a partnership model in which the OPTIC governance structure provides for team decision-makers and researchers to participate

  11. Role transition in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Holt, Ian G S

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on research that explored how nurses who are engaged in advanced practice adapt and adjust to their roles in primary and community health settings. Successive government policy has highlighted how the changing roles of nurses, who are engaged in advanced practice, are crucial to delivering high-quality patient care. The paper offers a framework for role transition which is potentially generalisable to doctors, physiotherapists and other healthcare professionals. The aim of the study was to enable an understanding of role transition, from a study of nurses going through changes to their roles or moving to new roles. The intended purpose of the study was to explore what was going on within role transition, and considers by what process(es) role transition evolves or is experienced. Eleven nurses' actions, expectations, and experiences of role transition were explored, within three district nurse centres and two community NHS trusts. Data were collected from participant and non-participant observation, content analysis of job descriptions and from individual and group interviews, including semi-structured schedules and focus group techniques. Data were comparatively analysed to conceptualise and saturate core themes, which were discussed and developed with participants and healthcare managers. A theory of role transition is proposed through a model representing the 'who', 'what', 'where' and 'how' of role transition, through four concepts of centring identity(ies); focusing role(s); enacting role(s); and shaping role(s). Identity was regarded by the participants as being the role, the person, and as part of a group. Current and anticipated role foci directed enactment of role within given contexts and resources, while shaping of role involved a balance of role loss and role expansion. This article presents a theory of role transition for primary care professionals.

  12. Evaluation of the Transit Reliability Information Program

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-06-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the rail portion of the Transit Reliability Information Program (TRIP), which was designed to collect and analyze equipment reliability data on U.S. transit systems. This assessment was conducted at the end of it...

  13. Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Program Results

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-05-06

    The objective of this program, which is supported by the U.S. Department of : Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to : provide an unbiased and comprehensive comparison of transit buses operating on : alternative f...

  14. Survey for rural transit assistance program.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-02-01

    Currently, the California Association for Coordinated Transportation Inc. (CalACT) is under contract to the Department of Transportation, Division of Mass Transportation (DMT) to implement all aspects of Rural Transit Assistance Program. (RTAP). RTAP...

  15. Resident Dyads Providing Transition Care to Adolescents and Young Adults With Chronic Illnesses and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Chung, Richard J; Jasien, Joan; Maslow, Gary R

    2017-04-01

    Youth with special health care needs often experience difficulty transitioning from pediatric to adult care. These difficulties may derive in part from lack of physician training in transition care and the challenges health care providers experience establishing interdisciplinary partnerships to support these patients. This educational innovation sought to improve pediatrics and adult medicine residents' interdisciplinary communication and collaboration. Residents from pediatrics, medicine-pediatrics, and internal medicine training programs participated in a transitions clinic for patients with chronic health conditions aged 16 to 26 years. Residents attended 1 to 4 half-day clinic sessions during 1-month ambulatory rotations. Pediatrics/adult medicine resident dyads collaboratively performed psychosocial and medical transition consultations that addressed health care navigation, self-care, and education and vocation topics. Two to 3 attending physicians supervised each clinic session (4 hours) while concurrently seeing patients. Residents completed a preclinic survey about baseline attitudes and experiences, and a postclinic survey about their transitions clinic experiences, changes in attitudes, and transition care preparedness. A total of 46 residents (100% of those eligible) participated in the clinic and completed the preclinic survey, and 25 (54%) completed the postclinic survey. A majority of respondents to the postclinic survey reported positive experiences. Residents in both pediatrics and internal medicine programs reported improved preparedness for providing transition care to patients with chronic health conditions and communicating effectively with colleagues in other disciplines. A dyadic model of collaborative transition care training was positively received and yielded improvements in immediate self-assessed transition care preparedness.

  16. Transition of Care from Childhood to Adulthood: Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Anne

    2018-01-01

    Deficiency of the 21-hydroxylase enzyme is the most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), accounting for more than 95% of the cases. With the advent of newborn screening and hormone replacement therapy, most children with CAH survive into adulthood. Adolescents and adults with CAH experience a number of complications, including short stature, obesity, infertility, impaired bone mineral density, and reduced quality of life. Transition from pediatric to adult care and management of long-term complications are challenging for both patients and practitioners. In adulthood, the aims of the medical treatment are to substitute cortisol and, when necessary, aldosterone deficiency, to ensure normal fertility, and to avoid the long-term consequences of glucocorticoid use on bone, metabolism, and cardiovascular risk. Recent data suggest that poor health status is likely to begin in adolescence and persist into adulthood, highlighting the importance of this time period in a patient's endocrine care. During transition from pediatric to adult specific care, a shift in treatment goals is thus needed. Successful transition from pediatric to adult health care requires a regular follow-up of patients by a multidisciplinary team including pediatric endocrinologists, urologists, gynecologists, psychiatrists, and adult endocrinologists. All of this could be included in a specific therapeutic education program regarding transition and/or CAH. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Rapid transit system noise abatement program

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1972-01-01

    This program plan describes a broad program for the reduction of noise and vibration in rapid transit systems, which impacts the patrons and inhabitants of the nearby commuity. An UMTA/TSC survey has provided data on the most urgent needs and state-o...

  18. Current practice and views of neurologists on the transition from pediatric to adult care.

    PubMed

    Oskoui, Maryam; Wolfson, Christina

    2012-12-01

    To describe the current practice and views of neurologists on transitioning patients from pediatric to adult care, a cross-sectional study of all pediatric and adult neurologists in the province of Quebec, Canada, was conducted. The response rate was 73% for pediatric and 49% for adult neurologists. Most pediatric neurologists do not have a patient transition program or policy in place. Although a transfer summary is commonly provided, critical information is often lacking. Nearly half of neurologists believed that patients experience a gap in care during the transition process, and most agreed that the transition process is often poorly coordinated, highlighting patient, family, and health care factors. Current practice does not follow existing consensus statements for transition of care with respect to timing, communication, and preparation, and many pediatric neurologists experience difficulty in finding an appropriate adult health care provider for their patients. Neurologists reported many challenges in the current transition of care process.

  19. Pediatric Heart Transplantation: Transitioning to Adult Care (TRANSIT): Baseline Findings.

    PubMed

    Grady, Kathleen L; Hof, Kathleen Van't; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Shankel, Tamara; Chinnock, Richard; Miyamoto, Shelley; Ambardekar, Amrut V; Anderson, Allen; Addonizio, Linda; Latif, Farhana; Lefkowitz, Debra; Goldberg, Lee; Hollander, Seth A; Pham, Michael; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Cool, Nichole; Yancy, Clyde; Pahl, Elfriede

    2018-02-01

    Young adult solid organ transplant recipients who transfer from pediatric to adult care experience poor outcomes related to decreased adherence to the medical regimen. Our pilot trial for young adults who had heart transplant (HT) who transfer to adult care tests an intervention focused on increasing HT knowledge, self-management and self-advocacy skills, and enhancing support, as compared to usual care. We report baseline findings between groups regarding (1) patient-level outcomes and (2) components of the intervention. From 3/14 to 9/16, 88 subjects enrolled and randomized to intervention (n = 43) or usual care (n = 45) at six pediatric HT centers. Patient self-report questionnaires and medical records data were collected at baseline, and 3 and 6 months after transfer. For this report, baseline findings (at enrollment and prior to transfer to adult care) were analyzed using Chi-square and t-tests. Level of significance was p < 0.05. Baseline demographics were similar in the intervention and usual care arms: age 21.3 ± 3.2 vs 21.5 ± 3.3 years and female 44% vs 49%, respectively. At baseline, there were no differences between intervention and usual care for use of tacrolimus (70 vs 62%); tacrolimus level (mean ± SD = 6.5 ± 2.3 ng/ml vs 5.6 ± 2.3 ng/ml); average of the within patient standard deviation of the baseline mean tacrolimus levels (1.6 vs 1.3); and adherence to the medical regimen [3.6 ± 0.4 vs 3.5 ± 0.5 (1 = hardly ever to 4 = all of the time)], respectively. At baseline, both groups had a modest amount of HT knowledge, were learning self-management and self-advocacy, and perceived they were adequately supported. Baseline findings indicate that transitioning HT recipients lack essential knowledge about HT and have incomplete self-management and self-advocacy skills.

  20. Transit Reliability Information Program (TRIP) Phase I Report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-06-01

    The Transit Reliability Information Program (TRIP) is a government initiated program to assist the transit industry in satisfying its need for transit reliability information. TRIP provides this assistance through the operation of a national reliabil...

  1. Transit Reliability Information Program (TRIP) : Final Technical Report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1984-05-01

    The Transit Reliability Information Program (TRIP) is a government-initiated program to assist the transit industry in satisfying its need for rail transit car subsystem reliability information. TRIP provided this assistance through the operation of ...

  2. Transitions in Care for Infants with Trisomy 13 or 18.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jacquelyn; Taylor, Genevieve; Smith, Melissa; Dotters-Katz, Sarah; Davis, Arlene M; Price, Wayne

    2017-07-01

    Background and Objectives  The scope of interventions offered to infants with trisomy 13 (T13) or trisomy 18 (T18) is increasing. We describe the spectrum of care provided, highlighting transitions in care for individual patients. Patients and Methods  This is a single-center, retrospective cohort of infants with T13 or T18 born between 2004 and 2015. Initial care was classified as comfort care or intervention using prenatal counseling notes. Transitions in care were identified in the medical record. Results  In this study, 25 infants were divided into two groups based on their care: neonates who experienced no transition in care and neonates who experienced at least one transition. Eleven neonates experienced no transition in care with 10 receiving comfort care. Fourteen neonates experienced at least one transition: three transitioned from comfort care to intervention and 11 from intervention to comfort care. The three initially provided comfort care were discharged home with hospice and readmitted. Among the 11 cases who transitioned from intervention to comfort care, 9 transitioned during the birth hospitalization, 6 had no prenatal suspicion for T13 or T18, and 5 experienced elective withdrawal of intensive care. Conclusion  The spectrum of care for infants with T13 or T18 illustrates the need for individualized counseling that is on-going, goal directed, collaborative, and responsive. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Daily bowel care program

    MedlinePlus

    ... a brain or spinal cord injury. People with multiple sclerosis also have problems with their bowels. Those with ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 18. Read More Multiple sclerosis Recovering after stroke Patient Instructions Constipation - self-care ...

  4. Treatment issues for children with epilepsy transitioning to adult care.

    PubMed

    Nabbout, Rima; Camfield, Carol S; Andrade, Danielle M; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Chiron, Catherine; Cramer, Joyce A; French, Jacqueline A; Kossoff, Eric; Mula, Marco; Camfield, Peter R

    2017-04-01

    This is the third of three papers that summarize the second symposium on Transition in Epilepsies held in Paris in June 2016. This paper focuses on treatment issues that arise during the course of childhood epilepsy and make the process of transition to adult care more complicated. Some AEDs used during childhood, such as stiripentol, vigabatrin, and cannabidiol, are unfamiliar to adult epilepsy specialists. In addition, new drugs are being developed for treatment of specific childhood onset epilepsy syndromes and have no indication yet for adults. The ketogenic diet may be effective during childhood but is difficult to continue in adult care. Regional adult epilepsy diet clinics could be helpful. Polytherapy is common for patients transitioning to adult care. Although these complex AED regimes are difficult, they are often possible to simplify. AEDs used in childhood may need to be reconsidered in adulthood. Rescue medications to stop prolonged seizures and clusters of seizures are in wide home use in children and can be continued in adulthood. Adherence/compliance is notoriously difficult for adolescents, but there are simple clinical approaches that should be helpful. Mental health issues including depression and anxiety are not always diagnosed and treated in children and young adults even though effective treatments are available. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and aggressive behavior disorders may interfere with transition and successful adulthood but these can be treated. For the majority, the adult social outcome of children with epilepsy is unsatisfactory with few proven interventions. The interface between pediatric and adult care for children with epilepsy is becoming increasingly complicated with a need for more comprehensive transition programs and adult epileptologists who are knowledgeable about special treatments that benefit this group of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Child Care Program Office

    Science.gov Websites

    Behavioral Health Office of Children's Services Office of the Commissioner Office of Substance Misuse and Addiction Prevention Finance & Management Services Health Care Services Juvenile Justice Public Assistance Public Health Seniors & Disabilities Services Boards, Councils & Commissions Services

  6. A Program Evaluation Tool for Dual Enrollment Transition Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigal, Meg; Dwyre, Amy; Emmett, Joyce; Emmett, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and use of a program evaluation tool designed to support self-assessment of college-based dual enrollment transition programs serving students with intellectual disabilities between the ages of 18-21 in college settings. The authors describe the need for such an evaluation tool, outline the areas addressed by…

  7. Initial Efficacy of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Transition Program: Cardiac TRUST

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Melissa; Boxer, Rebecca; Moore, Shirley M.

    2012-01-01

    Patients recovering from cardiac events are increasingly using postacute care, such as home health care and skilled nursing facility services. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the initial efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a specially designed postacute care transitional rehabilitation intervention for cardiac patients. Cardiac Transitional Rehabilitation Using Self- Management Techniques (Cardiac TRUST) is a family-focused intervention that includes progressive low-intensity walking and education in self-management skills to facilitate recovery following a cardiac event. Using a randomized two-group design, exercise self-efficacy, steps walked, and participation in an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program were compared in a sample of 38 older adults; 17 who received the Cardiac TRUST program and 21 who received usual care only. At discharge from postacute care, the intervention group had a trend for higher levels of self-efficacy for exercise outcomes (X=39.1, SD=7.4) than the usual care group (X=34.5; SD=7.0) (t-test 1.9, p=.06). During the 6 weeks following discharge, compared with the usual care group, the intervention group had more attendance in out-patient cardiac rehabilitation (33% compared to 11.8%, F=7.1, p=.03) and a trend toward more steps walked during the first week (X=1,307, SD=652 compared to X=782, SD=544, t-test 1.8, p=.07). The feasibility of the intervention was better for the home health participants than for those in the skilled nursing facility and there were no safety concerns. The provision of cardiac-focused rehabilitation during postacute care has the potential to bridge the gap in transitional services from hospitalization to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation for these patients at high risk for future cardiac events. Further evidence of the efficacy of Cardiac TRUST is warranted. PMID:22084960

  8. Health Care Transition Planning among Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Casey; Jones, Barbara; Schonwald, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Improving the health care transition process for youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is critically important. This study was designed to examine the overall national transition core outcome among youth with ASD and each of the component measures of health care transition planning. Fewer than 10% of youth with ASD meet the national transition…

  9. 77 FR 14465 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian... in funding provided by the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program (Tribal Transit... establishing the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program (Tribal Transit Program or TTP). This...

  10. Evaluation of a community transition to professional practice program for graduate registered nurses in Australia.

    PubMed

    Aggar, Christina; Gordon, Christopher J; Thomas, Tamsin H T; Wadsworth, Linda; Bloomfield, Jacqueline

    2018-03-26

    Australia has an increasing demand for a sustainable primary health care registered nursing workforce. Targeting graduate registered nurses who typically begin their nursing career in acute-care hospital settings is a potential workforce development strategy. We evaluated a graduate registered nurse Community Transition to Professional Practice Program which was designed specifically to develop and foster skills required for primary health care. The aims of this study were to evaluate graduates' intention to remain in the primary health care nursing workforce, and graduate competency, confidence and experiences of program support; these were compared with graduates undertaking the conventional acute-care transition program. Preceptor ratings of graduate competence were also measured. All of the 25 graduates (n = 12 community, n = 13 acute-care) who completed the questionnaire at 6 and 12 months intended to remain in nursing, and 55% (n = 6) of graduates in the Community Transition Program intended to remain in the primary health care nursing workforce. There were no differences in graduate experiences, including level of competence, or preceptors' perceptions of graduate competence, between acute-care and Community Transition Programs. The Community Transition to Professional Practice program represents a substantial step towards developing the primary health care health workforce by facilitating graduate nurse employment in this area. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transition to adult care in pediatric solid-organ transplant: development of a practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Gold, Anna; Martin, Kathy; Breckbill, Katie; Avitzur, Yaron; Kaufman, Miriam

    2015-06-01

    Transition to adult-centered care is becoming an increasingly important area of practice in pediatric organ transplant. Standardized, best-practice guidelines are needed to assist transplant practitioners in providing optimal transitional care for this population of patients. To describe the development and implementation of a practice guideline for the transitional care of pediatric transplant recipients. A quality improvement project was undertaken in a pediatric multiorgan transplant program setting. Strategies employed included (1) creation of an interdisciplinary working group, (2) survey of transition-related practices and learning needs of transplant practitioners, (3) review of the literature and existing transition-related materials, and (4) creation of transition guidelines. An interdisciplinary survey of transplant practitioners at our institution identified practice strengths related to transitional care and learning needs. Review of relevant literature and other materials revealed limited but emerging research related to the transition of pediatric transplant recipients from pediatric to adult care. Existing transition tools were examined and applicable items identified. A practice guideline for use with pediatric transplant recipients transitioning to adult care was developed. Strategies to educate staff about the guideline and promote ongoing guideline use were implemented. Preparing pediatric transplant recipients and their families for transition to adult-centered care is an emerging challenge for transplant teams. These guidelines provide practitioners with a developmentally sensitive overview of important transition-related domains and strategies directed toward patients and their caregivers, who may experience the process of transition differently. Dissemination of the pediatric transplant transition guideline will make transition information more widely available to transplant practitioners.

  12. From homeless to housed: caring for people in transition.

    PubMed

    Drury, Lin J

    2008-01-01

    This ethnographic study was conducted to determine what homeless people experience during the transition from street life into community housing. Data were gathered through participant observation at a program designed to secure housing and support services for homeless people upon discharge from a psychiatric hospital. Sixty homeless, mentally ill adults were followed from hospital discharge through their first 2 years in community housing. Homeless people interact with health care providers across a cultural divide produced by vast differences in their lived experiences. This cultural distance limits access to the services that these individuals require to achieve residential stability.

  13. Evolutionary transitions in parental care and live bearing in vertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John D; Goodwin, Nicholas B; Freckleton, Robert P

    2002-01-01

    We provide the first review of phylogenetic transitions in parental care and live bearing for a wide variety of vertebrates. This includes new analyses of both numbers of transitions and transition probabilities. These reveal numerous transitions by shorebirds and anurans toward uniparental care by either sex. Whereas most or all of the shorebird transitions were from biparental care, nearly all of the anuran transitions have been from no care, reflecting the prevalence of each form of care in basal lineages in each group. Teleost (bony) fishes are similar to anurans in displaying numerous transitions toward uniparental contributions by each sex. Whereas cichlid fishes have often evolved from biparental care to female care, other teleosts have usually switched from no care to male care. Taxa that have evolved exclusive male care without courtship-role reversal are characterized by male territoriality and low costs of care per brood. Males may therefore benefit from care through female preference of parental ability in these species. Primates show a high frequency of transitions from female care to biparental care, reflecting the prevalence of female care in basal lineages. In the numerous taxa that display live bearing by females, including teleosts, elasmobranchs, squamate reptiles and invertebrates, we find that live bearing has always evolved from a lack of care. Although the transition counts and probabilities will undoubtedly be refined as phylogenetic information and methodologies improve, the overall biases in these taxa should help to place adaptive hypotheses for the evolution of care into a stronger setting for understanding directions of change. PMID:11958696

  14. Rethinking Healthcare Transitions and Policies: Changing and Expanding Roles in Transitional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreño, Patricienn K.

    2014-01-01

    The breakdown of care transitions between various healthcare facilities, providers, and services is a major issue in healthcare, and accounts for over US$15 billion in healthcare expenditures annually. The transition between inpatient care and home care is a very delicate period where, too often, chronically ill patients get worse and wind up back…

  15. Venus transit 2004: An international education program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, L.; Odenwald, S.

    2003-04-01

    December 6th, 1882 was the last transit of the planet Venus across the disk of the sun. It was heralded as an event of immense interest and importance to the astronomical community as well as the public at large. There have been only six such occurrences since Galileo first trained his telescope on the heavens in 1609 and on Venus in 1610 where he concluded that Venus had phases like the moon and appeared to get larger and smaller over time. Many historians consider this the final nail in the coffin of the Ptolemaic, Earth centered solar system. In addition, each transit has provided unique opportunities for discovery such as measurement and refinement of the detection of Venus' atmosphere, calculation of longitudes, and calculation of the astronomical unit (and therefore the scale of the solar system). The NASA Sun Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) in partnership with the Solar System Exploration (SSE) and Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEU) Forums, AAS Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS), and a number of NASA space missions and science centers are developing plans for an international education program centered around the June 8, 2004 Venus transit. The transit will be visible in its entirety from Europe and partially from the East Coast of the United States. We will use a series of robotic observatories including the Telescopes In Education (TIE) network distributed in latitude to provide observations of the transit that will allow middle and high school students to calculate the A.U. through application of parallax. We will compare the terrestrial planets in terms of the evolutionary processes that define their magnetic fields, their widely differing interactions with the solar wind, and the implications this has for life on Earth and elsewhere in the universe. We will also use Venus transit as a probe of episodes in American history (e.g. 1769: revolutionary era, 1882: post civil war era, and 2004: modern era). Museums and planetariums in

  16. Multicentre randomized controlled trial of structured transition on diabetes care management compared to standard diabetes care in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes (Transition Trial).

    PubMed

    Spaic, Tamara; Mahon, Jeff L; Hramiak, Irene; Byers, Nicole; Evans, Keira; Robinson, Tracy; Lawson, Margaret L; Malcolm, Janine; Goldbloom, Ellen B; Clarson, Cheril L

    2013-10-09

    Transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care is a high risk period during which there is an increased rate of disengagement from care. Suboptimal transition has been associated with higher risks for acute and chronic diabetes-related complications. The period of emerging adulthood challenges current systems of healthcare delivery as many young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) default from diabetes care and are at risk for diabetes complications which are undetected and therefore untreated. Despite the importance of minimizing loss to follow-up there are no randomized control trials evaluating models of transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care. This is a multicentre randomized controlled trial. A minimum of 188 subjects with T1D aged between 17 and 20 years will be evaluated. Eligible subjects will be recruited from three pediatric care centres and randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to a structured transition program that will span 18 months or to receive standard diabetes care. The structured transition program is a multidisciplinary, complex intervention aiming to provide additional support in the transition period. A Transition Coordinator will provide transition support and will provide the link between pediatric and adult diabetes care. The Transition Coordinator is central to the intervention to facilitate ongoing contact with the medical system as well as education and clinical support where appropriate. Subjects will be seen in the pediatric care setting for 6 months and will then be transferred to the adult care setting where they will be seen for one year. There will then be a one-year follow-up period for outcome assessment. The primary outcome is the proportion of subjects who fail to attend at least one outpatient adult diabetes specialist visit during the second year after transition to adult diabetes care. Secondary outcome measures include A1C frequency measurement and levels, diabetes related emergency room visits and hospital

  17. Resident Dyads Providing Transition Care to Adolescents and Young Adults With Chronic Illnesses and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Jasien, Joan; Maslow, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Youth with special health care needs often experience difficulty transitioning from pediatric to adult care. These difficulties may derive in part from lack of physician training in transition care and the challenges health care providers experience establishing interdisciplinary partnerships to support these patients. Objective This educational innovation sought to improve pediatrics and adult medicine residents' interdisciplinary communication and collaboration. Methods Residents from pediatrics, medicine-pediatrics, and internal medicine training programs participated in a transitions clinic for patients with chronic health conditions aged 16 to 26 years. Residents attended 1 to 4 half-day clinic sessions during 1-month ambulatory rotations. Pediatrics/adult medicine resident dyads collaboratively performed psychosocial and medical transition consultations that addressed health care navigation, self-care, and education and vocation topics. Two to 3 attending physicians supervised each clinic session (4 hours) while concurrently seeing patients. Residents completed a preclinic survey about baseline attitudes and experiences, and a postclinic survey about their transitions clinic experiences, changes in attitudes, and transition care preparedness. Results A total of 46 residents (100% of those eligible) participated in the clinic and completed the preclinic survey, and 25 (54%) completed the postclinic survey. A majority of respondents to the postclinic survey reported positive experiences. Residents in both pediatrics and internal medicine programs reported improved preparedness for providing transition care to patients with chronic health conditions and communicating effectively with colleagues in other disciplines. Conclusions A dyadic model of collaborative transition care training was positively received and yielded improvements in immediate self-assessed transition care preparedness. PMID:28439357

  18. Licensed Vocational Nurse Residency Program in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Dannemeyer, Deborah; Jalandoni, Cecile; Vonderheide, Dawn

    This article will explain one organization's experience in developing a licensed vocational nurse residency program in an ambulatory setting, the barriers and challenges, and program outcomes. It outlines results of the program in building competence and confidence for vocational nurses to perform as effective team members in the primary care office setting. Learnings from this experience may be applied to enhance new and transitioning employee orientation and education programs in ambulatory and inpatient settings.

  19. Gender and Transition From Pediatric to Adult Health Care Among Youth With Acquired Brain Injury: Experiences in a Transition Model.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Sally; Proulx, Meghann; Maxwell, Joanne; Hamdani, Yani; Bayley, Mark; Macarthur, Colin; Colantonio, Angela

    2016-02-01

    To explore gender and sex differences in experiences of transitioning to adult health care among young adults with acquired brain injury (ABI) who take part in a coordinated model of transitional care. Descriptive design using in-depth semistructured qualitative interviews. Interviews over the phone and in person. Participants (N=18) included 10 young adults with a diagnosis of ABI (4 women, 6 men; age range, 19-21y) and 9 parents (8 women, 1 man) from the Greater Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada. Not applicable. Semistructured interviews with participants. Our findings highlight several commonalities and differences relative to sex and gender among young adults with ABI who are transitioning from pediatric to adult care. Both young adult men and women experienced a similar transition process and similar organization, continuity, and availability of care. Sex differences were found in relational factors (eg, communication, family involvement, social support). Young adult men, and parents of the men, differed in their transition regarding relational factors (eg, communication, family involvement). Our findings show that young adult men and women with ABI who have taken part in a transition preparation program experience similarities in organization, continuity, and availability of care, but they experience differences in relational factors (eg, communication, family involvement). Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Emancipated Foster Youth's Transition from Care to Virginia Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Shylan E.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was the experience of students who had successfully achieved the transition from foster care to enrollment in Virginia Community Colleges. The following questions guided the inquiry: How do students who are emancipating from foster care describe their transition to enrollment at one of the Virginia Community Colleges? What…

  1. Health care providers' attitudes towards transfer and transition in young persons with long term illness- a web-based survey.

    PubMed

    Sparud-Lundin, Carina; Berghammer, Malin; Moons, Philip; Bratt, Ewa-Lena

    2017-04-11

    Transition programs in health care for young persons with special health care needs aim to maximize lifelong functioning. Exploring health care professionals' perspective may increase the possibility of successful implementation of transition programs. The aim was to survey health care professionals' attitudes towards components and barriers on transition and transfer in young people with long-term medical conditions with special health care needs. A cross-sectional web-based survey was sent by e-mail to 529 physicians and nurses in Swedish pediatric and adult outpatient clinics. Response rate was 38% (n = 201). The survey consisted of 59 questions regarding different aspects of components and barriers on transition and transfer. Descriptive statistics were computed to summarize demographic data and categorized responses. The Chi square test was used for comparison between proportions of categories. Most respondents agreed on the destinations of care for adolescents within their specialty. Age and psychosocial aspects such as maturity and family situations were considered the most important initiators for transfer. Joint meeting with the patient (82%); presence of a transition coordinator (76%) and a written individualized transfer plan (55%) were reported as important transition components. Pediatric care professionals found the absence of a transition coordinator to be more of a transition barrier than adult care professionals (p = 0.018) and also a more important transfer component (p = 0.017). Other barriers were lack of funding (45%) and limited clinical space (19%). Transition programs were more common in university hospitals than in regional hospitals (12% vs 2%, p = <0.001) as well as having a transition coordinator (12% vs 3%, p = 0.004). The findings highlight a willingness to work on new transition strategies and provide direction for improvement, taking local transition components as well as potential barriers into consideration when

  2. The Prenatal Care at School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Carol H.; Nasso, Jacqueline T.; Swider, Susan; Ellison, Brenda R.; Griswold, Daniel L.; Brooks, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    School absenteeism and poor compliance with prenatal appointments are concerns for pregnant teens. The Prenatal Care at School (PAS) program is a new model of prenatal care involving local health care providers and school personnel to reduce the need for students to leave school for prenatal care. The program combines prenatal care and education…

  3. Transitions of care and rehabilitation after fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Michelle; Tran, Hong-Phuc

    2014-05-01

    Transitions in care are a vulnerable time period for patients during which unintended errors may occur. This article discusses potential risks that could occur during care transitions, suggested improvements, and the transition from hospital to skilled nursing facilities for patients needing rehabilitation after their discharge from the hospital. Different rehabilitation settings and their reimbursement are reviewed. Common potential medical conditions arising in patients undergoing rehabilitation, rehabilitation goals, and secondary prevention also are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrated Transitions of Care for Patients With Rare Pulmonary Diseases.

    PubMed

    Moreo, Kathleen; Lattimer, Cheri; Lett, James E; Heggen-Peay, Cherilyn L; Simone, Laura

    Many continuing education (CE) resources are available to support case management professionals in developing competencies in transitions of care (TOC) that apply generally across disease areas. However, CE programs and tools are lacking for advanced TOC competencies in specific disease areas. This article describes 2 projects in which leading TOC, case management, and CE organizations collaborated to develop CE-accredited interdisciplinary pathways for promoting safe and effective TOC for patients with rare pulmonary diseases, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The interdisciplinary pathways apply to PAH and IPF case management practice and TOC across settings that include community-based primary care and specialty care, PAH or IPF centers of expertise, acute care and post-acute settings, long-term care, rehabilitation and skilled nursing facilities, and patients' homes. Both PAH and IPF are chronic, progressive respiratory diseases that are associated with severe morbidity and mortality, along with high health care costs. Because they are relatively rare diseases with nonspecific symptoms and many comorbidities, PAH and IPF are difficult to diagnose. Early diagnosis, referral to centers of expertise, and aggressive treatment initiation are essential for slowing disease progression and maintaining quality of life and function. Both the rarity and complexity of PAH and IPF pose unique challenges to ensuring effective and safe TOC. Expert consensus and evidence-based approaches to meeting these challenges, and thereby improving PAH and IPF patient outcomes, are presented in the 2 interdisciplinary TOC pathways that are described in this article. In coordinating care for patients with complex pulmonary diseases such as PAH and IPF, case managers across practice settings can play key roles in improving workflow processes and communication, transition planning, coordinating TOC with centers of expertise

  5. Transition from Pediatric to Adult OI Care

    MedlinePlus

    Moving from Pediatric to Adult Care Introduction Teen and young adult years are a critical time for major life changes. An ... for youth who have OI is moving from pediatric care into the adult care system. Children’s hospitals ...

  6. Establishing a School-Based Mentoring Program for Youth Who Are Transitioning from a Secure Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Katherine S.; Houchins, David E.; Nomvete, Patsy Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Youth with disabilities face many obstacles when transitioning from a juvenile detention facility back to school. A school-based mentoring program provides formerly incarcerated youth with support and encouragement from a caring, responsible adult. Youth with positive role models such as a mentor are more likely to successfully transition back to…

  7. Youth in Transition: A Description of Selected Transition Programs Serving Adolescents with Emotional Disabilities. Youth in Transition Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modrcin, Matthew J.; And Others

    This monograph addresses the transition needs of adolescents with serious emotional disabilities, describing programs in various settings and states. An introductory chapter discusses the concept of transition and outlines service components. Findings from a national survey of 53 transition programs are then presented. Findings indicated that 60%…

  8. Lithuanian health care in transitional state: ethical problems.

    PubMed

    Jakusovaite, Irayda; Darulis, Zilvinas; Zekas, Romualdas

    2005-11-09

    Throughout the economic and political reforms in post-communist countries, significant changes have also occurred in public morality. One of the tasks of the Lithuanian health policy is to create mechanisms for strengthening the significance of ethical considerations in the decision-making processes concerning health care of individuals and groups of individuals, as well as considering the positions of physicians and the health care system itself in a general way. Thus, health care ethics could be analyzed at two levels: the micro level (the ethics of doctor-patient relationships) and the macro level (the ethics of health policy-making, which can be realized by applying the principles of equal access, reasonable quality, affordable care and shared responsibilities). To date, the first level remains dominant, but the need arises for our attention to refocus now from the micro level to the patterns of managing and delivering care, managing the health care resources, and conducting business practices. In attempting to increase the efficiency of health services in Lithuania, a common strategy has been in place for the last fifteen years. Decentralization and privatization have been implemented as part of its policy to achieve greater efficiency. Although decentralization in theory is supposed to improve efficiency, in practice the reform of decentralization has still to be completely implemented in Lithuania. Debates on health policy in Lithuania also include the issue of private versus public health care. Although the approach of private health care is changing in a positive way, it is obvious that reduced access to health services is the most vulnerable aspect. In the Lithuanian Health Program adopted in July 1998, the target of equity was stressed, stating that by 2010, differences in health and health care between various socio-economic groups should be reduced by 25%. The restructuring of health care system in Lithuania should be based on a balance between

  9. Lithuanian health care in transitional state: ethical problems

    PubMed Central

    Jakušovaitė, Irayda; Darulis, Žilvinas; Žekas, Romualdas

    2005-01-01

    Background Throughout the economic and political reforms in post-communist countries, significant changes have also occurred in public morality. One of the tasks of the Lithuanian health policy is to create mechanisms for strengthening the significance of ethical considerations in the decision-making processes concerning health care of individuals and groups of individuals, as well as considering the positions of physicians and the health care system itself in a general way. Thus, health care ethics could be analyzed at two levels: the micro level (the ethics of doctor-patient relationships) and the macro level (the ethics of health policy-making, which can be realized by applying the principles of equal access, reasonable quality, affordable care and shared responsibilities). To date, the first level remains dominant, but the need arises for our attention to refocus now from the micro level to the patterns of managing and delivering care, managing the health care resources, and conducting business practices. Discussion In attempting to increase the efficiency of health services in Lithuania, a common strategy has been in place for the last fifteen years. Decentralization and privatization have been implemented as part of its policy to achieve greater efficiency. Although decentralization in theory is supposed to improve efficiency, in practice the reform of decentralization has still to be completely implemented in Lithuania. Debates on health policy in Lithuania also include the issue of private versus public health care. Although the approach of private health care is changing in a positive way, it is obvious that reduced access to health services is the most vulnerable aspect. In the Lithuanian Health Program adopted in July 1998, the target of equity was stressed, stating that by 2010, differences in health and health care between various socio-economic groups should be reduced by 25%. Summary The restructuring of health care system in Lithuania should be

  10. Adapting The Joint Commission's Seven Foundations of Safe and Effective Transitions of Care to Home

    PubMed Central

    Labson, Margherita C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe The Joint Commission's 7 foundations of safe and effective transitions of care to home: (a) leadership support; (b) multidisciplinary collaboration; (c) early identification of patients/clients at risk; (d) transitional planning; (e) medication management; (f) patient and family action/engagement; and (g) transfer of information. These foundations were identified by The Joint Commission after a review of published research; focus groups with healthcare professionals involved in transitions of care; and visits to diverse healthcare organizations. The author, who is the executive director of The Joint Commission's Home Care Accreditation Program, illustrates how healthcare organizations are adapting the 7 foundations of safe and effective transitions of care to home. PMID:25742092

  11. Clinicians’ views on improving inter-organizational care transitions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with complex health conditions frequently require care from multiple providers and are particularly vulnerable to poorly executed transitions from one healthcare setting to another. Poorly executed care transitions can result in negative patient outcomes (e.g. medication errors, delays in treatment) and increased healthcare spending due to re-hospitalization or emergency room visits by patients. Little is known about care transitions from acute care to complex continuing care and rehabilitation settings. Thus, a qualitative study was undertaken to explore clinicians’ perceptions of strategies aimed at improving patient care transitions from acute care hospitals to complex continuing care and rehabilitation healthcare organizations. Methods A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted with clinicians employed at two selected healthcare facilities: an acute care hospital and a complex continuing care/rehabilitation organization, respectively. Analysis of the transcripts involved the creation of a coding schema using the content analyses outlined by Ryan and Bernard. In total, 31 interviews were conducted with clinicians at the participating study sites. Results Three themes emerged from the data to delineate what study participants described as strategies to ensure quality inter-organizational transitions of patients transferred from acute care to the complex continuing care and rehabilitation hospital. These themes are: 1) communicating more effectively; 2) being vigilant around the patients’ readiness for transfer and care needs; and 3) documenting more accurately and completely in the patient transfer record. Conclusion Our study provides insights from the perspectives of multiple clinicians that have important implications for health care leaders and clinicians in their efforts to enhance inter-organizational care transitions. Of particular importance is the need to have a collective and collaborative approach amongst

  12. Transition of care for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus from pediatric to adult health care systems

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Bethany; Kamboj, Manmohan K.

    2017-01-01

    Planning for the transition from pediatric to adult healthcare is broadly understood to be beneficial to the quality of care of patients with chronic illness. Due to the level of self-care that is necessary in the maintenance of most chronic diseases, it is important that pediatric settings can offer support during a time when adolescents are beginning to take more responsibility in all areas of their lives. Lack of supportive resources for adolescents with chronic conditions often results in both decreased access to care and impaired health and function likely leading to increased medical costs later. Additionally, fundamental differences in health care delivery exist between pediatric and adult care settings. There is limited empiric data and information on best practices in transition care. In this article we address the importance of bridging pediatric and adult care settings and highlight the challenges and successes of the implementation of the young adult transition clinic program for patients with type 1 diabetes at our facility. We provide recommendations for further research and program implementation with the transition population. PMID:29184818

  13. Anesthesia Care Transitions and Risk of Postoperative Complications.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Joseph A; Bohman, J Kyle; Kor, Daryl J; Subramanian, Arun; Bittner, Edward A; Narr, Bradly J; Cima, Robert R; Montori, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    A patient undergoing surgery may receive anesthesia care from several anesthesia providers. The safety of anesthesia care transitions has not been evaluated. Using unconditional and conditional multivariable logistic regression models, we tested whether the number of attending anesthesiologists involved in an operation was associated with postoperative complications. In a cohort of patients undergoing elective colorectal surgical in an academic tertiary care center with a stable anesthesia care team model participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, using unconditional and conditional multivariable logistic regression models, we tested adjusted associations between numbers of attending anesthesiologists and occurrence of death or a major complication (acute renal failure, bleeding that required a transfusion of 4 units or more of red blood cells within 72 hours after surgery, cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation, coma of 24 hours or longer, myocardial infarction, unplanned intubation, ventilator use for 48 hours or more, pneumonia, stroke, wound disruption, deep or organ-space surgical-site infection, superficial surgical-site infection, sepsis, septic shock, systemic inflammatory response syndrome). We identified 927 patients who underwent elective colectomy of comparable surgical intensity. In all, 71 (7.7%) patients had major nonfatal complications or death. One anesthesiologist provided care for 530 (57%) patients, 2 anesthesiologists for 287 (31%), and 3 or more for 110 (12%). The number of attending anesthesiologists was associated with increased odds of postoperative complication (unadjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-1.96, P = 0.0013; adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.09-1.91, P = 0.0106). In sensitivity analyses, occurrence of a complication was significantly associated with the number of in-room providers, defined as anesthesia residents and nurse anesthetists

  14. Medical care transition planning and dental care use for youth with special health care needs during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood: a preliminary explanatory model

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypotheses that youth with special health care needs (YSHCN) with a medical care transition plan are more likely to use dental care during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood and that different factors are associated with dental utilization for YSHCN with and YSHCN without functional limitations. Methods National Survey of CSHCN (2001) and Survey of Adult Transition and Health (2007) data were analyzed (N=1,746). The main predictor variable was having a medical care transition plan, defined as having discussed with a doctor how health care needs might change with age and having developed a transition plan. The outcome variable was dental care use in 2001 (adolescence) and 2007 (young adulthood). Multiple variable Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to estimate covariate-adjusted relative risks (RR). Results About 63% of YSHCN had a medical care transition plan and 73.5% utilized dental care. YSHCN with a medical care transition plan had a 9% greater relative risk (RR) of utilizing dental care than YSHCN without a medical care transition plan (RR:1.09; 95% CI:1.03–1.16). In the models stratified by functional limitation status, having a medical care transition plan was significantly associated with dental care use, but only for YSHCN without functional limitations (RR:1.11; 95% CI:1.04–1.18). Conclusions Having a medical care transition plan is significantly associated with dental care use, but only for YSHCN with no functional limitation. Dental care should be an integral part of the comprehensive health care transition planning process for all YSHCN. PMID:23812799

  15. Improving Sickle Cell Transitions of Care Through Health Information Technology.

    PubMed

    Frost, Jennifer R; Cherry, Rebecca K; Oyeku, Suzette O; Faro, Elissa Z; Crosby, Lori E; Britto, Maria; Tuchman, Lisa K; Horn, Ivor B; Homer, Charles J; Jain, Anjali

    2016-07-01

    Transitions between inpatient and outpatient care and pediatric to adult care are associated with increased mortality for sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. As accurate and timely sharing of health information is essential during transitions, a health information technology (HIT)-enabled tool holds promise to improve care transitions. From 2012 through 2014, the team conducted and analyzed data from an environmental scan, key informant interviews, and focus groups to inform the development of an HIT-enabled tool for SCD patients' use during care transitions. The scan included searches of peer-reviewed and gray literature to understand SCD patient needs, transition concerns, and best practices in mobile health applications, and searches of websites and online stores to identify existing transition tools and their features. Eleven focus groups consisted of four groups of SCD patients of varying ages (≥9 years); three groups of parents/caregivers of SCD patients; three groups of providers; and one with IT developers. In focus groups, patients and caregivers reported that the transition from home to the emergency department (ED) was the most challenging; the ED was also where transitions from pediatric to adult care usually occurred. Patients felt they were not taken seriously by unfamiliar ED providers, and their inability to convey their diagnosis, pain regimen, and detailed medical history while in significant pain hindered care. The environmental scan did not reveal an existing suitable transition tool, but patients, parents, providers, and IT experts saw the potential and appeal of creating a tool to meet ED health information needs to improve care transitions. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  16. Medicaid program; modification of the Medicaid upper payment limit transition period for inpatient hospital services, outpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, intermediate care facility services for the mentally retarded, and clinic services. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2001-09-05

    This final rule modifies the Medicaid upper payment (UPL) limit provisions by establishing a new transition period for States that submitted plan amendments before March 13, 2001 that do not comply with the new UPLs effective on that date (but do comply with the prior UPLs) and were approved on or after January 22, 2001. This new transition period applies to payments for inpatient hospital services, outpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, intermediate care facility services for the mentally retarded, and clinic services.

