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Sample records for career path choices

  1. Career Path Guide for Adult Career Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Clydia

    Intended for adults who are considering career choices or changes, this booklet provides opportunities for self-study and reflection in six career paths. The booklet begins with tips for long-term career survival and myths and realities of career planning. After a brief career survey, readers are introduced to six career paths: arts and…

  2. Career Path Guide for Adult Career Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Clydia

    Intended for adults who are considering career choices or changes, this booklet provides opportunities for self-study and reflection in six career paths. The booklet begins with tips for long-term career survival and myths and realities of career planning. After a brief career survey, readers are introduced to six career paths: arts and…

  3. The career path choices of veterinary radiologists.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray D; Silver, Tawni I

    2015-01-01

    Concerns of a shortage of board certified specialists willing to work in academia have shadowed the medical and veterinary communities for decades. As a result, a number of studies have been conducted to determine how to foster, attract, and retain specialists in academia. More recently, there has been a growing perception that it is difficult for academic institutions to hire board certified veterinary radiologists. The objective of this study was to describe the career paths (academia vs. private sector) of veterinary radiologists and to determine what factors influenced their career path decisions. A mixed mode cross-sectional survey was used to survey ACVR radiologists and residents-in-training, 48% (255/529) of which responded. There was a near unidirectional movement of radiologists from academia to the private sector: 45.7% (59/129) of the respondents who began their careers in academia had switched to the private sector while only 8% (7/88) had left the private sector for academia. If a shortage of academic radiologists exists, then perhaps the issue should be framed as a problem with retention vs. recruitment. The most influential factors in the decision to leave academia were remuneration (wages and benefits), lack of interest/enjoyment in research, geographical location, and family considerations. It is salient that average salaries increased by twofold after leaving academia for the private sector. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  4. Career Paths and Choices Leading to the Senior Student Affairs Office (SSAO) for Women at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Giddens, Brandi M.; Darsey, Jessica; Fricks, Jodie Boney; Tucker, Barbara D.; Robertson, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined career paths and choices leading to the Senior Student Affairs Office (SSAO) for women at community colleges. Data were comprised of 57 resumes and 11 interviews from SSAOs during the 2008-2009 academic year. Network analysis paired with interviews offer career track and progression profiles with rationale for women aspirants.…

  5. Career Paths and Choices Leading to the Senior Student Affairs Office (SSAO) for Women at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Giddens, Brandi M.; Darsey, Jessica; Fricks, Jodie Boney; Tucker, Barbara D.; Robertson, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined career paths and choices leading to the Senior Student Affairs Office (SSAO) for women at community colleges. Data were comprised of 57 resumes and 11 interviews from SSAOs during the 2008-2009 academic year. Network analysis paired with interviews offer career track and progression profiles with rationale for women aspirants.…

  6. Demographics and career path choices of graduates from three Canadian veterinary colleges.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray D; Campbell, John R; Lissemore, Kerry; Miller, Lisa M

    2008-10-01

    The classes of 2007 from the Atlantic Veterinary College, Ontario Veterinary College, and Western College of Veterinary Medicine were surveyed to determine what factors influenced the respondents' career path choices. Seventy percent (166/237) of those contacted participated in the survey of which 89.1% were female, 62.7% had an urban upbringing, and 33.0% expected to be employed in a small center (population < or = 10,000). Half (52.5%) of the respondents reported that they were interested in mixed or food animal practice at the time of entry into veterinary college, but this proportion declined to 34.2% by the time of graduation. Three factors were significantly associated with choosing a career in mixed or food animal practice: having been raised in a small center, being a male, and having a good to excellent knowledge of food animal production at the time of entry into veterinary college, as determined by a self-assessment.