  17. Negotiating futility, managing emotions: nursing the transition to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Broom, Alex; Kirby, Emma; Good, Phillip; Wootton, Julia; Yates, Patsy; Hardy, Janet

    2015-03-01

    Nurses play a pivotal role in caring for patients during the transition from life-prolonging care to palliative care. This is an area of nursing prone to emotional difficulty, interpersonal complexity, and interprofessional conflict. It is situated within complex social dynamics, including those related to establishing and accepting futility and reconciling the desire to maintain hope. Here, drawing on interviews with 20 Australian nurses, we unpack their accounts of nursing the transition to palliative care, focusing on the purpose of nursing at the point of transition; accounts of communication and strategies for representing palliative care; emotional engagement and burden; and key interprofessional challenges. We argue that in caring for patients approaching the end of life, nurses occupy precarious interpersonal and interprofessional spaces that involve a negotiated order around sentimental work, providing them with both capital (privileged access) and burden (emotional suffering) within their day-to-day work. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Clinician roles and responsibilities during care transitions of older adults.

    PubMed

    Schoenborn, Nancy L; Arbaje, Alicia I; Eubank, Kathryn J; Maynor, Kenric; Carrese, Joseph A

    2013-02-01

    To identify the perceived roles and responsibilities of clinicians during care transitions of older adults. Qualitative study involving 1-hour in-depth semistructured interviews. Audiotapes of interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed, and themes and subthemes were generated. An acute care hospital, a skilled nursing facility, two community-based outpatient practices, and one home healthcare agency. Forty healthcare professionals directly involved in care transitions of older adults (18 physicians, 11 home healthcare administrative and field staff, four social workers, three nurse practitioners, three physician assistants, and one hospital case manager). Perspectives of healthcare professionals regarding clinicians' roles and responsibilities during care transitions were examined and described. Content analysis revealed several themes: components of clinicians' roles during care transitions; congruence between self- and others' perceived ideal roles but incongruence between ideal and routine roles; ambiguity in accountability in the postdischarge period; factors prompting clinicians to act closer to ideal roles; and barriers to performing ideal roles. A conceptual framework was created to summarize clinicians' roles during care transitions. This study reports differences between what healthcare professionals perceive as ideal roles of clinicians during care transitions and what clinicians actually do routinely. Certain patient and clinician factors prompt clinicians to act closer to the ideal roles. Multiple barriers interfere with consistent practice of ideal roles. Future investigations could evaluate interventions targeting various components of the conceptual framework and relevant outcomes. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. The Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT): A Social Work-Led Model of Transitional Care.

    PubMed

    Basso Lipani, Maria; Holster, Kathleen; Bussey, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    In 2010, the Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT), a social work-led transitional care model, was developed at Mount Sinai to reduce 30-day readmissions among high-risk patients. PACT begins with a comprehensive bedside assessment to identify the psychosocial drivers of readmission. In partnership with the patient and family, a patient-centered action plan is developed and carried out through phone calls, accompaniments, navigations and home visits, as needed, in the first 30 days following discharge. 620 patients were enrolled during the pilot from September 2010-August 2012. Outcomes demonstrated a 43% reduction in inpatient utilization and a 54% reduction in emergency department visits among enrollees. In addition, 93% of patients had a follow-up appointment within 7-10 days of discharge and 90% of patients attended the appointment. The success of PACT has led to additional funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under the Community-based Care Transitions Program and several managed care companies seeking population health management interventions for high risk members.

  20. Health Care Transition in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Wolpert, Howard A.; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Laffel, Lori M.; Kleinman, Ken; Beste, Margaret G.; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I.; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine characteristics of the transition from pediatric to adult care in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes and evaluate associations between transition characteristics and glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We developed and mailed a survey to evaluate the transition process in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes, aged 22 to 30 years, receiving adult diabetes care at a single center. Current A1C data were obtained from the medical record. RESULTS The response rate was 53% (258 of 484 eligible). The mean transition age was 19.5 ± 2.9 years, and 34% reported a gap >6 months in establishing adult care. Common reasons for transition included feeling too old (44%), pediatric provider suggestion (41%), and college (33%). Less than half received an adult provider recommendation and <15% reported having a transition preparation visit or receiving written transition materials. The most recent A1C was 8.1 ± 1.3%. Respondents who felt mostly/completely prepared for transition had lower likelihood of a gap >6 months between pediatric and adult care (adjusted odds ratio 0.47 [95% CI 0.25–0.88]). In multivariate analysis, pretransition A1C (β = 0.49, P < 0.0001), current age (β = −0.07, P = 0.03), and education (β = −0.55, P = 0.01) significantly influenced current posttransition A1C. There was no independent association of transition preparation with posttransition A1C (β = −0.17, P = 0.28). CONCLUSIONS Contemporary transition practices may help prevent gaps between pediatric and adult care but do not appear to promote improvements in A1C. More robust preparation strategies and handoffs between pediatric and adult care should be evaluated. PMID:22699289

  1. Health system strategies supporting transition to adult care.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Charlotte Moore; Cohen, Eyal; Bhawra, Jasmin; Weiser, Natalie; Hayeems, Robin Z; Guttmann, Astrid

    2015-06-01

    The transition from paediatric to adult care is associated with poor clinical outcomes, increased costs and low patient and family satisfaction. However, little is known about health system strategies to streamline and safeguard care for youth transitioning to adult services. Moreover, the needs of children and youth are often excluded from broader health system reform discussions, leaving this population especially vulnerable to system 'disintegration'. (1) To explore the international policy profile of paediatric-to-adult care transitions, and (2) to document policy objectives, initiatives and outcomes for jurisdictions publicly committed to addressing transition issues. An international policy scoping review of all publicly available government documents detailing transition-related strategies was completed using a web-based search. Our analysis included a comparable cohort of nine wealthy Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) jurisdictions with Beveridge-style healthcare systems (deemed those most likely to benefit from system-level transition strategies). Few jurisdictions address transition of care issues in either health or broader social policy documents. While many jurisdictions refer to standardised practice guidelines, a few report the intention to use powerful policy levers (including physician remuneration and non-physician investments) to facilitate the uptake of best practice. Most jurisdictions do not address the policy infrastructure required to support successful transitions, and rigorous evaluations of transition strategies are rare. Despite the well-documented risks and costs associated with a poor transition from paediatric to adult care, little policy attention has been paid to this issue. We recommend that healthcare providers engage health system planners in the design and evaluation of system-level, policy-sensitive transition strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  2. Improving Literacy Achievement for English Learners in Transitional Bilingual Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, William M.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on the development and evaluation of a transitional bilingual program for grades 2 through 5. Evaluation results based on achievement of 42 students and 42 comparisons show that the program is more effective than the transition program students typically receive. Discusses implications for education of English learners. (SLD)

  3. Transition of Care from Childhood to Adulthood: Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Conway, Gerard

    2018-01-01

    Girls with Turner syndrome (TS) require special consideration during transition from childhood to adult care. During the transition years, treatment for short stature will be completed and sexual development induced in parallel with the peer group. The timing of sexual development may have later repercussions with respect to psychosocial development and partnership status. Late presentation of TS, which is so common, can result in additional difficulties with the transition process. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Interprofessional simulation to improve patient participation in transitional care.

    PubMed

    Dyrstad, Dagrunn Nåden; Storm, Marianne

    2017-06-01

    Educating and training healthcare professionals is known to improve the quality of transitional care for older adults. Arranging interprofessional meetings for healthcare professionals might be useful to improve patient participation skills in transitional care. To describe the learning activities used in The Meeting Point programme, focusing on patient participation in transitional care, and assess whether they increase healthcare professionals' awareness of and competencies relating to patient participation in the transitional care of older patients. Data were collected as part of an educational intervention programme, The Meeting Point, including three seminars on 'Patient participation in the transitional care of older patients' and four follow-up meetings. Participants were nurses, care assistants, doctors, physiotherapists, patient coordinators and administrative personnel from hospital, nursing homes and home-based care services. The Meeting Point was organised around four pillars: introduction, teaching session, group work activity and plenary discussion. Qualitative data included log reports, summaries of meetings, notes from group work activities, and reports from participants and from follow-up meetings. Feedback from participants shows that they were satisfied with meeting healthcare professionals from other units of care. A film scenario was perceived relevant for group work activity and useful in focusing participants' attention to patient participation. Follow-up meetings show that some nursing home wards, the emergency department and one medical ward at the hospital continued with ongoing work to improve quality of care. Efforts included implementation of an observational waiting room with comfortable chairs, planning for discharge in hospital admission, a daily patient flow registration system and motivational interviewing during admission to nursing home. The description of the learning activities used at The Meeting Point seminars shows that they

  5. Career transition and dental school faculty development program.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Jeffery L; Hendricson, William D; Partida, Mary N; Rugh, John D; Littlefield, John H; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-11-01

    Academic dentistry, as a career track, is not attracting sufficient numbers of new recruits to maintain a corps of skilled dental educators. The Faculty Development Program (FDP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Dental School received federal funds to institute a 7-component program to enhance faculty recruitment and retention and provide training in skills associated with success in academics including:(1) a Teaching Excellence and Academic Skills (TExAS)Fellowship, (2) training in research methodology,evidence-based practice research, and information management, (3) an annual dental hygiene faculty development workshop for dental hygiene faculty, (4) a Teaching Honors Program and Academic Dental Careers Fellowship to cultivate students' interest in educational careers, (5) an Interprofessional Primary Care Rotation,(6) advanced education support toward a master's degree in public health, and (7) a key focus of the entire FDP, an annual Career Transition Workshop to facilitate movement from the practice arena to the educational arm of the profession.The Career Transition Workshop is a cap stone for the FDP; its goal is to build a bridge from practice to academic environment. It will provide guidance for private practice, public health, and military dentists and hygienists considering a career transition into academic dentistry. Topics will be addressed including: academic culture, preparation for the academic environment,academic responsibilities, terms of employment,compensation and benefits, career planning, and job search / interviewing. Instructors for the workshop will include dental school faculty who have transitioned from the practice, military, and public health sectors into dental education.Objectives of the Overall Faculty Development Program:• Provide training in teaching and research skills,career planning, and leadership in order to address faculty shortages in dental schools and under representation of minority

  6. Pharmacist Advancement of Transitions of Care to Home (PATCH) Service.

    PubMed

    Trang, Joseph; Martinez, Amanda; Aslam, Sadaf; Duong, Minh-Tri

    2015-11-01

    There is a paucity of literature on a well-defined role of a pharmacist in different aspects of transition of care service (TCS). Although health care institutions have specific details on the discharge process, there is a need for a sustainable TCS with a well-defined role of pharmacists. To describe the impact of a pharmacist-led TCS on acute health care utilization, clinic quality indicators, and identification and resolution of medication-related problems (MRPs). A pharmacist-managed TCS service, referred to as the Pharmacist Advancement of Transitions of Care to Home (PATCH) service, was established at an academic medical center, where high-risk patients received a postdischarge phone call from a pharmacist followed by a face-to-face meeting with the pharmacist and the patient's primary care provider (PCP). In a prospective transitions of care group (n = 74), outcomes of patients such as acute health care utilization (an emergency department visit or an inpatient readmission, within 30 days post discharge), clinic quality indicators, and identification and resolution of MRPs were compared to a retrospective control group (n = 87) who received the standard of care. Utilization of acute health care services was significantly lower in the prospective group compared to the retrospective control group (23% vs 41.4%; P = .013). A total of 49 MRPs were discovered in patients who received the TCS. Pharmacists play an integral role in improving the transitions of care to reduce acute health care utilization. In addition, they may improve care transitions by optimizing clinic quality indicators and by identifying and resolving MRPs.

  7. Mothers' Transition Back to Work and Infants' Transition to Child Care: Does Work-Based Child Care Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skouteris, Helen; McCaught, Simone; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim in this study was twofold: to compare the use of work-based (WB) and non-work-based (NWB) child care on the transition back to the workplace for women after a period of maternity leave, and on the transition into child care for the infants of these women. Thirty-five mothers with infants in WB centres and 44 mothers with infants in…

  8. Transitioning from pediatric care to adult care for adolescents with special health care needs: dentist perspectives (part 2)

    PubMed Central

    Bayarsaikhan, Zoljargal; Cruz, Stephanie; Neff, John; Chi, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To understand dental care transitions for adolescents with special health care needs (ASHCN) from the dentist perspective. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 13 dentists (seven pediatric dentists and six general dentists) to learn about the dental transition process for ASHCN. Results Most dentists believed transitions from child-centered to adult-centered dental care were important for ASHCN. Dentists reported two main barriers to transitions: low dental reimbursements by Medicaid and a shortage of general dentists qualified or willing to treat ASHCN. Pediatric and general dentists reported playing complimentary roles in facilitating transitions for ASHCN and their families. Conclusions Dentists acknowledged the challenges that ASHCN and their families face in transitioning to adult-centered care and believed in the importance of ASHCN maintaining a dental home. Pediatric dentists and general dentists play a key role in working together to implement dental transition plans for the ASHCN and to ensure successful dental transitions. PMID:26531088

  9. Child Care in Russia: In Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ispa, Jean

    With the advent of "perestroika" and "glasnost," Russian childcare and education underwent a transitional period in practice and theory. Contrasting impressions from an earlier visit under the Communist regime, this book describes the experiences of Jean Ispa in her travels to Russia, observing children in six child care…

  10. Critical Care Organizations: Building and Integrating Academic Programs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason E; Oropello, John M; Stoltzfus, Daniel; Masur, Henry; Coopersmith, Craig M; Nates, Joseph; Doig, Christopher; Christman, John; Hite, R Duncan; Angus, Derek C; Pastores, Stephen M; Kvetan, Vladimir

    2018-04-01

    care programs to transition to integrated Critical Care Organizations within academic medical centers and provide recommendations and resources to facilitate this transition and foster Critical Care Organization effectiveness and future success.

  11. Implementation of Zuerich's transit priority program

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-10-01

    Zrich is famous for the quality of its public transit system and it has one of the highest levels of per capita transit ridership in the world. This is because its transit service is fast, frequent, reliable, and inexpensive, due in large part to i...

  12. 9 CFR 3.116 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.116 Section 3.116 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Marine...

  13. 9 CFR 3.116 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.116 Section 3.116 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Marine...

  14. 9 CFR 3.116 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.116 Section 3.116 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Marine...

  15. 50 CFR 14.133 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... knowledgeable in marine mammal care to provide for the animal's health and well-being. The shipper or... Wild Mammals and Birds to the United States Specifications for Marine Mammals (cetaceans, Sirenians, Sea Otters, Pinnipeds, and Polar Bears) § 14.133 Care in transit. (a) Any marine mammal shall be...

  16. 50 CFR 14.133 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... knowledgeable in marine mammal care to provide for the animal's health and well-being. The shipper or... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Care in transit. 14.133 Section 14.133 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING...

  17. 50 CFR 14.133 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... knowledgeable in marine mammal care to provide for the animal's health and well-being. The shipper or... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Care in transit. 14.133 Section 14.133 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING...

  18. 50 CFR 14.133 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... knowledgeable in marine mammal care to provide for the animal's health and well-being. The shipper or... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Care in transit. 14.133 Section 14.133 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING...

  19. Transition support for new graduate and novice nurses in critical care settings: An integrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Innes, Tiana; Calleja, Pauline

    2018-05-01

    Transition into critical care areas for new graduate nurses may be more difficult than transitioning into other areas due to the specialised knowledge needed. It is unknown which aspects of transition programs best support new graduate nurses improve competence and confidence to transition into critical care nursing specialties. Identifying these aspects would assist to design and implement best practice transition programs for new graduates in critical care areas. Themes identified in the literature include; having a designated resource person, workplace culture, socialisation, knowledge and skill acquisition, orientation, and rotation. Allocation of a quality resource person/s, supportive workplace culture, positive socialisation experiences, knowledge and skill acquisition and structured orientation based on new graduates' learning needs all positively supported increased confidence, competence and transition into nursing practice. Rotations between areas within graduate programs can potentially have both positive and negative impacts on the transition process. Negative impacts of including a rotation component in a transition program should be carefully considered alongside perceived benefits when designing new graduate nurse transition programs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A pragmatic randomized comparative effectiveness trial of transitional care for a socioeconomically diverse population: Design, rationale and baseline characteristics.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Christine; Teter, Caroline; Finch, Emily A; Hurt, Courtney; Keeter, Mary Kate; Liss, David T; Rogers, Angela; Sheth, Avani; Ackermann, Ronald

    2018-02-01

    Transitional care programs have been widely used to reduce readmissions and improve the quality and safety of the handoff process between hospital and outpatient providers. Very little is known about effective transitional care interventions among patients who are uninsured or with Medicaid. This paper describes the design and baseline characteristics of a pragmatic randomized comparative effectiveness trial of transitional care. Northwestern Medical Group- Transitional Care (NMG-TC) care model was developed to address the needs of patients with multiple medical problems that required lifestyle changes and were amenable to office-based management. We present the design, evaluation methods and baseline characteristics of NMG-TC trial patients. Baseline demographic characteristics indicate that our patient population is predominantly male, Medicaid insured and non-white. This study will evaluate two methods for implementing an effective transitional care model in a medically complex and socioeconomically diverse population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transit Marketing : A Program of Research, Demonstration and Communication

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-04-01

    This report recommends a five-year program of research, demonstration, and communication to improve the effectiveness of marketing practice in the U.S. transit industry. The program is oriented toward the development of improved market research tools...

  2. 1998 statistical summaries : Federal Transit Administration : grant assistance programs

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-03-01

    The 1998 Statistical Summaries provides information about the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) major financial aid programs for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 1998. The report covers the following programs: Urbanized Area Formula, Non-urbanized Area ...

  3. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reducing bottlenecks: professionals’ and adolescents’ experiences with transitional care delivery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe the interventions implemented in a quality improvement programme to improve transitional care and evaluate its effectiveness in reducing bottlenecks as perceived by professionals and improving chronically ill adolescents’ experiences with care delivery. Methods This longitudinal study was undertaken with adolescents and professionals who participated in the Dutch ‘On Your Own Feet Ahead!’ quality improvement programme. This programme followed the Breakthrough Series improvement and implementation strategy. A total of 102/128 (79.7%) professionals from 21 hospital teams filled out a questionnaire at the start of the programme (T0), and 79/123 (64.2%; five respondents had changed jobs) professionals completed the same questionnaire 1 year later (T1). Seventy-two (58.5%) professionals from 21 teams returned questionnaires at both time points. Of 389 and 430 participating adolescents, 36% and 41% returned questionnaires at T0 and T1, respectively. We used descriptive statistics and two-tailed, paired t-tests to investigate improvements in bottlenecks in transitional care (perceived by professionals) and care delivery (perceived by adolescents). Results Professionals observed improvement in all bottlenecks at T1 (vs. T0; p < 0.05), especially in the organisation of care, such as the presence of a joint mission between paediatric and adult care, coordination of care, and availability of more resources for joint care services. Within a 1-year period, the transition programme improved some aspects of patients’ experiences with care delivery, such as the provision of opportunities for adolescents to visit the clinic alone (p < 0.001) and to decide who should be present during consultations (p < 0.05). Conclusions This study demonstrated that transitional care interventions may improve the organisation and coordination of transitional care and better prepare adolescents for the transition to adult care

  5. Transition from neonatal intensive care unit to special care nurseries: experiences of parents and nurses.

    PubMed

    Helder, Onno K; Verweij, Jos C M; van Staa, AnneLoes

    2012-05-01

    To explore parents' and nurses' experiences with the transition of infants from the neonatal intensive care unit to a special care nursery. Qualitative explorative study in two phases. Level IIID neonatal intensive care unit in a university hospital and special care nurseries (level II) in five community hospitals in the Netherlands. Twenty-one pairs of parents and 18 critical care nurses. Semistructured interviews were used. Thematic analysis and comparison of themes across participants were performed. Trust was a central theme for parents. Three subthemes, related to the chronological stages of transition, were identified: gaining trust; betrayal of trust; and rebuilding confidence. Trust was associated with five other themes: professional attitude; information management; coordination of transfer; different environments; and parent participation. Although nurses at an early stage repeatedly mentioned a possible transition to community hospitals, the actual announcement took many parents by surprise. Parents felt excluded during the actual transfer and most questioned its necessity. In the special care nursery, parents found it difficult to adjust to new routines and to gain trust in new caregivers, but eventually their worries dissolved. In contrast to neonatal intensive care unit nurses, special care nursery nurses quite understood the impact of transition on parents. Both parents and nurses considered present transitional arrangements to be inadequate. Nurses should provide more effective discharge planning and transitional care. A positive labeling of the transition as a first step to home discharge for the newborn seems appropriate. Parents need to be better-informed and should be involved in the planning process.

  6. Transitioning HIV-infected youth into adult health care.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    With advances in antiretroviral therapy, most HIV-infected children survive into adulthood. Optimal health care for these youth includes a formal plan for the transition of care from primary and/or subspecialty pediatric/adolescent/family medicine health care providers (medical home) to adult health care provider(s). Successful transition involves the early engagement and participation of the youth and his or her family with the pediatric medical home and adult health care teams in developing a formal plan. Referring providers should have a written policy for the transfer of HIV-infected youth to adult care, which will guide in the development of an individualized plan for each youth. The plan should be introduced to the youth in early adolescence and modified as the youth approaches transition. Assessment of developmental milestones is important to define the readiness of the youth in assuming responsibility for his or her own care before initiating the transfer. Communication among all providers is essential and should include both personal contact and a written medical summary. Progress toward the transition should be tracked and,once completed, should be documented and assessed.

  7. Handoffs: Transitions of Care for Children in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    Transitions of care (ToCs), also referred to as handoffs or sign-outs, occur when the responsibility for a patient's care transfers from 1 health care provider to another. Transitions are common in the acute care setting and have been noted to be vulnerable events with opportunities for error. Health care is taking ideas from other high-risk industries, such as aerospace and nuclear power, to create models of structured transition processes. Although little literature currently exists to establish 1 model as superior, multiorganizational consensus groups agree that standardization is warranted and that additional work is needed to establish characteristics of ToCs that are associated with clinical or practice outcomes. The rationale for structuring ToCs, specifically those related to the care of children in the emergency setting, and a description of identified strategies are presented, along with resources for educating health care providers on ToCs. Recommendations for development, education, and implementation of transition models are included. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Getting Out of Silos: An Innovative Transitional Care Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents Through Experiential Interdisciplinary Learning

    PubMed Central

    Schoenborn, Nancy L.; Christmas, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Background Care transitions are common and highly vulnerable times during illness. Physicians need better training to improve care transitions. Existing transitional care curricula infrequently involve settings outside of the hospital or other health care disciplines. Intervention We created a curriculum to teach internal medicine residents how to provide better transitional care at hospital discharge through experiential, interdisciplinary learning in different care settings outside of the acute hospital, and we engaged other health care disciplines frequently involved in care transitions. Setting/Participants Nineteen postgraduate year-1 internal medicine trainees at an academic medical center in an urban location completed experiences in a postacute care facility, home health care, and outpatient clinics. Program Description The 2-week required curriculum involved teachers from geriatric medicine; physical, occupational, and speech therapy; and home health care, with both didactic and experiential components and self-reflective exercises. Program Evaluation The curriculum was highly rated (6.86 on a 9-point scale) and was associated with a significant increase in the rating of the overall quality of transitional care education (from 4.09 on a 5-point scale in 2011 to 4.53 in 2012) on the annual residency program survey. Learners reported improved knowledge in key curricular areas and that they would change practice as a result of the curriculum. Conclusions Our transitional care curriculum for internal medicine residents provides exposure to care settings and health care disciplines that patients frequently encounter. The curriculum has shown positive, short-term effects on learners' perceived knowledge and behavior. PMID:24455024

  9. Friendship Experiences of Participants in a University Based Transition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasr, Maya; Cranston-Gingras, Ann; Jang, Seung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the nature of friendships of 14 students with intellectual and developmental disabilities participating in a university-based transition program in the United States. The transition program is a bridge between high school and adulthood, designed to foster students' self-esteem and self-confidence by providing them with training…

  10. Administrator Perceptions of Transition Programs in International Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the extent to which transition programs are offered to students at international secondary schools. Components of professional development, orientation and departure programs, and transition support teams were examined. Participants included school administrators at 11 international schools across five continents. Findings…

  11. Optimizing Transitions of Care - Hospital to Community.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Emily; Thompson, Christine; Pinheiro, Tania; Robinson, Nicole; Davies, Karen; Whitmore, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Discharging patients from the hospital is a complex process, and preventing avoidable readmissions has the potential to improve both the quality of life for patients and the financial sustainability of the healthcare system (Alper et al. 2016). Improving the discharge process is one method to mitigate readmission to the hospital. Historically, St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital (STEGH) consistently experienced higher-than-expected readmission rates, and only 41% of discharge summaries were sent from the hospital to the community primary care within 48 hours. In addition, the overall percentage of patients attending a follow-up appointment with a primary care physician within seven days of discharge from hospital was lower than the provincial average. Through engagement with primary care providers (PCPs) and clinical associates (CAs) and with the use of standard work and monitoring organizational metrics, STEGH has achieved significant improvements.

  12. Resident and Staff Satisfaction of Pediatric Graduate Medical Education Training on Transition to Adult Care of Medically Complex Patients.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Matthew; Cole, Brandon; Flake, Eric; Roy, Daniel

    2018-04-11

    This study aims to describe the quantity and satisfaction current residents and experienced pediatricians have with graduate medical education on transitioning medically complex patients to adult care. There is an increasing need for transitioning medically complex adolescents to adult care. Over 90% now live into adulthood and require transition to adult healthcare providers. The 2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs found that only 40% of youth 12-17 yr receive the necessary services to appropriately transition to adult care. Prospective, descriptive, anonymous, web-based survey of pediatric residents and staff pediatricians at Army pediatric residency training programs was sent in March 2017. Questions focused on assessing knowledge of transition of care, satisfaction with transition training, and amount of education on transition received during graduate medical education training. Of the 145 responders (310 potential responders, 47% response rate), transition was deemed important with a score of 4.3 out of 5. The comfort level with transition was rated 2.6/5 with only 4.2% of participants receiving formal education during residency. The most commonly perceived barriers to implementing a curriculum were time constraints and available resources. Of the five knowledge assessment questions, three had a correct response rate of less than 1/3. The findings show the disparity between the presence of and perceived need for a formal curriculum on transitioning complex pediatric patients to adult care. This study also highlighted the knowledge gap of the transition process for novice and experienced pediatricians alike.

  13. The Avahan Transition: Effects of Transition Readiness on Program Institutionalization and Sustained Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suneeta; Singh, Kriti; Chhabra, Vibha; Bennett, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background With declines in development assistance for health and growing interest in country ownership, donors are increasingly faced with the task of transitioning health programs to local actors towards a path to sustainability. Yet there is little available guidance on how to measure and evaluate the success of a transition and its subsequent effects. This study assesses the transition of the Avahan HIV/AIDS prevention program in India to investigate how preparations for transition affected continuation of program activities post-transition. Methods Two rounds of two surveys were conducted and supplemented by data from government and Avahan Computerized Management Information Systems (CMIS). Exploratory factor analysis was used to develop two measures: 1) transition readiness pre-transition, and 2) institutionalization (i.e. integration of initial program systems into organizational procedures and behaviors) post-transition. A fixed effects model was built to examine changes in key program delivery outcomes over time. An ordinary least square regression was used to assess the relationship between transition readiness and sustainability of service outcomes both directly, and indirectly through institutionalization. Results Transition readiness data revealed 3 factors (capacity, alignment and communication), on a 15-item scale with adequate internal consistency (alpha 0.73). Institutionalization was modeled as a unidimensional construct, and a 12-item scale demonstrated moderate internal consistency (alpha 0.60). Coverage of key populations and condom distribution were sustained compared to pre-transition levels (p<0.01). Transition readiness, but not institutionalization, predicted sustained outcomes post-transition. Transition readiness did not necessarily lead to institutionalization of key program elements one year after transition. Conclusion Greater preparedness prior to transition is important to achieve better service delivery outcomes post-transition

  14. Trauma transitional care coordination: A mature system at work.

    PubMed

    Hall, Erin C; Tyrrell, Rebecca L; Doyle, Karen E; Scalea, Thomas M; Stein, Deborah M

    2018-05-01

    We have previously demonstrated effectiveness of a Trauma Transitional Care Coordination (TTCC) Program in reducing 30-day readmission rates for trauma patients most at risk. With program maturation, we achieved improved readmission rates for specific patient populations. TTCC is a nursing driven program that supports patients at high risk for 30-day readmission. The TTCC interventions include calls to patients within 72 hours of discharge, complete medication reconciliation, coordination of medical appointments, and individualized problem solving. Account IDs were used to link TTCC patients with the Health Services Cost Review Commission database to collect data on statewide unplanned 30-day readmissions. Four hundred seventy-five patients were enrolled in the TTCC program from January 2014 to September 2016. Only 10.5% (n = 50) of TTCC enrollees were privately insured, 54.5% had Medicaid (n = 259), and 13.5% had Medicare (n = 64). Seventy-three percent had Health Services Cost Review Commission severity of injury ratings of 3 or 4 (maximum severity of injury = 4). The most common All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups for participants were: lower-extremity procedures (n = 67, 14%); extensive abdominal/thoracic procedures (n = 40, 8.4%); musculoskeletal procedures (n = 37, 7.8%); complicated tracheostomy and upper extremity procedures (n = 29 each, 6.1%); infectious disease complications (n = 14, 2.9%); major chest/respiratory trauma, major small and large bowel procedures and vascular procedures (n = 13 each, 2.7%). The TTCC participants with lower-extremity injury, complicated tracheostomy, and bowel procedures had 6-point reduction (10% vs. 16%, p = 0.05), 11-point reduction (13% vs. 24%, p = 0.05), and 16-point reduction (11% vs. 27%, p = 0.05) in 30-day readmission rates, respectively, compared to those without TTCC. Targeted outpatient support for high-risk patients can decrease 30-day readmission rates. As our TTCC program matured, we reduced 30-day

  15. Self-management and Transition to Adult Health Care in Adolescents and Young Adults: A Team Process.

    PubMed

    Mahan, John D; Betz, Cecily L; Okumura, Megumi J; Ferris, Maria E

    2017-07-01

    As health care continues to evolve, the need for more effective health care transition (HCT) for all youth, but particularly children with chronic conditions and special health care needs, becomes even more important. With more than 90% of adolescents with chronic medical conditions now surviving into adulthood, suboptimal transition can lead to poorer quality of life and less successful adulthood.Through a series of clinical vignettes, the challenges of HCT are presented herein and accompanied by comments that underscore how these adolescents can best be helped to transition to successful adulthood. Several methods are presented to assess the readiness of adolescents and young adults (AYA) for transition. The process of transition can be divided into 3 stages: 1) setting the stage: initiation of HCT services and transition readiness assessment, 2) moving forward: ongoing provision of HCT services, and 3) reaching the goal: transfer of care and transition to adulthood.Several valuable suggestions for incorporating the HCT process into the health care system and improving HCT programs through a quality improvement (QI) approach are outlined. Future challenges in HCT include developing more precise assessments of transition status or transition readiness, better understanding the status and specific needs of AYA with chronic health care needs, continued program evaluation and QI efforts, and more reliance on patients and families to teach us about the challenges and methods in HCT that most effectively work for them. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2017. All rights reserved.

  16. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  17. Middle Grades Transition Programs around the Globe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Colin; Bishop, Penny

    2012-01-01

    Transitions into and out of the middle grades can be challenging for many reasons. Students need to acclimate to new policies, practices, and buildings; teachers require accurate data about their new students' capacities; and families must navigate relationships with new personnel. All school transitions present different and, at times, puzzling…

  18. Transition of Care in Adolescents With Cerebral Palsy: A Survey of Current Practices.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Ashlee; Vargus-Adams, Jilda; McMahon, Mary

    2017-03-01

    Transition of care from pediatric to adult health care providers for youth with special needs (including cerebral palsy [CP]) is of current interest because these individuals are now living well into adulthood. Studies have attempted to identify barriers to transition, ideal timing for transition of care, and key elements for successful transition programs. These studies often encompass a wide range of diagnoses, and results cannot be fully applied to those with CP. To identify and describe current transition-of-care (TOC) practices and beliefs among physician providers of adolescents with CP in multidisciplinary CP clinics. Descriptive survey. Multidisciplinary CP clinics in the United States. Physician leaders in the aforementioned CP clinics. Respondents completed an electronic survey. Responses were deidentified and reported in aggregate by the use of descriptive statistics. Electronic survey addressing 3 domains: demographics of clinics, current opinions/practices related to TOC processes, and perceived barriers to successful TOC. Fifteen surveys were sent with 11 returned (response rate = 73%). TOC practices varied among clinics surveyed. Fifty-five percent of clinics had a structured transition program, but only one transitioned 100% of their patients to adult providers by 22 years of age. Only one clinic had an absolute upper age limit for seeing patients, and 36% of clinics accepted new patients older than 21 years. No respondent was "completely satisfied" with their transition process, and only one respondent was "moderately satisfied." The majority of respondents felt the ideal care setting for adults with CP was a comprehensive, multidisciplinary adult-focused clinic in an adult hospital/clinic with primarily adult providers. They noted the top 3 perceived barriers to successful TOC were limited adult providers willing to accept CP patients, concern about the level of care in the adult health care system, and lack of financial resources. Current TOC

  19. Hospital to home: a transition program for frail older adults.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Lynn; Hall, Carol; Kring, Daria

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a social-worker navigator transitional care model for at-risk seniors being discharged from hospital to home. The model is designed to prevent rehospitalizations so as to improve quality of life and patient outcomes. This model is different from others with its focus on the psychosocial aspects of care transitions, medical needs, and individualized needs with the provision of nonreimbursable services. Care begins in the acute care hospital or inpatient rehabilitation facility and continues in the postdischarge home environment. Participants are connected to community services to support their independent living at home. Case managers, physicians, or others refer potential participants to the navigator. Criteria for inclusion include the following: age 65 years or older, Medicare and/or Medicaid recipient, living in the same county as the hospital, and having at least 2 of a list of 11 criteria that predict readmission. After the participant agrees to enroll, the navigator recommends in-home services at discharge. Within the first 72 hr, the navigator makes a home visit to evaluate the home environment, assess medical management, and make referrals for other services. Follow-up phone calls and other home visits are made by the navigator during the participant's enrollment, which is from 30 days to 4 months. Hospital readmissions were decreased by 61% for this high-risk population. Cost savings by preventing readmissions correlated to a cost savings of $628,202 per year. The 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey showed statistically significant improvements in quality-of-life scores for both physical and mental health summary scales and for all 8 subscales (p < .004). Almost all (99%) of respondents were satisfied with the overall Hospital to Home program. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of extending social support and health education into the home after discharge from the hospital. Access to immediate in-home care services such

  20. Pediatric to Adult Care Transition: Perspectives of Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Porter, Jerlym S; Wesley, Kimberly M; Zhao, Mimi S; Rupff, Rebecca J; Hankins, Jane S

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore perspectives of transition and transition readiness of young adult patients (YAs) with sickle cell disease (SCD) who have transitioned to adult health care. In all, 19 YAs with SCD (ages 18-30 years) participated in one of three focus groups and completed a brief questionnaire about transition topics. Transcripts were coded and emergent themes were examined using the social-ecological model of adolescent and young adult readiness for transition (SMART). Themes were consistent with most SMART components. Adult provider relationships and negative medical experiences emerged as salient factors. YAs ranked choosing an adult provider, seeking emergency care, understanding medications/medication adherence, knowing SCD complications, and being aware of the impact of health behaviors as the most important topics to include in transition programming. The unique perspectives of YAs can inform the development and evaluation of SCD transition programming by incorporating the identified themes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Efficacy of a Transition Theory-Based Discharge Planning Program for Childhood Asthma Management.

    PubMed

    Ekim, Ayfer; Ocakci, Ayse Ferda

    2016-02-01

    This study tested the efficacy of a nurse-led discharge planning program for childhood asthma management, based on transition theory. A quasi-experimental design was used. The sample comprised 120 children with asthma and their parents (intervention group n = 60, control group n = 60). The asthma management self-efficacy perception level of parents in the intervention group increased significantly and the number of triggers their children were exposed to at home was reduced by 60.8%. The rates of admission to emergency departments and unscheduled outpatient visits were significantly lower in the intervention group compared with the control group. Transition theory-based nursing interventions can provide successful outcomes on childhood asthma management. Transition theory-based discharge planning program can guide nursing interventions to standardize care of the child with asthma. Combining care at home with hospital care strengthens ongoing qualified asthma management. © 2015 NANDA International, Inc.

  2. Epilepsy: Transition from pediatric to adult care. Recommendations of the Ontario epilepsy implementation task force.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Danielle M; Bassett, Anne S; Bercovici, Eduard; Borlot, Felippe; Bui, Esther; Camfield, Peter; Clozza, Guida Quaglia; Cohen, Eyal; Gofine, Timothy; Graves, Lisa; Greenaway, Jon; Guttman, Beverly; Guttman-Slater, Maya; Hassan, Ayman; Henze, Megan; Kaufman, Miriam; Lawless, Bernard; Lee, Hannah; Lindzon, Lezlee; Lomax, Lysa Boissé; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Menna-Dack, Dolly; Minassian, Berge A; Mulligan, Janice; Nabbout, Rima; Nejm, Tracy; Secco, Mary; Sellers, Laurene; Shapiro, Michelle; Slegr, Marie; Smith, Rosie; Szatmari, Peter; Tao, Leeping; Vogt, Anastasia; Whiting, Sharon; Carter Snead, O

    2017-09-01

    The transition from a pediatric to adult health care system is challenging for many youths with epilepsy and their families. Recently, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care of the Province of Ontario, Canada, created a transition working group (TWG) to develop recommendations for the transition process for patients with epilepsy in the Province of Ontario. Herein we present an executive summary of this work. The TWG was composed of a multidisciplinary group of pediatric and adult epileptologists, psychiatrists, and family doctors from academia and from the community; neurologists from the community; nurses and social workers from pediatric and adult epilepsy programs; adolescent medicine physician specialists; a team of physicians, nurses, and social workers dedicated to patients with complex care needs; a lawyer; an occupational therapist; representatives from community epilepsy agencies; patients with epilepsy; parents of patients with epilepsy and severe intellectual disability; and project managers. Three main areas were addressed: (1) Diagnosis and Management of Seizures; 2) Mental Health and Psychosocial Needs; and 3) Financial, Community, and Legal Supports. Although there are no systematic studies on the outcomes of transition programs, the impressions of the TWG are as follows. Teenagers at risk of poor transition should be identified early. The care coordination between pediatric and adult neurologists and other specialists should begin before the actual transfer. The transition period is the ideal time to rethink the diagnosis and repeat diagnostic testing where indicated (particularly genetic testing, which now can uncover more etiologies than when patients were initially evaluated many years ago). Some screening tests should be repeated after the move to the adult system. The seven steps proposed herein may facilitate transition, thereby promoting uninterrupted and adequate care for youth with epilepsy leaving the pediatric system. Wiley

  3. Transitions: A Guide to Teens Getting Older and Changing Health Care Providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transitions: A Guide to Getting Older and Changing Health Care Providers (HCP’s) Posted under Health Guides . Updated 11 ... can help me plan my transition to adult health care? Your pediatrician or other health care provider Your ...

  4. Transitioning a Large Scale HIV/AIDS Prevention Program to Local Stakeholders: Findings from the Avahan Transition Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Sara; Singh, Suneeta; Rodriguez, Daniela; Ozawa, Sachiko; Singh, Kriti; Chhabra, Vibha; Dhingra, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Background Between 2009–2013 the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation transitioned its HIV/AIDS prevention initiative in India from being a stand-alone program outside of government, to being fully government funded and implemented. We present an independent prospective evaluation of the transition. Methods The evaluation drew upon (1) a structured survey of transition readiness in a sample of 80 targeted HIV prevention programs prior to transition; (2) a structured survey assessing institutionalization of program features in a sample of 70 targeted intervention (TI) programs, one year post-transition; and (3) case studies of 15 TI programs. Findings Transition was conducted in 3 rounds. While the 2009 transition round was problematic, subsequent rounds were implemented more smoothly. In the 2011 and 2012 transition rounds, Avahan programs were well prepared for transition with the large majority of TI program staff trained for transition, high alignment with government clinical, financial and managerial norms, and strong government commitment to the program. One year post transition there were significant program changes, but these were largely perceived positively. Notable negative changes were: limited flexibility in program management, delays in funding, commodity stock outs, and community member perceptions of a narrowing in program focus. Service coverage outcomes were sustained at least six months post-transition. Interpretation The study suggests that significant investments in transition preparation contributed to a smooth transition and sustained service coverage. Notwithstanding, there were substantive program changes post-transition. Five key lessons for transition design and implementation are identified. PMID:26327591

  5. Challenging graduate nurses' transition: Care of the deteriorating patient.

    PubMed

    Della Ratta, Carol

    2016-10-01

    To explore graduate nurses' experiences of caring for deteriorating patients during the first year of practice. Hospital-based transition programmes have been established to ease graduate nurse transition. Despite this, novice nurses persistently cite caring for deteriorating patients as a clinical challenge. Few studies have explored the unique needs of novice nurses during such encounters, even less research has been undertaken from their perspective. Qualitative interpretive phenomenological analysis. One-on-one, semi-structured, in-depth, audio-recorded interviews were conducted between July-November 2014. A purposive sample of eight novice nurses working in acute care, ICU and the ED was recruited through the use of flyers. Three major patterns with related themes illuminate the experience of caring for deteriorating patients as it is lived by graduate nurses. Dwelling with uncertainty occurred during initial encounters with deteriorating patients with its deeply felt impact upon these novices causing them to question their capability of becoming a nurse. 'Success' or 'failure' of their performance during these encounters extended to their view of themselves as nurses and impacted transition. Building me up was influenced by participants' expressed need for and importance of trusted relationships with preceptors, nurse colleagues and/or educators as they learned to care for deteriorating patients. A new lifeline: Salient being emerged as change in participants' identity and increased self-understanding as professional nurses. Caring for deteriorating patients impacted graduate nurses because they viewed such encounters to be 'high stakes' not only for their patient but also for themselves. Crucial to their development were trusted relationships with preceptors, nurse colleagues and/or educators. The findings identify needs of graduate nurses' during a high-stakes patient encounter and shed light upon one aspect of transition. Clinical leaders may use the

  6. Transitioning youth to adult healthcare: new tools from the Illinois Transition Care Project.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, K E; Ruch-Ross, H S; Bargeron, J L; Contri, D A; Kalichman, M A

    2015-01-01

    To improve youths' transition to adult healthcare, especially for youth with disabilities, The Illinois Transition Care Project created separate, yet complementary, curricula for pediatric and adult-oriented providers. Content from the curricula was tested by practicing physicians. The project created a library of skill worksheets with functional goals for patients. All methods included opportunities to teach life skills to patients to independently manage their conditions. The curricula used Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Part 4 credit as an incentive for physician participation. Pediatric pilot data indicate improvement across all sites and activities. Adult medicine results indicate increased perceived importance and feasibility of accepting young adult patients with childhood conditions. Patient/parent reviewers indicate the tools are understandable, interesting, and effective. Findings suggest the curricula, with MOC Part 4 credit for physicians, are effective in improving transition care. Project results provided new information on population management for transitioning youth and on the use of MOC Part 4 credit as an incentive. Findings have implications for primary care and specialty physicians, team-based care, teaching self-management skills to patients and methods for engaging adult-oriented physicians in the transition process.

  7. Transitional Class Program, 1979-80. OEE Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opperman, Prudence Ward; And Others

    This evaluation report describes the implementation and results of the 1979-80 Transitional Class Program. Although the program no longer exists as a centrally-coordinated effort, it serves as a final summary of the program's two years of operation by comparing the results from one year (1978-1979) to the next (1979-1980), and provides guidance to…

  8. Transition from Long Day Care to Kindergarten: Continuity or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barblett, Lennie; Barratt-Pugh, Caroline; Kilgallon, Pam; Maloney, Carmel

    2011-01-01

    Transition practices that ensure continuity between early childhood settings have been shown to be important in assisting children's short-term and long-term growth and development (Vogler, Cravello & Woodhead, 2008). In Western Australia many young children move from and between long day care (LDC) settings to kindergarten. In that state,…

  9. 9 CFR 3.39 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Transportation Standards § 3.39 Care in transit. (a) During surface transportation... pigs or hamsters as frequently as circumstances may dictate, but not less than once every 4 hours, to... any of the live guinea pigs or hamsters are in obvious physical distress and to provide any needed...

  10. 50 CFR 14.123 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Wild Mammals and Birds to the United States Specifications for Nonhuman Primates § 14.123 Care in transit. (a) A primate shall be observed for signs of distress and given food and water according to the... to keep enclosures containing primates sufficiently separated in the conveyance or holding area to...

  11. 50 CFR 14.123 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Wild Mammals and Birds to the United States Specifications for Nonhuman Primates § 14.123 Care in transit. (a) A primate shall be observed for signs of distress and given food and water according to the... to keep enclosures containing primates sufficiently separated in the conveyance or holding area to...

  12. 9 CFR 3.39 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Transportation Standards § 3.39 Care in transit. (a) During surface transportation... pigs or hamsters as frequently as circumstances may dictate, but not less than once every 4 hours, to... any of the live guinea pigs or hamsters are in obvious physical distress and to provide any needed...

  13. 9 CFR 3.39 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Transportation Standards § 3.39 Care in transit. (a) During surface transportation... pigs or hamsters as frequently as circumstances may dictate, but not less than once every 4 hours, to... any of the live guinea pigs or hamsters are in obvious physical distress and to provide any needed...

  14. 9 CFR 3.39 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Transportation Standards § 3.39 Care in transit. (a) During surface transportation... pigs or hamsters as frequently as circumstances may dictate, but not less than once every 4 hours, to... any of the live guinea pigs or hamsters are in obvious physical distress and to provide any needed...

  15. 9 CFR 3.140 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Warmblooded Animals Other Than Dogs, Cats, Rabbits, Hamsters, Guinea Pigs, Nonhuman Primates, and Marine... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.140 Section 3.140 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL...

  16. 9 CFR 3.140 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Warmblooded Animals Other Than Dogs, Cats, Rabbits, Hamsters, Guinea Pigs, Nonhuman Primates, and Marine... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.140 Section 3.140 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL...

  17. 9 CFR 3.140 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Warmblooded Animals Other Than Dogs, Cats, Rabbits, Hamsters, Guinea Pigs, Nonhuman Primates, and Marine... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.140 Section 3.140 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL...

  18. 9 CFR 3.140 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Warmblooded Animals Other Than Dogs, Cats, Rabbits, Hamsters, Guinea Pigs, Nonhuman Primates, and Marine... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.140 Section 3.140 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL...

  19. 9 CFR 3.140 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Warmblooded Animals Other Than Dogs, Cats, Rabbits, Hamsters, Guinea Pigs, Nonhuman Primates, and Marine... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.140 Section 3.140 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL...

  20. 38 CFR 17.48 - Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program. 17.48 Section 17.48 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.48 Compensated Work Therapy...

  1. 38 CFR 17.48 - Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program. 17.48 Section 17.48 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.48 Compensated Work Therapy...

  2. 38 CFR 17.48 - Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program. 17.48 Section 17.48 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.48 Compensated Work Therapy...

  3. 38 CFR 17.48 - Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program. 17.48 Section 17.48 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.48 Compensated Work Therapy...

  4. 38 CFR 17.48 - Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program. 17.48 Section 17.48 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.48 Compensated Work Therapy...

  5. Perception of transition readiness and preferences for use of technology in transition programs: teens' ideas for the future.

    PubMed

    Applebaum, Mark A; Lawson, Erica F; von Scheven, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to facilitate transition of care to adult providers for adolescents with chronic disease are not uniformly successful and many patients encounter challenges. The goal of this study was to assess transition readiness and preferences for tools to aid in the transition process with an emphasis on technology and social media. We surveyed and performed focus groups on patients aged 13-21 years from a pediatric university-based rheumatology and general pediatric practice. Demographics and transition readiness were assessed using a questionnaire. Transition readiness was assessed by examining patient knowledge and independence with care. Focus groups were conducted to elicit perspectives about desirable features of a transition program and useful tools. Thirty-five patients completed surveys; and 20 patients and 13 of their parents participated in a focus group. The median patient age was 17 years and 74.3% were female. A Likert scale (0-10, 10=most) was used to evaluate concern over changing to an adult medical provider, (mean=6.4, SD=2.6), preparedness for disease self-management (mean=6.0, SD=2.8), and perceived importance of self-managing their condition (mean=7.1, SD=3.1). Themes that emerged from focus groups included a desire for support groups with other teens, a preference for using text messaging for communication and a desire for an online health management program. Teens with chronic disease are able to identify health maintenance tasks and strategies that will aid in developing independence with healthcare management. These findings support the idea that developing engaging applications and support groups will assist teens in the transitioning.

  6. The Challenges in Providing Needed Transition Programming to Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, John S.; Bohac, Paul D.; Wade, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    The transition to and from juvenile justice settings is a complex and challenging process. Effectively preparing juvenile justice personnel to address the transition needs of incarcerated students is an essential aspect of reducing the negative effects of the school-to-prison pipeline. This article examines program and professional development…

  7. Building Strategically Aligned Individualized Education Programs for Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, K. Brigid; Hellemn, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    The Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for students 16 years of age or above must address specific transition components. Studies to date have focused on the presence and quality of these transition components, yet the alignment of these components and their role in leading the development of the IEP is just as critical. This qualitative…

  8. Effective Ninth-Grade Transition Programs Can Promote Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roybal, Victoria; Thornton, Bill; Usinger, Janet

    2014-01-01

    The transition from middle into high school can be perilous for some students. High school freshmen fail at an alarming rate. In a general sense, the environment, expectations, structure, and culture of high schools are different from middle schools. However, school leaders can implement transition programs that may promote success of 9th graders.…

  9. Programs That Support Safety and Security for the Transit Industry

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-03-01

    FTA's Office of Safety and Security (Office) directly supports the U.S. Department of Transportation's safety goals through a series of programs designed to maintain continuous improvement in the safety and security of our nation's transit systems. T...

  10. Computer program (POWREQ) for power requirements of mass transit vehicles

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1977-08-01

    This project was performed to develop a computer program suitable for use in systematic analyses requiring estimates of the energy requirements of mass transit vehicles as a function of driving schedules and vehicle size, shape, and gross weight. The...

  11. Automated medication reconciliation and complexity of care transitions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pamela A Bozzo; Bernstam, Elmer V; Markowitz, Eliz; Johnson, Todd R; Zhang, Jiajie; Herskovic, Jorge R

    2011-01-01

    Medication reconciliation is a National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG) from The Joint Commission (TJC) that entails reviewing all medications a patient takes after a health care transition. Medication reconciliation is a resource-intensive, error-prone task, and the resources to accomplish it may not be routinely available. Computer-based methods have the potential to overcome these barriers. We designed and explored a rule-based medication reconciliation algorithm to accomplish this task across different healthcare transitions. We tested our algorithm on a random sample of 94 transitions from the Clinical Data Warehouse at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. We found that the algorithm reconciled, on average, 23.4% of the potentially reconcilable medications. Our study did not have sufficient statistical power to establish whether the kind of transition affects reconcilability. We conclude that automated reconciliation is possible and will help accomplish the NPSG.

  12. Patient Care Assistant. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a patient care assistant program. An occupational description and program content are presented. A curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content, laboratory activities, special…

  13. Perspectives of Post-Acute Transition of Care for Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; You, Tian; Eiterman, Andrew; Hartwell, Clifton; Davila, Victor; Marjoribanks, Stephen; Florescu, Cristina; Bergese, Sergio Daniel; Rogers, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Post-acute care (PAC) facilities improve patient recovery, as measured by activities of daily living, rehabilitation, hospital readmission, and survival rates. Seamless transitions between discharge and PAC settings continue to be challenges that hamper patient outcomes, specifically problems with effective communication and coordination between hospitals and PAC facilities at patient discharge, patient adherence and access to cardiac rehabilitation (CR) services, caregiver burden, and the financial impact of care. The objective of this review is to examine existing models of cardiac transitional care, identify major challenges and social factors that affect PAC, and analyze the impact of current transitional care efforts and strategies implemented to improve health outcomes in this patient population. We intend to discuss successful methods to address the following aspects: hospital-PAC linkages, improved discharge planning, caregiver burden, and CR access and utilization through patient-centered programs. Regular home visits by healthcare providers result in decreased hospital readmission rates for patients utilizing home healthcare while improved hospital-PAC linkages reduced hospital readmissions by 25%. We conclude that widespread adoption of improvements in transitional care will play a key role in patient recovery and decrease hospital readmission, morbidity, and mortality. PMID:29230400

  14. Perspectives of Post-Acute Transition of Care for Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; You, Tian; Eiterman, Andrew; Hartwell, Clifton; Davila, Victor; Marjoribanks, Stephen; Florescu, Cristina; Bergese, Sergio Daniel; Rogers, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Post-acute care (PAC) facilities improve patient recovery, as measured by activities of daily living, rehabilitation, hospital readmission, and survival rates. Seamless transitions between discharge and PAC settings continue to be challenges that hamper patient outcomes, specifically problems with effective communication and coordination between hospitals and PAC facilities at patient discharge, patient adherence and access to cardiac rehabilitation (CR) services, caregiver burden, and the financial impact of care. The objective of this review is to examine existing models of cardiac transitional care, identify major challenges and social factors that affect PAC, and analyze the impact of current transitional care efforts and strategies implemented to improve health outcomes in this patient population. We intend to discuss successful methods to address the following aspects: hospital-PAC linkages, improved discharge planning, caregiver burden, and CR access and utilization through patient-centered programs. Regular home visits by healthcare providers result in decreased hospital readmission rates for patients utilizing home healthcare while improved hospital-PAC linkages reduced hospital readmissions by 25%. We conclude that widespread adoption of improvements in transitional care will play a key role in patient recovery and decrease hospital readmission, morbidity, and mortality.

  15. 25 CFR 170.152 - What transit facilities and activities are eligible for IRR Program funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and... transit vehicle; (d) Preventive maintenance; (e) Leasing transit vehicles, equipment, buildings, and...

  16. Integrating Social Determinants of Health into Primary Care Clinical and Informational Workflow during Care Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Hewner, Sharon; Casucci, Sabrina; Sullivan, Suzanne; Mistretta, Francine; Xue, Yuqing; Johnson, Barbara; Pratt, Rebekah; Lin, Li; Fox, Chester

    2017-01-01

    Context: Care continuity during transitions between the hospital and home requires reliable communication between providers and settings and an understanding of social determinants that influence recovery. Case Description: The coordinating transitions intervention uses real time alerts, delivered directly to the primary care practice for complex chronically ill patients discharged from an acute care setting, to facilitate nurse care coordinator led telephone outreach. The intervention incorporates claims-based risk stratification to prioritize patients for follow-up and an assessment of social determinants of health using the Patient-centered Assessment Method (PCAM). Results from transitional care are stored and transmitted to qualified healthcare providers across the continuum. Findings: Reliance on tools that incorporated interoperability standards facilitated exchange of health information between the hospital and primary care. The PCAM was incorporated into both the clinical and informational workflow through the collaboration of clinical, industry, and academic partners. Health outcomes improved at the study practice over their baseline and in comparison with control practices and the regional Medicaid population. Major Themes: Current research supports the potential impact of systems approaches to care coordination in improving utilization value after discharge. The project demonstrated that flexibility in developing the informational and clinical workflow was critical in developing a solution that improved continuity during transitions. There is additional work needed in developing managerial continuity across settings such as shared comprehensive care plans. Conclusions: New clinical and informational workflows which incorporate social determinant of health data into standard practice transformed clinical practice and improved outcomes for patients.

  17. Impact of California's Transitional Kindergarten Program, 2013-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manship, Karen; Quick, Heather; Holod, Aleksandra; Mills, Nicholas; Ogut, Burhan; Chernoff, Jodi Jacobson; Blum, Jarah; Hauser, Alison; Anthony, Jennifer; González, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Transitional kindergarten--the first year of a two-year kindergarten program for California children born between September 2 and December 2--is intended to better prepare young five-year-olds for kindergarten and ensure a strong start to their educational career. The goal of this study was to measure the success of the program by determining the…

  18. 34 CFR 303.148 - Transition to preschool programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluations of children. • The development and implementation of an individualized education program (“IEP... EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND... procedures to be used to ensure a smooth transition for children receiving early intervention services under...

  19. 34 CFR 303.148 - Transition to preschool programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... evaluations of children. • The development and implementation of an individualized education program (“IEP... EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND... procedures to be used to ensure a smooth transition for children receiving early intervention services under...

  20. International and Interdisciplinary Identification of Health Care Transition Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fair, Cynthia; Cuttance, Jessica; Sharma, Niraj; Maslow, Gary; Wiener, Lori; Betz, Cecily; Porter, Jerlym; McLaughlin, Suzanne; Gilleland-Marchak, Jordan; Renwick, Amy; Naranjo, Diana; Jan, Sophia; Javalkar, Karina; Ferris, Maria

    2016-03-01

    There is a lack of agreement on what constitutes successful outcomes for the process of health care transition (HCT) among adolescent and young adults with special health care needs. To present HCT outcomes identified by a Delphi process with an interdisciplinary group of participants. A Delphi method involving 3 stages was deployed to refine a list of HCT outcomes. This 18-month study (from January 5, 2013, of stage 1 to July 3, 2014, of stage 3) included an initial literature search, expert interviews, and then 2 waves of a web-based survey. On this survey, 93 participants from outpatient, community-based, and primary care clinics rated the importance of the top HCT outcomes identified by the Delphi process. Analyses were performed from July 5, 2014, to December 5, 2014. Health care transition outcomes of adolescents and young adults with special health care needs. Importance ratings of identified HCT outcomes rated on a Likert scale from 1 (not important) to 9 (very important). The 2 waves of surveys included 117 and 93 participants as the list of outcomes was refined. Transition outcomes were refined by the 3 waves of the Delphi process, with quality of life being the highest-rated outcome with broad agreement. The 10 final outcomes identified included individual outcomes (quality of life, understanding the characteristics of conditions and complications, knowledge of medication, self-management, adherence to medication, and understanding health insurance), health services outcomes (attending medical appointments, having a medical home, and avoidance of unnecessary hospitalization), and a social outcome (having a social network). Participants indicated that different outcomes were likely needed for individuals with cognitive disabilities. Quality of life is an important construct relevant to HCT. Future research should identify valid measures associated with each outcome and further explore the role that quality of life plays in the HCT process. Achieving

  1. An Expanded Theoretical Framework of Care Coordination Across Transitions in Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Radwin, Laurel E; Castonguay, Denise; Keenan, Carolyn B; Hermann, Cherice

    2016-01-01

    For many patients, high-quality, patient-centered, and cost-effective health care requires coordination among multiple clinicians and settings. Ensuring optimal care coordination requires a clear understanding of how clinician activities and continuity during transitions affect patient-centeredness and quality outcomes. This article describes an expanded theoretical framework to better understand care coordination. The framework provides clear articulation of concepts. Examples are provided of ways to measure the concepts.

  2. MIGRANT DAY CARE PROGRAM, 1961.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NAYLOR, NAOMI L.

    WITH THE COOPERATION OF VARIOUS COMMUNITY AGENCIES AND WITH FEDERAL AID FROM THE PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT, SEVERAL MIGRANT CHILD CARE CENTERS WERE ESTABLISHED BY PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY IN THE CENTRAL PART OF THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA. STAFFS WERE COMPOSED OF DIRECTORS AND EXPERIENCED TEACHERS FROM PRESCHOOL AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION.…

  3. Statewide Transportation Improvement Program - FY 1998-2000 - Proposed Highway & Transit Improvement Program - Draft

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-10-01

    The FY 1998-2000 Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) is a three-year program of highway and transit projects developed to fulfill the requirements set forth in the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA). The ...

  4. A transitional care service for elderly chronic disease patients at risk of readmission.

    PubMed

    Brand, Caroline A; Jones, Catherine T; Lowe, Adrian J; Nielsen, David A; Roberts, Carol A; King, Bellinda L; Campbell, Donald A

    2004-12-13

    Multiple hospital admissions, especially those related to chronic disease, represent a particular challenge to the acute health care sector in Australia. To determine whether a nurse-led chronic disease management model of transitional care reduced readmissions to acute care. A quasi-experimental controlled trial. A large tertiary metropolitan teaching hospital. 166 general medical patients aged > or = 65 years with either a history of readmissions to acute care or multiple medical comorbidities. Implementation of a chronic disease management model of transitional care aimed at improving patient management and reducing readmissions to acute care. Readmission rates and emergency department presentation rates at 3-and 6-month follow up. Secondary outcome measures include quality of life, discharge destination, and primary health care service utilisation. There was no difference in readmission rates, emergency department presentation rates, quality of life, discharge destination or primary health care service utilisation. The difficulties inherent in evaluating this type of multifactorial intervention are discussed and consideration is given to patient factors, the difficulty of influencing readmission rates, and local system issues. The outcomes of this study reflect the tension that exists between implementing multifaceted integrated health service programs and attempting to evaluate them within complex and changing environments using robust research methodologies.

  5. Stakeholder validation of a model of readiness for transition to adult care.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lisa A; Brumley, Lauren D; Tuchman, Lisa K; Barakat, Lamia P; Hobbie, Wendy L; Ginsberg, Jill P; Daniel, Lauren C; Kazak, Anne E; Bevans, Katherine; Deatrick, Janet A

    2013-10-01

    That too few youth with special health care needs make the transition to adult-oriented health care successfully may be due, in part, to lack of readiness to transfer care. There is a lack of theoretical models to guide development and implementation of evidence-based guidelines, assessments, and interventions to improve transition readiness. To further validate the Social-ecological Model of Adolescent and Young Adult Readiness to Transition (SMART) via feedback from stakeholders (patients, parents, and providers) from a medically diverse population in need of life-long follow-up care, survivors of childhood cancer. Mixed-methods participatory research design. A large Mid-Atlantic children's hospital. Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood cancer (n = 14), parents (n = 18), and pediatric providers (n = 10). Patients and parents participated in focus groups; providers participated in individual semi-structured interviews. Validity of SMART was assessed 3 ways: (1) ratings on importance of SMART components for transition readiness using a 5-point scale (0-4; ratings >2 support validity), (2) nominations of 3 "most important" components, and (3) directed content analysis of focus group/interview transcripts. Qualitative data supported the validity of SMART, with minor modifications to definitions of components. Quantitative ratings met criteria for validity; stakeholders endorsed all components of SMART as important for transition. No additional SMART variables were suggested by stakeholders and the "most important" components varied by stakeholders, thus supporting the comprehensiveness of SMART and need to involve multiple perspectives. SMART represents a comprehensive and empirically validated framework for transition research and program planning, supported by survivors of childhood cancer, parents, and pediatric providers. Future research should validate SMART among other populations with special health care needs.

  6. A Review of Interventions Aimed at Facilitating Successful Transition Planning and Transfer to Adult Care Among Youth with Chronic Illness.

    PubMed

    Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Shapiro, Jenna B

    2017-05-01

    This article reviews studies that developed interventions aimed at facilitating the transition process and/or the transfer of youth with chronic illness to adult programs during the past decade. Three key intervention approaches have been studied. Data assessing the impact of transition coordinators suggest that the most successful outcomes occur when coordinators meet with patients prior to the transfer of care, support them as they negotiate the adult programs, and facilitate appointment keeping. Data assessing the impact of transition clinics suggest that the key to positive outcomes is helping patients develop a trusting relationship with the adult providers before fully transferring their care to the adult clinic. Similar conclusions can be drawn for transition programs, where it appears that the opportunity to discuss and plan transition with a pediatric provider over time and to meet with both the pediatric and adult providers simultaneously are beneficial for facilitating successful transfer to adult care. Although aspects of these care processes appear promising for improving transition success, this review identifies areas that need further study. We argue that studies are needed that examine individual patient and family-focused interventions as well as looking at other potential interventions in the health care system. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(5):e182-e187.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Transition towards end of life in palliative care: an exploration of its meaning for advanced cancer patients in Europe.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Philip J; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Schotsmans, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Transition as a concept in healthcare has been explored, but there is limited empirical work which considers transition in the context of palliative care, specifically from the patient perspective. This article reports findings from a qualitative study designed to explore transition experiences of 100 advanced cancer patients in six European countries. Data were analyzed using the ATLAS.ti program. Findings suggest that transition is a confusing time of mixed messages, poor communication, and uncertainty, but the physical environment of the hospice offers a place of ontological security from which to address this. Transition concepts fail to capture the palliative care experience fully. Transience, as an alternative concept, is reported, although further research is needed to explore this. In clinical practice, the value given to hospice by patients suggests that clinicians must carefully balance the benefit of mainstream integration with sensitive assimilation of hospice philosophy.

  8. Parental experiences transitioning their adolescent with epilepsy and cognitive impairments to adult health care.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Rebecca J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explicate processes that parents of adolescents with epilepsy and cognitive impairments undergo as they help their adolescents transition to adult health care. A qualitative grounded theory methodology was used in this study. Theoretical sampling techniques were used to recruit seven ethnically diverse parents of adolescents 18 years or older with epilepsy and cognitive impairments from the community in a large metropolitan area in the southern United States. Data collection and analysis occurred simultaneously using coding and constant comparison analysis. The substantive theory Journey of Advocacy was developed from interviewing the participants. The theory has five categories: crisis sparks transition, parents in turmoil, parents as advocates, web of information, and captive waiting. Parents emerged as strong advocates in the transition process. Transitioning this group of adolescents to adult health care was an unplanned, complex, multisystem process. This study affirms the need to develop a transition program that acknowledges the unique challenges of transitioning adolescents with cognitive impairments and the interrelationship between these parents and other systems. Copyright © 2013 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. How to Operate Your Day Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones (Ryan) Associates, Inc., Wyomissing, PA.

    Originally written to assist communities in Pennsylvania in the design and implementation of comprehensive child development day care programs to meet Federal Inter-Agency guidelines, this manual is geared to the specific needs of the administrator and is equally valuable for any program, large or small, public or private. Section I is on the…

  10. Day Care and Intervention Programs for Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haith, Marshall M.

    This guide represents an attempt to organize the available literature on day care programs currently in operation or in the proposal stage for infants under two years of age. Special emphases are placed on program goals for psychological development in the first two years, the curricula which have been developed to accomplish these goals, and the…

  11. Enhancing Program Quality and Care through Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Heather; Kowalski, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    In this age of accountability, afterschool programs are increasingly held responsible for providing youth with quality care and education. Afterschool programs play a critical role in helping youth develop their intrapersonal and interpersonal skills, often by engaging them in activities in which they interact with their peers. Such activities…

  12. Laser transit anemometer software development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbiss, John B.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms were developed for the extraction of two components of mean velocity, standard deviation, and the associated correlation coefficient from laser transit anemometry (LTA) data ensembles. The solution method is based on an assumed two-dimensional Gaussian probability density function (PDF) model of the flow field under investigation. The procedure consists of transforming the data ensembles from the data acquisition domain (consisting of time and angle information) to the velocity space domain (consisting of velocity component information). The mean velocity results are obtained from the data ensemble centroid. Through a least squares fitting of the transformed data to an ellipse representing the intersection of a plane with the PDF, the standard deviations and correlation coefficient are obtained. A data set simulation method is presented to test the data reduction process. Results of using the simulation system with a limited test matrix of input values is also given.

  13. Program Transition Challenges in International Baccalaureate Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinger, Philip; Lee, Moosung; Walker, Allan

    2011-01-01

    International Baccalaureate (IB) schools have experienced dramatic growth worldwide over the past decade in response to burgeoning demand for high-quality education with an international orientation. One increasingly common trend has found international schools adopting two or more of the three programs offered by the IB: the Diploma, Middle Years…

  14. Improving Care Transitions Management: Examining the Role of Accountable Care Organization Participation and Expanded Electronic Health Record Functionality.

    PubMed

    Huber, Thomas P; Shortell, Stephen M; Rodriguez, Hector P

    2017-08-01

    Examine the extent to which physician organization participation in an accountable care organization (ACO) and electronic health record (EHR) functionality are associated with greater adoption of care transition management (CTM) processes. A total of 1,398 physician organizations from the third National Study of Physician Organization survey (NSPO3), a nationally representative sample of medical practices in the United States (January 2012-May 2013). We used data from the third National Study of Physician Organization survey (NSPO3) to assess medical practice characteristics, including CTM processes, ACO participation, EHR functionality, practice type, organization size, ownership, public reporting, and pay-for-performance participation. Multivariate linear regression models estimated the extent to which ACO participation and EHR functionality were associated with greater CTM capabilities, controlling for practice size, ownership, public reporting, and pay-for-performance participation. Approximately half (52.4 percent) of medical practices had a formal program for managing care transitions in place. In adjusted analyses, ACO participation (p < .001) and EHR functionality (p < .001) were independently associated with greater use of CTM processes among medical practices. The growth of ACOs and similar provider risk-bearing arrangements across the country may improve the management of care transitions by physician organizations. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. Creating a Successful Child Care Substitute Program. Program Services Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Partnership for Children, Raleigh.

    In efforts to address child care provider concerns about the staffing crisis, many Smart Start counties in North Carolina are seeking to implement substitute programs to promote release time for child caregivers to return to school or to cover staff illness and leave time. This type of substitute program involves the use of regularly employed,…

  16. Military Transition Assistance Program (TAP): An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-15

    Title II of P.L. 112-56) which made a pre-separation counseling program mandatory for all servicemembers who have served at least 180 continuous days...anticipated retirement date or 12-month period preceding the anticipated separation date. It also specifies that pre-separation counseling should...in the development, management oversight, and strategic planning of TAP. TAP Counseling Requirements Over time, Congress has increased the

  17. Transition of Care from Childhood to Adulthood: Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Andrew A; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2018-01-01

    Passage from childhood to adult life involves biological changes culminating in full reproductive capacity as well as psychosocial development. For patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH), this can be an emotionally challenging time as their pubertal failure results in striking physical differences from their peers. CHH is difficult to differentiate from common disorders of puberty such as constitutional delay of growth and puberty. As such, delays in diagnosis are frequent, and it is a common source of stress and frustration for these adolescents. While effective treatments are available for inducing puberty and attaining fertility is possible in most cases, patients may find it difficult to cope with living with CHH. A critical issue for adolescents with CHH is the risk for being lost to follow-up during the transition from pediatric-centered care to adult care. This article will review the state of the art in diagnosis and treatment of patients with CHH with a particular focus on supporting an effective transition from pediatric-centered care to adult-oriented endocrine services. A synthesis of best practices is offered to help guide clinicians in supporting patients and families during this challenging period of care. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The Transiting Exoplanet Community Early Release Science Program for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie Marie; Bean, Jacob; Stevenson, Kevin; Sing, David; Crossfield, Ian; Knutson, Heather; Line, Michael; Kreidberg, Laura; Desert, Jean-Michel; Wakeford, Hannah R.; Crouzet, Nicolas; Moses, Julianne; Benneke, Björn; Kempton, Eliza; Berta-Thompson, Zach; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Parmentier, Vivien; Gibson, Neale; Schlawin, Everett; Fraine, Jonathan; Kendrew, Sarah; Transiting Exoplanet ERS Team

    2018-01-01

    A community working group was formed in October 2016 to consider early release science with the James Webb Space Telescope that broadly benefits the transiting exoplanet community. Over 100 exoplanet scientists worked collaboratively to identify targets that are observable at the initiation of science operations, yield high SNR with a single event, have substantial scientific merit, and have known spectroscopic features identified by prior observations. The working group developed a program that yields representative datasets for primary transit, secondary eclipse, and phase curve observations using the most promising instrument modes for high-precision spectroscopic timeseries (NIRISS-SOSS, NIRCam, NIRSPec, and MIRI-LRS). The centerpiece of the program is an open data challenge that promotes community engagement and leads to a deeper understanding of the JWST instruments as early as possible in the mission. The program is managed under the premise of open science in order to maximize the value of the early release science observations for the transiting exoplanet community.

  19. The critical care air transport program.

    PubMed

    Beninati, William; Meyer, Michael T; Carter, Todd E

    2008-07-01

    The critical care air transport team program is a component of the U.S. Air Force Aeromedical Evacuation system. A critical care air transport team consists of a critical care physician, critical care nurse, and respiratory therapist along with the supplies and equipment to operate a portable intensive care unit within a cargo aircraft. This capability was developed to support rapidly mobile surgical teams with high capability for damage control resuscitation and limited capacity for postresuscitation care. The critical care air transport team permits rapid evacuation of stabilizing casualties to a higher level of care. The aeromedical environment presents important challenges for the delivery of critical care. All equipment must be tested for safety and effectiveness in this environment before use in flight. The team members must integrate the current standards of care with the limitation imposed by stresses of flight on their patient. The critical care air transport team capability has been used successfully in a range of settings from transport within the United States, to disaster response, to support of casualties in combat.

  20. Transit Reliability Information Program : PATCO-WMATA Propulsion System Reliability/Productivity Analysis

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1984-10-01

    The Transit Reliability Information Program (TRIP) is a government-initiated program to assist the transit industry in satisfying its need for transit reliability information. TRIP provides this assistance through the operation of a national data ban...

  1. Transit Reliability Information Program : Reliability Verification Demonstration Plan for Rapid Rail Vehicles

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-08-01

    The Transit Reliability Information Program (TRIP) is a government-initiated program to assist the transit industry in satisfying its need for transit reliability information. TRIP provides this assistance through the operation of a national Data Ban...

  2. Transit investments for greenhouse gas and energy reduction program : second assessment report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-08-01

    This report is the second assessment of the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administrations Transit Investments for : Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction (TIGGER) Program. The TIGGER Program provides capital funds to transit age...

  3. Transitioning Adolescents and Young Adults With HIV Infection to Adult Care: Pilot Testing the "Movin' Out" Transitioning Protocol.

    PubMed

    Maturo, Donna; Powell, Alexis; Major-Wilson, Hannah; Sanchez, Kenia; De Santis, Joseph P; Friedman, Lawrence B

    2015-01-01

    Advances in care and treatment of adolescents/young adults with HIV infection have made survival into adulthood possible, requiring transition to adult care. Researchers have documented that the transition process is challenging for adolescents/young adults. To ensure successful transition, a formal transition protocol is needed. Despite existing research, little quantitative evaluation of the transition process has been conducted. The purpose of the study was to pilot test the "Movin' Out" Transitioning Protocol, a formalized protocol developed to assist transition to adult care. A retrospective medical/nursing record review was conducted with 38 clients enrolled in the "Movin' Out" Transitioning Protocol at a university-based adolescent medicine clinic providing care to adolescents/young adults with HIV infection. Almost half of the participants were able to successfully transition to adult care. Reasons for failure to transition included relocation, attrition, lost to follow-up, and transfer to another adult service. Failure to transition to adult care was not related to adherence issues, X(2) (1, N=38)=2.49, p=.288; substance use, X(2) (1, N=38)=1.71, p=.474; mental health issues, X(2) (1, N=38)=2.23, p=.322; or pregnancy/childrearing, X(2) (1, N=38)=0.00, p=.627). Despite the small sample size, the "Movin' Out" Transitioning Protocol appears to be useful in guiding the transition process of adolescents/young adults with HIV infection to adult care. More research is needed with a larger sample to fully evaluate the "Movin' Out" Transitioning Protocol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimizing care transitions: the role of the community pharmacist

    PubMed Central

    Melody, Karleen T; McCartney, Elizabeth; Sen, Sanchita; Duenas, Gladys

    2016-01-01

    Transitions of care (TOC) refer to the movement of patients across institutions, among providers, between different levels of care, and to and from home. Medication errors that occur during TOC have the potential to result in medical complications that are serious for the patient and costly to the health care system. Positive outcomes have been demonstrated when pharmacists are involved in providing TOC services, including reducing preventable adverse drug reactions, medication-related problems, and rehospitalizations, as well as improving the discharge process. This review explores TOC models involving community pharmacy practice, the current impact of pharmacist interventions in TOC, and patient satisfaction with TOC services provided by community pharmacists. Common barriers and potential solutions to TOC services provided in the community pharmacy, such as patient identification, information gathering, standardization of services, administrative support, reimbursement, and time restraints, are also discussed. PMID:29354539

  5. Transition to Adult Care for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Markowitz, Jessica T.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adults with type 1 diabetes are at risk for poor glycemic control, gaps in medical care, and adverse health outcomes. With the increasing incidence in type 1 diabetes in the pediatric population, there will be an increase in the numbers of teens and young adults transferring their care from pediatric providers to adult diabetes services in the future. In recent years, the topic of transitioning pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes to adult diabetes care has been discussed at length in the literature and there have been many observational studies. However, there are few interventional studies and, to date, no randomized clinical trials. This paper discusses the rationale for studying this important area. We review both observational and interventional literature over the past several years, with a focus on new research. In addition, important areas for future research are outlined. PMID:22922877

  6. Transition to adult care for children with chronic neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol

    2011-03-01

    Chronic neurological disorders in children have significant effects on adult medical and social function. Transition and then formal transfer of care from pediatric to adult services is a complex process, although there are virtually no objective data to inform physicians about the most effective approach. Some neurological disorders that start in children are a danger to society if poorly treated in adulthood, some disorders that were previously lethal in childhood now permit survival well into adulthood, and others are static in childhood but progressive in adulthood. Some disorders remit or are cured in childhood but continue to have serious comorbidity in adulthood, whereas others are similar and persistent in children and adults. Maturity, provision of information, and cognitive problems are confounders. We discuss several models of transition/transfer but prefer a joint pediatric/adult transition clinic. We make a series of suggestions about how to improve the transition/transfer process with the hope of better medical and social adult outcome for children with neurological disorders. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  7. Leaving foster or residential care: a participatory study of care leavers' experiences of health and social care transitions.

    PubMed

    Liabo, K; McKenna, C; Ingold, A; Roberts, H

    2017-03-01

    Young people in residential or foster care experience multiple transitions around their 18 th birthday without the long term and consistent support from their family of origin that most of their peers can expect. We report a mixed methods qualitative study of transitions across health and social care services for children leaving care, providing narratives of what young people described as positive, and what they and professionals think might be improved. Data were collected in participatory meetings and individual interviews between young people and researchers (n = 24) and individual interviews with practitioners (n = 11). In addition to discussion and interview techniques, we used pictorial and other participatory methods. Interviews were coded by three members of the team and differences resolved with a fourth. Our analysis draws on thematic and framework approaches. Health was rarely at the top of any young person's agenda, although gaps in health care and exceptional care were both described. Housing, financial support and education took priority. Young people and professionals alike emphasized the importance of workers prepared to go the extra mile; of young people being able to contact professionals; and professionals being able to contact one another. Policy and practice aspirations for care leavers recommend gradual change but transfer rather than transition continues to be described by care leavers. Our data support the need for transition as a long-term process, with children and young people having early opportunities to prepare for citizenship. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Safety threats and opportunities to improve interfacility care transitions: insights from patients and family members.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Kitto, Simon; Merkley, Jane; Lyons, Renee F; Bell, Chaim M

    2012-01-01

    To explore patients' and family members' perspectives on how safety threats are detected and managed across care transitions and strategies that improve care transitions from acute care hospitals to complex continuing care and rehabilitation health care organizations. Poorly executed care transitions can result in additional health care spending due to adverse outcomes and delays as patients wait to transfer from acute care to facilities providing different levels of care. Patients and their families play an integral role in ensuring they receive safe care, as they are the one constant in care transitions processes. However, patients' and family members' perspectives on how safety threats are detected and managed across care transitions from health care facility to health care facility remain poorly understood. This qualitative study used semistructured interviews with patients (15) and family members (seven) who were transferred from an acute care hospital to a complex continuing care/rehabilitation care facility. Data were analyzed using a directed content analytical approach. OUR RESULTS REVEALED THREE KEY OVERARCHING THEMES IN THE PERCEPTIONS: lacking information, getting "funneled through" too soon, and difficulty adjusting to the shift from total care to almost self-care. Several patients and families described their expectations and experiences associated with their interfacility care transitions as being uninformed about their transfer or that transfer happened too early. In addition, study participants identified the need for having a coordinated approach to care transitions that engages patients and family members. Study findings provide patients' and family members' perspectives on key safety threats and how to improve care transitions. Of particular importance is the need for patients and family members to play a more active role in their care transition planning and self-care management.

  9. Now where was I going? The challenge of care transitions for the cognitively impaired.

    PubMed

    Noel, Margaret A

    2012-01-01

    Transitions in care settings can be disconcerting to anyone, but they can be particularly difficult for people with cognitive impairment. MemoryCare's design of integrated clinical and care management services is well suited to minimizing the preventable morbidity that can accompany transitions in health care for cognitively impaired older adults at high risk for poor outcomes.

  10. A Mixed Methods Investigation of Maternal Perspectives on Transition Experiences in Early Care and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Rebecca Anne; Speirs, Katherine Elizabeth; Encinger, Amy Johnson; McElwain, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Strong relationships among children, families, and early care and education (ECE) providers are key to quality infant-toddler care. These relationships are shaped during the initial transition period to group care. We used a mixed methods approach to (a) assess maternal perspectives on the transition to group care, (b) explore…

  11. Novice nurse practitioner workforce transition and turnover intention in primary care.

    PubMed

    Faraz, Asefeh

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the workforce transition and turnover intention of novice nurse practitioners (NPs) in primary care (PC). This research aimed to describe the individual characteristics, role acquisition and job satisfaction of novice NPs, and identify factors associated with their successful transition and turnover intention in the first year of PC practice. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted via online survey administered to a national sample of 177 NPs who graduated from an accredited NP program and were practicing in a PC setting for 3-12 months. This study demonstrated that greater professional autonomy in the workplace is a critical factor in turnover intention in novice NPs in the PC setting. Further research is needed regarding the novice NP workforce transition to provide adequate professional autonomy and support during this critical period. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  12. Implementing a wound care resource nurse program.

    PubMed

    Tully, Sandra; Ganson, Claudia; Savage, Pamela; Banez, Carol; Zarins, Baiba

    2007-08-01

    Nurses are leaders in implementing innovations that can create positive outcomes in the prevention and management of pressure ulcers in patients admitted to acute care hospitals. Believing that nurses knowledgeable in best practices could impact prevalence, incidence, and care of pressure ulcers, an educational program was developed in a Canadian healthcare system to inform and empower nurses providing skin and wound care. The program afforded participants the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skill to recognize patients at risk for developing pressure ulcers and to independently treat Stage I and Stage II pressure ulcers and skin breakdown related to moisture, friction, and shear. The program includes evidence-based practice recommendations and highlights the Best Practice Guidelines developed by the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario, a provincial body taking an active role in the development, implementation, and evaluation of published guidelines derived from global research literature synthesis. Pre- and post participation assessment of 65 nurse participants from three hospitals deemed the program successful in terms of knowledge and fulfillment of their educational expectations. Organizational support to implement the skin and wound care resource nurse role was encouraging and medical directives for Stage I and Stage II pressure ulcers by nurses were implemented. Evaluation and monitoring of program outcomes, including pressure ulcer incidence rates, continue.

  13. Update: Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program (TBIP), 2012-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malagon, Helen; McCold, Paul; Nelson, Joan Johnston

    2013-01-01

    This report provides an update on the Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program (TBIP). In 2012-13, 104,025 English language learners (ELLs) received state services through the TBIP. This was an increase of just over 9% from the previous year. Most students live in urban areas along Interstate 5 corridor and in rural areas like the Yakima Valley.…

  14. Update: Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program (TBIP) 2012-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malagon, Helen; McCold, Paul; Nelson, Joan Johnston

    2013-01-01

    When students with little or no previous exposure to the English language enter schools in Washington, they are often unable to fully benefit from content instruction provided in English. They are at a high risk of academic failure unless the necessary language support is provided. The Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program (TBIP) provides…

  15. Acquisition: Navy Transition of Advanced Technology Programs to Military Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-04

    The audit objective was to determine whether the Navy was successful in transitioning advanced technology projects to military applications...they relate to the audit objective. See Appendix A for a discussion of the audit scope and methodology, the review of the management control program, and prior coverage related to the audit objectives.