  7. Factors affecting the career path choices of graduates at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, Murray D.; Campbell, John R.; Naylor, Jonathan M.; Lawson, Karen L.; Derkzen, Dena

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the demographics of the Class of 2006, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, and to determine which factors influenced the graduates’ career path choices. Data were collected via an on-line survey and the response rate was 95.7% (67/70). The majority (57%) of graduates were starting their veterinary career in a food animal-related (FAR) job. Two factors were significantly associated with this choice: 1) those raised in, or near, a small center (population < 10 000) were 3.4 times (P = 0.03) more likely to accept a FAR position than were those raised in a large center (> 10 000), and 2) graduates with a bachelor of science in agriculture (BSc Ag) were 4.5 times (P = 0.04) more likely to begin their career as a FAR practitioner than were those without such a degree. However, 9 of the 16 graduates having a BSc Ag had an urban upbringing. PMID:18309746

  8. Factors affecting the career path choices of graduates at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray D; Campbell, John R; Naylor, Jonathan M; Lawson, Karen L; Derkzen, Dena

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the demographics of the Class of 2006, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, and to determine which factors influenced the graduates' career path choices. Data were collected via an on-line survey and the response rate was 95.7% (67/70). The majority (57%) of graduates were starting their veterinary career in a food animal-related (FAR) job. Two factors were significantly associated with this choice: 1) those raised in, or near, a small center (population < 10 000) were 3.4 times (P = 0.03) more likely to accept a FAR position than were those raised in a large center (> 10 000), and 2) graduates with a bachelor of science in agriculture (BSc Ag) were 4.5 times (P = 0.04) more likely to begin their career as a FAR practitioner than were those without such a degree. However, 9 of the 16 graduates having a BSc Ag had an urban upbringing.

  9. Testing the Choice Model of Social Cognitive Career Theory across Holland Themes: A Meta-Analytic Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheu, Hung-Bin; Lent, Robert W.; Brown, Steven D.; Miller, Matthew J.; Hennessy, Kelly D.; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2010-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) seeks to explain the factors that shape educational and vocational interests and choices. We used meta-analytic path analyses to synthesize data (from 1981 to 2008) relevant to SCCT's interest and choice hypotheses, organizing the literature according to Holland's (1997) broad…

  10. Testing the Choice Model of Social Cognitive Career Theory across Holland Themes: A Meta-Analytic Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheu, Hung-Bin; Lent, Robert W.; Brown, Steven D.; Miller, Matthew J.; Hennessy, Kelly D.; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2010-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) seeks to explain the factors that shape educational and vocational interests and choices. We used meta-analytic path analyses to synthesize data (from 1981 to 2008) relevant to SCCT's interest and choice hypotheses, organizing the literature according to Holland's (1997) broad…

  11. Demographics and career path choices of graduates from three Canadian veterinary colleges

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, Murray D.; Campbell, John R.; Lissemore, Kerry; Miller, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    The classes of 2007 from the Atlantic Veterinary College, Ontario Veterinary College, and Western College of Veterinary Medicine were surveyed to determine what factors influenced the respondents’ career path choices. Seventy percent (166/237) of those contacted participated in the survey of which 89.1% were female, 62.7% had an urban upbringing, and 33.0% expected to be employed in a small center (population ≤ 10 000). Half (52.5%) of the respondents reported that they were interested in mixed or food animal practice at the time of entry into veterinary college, but this proportion declined to 34.2% by the time of graduation. Three factors were significantly associated with choosing a career in mixed or food animal practice: having been raised in a small center, being a male, and having a good to excellent knowledge of food animal production at the time of entry into veterinary college, as determined by a self-assessment. PMID:19119368

  12. Factors associated with the career path choices of veterinarians in western Canada

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, Murray D.; Campbell, John R.; Naylor, Jonathan M.; Lawson, Karen L.; Derkzen, Dena

    2009-01-01

    This second of 2 articles, relating to the veterinary profession in western Canada, explores the factors associated with veterinarians’ career path choices. Among other factors, companion animal (small animal and equine) (CA) practitioners were less likely to have been raised in, or near to, a small center (≤ 10 000), were more concerned with their workload (hours of work and number of nights on-call), and preferred to work in progressive practices. Food animal (FA) practitioners were more likely to be male, have been raised in a small center, have been raised in the Province of Saskatchewan, and to have self-assessed themselves as having an above average knowledge of agriculture at the time they applied for admission to veterinary college. Mixed animal (MA) practitioners had more factors in common with FA than with CA practitioners. Three main factors were associated with leaving mixed or food animal practice: hours of work and too many nights on-call, the level of remuneration, and lack of support and mentorship. PMID:19721783