  16. Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

  17. Competition and rural primary care programs.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, T C

    1990-04-01

    Rural primary care programs were established in areas where there was thought to be no competition for patients. However, evidence from site visits and surveys of a national sample of subsidized programs revealed a pattern of competitive responses by the clinics. In this study of 193 rural primary care programs, mail and telephone surveys produced uniform data on the organization, operation, finances, and utilization of a representative sample of clinics. The programs were found to compete in terms of: (1) price, (2) service mix, (3) staff availability, (4) structural accessibility, (5) outreach, and (6) targeting a segment of the market. The competitive strategies employed by the clinics had consequences that affected their productivity and financial stability. The strategies were related to the perceived missions of the programs, and depended heavily upon the degree of isolation of the program and the targeting of the services. The competitive strategy chosen by a particular program could not be predicted based on service area population and apparent competitors in the service area. The goals and objectives of the programs had more to do with their competitive responses than with market characteristics. Moreover, the chosen strategies may not meet the demands of those markets.

  18. Managing the transition to integrated health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Griffith, J R

    1996-01-01

    Today's successful community hospitals should and will evolve into integrated health care organizations (IHCOs) that will share several common characteristics. IHCOs will have a community--not a membership--orientation, and this will be a distinguishing characteristic and a source of market appeal. The transition to IHCO will be a slow one, and to prosper, the IHCO will have to accommodate both price-oriented markets and traditional ones. Successful IHCOs will expand technical skills and capabilities to control costs and quality. New strategic competencies will have to be developed, and to do this, emerging IHCOs will improve the ability of managers to support decisions and sell them both to the buyers and the public at large. Excellent patient care will rest upon better trained, advised, and informed management teams. Making the change to an IHCO will take time and money, but organizations that make steady progress are likely to succeed.

  19. The Discourse of Transition: Teachers' Language Ideologies within Transitional Bilingual Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Transitional bilingual education (TBE), the most common form of bilingual education in the United States, is too often entrenched in a subtractive, English-dominant ideology. This article explores the conflicting language ideologies of teachers in TBE programs, posing the question, "In what way do TBE teachers' discourses reflect/reinforce…

  20. Transition from paediatric care to adult care for patients with mucopolysaccharidosis.

    PubMed

    Couce, M L; Del Toro, M; García-Jiménez, M C; Gutierrez-Solana, L; Hermida-Ameijeiras, Á; López-Rodríguez, M; Pérez-López, J; Torralba, M Á

    Mucopolysaccharidosis are multisystem diseases that require large multidisciplinary teams for their care. Specific recommendations are therefore needed for the transition from childhood to adulthood in this patient group. To overcome the barriers that might arise during the transition, the authors consider it essential to implement a flexible plan with a coordinator for the entire process, systematising the information through a standardised paediatric discharge report and educating the patient and their family about the disease, showing the characteristics of the healthcare system in this new stage. The final objective is that, once the transition to adulthood has been completed, the patient's autonomy and potential development are maximised and that the patient receives appropriate healthcare during this transition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  1. Child Care Subsidy and Program Quality Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antle, Becky F.; Frey, Andy; Barbee, Anita; Frey, Shannon; Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Cox, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: Previous research has documented conflicting results on the relationship between program quality and the percentage of children receiving subsidized child care (subsidy density) in early childhood centers. This research examined the relationship between subsidy density and the quality of infant and preschool classrooms in child…

  2. Framing Care for Planners of Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glowacki-Dudka, Michelle; Mullett, Cathy; Griswold, Wendy; Baize-Ward, Amy; Vetor-Suits, Crissy; Londt, Susan Cole

    2018-01-01

    Using a framework of care to design experiences in formal or informal learning does two things. It acknowledges intentions of reflective learning through open communication and meets expectations of scholars seeking knowledge within a learning community. This proposed framework was developed from programs involving popular education, community…

  3. Computer Programming Languages for Health Care

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Joseph T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper advocates the use of standard high level programming languages for medical computing. It recommends that U.S. Government agencies having health care missions implement coordinated policies that encourage the use of existing standard languages and the development of new ones, thereby enabling them and the medical computing community at large to share state-of-the-art application programs. Examples are based on a model that characterizes language and language translator influence upon the specification, development, test, evaluation, and transfer of application programs.

  4. The Transiting Exoplanet Community Early Release Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie; Bean, Jacob; Stevenson, Kevin; Alam, M.; Batalha, N.; Benneke, B.; Berta-Thompson, Z.; Blecic, J.; Bruno, G.; Carter, A.; Chapman, J.; Crossfield, I.; Crouzet, N.; Decin, L.; Demory, B.; Desert, J.; Dragomir, D.; Evans, T.; Fortney, J.; Fraine, J.; Gao, P.; Garcia Munoz, A.; Gibson, N.; Goyal, J.; Harrington, J.; Heng, K.; Hu, R.; Kempton, E.; Kendrew, S.; Kilpatrick, B.; Knutson, H.; Kreidberg, L.; Krick, J.; Lagage, P.; Lendl, M.; Line, M.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Louden, T.; Madhusudhan, N.; Mandell, A.; Mansfield, M.; May, E.; Morello, G.; Morley, C.; Moses, J.; Nikolov, N.; Parmentier, V.; Redfield, S.; Roberts, J.; Schlawin, E.; Showman, A.; Sing, D.; Spake, J.; Swain, M.; Todorov, K.; Tsiaras, A.; Venot, O.; Waalkes, W.; Wakeford, H.; Wheatley, P.; Zellem, R.

    2017-11-01

    JWST presents the opportunity to transform our understanding of planets and the origins of life by revealing the atmospheric compositions, structures, and dynamics of transiting exoplanets in unprecedented detail. However, the high-precision, time-series observations required for such investigations have unique technical challenges, and our prior experience with HST, Spitzer, and Kepler indicates that there will be a steep learning curve when JWST becomes operational. We propose an ERS program to accelerate the acquisition and diffusion of technical expertise for transiting exoplanet observations with JWST. This program will also provide a compelling set of representative datasets, which will enable immediate scientific breakthroughs. We will exercise the time-series modes of all four instruments that have been identified as the consensus highest priority by the community, observe the full suite of transiting planet characterization geometries (transits, eclipses, and phase curves), and target planets with host stars that span an illustrative range of brightnesses. The proposed observations were defined through an inclusive and transparent process that had participation from JWST instrument experts and international leaders in transiting exoplanet studies. The targets have been vetted with previous measurements, will be observable early in the mission, and have exceptional scientific merit. We will engage the community with a two-phase Data Challenge that culminates with the delivery of planetary spectra, time series instrument performance reports, and open-source data analysis toolkits.

  5. 32 CFR 199.20 - Continued Health Care Benefit Program (CHCBP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... program. However, unlike the Standard program there is a cost for enrollment to the CHCBP and these premium costs are payable by enrollees before any care may be provided. (b) General provisions. Except for... 55 or transitional healthcare under 10 U.S.C. 1145, and (iii) Who would otherwise not be eligible for...

  6. 32 CFR 199.20 - Continued Health Care Benefit Program (CHCBP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... program. However, unlike the Standard program there is a cost for enrollment to the CHCBP and these premium costs are payable by enrollees before any care may be provided. (b) General provisions. Except for... 55 or transitional healthcare under 10 U.S.C. 1145, and (iii) Who would otherwise not be eligible for...

  7. 32 CFR 199.20 - Continued Health Care Benefit Program (CHCBP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... program. However, unlike the Standard program there is a cost for enrollment to the CHCBP and these premium costs are payable by enrollees before any care may be provided. (b) General provisions. Except for... 55 or transitional healthcare under 10 U.S.C. 1145, and (iii) Who would otherwise not be eligible for...

  8. A Summative Program Evaluation of a Comprehensive 9th Grade Transition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roybal, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    The transition from 8th grade to 9th grade is one that is replete with challenges for students, especially for minority students who live in economically disadvantaged communities. One low-income, high minority comprehensive high school in the western United States implemented five separate strategies to create a freshman transition program to aid…

  9. Transitional care for rheumatic conditions in Europe: current clinical practice and available resources.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Daniel; Leon, Leticia; Foster, Helen; Carmona, Loreto; Minden, Kirsten

    2017-06-09

    To assess European pediatric rheumatology providers' current clinical practices and resources used in the transition from child-centered to adult-oriented care. European pediatric rheumatologists were invited to complete a 17-item anonymized e-survey assessing current transition practices, transition policy awareness, and needs in advance of the publication of EULAR/PReS recommendations on transition. The response rate was 121/276 (44%), including responses from 115 centers in 22 European Union countries. Although 32/121 (26%) responded that their centers did not offer transition services, the majority (99%) agreed that a formalized process in transitioning patients to adult care is necessary. A minority (<30%) of respondents stated that they have a written transition policy although 46% have an informal transition process. Designated staff to support transitional care were available in a minority of centers: nurse (35%), physiotherapist (15%), psychologist (15%), social worker (8%), and occupational therapist (2%). The existence of a designated team member to coordinate transition was acknowledged in many centers (64% of respondents) although just 36% use a checklist for young people as part of individualized transitional care. This survey of European pediatric rheumatology providers regarding transitional care practices demonstrates agreement that transitional care is important, and wide variation in current provision of transition services exists.

  10. 5 CFR 792.203 - Child care subsidy programs; eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Child care subsidy programs; eligibility... of Appropriated Funds for Child Care Costs for Lower Income Employees § 792.203 Child care subsidy programs; eligibility. (a)(1) An Executive agency may establish a child care subsidy program in which the...

  11. 5 CFR 792.203 - Child care subsidy programs; eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Child care subsidy programs; eligibility... of Appropriated Funds for Child Care Costs for Lower Income Employees § 792.203 Child care subsidy programs; eligibility. (a)(1) An Executive agency may establish a child care subsidy program in which the...

  12. Project ACHIEVE - using implementation research to guide the evaluation of transitional care effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Brock, Jane; Jack, Brian; Mittman, Brian; Naylor, Mary; Sorra, Joanna; Mays, Glen; Williams, Mark V

    2016-02-19

    Poorly managed hospital discharges and care transitions between health care facilities can cause poor outcomes for both patients and their caregivers. Unfortunately, the usual approach to health care delivery does not support continuity and coordination across the settings of hospital, doctors' offices, home or nursing homes. Though complex efforts with multiple components can improve patient outcomes and reduce 30-day readmissions, research has not identified which components are necessary. Also we do not know how delivery of core components may need to be adjusted based on patient, caregiver, setting or characteristics of the community, or how system redesign can be accelerated. Project ACHIEVE focuses on diverse Medicare populations such as individuals with multiple chronic diseases, patients with low health literacy/numeracy and limited English proficiency, racial and ethnic minority groups, low-income groups, residents of rural areas, and individuals with disabilities. During the first phase, we will use focus groups to identify the transitional care outcomes and components that matter most to patients and caregivers to inform development and validation of assessment instruments. During the second phase, we will evaluate the comparative effectiveness of multi-component care transitions programs occurring across the U.S. Using a mixed-methods approach for this evaluation, we will study historical (retrospective) and current and future (prospective) groups of patients, caregivers and providers using site visits, surveys, and clinical and claims data. In this natural experiment observational study, we use a fractional factorial study design to specify comparators and estimate the individual and combined effects of key transitional care components. Our study will determine which evidence-based transitional care components and/or clusters most effectively produce patient and caregiver desired outcomes overall and among diverse patient and caregiver populations in

  13. Transitions of Care Between Acute and Chronic Heart Failure: Critical Steps in the Design of a Multidisciplinary Care Model for the Prevention of Rehospitalization.

    PubMed

    Comín-Colet, Josep; Enjuanes, Cristina; Lupón, Josep; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Badosa, Neus; Verdú, José María

    2016-10-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of heart failure, mortality, the number of readmissions, and their associated health care costs are very high. Heart failure care models inspired by the chronic care model, also known as heart failure programs or heart failure units, have shown clinical benefits in high-risk patients. However, while traditional heart failure units have focused on patients detected in the outpatient phase, the increasing pressure from hospital admissions is shifting the focus of interest toward multidisciplinary programs that concentrate on transitions of care, particularly between the acute phase and the postdischarge phase. These new integrated care models for heart failure revolve around interventions at the time of transitions of care. They are multidisciplinary and patient-centered, designed to ensure continuity of care, and have been demonstrated to reduce potentially avoidable hospital admissions. Key components of these models are early intervention during the inpatient phase, discharge planning, early postdischarge review and structured follow-up, advanced transition planning, and the involvement of physicians and nurses specialized in heart failure. It is hoped that such models will be progressively implemented across the country. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Medicaid program; health care-related taxes.

    PubMed

    2008-02-22

    This final rule revises the collection threshold under the regulatory indirect guarantee hold harmless arrangement test to reflect the provisions of the Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006. When determining whether there is an indirect guarantee under the 2-prong test for portions of fiscal years beginning on or after January 1, 2008 and before October 1, 2011, the allowable amount that can be collected from a health care-related tax is reduced from 6 to 5.5 percent of net patient revenues received by the taxpayers. This final rule also clarifies the standard for determining the existence of a hold harmless arrangement under the positive correlation test, Medicaid payment test, and the guarantee test (with conforming changes to parallel provisions concerning hold harmless arrangements with respect to provider-related donations); codifies changes to permissible class of health care items or services related to managed care organizations as enacted by the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005; and, removes obsolete transition period regulatory language.

  15. We Never Thought This Would Happen: Transitioning Care of Adolescents with Perinatally-Acquired HIV Infection from Pediatrics to Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Tara; Benin, Andrea L.; Wagner, Krystn; Romano, Sostena; Andiman, Warren A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Transitioning the medical care of children with perinatally-acquired HIV from pediatric care to internal medicine practices has become increasingly important as newer therapies prolong survival. The study aims to describe challenges to caring for these adolescents and the potential barriers to transitioning them to internal medicine-based care. Methods Qualitative study in which data were gathered from open-ended interviews conducted from November 2005-April 2006 with 18 adolescents with HIV, 15 of their principal guardians, and 9 pediatric health care providers from the Yale Pediatric AIDS Care Program, New Haven, Connecticut. Results Issues of stigma played a prominent role in both the challenges to care and barriers to transitioning care. Challenges to care were: (1) poor adherence to medication regimens; (2) adolescent sexuality; and (3) disorganized social environments. Potential barriers to transitioning care were: (1) families’ negative perceptions of and experiences with stigma of HIV disease--which undermined the desire to meet new providers; (2) perceived and actual lack of autonomy-- pediatric providers feared that staff in adult clinics would demand a level of independence that adolescents did not have; and (3) difficulty letting-go of relationships-- adolescents, guardians, and providers described a familial relationship and expressed anxiety about terminating their relationships. Conclusion Understanding these challenges and barriers can inform both pediatric and adult HIV care providers and enable them to create successful transition programs, with the goal of improving retention and follow-up to care. PMID:20024697

  16. Transition from paediatric to adult care of adolescent patients with congenital heart disease: a pathway to optimal care.

    PubMed

    Strijbosch, A M M; Zwart, R; Blom, N A; Bouma, B J; Groenink, M; Boekholdt, S M; de Winter, R; Mulder, B J M; Backx, A P

    2016-11-01

    Adolescents with congenital heart disease transition from a paediatric to an adult setting. This is associated with loss-to-follow-up and suboptimal care. Increasing numbers of patients justify a special program. In this study we evaluated the cooperative program between paediatric and adult cardiology departments in a tertiary referral centre. In this retrospective study, patients with congenital heart disease with at least one appointment scheduled at the transition program between January 2010 and January 2015 were included. They were seen by a paediatric cardiologist at the age of 15 years in the paediatric department and from age 18 to 25 in the adult department. Demographic and medical data were collected from the electronic patient files. A total of 193 patients (105 males, 88 females) were identified. Sex distribution was almost equal. Most patients were 18-21 years of age. The largest group, 128 patients (67 %), lived within 50 kilometres of our hospital. Paediatric cardiologists referred 157 (81 %) of patients. General practitioners and cardiologists from outside our centre were important referrers for patients lost to follow-up, together accounting for 9 %. A total of 34 (18 %) patients missed an appointment without notification. Repeat offenders, 16 of 34 patients, formed a significant minority within this group. A total of 114 (59 %) patients were attending school, 46 (24 %) were employed, and 33 (17 %) patients were inactive. Activities are in line with capabilities. A nurse practitioner was involved with the 7 % with complex and psychosocial problems. Moderately severe congenital heart defects formed the largest patient category of 102 (53 %) patients. In 3 % of patients the diagnosis had to be revised or was significantly incomplete. In 30 (16 %) patients, cardiac diagnosis was part of a syndrome. Of the 193 patients, 117 (92 %) were in NYHA class I, with 12 (6 %) and 4 (2 %) patients falling into classes

  17. Leadership transitions in multisectoral health care alliances: Implications for member perceptions of participation value.

    PubMed

    Hearld, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shi, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative forms of organizations such as multisectoral health care alliances play an increasingly prominent role in the U.S. health care system. A key feature of these organizations highlighted in previous research is leadership, yet little research has examined what happens when there is a change in leadership. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between leadership transitions in an alliance and member assessments of the benefits and costs of participation, indicators of the value that members derive from their involvement in the alliance. The study used quantitative data collected from three rounds of surveys of alliance members participating in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Aligning Forces for Quality Program. Qualitative interview data supplemented this analysis by providing examples of why leadership transitions may affect participation benefits and costs. Quantitative analysis indicated that alliance members who experienced a change in leadership reported both higher and lower levels of participation benefits and costs, depending on the type of leadership change (i.e., alliance leader vs. programmatic leader). Qualitative analysis suggested that the scope of responsibilities of different types of leaders plays an important role in how members perceive changes. Likewise, interviews indicated that timing influences how disruptive a leadership transition is and whether it is perceived positively or negatively. Leadership transitions present both challenges and opportunities; whether the effects are felt positively or negatively depends on when a transition occurs and how it is handled by incoming leaders and remaining members. Furthermore, different types of members report higher levels of participation benefits and lower levels of participation costs, suggesting that efforts to maintain a sense of alliance value during times of transitions may be able to target certain types of individuals.

  18. The Transiting Exoplanet Community Early Release Science Program for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob; Sing, David K.; Crossfield, Ian; Knutson, Heather; Line, Michael R.; Kreidberg, Laura; Desert, Jean-Michel; Wakeford, Hannah; Crouzet, Nicolas; Moses, Julianne I.; Benneke, Björn; Kempton, Eliza; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Parmentier, Vivien; Gibson, Neale; Schlawin, Everett; Fraine, Jonathan; Kendrew, Sarah; Transiting Exoplanet Community ERS Team

    2018-06-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope offers astronomers the opportunity to observe the composition, structure, and dynamics of transiting exoplanet atmospheres with unprecedented detail. However, such observations require very precise time-series spectroscopic monitoring of bright stars and present unique technical challenges. The Transiting Exoplanet Community Early Release Science Program for JWST aims to help the community understand and overcome these technical challenges as early in the mission as possible, and to enable exciting scientific discoveries through the creation of public exoplanet atmosphere datasets. With observations of three hot Jupiters spanning a range of host star brightnesses, this program will exercise time-series modes with all four JWST instruments and cover a full suite of transiting planet characterization geometries (transits, eclipses, and phase curves). We designed the observational strategy through an open and transparent community effort, with contributions from an international collaboration of over 100 experts in exoplanet observations, theory, and instrumentation. Community engagement with the project will be centered around open Data Challenge activities using both simulated and real ERS data, for exoplanet scientists to cross-validate and improve their analysis tools and theoretical models. Recognizing that the scientific utility of JWST will be determined not only by its hardware and software but also by the community of people who use it, we take an intentional approach toward crafting an inclusive collaboration and encourage new participants to join our efforts.

  19. Transition to adult-oriented health care: perspectives of youth and adults with complex physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Young, Nancy L; Barden, Wendy S; Mills, Wendy A; Burke, Tricia A; Law, Mary; Boydell, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    The transition to adulthood is extremely difficult for individuals with disabilities. We sought to explore the specific issue of transition to adult-oriented health care in a Canadian context. We conducted semi-structured individual interviews with 15 youth and 15 adults with cerebral palsy, spina bifida, and acquired brain injuries of childhood, and their parents (n = 30). Respondents discussed their health care services, their experience with clinical transition, and contributing factors. We analyzed the transcripts using qualitative methods. All participants identified challenges in transition, including: lack of access to health care; lack of professionals' knowledge; lack of information and uncertainty regarding the transition process. Two solutions were identified: early provision of detailed information and more extensive support throughout the clinical transition process. The challenges of clinical transition were universal. More extensive information and support is needed during transition to ensure an efficient move to appropriate adult-oriented health care.

  20. A Pilot Study for Antimicrobial Stewardship Post-Discharge: Avoiding Pitfalls at the Transitions of Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Justin M; Leedahl, Nathan D; Losing, Ashley; Carson, Paul J; Leedahl, David D

    2018-04-01

    Lack of patient follow-up is a major concern during care transitions, and the role of an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) in assessing antimicrobial regimens after hospital discharge is not well described. We implemented an expanded ASP to include patients recently discharged from the hospital and measured its impact on inappropriate antimicrobial therapy 72 hours after inpatient culture data were finalized. A prospective cohort study was conducted at a 583-bed tertiary care center in the Upper Midwest of America. All patients discharged from our facility on antimicrobial therapy with pending culture results between February 3, 2016, and March 2, 2016, were included for review. If a pathogen nonsusceptible to all prescribed antimicrobials was identified post-discharge, a recommendation for therapy modification was communicated to the prescriber. Thirty-eight patients discharged from our hospital on antimicrobial therapy with pending culture results were evaluated for intervention. When final culture susceptibilities were considered, 5 of 38 patients had been prescribed an inappropriate antimicrobial agent. An ASP pharmacist intervened on 4 of 5 patients, resulting in 3 of 5 patients transitioning to appropriate antimicrobial therapy. When compared to a historical cohort, our transitions-of-care ASP yielded a 3.6-fold increase in antimicrobial-related interventions among discharged patients while reducing inappropriate outpatient antimicrobial therapy by 39%. We believe this is the first pharmacist-driven ASP represented in the medical literature which evaluated all available inpatient culture data to serve patients discharged from the hospital. Antimicrobial stewardship for patients in care transitions may provide an opportunity to increase ASP interventions and reduce inappropriate antimicrobial therapy.

  1. New graduate nurse transition programs: Relationships with bullying and access to support.

    PubMed

    Rush, Kathy L; Adamack, Monica; Gordon, Jason; Janke, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract New graduate nurses are often targets of bullying and horizontal violence. The support offered by new graduate nurse transition programs may moderate the effects of bullying and limit its negative impact on new graduate nurse transition. This study examined the relationships between access to support, workplace bullying and new graduate nurse transition within the context of new graduate transition programs. As part of a mixed methods study, an online survey was administered to new graduates (N = 245) approximately a year from starting employment. Bullied new graduate nurses were less able to access support when needed and had poorer transition experiences than their non-bullied peers. Participation in a formal transition program improved access to support and transition for bullied new graduate nurses. People supports within transition programs positively influenced the new graduate nurse transition experience. Formal transition programs provide support that attenuates the impact of bullying on new graduate nurses and improves transition.

  2. New Graduate Transition Programs: Relationships With Access to Support and Bullying.

    PubMed

    Rush, Kathy L; Adamack, Monica; Gordon, Jason; Janke, Robert

    2014-02-03

    Abstract New graduate nurses are often targets of bullying and horizontal violence. The support offered by new graduate nurse transition programs may moderate the effects of bullying and limit its negative impact on new graduate nurse transition. This study examined the relationships between access to support, workplace bullying and new graduate nurse transition within the context of New Graduate Transition programs. As part of a mixed methods study, an online survey was administered to new graduates (n=245) approximately a year from starting employment. Bullied new graduate nurses were less able to access support when needed and had poorer transition experiences than their non-bullied peers. Participation in a formal transition program improved access to support and transition for bullied new graduate nurses. People supports within transition programs positively influenced the new graduate nurse transition experience. Formal transition programs provide support that attenuates the impact of bullying on new graduate nurses and improves transition.

  3. Boundary Layer Transition Experiments in Support of the Hypersonics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Chen, Fang-Jenq; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental boundary layer transition studies in support of fundamental hypersonics research are reviewed. The two studies are the HyBoLT flight experiment and a new ballistic range effort. Details are provided of the objectives and approach associated with each experimental program. The establishment of experimental databases from ground and flight are to provide better understanding of high-speed flows and data to validate and guide the development of simulation tools.

  4. MASS TRANSIT: FTA Could Relieve New Starts Program Funding Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    progress through a local or regional review of alternatives, develop preliminary engineering plans , and obtain FTA’s approval for final design.7 TEA-21...and transit programs can also be used to develop, plan , and/or construct these projects. 7The alternatives analysis stage provides information on the...include right-of-way acquisition, utility relocation, and the preparation of final construction plans and cost estimates. Background Page 5 GAO-01-987 New

  5. [Nutritional care in the cardiac rehabilitation program].

    PubMed

    da Vico, Letizia; Biffi, Barbara; Masini, Maria Luisa; Fattirolli, Francesco

    2007-06-01

    There is some evidence of the efficacy of nutritional care in modifying eating habits and behavior in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation: nutritional care has a relevant role in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. The dietitian is the qualified sanitary professional for nutritional care. The aim of this study was to define the role of dietitians within a health care team in programs of cardiac rehabilitation. In this setting, nutritional care starts with a dietary assessment, which includes a measurement of the anthropometric parameters, and a survey of the patient knowledge and eating habits. If there is no need for change in the patient lifestyle, the patient is addressed to the normal cardiac rehabilitation program with no further nutritional intervention except one session of counseling. When lifestyle changes are needed, the dietitian defines, together with the patient, therapeutic aims and expected results. The following phase is represented by group session with patients and their relatives during which nutritional topics are discussed and nutritional education is provided Afterwards, self-monitoring sheets of eating habits are individually discussed in one visit; a last individual visit is used for a final assessment of nutritional knowledge, dietary habits, and anthropometric parameters. In case of unsatisfactory results, patients are invited to participate to three group session to be held biweekly, during which they interact with the dietitian and take part to exercises and group discussions. When the established targets are reached, the nutritional program includes individual follow up visits at six and twelve months for further assessment of medium term results.

  6. Challenges of the Transition from Pediatric Care to Care of Adults: "Say Goodbye, Say Hello".

    PubMed

    Touraine, Philippe; Polak, Michel

    2018-01-01

    Transition has been defined as "the purposeful, planned movement of adolescents and young adults with chronic physical and medical conditions from child-centered to adult-oriented health care systems." We will here describe the challenges of such a process: challenges coming from the pediatrician, from the adolescent, linked to the disease itself, and those from the parents. We will outline how to overcome those fears and challenges to provide a successful transition process. A key factor to underline that process is that a relationship based on confidence should be established between the pediatrician and the physician for adults, in order for that relationship, based on trust, to be the basis for the transfer of the adolescent from the pediatric system of care to the adult one. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Patient care information systems and physicians: the transition from technology icon to health care instrument.

    PubMed

    Bria, W F

    1993-11-01

    We have discussed several important transitions now occurring in PCIS that promise to improve the utility and availability of these systems for the average physician. Charles Babbage developed the first computers as "thinking machines" so that we may extend our ability to grapple with more and more complex problems. If current trends continue, we will finally witness the evolution of patient care computing from information icons of the few to clinical instruments improving the quality of medical decision making and care for all patients.

  8. Improving care transitions through meaningful use stage 2: continuity of care document.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz; Wilson, Marisa L; Newhouse, Robin P

    2013-02-01

    In this department, Drs Murphy, Wilson, and Newhouse highlight hot topics in nursing outcomes, research, and evidence-based practice relevant to the nurse administrator. The goal is to discuss the practical implications for nurse leaders in diverse healthcare settings. Content includes evidence-based projects and decision making, locating measurement tools for quality improvement and safety projects, using outcome measures to evaluate quality, practice implications of administrative research, and exemplars of projects that demon strate innovative approaches to organizational problems. In this article, the authors describe the elements of continuity of care documentation, how sharing information can improve the quality and safety of care transitions and the implications for nurse executives.

  9. Examining the Role of Primary Care Physicians and Challenges Faced When Their Patients Transition to Home Hospice Care.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Ariel; Phongtankuel, Veerawat; Lampa, Katherine; Reid, M C; Eiss, Brian M; Bhatia, Sonica; Adelman, Ronald D

    2018-04-01

    The transition into home hospice care is often a critical time in a patient's medical care. Studies have shown patients and caregivers desire continuity with their physicians at the end of life (EoL). However, it is unclear what roles primary care physicians (PCPs) play and what challenges they face caring for patients transitioning into home hospice care. To understand PCPs' experiences, challenges, and preferences when their patients transition to home hospice care. Nineteen semi-structured phone interviews with PCPs were conducted. Study data were analyzed using standard qualitative methods. Participants included PCPs from 3 academic group practices in New York City. Measured: Physician recordings were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Most PCPs noted that there was a discrepancy between their actual role and ideal role when their patients transitioned to home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed a desire to maintain continuity, provide psychosocial support, and collaborate actively with the hospice team. Better establishment of roles, more frequent communication with the hospice team, and use of technology to communicate with patients were mentioned as possible ways to help PCPs achieve their ideal role caring for their patients receiving home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed varying degrees of involvement during a patient's transition to home hospice care, but many desired to be more involved in their patient's care. As with patients, physicians desire to maintain continuity with their patients at the EoL and solutions to improve communication between PCPs, hospice providers, and patients need to be explored.

  10. 34 CFR 300.124 - Transition of children from the Part C program to preschool programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Transition of children from the Part C program to preschool programs. 300.124 Section 300.124 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Additional Eligibility...

  11. The Family Transition Program: Implementation and Early Impacts of Florida's Initial Time-Limited Welfare Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Dan; And Others

    Florida's Family Transition Program (FTP) combines a welfare time limit of 24-36 months with services, requirements, and financial incentives designed to help welfare recipients find and hold jobs. Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) applicants who were not incapacitated, disabled, or otherwise exempt from the FTP program were randomly…

  12. Challenges of modern day transition care in inflammatory bowel disease: From inflammatory bowel disease to biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Hakizimana, Ali; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Russell, Rachel; Wright, Mark; Afzal, Nadeem A

    2017-07-07

    In this article we discuss the challenges of delivering a high quality Transition care. A good understanding of the adolescent needs with good communication between Transition care physicians and the patient is essential for good continuity of care. Despite availability of several guidelines, one model doesn't fit all and any transition service development should be determined by the local need and available healthcare facilities.

  13. Next of kin's experiences of information and responsibility during their older relatives' care transitions from hospital to municipal health care.

    PubMed

    Rustad, Else Cathrine; Seiger Cronfalk, Berit; Furnes, Bodil; Dysvik, Elin

    2017-04-01

    To gain an understanding of how next of kin experience the transition of their older relatives from hospital to municipal health care. During the care transition of their older relatives, next of kin experience a period of ill-defined roles and expectations. Successful transition lays the ground for postdischarge treatment and care, in which next of kin have important roles. A descriptive, exploratory design was used to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of next of kin during their older relatives' care transitions. We conducted qualitative interviews of 13 next of kin of patients aged ≥80 years who had been discharged from the hospital to municipal care. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse interviews. The main theme, 'Next of kin balance multiple tasks during older relatives' care transitions', emerged from two subthemes: 'Next of kin strive to fulfil informational needs during care transition' and 'Next of kin take responsibility for the older relative during care transition'. Next of kin have the challenging role of letting their older relative manage self-care during transition, when able, while being prepared to act on behalf of their relative as needed. Insufficient information and significant responsibilities contribute to unnecessary concerns and worries among next of kin. Nurses in both hospitals and municipal health care will benefit from knowing more about the experiences of next of kin; this may ensure continuity of care during transitions and diminish unnecessary worries and concerns. Clinical nurses should be sensitive to the next of kin's need for support so the next of kin can better manage their older relatives' care after homecoming. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. South Africans' experiences of being old and of care and caring in a transitional period.

    PubMed

    Bohman, Doris M; van Wyk, Neltjie C; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa

    2011-09-01

    This focused ethnographic study aimed to illuminate a group of South Africans' experiences of being old and of care and caring in a transitional period. With a growing number of older people in Africa, studies on the individual experiences may help to develop care which is more sensitively based on the needs for older people in a changing Southern Africa context. Data were collected through group and individual in-depth interviews and participant observations which involved 16 individuals, aged 52-76. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. The study showed two interrelated themes reflections on life and ubuntu - an orientation towards others. Findings were discussed from the viewpoint of the theory of gerotranscendence, showing similarities as well as differences, possibly due to societal and cultural differences. Shortage of formal care for older people living in poor conditions in Southern Africa, gave rise to the discussion for the need of a contextualized development of gerontological care. To enhance knowledge on the theory of gerotranscendence and develop guidelines for nursing in home-based care/community-based care in a South African context may be a first step to support older people in their process towards gerotranscendence. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Implementing an infant oral care program.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Jue, Bonnie; Bonta, C Yolanda

    2002-10-01

    The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, American Dental Association, American Public Health Association, Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, California Dental Association, and California Society of Pediatric Dentists currently recommend that children receive their first dental evaluation within the first year of life. Providing early care to children from ages 6 months to 5 years offers an opportunity to educate and inform parents about their children's oral health. Anticipatory guidance - counseling of parents by health providers about developmental changes that will occur in their children between health visits - for children's dental health is an important part of preventive care. It may be the most effective way to prevent problems that traditional infectious disease models have failed to address, such as early childhood caries. The model of anticipatory guidance is valuable for dental professionals because it emphasizes prevention of dental problems rather than restorative care. A comprehensive infant oral care program utilizes (1) oral health assessment at regularly scheduled dental visits, (2) risk assessments, (3) counseling sessions with parents during either regular dental visits or additional visits scheduled if a child is deemed at risk, (4) preventive treatment such as the application of fluoride varnish or sealants, and (5) outreach and incentives to reinforce attendance. Facilitating access to early and regular dental care is a crucial part of any effective intervention strategy, and intervention techniques should be tailored to the community being served.

  16. Applying sociodramatic methods in teaching transition to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Baile, Walter F; Walters, Rebecca

    2013-03-01

    We introduce the technique of sociodrama, describe its key components, and illustrate how this simulation method was applied in a workshop format to address the challenge of discussing transition to palliative care. We describe how warm-up exercises prepared 15 learners who provide direct clinical care to patients with cancer for a dramatic portrayal of this dilemma. We then show how small-group brainstorming led to the creation of a challenging scenario wherein highly optimistic family members of a 20-year-old young man with terminal acute lymphocytic leukemia responded to information about the lack of further anticancer treatment with anger and blame toward the staff. We illustrate how the facilitators, using sociodramatic techniques of doubling and role reversal, helped learners to understand and articulate the hidden feelings of fear and loss behind the family's emotional reactions. By modeling effective communication skills, the facilitators demonstrated how key communication skills, such as empathic responses to anger and blame and using "wish" statements, could transform the conversation from one of conflict to one of problem solving with the family. We also describe how we set up practice dyads to give the learners an opportunity to try out new skills with each other. An evaluation of the workshop and similar workshops we conducted is presented. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. From home to 'home': Mapping the caregiver journey in the transition from home care into residential care.

    PubMed

    Hainstock, Taylor; Cloutier, Denise; Penning, Margaret

    2017-12-01

    Family caregivers play a pivotal role in supporting the functional independence and quality of life of older relatives, often taking on a wide variety of care-related activities over the course of their caregiving journey. These activities help family members to remain in the community and age-in-place for as long as possible. However, when needs exceed family capacities to provide care, the older family member may need to transition from one care environment to another (e.g., home care to nursing home care), or one level of care to another (from less intense to more intensive services). Drawing upon qualitative interview data collected in a populous health region in British Columbia, Canada, this study explores the roles and responsibilities of family caregivers for family members making the care transition from home care to residential care. A thematic analysis of the interview transcripts resulted in the development of a conceptual framework to characterize the "Caregiver Journey" as a process that could be divided into at least three phases: 1) Precursors to transition - recognizing frailty in family members and caregivers prior to transition; 2) Preparing to transition into residential nursing home care (RC) and 3) Post-transition: Finding a new balance - where caregivers adjust and adapt to new caregiving responsibilities. Our analyses revealed that the second phase is the most complex involving a consideration of the various activities, and roles that family caregivers take on to prepare for the care transition including: information gathering, advocacy and system navigation. We conclude that there is a need for family caregivers to be better supported during care transitions; notably through ongoing and enhanced investments in strategies to support caregiver communication and education. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 76 FR 57637 - TRICARE; Continued Health Care Benefit Program Expansion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... TRICARE; Continued Health Care Benefit Program Expansion AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of... Continued Health Care Benefit Program (CHCBP) coverage under certain circumstances that terminate their MHS.... Introduction and Background CHCBP is the program that provides continued health care coverage for eligible...

  19. Provider-to-Provider Communication during Transitions of Care from Outpatient to Acute Care: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pitts, Samantha; Petty, Brent; Sawyer, Melinda D; Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl; Boonyasai, Romsai Tony; Maruthur, Nisa M

    2016-04-01

    Most research on transitions of care has focused on the transition from acute to outpatient care. Little is known about the transition from outpatient to acute care. We conducted a systematic review of the literature on the transition from outpatient to acute care, focusing on provider-to-provider communication and its impact on quality of care. We searched the MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases for English-language articles describing direct communication between outpatient providers and acute care providers around patients presenting to the emergency department or admitted to the hospital. We conducted double, independent review of titles, abstracts, and full text articles. Conflicts were resolved by consensus. Included articles were abstracted using standardized forms. We maintained search results via Refworks (ProQuest, Bethesda, MD). Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of the Downs' and Black's tool. Of 4009 citations, twenty articles evaluated direct provider-to-provider communication around the outpatient to acute care transition. Most studies were cross-sectional (65%), conducted in the US (55%), and studied communication between primary care and inpatient providers (62%). Of three studies reporting on the association between communication and 30-day readmissions, none found a significant association; of these studies, only one reported a measure of association (adjusted OR for communication vs. no communication, 1.08; 95% CI 0.92-1.26). The literature on provider-to-provider communication at the transition from outpatient to acute care is sparse and heterogeneous. Given the known importance of communication for other transitions of care, future studies are needed on provider-to-provider communication during this transition. Studies evaluating ideal methods for communication to reduce medical errors, utilization, and optimize patient satisfaction at this transition are especially needed.

  20. Improving the quality of transition and transfer of care in young adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Everitt, Ian K; Gerardin, Jennifer F; Rodriguez, Fred H; Book, Wendy M

    2017-05-01

    The transition and transfer from pediatric to adult care is becoming increasingly important as improvements in the diagnosis and management of congenital heart disease allow patients to live longer. Transition is a complex and continuous process that requires careful planning. Inadequate transition has adverse effects on patients, their families and healthcare delivery systems. Currently, significant gaps exist in patient care as adolescents transfer to adult care and there are little data to drive the informed management of transition and transfer of care in adolescent congenital heart disease patients. Appropriate congenital heart disease care has been shown to decrease mortality in the adult population. This paper reviews the transition and transfer of care processes and outlines current congenital heart disease specific guidelines in the United States and compares these recommendations to Canadian and European guidelines. It then reviews perceived and real barriers to successful transition and identifies predictors of success during transfer to adult congenital heart disease care. Lastly, it explores how disease-specific markers of outcomes and quality indicators are being utilized to guide transition and transfer of care in other chronic childhood illnesses, and identifies existing knowledge gaps and structural impediments to improving the management of transition and transfer among congenital heart disease patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. NAPNAP Position Statement. Position Statement on Pediatric Health Care/Medical Home: Key Issues on Care Coordination, Transitions, and Leadership.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) affirms that the delivery of children's health care should be family-centered, accessible, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally appropriate, compassionate, and focused on the overall well-being of children and families. All qualified pediatric health care providers should collaborate in providing health care services for children in pediatric health care/medical homes. Interventions must address the concepts of family-centered partnerships, community-based systems, and transitional care from pediatric to adult services.

  2. Polytrauma transitional rehabilitation programs: Comprehensive rehabilitation for community integration after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Duchnick, Jennifer J; Ropacki, Susan; Yutsis, Maya; Petska, Kelly; Pawlowski, Carey

    2015-08-01

    When the U.S. Congress passed the Veterans Health Programs Improvement Act of 2004 and the Consolidated Appropriations Act in 2005, Veterans Affairs (VA) traumatic brain injury centers responded by establishing and developing the polytrauma rehabilitation centers and polytrauma transitional rehabilitation programs (PTRPs) across 4 sites in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Palo Alto, California, Richmond, Virginia, and Tampa, Florida, in 2007. The 5th PTRP was opened in 2011 in San Antonio, Texas. This article presents the context of establishing these programs within a VA system, describes aspects of programmatic design, and shares characteristics and outcomes of individuals served by the first 4 national centers. PTRPs provide specialized, interdisciplinary brain injury rehabilitation to active-duty service members and veterans with complex rehabilitation needs. A total of 286 individuals participated in the first 4 PTRPs during the first 3 years. Admission and discharge data were collected as part of routine care, and data review focused on describing the demographic, injury, and neurobehavioral functioning outcomes across 4 sites. Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory Abilities, Adjustment, and Participation subscales and total scale T-scores served as primary functioning outcome measures. Mean scores are presented. Statistical analysis found a significant change in total scale T-score from admission to discharge, consistent with improved patient functional ability. Challenges associated with the development and implementation of programs are discussed. Elements of programming may be applicable for other health care organizations that seek to improve rehabilitation care delivery. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. The Current Landscape of Transitions of Care Practice Models: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Rochester-Eyeguokan, Charmaine D; Pincus, Kathleen J; Patel, Roshni S; Reitz, Shirley J

    2016-01-01

    . Best model TOC services must include services along the TOC continuum: pretransition and posttransition, as well as at home and in outpatient health care settings. Studies clearly show that single-modal interventions are rarely successful in reducing readmissions and that successful TOC services must be multimodal and multidisciplinary, and continue throughout the care transition. Utilizing best practice TOC models described in this article as a starting point, practitioners interested in developing their own TOC program should test these tools in new practice environments and add to the body of literature by publishing their findings. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  4. Transitions of Care in Medical Education: A Compilation of Effective Teaching Methods.

    PubMed

    McBryde, Meagan; Vandiver, Jeremy W; Onysko, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Transitioning patients safely from the inpatient environment back to an outpatient environment is an important component of health care, and multidisciplinary cooperation and formal processes are necessary to accomplish this task. This Transitions of Care (TOC) process is constantly being shaped in health care systems to improve patient safety, outcomes, and satisfaction. While there are many models that have been published on methods to improve the TOC process systematically, there is no clear roadmap for educators to teach TOC concepts to providers in training. This article reviews published data to highlight specific methods shown to effectively instill these concepts and values into medical students and residents. Formal, evidence-based, TOC curriculum should be developed within medical schools and residency programs. TOC education should ideally begin early in the education process, and its importance should be reiterated throughout the curriculum longitudinally. Curriculum should have a specific focus on recognition of common causes of hospital readmissions, such as medication errors, lack of adequate follow-up visits, and social/economic barriers. Use of didactic lectures, case-based workshops, role-playing activities, home visits, interprofessional activities, and resident-led quality improvement projects have all be shown to be effective ways to teach TOC concepts.

  5. Provision of Mental Health Services for Care Leavers: Transition to Adult Services. LGA Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Emily; Harland, Jennie; Atkinson, Mary; White, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Children (Leaving Care) Act 2000 was designed to address the wide variation in local authority provision for care leavers and to promote a more multi-dimensional approach to the process of leaving care. Care leavers are likely to be at greater risk of mental health difficulties than other young people and the transitional period from leaving…

  6. Transitioning from acute to primary health care nursing: an integrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Christine; Halcomb, Elizabeth; Brown, Angela

    2016-08-01

    This paper seeks to explore the transition experiences of acute care nurses entering employment in primary health care settings. Internationally the provision of care in primary health care settings is increasing. Nurses are moving from acute care settings to meet the growing demand for a primary health care workforce. While there is significant research relating to new graduate transition experiences, little is known about the transition experience from acute care into primary health care employment. An integrative review, guided by Whittemore and Knafl's (2005) approach, was undertaken. Following a systematic literature search eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Papers which met the study criteria were identified and assessed against the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Papers were then subjected to methodological quality appraisal. Thematic analysis was undertaken to identify key themes within the data. Eight papers met the selection criteria. All described nurses transitioning to either community or home nursing settings. Three themes were identified: (1) a conceptual understanding of transition, (2) role losses and gains and (3) barriers and enablers. There is a lack of research specifically exploring the transitioning of acute care nurses to primary health care settings. To better understand this process, and to support the growth of the primary health care workforce there is an urgent need for further well-designed research. There is an increasing demand for the employment of nurses in primary health care settings. To recruit experienced nurses it is logical that many nurses will transition into primary health care from employment in the acute sector. To optimise retention and enhance the transition experience of these nurses it is important to understand the transition experience. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of a health-social partnership transitional program for post-discharge medical patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Chau, June; So, Ching; Tam, Stanley Ku Fu; McGhee, Sarah

    2012-12-24

    Readmissions are costly and have implications for quality of care. Studies have been reported to support effects of transitional care programs in reducing hospital readmissions and enhancing clinical outcomes. However, there is a paucity of studies executing full economic evaluation to assess the cost-effectiveness of these transitional care programs. This study is therefore launched to fill this knowledge gap. Cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial that examined the effects of a Health-Social Transitional Care Management Program (HSTCMP) for medical patients discharged from an acute regional hospital in Hong Kong. The cost and health outcomes were compared between the patients receiving the HSTCMP and usual care. The total costs comprised the pre-program, program, and healthcare utilization costs. Quality of life was measured with SF-36 and transformed to utility values between 0 and 1. The readmission rates within 28 (control 10.2%, study 4.0%) and 84 days (control 19.4%, study 8.1%) were significantly higher in the control group. Utility values showed no difference between the control and study groups at baseline (p = 0.308). Utility values for the study group were significantly higher than in the control group at 28 (p < 0.001) and 84 days (p = 0.002). The study group also had a significantly higher QALYs gain (p < 0.001) over time at 28 and 84 days when compared with the control group. The intervention had an 89% chance of being cost-effective at the threshold of £20000/QALY. Previous studies on transitional care focused mainly on clinical outcomes and not too many included cost as an outcome measure. Studies examining the cost-effectiveness of the post-discharge support services are scanty. This study is the first to examine the cost-effectiveness of a transitional care program that used nurse-led services participated by volunteers. Results have shown that a health-social partnership transitional

  8. Use of Transition Resources by Primary Care Providers for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dressler, Paul B.; Nguyen, Teresa K.; Moody, Eric J.; Friedman, Sandra L.; Pickler, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often experience difficulties with successful transition from pediatric to adult healthcare. A consultative Transition Clinic for youth with IDD was piloted as a quality improvement project, and assessed the engagement of primary care providers (PCPs) for transition planning after…

  9. The Transition from State Care to Adulthood: International Examples of Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Carrie

    2007-01-01

    The issue of outcomes for youth who transition from state care to adulthood is not unique to any one country. Youth exiting the child welfare system, or aging out, face a plethora of problems and issues associated with the transition to adulthood. For the majority of youth, the transition to adulthood represents a process that takes place over a…

  10. Transition Planning for Youth with Special Health Care Needs (YSHCN) in Illinois Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargeron, Jodie; Contri, Darcy; Gibbons, Linda J.; Ruch-Ross, Holly S.; Sanabria, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    "Transition Planning for Youth with Special Health Care Needs (YSHCN)" chronicles the research and work completed by agencies in Illinois to provide examples of best practice in transition planning. Increasing numbers of YSHCN survive into adulthood creating a need for focus on the transition to adult life for these young people,…

  11. Transition Planning for Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs and Disabilities: Information for Families and Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Stephanie; Freeman, Linda; Griffin, Lynne Reeves

    Designed for Massachusetts parents and adolescents with special health needs, this booklet provides information on the transition to adulthood. It covers four major areas of adulthood: health care, education, employment, and recreation. It includes: (1) a family fact sheet on health care transition that explains important issues and lists…

  12. Auditing an intensive care unit recycling program.

    PubMed

    Kubicki, Mark A; McGain, Forbes; O'Shea, Catherine J; Bates, Samantha

    2015-06-01

    The provision of health care has significant direct environmental effects such as energy and water use and waste production, and indirect effects, including manufacturing and transport of drugs and equipment. Recycling of hospital waste is one strategy to reduce waste disposed of as landfill, preserve resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and potentially remain fiscally responsible. We began an intensive care unit recycling program, because a significant proportion of ICU waste was known to be recyclable. To determine the weight and proportion of ICU waste recycled, the proportion of incorrect waste disposal (including infectious waste contamination), the opportunity for further recycling and the financial effects of the recycling program. We weighed all waste and recyclables from an 11-bed ICU in an Australian metropolitan hospital for 7 non-consecutive days. As part of routine care, ICU waste was separated into general, infectious and recycling streams. Recycling streams were paper and cardboard, three plastics streams (polypropylene, mixed plastics and polyvinylchloride [PVC]) and commingled waste (steel, aluminium and some plastics). ICU waste from the waste and recycling bins was sorted into those five recycling streams, general waste and infectious waste. After sorting, the waste was weighed and examined. Recycling was classified as achieved (actual), potential and total. Potential recycling was defined as being acceptable to hospital protocol and local recycling programs. Direct and indirect financial costs, excluding labour, were examined. During the 7-day period, the total ICU waste was 505 kg: general waste, 222 kg (44%); infectious waste, 138 kg (27%); potentially recyclable waste, 145 kg (28%). Of the potentially recyclable waste, 70 kg (49%) was actually recycled (14% of the total ICU waste). In the infectious waste bins, 82% was truly infectious. There was no infectious contamination of the recycling streams. The PVC waste was 37% contaminated

  13. Validity and reliability of the Palliative Care Transition Measure for Caregivers (PCTM-C).

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Daniela; Mastroianni, Chiara; Artico, Marco; Biagioli, Valentina; Latina, Roberto; Guarda, Michela; Piredda, Michela; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2018-01-21

    Patients suffering from advanced disease face different care transitions. The transition from acute to palliative care is challenging and may lead to the discontinuity of care. Family caregivers become important sources of information, as patients begin to experience difficulties in coping with emotional transition events. The Care Transition Measure was developed to evaluate care transitions as experienced by the elderly. It has never been used in palliative care. The aim of this study was to test the validity and reliability of a modified version of the Palliative Care Transition Measure, specifically the Palliative Care Transition Measure for Caregivers (PCTM-C). The study included two main phases. Phase I focused on the construction of a modified version of the Palliative Care Transition Measure through two focus groups and by computing the content validity index. Phase II focused on testing the psychometric properties of the PCTM-C on 272 family caregivers through confirmatory factor analysis. Result The content validity index for each of the items was higher than 0.80, whereas that for the scale was 0.95. The model tested with confirmatory factor analysis fitted the data well and confirmed that the transition measures referred to communication, integrated care and a trusting-relationship, and therefore the core dimensions of continuity according to existing conceptual models. The internal consistency was high (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94). Significance of results The PCTM-C proved to be a suitable measure of the quality of such transitions. It may be used in clinical practice as a continuity quality indicator and has the potential to guide interventions to enhance family caregivers' experience of care continuity.

  14. Day Care: A Program in Search of a Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bikales, Gerda

    This report examines current issues relating to day care and challenges many of the policy assumptions that underlie a major public program of subsidized day care for children. A historical perspective of day care is presented and various types of day care are described. The costs and benefits of day care are examined and the relation of day care…

  15. User experience and care for older people transitioning from hospital to home: Patients' and carers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jacqueline; Hutchinson, Alison M; Brown, Rhonda; Livingston, Patricia M

    2018-04-01

    Transitioning from hospital to home is challenging for many older people living with chronic health conditions. Transitional care facilitates safe and timely transfer of patients between levels of care and across care settings and includes communication between practitioners, assessment and planning, preparation, medication reconciliation, follow-up care and self-management education. To date, there is limited understanding of how to actively involve care recipient service users in transitional care. This study was part of a larger research project. The objective of this article was to report the first study phase, in which we aimed to describe user experience pertaining to patients and carers. The study design was qualitative descriptive using interviews. Patients (n = 19) and carers (n = 7) participated in semi-structured interviews about their experience of transition from hospital to home in an urban Australian health-care setting. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis. All participants reported that they needed to become independent in transition. Participants perceived a range of social processes supported their independence at home: supportive relationships with carers, caring relationships with health-care practitioners, seeking information, discussing and negotiating the transitional care plan and learning to self-care. Findings contribute to our understanding that quality transitional care should focus on patients' need to regain independence. Social processes supporting the capacities of patients and carers should be emphasized in future initiatives. Future transitional care interventions should emphasize strategies to enable negotiation for suitable supports and assist care recipients to overcome barriers identified in this study. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Pediatricians Transitioning Practices, Youth With Special Health Care Needs in New York State.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lynn F; Chhabra, Rosy; Cohen, Hillel W; Lechuga, Claudia; Diaz, Patricia; Racine, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    To assess current practices of New York State pediatricians as they transition youth with special health care needs to adult-oriented medical care. A survey of New York State pediatricians included 6 critical steps from 2002 consensus statement, 11 essential steps adapted from recent literature, and questions targeting age of starting transition and availability of transition policy. Of 181 respondents, only 11% have a transition policy. Most assist patients in transition process; identify an adult provider (92%); and create portable medical summary (57%). Only 3% start planning process at recommended age. No respondents are compliant with all 6 critical steps; subspecialists were more likely to report compliance to more than 4 steps. Participating pediatricians are making gains, yet effort is needed, to incorporate the essential steps into practice for transitioning youth with special health care needs. Recognition of barriers, use of electronic tools, and clarifying subspecialist's approach, may improve compliance with transition recommendations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. An evaluation of undergraduate family care programs.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, E B; Scott, C J

    1978-01-01

    Evaluation of the many new family care programs (FCP), and others of similar intent, however defined, is as essential as determining the value of any other curriculum change. Replies to a questionnaire from 101 U.S. and 15 Canadian medical schools indicated that 80% of the former and 93% of the latter had FCPs; 35% and 29%, respectively, were not evaluating their program by any method. No single evaluative technique was used by more than 42% of the American medical schools. A review of the literature on FCPs frequently indicated that the conclusions that could be drawn about the programs were ambiguous. Students in the University of Cincinnati Medical Center FCPs elected family practice or pediatric internships significantly more often than did the FCP nonparticipants, but they indicated that the program had little effect on this choice, despite almost uniformly favorable testimonials. We discuss the possibility that FCPs may be educating the wrong students, that FCPs, if not reinforced in other clinical areas, may have few lasting effects on student attitudes or career choice, and that we may be asking the wrong questions, and with inadequate methods.

  18. Transitioning from Pediatric to Adult Dental Care for Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs: Dentist Perspectives--Part Two.

    PubMed

    Bayarsaikhan, Zoljargal; Cruz, Stephanie; Neff, John; Chi, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand dental care transitions for adolescents with special health care needs (ASHCNs) from the dentist perspective. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 13 dentists (seven pediatric dentists and six general dentists) to learn about the dental transition process for ASHCNs. Most dentists believed transitions from child-centered to adult-centered dental care were important for ASHCNs. Dentists reported two main barriers to transitions: (1) low dental reimbursements by Medicaid; and (2) a shortage of general dentists qualified or willing to treat ASHCNs. Pediatric and general dentists reported playing complimentary roles in facilitating transitions for ASHCNs and their families. Dentists acknowledged the challenges that adolescents with special health care needs and their families face in transitioning to adult-centered care and believed in the importance of ASHCNs maintaining a dental home. Pediatric dentists and general dentists play a key role in working together to implement dental transition plans for ASHCNs and to ensure successful dental transitions.

  19. Evaluating the Impact of Dental Care on Housing Intervention Program Outcomes Among Homeless Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Elizabeth; Gibson, Gretchen; Jones, Judith A.; Schinka, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. In this retrospective longitudinal cohort study, we examined the impact of dental care on outcomes among homeless veterans discharged from a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) transitional housing intervention program. Methods. Our sample consisted of 9870 veterans who were admitted into a VA homeless intervention program during 2008 and 2009, 4482 of whom received dental care during treatment and 5388 of whom did not. Primary outcomes of interest were program completion, employment or stable financial status on discharge, and transition to permanent housing. We calculated descriptive statistics and compared the 2 study groups with respect to demographic characteristics, medical and psychiatric history (including alcohol and substance use), work and financial support, and treatment outcomes. Results. Veterans who received dental care were 30% more likely than those who did not to complete the program, 14% more likely to be employed or financially stable, and 15% more likely to have obtained residential housing. Conclusions. Provision of dental care has a substantial positive impact on outcomes among homeless veterans participating in housing intervention programs. This suggests that homeless programs need to weigh the benefits and cost of dental care in program planning and implementation. PMID:23678921

  20. Current Status and Issues Regarding Transitional Health Care for Adults and Young Adults with Special Health Care Needs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Akamizu, Takashi

    2018-05-15

    With the progress of medical care in recent years, the prognosis of intractable diseases of childhood onset has markedly improved. Young adults with special health care needs require continuous medical support throughout their lifetimes. To provide them with optimal health care services, a smooth transition from the pediatric medical system to the adult one is essential. However, in Japan many adult health providers are not sufficiently prepared to care for these patients, due both to limited opportunities to gain up-to-date medical knowledge on transitional health care and a lack of familiarity with the medical treatment of childhood-onset chronic diseases. In this review, we discuss current issues in transitional health care in Japan from an internist's viewpoint.

  1. Facilitating the transition of patients with special health care needs from pediatric to adult oral health care.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Arthur J; Casamassimo, Paul S; Slayton, Rebecca L

    2010-11-01

    Without guidelines or policies in dentistry for transitioning adolescents with special heath care needs from pediatric to adult oral health care, little is known about traditional support services. The authors surveyed pediatric dentists about their transition of adolescent patients with and without special health care needs (SHCNs) to adult care. In 2009, the authors e-mailed a pilot-tested survey modified from a survey used for U.S. pediatricians to 4,000 pediatric dentists. The survey included demographic questions and questions regarding services and barriers associated with the transition of patients to adult care. Responses were obtained from 1,686 (42.2 percent response) pediatric dentists who were mostly in group or solo private practices and were younger, in that most had completed their education in the preceding 15 years. More than one-half practiced in suburban settings, and most worked with both dental hygienists and dental assistants. Most assisted patients with SHCNs with their transitions to adult care, and the predominant barrier to transitioning to adult care was availability of general dentists and specialists who were willing to accept these new patients. Pediatric dentists' answers paralleled those of pediatricians for the most part in terms of services provided and barriers to transition. Most responding dentists helped adolescents with and without SHCNs make the transition into adult care, but the major barrier was the availability of general dentists and specialists. With an office protocol in place that includes trained staff members, transitioning patients (especially those with SHCNs) to adult care can be facilitated to provide the appropriate oral health and support services.

  2. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient-provider language concordance.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Nosaiba; Admi, Hanna; Shadmi, Efrat

    2014-01-01

    Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients' discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient-provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0-100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient-provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients' discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P <0.001). Other aspects significantly associated with CTM scores: extent of discharge explanations (P <0.05), quality of discharge briefing (P <0.001), and post-discharge explanations by the primary care physician (P <0.01). Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients.

  3. The Costs of Critical Care Telemedicine Programs

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Derik M.; Bonello, Robert S.; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Perencevich, Eli; Cram, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background: Implementation of telemedicine programs in ICUs (tele-ICUs) may improve patient outcomes, but the costs of these programs are unknown. We performed a systematic literature review to summarize existing data on the costs of tele-ICUs and collected detailed data on the costs of implementing a tele-ICU in a network of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) hospitals. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of studies published between January 1, 1990, and July 1, 2011, reporting costs of tele-ICUs. Studies were summarized, and key cost data were abstracted. We then obtained the costs of implementing a tele-ICU in a network of seven VHA hospitals and report these costs in light of the existing literature. Results: Our systematic review identified eight studies reporting tele-ICU costs. These studies suggested combined implementation and first year of operation costs for a tele-ICU of $50,000 to $100,000 per monitored ICU-bed. Changes in patient care costs after tele-ICU implementation ranged from a $3,000 reduction to a $5,600 increase in hospital cost per patient. VHA data suggested a cost for implementation and first year of operation of $70,000 to $87,000 per ICU-bed, depending on the depreciation methods applied. Conclusions: The cost of tele-ICU implementation is substantial, and the impact of these programs on hospital costs or profits is unclear. Until additional data become available, clinicians and administrators should carefully weigh the clinical and economic aspects of tele-ICUs when considering investing in this technology. PMID:22797291

  4. 34 CFR 300.124 - Transition of children from the Part C program to preschool programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... have in effect policies and procedures to ensure that— (a) Children participating in early intervention... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transition of children from the Part C program to... ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Additional Eligibility...

  5. Supporting Nutrition in Early Care and Education Settings: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Child care centers, Head Start programs, and family child care providers serving young children--as well as after school programs and homeless shelters that reach older children, adults, and families--are supported in providing healthy meals and snacks by reimbursements through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Administered by the…

  6. Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Jusela, Cheryl; Struble, Laura; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Redman, Richard W; Ziemba, Rosemary A

    2017-03-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review" found on pages 19-28, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until February 29, 2020. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Discuss problematic barriers during care transitions

  7. Care of the elderly program at the University of Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Lesley; Dobbs, Bonnie; Triscott, Jean; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed The population is aging rapidly and there are implications for health care delivery in the face of few physicians specializing in care of the elderly (COE). Objective of program To train physicians wishing to provide COE services. Program description The COE program at the University of Alberta in Edmonton is an enhanced skills diploma program lasting 6 months to 1 year, with core program requirements including geriatric inpatient care, geriatric psychiatry, ambulatory care, continuing care, and outreach. There is a longitudinal clinic component and a research project requirement. The program is designed to cover the 85 core competencies in the CanMEDS– Family Medicine roles. Conclusion There is a need for COE physicians to provide clinical care as well as fill educational, administrative, and research roles to meet the health care needs of medically complex seniors. These physicians require alternative funding and a departmental home within a university if they are to provide an academic service. PMID:25551143

  8. Health care services and the transition to young adulthood: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Park, M Jane; Adams, Sally H; Irwin, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of the health care system in the successful transition to young adulthood for all adolescents, with emphasis on adolescents with special health care needs (ASHCN), and to evaluate the system's status in filling that role. Research and conceptual frameworks addressing successful transitions and functioning were reviewed. A framework describing a role for health care services in the transition was presented. The health care system's status in promoting healthy transitions was evaluated, including National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs 2005-2006 analyses of key outcomes for ASHCN. Although most national efforts to define skills needed for the transition have focused on career/vocational skills, a few frameworks integrate broader issues such as health, psychosocial development, and civic engagement. Adolescent transitional issues have generally received little attention; however, these have been articulated for ASHCN. Nevertheless, only 2 in 5 ASHCN receive transitional care, and ASHCN fare poorly on other core outcomes. ASHCN with mental health conditions fare worse on outcomes than those with physical health conditions. Our framework for healthy transitions includes the following: 1) adolescents can access a comprehensive health care system, 2) preventable problems are avoided, and 3) chronic problems are managed. The present health care system falls short of accomplishing these. Health care services can potentially play a role in facilitating a healthy transition to young adulthood; however, many gaps exist. Although the health care reform act addresses some gaps, efforts that integrate adolescents' developmental needs and address mental health issues are needed. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 78 FR 36449 - State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... 0985-AA08 State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program AGENCY: Administration on Aging, Administration for... Act, the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman program. This proposed rule replaces AoA's 1994 Notice of... highlighted the difficulty of determining State compliance in carrying out the Long-Term Care Ombudsman...

  10. Survey of transit bus maintenance programs in Virginia.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-01-01

    Transit bus maintenance practices as used by thirteen small and medium-sized transit systems in Virginia were cataloged. Different approaches to maintenance were investigated and the current condition of transit bus maintenance was determined. Factor...

  11. Monitoring and Evaluating the Transition of Large-Scale Programs in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Bao, James; Rodriguez, Daniela C; Paina, Ligia; Ozawa, Sachiko; Bennett, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Donors are increasingly interested in the transition and sustainability of global health programs as priorities shift and external funding declines. Systematic and high-quality monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of such processes is rare. We propose a framework and related guiding questions to systematize the M&E of global health program transitions. Methods: We conducted stakeholder interviews, searched the peer-reviewed and gray literature, gathered feedback from key informants, and reflected on author experiences to build a framework on M&E of transition and to develop guiding questions. Findings: The conceptual framework models transition as a process spanning pre-transition and transition itself and extending into sustained services and outcomes. Key transition domains include leadership, financing, programming, and service delivery, and relevant activities that drive the transition in these domains forward include sustaining a supportive policy environment, creating financial sustainability, developing local stakeholder capacity, communicating to all stakeholders, and aligning programs. Ideally transition monitoring would begin prior to transition processes being implemented and continue for some time after transition has been completed. As no set of indicators will be applicable across all types of health program transitions, we instead propose guiding questions and illustrative quantitative and qualitative indicators to be considered and adapted based on the transition domains identified as most important to the particular health program transition. The M&E of transition faces new and unique challenges, requiring measuring constructs to which evaluators may not be accustomed. Many domains hinge on measuring “intangibles” such as the management of relationships. Monitoring these constructs may require a compromise between rigorous data collection and the involvement of key stakeholders. Conclusion: Monitoring and evaluating transitions in global

  12. Health Update: Care of Ill Children in Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses differing opinions about (1) exclusion of ill children from child care; (2) the meaning of fever; (3) appropriate care for ill children; (4) transfer of information about ill children in child care; and (5) written policies and procedures for care of ill children. (NH)

  13. Resident learning across the full range of core competencies through a transitions of care curriculum.

    PubMed

    Pavon, Juliessa M; Pinheiro, Sandro O; Buhr, Gwendolen T

    2018-01-01

    The authors developed a Transitions of Care (TOC) curriculum to teach and measure learner competence in performing TOC tasks for older adults. Internal medicine interns at an academic residency program received the curriculum, which consisted of experiential learning, self-study, and small group discussion. Interns completed retrospective pre/post surveys rating their confidence in performing five TOC tasks, qualitative open-ended survey questions, and a self-reflection essay. A subset of interns also completed follow-up assessments. For all five TOC tasks, the interns' confidence improved following completion of the TOC curriculum. Self-confidence persisted for up to 3 months later for some but not all tasks. According to the qualitative responses, the TOC curriculum provided interns with learning experiences and skills integral to performing safe care transitions. The TOC curriculum and a mixed-method assessment approach effectively teaches and measures learner competency in TOC across all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competency domains.

  14. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    PubMed

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Space Station Freedom Environmental Health Care Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Russo, Dane M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the environmental planning and monitoring aspects of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Environmental Health Care Program, which encompasses all phases of the SSF assembly and operation from the first element entry at MB-6 through the Permanent Manned Capability and beyond. Environmental planning involves the definition of acceptability limits and monitoring requirements for the radiation dose barothermal parameters and potential contaminants in the SSF air and water and on internal surfaces. Inflight monitoring will be implemented through the Environmental Health System, which consists of five subsystems: Microbiology, Toxicology, Water Quality, Radiation, and Barothermal Physiology. In addition to the environmental data interpretation and analysis conducted after each mission, the new data will be compared to archived data for statistical and long-term trend analysis and determination of risk exposures. Results of these analyses will be used to modify the acceptability limits and monitoring requirements for the future.

  16. Latch Key: Developing Child Care Programs Through Community Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, James P.; And Others

    This guide to the Latch Key program for after-school day care explores rationale and methods for developing Latch Key programs in the public schools to provide low cost after-school care for children (grades 1-6) of working or student parents. (Some programs have been provided for kindergarten children and some have been expanded to full time…

  17. Residents' Perceptions of Primary Care versus Traditional Internal Medicine Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Howard K.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Two internal medicine residency programs at Baylor College of Medicine are discussed. The traditional program emphasizes experience in the care of acute problems within a hospital inpatient environment. The primary care residency program emphasizes training in the outpatient environment and in noninternal medicine disciplines. (MLW)

  18. Evaluation of a Research Mentorship Program in Community Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploeg, Jenny; de Witt, Lorna; Hutchison, Brian; Hayward, Lynda; Grayson, Kim

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the results of a qualitative case study evaluating a research mentorship program in community care settings in Ontario, Canada. The purpose of the program was to build evaluation and research capacity among staff of community care agencies through a mentorship program. Data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured…

  19. 76 FR 71934 - Tobacco Transition Payment Program; Availability of Current Assessment Methods Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Farm Service Agency Tobacco Transition Payment Program; Availability of Current Assessment Methods Determination Document AGENCY: Commodity Credit Corporation and Farm Service... current methods used to calculate manufacturer and importer assessments that fund the Tobacco Transition...

  20. Transit investments for greenhouse gas and energy reduction program : first assessment report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and preliminary analysis of the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administrations TIGGER Program. TIGGER, which stands for Transit Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy Redu...

  1. Quantifying the benefits of the Florida Transit Research Inspection Procurement Services (TRIPS) program : [research summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-04-01

    Established in 1995 as the Florida Vehicle : Procurement Program (FVPP), Florida Transit : Research Inspection Procurement Services (TRIPS) : is a vehicle sourcing and procurement system for : Floridas public transit agencies that integrates : ins...

  2. Housing Trajectories for Youth Transitioning from Foster Care: Gender Differences from 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Robert G Iii; Reynolds, Andrew D; Crea, Ihomas M

    This study focuses on longitudinal housing trends for males and females among transitional youth who were participants of a transitional living program (2010 to 2014). Results indicate that young women were more likely to transition to secure independent housing than young men. Demographic characteristics, education, and employment predicted time to secure independent housing. Additionally, results indicate that more highly educated young women transitioned to independence at a faster rate than young men with lower education status.

  3. Improved outcomes for elderly patients who received care on a transitional care unit.

    PubMed

    Manville, Margaret; Klein, Michael C; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether providing elderly alternate level of care (ALC) patients with interdisciplinary care on a transitional care unit (TCU) achieves better clinical outcomes and lowers costs compared with providing them with standard hospital care. Before-and-after structured retrospective chart audit. St Joseph's Hospital in Comox, BC. One hundred thirty-five consecutively admitted patients aged 70 years and older with ALC designation during 5-month periods before (n = 49) and after (n = 86) the opening of an on-site TCU. Length of stay, discharge disposition, complications of the acute and ALC portions of the patients' hospital stays, activities of daily living (mobility, transfers, and urinary continence), psychotropic medications and vitamin D prescriptions, and ALC patient care costs, as well as annual hospital savings, were examined. Among the 86 ALC patients receiving care during the postintervention period, 57 (66%) were admitted to the TCU; 29 of the 86 (34%) patients in the postintervention group received standard care (SC). All 86 ALC patients in the postintervention group were compared with the 49 preintervention ALC patients who received SC. Length of stay reduction occurred among the postintervention group during the acute portion of the hospital stay (14.0 days postintervention group vs 22.5 days preintervention group; P < .01). Discharge home or to an assisted-living facility increased among the postintervention group (30% postintervention group vs 12% preintervention group; P < .01). Patients' ability to transfer improved among the postintervention group (55% postintervention group vs 14% preintervention group; P < .01). At discharge, 48% of ALC patients in the postintervention group were able to transfer independently compared with 17% of ALC patients in the preintervention group. Hospital-acquired infections among the postintervention group decreased during the acute phase (14% postintervention group vs 33% preintervention group; P < .01) and in

  4. Improved outcomes for elderly patients who received care on a transitional care unit

    PubMed Central

    Manville, Margaret; Klein, Michael C.; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether providing elderly alternate level of care (ALC) patients with interdisciplinary care on a transitional care unit (TCU) achieves better clinical outcomes and lowers costs compared with providing them with standard hospital care. Design Before-and-after structured retrospective chart audit. Setting St Joseph’s Hospital in Comox, BC. Participants One hundred thirty-five consecutively admitted patients aged 70 years and older with ALC designation during 5-month periods before (n = 49) and after (n = 86) the opening of an on-site TCU. Main outcome measures Length of stay, discharge disposition, complications of the acute and ALC portions of the patients’ hospital stays, activities of daily living (mobility, transfers, and urinary continence), psychotropic medications and vitamin D prescriptions, and ALC patient care costs, as well as annual hospital savings, were examined. Results Among the 86 ALC patients receiving care during the postintervention period, 57 (66%) were admitted to the TCU; 29 of the 86 (34%) patients in the postintervention group received standard care (SC). All 86 ALC patients in the postintervention group were compared with the 49 preintervention ALC patients who received SC. Length of stay reduction occurred among the postintervention group during the acute portion of the hospital stay (14.0 days postintervention group vs 22.5 days preintervention group; P < .01). Discharge home or to an assisted-living facility increased among the postintervention group (30% postintervention group vs 12% preintervention group; P < .01). Patients’ ability to transfer improved among the postintervention group (55% postintervention group vs 14% preintervention group; P < .01). At discharge, 48% of ALC patients in the postintervention group were able to transfer independently compared with 17% of ALC patients in the preintervention group. Hospital-acquired infections among the postintervention group decreased during the

  5. Psychological factors impacting transition from paediatric to adult care by childhood cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Granek, Leeat; Nathan, Paul C; Rosenberg-Yunger, Zahava R S; D'Agostino, Norma; Amin, Leila; Barr, Ronald D; Greenberg, Mark L; Hodgson, David; Boydell, Katherine; Klassen, Anne F

    2012-09-01

    Childhood cancer survivors require life-long care focused on the specific late effects that may arise from their cancer and its treatment. In many centers, survivors are required to transition from follow-up care in a paediatric cancer center, to care provided in an adult care setting. The purpose of this study was to identify the psychological factors involved in this transition to adult care long-term follow-up clinics. Qualitative interviews were conducted with ten paediatric survivors still in paediatric care, as well as 28 adult survivors of whom 11 had transitioned successfully to adult care (attended three long-term follow-up (LTFU) appointments consecutively); ten who failed to transition (attended at least one LTFU appointment as an adult, but were inconsistent with subsequent attendance); and seven who had never transitioned (did not attend any LTFU care as an adult). Line-by-line coding was used to establish categories and themes. Constant comparison was used to examine relationships within and across codes and categories. Two overall categories and four subthemes were identified: (1) Identification with being a cancer survivor included the subthemes of 'cancer identity' and 'cancer a thing of the past' and; (2) Emotional components included the subthemes of 'fear and anxiety' and 'gratitude and gaining perspective'. The analysis revealed that the same factor could act as either a motivator or a hindrance to successful transition in different survivors (e.g., fear of recurrence of cancer might be a barrier or a facilitator depending on the survivor's life experience). Psychological factors are an important consideration when preparing cancer survivors for transition to adult long-term follow-up care. Identifying and addressing the individual psychological needs of childhood cancer survivors may improve the likelihood of their successful transition to adult care.

  6. The Medical Transition from Pediatric to Adult-Oriented Care: Considerations for Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Hart, Laura C; Maslow, Gary

    2018-01-01

    More adolescents and young adults are surviving previously fatal childhood illness and need support to transition from pediatric care to adult-oriented care. There are many barriers, but guidelines and tools assist providers with emphasis on gradually addressing transition with patients and families. Child and adolescent psychiatrists should be particularly attuned to the needs of adolescents with previously identified mental illness who are at high risk of falling out of regular care during transition. Providers are also uniquely suited to address the needs of adolescents and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Concept Analysis of Health Care Transition in Adolescents with Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ladores, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Children with chronic conditions are living into adulthood and present with unique needs. One such need is their transition from pediatric to adult health care. This paper examined the literature to analyze and synthesize the concept of transition within two contexts, health care and adolescents with chronic conditions. Fifty multidisciplinary sources were included for analysis. A refined, working definition of the concept of health care transition in adolescents with chronic conditions is presented. Results will enable the scientific community to discuss salient issues using well-defined, uniform terminology. Nursing implications are delineated to ensure that these youths thrive into adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Trauma Transitional Care Coordination: protecting the most vulnerable trauma patients from hospital readmission

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Erin C; Tyrrell, Rebecca; Scalea, Thomas M; Stein, Deborah M

    2018-01-01

    Background Unplanned hospital readmissions increase healthcare costs and patient morbidity. We hypothesized that a program designed to reduce trauma readmissions would be effective. Methods A Trauma Transitional Care Coordination (TTCC) program was created to support patients at high risk for readmission. TTCC interventions included call to patient (or caregiver) within 72 hours of discharge to identify barriers to care, complete medication reconciliation, coordination of appointments, and individualized problem solving. Information on all 30-day readmissions was collected. 30-day readmission rates were compared with center-specific readmission rates and population-based, risk-adjusted rates of readmission using published benchmarks. Results 260 patients were enrolled in the TTCC program from January 2014 to September 2015. 30.8% (n=80) of enrollees were uninsured, 41.9% (n=109) reported current substance abuse, and 26.9% (n=70) had a current psychiatric diagnosis. 74.2% (n=193) attended outpatient trauma appointments within 14 days of discharge. 96.3% were successfully followed. Only 6.6% (n=16) of patients were readmitted in the first 30 days after discharge. This was significantly lower than both center-specific readmission rates before start of the program (6.6% vs. 11.3%, P=0.02) and recently published population-based trauma readmission rates (6.6% vs. 27%, P<0.001). Discussion A nursing-led TTCC program successfully followed patients and was associated with a significant decrease in 30-day readmission rates for patients with high-risk trauma. Targeted outpatient support for these most vulnerable patients can lead to better utilization of outpatient resources, increased patient satisfaction, and more consistent attainment of preinjury level of functioning or better. Level of evidence Level IV. PMID:29766133

  9. Watching Transitions Unfold: A Mixed-Method Study of Transitions within Early Childhood Care and Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrelly, Christine; Hennessy, Eilis

    2014-01-01

    Unlike the transitions children make between settings, those they undertake between age groups within early childhood care and education (ECCE) settings are seldom studied. Accordingly, this exploratory study followed seven preschool children (three boys and four girls) as they moved to new rooms in five ECCE settings. Structured observations of…

  10. 28 CFR 550.56 - Community Transitional Drug Abuse Treatment Program (TDAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Community Transitional Drug Abuse... JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Abuse Treatment Program § 550.56 Community Transitional Drug Abuse Treatment Program (TDAT). (a) For inmates to successfully complete all components of...

  11. 28 CFR 550.56 - Community Transitional Drug Abuse Treatment Program (TDAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Community Transitional Drug Abuse... JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Abuse Treatment Program § 550.56 Community Transitional Drug Abuse Treatment Program (TDAT). (a) For inmates to successfully complete all components of...

  12. 28 CFR 550.56 - Community Transitional Drug Abuse Treatment Program (TDAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Community Transitional Drug Abuse... JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Abuse Treatment Program § 550.56 Community Transitional Drug Abuse Treatment Program (TDAT). (a) For inmates to successfully complete all components of...

  13. 28 CFR 550.56 - Community Transitional Drug Abuse Treatment Program (TDAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Community Transitional Drug Abuse... JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Abuse Treatment Program § 550.56 Community Transitional Drug Abuse Treatment Program (TDAT). (a) For inmates to successfully complete all components of...

  14. 28 CFR 550.56 - Community Transitional Drug Abuse Treatment Program (TDAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Community Transitional Drug Abuse... JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT DRUG PROGRAMS Drug Abuse Treatment Program § 550.56 Community Transitional Drug Abuse Treatment Program (TDAT). (a) For inmates to successfully complete all components of...

  15. Evaluation of Achieving a College Education Plus: A Credit-Based Transition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, Gaye; Fowler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This ex post facto study evaluated Achieving a College Education (ACE) Plus program, a credit-based transition program between a high school district and a community college. Achieving a College Education Plus is an early outreach program. It is designed to aid at-risk students in graduating from high school and making a smooth transition to…

  16. The Continental Project: A Model Program for School to Work Transition for Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Patricia; Ellsworth, J'Anne; Penny, Dave

    The Continental Project is a school-to-work transition program for students with disabilities. The 6-year old program, which is located at a country club and golf course, serves more than 20 students per year and has successfully transitioned 45 young adults with moderate to severe handicaps into the workforce. The program is a cooperative effort…

  17. Volunteer Evaluations of the Transitions Program for Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Lacey

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the effects of participation of peer volunteers in the Transitions Program for young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a program that facilitates social skills and social interactions. Participants in this study were peer volunteers in the Transitions Program. Each peer volunteer completed a questionnaire, following…

  18. 9 CFR 3.64 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... physical disress and to provide any needed veterinary care as soon as possible. When transported by air... are in obvious physical distress. The carrier shall provide any needed veterinary care as soon as...

  19. 50 CFR 14.109 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... veterinary care if no veterinary attendant is traveling with the shipment; if the shipper cannot be reached in the case of an emergency, qualified veterinary care should be provided. A veterinarian or...

  20. 9 CFR 3.64 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... physical disress and to provide any needed veterinary care as soon as possible. When transported by air... are in obvious physical distress. The carrier shall provide any needed veterinary care as soon as...

  1. 50 CFR 14.109 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... veterinary care if no veterinary attendant is traveling with the shipment; if the shipper cannot be reached in the case of an emergency, qualified veterinary care should be provided. A veterinarian or...

  2. Transitions in Care from Pediatric to Adult Health Care Providers: Ongoing Challenges and Opportunities for Young Persons with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Katharine; Laffel, Lori

    2018-01-01

    Adolescence and young adulthood are times of multiple developmental changes, including physiological, social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral transformations. The adolescent or young adult living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes must navigate the vicissitudes of these developmental stages while managing the rigors and self-care demands of these conditions. Diabetes in children is managed by adults, mainly by parents. As the child matures, diabetes management tasks transition from parents to the developing teen. This transition in care is a process that generally begins in early adolescence and culminates when the older teen successfully accepts and manages diabetes self-care tasks. Along with the transitions in diabetes management tasks, older teens and young adults must be prepared for transfer from the pediatric diabetes care team to an adult-focused health care team. Numerous publications have described the challenges associated with both the process of transition and the act of transfer. Lack of preparation during transition followed by unsuccessful transfer often results in gaps in diabetes care exceeding 6 months, deterioration in glycemic control, increase in emergency room use and hospitalization, and emergence of diabetes complications among older teens and young adults. There is need for ongoing research internationally to address these deficiencies in order to improve the short- and long-term health of young persons with diabetes. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. User Experience and Care Integration in Transitional Care for Older People From Hospital to Home: A Meta-Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jacqueline; Hutchinson, Alison M; Brown, Rhonda; Livingston, Patricia M

    2017-01-01

    This meta-synthesis aimed to improve understanding of user experience of older people, carers, and health providers; and care integration in the care of older people transitioning from hospital to home. Following our systematic search, we identified and synthesized 20 studies, and constructed a comprehensive framework. We derived four themes: (1) 'Who is taking care of what? Trying to work together"; (2) 'Falling short of the mark'; (3) 'A proper discharge'; and (4) 'You adjust somehow.' The themes that emerged from the studies reflected users' experience of discharge and transitional care as a social process of 'negotiation and navigation of independence (older people/carers), or dependence (health providers).' Users engaged in negotiation and navigation through the interrogative strategies of questioning, discussion, information provision, information seeking, assessment, and translation. The derived themes reflected care integration that facilitated, or a lack of care integration that constrained, users' experiences of negotiation and navigation of independence/dependence. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. 50 CFR 14.133 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... representative shall observe such marine mammals to determine whether or not they need veterinary care and shall provide or obtain any needed veterinary care as soon as possible. Care during transport shall include the... shall not be taken from its primary enclosure except under extreme emergency conditions and then only by...

  5. Coordination Program Reduced Acute Care Use And Increased Primary Care Visits Among Frequent Emergency Care Users.

    PubMed

    Capp, Roberta; Misky, Gregory J; Lindrooth, Richard C; Honigman, Benjamin; Logan, Heather; Hardy, Rose; Nguyen, Dong Q; Wiler, Jennifer L

    2017-10-01

    Many high utilizers of the emergency department (ED) have public insurance, especially through Medicaid. We evaluated how participation in Bridges to Care (B2C)-an ED-initiated, multidisciplinary, community-based program-affected subsequent ED use, hospital admissions, and primary care use among publicly insured or Medicaid-eligible high ED utilizers. During the six months after the B2C intervention was completed, participants had significantly fewer ED visits (a reduction of 27.9 percent) and significantly more primary care visits (an increase of 114.0 percent), compared to patients in the control group. In a subanalysis of patients with mental health comorbidities, we found that recipients of B2C services had significantly fewer ED visits (a reduction of 29.7 percent) and hospitalizations (30.0 percent), and significantly more primary care visits (an increase of 123.2 percent), again compared to patients in the control group. The B2C program reduced acute care use and increased the number of primary care visits among high ED utilizers, including those with mental health comorbidities. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  6. Basis And Application Of The CARES/LIFE Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Powers, Lynn M.

    1996-01-01

    Report discusses physical and mathematical basis of Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures LIFE prediction (CARES/LIFE) computer program, described in "Program for Evaluation of Reliability of Ceramic Parts" (LEW-16018).