  13. Factors associated with the career path choices of veterinarians in western Canada.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray D; Campbell, John R; Naylor, Jonathan M; Lawson, Karen L; Derkzen, Dena

    2009-06-01

    This second of 2 articles, relating to the veterinary profession in western Canada, explores the factors associated with veterinarians' career path choices. Among other factors, companion animal (small animal and equine) (CA) practitioners were less likely to have been raised in, or near to, a small center (< or = 10 000), were more concerned with their workload (hours of work and number of nights on-call), and preferred to work in progressive practices. Food animal (FA) practitioners were more likely to be male, have been raised in a small center, have been raised in the Province of Saskatchewan, and to have self-assessed themselves as having an above average knowledge of agriculture at the time they applied for admission to veterinary college. Mixed animal (MA) practitioners had more factors in common with FA than with CA practitioners. Three main factors were associated with leaving mixed or food animal practice: hours of work and too many nights on-call, the level of remuneration, and lack of support and mentorship.

  14. Overconfidence and Career Choice.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Jonathan F; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in.

  15. Overconfidence and Career Choice

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Jonathan F.; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in. PMID:26808273

  16. Factors associated with veterinarians' career path choices in the early postgraduate period.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray D; Campbell, John R; MacGregor, Michael W; Watts, Jon M

    2009-09-01

    Veterinarians who graduated between 2000 and 2004, inclusive, were surveyed to determine the factors associated with career path (job) switching in the early postgraduate period. The sampling frame consisted of 348 veterinarians, 285 of whom were contacted and of these, 192 (67.4%) responded to the survey. Only 28.4% of respondents had remained with their initial employer. Three main factors were associated with employee retention: the type of practice/caseload, the workload (hours worked and number of nights on-call), and the level of mentorship and support provided by the practice. Workload and mentorship were also cited as the main reasons for leaving a place of employment. More than a third (38.0%) of respondents reported leaving a position solely because of inadequate mentorship and support. A third (33.7%) of respondents who began their careers in mixed or food animal practice were no longer in these types of practice; the main reasons for leaving were related to workload and mentorship.

  17. Factors associated with veterinarians’ career path choices in the early postgraduate period

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, Murray D.; Campbell, John R.; MacGregor, Michael W.; Watts, Jon M.

    2009-01-01

    Veterinarians who graduated between 2000 and 2004, inclusive, were surveyed to determine the factors associated with career path (job) switching in the early postgraduate period. The sampling frame consisted of 348 veterinarians, 285 of whom were contacted and of these, 192 (67.4%) responded to the survey. Only 28.4% of respondents had remained with their initial employer. Three main factors were associated with employee retention: the type of practice/caseload, the workload (hours worked and number of nights on-call), and the level of mentorship and support provided by the practice. Workload and mentorship were also cited as the main reasons for leaving a place of employment. More than a third (38.0%) of respondents reported leaving a position solely because of inadequate mentorship and support. A third (33.7%) of respondents who began their careers in mixed or food animal practice were no longer in these types of practice; the main reasons for leaving were related to workload and mentorship. PMID:19949554

  18. Lean in and Lift up: Female Superintendents Share Their Career Path Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelsey, Cheryl; Allen, Kathy; Coke, Kelly; Ballard, Glenda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to inform professional practice pertaining to the preparation of female administrators as future school superintendents. Twenty female superintendents in Texas were interviewed using a qualitative research approach. Strategies, career experiences and perception of barriers were identified using open-ended questions.…

  19. PATERNAL INFLUENCE ON CAREER CHOICE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WERTS, CHARLES E.

    FATHER'S OCCUPATION WAS COMPARED WITH SON'S CAREER CHOICE FOR A SAMPLE OF 76,015 MALE, COLLEGE FRESHMEN. RESULTS INDICATED THAT CERTAIN TYPES OF FATHERS' OCCUPATIONS WERE ASSOCIATED WITH SIMILAR TYPES OF CAREER CHOICES BY SONS. BOYS WHOSE FATHERS WERE IN SCIENTIFIC OCCUPATIONS (ENGINEERS, MILITARY OFFICERS, ARCHITECTS, BIOLOGISTS, CHEMISTS, AND…

  20. Foundation doctors career choice and factors influencing career choice.

    PubMed

    Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Begg, Drummond; Dixon, Guy

    2015-11-01

    This study is seeking to establish the factors influencing foundation doctors' decision-making when applying for speciality training. A questionnaire was sent to all foundation doctors in Scotland (n = 1602, response rate 34%) asking them about their career intention in relation to General Practice, whether they received career advice and the extent to which certain factors influenced their career choice. For the majority of trainees, General Practice was not their first choice but just under half were considering it as a career. There were significant differences in career choices between the four Scottish regions and between the medical schools, with a greater proportion of those who studied in Aberdeen and Dundee Medical Schools opting for a career in General Practice. Undergraduate GP placement was reported as the strongest influence in favour of a career in General Practice followed by discussion with family and friends and discussion with speciality trainees. There were differences between medical schools in the way hospital placements, General Practice placements and role models influenced career choices. Career advice on General Practice was reported to be less available and more difficult to find.

  1. Career Paths in Environmental Sciences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Career paths, current and future, in the environmental sciences will be discussed, based on experiences and observations during the author's 40 + years in the field. An emphasis will be placed on the need for integrated, transdisciplinary systems thinking approaches toward achie...

  2. Career Paths in Environmental Sciences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Career paths, current and future, in the environmental sciences will be discussed, based on experiences and observations during the author's 40 + years in the field. An emphasis will be placed on the need for integrated, transdisciplinary systems thinking approaches toward achie...

  3. Career Paths in Sport Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Keri A.; Legg, Eric; Tanner, Preston; Timmerman, Danielle; Dustin, Daniel; Arthur-Banning, Skye G.

    2015-01-01

    Sport management alumni (N = 268) from five universities that offer undergraduate programs with an emphasis in sport management within departments of parks, recreation, and tourism were sampled via an electronic survey. The survey sought to learn where alumni were working, and how they felt about their career choice and undergraduate professional…

  4. Career Paths in Sport Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Keri A.; Legg, Eric; Tanner, Preston; Timmerman, Danielle; Dustin, Daniel; Arthur-Banning, Skye G.

    2015-01-01

    Sport management alumni (N = 268) from five universities that offer undergraduate programs with an emphasis in sport management within departments of parks, recreation, and tourism were sampled via an electronic survey. The survey sought to learn where alumni were working, and how they felt about their career choice and undergraduate professional…

  5. The Path to Career Success: High School Achievement, Certainty of Career Choice, and College Readiness Make a Difference. Issues In College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2009

    2009-01-01

    It is essential for all students to be ready for college and career when they graduate from high school. Postsecondary educators expect high school graduates to be prepared academically for success in postsecondary education, which in turn influences success in the work world. Employers continue to call for workers to have the tools needed to…

  6. Career Counseling as an Environmental Support: Exploring Influences on Career Choice, Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy, and Career Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makela, Julia Panke

    2011-01-01

    This study was motivated by concerns regarding the difficult academic and career choices facing today's college students as they navigate higher education and encounter career barriers along their paths. Using Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) as a primary framework, the study sought to understand the role that…

  7. Adolescent Childbearing as Career "Choice": Perspective from an Ecological Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrick, Elizabeth N.

    1995-01-01

    Childbearing among African American girls of lower socioeconomic status who are 16 to 21 years of age constitutes a "career choice" and an alternative, normative path within African American culture. The author addresses this choice from the perspective of vocational and developmental psychology. The views presented incorporate a…

  8. Coping with Career Indecision: Differences between Four Career Choice Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ki-Hak

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the applicability of Gianakos' [1999. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 54, 244-258] typology of career choice--stable, conventional, multiple-trial and unstable--to emotional coping with career indecision. Three hundred-twenty (Men = 203, Women = 117) Korean undergraduates were classified into Gianakos' four career choice types.…

  9. Coping with Career Indecision: Differences between Four Career Choice Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ki-Hak

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the applicability of Gianakos' [1999. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 54, 244-258] typology of career choice--stable, conventional, multiple-trial and unstable--to emotional coping with career indecision. Three hundred-twenty (Men = 203, Women = 117) Korean undergraduates were classified into Gianakos' four career choice types.…