  7. Qualitative Evaluation of the Coach Training within a Community Paramedicine Care Transitions Intervention.

    PubMed

    Lau, Hunter Singh; Hollander, Matthew M; Cushman, Jeremy T; DuGoff, Eva H; Jones, Courtney M C; Kind, Amy J H; Lohmeier, Michael T; Coleman, Eric A; Shah, Manish N

    2018-02-12

    The Care Transitions Intervention (CTI) has potential to improve the emergency department (ED)-to-home transition for older adults. Community paramedics may function as the CTI coaches; however, this requires the appropriate knowledge, skills, and attitudes, which they do not receive in traditional emergency medical services (EMS) education. This study aimed to define community paramedics' perceptions regarding their training needs to serve as CTI coaches supporting the ED-to-home transition. This study forms part of an ongoing randomized controlled trial evaluating a community paramedic-implemented CTI to enhance the ED-to-home transition. The community paramedics' training covered the following domains: the CTI program, geriatrics, effective coaching, ED discharge processes, and community paramedicine. Sixteen months after starting the study, we conducted audio-recorded semi-structured interviews with community paramedics at both study sites. After transcribing the interviews, team members independently coded the transcripts. Ensuing group analysis sessions led to the development of final codes and identifying common themes. Finally, we conducted member checking to confirm our interpretations of the interview data. We interviewed all 8 participating community paramedics. Participants consisted solely of non-Hispanic whites, included 5 women, and had a mean age of 43. Participants had extensive backgrounds in healthcare, primarily as EMS providers, but minimal experience with community paramedicine. All reported some prior geriatrics training. Four themes emerged from the interviews: (1) paramedics with positive attitudes and willingness to acquire the needed knowledge and skills will succeed as CTI coaches; (2) active rather than passive learning is preferred by paramedics; (3) the existing training could benefit from adjustments such as added content on mental health, dementia, and substance abuse issues, as well as content on coaching subjects with a range of

  8. Disease Management, Case Management, Care Management, and Care Coordination: A Framework and a Brief Manual for Care Programs and Staff.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Osman I

    2016-01-01

    With the changing landscape of health care delivery in the United States since the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010, health care organizations have struggled to keep pace with the evolving paradigm, particularly as it pertains to population health management. New nomenclature emerged to describe components of the new environment, and familiar words were put to use in an entirely different context. This article proposes a working framework for activities performed in case management, disease management, care management, and care coordination. The author offers standard working definitions for some of the most frequently used words in the health care industry with the goal of increasing consistency for their use, especially in the backdrop of the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services offering a "chronic case management fee" to primary care providers for managing the sickest, high-cost Medicare patients. Health care organizations performing case management, care management, disease management, and care coordination. Road map for consistency among users, in reporting, comparison, and for success of care management/coordination programs. This article offers a working framework for disease managers, case and care managers, and care coordinators. It suggests standard definitions to use for disease management, case management, care management, and care coordination. Moreover, the use of clear terminology will facilitate comparing, contrasting, and evaluating all care programs and increase consistency. The article can improve understanding of care program components and success factors, estimate program value and effectiveness, heighten awareness of consumer engagement tools, recognize current state and challenges for care programs, understand the role of health information technology solutions in care programs, and use information and knowledge gained to assess and improve care programs to design the "next generation" of programs.

  9. Evaluation of Hospital-Based Palliative Care Programs.

    PubMed

    Hall, Karen Lynn; Rafalson, Lisa; Mariano, Kathleen; Michalek, Arthur

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated current hospital-based palliative care programs using recommendations from the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) as a framework. Seven hospitals located in Buffalo, New York were included based on the existence of a hospital-based palliative care program. Data was collected from August through October of 2013 by means of key informant interviews with nine staff members from these hospitals using a guide comprised of questions based on CAPC's recommendations. A gap analysis was conducted to analyze the current state of each hospital's program based upon CAPC's definition of a quality palliative care program. The findings identify challenges facing both existing/evolving palliative care programs, and establish a foundation for strategies to attain best practices not yet implemented. This study affirms the growing availability of palliative care services among these selected hospitals along with opportunities to improve the scope of services in line with national recommendations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Searching for the missing pieces between the hospital and primary care: mapping the patient process during care transitions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julie K; Farnan, Jeanne M; Barach, Paul; Hesselink, Gijs; Wollersheim, Hub; Pijnenborg, Loes; Kalkman, Cor; Arora, Vineet M

    2012-12-01

    Safe patient transitions depend on effective communication and a functioning care coordination process. Evidence suggests that primary care physicians are not satisfied with communication at transition points between inpatient and ambulatory care, and that communication often is not provided in a timely manner, omits essential information, or contains ambiguities that put patients at risk. Our aim was to demonstrate how process mapping can illustrate current handover practices between ambulatory and inpatient care settings, identify existing barriers and facilitators to effective transitions of care, and highlight potential areas for quality improvement. We conducted focus group interviews to facilitate a process mapping exercise with clinical teams in six academic health centres in the USA, Poland, Sweden, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands. At a high level, the process of patient admission to the hospital through the emergency department, inpatient care, and discharge back in the community were comparable across sites. In addition, the process maps highlighted similar barriers to providing information to primary care physicians, inaccurate or incomplete information on referral and discharge, a lack of time and priority to collaborate with counterpart colleagues, and a lack of feedback to clinicians involved in the handovers. Process mapping is effective in bringing together key stakeholders and makes explicit the mental models that frame their understanding of the clinical process. Exploring the barriers and facilitators to safe and reliable patient transitions highlights opportunities for further improvement work and illustrates ideas for best practices that might be transferrable to other settings.

  11. Monitoring and evaluating transition and sustainability of donor-funded programs: Reflections on the Avahan experience.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sara; Ozawa, Sachiko; Rodriguez, Daniela; Paul, Amy; Singh, Kriti; Singh, Suneeta

    2015-10-01

    In low and middle-income countries, programs funded and implemented by international donors frequently transition to local funding and management, yet such processes are rarely evaluated. We reflect upon experience evaluating the transition of a large scale HIV/AIDS prevention program in India, known as Avahan, in order to draw lessons about transition evaluation approaches and implementation challenges. In terms of conceptualizing the transition theory, the evaluation team identified tensions between the idea of institutionalizing key features of the Avahan program, and ensuring program flexibility to promote sustainability. The transition was planned in three rounds allowing for adaptations to transition intervention and program design during the transition period. The assessment team found it important to track these changes in order to understand which strategies and contextual features supported transition. A mixed methods evaluation was employed, combining semi-structured surveys of transitioning entities (conducted pre and post transition), with longitudinal case studies. Qualitative data helped explain quantitative findings. Measures of transition readiness appeared robust, but we were uncertain of the robustness of institutionalization measures. Finally, challenges to the implementation of such an evaluation are discussed. Given the scarceness of transition evaluations, the lessons from this evaluation may have widespread relevance. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. A Qualitative Study of Patient and Provider Experiences during Preoperative Care Transitions

    PubMed Central

    MALLEY, ANN; YOUNG, GARY J.

    2017-01-01

    Aims To explore the issues and challenges of care transitions in the preoperative environment. Background Ineffective transitions play a role in a majority of serious medical errors. There is a paucity of research related to the preoperative arena and the multiple inherent transitions in care that occur there. Design Qualitative descriptive design was used. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted in a 975 bed academic medical center. Results 30 providers and 10 preoperative patients participated. Themes that arose were: (1) Need for clarity of purpose of preoperative care (2) Care coordination (3) Inter-professional boundaries of care (4) Inadequate time and resources. Conclusion Effective transitions in the preoperative environment require that providers bridge scope of practice barriers to promote good teamwork. Preoperative care that is a product of well-informed providers and patients can improve the entire perioperative care process and potentially influence post-operative patient outcomes. Relevance to Clinical Practice Nurses are well positioned to bridge the gaps within transitions of care and accordingly affect health outcomes. PMID:27706872

  13. Non-Technical Medical Care: An In-Home Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Human Services, Oklahoma City.

    This document describes the Non-Technical Medical Care (NTMC) program, a personal care service offered by the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to eligible persons in their own homes. These NTMC program goals are listed: to provide personal care services to frail elderly and disabled persons, allowing them to remain in their homes; and to…

  14. 76 FR 11338 - Hospital and Outpatient Care for Veterans Released From Incarceration to Transitional Housing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ..., found health care played a key role in the first months of community re-adjustment and reduced... abuse, Alcoholism, Claims, Day care, Dental health, Drug abuse, Foreign relations, Government contracts, Grant programs--health, Grant programs--veterans, Health care, Health facilities, Health professions...

  15. Primary Care Physicians' Experience with Disease Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Alicia; Grumbach, Kevin; Vranizan, Karen; Osmond, Dennis H; Bindman, Andrew B

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine primary care physicians' perceptions of how disease management programs affect their practices, their relationships with their patients, and overall patient care. DESIGN Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING The 13 largest urban counties in California. PARTICIPANTS General internists, general pediatricians, and family physicians. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Physicians' self-report of the effects of disease management programs on quality of patient care and their own practices. Respondents included 538 (76%) of 708 physicians: 183 (34%) internists, 199 (38%) family practitioners, and 156 (29%) pediatricians. Disease management programs were available 285 to (53%) physicians; 178 had direct experience with the programs. Three quarters of the 178 physicians believed that disease management programs increased the overall quality of patient care and the quality of care for the targeted disease. Eighty-seven percent continued to provide primary care for their patients in these programs, and 70% reported participating in major patient care decisions. Ninety-one percent reported that the programs had no effect on their income, decreased (38%) or had no effect (48%) on their workload, and increased (48%)) their practice satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS Practicing primary care physicians have generally favorable perceptions of the effect of voluntary, primary care-inclusive, disease management programs on their patients and on their own practice satisfaction. PMID:11318911

  16. The impact of Kaua'i Care Transition Intervention on hospital readmission rates.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengfang; Guo, Jing; Suga-Nakagawa, Audrey; Takahashi, Ludvina K; Renaud, June

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of Kaua'i Care Transition Intervention (KCTI), a patient-centered intervention program, on reducing hospital readmission rates among patients 60 years or older. A prospective quasi-experimental prepost design. Hospital admissions data for the year 2010 (January 1 to December 31) served as the baseline data and were used to identify patients at risk of hospital readmission. KCTI was implemented over a 12-month period from April 1, 2012, to March 31, 2013, and 30-day, 60-day, and 1-year readmission rates were assessed for both the intervention and baseline periods. The impact of the intervention was examined by a logistic regression model, controlling for possible patient population differences. During the intervention period, a total of 269 patients 60 years or older were admitted to the hospital, of which, 58 were referred to the KCTI program. Logistic regression controlling for patients' primary health insurance, discharge sites, and certain admitting diagnoses (eg, arrhythmias, cellulitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) found that the intervention reduced the 30-day readmission rate by two-thirds (odds ratio [OR], 0.34; P = .003). Readmission rates within 60 days (OR, 0.42; P < .01) and within a year (OR, 0.48; P < .001) during the intervention period were less than half of the baseline rates. By selecting patients with identified risk factors, then empowering and educating them with the intervention program, this study was successful in reducing hospital readmission rates. This study also demonstrated the value of carefully selecting patients for intervention programs.

  17. Transition to Adult-Oriented Health Care: Perspectives of Youth and Adults with Complex Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Nancy L.; Barden, Wendy S.; Mills, Wendy A.; Burke, Tricia A.; Law, Mary; Boydell, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The transition to adulthood is extremely difficult for individuals with disabilities. We sought to explore the specific issue of transition to adult-oriented health care in a Canadian context. Methods: We conducted semi-structured individual interviews with 15 youth and 15 adults with cerebral palsy, spina bifida, and acquired brain…

  18. Supporting Youth in the Transition from Foster Care: Formal and Informal Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mary Elizabeth; Spencer, Renee; Ward, Rolanda

    2010-01-01

    Social support is needed by everyone, but particularly by vulnerable populations at times of transition. This study utilizes data collected from 96 former foster youth regarding supports they received during the transition from care. The report addresses three questions: (1) What types of supportive relationships did the sample report? (2) What…

  19. A Qualitative Analysis of an Advanced Practice Nurse-Directed Transitional Care Model Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradway, Christine; Trotta, Rebecca; Bixby, M. Brian; McPartland, Ellen; Wollman, M. Catherine; Kapustka, Heidi; McCauley, Kathleen; Naylor, Mary D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe barriers and facilitators to implementing a transitional care intervention for cognitively impaired older adults and their caregivers lead by advanced practice nurses (APNs). Design and Methods: APNs implemented an evidence-based protocol to optimize transitions from hospital to home. An…

  20. Parents' Experiences during Their Infant's Transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Sharon W.; Spillet, Marydee A.; Cronin, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Limited literature exists which examines how parents of infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transition from their infant's NICU hospital stay to home. This study examines the question, "What are the experiences of parents during their infant's transition from the NICU to home?" Grounded theory methods served as the…

  1. What influences success in family medicine maternity care education programs?

    PubMed Central

    Biringer, Anne; Forte, Milena; Tobin, Anastasia; Shaw, Elizabeth; Tannenbaum, David

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To ascertain how program leaders in family medicine characterize success in family medicine maternity care education and determine which factors influence the success of training programs. Design Qualitative research using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Purposive sample of 6 family medicine programs from 5 Canadian provinces. Participants Eighteen departmental leaders and program directors. METHODS Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with program leaders in family medicine maternity care. Departmental leaders identified maternity care programs deemed to be “successful.” Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Team members conducted thematic analysis. Main findings Participants considered their education programs to be successful in family medicine maternity care if residents achieved competency in intrapartum care, if graduates planned to include intrapartum care in their practices, and if their education programs were able to recruit and retain family medicine maternity care faculty. Five key factors were deemed to be critical to a program’s success in family medicine maternity care: adequate clinical exposure, the presence of strong family medicine role models, a family medicine–friendly hospital environment, support for the education program from multiple sources, and a dedicated and supportive community of family medicine maternity care providers. Conclusion Training programs wishing to achieve greater success in family medicine maternity care education should employ a multifaceted strategy that considers all 5 of the interdependent factors uncovered in our research. By paying particular attention to the informal processes that connect these factors, program leaders can preserve the possibility that family medicine residents will graduate with the competence and confidence to practise full-scope maternity care. PMID:29760273

  2. National Fuel Cell Bus Program : Accelerated Testing Report, AC Transit

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006 compared to similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. This evaluation report includes results from November 2007 throu...

  3. Transitioning young adults from paediatric to adult care and the HIV care continuum in Atlanta, Georgia, USA: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hussen, Sophia A; Chakraborty, Rana; Knezevic, Andrea; Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Huang, Eugene; Stephenson, Rob; Del Rio, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    The transition from paediatric to adult HIV care is a particularly high-risk time for disengagement among young adults; however, empirical data are lacking. We reviewed medical records of 72 youth seen in both the paediatric and the adult clinics of the Grady Infectious Disease Program in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, from 2004 to 2014. We abstracted clinical data on linkage, retention and virologic suppression from the last two years in the paediatric clinic through the first two years in the adult clinic. Of patients with at least one visit scheduled in adult clinic, 97% were eventually seen by an adult provider (median time between last paediatric and first adult clinic visit = 10 months, interquartile range 2-18 months). Half of the patients were enrolled in paediatric care immediately prior to transition, while the other half experienced a gap in paediatric care and re-enrolled in the clinic as adults. A total of 89% of patients were retained (at least two visits at least three months apart) in the first year and 56% in the second year after transition. Patients who were seen in adult clinic within three months of their last paediatric visit were more likely to be virologically suppressed after transition than those who took longer (Relative risk (RR): 1.76; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-2.9; p  = 0.03). Patients with virologic suppression (HIV-1 RNA below the level of detection of the assay) at the last paediatric visit were also more likely to be suppressed at the most recent adult visit (RR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.34-3.9; p  = 0.002). Retention rates once in adult care, though high initially, declined significantly by the second year after transition. Pre-transition viral suppression and shorter linkage time between paediatric and adult clinic were associated with better outcomes post-transition. Optimizing transition will require intensive transition support for patients who are not virologically controlled, as well as support for youth beyond the first year

  4. Promoting Local Ownership: Lessons Learned from Process of Transitioning Clinical Mentoring of HIV Care and Treatment in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kassie, Getnet M; Belay, Teklu; Sharma, Anjali; Feleke, Getachew

    2018-01-01

    Focus on improving access and quality of HIV care and treatment gained acceptance in Ethiopia through the work of the International Training and Education Center for Health. The initiative deployed mobile field-based teams and capacity building teams to mentor health care providers on clinical services and program delivery in three regions, namely Tigray, Amhara, and Afar. Transitioning of the clinical mentoring program (CMP) began in 2012 through capacity building and transfer of skills and knowledge to local health care providers and management. The initiative explored the process of transitioning a CMP on HIV care and treatment to local ownership and documented key lessons learned. A mixed qualitative design was used employing focus group discussions, individual in-depth interviews, and review of secondary data. The participants included regional focal persons, mentors, mentees, multidisciplinary team members, and International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH) staff. Three facilities were selected in each region. Data were collected by trained research assistants using customized guides for interviews and with data extraction format. The interviews were recorded and fully transcribed. Open Code software was used for coding and categorizing the data. A total of 16 focus group discussions and 20 individual in-depth interviews were conducted. The critical processes for transitioning a project were: establishment of a mentoring transition task force, development of a roadmap to define steps and directions for implementing the transition, and signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the respective regional health bureaus and I-TECH Ethiopia to formalize the transition. The elements of implementation included mentorship and capacity building, joint mentoring, supportive supervision, review meetings, and independent mentoring supported by facility-based mechanisms: multidisciplinary team meetings, case-based discussions, and catchment

  5. Oregon Child Care Quality Indicators Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Oregon's Child Care Quality Indicators Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  6. Drug therapy problems and medication discrepancies during care transitions in super-utilizers.

    PubMed

    Surbhi, Satya; Munshi, Kiraat D; Bell, Paula C; Bailey, James E

    First, to investigate the prevalence and types of drug therapy problems and medication discrepancies among super-utilizers, and associated patient characteristics. Second, to examine the outcomes of pharmacist recommendations and estimated cost avoidance through care transitions support focused on medication management. Retrospective analysis of the pharmacist-led interventions as part of the SafeMed Program. A large nonprofit health care system serving the major medically underserved areas in Memphis, Tennessee. Three hundred seventy-four super-utilizing SafeMed participants with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy. Comprehensive medication review, medication therapy management, enhanced discharge planning, home visits, telephone follow-up, postdischarge medication reconciliation, and care coordination with physicians. Types of drug therapy problems, outcomes of pharmacist recommendations, estimated cost avoided, medication discrepancies, and self-reported medication adherence. Prevalence of drug therapy problems and postdischarge medication discrepancies was 80.7% and 75.4%, respectively. The most frequently occurring drug therapy problems were enrollee not receiving needed medications (33.4%), underuse of medications (16.9%), and insufficient dose or duration (11.2%). Overall 50.8% of the pharmacist recommendations were accepted by physicians and patients, resulting in an estimated cost avoidance of $293.30 per drug therapy problem identified. Multivariate analysis indicated that participants with a higher number of comorbidities were more likely to have medication discrepancies (odds ratio 1.23 [95% CI 1.05-1.44]). Additional contributors to postdischarge medication discrepancies were difficulty picking up and paying for medications and not being given necessary prescriptions before discharge. Drug therapy problems and medication discrepancies are common in super-utilizers with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy during transitions of care

  7. Diagnosis and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, part 3: primary care, emergency management, psychosocial care, and transitions of care across the lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Birnkrant, David J; Bushby, Katharine; Bann, Carla M; Apkon, Susan D; Blackwell, Angela; Colvin, Mary K; Cripe, Linda; Herron, Adrienne R; Kennedy, Annie; Kinnett, Kathi; Naprawa, James; Noritz, Garey; Poysky, James; Street, Natalie; Trout, Christina J; Weber, David R; Ward, Leanne M

    2018-01-01

    Improvements in the function, quality of life, and longevity of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have been achieved through a multidisciplinary approach to management across a range of health-care specialties. In part 3 of this update of the DMD care considerations, we focus on primary care, emergency management, psychosocial care, and transitions of care across the lifespan. Many primary care and emergency medicine clinicians are inexperienced at managing the complications of DMD. We provide a guide to the acute and chronic medical conditions that these first-line providers are likely to encounter. With prolonged survival, individuals with DMD face a unique set of challenges related to psychosocial issues and transitions of care. We discuss assessments and interventions that are designed to improve mental health and independence, functionality, and quality of life in critical domains of living, including health care, education, employment, interpersonal relationships, and intimacy. PMID:29398641

  8. Parental experiences of a developmentally focused care program for infants and children during prolonged hospitalization.

    PubMed

    So, Stephanie; Rogers, Alaine; Patterson, Catherine; Drew, Wendy; Maxwell, Julia; Darch, Jane; Hoyle, Carolyn; Patterson, Sarah; Pollock-BarZiv, Stacey

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates parental experiences and perceptions of the care received during their child's prolonged hospitalization. It relates this care to the Beanstalk Program (BP), a develop-mentally focused care program provided to these families within an acute care hospital setting. A total of 20 parents (of children hospitalized between 1-15 months) completed the Measures of Processes of Care (MPOC-20) with additional questions regarding the BP. Scores rate the extent of the health-care provider's behaviour as perceived by the family, ranging from 'to a great extent' (7) to 'never' (1). Parents rated Respectful and Supportive Care (6.33) as highest, while Providing General Information (5.65) was rated lowest. Eleven parents participated in a follow-up, qualitative, semi-structured interview. Interview data generated key themes: (a) parents strive for positive and normal experiences for their child within the hospital environment; (b) parents value the focus on child development in the midst of their child's complex medical care; and (c) appropriate developmentally focused education helps parents shift from feeling overwhelmed with a medically ill child to instilling feelings of confidence and empowerment to care for their child and transition home. These results emphasize the importance of enhancing child development for hospitalized infants and young children through programs such as the BP. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Employer Child Care Resources: A Guide to Developing Effective Child Care Programs and Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Increasing numbers of employers are responding to employee child care needs by revising their benefit packages, work schedules, and recruitment plans to include child care options. This guide details ways to develop effective child care programs and policies. Section 1 of the guide describes employees' growing child care needs and employers'…

  10. Annual progress report : for the period of January 2001 through December 2001 : Florida Transit Training Program (2001) : Florida Technical Assistance Program (2001)

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-01-01

    The following progress report is intended to highlight the significant activities of the Florida Transit Training Program and Florida Technical Assistant Program for the 2001 year. Activities of the Florida Statewide Transit Training Program are pres...

  11. Health Changes in Low Income Men Transitioning from a State Funded Prostate Cancer Program to Comprehensive Insurance.

    PubMed

    Nabhani, Jamal A; Kuang, Ruby; Liu, Hui; Kwan, Lorna; Litwin, Mark S

    2018-07-01

    We evaluated the effect of transitioning from a prostate cancer specific treatment program to comprehensive insurance under the ACA (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) on the physical, mental and prostate cancer related health of poor, previously uninsured men. We assessed general and prostate cancer specific health related quality of life using the RAND SF-12v2™ (12-Item Short Form Survey, version 2) and the UCLA PCI (Prostate Cancer Index) at 3 time points in 24 men who transitioned to comprehensive insurance as the insured group relative to 39 who remained in the prostate cancer program as the control group. We used mixed effects models controlling for treatment and patient factors to measure health differences between the groups during the transition period. Demographics, prostate cancer treatment patterns, and mental, physical and general health were similar before transition in the control and insured groups. After transition men who gained insurance coverage reported significantly worse physical health than men who remained in the prostate cancer program (p = 0.0038). After adjustment in the mixed effects model physical health remained worse in men who gained insurance (p = 0.0036). Mental health and prostate cancer related quality of life did not differ with time between the groups. Compared to controls who remained in the state funded prostate cancer treatment program for poor, uninsured men, newly insured men reported worse physical health after transitioning to ACA coverage. Providers and policy makers may draw important lessons from understanding the mechanisms of this paradoxical worsening in physical health after gaining insurance. These results inform the development of disease specific models of care in the broader health insurance context. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hospital-Based Comprehensive Care Programs for Children With Special Health Care Needs

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Eyal; Jovcevska, Vesna; Kuo, Dennis Z.; Mahant, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of hospital-based comprehensive care programs in improving the quality of care for children with special health care needs. Data Sources A systematic review was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts SocioFile, and Web of Science. Study Selection Evaluations of comprehensive care programs for categorical (those with single disease) and noncategorical groups of children with special health care needs were included. Selected articles were reviewed independently by 2 raters. Data Extraction Models of care focused on comprehensive care based at least partially in a hospital setting. The main outcome measures were the proportions of studies demonstrating improvement in the Institute of Medicine’s quality-of-care domains (effectiveness of care, efficiency of care, patient or family centeredness, patient safety, timeliness of care, and equity of care). Data Synthesis Thirty-three unique programs were included, 13 (39%) of which were randomized controlled trials. Improved outcomes most commonly reported were efficiency of care (64% [49 of 76 outcomes]), effectiveness of care (60% [57 of 95 outcomes]), and patient or family centeredness (53% [10 of 19 outcomes). Outcomes less commonly evaluated were patient safety (9% [3 of 33 programs]), timeliness of care (6% [2 of 33 programs]), and equity of care (0%). Randomized controlled trials occurred more frequently in studies evaluating categorical vs noncategorical disease populations (11 of 17 [65%] vs 2 of 16 [17%], P = .008). Conclusions Although positive, the evidence supporting comprehensive hospital-based programs for children with special health care needs is restricted primarily to nonexperimental studies of children with categorical diseases and is limited by inadequate outcome measures. Additional high-quality evidence with appropriate comparative groups and broad outcomes is necessary to justify continued development and growth of

  13. Wellness Programs: Preventive Medicine to Reduce Health Care Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martini, Gilbert R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A wellness program is a formalized approach to preventive health care that can positively affect employee lifestyle and reduce future health-care costs. Describes programs for health education, smoking cessation, early detection, employee assistance, and fitness, citing industry success figures. (eight references) (MLF)

  14. Taylor Proposes Five-Year Child-Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Glen

    Senator Glen Taylor of Minnesota proposed a five-year child-care program for the purposes of encouraging employer-sponsored child care and increasing by 53,000 the number of children in low-income families who were covered. This report lists central features of the program, which include: (1) tax incentives which employers can use when they build…

  15. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient–provider language concordance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients’ discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient–provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. Methods This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0–100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Results Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient–provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients’ discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P <0.001). Other aspects significantly associated with CTM scores: extent of discharge explanations (P <0.05), quality of discharge briefing (P <0.001), and post-discharge explanations by the primary care physician (P <0.01). Conclusion Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients. PMID:25075273

  16. Outcomes for a transitional living program serving LGBTQ youth in New York City.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Theresa C

    2006-01-01

    Providing stable housing for runaway and homeless youth is a major function of a transitional living program. This article introduces the focus of one program working with LGBTQ youth in New York City and discusses some issues to consider when working with this population. The article also presents data associated with young people's lives after discharge. In any discussion of outcomes, both reason for discharge and length of stay play important roles in whether or not an exit is safe. Regardless of these two elements, the places youth move to when leaving programs are crucial to their safety and well-being. The exit can be safe even when a young person is discharged early from a program. This article presents types of exits, as well as status of employment and school enrollment at exit. Some youth and staff-identified lessons gained in the program also are discussed in detail. Types of aftercare services sought by discharged youth are specified. This article also describes any differences in outcomes for youth with and without foster care experience.

  17. New Graduate Entry: Students' Transition to an Adapted Physical Education Graduate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Takahiro; Samalot-Rivera, Amaury; Kozub, Francis M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and explain master of arts students' academic and social experiences during the transition to an adapted physical education (APE) graduate program. In this study, we used the theory of transition, which allowed us to understand students' transition to graduate studies and to assist them in connecting to…

  18. The costs of transit fare prepayment programs : a parametric cost analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    Despite the renewed interest in transit fare prepayment plans over the past : 10 years, few transit managers have a clear idea of how much it costs to operate : and maintain a fare prepayment program. This report provides transit managers : with the ...

  19. The role and significance of nurses in managing transitions to palliative care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Emma; Broom, Alex; Good, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nurses are generally present, and often influential, in supporting patient and family acceptance of medical futility and in assisting doctors in negotiating referral to palliative care. Yet the specificities of the nursing role and how nurses may contribute to timely and effective referrals is not well understood. This study aimed to systematically explore hospital-based nurses’ accounts of the transition to palliative care, and the potential role of nurses in facilitating more effective palliative care transitions. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting Two health services with public as well as private clinical environments in a major metropolitan area of Australia. Participants Hospital-based nurses (n=20) who regularly work with patients at the point of referral and in managing transitions to palliative care. Results Four significant themes emerged from thematic analysis. These include: (1) professional dynamics and the roles played by nurses in initiating the transition to palliative care; (2) the value of nurses’ informal interactions in timely and effective transitions; (3) the emerging challenge of managing task-oriented nursing versus intense emotional nursing work at the point of medical futility and (4) the emotional burden experienced by nurses within this clinical context. Nurses self-reported occupying critical albeit complex roles in the management of medical futility and the transition to palliative care. They reported experiencing significant emotional burden in balancing interpersonal and interprofessional relationships during this time. Conclusions The results suggest that nurses may be utilised in a more formalised and systematic fashion in the context of managing medical futility and the need to topicalise the transition, with the focus shifted away from medical referrals towards more team-based and patient-centred timely transitions. Further research focused on the experiences of doctors, allied health

  20. Who Cares about Caring in Early Childhood Teacher Education Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Abigail; Mercurio, Mia; Peloso, Jeanne M.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to care for oneself, near and distant others, animals, plants, human-made objects, and even ideas is an antidote for violence in its many forms as experienced in childhood as well as adulthood. This article makes a case for facilitating the development of the ability to care as children develop. The authors emphasize the importance of…

  1. 9 CFR 3.90 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... nonhuman primates are in obvious physical distress, and obtains any veterinary care needed for the nonhuman primates at the closest available veterinary facility. (b) Air transportation. During air transportation of... primates is in obvious physical distress, and arrange for any needed veterinary care for the nonhuman...

  2. 9 CFR 3.90 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... nonhuman primates are in obvious physical distress, and obtains any veterinary care needed for the nonhuman primates at the closest available veterinary facility. (b) Air transportation. During air transportation of... primates is in obvious physical distress, and arrange for any needed veterinary care for the nonhuman...

  3. UMTA Rail Transit EMI/EMC Program : An Overview and Summary

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-02-01

    This report gives a history of the UMTA Rail Transit Electromagnetic Interference and Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMI/EMC) program, together with a listing of significant achievements over the life of the program. This is the lead volume of a nine...

  4. Quantifying the benefits of the Florida Transit Research Inspection Procurement Services (TRIPS) program.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-04-01

    This study details the analysis of the Florida Transit Research Inspection Procurement Services (TRIPS) Program. It provides a comparative assessment of the program with respect to out-of-state practice, provides recommendations to improve life cycle...

  5. Discharge summary for medically complex infants transitioning to primary care.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Jennifer J

    2014-01-01

    Improvements in the care of the premature infant and advancements in technology are increasing life expectancy of infants with medical conditions once considered lethal; these infants are at risk of becoming a medically complex infant. Complex infants have a significant existing problem list, are on several medications, and receive medical care by several specialists. Deficits in communication and information transfer at the time of discharge remain problematic for this population. A questionnaire was developed for primary care providers (PCPs) to explore the effectiveness of the current discharge summary because it is related to effective communication when assuming the care of a new patient with medical complexity. PCPs assuming the care of these infants agree that an evidence-based tool, in the form of a specialized summary for this population, would be of value.

  6. Site of Death, Place of Care, and Health Care Transitions Among US Medicare Beneficiaries, 2000-2015.

    PubMed

    Teno, Joan M; Gozalo, Pedro; Trivedi, Amal N; Bunker, Jennifer; Lima, Julie; Ogarek, Jessica; Mor, Vincent

    2018-06-25

    End-of-life care costs are high and decedents often experience poor quality of care. Numerous factors influence changes in site of death, health care transitions, and burdensome patterns of care. To describe changes in site of death and patterns of care among Medicare decedents. Retrospective cohort study among a 20% random sample of 1 361 870 decedents who had Medicare fee-for-service (2000, 2005, 2009, 2011, and 2015) and a 100% sample of 871 845 decedents who had Medicare Advantage (2011 and 2015) and received care at an acute care hospital, at home or in the community, at a hospice inpatient care unit, or at a nursing home. Secular changes between 2000 and 2015. Medicare administrative data were used to determine site of death, place of care, health care transitions, which are changes in location of care, and burdensome patterns of care. Burdensome patterns of care were based on health care transitions during the last 3 days of life and multiple hospitalizations for infections or dehydration during the last 120 days of life. The site of death and patterns of care were studied among 1 361 870 decedents who had Medicare fee-for-service (mean [SD] age, 82.8 [8.4] years; 58.7% female) and 871 845 decedents who had Medicare Advantage (mean [SD] age, 82.1 [8.5] years; 54.0% female). Among Medicare fee-for-service decedents, the proportion of deaths that occurred in an acute care hospital decreased from 32.6% (95% CI, 32.4%-32.8%) in 2000 to 19.8% (95% CI, 19.6%-20.0%) in 2015, and deaths in a home or community setting that included assisted living facilities increased from 30.7% (95% CI, 30.6%-30.9%) in 2000 to 40.1% (95% CI, 39.9%-30.3% ) in 2015. Use of the intensive care unit during the last 30 days of life among Medicare fee-for-service decedents increased from 24.3% (95% CI, 24.1%-24.4%) in 2000 and then stabilized between 2009 and 2015 at 29.0% (95% CI, 28.8%-29.2%). Among Medicare fee-for-service decedents, health care transitions during the last 3

  7. Military Child Care Programs: Progress Made, More Needed.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    AD-A115 281 GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE WASHINGTON DC FEDERAL PURS-ETC F/B 5/11 MILITARY CHILD CARE PROGRAMSI PROGRESS MADE. MORE NEEDED. (U) JUN Ba...provides background information on military child care programs in each of the services and points out some potential problems in the quality of the...programs. It also identifies oppor- tunities to reduce child care costs. This report contains recommendations to you on pages 9, 15, and 19. As you know

  8. Preceptor Support in Hospital Transition to Practice Programs.

    PubMed

    Blegen, Mary A; Spector, Nancy; Ulrich, Beth T; Lynn, Mary R; Barnsteiner, Jane; Silvestre, Josephine

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe newly licensed RN (NLRN) preceptorships and the effects on competency and retention. Preceptors are widely used, but little is known about the benefit from the perspective of the NLRN or about the models of the relationships. The National Council of State Boards of Nursing added questions about the preceptor experience in a study of transition-to-practice programs. Hospitals were coded as having high or low preceptor support in regard to scheduling NLRN on the same shifts as their preceptors, assignment sharing, and preceptor release time and a low number of preceptors per preceptee. Half of the 82 hospitals were classified as high, and half as low preceptor support. NLRNs and their preceptors in high-support hospitals evaluated the preceptor experience and NLRN competence higher. In addition, NLRN retention was higher in the high-support hospitals. To improve NLRN competence and retention, preceptors should have adequate time with each NLRN, share shift and patient assignments, and have few preceptees assigned to each preceptor concurrently.

  9. The Transition Status of Youth Departing Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Kathryn J.; Reid, Robert; Trout, Alexandra L.; Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Chmelka, M. Beth; Thompson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the characteristics related to a successful reintegration among youth from a residential facility. Specifically, this study describes the transition skills of youth at departure in five areas: (a) education and employment goals, (b) self-determination skills, (c) social support, (d) life skills, and (e) hopefulness. Further,…

  10. Adolescent to Adult HIV Health Care Transition From the Perspective of Adult Providers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Amanda E; Philbin, Morgan M; Ma, Alice; Chambers, Brittany D; Nichols, Sharon; Lee, Sonia; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2017-10-01

    The HIV Care Continuum highlights the need for HIV-infected youth to be tested, linked, and maintained in lifelong care. Care engagement is important for HIV-infected youth in order for them to stay healthy, maintain a low viral load, and reduce further transmission. One point of potential interruption in the care continuum is during health care transition from adolescent- to adult-centered HIV care. HIV-related health care transition research focuses mainly on youth and on adolescent clinic providers; missing is adult clinic providers' perspectives. We examined health care transition processes through semi-structured interviews with 28 adult clinic staff across Adolescent Trials Network sites. We also collected quantitative data related to clinical characteristics and transition-specific strategies. Overall, participants described health care transition as a "warm handoff" and a collaborative effort across adolescent and adult clinics. Emergent transition themes included adult clinical care culture (e.g., patient responsibility), strategies for connecting youth to adult care (e.g., adolescent clinic staff attending youth's first appointment at adult clinic), and approaches to evaluating transition outcomes (e.g., data sharing). Participants provided transition improvement recommendations (e.g., formalized protocols). Using evidence-based research and a quality improvement framework to inform comprehensive and streamlined transition protocols can help enhance the capacity of adult clinics to collaborate with adolescent clinics to provide coordinated and uninterrupted HIV-related care and to improve continuum of care outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; establishment of exchanges and qualified health plans; Small Business Health Options Program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-06-04

    This final rule implements provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act) related to the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP). Specifically, this final rule amends existing regulations regarding triggering events and special enrollment periods for qualified employees and their dependents and implements a transitional policy regarding employees' choice of qualified health plans (QHPs) in the SHOP.

  12. Cystic fibrosis: addressing the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care.

    PubMed

    Kreindler, James L; Miller, Victoria A

    2013-12-11

    Survival for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) increased to nearly 40 years in 2012 from the early childhood years in the 1940s. Therefore, patients are living long enough to require transition from pediatric CF centers to adult CF centers. The goal of transition is for the young adult to be engaged in the adult health care system in ways that optimize health, maximize potential, and increase quality of life. A successful transition promotes autonomy and responsibility with respect to one's own health. Currently, there is an information gap in the literature with respect to psychological models that can help guide informed transition processes. In this review, we establish the framework in which transition exists in CF; we review some of the published literature from the last 20 years of experience with transition in CF centers around the world; and we discuss psychological models of pediatric illness that can help to explain the current state of transition to adult-oriented care from pediatric-oriented care and help to formulate new models of ascertaining readiness for transition. Finally, we look at our current knowledge gaps and opportunities for future research endeavors.

  13. SafeMed: Using pharmacy technicians in a novel role as community health workers to improve transitions of care.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James E; Surbhi, Satya; Bell, Paula C; Jones, Angel M; Rashed, Sahar; Ugwueke, Michael O

    2016-01-01

    To describe the design, implementation, and early experience of the SafeMed program, which uses certified pharmacy technicians in a novel expanded role as community health workers (CPhT-CHWs) to improve transitions of care. A large nonprofit health care system serving the major medically underserved areas and geographic hotspots for readmissions in Memphis, TN. The SafeMed program is a care transitions program with an emphasis on medication management designed to use low-cost health workers to improve transitions of care from hospital to home for superutilizing patients with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy. CPhT-CHWs were given primary responsibility for patient outreach after hospital discharge with the use of home visits and telephone follow-up. SafeMed program CPhT-CHWs served as pharmacist extenders, obtaining medication histories, assisting in medication reconciliation and identification of potential drug therapy problems (DTPs), and reinforcing medication education previously provided by the pharmacist per protocol. CPhT-CHW training included patient communication skills, motivational interviewing, medication history taking, teach-back techniques, drug disposal practices, and basic disease management. Some CPhT-CHWs experienced difficulties adjusting to an expanded scope of practice. Nonetheless, once the Tennessee Board of Pharmacy affirmed that envisioned SafeMed CPhT-CHW roles were consistent with Board rules, additional responsibilities were added for CPhT-CHWs to enhance their effectiveness. Patient outreach teams including CPhT-CHWs achieved increases in home visit and telephone follow-up rates and were successful in helping identify potential DTPs. The early experience of the SafeMed program demonstrates that CPhT-CHWs are well suited for novel expanded roles to improve care transitions for superutilizing populations. CPhT-CHWs can identify and report potential DTPs to the pharmacist to help target medication therapy management. Critical

  14. A role for social workers in improving care setting transitions: a case study.

    PubMed

    Barber, Ruth D; Coulourides Kogan, Alexis; Riffenburgh, Anne; Enguidanos, Susan

    2015-01-01

    High 30-day readmission rates are a major burden to the American medical system. Much attention is on transitional care to decrease financial costs and improve patient outcomes. Social workers may be uniquely qualified to improve care transitions and have not previously been used in this role. We present a case study of an older, dually eligible Latina woman who received a social work-driven transition intervention that included in-home and telephone contacts. The patient was not readmitted during the six-month study period, mitigated her high pain levels, and engaged in social outings once again. These findings suggest the value of a social worker in a transitional care role.

  15. Transitional care challenges of rehospitalized veterans: listening to patients and providers.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Caroline; Sackett, Nathan; Pierce, Read; Schopfer, David; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Moy, Nicholas; Bachhuber, Melissa; Wallhagen, Margaret I; Lee, Sei J

    2013-10-01

    Readmissions to the hospital are common and costly, often resulting from poor care coordination. Despite increased attention given to improving the quality and safety of care transitions, little is known about patient and provider perspectives of the transitional care needs of rehospitalized Veterans. As part of a larger quality improvement initiative to reduce hospital readmissions, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 patients and 14 of their interdisciplinary health care providers to better understand their perspectives of the transitional care needs and challenges faced by rehospitalized Veterans. Patients identified 3 common themes that led to rehospitalization: (1) knowledge gaps and deferred power; (2) difficulties navigating the health care system; and (3) complex psychiatric and social needs. Providers identified different themes that led to rehospitalization: (1) substance abuse and mental illness; (2) lack of social or financial support and homelessness; (3) premature discharge and poor communication; and (4) nonadherence with follow-up. Results underscore that rehospitalized Veterans have a complex overlapping profile of real and perceived physical, mental, and social needs. A paradigm of disempowerment and deferred responsibility appears to exist between patients and providers that contributes to ineffective care transitions, resulting in readmissions. These results highlight the cultural constraints on systems of care and suggest that process improvements should focus on increasing the sense of partnership between patients and providers, while simultaneously creating a culture of empowerment, ownership, and engagement, to achieve success in reducing hospital readmissions.