  10. Women's career choices in radiology in France.

    PubMed

    Pyatigorskaya, N; Madson, M; Di Marco, L

    2017-07-27

    The purpose of this study was to determine the possible effects of gender on residents' and fellows' motivations in choosing radiology as a career in France, and on choosing a practice setting later on. An online survey was sent to French residents and fellows in order to access their radiology practice and career aspirations, as well as the potential influence of their gender. Influence of being a woman on initial professional expectations, professional choices, and the evolution of career paths was investigated using the chi-square test. Responses were collected from 206 French residents and fellows. The reasons for choosing radiology residency were, at first, mostly the same for men and women such as interest in the specialty (100% of women and men), work conditions (74% of women and men), technical aspects of the specialty (63% of men and 52% of women, P=0.11) or "reasonable" workload (29% women and 21% men, P=0.19); however, 74% of women stated that maternity might influence their career choices, and were less interested in unstable positions exclusively in private practice (45% men and 33% women, P=0.05). Male and female radiologists primarily considered the same factors in choosing their specialties. However, maternity is still a source of inequality in France, including fewer opportunities for fellowship positions or academic careers. Furthermore, more women were willing to work in salaried positions to acquire a secure job, even though compensation might be lower. Copyright © 2017 Editions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Free choice and career choice: Clerkship electives in medical education.

    PubMed

    Mihalynuk, Tanis; Leung, Gentson; Fraser, Joan; Bates, Joanna; Snadden, David

    2006-11-01

    Medical education experiences, particularly in clinical years, are reported determinants of career choice. Less is known about features of clinical education experiences including length, discipline, setting and choice, which may serve as landmarks in career choice decisions. This study's purpose was to explore the benefits of a free choice clerkship elective, and more specifically, its role in clarifying career choice. Using framework and content analysis methodology, we analysed University of British Columbia, third-year medical student anonymised assignments regarding free choice and 2-week clerkship elective experiences. This clerkship was designed to provide students with clerkship experiences outside the conventional curricular model, while encouraging student choice of ambulatory and community settings. Assignment questions included: reasons for choosing elective; whether learning objectives were met; influence of elective on career choice; and unique elective experiences. Iterative review, coding, analysis and indexing of assignments were carried out to identify themes and corroborate findings. Emergent themes included: positive views of experience; transferable knowledge and skills; and influencer of future education and career choices. Although students were encouraged to choose clerkship experiences outside the conventional curricular model, most students chose the elective to clarify future career decisions. This qualitative descriptive study highlights the influence of highly regarded, free choice clerkship elective experiences in the career decision making process in medical education. Further examination of the details of clerkship elective experiences which influence career choice is recommended.

  12. The Relationship between Career Choice Attitudes and Career Choice Competencies of Ninth-Grade Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study designed to determine whether or not Career Choice Attitudes and Career Choice Competencies are interrelated as hypothesized in the Crites' (1965, 1973a) model of career maturity. Resulting correlations appear to be mostly consistent with the model of career maturity. (Author)

  13. Effects of Career Choice Intervention on Components of Career Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivisto, Petri; Vinokur, Amiram D.; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    This randomized experimental study (N = 1,034) examines both the direct and the indirect effects of the Towards Working Life intervention on 2 components of adolescents' career preparation: preparedness for career choice and attitude toward career planning. The intervention comprised a 1-week workshop program, the proximal goals of which were to…

  14. Effects of Career Choice Intervention on Components of Career Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivisto, Petri; Vinokur, Amiram D.; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    This randomized experimental study (N = 1,034) examines both the direct and the indirect effects of the Towards Working Life intervention on 2 components of adolescents' career preparation: preparedness for career choice and attitude toward career planning. The intervention comprised a 1-week workshop program, the proximal goals of which were to…

  15. Career Paths for Managers in the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Loretta; Cray, David

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine the career paths of top-level managers in the arts. By analysing the training and work history of 23 managers in a variety of arts organisations we evaluate the utility of several existing theories for understanding careers that are characterised by low levels of initial knowledge, the absence of a clear method of entry…