  16. Fathers' Involvement in Child Care and Perceptions of Parenting Skill over the Transition to Parenthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Amy A.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.; Deutsch, Francine M.; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    This study explored first-time fathers' perceived child care skill over the transition to parenthood, based on face-to-face interviews of 152 working-class, dual-earner couples. Analyses examined the associations among fathers' perceived skill and prenatal perception of skill, child care involvement, mothers' breastfeeding, maternal gatekeeping,…

  17. Psychosocial changes following transition to an aged care home: qualitative findings from Iran.

    PubMed

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rahmani, Azad; Pakpour, Vahid; Chenoweth, Lynnette Lorraine; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2017-06-01

    The study explored the psychosocial effects of transitioning from home to an aged care home for older Iranian people. Moving from one's own home to a communal aged care home is challenging for older people and may give rise to numerous psychosocial responses. The extent and intensity of such changes have rarely been explored in Middle Eastern countries. Data were collected through purposive sampling by in-depth semi-structured interviews with 20 participants (17 people living in aged care homes and three formal caregivers). All the interviews were recorded and typed, and conventional qualitative content analysis was used, eliciting common themes. There were four common themes: communication isolation, resource change, monotone institutional life and negative emotional response. Participants lost their previous support systems when transitioning to an aged care home and were not able to establish new ones. Routine care was provided by formal caregivers with little attention to individual needs, and minimal support was given to help maintain the older person's independence. These losses gave rise to negative emotions in some of the participants, depending on their previous lifestyle and accommodation arrangements. The extent and intensity of psychosocial changes occurring in most of the participants following their transition to an aged care home indicates the need for a review of Iranian aged care services. To assist older Iranian people adapt more readily when making the transition to aged care home and to meet their unique psychosocial needs, a family-centred approach to service delivery is recommended. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Quality in transitional care of the elderly: Key challenges and relevant improvement measures

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Marianne; Siemsen, Inger Margrete D.; Laugaland, Kristin; Dyrstad, Dagrunn Nåden; Aase, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Elderly people aged over 75 years with multifaceted care needs are often in need of hospital treatment. Transfer across care levels for this patient group increases the risk of adverse events. The aim of this paper is to establish knowledge of quality in transitional care of the elderly in two Norwegian hospital regions by identifying issues affecting the quality of transitional care and based on these issues suggest improvement measures. Methodology Included in the study were elderly patients (75+) receiving health care in the municipality admitted to hospital emergency department or discharged to community health care with hip fracture or with a general medical diagnosis. Participant observations of admission and discharge transitions (n = 41) were carried out by two researchers. Results Six main challenges with belonging descriptions have been identified: (1) next of kin (bridging providers, advocacy, support, information brokering), (2) patient characteristics (level of satisfaction, level of insecurity, complex clinical conditions), (3) health care personnel's competence (professional, system, awareness of others’ roles), (4) information exchange (oral, written, electronic), (5) context (stability, variability, change incentives, number of patient handovers) and (6) patient assessment (complex clinical picture, patient description, clinical assessment). Conclusion Related to the six main challenges, several measures have been suggested to improve quality in transitional care, e.g. information to and involvement of patients and next of kin, staff training, standardisation of routines and inter-organisational staff meetings. PMID:24868196

  19. Building mobile technologies to improve transitions of care in adolescents with congenital heart disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are the most common type of birth defects. Improvements in CHD care have led to roughly 1.4 million survivors reaching adulthood. This emerging "survivor" population are often palliated but not cured. Thus successful transition from pediatric to adult care for CHD pa...

  20. How the Avahan HIV prevention program transitioned from the Gates Foundation to the government of India.

    PubMed

    Sgaier, Sema K; Ramakrishnan, Aparajita; Dhingra, Neeraj; Wadhwani, Alkesh; Alexander, Ashok; Bennett, Sara; Bhalla, Aparajita; Kumta, Sameer; Jayaram, Matangi; Gupta, Pankaj; Piot, Peter K; Bertozzi, Stefano M; Anthony, John

    2013-07-01

    Developing countries face diminishing development aid and time-limited donor commitments that challenge the long-term sustainability of donor-funded programs to improve the health of local populations. Increasing country ownership of the programs is one solution. Transitioning managerial and financial responsibility for donor-funded programs to governments and local stakeholders represents a highly advanced form of country ownership, but there are few successful examples among large-scale programs. We present a transition framework and describe how it was used to transfer the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's HIV/AIDS prevention program, the Avahan program, to the Government of India. Essential features recommended for the transition of donor-funded programs to governments include early planning with the government, aligning donor program components with government structures and funding models prior to transition, building government capacity through active technical and management support, budgeting for adequate support during and after the transition, and dividing the transition into phases to allow time for adjustments and corrections. The transition of programs to governments is an important sustainability strategy for efforts to scale up HIV prevention programs to reach the populations most at risk.

  1. HEALTH CARE TRANSITION IN YOUNG ADULTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES: BARRIERS TO TIMELY ESTABLISHMENT OF ADULT DIABETES CARE

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Wolpert, Howard A.; Laffel, Lori M.; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I.; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine barriers to health care transition reported by young adults with type 1 diabetes and associations between barriers and prolonged gaps between pediatric and adult diabetes care. Methods We surveyed young adults aged 22 to 30 years with type 1 diabetes about their transition experiences, including barriers to timely establishment of adult diabetes care. We evaluated relationships between barriers and gaps in care using multivariate logistic regression. Results The response rate was 53% (258 of 484 eligible subjects). Respondents (62% female) were 26.7 ± 2.4 years old and transitioned to adult diabetes care at 19.5 ± 2.9 years. Reported barriers included lack of specific adult provider referral name (47%) or contact information (27%), competing life priorities (43%), difficulty getting an appointment (41%), feeling upset about leaving pediatrics (24%), and insurance problems (10%). In multivariate analysis, barriers most strongly associated with gaps in care >6 months were lack of adult provider name (odds ratio [OR], 6.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.0–12.7) or contact information (OR, 5.3; 95% CI, 2.0–13.9), competing life priorities (OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 2.7–10.3), and insurance problems (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.2–10.3). Overall, respondents reporting ≥1 moderate/major barrier (48%) had 4.7-fold greater adjusted odds of a gap in care >6 months (95% CI, 2.8–8.7). Conclusion Significant barriers to transition, such as a lack of specific adult provider referrals, may be addressed with more robust preparation by pediatric providers and care coordination. Further study is needed to evaluate strategies to improve young adult self-care in the setting of competing life priorities. PMID:23807526

  2. Work satisfaction and future career intentions of experienced nurses transitioning to primary health care employment.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Christine; Peters, Kath; Brown, Angela; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2018-02-12

    To explore registered nurses' reflections on transitioning from acute to primary health care employment, and future career intentions. Reforms in primary health care have resulted in increasing demands for a skilled primary health care nursing workforce. To meet shortfalls, acute care nurses are being recruited to primary health care employment, yet little is known about levels of satisfaction and future career intentions. A sequential mixed methods study consisting of a survey and semi-structured interviews with nurses who transition to primary health care. Most reported positive experiences, valuing work/life balance, role diversity and patient/family interactions. Limited orientation and support, loss of acute skills and inequitable remuneration were reported negatively. Many respondents indicated an intention to stay in primary health care (87.3%) and nursing (92.6%) for the foreseeable future, whilst others indicated they may leave primary health care as soon as convenient (29.6%). Our findings provide guidance to managers in seeking strategies to recruit and retain nurses in primary health care employment. To maximize recruitment and retention, managers must consider factors influencing job satisfaction amongst transitioning nurses, and the impact that nurses' past experiences may have on future career intentions in primary health care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Study protocol: improving the transition of care from a non-network hospital back to the patient's medical home.

    PubMed

    Ayele, Roman A; Lawrence, Emily; McCreight, Marina; Fehling, Kelty; Peterson, Jamie; Glasgow, Russell E; Rabin, Borsika A; Burke, Robert; Battaglia, Catherine

    2017-02-10

    The process of transitioning Veterans to primary care following a non-Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitalization can be challenging. Poor transitions result in medical complications and increased hospital readmissions. The goal of this transition of care quality improvement (QI) project is to identify gaps in the current transition process and implement an intervention that bridges the gap and improves the current transition of care process within the Eastern Colorado Health Care System (ECHCS). We will employ qualitative methods to understand the current transition of care process back to VA primary care for Veterans who received care in a non-VA hospital in ECHCS. We will conduct in-depth semi-structured interviews with Veterans hospitalized in 2015 in non-VA hospitals as well as both VA and non-VA providers, staff, and administrators involved in the current care transition process. Participants will be recruited using convenience and snowball sampling. Qualitative data analysis will be guided by conventional content analysis and Lean Six Sigma process improvement tools. We will use VA claim data to identify the top ten non-VA hospitals serving rural and urban Veterans by volume and Veterans that received inpatient services at non-VA hospitals. Informed by both qualitative and quantitative data, we will then develop a transitions care coordinator led intervention to improve the transitions process. We will test the transition of care coordinator intervention using repeated improvement cycles incorporating salient factors in value stream mapping that are important for an efficient and effective transition process. Furthermore, we will complete a value stream map of the transition process at two other VA Medical Centers and test whether an implementation strategy of audit and feedback (the value stream map of the current transition process with the Transition of Care Dashboard) versus audit and feedback with Transition Nurse facilitation of the process using the

  4. The Transition Program for Refugee Children. O.E.E. Evaluation Report, 1982-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasin, Karen; And Others

    The Transition Program for Refugee Children (TPRC) is designed to provide target students with the linguistic and cultural skills necessary for a successful transition into the educational and societal mainstream. In 1982-83, the program served 885 students in 18 New York City high schools. TPRC funds--provided under the Refugee Act--supported…

  5. Development of a College Transition and Support Program for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Elias, Rebecca; Capriola-Hall, Nicole N.; Smith, Isaac C.; Conner, Caitlin M.; Asselin, Susan B.; Howlin, Patricia; Getzel, Elizabeth E.; Mazefsky, Carla A.

    2017-01-01

    Empirically based, consumer-informed programming to support students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) transitioning to college is needed. Informed by theory and research, the Stepped Transition in Education Program for Students with ASD (STEPS) was developed to address this need. The first level (Step 1) supports high school students and the…

  6. Transitioning from learning healthcare systems to learning health care communities.

    PubMed

    Mullins, C Daniel; Wingate, La'Marcus T; Edwards, Hillary A; Tofade, Toyin; Wutoh, Anthony

    2018-02-26

    The learning healthcare system (LHS) model framework has three core, foundational components. These include an infrastructure for health-related data capture, care improvement targets and a supportive policy environment. Despite progress in advancing and implementing LHS approaches, low levels of participation from patients and the public have hampered the transformational potential of the LHS model. An enhanced vision of a community-engaged LHS redesign would focus on the provision of health care from the patient and community perspective to complement the healthcare system as the entity that provides the environment for care. Addressing the LHS framework implementation challenges and utilizing community levers are requisite components of a learning health care community model, version two of the LHS archetype.

  7. [Transition - how adolescents with cystic fibrosis their parents experience the change from paediatric to adult care].

    PubMed

    Becher, Christine; Regamey, Nicolas; Spichiger, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common autosomal-recessive hereditary disease among white Europeans. The average survival of CF patients has increased to above 40 years and transition from paediatric to adult care has therefore become a significant issue. With this study, experiences of adolescents with CF and their parents with the transition from the paediatric to the adult care were explored. At a Swiss university CF centre, six adolescents and their mothers were recruited. Twelve narrative interviews were conducted on how the phase of transition was experienced. The transcribed interviews were analysed according to the method of hermeneutic phenomenology. Positive and negative experiences with long term routine care in the paediatric service, general themes of adolescence and the quality of the relationship with paediatric doctors influenced the families' experience during transition significantly. For mothers, insensitive information on the CF diagnosis might have influenced the transition experience. The adolescents welcomed an individualized and age appropriate care. Continuity in care, the announcement of, and involvement in the planning of the transfer were of great importance. The families particularly appreciated the timed adaptations of the transfer to individual needs. Flexibility and a strong collaboration between paediatric and adult CF teams are most relevant in the care of families.

  8. Child Care and Other Support Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Latosha; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has come to realize that providing reliable, high-quality child care for service members' children is a key component of combat readiness. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) has invested heavily in child care. The DoD now runs what is by far the nation's largest employer-sponsored child-care system, a sprawling network…

  9. Defining pediatric inpatient cardiology care delivery models: A survey of pediatric cardiology programs in the USA and Canada.

    PubMed

    Mott, Antonio R; Neish, Steven R; Challman, Melissa; Feltes, Timothy F

    2017-05-01

    The treatment of children with cardiac disease is one of the most prevalent and costly pediatric inpatient conditions. The design of inpatient medical services for children admitted to and discharged from noncritical cardiology care units, however, is undefined. North American Pediatric Cardiology Programs were surveyed to define noncritical cardiac care unit models in current practice. An online survey that explored institutional and functional domains for noncritical cardiac care unit was crafted. All questions were multi-choice with comment boxes for further explanation. The survey was distributed by email four times over a 5-month period. Most programs (n = 45, 60%) exist in free-standing children's hospitals. Most programs cohort cardiac patients on noncritical cardiac care units that are restricted to cardiac patients in 39 (54%) programs or restricted to cardiac and other subspecialty patients in 23 (32%) programs. The most common frontline providers are categorical pediatric residents (n = 58, 81%) and nurse practitioners (n = 48, 67%). However, nurse practitioners are autonomous providers in only 21 (29%) programs. Only 33% of programs use a postoperative fast-track protocol. When transitioning care to referring physicians, most programs (n = 53, 72%) use facsimile to deliver pertinent patient information. Twenty-two programs (31%) use email to transition care, and eighteen (25%) programs use verbal communication. Most programs exist in free-standing children's hospitals in which the noncritical cardiac care units are in some form restricted to cardiac patients. While nurse practitioners are used on most noncritical cardiac care units, they rarely function as autonomous providers. The majority of programs in this survey do not incorporate any postoperative fast-track protocols in their practice. Given the current era of focused handoffs within hospital systems, relatively few programs utilize verbal handoffs to the referring pediatric

  10. New graduate nurses, new graduate nurse transition programs, and clinical leadership skill: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the relationship between new graduate nurses and clinical leadership skill, and between new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs have been cited as one strategy to improve clinical leadership skill, but to our knowledge, no one has synthesized the evidence on new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. Results of this review showed that new graduate nurse transition programs that were at least 24 weeks in length had a positive impact on clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs using the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing Nurse Residency curriculum had the greatest impact, followed by curriculum developed by the Versant New Graduate RN Residency, an important finding for nursing professional development specialists.

  11. Innovative and Successful Approaches to Improving Care Transitions From Hospital to Home

    PubMed Central

    Labson, Margherita C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Effective transitions to home care have been identified as among the factors leading to reducing hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge and improvements on various other quality measures. Innovative applications of published evidence-based models and best practices designed to improve care transitions have been implemented in various settings across the country in an effort to enhance quality performance. For this article, The Joint Commission collected a series of case examples to examine how evidence-based innovations in care transitions are reducing readmissions and improving other quality outcomes. The organizations providing the case examples were interviewed and asked to provide performance data demonstrating quality improvement, as well as information about their care processes and data-gathering techniques. Their innovative approaches are reducing hospital readmissions; improving patient safety, satisfaction, and engagement; and contributing to other positive outcomes. PMID:25654457

  12. Improving care transitions from hospital to home: standardized orders for home health nursing with remote telemonitoring.

    PubMed

    Heeke, Sheila; Wood, Felecia; Schuck, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A task force at a multihospital health care system partnered with home health agencies to improve gaps during the discharge transition process. A standardized order template for home health nursing and remote telemonitoring was developed to decrease discrepancies in communication between hospital health care providers and home health nurses caring for patients with heart failure. Pilot results showed significantly improved communication with no readmissions, using the order template.

  13. Health Care Executive Education: A Program Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Thomas T. H.; Clement, Dolores Gurnick

    1995-01-01

    Virginia Commonwealth University's Master of Science program in health administration uses distance education techniques to facilitate professional education with limited facilities. The program has developed from a first-generation bulletin board conferencing system to an individualized "client-server" based program on the World Wide…

  14. Impact of transitional care on endocrine and anthropometric parameters in Prader–Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paepegaey, A C; Coupaye, M; Jaziri, A; Ménesguen, F; Dubern, B; Polak, M; Oppert, J M; Tauber, M; Pinto, G; Poitou, C

    2018-01-01

    Context The transition of patients with Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) to adult life for medical care is challenging because of multiple comorbidities, including hormone deficiencies, obesity and cognitive and behavioral disabilities. Objective To assess endocrine management, and metabolic and anthropometric parameters of PWS adults who received (n = 31) or not (n = 64) transitional care, defined as specialized pediatric care followed by a structured care pathway to a multidisciplinary adult team. Patients and study design Hormonal and metabolic parameters were retrospectively recorded in 95 adults with PWS (mean ± s.d. age 24.7 ± 8.2 years, BMI: 39.8 ± 12.1 kg/m²) referred to our Reference Center and compared according to transition. Results Among the entire cohort, 35.8% received growth hormone (GH) during childhood and 16.8% had a GH stimulation test after completion of growth. In adulthood, 14.7% were treated with GH, 56.8% received sex-hormone therapy, whereas 91.1% were hypogonadic and 37.9% had undergone valid screening of the corticotropic axis. The main reason for suboptimal endocrine management was marked behavioral disorders. Patients receiving transitional care were more likely to have had a GH stimulation test and hormonal substitutions in childhood. They also had a lower BMI, percentage of fat mass, improved metabolic parameters and fewer antidepressant treatments. Transitional care remained significantly associated with these parameters in multivariate analysis when adjusted on GH treatment. Conclusion A coordinated care pathway with specialized pediatric care and transition to a multidisciplinary adult team accustomed to managing complex disability including psychiatric troubles are associated with a better health status in adults with PWS. PMID:29666169

  15. Impact of transitional care on endocrine and anthropometric parameters in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Paepegaey, A C; Coupaye, M; Jaziri, A; Ménesguen, F; Dubern, B; Polak, M; Oppert, J M; Tauber, M; Pinto, G; Poitou, C

    2018-05-01

    The transition of patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) to adult life for medical care is challenging because of multiple comorbidities, including hormone deficiencies, obesity and cognitive and behavioral disabilities. To assess endocrine management, and metabolic and anthropometric parameters of PWS adults who received ( n  = 31) or not ( n  = 64) transitional care, defined as specialized pediatric care followed by a structured care pathway to a multidisciplinary adult team. Hormonal and metabolic parameters were retrospectively recorded in 95 adults with PWS (mean ± s.d. age 24.7 ± 8.2 years, BMI: 39.8 ± 12.1 kg/m²) referred to our Reference Center and compared according to transition. Among the entire cohort, 35.8% received growth hormone (GH) during childhood and 16.8% had a GH stimulation test after completion of growth. In adulthood, 14.7% were treated with GH, 56.8% received sex-hormone therapy, whereas 91.1% were hypogonadic and 37.9% had undergone valid screening of the corticotropic axis. The main reason for suboptimal endocrine management was marked behavioral disorders. Patients receiving transitional care were more likely to have had a GH stimulation test and hormonal substitutions in childhood. They also had a lower BMI, percentage of fat mass, improved metabolic parameters and fewer antidepressant treatments. Transitional care remained significantly associated with these parameters in multivariate analysis when adjusted on GH treatment. A coordinated care pathway with specialized pediatric care and transition to a multidisciplinary adult team accustomed to managing complex disability including psychiatric troubles are associated with a better health status in adults with PWS. © 2018 The authors.

  16. Prescription for Health Care Costs. Wellness Programs on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlavey, Christopher S.

    1992-01-01

    The wellness program is applied within the higher education setting as one means to control health care costs. Discussed are the program's design, objectives, content, facilities, structure and staff, financing, and evaluation. It is noted that wellness programs are not only cost effective but can help to improve morale and increase productivity.…

  17. Get Well Care: Guidelines for Programs Serving Mildly Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanari, Ellen Orton, Ed.

    Although child care programs for mildly ill children are proliferating around the country, very few states have developed regulations for these types of programs, and no states have developed standards or guidelines. Based upon this concern, a group of medical and early childhood professionals, parents, and directors of programs for mildly ill…

  18. Perspectives on care for young adults with type 1 diabetes transitioning from pediatric to adult health systems: A national survey of pediatric endocrinologists.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shivani; Garvey, Katharine C; Raymond, Jennifer K; Schutta, Mark H

    2017-11-01

    Healthcare transition from pediatric to adult care for young adults (YA) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with risk of adverse outcomes. Consensus recommendations exist from US professional societies on transition care for YA with T1D, but it is not known whether they have been widely adopted. We describe experiences, barriers, and provider characteristics associated with transition care in a national sample of pediatric endocrinologists. US pediatric endocrinologists identified through the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile were sent an electronic survey. Response rate was 16% (164/1020) representing 32 states. The majority of pediatric endocrinologists (age 44 ± 10; years in practice 12 ± 11) were female (67%) and worked in academic centers (75%). Main reasons for transfer were age (49%) and glycemic control (18%). Barriers to transition included ending long-therapeutic relationships with patients (74%), lack of transition protocols (46%), and perceived deficiencies in adult care (42%). The majority of pediatric endocrinologists reported lack of transition training (68%); those who received training were less likely to have difficulty ending patient relationships [odds ratio (OR) = 0.39, P = .03], more likely to perform patient record transfer to adult systems (OR=1.27, P = .006), and less likely to report patient returns to pediatric care after transfer (OR=0.49, P = .01), independent of endocrinologist gender, years in practice, or practice type. There is wide variation in transition care for YA with T1D among US pediatric endocrinologists despite consensus recommendations. Dissemination of educational programming on transition care and provision of actionable solutions to overcome local health system and perceived barriers is needed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Measuring Success in Health Care Value-Based Purchasing Programs

    PubMed Central

    Damberg, Cheryl L.; Sorbero, Melony E.; Lovejoy, Susan L.; Martsolf, Grant R.; Raaen, Laura; Mandel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Value-based purchasing (VBP) refers to a broad set of performance-based payment strategies that link financial incentives to health care providers' performance on a set of defined measures in an effort to achieve better value. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is advancing the implementation of VBP across an array of health care settings in the Medicare program in response to requirements in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and policymakers are grappling with many decisions about how best to design and implement VBP programs so that they are successful in achieving stated goals. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge about VBP based on a review of the published literature, a review of publicly available documentation from VBP programs, and discussions with an expert panel composed of VBP program sponsors, health care providers and health systems, and academic researchers with VBP evaluation expertise. Three types of VBP models were the focus of the review: (1) pay-for-performance programs, (2) accountable care organizations, and (3) bundled payment programs. The authors report on VBP program goals and what constitutes success; the evidence on the impact of these programs; factors that characterize high– and low–performing providers in VBP programs; the measures, incentive structures, and benchmarks used by VBP programs; evidence on spillover effects and unintended consequences; and gaps in the knowledge base. PMID:28083347

  20. Design and evaluation of a prelicensure interprofessional course on improving care transitions.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Mitchell T; Pinheiro, Sandro O; Konrad, Thomas R; Egerton, Emily O; Thornlow, Deirdre K; White, Heidi K; McConnell, Eleanor J

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of care transitions for older adults require the coordinated expertise of an interprofessional team. Unfortunately, different health care professions are rarely educated together or trained in teamwork skills. To address this issue, a team of professionally diverse faculty from the Duke University Geriatric Education Center designed an interprofessional course focused on improving transitions of care for older adults. This innovative prelicensure course provided interactive teaching sessions designed to promote critical thinking and foster effective communication among health care professionals, caregivers, and patients. Students were assessed by in-class and online participation, performance on individual assignments, and team-based proposals to improve care transitions for older patients with congestive heart failure. Twenty students representing six professions completed the course; 18 completed all self-efficacy and course evaluation surveys. Students rated their self-efficacy in several domains before and after the course and reported gains in teamwork skills (p < .001), transitions of care (p < .001), quality improvement (p < .001) and cultural competence (p < .001). Learner feedback emphasized the importance of enthusiastic and well-prepared faculty, interactive learning experiences, and engagement in relevant work. This course offers a promising approach to shifting the paradigm of health professions education to empower graduates to promote quality improvement through team-based care.

  1. A qualitative analysis of an advanced practice nurse-directed transitional care model intervention.

    PubMed

    Bradway, Christine; Trotta, Rebecca; Bixby, M Brian; McPartland, Ellen; Wollman, M Catherine; Kapustka, Heidi; McCauley, Kathleen; Naylor, Mary D

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe barriers and facilitators to implementing a transitional care intervention for cognitively impaired older adults and their caregivers lead by advanced practice nurses (APNs). APNs implemented an evidence-based protocol to optimize transitions from hospital to home. An exploratory, qualitative directed content analysis examined 15 narrative case summaries written by APNs and fieldnotes from biweekly case conferences. Three central themes emerged: patients and caregivers having the necessary information and knowledge, care coordination, and the caregiver experience. An additional category was also identified, APNs going above and beyond. APNs implemented individualized approaches and provided care that exceeds the type of care typically staffed and reimbursed in the American health care system by applying a Transitional Care Model, advanced clinical judgment, and doing whatever was necessary to prevent negative outcomes. Reimbursement reform as well as more formalized support systems and resources are necessary for APNs to consistently provide such care to patients and their caregivers during this vulnerable time of transition.

  2. [Transition from pediatric to adult health care services for adolescents with chronic diseases: Recommendations from the Adolescent Branch from Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría].

    PubMed

    Zubarew, Tamara; Correa, Loreto; Bedregal, Paula; Besoain, Carolina; Reinoso, Alejandro; Velarde, Macarena; Valenzuela, María Teresa; Inostroza, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    The Adolescent Branch from Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría supports the implementation of planned programs for transition from child to adult health centers, oriented to adolescents with chronic diseases, in order to ensure an appropriate follow-up and a high-quality health care. Recommendations for care are set out in the FONIS and VRI PUC project carried out by the Division of Pediatrics of the Universidad Católica de Chile: “Transition process from pediatric to adult services: perspectives of adolescents with chronic diseases, caregivers and health professionals”, whose goal was to describe the experience, barriers, critical points, and facilitators in the transition process. Critical points detected in this study were: existence of a strong bond between adolescents, caregivers and the pediatric team, resistance to transition, difficulty developing autonomy and self-management among adolescents; invisibility of the process of adolescence; and lack of communication between pediatric and adult team during the transfer. According to these needs, barriers and critical points, and based on published international experiences, recommendations are made for implementation of gradual and planned transition processes, with emphasis on the design and implementation of transition policies, establishment of multidisciplinary teams and transition planning. We discuss aspects related to coordination of teams, transfer timing, self-care and autonomy, transition records, adolescent and family participation, need for emotional support, ethical aspects involved, importance of confidentiality, need for professional training, and the need for evaluation and further research on the subject.

  3. Incorporating the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition Into a Medicaid Managed Care Plan: Lessons Learned From a Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    McManus, Margaret; White, Patience; Pirtle, Robin; Hancock, Catina; Ablan, Michael; Corona-Parra, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This pediatric-to-adult health care transition pilot project describes the process and results of incorporating the "Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition (2.0)" into a Medicaid managed care plan with a group of 35 18-23 year olds who have chronic mental health, developmental, and complex medical conditions. The pilot project demonstrated an effective approach for customizing and delivering recommended transition services. At the start of the 18-month project, the Medicaid plan was at the basic level (1) of transition implementation of the Six Core Elements with no transition policy, member transition readiness assessment results, health care transition plans of care, updated medical summaries, transfer package for the adult-focused provider, and assurance of transfer completion and consumer feedback. At the conclusion of the pilot project, the plan scored at level 3 on each core element. The primary reason for not scoring at the highest level (4) was because the transition elements have not been incorporated into services for all enrollees within the plan. Future efforts in managed care will benefit from starting the transition process much earlier (ages 12-14), expanding the role of nurse care managers and participating pediatric and adult-focused clinicians in transition, and offering payment incentives to clinicians to implement the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis of a hospital-based discharge transition program for elderly Medicare recipients.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Shadi S; Freire, Chris; Morris-Dickinson, Gwendolyn; Shannon, Trip

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the business case of postdischarge care transition (PDCT) among Medicare beneficiaries by conducting a cost-benefit analysis. Randomized controlled trial. A general hospital in upstate New York State. Elderly Medicare beneficiaries being treated from October 2008 through December 2009 were randomly selected to receive services as part of a comprehensive PDCT program (intervention--173 patients) or regular discharge process (control--160 patients) and followed for 12 months. The intervention comprised five activities: development of a patient-centered health record, a structured discharge preparation checklist of critical activities, delivery of patient self-activation and management sessions, follow-up appointments, and coordination of data flow. Cost-benefit ratio of the PDCT program; self-management skills and abilities. The 1-year readmission analysis revealed that control participants were more likely to be readmitted than intervention participants (58.2% vs 48.2%; P = .08); with most of that difference observed in the 91 to 365 days after discharge. Findings from the cost-benefit analysis revealed a cost-benefit ratio of 1.09, which indicates that, for every $1 spent on the program, a saving of $1.09 was realized. In addition, participating in a care transition program significantly enhanced self-management skills and abilities. Postdischarge care transition programs have a dual benefit of enhancing elderly adults' self-management skills and abilities and producing cost savings. This study builds a case for the inclusion of PDCT programs as a reimbursable service in benefit packages. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Tough Transitions: Mental Health Care Professionals' Perception of the Psychiatric Hospital to School Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric reasons are among the most common causes of hospitalization for adolescents. A Consensual Qualitative Research approach was used to explore mental health professionals' perceptions of the needs of adolescents as they transition from psychiatric hospital to school. Academic, social, and emotional domains emerged as important areas of…

  6. Intensive care survivors' experiences of ward-based care: Meleis' theory of nursing transitions and role development among critical care outreach services.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Pam; Huby, Guro; Thompson, Andrew; Walsh, Tim

    2014-03-01

    To explore the psychosocial needs of patients discharged from intensive care, the extent to which they are captured using existing theory on transitions in care and the potential role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services. Intensive care patients are at an increased risk of adverse events, deterioration or death following ward transfer. Nurse-led critical care outreach, follow-up or liaison services have been adopted internationally to prevent these potentially avoidable sequelae. The need to provide patients with psychosocial support during the transition to ward-based care has also been identified, but the evidence base for role development is currently limited. Twenty participants were invited to discuss their experiences of ward-based care as part of a broader study on recovery following prolonged critical illness. Psychosocial distress was a prominent feature of their accounts, prompting secondary data analysis using Meleis et al.'s mid-range theory on experiencing transitions. Participants described a sense of disconnection in relation to profound debilitation and dependency and were often distressed by a perceived lack of understanding, indifference or insensitivity among ward staff to their basic care needs. Negotiating the transition between dependence and independence was identified as a significant source of distress following ward transfer. Participants varied in the extent to which they were able to express their needs and negotiate recovery within professionally mediated boundaries. These data provide new insights into the putative origins of the psychosocial distress that patients experience following ward transfer. Meleis et al.'s work has resonance in terms of explicating intensive care patients' experiences of psychosocial distress throughout the transition to general ward-based care, such that the future role development of critical care outreach, follow-up and liaison services may be more theoretically informed

  7. Transitional Jobs: Background, Program Models, and Evaluation Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Dan

    2010-01-01

    The budget for the U.S. Department of Labor for Fiscal Year 2010 includes a total of $45 million to support and study transitional jobs. This paper describes the origins of the transitional jobs models that are operating today, reviews the evidence on the effectiveness of this approach and other subsidized employment models, and offers some…

  8. Examining Federally Funded Secondary Transition Personnel Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotner, Anthony J.; Simonsen, Monica L.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine 41 secondary transition-focused personnel preparation projects funded between 2001 and 2016. Specifically, this study examined the amount and characteristics of these projects through a systematic abstract review. In addition, authors explored key issues in federally funded transition-focused personnel…

  9. Comparing mandated health care reforms: the Affordable Care Act, accountable care organizations, and the Medicare ESRD program.

    PubMed

    Watnick, Suzanne; Weiner, Daniel E; Shaffer, Rachel; Inrig, Jula; Moe, Sharon; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2012-09-01

    In addition to extending health insurance coverage, the Affordable Care Act of 2010 aims to improve quality of care and contain costs. To this end, the act allowed introduction of bundled payments for a range of services, proposed the creation of accountable care organizations (ACOs), and established the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to test new care delivery and payment models. The ACO program began April 1, 2012, along with demonstration projects for bundled payments for episodes of care in Medicaid. Yet even before many components of the Affordable Care Act are fully in place, the Medicare ESRD Program has instituted legislatively mandated changes for dialysis services that resemble many of these care delivery reform proposals. The ESRD program now operates under a fully bundled, case-mix adjusted prospective payment system and has implemented Medicare's first-ever mandatory pay-for-performance program: the ESRD Quality Incentive Program. As ACOs are developed, they may benefit from the nephrology community's experience with these relatively novel models of health care payment and delivery reform. Nephrologists are in a position to assure that the ACO development will benefit from the ESRD experience. This article reviews the new ESRD payment system and the Quality Incentive Program, comparing and contrasting them with ACOs. Better understanding of similarities and differences between the ESRD program and the ACO program will allow the nephrology community to have a more influential voice in shaping the future of health care delivery in the United States.

  10. Transitional care in clinical networks for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current situation and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cruikshank, Mary; Foster, Helen E; Stewart, Jane; Davidson, Joyce E; Rapley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Clinical networks for paediatric and adolescent rheumatology are evolving, and their effect and role in the transition process between paediatric and adult services are unknown. We therefore explored the experiences of those involved to try and understand this further. Health professionals, young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their families were recruited via five national health service paediatric and adolescent rheumatology specialist centres and networks across the UK. Seventy participants took part in focus groups and one-to-one interviews. Data was analysed using coding, memoing and mapping techniques to identify features of transitional services across the sector. Variation and inequities in transitional care exist. Although transition services in networks are evolving, development has lagged behind other areas with network establishment focusing more on access to paediatric rheumatology multidisciplinary teams. Challenges include workforce shortfalls, differences in service priorities, standards and healthcare infrastructures, and managing the legacy of historic encounters. Providing equitable high-quality clinically effective services for transition across the UK has a long way to go. There is a call from within the sector for more protected time, staff and resources to develop transition roles and services, as well as streamlining of local referral pathways between paediatric and adult healthcare services. In addition, there is a need to support professionals in developing their understanding of transitional care in clinical networks, particularly around service design, organisational change and the interpersonal skills required for collaborative working. Key messages • Transitional care in clinical networks requires collaborative working and an effective interface with paediatric and adult rheumatology.• Professional centrism and historic encounters may affect collaborative relationships within clinical networks.• Education

  11. Effectiveness of person- and family-centered care transition interventions: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Backman, Chantal; Chartrand, Julie; Dingwall, Orvie; Shea, Beverley

    2017-08-08

    Care transitions from the hospital to home are critical to the sustainability of our health care system. Ineffective care transitions can be caused by high incidences of post-discharge adverse events, by poor communication with patients, and/or by inadequate information transfer between providers from the hospital to home. Any one of these can lead to fragmented care, high readmission rates, increased visits to the emergency department, and ultimately poor patient outcomes. Despite the ongoing improvement efforts of health care organizations, the efficacy of person- and family-centered care transition interventions on the quality of care and on the patient experience are not known. The aim of this systematic review is to critically analyze the body of evidence regarding the effectiveness of person- and family-centered care transition interventions on the quality of care, and the experience of patients. We will conduct a systematic review using the Cochrane Handbook's guidelines and will adhere to a standardized reporting format: Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). A comprehensive search strategy will be conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Group. Following a two-step screening process, data including the full reference, objectives, target population, description of the intervention and control intervention, outcome measures, design, length of post-intervention follow-up period, and the study results will be extracted, synthesized, and reported. Risk of bias and quality of the studies will also be assessed. This systematic review will summarize and present the evidence base for person- and family-centered care transition interventions. This review will also inform further research and will lay the groundwork for more empirical studies on person- and family-centered care transitions. Specifically, the results

  12. Engaging patients and families in communication across transitions of care: an integrative review protocol.

    PubMed

    Bucknall, Tracey K; Hutchinson, Alison M; Botti, Mari; McTier, Lauren; Rawson, Helen; Hewitt, Nicky A; McMurray, Anne; Marshall, Andrea P; Gillespie, Brigid M; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2016-07-01

    To describe an integrative review protocol to analyse and synthesize peer-reviewed research evidence in relation to engagement of patients and their families in communication during transitions of care to, in and from acute care settings. Communication at transitions of care in acute care settings can be complex and challenging, with important information about patients not always clearly transferred between responsible healthcare providers. Involving patients and their families in communication during transitions of care may improve the transfer of clinical information and patient outcomes and prevent adverse events during hospitalization and following discharge. Recently, optimizing patient and family participation during care transitions has been acknowledged as central to the implementation of patient-centred care. Integrative review with potential for meta-analysis and application of framework synthesis. The review will evaluate and synthesize qualitative and quantitative research evidence identified through a systematic search. Primary studies will be selected according to inclusion criteria. Data collection, quality appraisal and analysis of the evidence will be conducted by at least two authors. Nine electronic databases (including CINAHL and Medline) will be searched. The search will be restricted to 10 years up to December 2013. Data analysis will include content and thematic analysis. The review will seek to identify all types of patient engagement activities employed during transitions of care communication. The review will identify enablers for and barriers to engagement for patients, families and health professionals. Key strategies and tools for improving patient engagement, clinical communication and promoting patient-centred care will be recommended based on findings. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Innovative interprofessional geriatric education for medical and nursing students: focus on transitions in care.

    PubMed

    Balogun, S A; Rose, K; Thomas, S; Owen, J; Brashers, V

    2015-06-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is crucial in fostering effective collaboration and optimal team-based patient care, all of which improve patient care and outcomes. Appropriate interprofessional communication is especially important in geriatrics where patients are vulnerable to adverse effects across the care continuum. Transitions in geriatric care are complex, involving several disciplines and requiring careful coordination. As part of the University of Virginia's initiative on IPE, we developed and implemented an interprofessional geriatric education workshop for nursing and medical students with a focus on transitions in care. A total of 254 students (144 medical students, 107 nursing students and 3 unknown) participated in a 90-min interactive, case-based workshop. Nursing and medical faculty facilitated the monthly workshops with small groups of medical and nursing students over 1 year. Self-perceived competencies in IPE skills and attitudes toward interprofessional teamwork were measured through post-workshop surveys. Data were analyzed using descriptive and nonparametric statistics, excluding the three unknown students. Over 90% of students were better able to describe the necessary interprofessional communication needed to develop a patient-centered care plan in transitioning patients between clinical sites. Four out of five students reported an enhanced appreciation of interprofessional teamwork. They were also able to identify legal, financial and social implications in transitions of care (75%). Nursing students consistently rated the workshop more highly than medical students across most domains (P < 0.05). Students improved and demonstrated their knowledge of interprofessional communication and teamwork skills required in transitions of geriatric care. Introducing these concepts in medical and nursing training may help in fostering effective interprofessional communication and collaboration. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press

  14. Participation in modified sports programs: a longitudinal study of children's transition to club sport competition.

    PubMed

    Eime, Rochelle M; Casey, Meghan M; Harvey, Jack T; Charity, Melanie J; Young, Janet A; Payne, Warren R

    2015-07-14

    Many children are not physically active enough for a health benefit. One avenue of physical activity is modified sport programs, designed as an introduction to sport for young children. This longitudinal study identified trends in participation among children aged 4-12 years. Outcomes included continuation in the modified sports program, withdrawal from the program or transition to club sport competition. De-identified data on participant membership registrations in three popular sports in the Australian state of Victoria were obtained from each sport's state governing body over a 4-year period (2009-2012 for Sport A and 2010-2013 for Sports B and C). From the membership registrations, those who were enrolled in a modified sports program in the first year were tracked over the subsequent three years and classified as one of: transition (member transitioned from a modified sport program to a club competition); continue (member continued participation in a modified sport program; or withdraw (member discontinued a modified program and did not transition to club competition). Many modified sports participants were very young, especially males aged 4-6 years. More children withdrew from their modified sport program rather than transitioning. There were age differences between when boys and girls started, withdrew and transitioned from the modified sports programs. If we can retain children in sport it is likely to be beneficial for their health. This study highlights considerations for the development and implementation of sport policies and programming to ensure lifelong participation is encouraged for both males and females.

  15. Family Child Care Programs within the Military System of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Carolyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Military families face challenges not found in other work environments. Shifting work schedules that are often longer than the typical 8-hour day, as well as the ever-present possibility of being deployed anywhere in the world on a moment's notice, require a child care system that is flexible but maintains high-quality standards. The U.S.…

  16. 9 CFR 3.17 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and...). Any person subject to the Animal Welfare regulations transporting dogs or cats in commerce must ensure that the operator of the conveyance, or a person accompanying the operator, observes the dogs or cats...

  17. 9 CFR 3.17 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and...). Any person subject to the Animal Welfare regulations transporting dogs or cats in commerce must ensure that the operator of the conveyance, or a person accompanying the operator, observes the dogs or cats...

  18. 9 CFR 3.17 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and...). Any person subject to the Animal Welfare regulations transporting dogs or cats in commerce must ensure that the operator of the conveyance, or a person accompanying the operator, observes the dogs or cats...

  19. 9 CFR 3.90 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... primates in commerce must ensure that the operator of the conveyance or a person accompanying the operator... nonhuman primates whenever they are loaded and unloaded and whenever the animal cargo space is otherwise..., it must not be transported in commerce, except to receive veterinary care for the condition. (d...

  20. 9 CFR 3.17 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and...). Any person subject to the Animal Welfare regulations transporting dogs or cats in commerce must ensure that the operator of the conveyance, or a person accompanying the operator, observes the dogs or cats...

  1. 9 CFR 3.17 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Dogs and...). Any person subject to the Animal Welfare regulations transporting dogs or cats in commerce must ensure that the operator of the conveyance, or a person accompanying the operator, observes the dogs or cats...

  2. 9 CFR 3.39 - Care in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... any of the live guinea pigs or hamsters are in obvious physical distress and to provide any needed veterinary care as soon as possible. When transported by air, live guinea pigs and hamsters shall be visually... during flight, the carrier shall visually observe the live guinea pigs or hamsters whenever loaded and...