  16. Gender Differences in Career Paths in Banking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Sandra; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed career paths of middle managers in bank. Study of matched pairs found that men (n=25) advanced faster and reached middle management through fewer promotions and positions than did women (n=25). Men had significantly more work experience outside of banking. In banking careers, men held more jobs in lending, whereas women occupied more…

  17. Gender Differences in Career Paths in Banking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Sandra; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed career paths of middle managers in bank. Study of matched pairs found that men (n=25) advanced faster and reached middle management through fewer promotions and positions than did women (n=25). Men had significantly more work experience outside of banking. In banking careers, men held more jobs in lending, whereas women occupied more…

  18. Ambivalent Journey: Teacher Career Paths in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W.; Al-Barwani, Thuwayba; Al Mawali, Fathiya; Green, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the career paths of 625 university graduates who prepared to be secondary school teachers in Oman, their assessment of their current work situation, and the extent to which their initial commitment to teaching was related to their subsequent career satisfaction and intention to remain in teaching. While nearly all graduates…

  19. Exploring Career Paths. A Guide for Students and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This five-section guide is designed to help students and their parents explore career paths. The first part of the guide is an introduction to the concept of career paths and an explanation of the steps students follow in exploring career paths. The second section, which makes up most of the booklet, covers five steps for exploring career paths:…

  20. Designing Dual Career Paths and Compensation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moravec, Milan; McKee, Beverly

    1990-01-01

    National Semiconductor, a worldwide firm with headquarters in California, designed dual career paths with the assistance of a compensation and benefits consulting firm. The approach to change was so effective, because of the paths, job evaluations, compensation structure, and the process, that others have adopted it. (JOW)

  1. Career Choice and Development. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Duane; And Others

    This book contains 12 papers examining established and newly emerging theories of career choice and development. Following prefaces to the third, second, and first editions by Duane Brown and Linda Brooks, the following papers are included: "Introduction to Theories of Career Development and Choice: Origins, Evolution, and Current Efforts" (Duane…

  2. Personality Differences in Career Choice Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Roth, Karl S.; Seibel, Hugo R.

    2004-01-01

    Vocational identity is an important construct for physician career development. Physician vocational development has been grouped into three tasks (crystallization, specification, and implementation) pertaining to career choice and specialty choice (1) In defining the construct of vocational identity, it has been suggested that the relation…

  3. Factors Influencing Career Choice among Police Recruits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative, non-experimental study examined the career choice factors of 154 (n = 154) police recruits to determine a correlation of age group generation to the five career choice factors presented in the Sibson Reward of Work Model. Law enforcement agencies faced a shortage of viable candidates to fill vacant positions. While extensive…

  4. Factors Influencing Career Choice among Police Recruits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative, non-experimental study examined the career choice factors of 154 (n = 154) police recruits to determine a correlation of age group generation to the five career choice factors presented in the Sibson Reward of Work Model. Law enforcement agencies faced a shortage of viable candidates to fill vacant positions. While extensive…

  5. Career Choice and Development. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Duane; And Others

    This book contains 12 papers examining established and newly emerging theories of career choice and development. Following prefaces to the third, second, and first editions by Duane Brown and Linda Brooks, the following papers are included: "Introduction to Theories of Career Development and Choice: Origins, Evolution, and Current Efforts" (Duane…

  6. Authentic science experiences as a vehicle to change students' orientations toward science and scientific career choices: Learning from the path followed by Brad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eijck, Michiel; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2009-09-01

    Bringing a greater number of students into science is one of, if not the most fundamental goals of science education for all, especially for heretofore-neglected groups of society such as women and Aboriginal students. Providing students with opportunities to experience how science really is enacted—i.e., authentic science—has been advocated as an important means to allow students to know and learn about science. The purpose of this paper is to problematize how "authentic" science experiences may mediate students' orientations towards science and scientific career choices. Based on a larger ethnographic study, we present the case of an Aboriginal student who engaged in a scientific internship program. We draw on cultural-historical activity theory to understand the intersection between science as practice and the mundane practices in which students participate as part of their daily lives. Following Brad, we articulate our understanding of the ways in which he hybridized the various mundane and scientific practices that intersected in and through his participation and by which he realized his cultural identity as an Aboriginal. Mediated by this hybridization, we observe changes in his orientation towards science and his career choices. We use this case study to revisit methodological implications for understanding the role of "authentic science experiences" in science education.

  7. Module for Business, Management, and Technology Career Path.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broeker, Arlene M.

    Designed for use with secondary students who have explored career paths and wish to pursue a career in business, management, and technology (BM&T), this module focuses on providing work-based learning experiences. Introductory materials include the following: career paths rationale and philosophy, benefits of using career paths, information on…

  8. In pursuit of balance: Why your career path is unique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbloom, N. A.; Phillips, A. S.; Hannay, C.

    2012-12-01

    When NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars in August 2012, the room at JPL erupted in applause. Among the onlookers were highly trained scientists, engineers, programmers, and technicians with a wide range of career paths. The individuals remain anonymous, but each had a key role in the success of the mission. Behind every successful scientific project are the individuals who support the mission with their knowledge, commitment and curiosity. Whether by preference, personality, or ambition, many highly trained and qualified scientists choose to support science from behind-the-scenes. For these scientists, a supporting role in research remains a satisfying career choice. Other scientists attempt to race up the position ladder, eagerly taking leadership and/or more public roles. How do you decide which role is right for you, and how do you find balance in your chosen career path?

  9. Career Choice in Academic Medicine: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Straus, Sharon E; Straus, Christine; Tzanetos, Katina

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To review systematically the evidence about what factors influence the decision to choose or not choose a career in academic medicine. DESIGN A systematic review of relevant literature from 1990 to May 2005. DATA SOURCES Searches of The Cochrane Library, Medline (using Ovid and PubMed) from 1990 to May 2005, and EMBASE from 1990 to May 2005 were completed to identify relevant studies that explored the influential factors. Additional articles were identified from searching the bibliographies of retrieved articles. SELECTION OF STUDIES We attempted to identify studies that included residents, fellows, or staff physicians. No restrictions were placed on the study methodologies identified and all articles presenting empirical evidence were retrieved. For cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies, minimum inclusion criteria were the presence of defined groups, and the ability to extract relevant data. For surveys that involved case series, minimum inclusion criteria were a description of the population, and the availability of extractable data. Minimum inclusion criteria for qualitative studies were descriptions of the sampling strategy and methods. RESULTS The search identified 251 abstracts; 25 articles were included in this review. Completion of an MD with a graduate degree or fellowship program is associated with a career in academic medicine. Of the articles identified in this review, this finding is supported by the highest quality of evidence. Similarly, the completion of research and publication of this research in medical school and residency are associated with a career in academic medicine. The desire to teach, conduct research, and the intellectual stimulation and challenge provided in academia may also persuade people to choose this career path. The influence of a role model or a mentor was reported by physicians to impact their decision making. Trainees' interest in academic medicine wanes as they progress through their residency

  10. Disabled nurses discover new career paths.

    PubMed

    Bemis, Patricia Ann

    2009-06-01

    When confronted with a disability, the steps learned from the nursing process help nurses maintain employability. The nursing process teaches nurses to gather information, evaluate the information, develop a plan, implement the plan, evaluate the outcome, modify the plan, implement again, etc. By following the process to modify their career paths and/or implement adaptive devices, nurses maintain their employability.

  11. Non-conventional vs. Conventional Career Paths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-06

    FAO / RAO “Through a combination of graduate education , language training, and in- country training, the FAO training program produces officers with...tough screening requirements) Many career choices are available for high potential Marine officers, such as foriegn area officer (FAO) / regional area...officer (RAO), special education program (SEP), and Marine special operations command (MARSOC). Additional opportunities specific for aviators: HMX

  12. Can "Word Choices" Compromise a Woman's Career?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    A letter of recommendation can catapult a woman into the next phase of the interview process for a particular job--or land her in the slush pile. Word choice in describing this female candidate can make or break her career. Letters of recommendation--especially when a reference's word choice paints a negative, less than stellar picture of the…

  13. Can "Word Choices" Compromise a Woman's Career?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    A letter of recommendation can catapult a woman into the next phase of the interview process for a particular job--or land her in the slush pile. Word choice in describing this female candidate can make or break her career. Letters of recommendation--especially when a reference's word choice paints a negative, less than stellar picture of the…