  3. A Pilot Study Exploring the Role of Physical Therapists and Transition in Care of Pediatric Patients with Cystic Fibrosis to the Adult Setting

    PubMed Central

    Packel, Lora; Sood, Megha; Gormley, Michelle; Hayden, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease that requires intensive multidisciplinary care, including care by physical therapists (PTs). People with CF are now living well into adulthood, necessitating a transfer of care from the pediatric setting to an adult one. Physical therapists play a large role in the care of the person with CF; however, there is little known about the PT role in transition of care. Purpose To explore transition issues for people with CF from the perspective of PTs. Methods An 18-question online survey was sent to PTs via an electronic CF listserv. Questions were derived from an analysis of transition literature in CF and other chronic childhood conditions. Physical therapists who reported treating people with CF gave their opinions on issues impacting transition from their perspective as well as their perception of patient and parent concerns. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results A total of 26 PTs completed the survey. A majority, 61.5%, reported that there was a transition program at their facility, with 42.3% involving physical therapy. Common themes for patients and parents included feeling uncertain about: knowledge of the adult physician, acquiring pulmonary infections in the adult setting, and pace of the adult clinic. Physical therapists were concerned about adherence with airway clearance and exercise following transfer to the adult clinic. Conclusions The role of PT in transition programs is quite varied. Physical therapists should address common concerns of their patients and families to improve the transition process and possibly impact adherence to the PT plan of care. PMID:23754936

  4. New graduate registered nurse transition into primary health care roles: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Murray-Parahi, Pauline; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Jackson, Debra; Davidson, Patricia M

    2016-11-01

    To summarise the literature describing new graduate nurse transition to professional practice within the primary health care (PHC) setting. There is a plethora of research literature spanning several decades about new graduate nurse transition in the acute care setting. Yet, the experiences of new graduate nurse in the PHC setting is unremarkable particularly considering the increasing demand for skilled health care workers and focus of health reform to provide care where people work and live. Electronic data bases, Academic Search Complete, EBSCO, Medline, PsycINFO, CINHAL, and ERIC were searched using a combination of terms and synonyms arising from three key concepts which identify the phenomenon; 'transition', 'new graduate registered nurse' and 'primary health care. An inclusive search strategy placed no limits on language or publication date. Of the 50 articles located and examined for relevance; 40 were sourced through databases and 10 from Google Scholar/Alerts and hand-searching references. None of the 19 articles retained for analysis addressed all key concepts. Some challenges of researching the professional transition of graduate nurses in PHC settings included, an absence of definitive transition models, a dearth of literature and deference to acute care research. Nursing in PHC settings, particularly the client's home is notably different to hospital settings because of higher levels of isolation and autonomy. Societal changes, health reform and subsequent demand for skilled workers in PHC settings has caused health care providers to question the logic that such roles are only for experienced nurses. Implications arise for education and health service providers who desire to close the theory practice gap and mitigate risk for all stakeholders when next generation nurses have limited opportunities to experience PHC roles as undergraduates and newly graduated registered nurses are already transitioning in this setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Medical Team Training Programs in Health Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    simulator-based programs and classroom -based programs. Specifically, we examine the purpose and strategy of each and then review the reported empirical...evidence. In addition, for three of four classroom -based programs we report the results from a series of course observations, curriculum reviews...the-art simulators, whereas others primarily use classroom techniques. Despite these differences, all are heavily inspired by CRM and share the common

  6. A Strategic Approach for Developing an Advanced Practice Workforce: From Postgraduate Transition-to-Practice Fellowship Programs and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Dennis A; Broyhill, Britney S; Burris, Allison M; Wilcox, Mary Ann

    The healthcare provider landscape is rapidly changing. Given the imminent retirement of baby boomer physicians, implementation of the Affordable Care Act, and the increased utilization of health care services by an ever-aging population, the supply of providers cannot keep pace with the demand for services. This has led to an increased utilization of advanced clinical practitioners (ACPs). This article shows how one large highly-matrixed health care system approached identifying this workforce, and how thought leaders worked collaboratively with physicians, administrators, and ACPs to meet a growing demand for providers. Carolinas HealthCare System developed a 3-pronged approach to this opportunity. The development of a Center for Advanced Practice was explored and implemented. This Center serves as a 2-way conduit of information and ideas between system administrators and providers. It also serves as a central source of regulatory and practice information for administrators and providers. The growing number of open ACP positions, along with the reluctance to employ novice and new graduate ACPs, led to the development of a postgraduate transition to practice fellowship program. This program's clinical tracks and curriculum are described. Finally, a collaborative effort between the health care system and a local university resulted in the local offering of an acute care nurse practitioner program, which allowed system nurses to continue their education without the need for relocation. Higher satisfaction and engagement, lower turnover, better career opportunities, more satisfied administrators, and physicians all contributed to the overwhelming success of this initiative.

  7. Selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs in health care systems

    PubMed Central

    Zullig, Leah L; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2015-01-01

    Practitioners and researchers often design behavioral programs that are effective for a specific population or problem. Despite their success in a controlled setting, relatively few programs are scaled up and implemented in health care systems. Planning for scale-up is a critical, yet often overlooked, element in the process of program design. Equally as important is understanding how to select a program that has already been developed, and adapt and implement the program to meet specific organizational goals. This adaptation and implementation requires attention to organizational goals, available resources, and program cost. We assert that translational behavioral medicine necessitates expanding successful programs beyond a stand-alone research study. This paper describes key factors to consider when selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs for scale-up in large health care systems and applies the Knowledge to Action (KTA) Framework to a case study, illustrating knowledge creation and an action cycle of implementation and evaluation activities. PMID:25931825

  8. Design and implementation of population-based specialty care programs.

    PubMed

    Botts, Sheila R; Gee, Michael T; Chang, Christopher C; Young, Iris; Saito, Logan; Lyman, Alfred E

    2017-09-15

    The development, implementation, and scaling of 3 population-based specialty care programs in a large integrated healthcare system are reviewed, and the role of clinical pharmacy services in ensuring safe, effective, and affordable care is highlighted. The Kaiser Permanente (KP) integrated healthcare delivery model allows for rapid development and expansion of innovative population management programs involving pharmacy services. Clinical pharmacists have assumed integral roles in improving the safety and effectiveness of high-complexity, high-cost care for specialty populations. These roles require an appropriate practice scope and are supported by an advanced electronic health record with disease registries and electronic surveillance tools for care-gap identification. The 3 specialty population programs described were implemented to address variation or unrecognized gaps in care for at-risk specialty populations. The Home Phototherapy Program has leveraged internal partnerships with clinical pharmacists to improve access to cost-effective nonpharmacologic interventions for psoriasis and other skin disorders. The Multiple Sclerosis Care Program has incorporated clinical pharmacists into neurology care in order to apply clinical guidelines in a systematic manner. The KP SureNet program has used clinical pharmacists and data analytics to identify opportunities to prevent drug-related adverse outcomes and ensure timely follow-up. Specialty care programs improve quality, cost outcomes, and the patient experience by appropriating resources to provide systematic and targeted care to high-risk patients. KP leverages an integration of people, processes, and technology to develop and scale population-based specialty care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Quality of Care under a Managed-Care Program for Dual Eligibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Homyak, Patricia; Bershadsky, Boris; Lum, Terry; Flood, Shannon; Zhang, Hui

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective in this study was to compare the quality of care provided under the Minnesota Senior Health Options (MSHO), a special program designed to serve dually eligible older persons, to care provided to controls who received fee-for-service Medicare and Medicaid managed care. Design and Methods: Two control groups were used; one was…

  10. Examining the Experiences of Young People Transitioning from Out-of-Home Care in Rural Victoria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Young people leaving state out-of-home care are arguably one of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged groups in society. Many have been found to experience significant health, social and educational deficits. In recent years, most Australian States and Territories have introduced specialist leaving care and after care programs and supports, but…

  11. Transitional Care for Older Adults with Chronic Illnesses as a Vulnerable Population: Theoretical Framework and Future Directions in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Son, Youn Jung; You, Mi Ae

    2015-12-01

    Effective transitional care is needed to improve the quality of life in older adult patients with chronic illness and avoid discontinuity of care and adverse events. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the key features, broader implications, and the utility of Meleis' transition theory intended for the transitional care of older adults with chronic illnesses. We present the role of nurse in the context of transitional care and propose future directions to increase the quality of nursing care. The online databases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE, and Science Direct were searched for relevant literature published since 1970 along with textbooks regarding nursing theory. An evaluation of the usefulness of transition theory based on transitional care in older adult patients with chronic illnesses is provided. Healthy transition should be the expected standard of nursing care for older adults across all healthcare settings. Nurses need to contribute to the development of transitional care for vulnerable populations; however, transition theory needs to be enhanced through additional theoretical work and repeated evaluations of the applicability in areas of transitional care.

  12. Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs Use Clinical Education to Facilitate Transition to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Jessica L.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students' ability to transition into professional practice is a critical component for the future of the profession. However, research on professional master's students' transition to practice and readiness to provide autonomous care is lacking. Objective: To determine professional master's athletic training students'…

  13. The institutional logic of integrated care: an ethnography of patient transitions.

    PubMed

    Shaw, James A; Kontos, Pia; Martin, Wendy; Victor, Christina

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to use theories of institutional logics and institutional entrepreneurship to examine how and why macro-, meso-, and micro-level influences inter-relate in the implementation of integrated transitional care out of hospital in the English National Health Service. Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted an ethnographic case study of a hospital and surrounding services within a large urban centre in England. Specific methods included qualitative interviews with patients/caregivers, health/social care providers, and organizational leaders; observations of hospital transition planning meetings, community "hub" meetings, and other instances of transition planning; reviews of patient records; and analysis of key policy documents. Analysis was iterative and informed by theory on institutional logics and institutional entrepreneurship. Findings Organizational leaders at the meso-level of health and social care promoted a partnership logic of integrated care in response to conflicting institutional ideas found within a key macro-level policy enacted in 2003 (The Community Care (Delayed Discharges) Act). Through institutional entrepreneurship at the micro-level, the partnership logic became manifest in the form of relationship work among health and social care providers; they sought to build strong interpersonal relationships to enact more integrated transitional care. Originality/value This study has three key implications. First, efforts to promote integrated care should strategically include institutional entrepreneurs at the organizational and clinical levels. Second, integrated care initiatives should emphasize relationship-building among health and social care providers. Finally, theoretical development on institutional logics should further examine the role of interpersonal relationships in facilitating the "spread" of logics between macro-, meso-, and micro-level influences on inter-organizational change.

  14. The transition to medication adoption in publicly funded substance use disorder treatment programs: organizational structure, culture, and resources.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Roman, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    Medications for the treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs) are not widely available in publicly funded SUD treatment programs. Few studies have drawn on longitudinal data to examine the organizational characteristics associated with programs transitioning from not delivering any pharmacotherapy to adopting at least one SUD medication. Using two waves of panel longitudinal data collected over a 5-year period, we measured the transition to medication adoption in a cohort of 190 publicly funded treatment organizations that offered no SUD medications at baseline. Independent variables included organizational characteristics, medical resources, funding, treatment culture, and detailing activities by pharmaceutical companies. Of 190 programs not offering SUD pharmacotherapy at baseline, 22.6% transitioned to offering at least one SUD medication at follow-up approximately 5 years later. Multivariate logistic regression results indicated that the employment of at least one physician at baseline, having a greater proportion of Medicaid clients, and pharmaceutical detailing were positively associated with medication adoption. Adoption of pharmacotherapy was more likely in programs that had greater medical resources, Medicaid funding, and contact with pharmaceutical companies. Given the potential expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, patients served by publicly funded programs may gain greater access to such treatments, but research is needed to document health reform's impact on this sector of the treatment system.

  15. Family Experiences of Transition from Child Care to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Alison

    A study traced the experiences of Australian working families as their children started formal schooling. Each family faced the prospect of moving their child or children from the intimate environment of a child care center that operated from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. to a large elementary school with a 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. school day. The study focused on:…

  16. Analysis of Florida Department of Transportation transit corridor program/projects : technical memorandum number one - review and summary of transit corridor plans

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to undertake a consolidated comprehensive review of the Florida Department of Transportation Transit Corridor Program. Technical Memorandum Number One provides a summary of all transit corridor projects either under wa...

  17. Care management program evaluation: constituents, conflicts, and moves toward standardization.

    PubMed

    Long, D Adam; Perry, Theodore L; Pelletier, Kenneth R; Lehman, Gregg O

    2006-06-01

    Care management program evaluations bring together constituents from finance, medicine, and social sciences. The differing assumptions and scientific philosophies that these constituents bring to the task often lead to frustrations and even contentions. Given the forms and variations of care management programs, the difficulty associated with program outcomes measurement should not be surprising. It is no wonder then that methods for clinical and economic evaluations of program efficacy continue to be debated and have yet to be standardized. We describe these somewhat hidden processes, examine where the industry stands, and provide recommendations for steps to standardize evaluation methodology.

  18. Ensuring Patient Safety in Care Transitions: An Empirical Evaluation of a Handoff Intervention Tool

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Joanna; Kannampallil, Thomas; Patel, Bela; Almoosa, Khalid; Patel, Vimla L.

    2012-01-01

    Successful handoffs ensure smooth, efficient and safe patient care transitions. Tools and systems designed for standardization of clinician handoffs often focuses on ensuring the communication activity during transitions, with limited support for preparatory activities such as information seeking and organization. We designed and evaluated a Handoff Intervention Tool (HAND-IT) based on a checklist-inspired, body system format allowing structured information organization, and a problem-case narrative format allowing temporal description of patient care events. Based on a pre-post prospective study using a multi-method analysis we evaluated the effectiveness of HAND-IT as a documentation tool. We found that the use of HAND-IT led to fewer transition breakdowns, greater tool resilience, and likely led to better learning outcomes for less-experienced clinicians when compared to the current tool. We discuss the implications of our results for improving patient safety with a continuity of care-based approach. PMID:23304268

  19. Transition of care for the elderly after cerebrovascular accidents--from hospital to the home.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rosalina Aparecida Partezani; Marques, Sueli; Kusumota, Luciana; dos Santos, Emanuella Barros; Fhon, Jack Roberto da Silva; Fabrício-Wehbe, Suzele Cristina Coelho

    2013-01-01

    to examine the transition of care in families caring for elderly persons who suffered the first episode of a cerebrovascular accident. an instrumental ethnographic case study was used. The sample comprised 20 subjects: 10 caregivers and 10 elderly persons aged 65 or over, of both sexes, with diagnoses of first episode of cerebrovascular accident, capable of communicating, and requiring care from a main carer in their family. The data was collected through interviews, observation, existing documentation and field notes. Qualitative analysis techniques were used to codify and classify the data and to formulate significant categories, which generated typologies of care. The central idea was the Transition of Care and showed the context in three typologies: The care process for the dependent elderly person, Strategies for the care process and Impact and acceptance of the limitations. The data indicates that caring for an elderly person after a cerebrovascular accident is a challenge for the family. The data permitted it possible to elaborate a proposal for a model for the organization of the work, with a view to holistic care delivery in the health services, forming a care network, which constitutes an advance for the area of nursing.

  20. 76 FR 47296 - Transit Asset Management (TAM) Pilot Program Funds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... makes funds available for public transportation providers, State Departments of Transportation (DOT... transportation asset management at the nation's rail and bus public transportation agencies. FOR FURTHER... asset management at the rail and bus public transportation agencies. Transit Asset Management Selections...

  1. Clean air program : liquefied natural gas safety in transit operations

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-03-31

    The report examines the safety issues relating to the use of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) in transit service. The safety issues were determined by on-site surveys performed by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, and Science Applications International Corp. (S...

  2. Externalization of the Health Care System's Educational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seisser, Mary A.; Epstein, Alice L.

    1999-01-01

    Health care organizations with successful internal education programs can expand their offerings through a formal externalization process. The process involves needs assessment, environmental scanning, identification of internal successes, and selection of appropriate topics. (SK)

  3. Development of a chronic care ostomy self-management program.

    PubMed

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C; Wendel, Christopher S; Krouse, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long-term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality-of-life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies.

  4. Development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Krouse, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality of life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies. PMID:23104143

  5. Improving transition of care for veterans after total joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Green, Uthona R; Dearmon, Valorie; Taggart, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Patients transitioning from hospital to home are at risk for readmission to the hospital. Readmissions are costly and occur too often. Standardized discharge education processes have shown to decrease readmissions. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to utilize evidence-based practice changes to decrease 30-day all-cause readmissions after total joint replacement. Review of literature revealed that improved discharge education can decrease unnecessary readmissions after discharge. A quality improvement project was developed including standardized total joint replacement discharge education, teach-back education methodology, and improved postdischarge telephone follow-up. The quality improvement project was initiated and outcomes were evaluated. Improving coordination of the discharge process, enhanced education for patients/caregivers, and postdischarge follow-up decreased total joint replacement readmissions.

  6. Informal payments and the financing of health care in developing and transition countries.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Maureen

    2007-01-01

    Informal, under-the-table payments to public health care providers are increasingly viewed as a critically important source of health care financing in developing and transition countries. With minimal funding levels and limited accountability, publicly financed and delivered care falls prey to illegal payments, which require payments that can exceed 100 percent of a country's median income. Methods to address the abuse include establishing official fees, combined with improved oversight and accountability for public health care providers, and a role for communities in holding providers accountable.

  7. Home-based intermediate care program vs hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Catherine Deri; Hogg, William E.; Lemelin, Jacques; Dahrouge, Simone; Martin, Carmel; Viner, Gary S.; Saginur, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore whether a home-based intermediate care program in a large Canadian city lowers the cost of care and to look at whether such home-based programs could be a solution to the increasing demands on Canadian hospitals. DESIGN Single-arm study with historical controls. SETTING Department of Family Medicine at the Ottawa Hospital (Civic campus) in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Patients requiring hospitalization for acute care. Participants were matched with historical controls based on case-mix, most responsible diagnosis, and level of complexity. INTERVENTIONS Placement in the home-based intermediate care program. Daily home visits from the nurse practitioner and 24-hour access to care by telephone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Multivariate regression models were used to estimate the effect of the program on 5 outcomes: length of stay in hospital, cost of care substituted for hospitalization (Canadian dollars), readmission for a related diagnosis, readmission for any diagnosis, and costs incurred by community home-care services for patients following discharge from hospital. RESULTS The outcomes of 43 hospital admissions were matched with those of 363 controls. Patients enrolled in the program stayed longer in hospital (coefficient 3.3 days, P < .001), used more community care services following discharge (coefficient $729, P = .007), and were more likely to be readmitted to hospital within 3 months of discharge (coefficient 17%, P = .012) than patients treated in hospital. Total substituted costs of home-based care were not significantly different from the costs of hospitalization (coefficient -$501, P = .11). CONCLUSION While estimated cost savings were not statistically significant, the limitations of our study suggest that we underestimated these savings. In particular, the economic inefficiencies of a small immature program and the inability to control for certain factors when selecting historical controls affected our results. Further research is needed to

  8. Health care transition in Germany – standardization of procedures and improvement actions

    PubMed Central

    Pieper, Claudia; Kolankowska, Izabela

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have assessed an increase in the number of people in need and emphasized the advantages of structured discharge management and health care transition. Therefore, our study evaluated the status quo of transition in a major German city after standardization of procedures and implementation of standard forms. Satisfaction with handling of standard forms and improvement of procedures was evaluated. Additionally, patients who had recently been hospitalized were asked about the hospital discharge process. The results show that the recent efforts of standardization helped to improve interface management for health care workers and patients and showed further improvement options. PMID:21811388

  9. Position Paper on College-Sponsored Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition for Campus Child Care, Inc., Milwaukee, WI.

    Universities must be prepared to provide quality child care not only to accommodate their changing student population, but also to help attract and retain competent and dedicated employees. Campus child care programs should be: (1) models to the community, to early education specialists, to parents, and to policymakers; (2) an integral part of the…

  10. Creating a successful culturally sensitive home care program.

    PubMed

    Blanter, R; Page, P M

    1995-12-01

    Providing quality home care services to immigrants requires an integrated, holistic approach that genuinely addresses language and cultural differences. One home care agency in Massachusetts developed a team-oriented, culturally sensitive outreach program that ensures non-English-speaking patients the same level of service that the general population receives.

  11. Extended Care Programs in Catholic Schools: Some Legal Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Mary Angela

    This publication addresses issues concerning the application of the law to extended-day Catholic schools. The first chapter provides an overview of extended care. In the second chapter, sources of the law that are applied to extended care programs are described. Canon law affects Catholic schools. Catholic schools are also subject to four types of…

  12. 45 CFR 1306.35 - Family child care program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cognitive, socio-emotional, and physical development, including both gross and fine motor. Family child care... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Family child care program option. 1306.35 Section 1306.35 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT...

  13. 45 CFR 1306.35 - Family child care program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cognitive, socio-emotional, and physical development, including both gross and fine motor. Family child care... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Family child care program option. 1306.35 Section 1306.35 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT...

  14. 45 CFR 1306.35 - Family child care program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cognitive, socio-emotional, and physical development, including both gross and fine motor. Family child care... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Family child care program option. 1306.35 Section 1306.35 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT...

  15. 45 CFR 1306.35 - Family child care program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cognitive, socio-emotional, and physical development, including both gross and fine motor. Family child care... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Family child care program option. 1306.35 Section 1306.35 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT...

  16. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  17. PENNSYLVANIA MIGRANT DAY CARE PROGRAM AND PARTICIPATING AGENCIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NAYLOR, NAOMI L.

    A DESCRIPTION OF A MIGRANT DAY CARE PROGRAM WAS GIVEN. A TOTAL OF 180 PRESCHOOL AND SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN WERE ENROLLED IN SIX DAY CARE CENTERS. SOME FINANCIAL AID, EQUIPMENT, MATERIALS, AND ADVISORY HELP WERE GIVEN TO TWO OTHER CENTERS ENROLLING 40 MORE CHILDREN. FUNDS FOR THE OPERATION OF THE CENTERS WERE FEDERAL FUNDS, ALLOCATED TO PROVIDE…

  18. Collaboration and Subsidized Early Care and Education Programs in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Zanoni, Wladimir; Barisik, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    As a result of policy changes following welfare reform in 1996 and the costs associated with providing high-quality early care and education for children of low-income working families, agency collaboration in the state of Illinois has become an increasingly salient feature of subsidized early care and education programs (SECE). The authors…

  19. Adult care providers' perspectives on the transition to adult care for emerging adults with Type 1 diabetes: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Michaud, S; Dasgupta, K; Bell, L; Yale, J-F; Anjachak, N; Wafa, S; Nakhla, M

    2018-03-25

    To assess adult diabetes care providers' current transition practices, knowledge about transition care, and perceived barriers to implementation of best practices in transition care for emerging adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. We administered a 38-item web-based survey to adult diabetes care providers identified through the Québec Endocrinologist Medical Association and Diabetes Québec. Fifty-three physicians responded (35%). Fewer than half of all respondents (46%) were familiar with the American Diabetes Association's transition care position statement. Approximately one-third of respondents reported a gap of >6 months between paediatric and adult diabetes care. Most (83%) believed communication with the paediatric team was adequate; however, only 56% reported receiving a medical summary and 2% a psychosocial summary from the paediatric provider. Respondents believed that the paediatric team should improve emerging adults' preparation for transition care by developing their self-management skills and improve teaching about the differences between paediatric and adult-oriented care. Only 31% had a system for identifying emerging adults lost to follow-up in adult care. Perceived barriers included difficulty accessing psychosocial services, emerging adults' lack of motivation, and inadequate transition preparation. Most (87%) were interested in having additional resources, including a self-care management tool and a registry to track those lost to follow-up. Our findings highlight the need to better engage adult care providers into transition care practices. Despite adult physicians' interest in transition care, implementation of transition care recommendations and resources in clinical care remains limited. Enhanced efforts are needed to improve access to mental health services within the adult healthcare setting. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  20. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation for Providers of Inpatient Psychiatric Services... Conditions of Participation for Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation... Participation for Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation for Providers of...

  1. Transitions in the communication experiences of tracheostomised patients in intensive care: a qualitative descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Flinterud, Stine Irene; Andershed, Birgitta

    2015-08-01

    To describe how tracheostomised patients in intensive care experience acts of communication and to better understand their experiences in the context of the transitions theory. Waking up in an intensive care unit unable to speak because of mechanical ventilation can be challenging. Communication aids are available, but patients still report difficulties communicating. Investigating how mechanically ventilated patients experience communication in the context of the transitions theory might elucidate new ways of supporting them during their transitions while being ventilated. A qualitative, descriptive design. Eleven patients who had previously been tracheostomised in an intensive care unit were included in this quality improvement project conducted in a university hospital in Norway. Participants were tracheostomised from 3-27 days. Semistructured interviews were conducted from June 2013-August 2013, 3-18 months after hospital discharge. Transcripts were analysed using inductive content analysis. Participants reported a great diversity of emotions and experiences attempting to communicate while being tracheostomised. One overarching theme emerging from the analysis was the 'Experience of caring and understanding despite having uncomfortable feelings due to troublesome communication.' The theme consists of three categories. The category 'Emotionally challenging' shows that patients struggled initially. With time, their coping improved, as revealed in the category 'The experience changes with time.' Despite difficulties, participants described positive experiences, as shown in the category 'Successful communication.' The importance of patients experiencing caring and understanding despite their difficult situation constitutes the core finding. The findings suggest that participants went through different transitions. Some reached the end of their transition, experiencing increased stability. Despite challenges with communication, participants reported that caring

  2. Ethnographic process evaluation of a quality improvement project to improve transitions of care for older people

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Elizabeth; Dixon-Woods, Mary; Tarrant, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Quality improvement projects to address transitions of care across care boundaries are increasingly common but meet with mixed success for reasons that are poorly understood. We aimed to characterise challenges in a project to improve transitions for older people between hospital and care homes. Design Independent process evaluation, using ethnographic observations and interviews, of a quality improvement project. Setting and participants An English hospital and two residential care homes for older people. Data 32 hours of non-participant observations and 12 semistructured interviews with project members, hospital and care home staff. Results A hospital-based improvement team sought to reduce unplanned readmissions from residential care homes using interventions including a community-based geriatric team that could be accessed directly by care homes and a communication tool intended to facilitate transfer of information between homes and hospital. Only very modest (if any) impacts of these interventions on readmission rates could be detected. The process evaluation identified multiple challenges in implementing interventions and securing improvement. Many of these arose because of lack of consensus on the nature of the problem and the proper solutions: while the hospital team was keen to reduce readmissions and saw the problems as lying in poor communication and lack of community-based support for care homes, the care home staff had different priorities. Care home staff were unconvinced that the improvement interventions were aligned with their needs or addressed their concerns, resulting in compromised implementation. Conclusions Process evaluations have a valuable role in quality improvement. Our study suggests that a key task for quality improvement projects aimed at transitions of care is that of developing a shared view of the problem to be addressed. A more participatory approach could help to surface assumptions, interpretations and interests

  3. “Just another fish in the pond”: the transitional care experience of a hip fracture patient

    PubMed Central

    Toscan, Justine; Manderson, Brooke; Santi, Selena M; Stolee, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Miscommunication and lack of coordination can compromise care quality and patient safety during transitions in care, especially for medically complex older adults. Little research has been done to investigate care transitions from the perspective of those receiving and providing care. Methods This study explored multiple care transitions for an elderly hip fracture patient, post-surgery. Interviews and observations were conducted with the patient, their family caregivers, and health care providers, at each point of transition between four different care settings. Results Four key themes were identified over the patients care trajectory: ‘Missing Crucial Coversations’—Patient and family caregivers did not feel involved or informed about decisions in care; ‘Who’s Who’—Confusion about the role of health care providers; ‘Ready or Not’—Not knowing what to expect or what is expected; and, ‘Playing by the Rules’—Health system policies and procedures hinder individualized care. Conclusion Study findings point to the need for the health care system to engage patients and family caregivers more fully and consistently in the process of care transitions as well as the importance of understanding these processes from multiple perspectives. Recommendations for system integration are proposed with a focus on transitional care. PMID:23882170

  4. Outcome Evidence for Structured Pediatric to Adult Health Care Transition Interventions: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Phabinly; McManus, Margaret; Rogers, Katherine; White, Patience

    2017-09-01

    To identify statistically significant positive outcomes in pediatric-to-adult transition studies using the triple aim framework of population health, consumer experience, and utilization and costs of care. Studies published between January 1995 and April 2016 were identified using the CINAHL, Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases. Included studies evaluated pre-evaluation and postevaluation data, intervention and comparison groups, and randomized clinic trials. The methodological strength of each study was assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool. Out of a total of 3844 articles, 43 met our inclusion criteria. Statistically significant positive outcomes were found in 28 studies, most often related to population health (20 studies), followed by consumer experience (8 studies), and service utilization (9 studies). Among studies with moderate to strong quality assessment ratings, the most common positive outcomes were adherence to care and utilization of ambulatory care in adult settings. Structured transition interventions often resulted in positive outcomes. Future evaluations should consider aligning with professional transition guidance; incorporating detailed intervention descriptions about transition planning, transfer, and integration into adult care; and measuring the triple aims of population health, experience, and costs of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Management issues of congenital adrenal hyperplasia during the transition from pediatric to adult care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2017-02-01

    Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency is the most prevalent form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), accounting for approximately 95% of cases. With the advent of newborn screening and hormone replacement therapy, most children with CAH survive into adulthood. Adolescents and adults with CAH experience a number of complications, including short stature, obesity, infertility, tumor, osteoporosis, and reduced quality of life. Transition from pediatric to adult care and management of long-term complications are challenging for both patients and health-care providers. Psychosocial issues frequently affect adherence to glucocorticoid treatment. Therefore, the safe transition of adolescents to adult care requires regular follow-up of patients by a multidisciplinary team including pediatric and adult endocrinologists. The major goals for management of adults with 21-hydroxylase deficiency are to minimize the long-term complications of glucocorticoid therapy, reduce hyperandrogenism, prevent adrenal or testicular adrenal rest tumors, maintain fertility, and improve quality of life. Optimized medical or surgical treatment strategies should be developed through coordinated care, both during transition periods and throughout patients' lifetimes. This review will summarize current knowledge on the management of adults with CAH, and suggested appropriate approaches to the transition from pediatric to adult care.

  6. Barriers and facilitators to successful transition from pediatric to adult inflammatory bowel disease care from the perspectives of providers.

    PubMed

    Paine, Christine W; Stollon, Natalie B; Lucas, Matthew S; Brumley, Lauren D; Poole, Erika S; Peyton, Tamara; Grant, Anne W; Jan, Sophia; Trachtenberg, Symme; Zander, Miriam; Mamula, Petar; Bonafide, Christopher P; Schwartz, Lisa A

    2014-11-01

    For adolescents and young adults (AYA) with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the transition from pediatric to adult care is often challenging and associated with gaps in care. Our study objectives were to (1) identify outcomes for evaluating transition success and (2) elicit the major barriers and facilitators of successful transition. We interviewed pediatric and adult IBD providers from across the United States with experience caring for AYAs with IBD until thematic saturation was reached after 12 interviews. We elicited the participants' backgrounds, examples of successful and unsuccessful transition of AYAs for whom they cared, and recommendations for improving transition using the Social-Ecological Model of Adolescent and Young Adult Readiness to Transition framework. We coded interview transcripts using the constant comparative method and identified major themes. Participants reported evaluating transition success and failure using health care utilization outcomes (e.g., maintaining continuity with adult providers), health outcomes (e.g., stable symptoms), and quality of life outcomes (e.g., attending school). The patients' level of developmental maturity (i.e., ownership of care) was the most prominent determinant of transition outcomes. The style of parental involvement (i.e., helicopter parent versus optimally involved parent) and the degree of support by providers (e.g., care coordination) also influenced outcomes. IBD transition success is influenced by a complex interplay of patient developmental maturity, parenting style, and provider support. Multidisciplinary IBD care teams should aim to optimize these factors for each patient to increase the likelihood of a smooth transfer to adult care.

  7. Palliative Care Professional Development for Critical Care Nurses: A Multicenter Program.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Wendy G; Puntillo, Kathleen; Cimino, Jenica; Noort, Janice; Pearson, Diana; Boyle, Deborah; Grywalski, Michelle; Meyer, Jeannette; O'Neil-Page, Edith; Cain, Julia; Herman, Heather; Barbour, Susan; Turner, Kathleen; Moore, Eric; Liao, Solomon; Ferrell, Bruce; Mitchell, William; Edmonds, Kyle; Fairman, Nathan; Joseph, Denah; MacMillan, John; Milic, Michelle M; Miller, Monica; Nakagawa, Laura; O'Riordan, David L; Pietras, Christopher; Thornberry, Kathryn; Pantilat, Steven Z

    2017-09-01

    Integrating palliative care into intensive care units (ICUs) requires involvement of bedside nurses, who report inadequate education in palliative care. To implement and evaluate a palliative care professional development program for ICU bedside nurses. From May 2013 to January 2015, palliative care advanced practice nurses and nurse educators in 5 academic medical centers completed a 3-day train-the-trainer program followed by 2 years of mentoring to implement the initiative. The program consisted of 8-hour communication workshops for bedside nurses and structured rounds in ICUs, where nurse leaders coached bedside nurses in identifying and addressing palliative care needs. Primary outcomes were nurses' ratings of their palliative care communication skills in surveys, and nurses' identification of palliative care needs during coaching rounds. Each center held at least 6 workshops, training 428 bedside nurses. Nurses rated their skill level higher after the workshop for 15 tasks (eg, responding to family distress, ensuring families understand information in family meetings, all P < .01 vs preworkshop). Coaching rounds in each ICU took a mean of 3 hours per month. For 82% of 1110 patients discussed in rounds, bedside nurses identified palliative care needs and created plans to address them. Communication skills training workshops increased nurses' ratings of their palliative care communication skills. Coaching rounds supported nurses in identifying and addressing palliative care needs. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. Lessons Learned from Testing the Quality Cost Model of Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) Transitional Care

    PubMed Central

    Brooten, Dorothy; Naylor, Mary D.; York, Ruth; Brown, Linda P.; Munro, Barbara Hazard; Hollingsworth, Andrea O.; Cohen, Susan M.; Finkler, Steven; Deatrick, Janet; Youngblut, JoAnne M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the development, testing, modification, and results of the Quality Cost Model of Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) Transitional Care on patient outcomes and health care costs in the United States over 22 years, and to delineate what has been learned for nursing education, practice, and further research. Organizing Construct The Quality Cost Model of APN Transitional Care. Methods Review of published results of seven randomized clinical trials with very low birth-weight (VLBW) infants; women with unplanned cesarean births, high risk pregnancies, and hysterectomy surgery; elders with cardiac medical and surgical diagnoses and common diagnostic related groups (DRGs); and women with high risk pregnancies in which half of physician prenatal care was substituted with APN care. Ongoing work with the model is linking the process of APN care with the outcomes and costs of care. Findings APN intervention has consistently resulted in improved patient outcomes and reduced health care costs across groups. Groups with APN providers were rehospitalized for less time at less cost, reflecting early detection and intervention. Optimal number and timing of postdischarge home visits and telephone contacts by the APNs and patterns of rehospitalizations and acute care visits varied by group. Conclusions To keep people well over time, APNs must have depth of knowledge and excellent clinical and interpersonal skills that are the hallmark of specialist practice, an in-depth understanding of systems and how to work within them, and sufficient patient contact to effect positive outcomes at low cost. PMID:12501741

  9. Iowa's High School Super Senior School-to-Work Transition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nietupski, John; Warth, Judy; Winslow, Amy; Johnson, Russ; Douglas, Beverly; Johnson, Maggie; Cilek, Judy

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an innovative school-to-work transition program incorporating identified best practices. Iowa's Super Senior program serves students in the "middle range" of the disability severity spectrum during the student's senior and 5th, or "Super Senior" year. The article describes the program elements, presents…

  10. A Peer-Led High School Transition Program Increases Graduation Rates among Latino Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Valerie L.; Simon, Patricia; Mun, Eun-Young

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the impact of a manualized high school transition program, the Peer Group Connection (PGC) program, on the graduation rate at a low-income, Mid-Atlantic high school. The program utilized 12th-grade student peer leaders to create a supportive environment for incoming ninth-grade students. Results of a randomized control…

  11. 76 FR 67801 - Medicare Program; Medicare Shared Savings Program: Accountable Care Organizations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... Community Care Network NP Nurse Practitioner NPI National Provider Identifier NQF National Quality Forum OIG...: Accountable Care Organizations; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 212 / Wednesday, November 2... Savings Program: Accountable Care Organizations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS...

  12. Patients in transition--improving hospital-home care collaboration through electronic messaging: providers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Melby, Line; Brattheim, Berit J; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2015-12-01

    To explore how the use of electronic messages support hospital and community care nurses' collaboration and communication concerning patients' admittance to and discharges from hospitals. Nurses in hospitals and in community care play a crucial role in the transfer of patients between the home and the hospital. Several studies have shown that transition situations are challenging due to a lack of communication and information exchange. Information and communication technologies may support nurses' work in these transition situations. An electronic message system was introduced in Norway to support patient transitions across the health care sector. A descriptive, qualitative interview study was conducted. One hospital and three adjacent communities were included in the study. We conducted semi-structured interviews with hospital nurses and community care nurses. In total, 41 persons were included in the study. The analysis stemmed from three main topics related to the aims of e-messaging: efficiency, quality and safety. These were further divided into sub-themes. All informants agreed that electronic messaging is more efficient, i.e. less time-consuming than previous means of communication. The shift from predominantly oral communication to writing electronic messages has brought attention to the content of the information exchanged, thereby leading to more conscious communication. Electronic messaging enables improved information security, thereby enhancing patient safety, but this depends on nurses using the system as intended. Nurses consider electronic messaging to be a useful tool for communication and collaboration in patient transitions. Patient transitions are demanding situations both for patients and for the nurses who facilitate the transitions. The introduction of information and communication technologies can support nurses' work in the transition situations, and this is likely to benefit the patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Putting It All Together: A Minority Transition Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacramento City Coll., CA.

    Sacramento City College (SCC) created a transfer opportunity program to implement joint activities with four-year colleges and high schools, establish an academic skills program for potential minority transfers, improve telecommunications with local four-year institutions, expand its existing junior high school program. and continue its formalized…

  14. Medication discrepancies across multiple care transitions: A retrospective longitudinal cohort study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonaudo, Marco; Martorana, Maria; Dimonte, Valerio; D'Alfonso, Alessandra; Fornero, Giulio; Politano, Gianfranco; Gianino, Maria Michela

    2018-01-01

    Medication discrepancies are defined as unexplained differences among regimens across different sites of care. The problem of medication discrepancies that occur during the entire care pathway from hospital admission to a local care setting discharge (namely all types of settings dedicated to formal care other than hospitals) has received little attention in the medical literature. The present study aims to (1) determine the prevalence of medication discrepancies that occur during the entire care pathway from hospital admission to local care setting discharge, (2) describe the discrepancy and medication type, and (3) identify potential risk factors for experiencing medication discrepancies in patient care transitions. Evidence from an integrated health care system, such as the Italian one, may explain results from other studies in different healthcare systems. A retrospective longitudinal cohort study of patients admitted from July 2015 to July 2016 to the Giovanni Bosco Hospital serving Turin, Italy and its surrounding territory was performed. Discrepancies were recorded at the following four care transitions: T1: Hospital admission; T2: Hospital discharge; T3: Admission into local care settings; T4: Discharge from local care settings. All evaluations were based on documented regimens and were performed by a team (doctor, nurse and pharmacists). Of 366 included patients, 25.68% had at least one discrepancy. The most frequent type of discrepancy was from medication omission (N = 74; 71.15%). Only discharge from a long-stay care setting (T4) was significantly associated with the onset of discrepancies (p = 0.045). When considering a lack of adequate documentation, not as missing data but as a discrepancy, 43.72% of patients had at least one discrepancy. This study suggests that an integrated health care system, such as Italian system, may influence the prevalence of discrepancies, thus highlighting the need for structured multidisciplinary and, if possible

  15. The Family Characteristics of Youth Entering a Residential Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Annette K.; Ingram, Stephanie D.; Barth, Richard P.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Thompson, Ronald W.; Epstein, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Although much is known about the mental health and behavioral functioning of youth who enter residential care programs, very little research has focused on examining the family characteristics of this population. Knowledge about family characteristics is important, however, as it can aid in tailoring programs to meet the needs of families who are…

  16. A Predoctoral Program in Dental Care for the Developmentally Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Fred S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In 1980, the State University of New York at Stony Brook began a program, integrated into the program of children's dentistry, to train students in care for the developmentally disabled. Management of developmentally disabled patients is provided over three years, and represents an extension of pediatric behavior management. (MSE)

  17. Developing Healthy Adolescents--A Progressive Health Care Partnership Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griesemer, Bernard A.; Hough, David L.

    1993-01-01

    A 1991 partnership coupling Southwest Missouri State University with Saint John's Regional Health Center spawned the Midwest Sports Medicine Center, originally designed to treat orthopedic injuries. Soon the center developed major educational initiatives, including SportsPACE, a program integrating health care programs into the secondary core…

  18. Understanding the Impact of a Ninth-Grade Transition Program in Texas. Vignette

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Institutes for Research, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Ninth grade often is considered a make-or-break year in determining whether students will be successful in high school and beyond. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) created the Texas Ninth Grade Transition and Intervention Program to ease the transition of at-risk students into high school and increase the likelihood that they graduate on time and…

  19. Compliance and Practices in Transition Planning: A Review of Individualized Education Program Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landmark, Leena Jo; Zhang, Dalun

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which transition components of students’ Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) were compliant with IDEIA 2004; the extent to which transition components provided evidence of best practices; the association among disability, ethnicity, compliance, and practices; and the relationship between compliance and best…

  20. Challenges of postgraduate critical care nursing program in Iran.

    PubMed

    Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Shariat, Esmaeil; Tayebi, Zahra; Ghorbanzadeh, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Background: The main philosophy of postgraduate preparation for working in critical care units is to ensure the safety and quality of patients' care. Increasing the complexity of technology, decision-making challenges and the high demand for advanced communication skills necessitate the need to educate learners. Within this aim, a master's degree in critical care nursing has been established in Iran. Current study was designed to collect critical care nursing students' experiences as well as their feedback to the field critical care nursing. Methods: This study used qualitative content analysis through in-depth semi-structured interviews. Graneheim and Lundman method was used for data analysis. Results: The results of the total 15 interviews were classified in the following domains: The vision of hope and illusion; shades of grey attitude; inefficient program and planning; inadequacy to run the program; and multiple outcomes: Far from the effectiveness. Overall findings indicated the necessity to review the curriculum and the way the program is implemented. Conclusion: The findings of this study provided valuable information to improve the critical care-nursing program. It also facilitated the next review of the program by the authorities.