  14. Career Choice Anxiety, Coping, and Perceived Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Faye M.; Healy, Charles C.; Ender, Philip B.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a study exploring whether perceived control moderates the relation between coping with career indecision and choice anxiety among women in low-level jobs. Results revealed that perceived control interacted with problem-focused coping to increase accountable variance in choice anxiety. Discusses implications for interventions with women in…

  15. Career paths in physicians' postgraduate training - an eight-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Klaghofer, Richard

    2010-10-06

    To date, there are hardly any studies on the choice of career path in medical school graduates. The present study aimed to investigate what career paths can be identified in the course of postgraduate training of physicians; what factors have an influence on the choice of a career path; and in what way the career paths are correlated with career-related factors as well as with work-life balance aspirations. The data reported originates from five questionnaire surveys of the prospective SwissMedCareer Study, beginning in 2001 (T1, last year of medical school). The study sample consisted of 358 physicians (197 females, 55%; 161 males, 45%) participating at each assessment from T2 (2003, first year of residency) to T5 (2009, seventh year of residency), answering the question: What career do you aspire to have? Furthermore, personal characteristics, chosen specialty, career motivation, mentoring experience, work-life balance as well as workload, career success and career satisfaction were assessed. Career paths were analysed with cluster analysis, and differences between clusters analysed with multivariate methods. The cluster analysis revealed four career clusters which discriminated distinctly between each other: (1) career in practice, (2) hospital career, (3) academic career, and (4) changing career goal. From T3 (third year of residency) to T5, respondents in Cluster 1-3 were rather stable in terms of their career path aspirations, while those assigned to Cluster 4 showed a high fluctuation in their career plans. Physicians in Cluster 1 showed high values in extraprofessional concerns and often consider part-time work. Cluster 2 and 3 were characterised by high instrumentality, intrinsic and extrinsic career motivation, career orientation and high career success. No cluster differences were seen in career satisfaction. In Cluster 1 and 4, females were overrepresented. Trainees should be supported to stay on the career path that best suits his/her personal and

  16. Encouraging Minority Undergraduates to Choose Science Careers: Career Paths Survey Results

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Amy E. L.; Kogan, Deborah; Veazey, Brian D.; Sweeney, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    To explore the reasons for the dearth of minorities in Ph.D.-level biomedical research and identify opportunities to increase minority participation, we surveyed high-achieving alumni of an undergraduate biology enrichment program for underrepresented minorities. Respondents were asked to describe their career paths and to reflect on the influences that guided their career choices. We particularly probed for attitudes and experiences that influenced students to pursue a research career, as well as factors relevant to their choice between medicine (the dominant career choice) and basic science. In agreement with earlier studies, alumni strongly endorsed supplemental instruction as a mechanism for achieving excellence in basic science courses. Undergraduate research was seen as broadening by many and was transformative for half of the alumni who ultimately decided to pursue Ph.D.s in biomedical research. That group had expressed no interest in research careers at college entry and credits their undergraduate research experience with putting them on track toward a research career. A policy implication of these results is that making undergraduate research opportunities widely available to biology students (including “premed” students) in the context of a structured educational enrichment program should increase the number of minority students who choose to pursue biomedical Ph.D.s. PMID:19047426

  17. Ambivalent journey: Teacher career paths in Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David W.; Al-Barwani, Thuwayba; Mawali, Fathiya Al; Green, Elizabeth

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the career paths of 625 university graduates who prepared to be secondary school teachers in Oman, their assessment of their current work situation, and the extent to which their initial commitment to teaching was related to their subsequent career satisfaction and intention to remain in teaching. While nearly all graduates entered teaching, their decision was marked by ambivalence. Nearly half of the graduates reported being only somewhat or not at all committed to teaching as a career when they graduated. It also appears that initial commitment to teaching operates as an important lens through which teachers view their subsequent careers. Those initially more committed to teaching were more likely to be satisfied with the progress they made in their career, more likely to think that their current teaching position offered them opportunities for advancement, and more likely to want to remain in teaching than were graduates who had a lower initial commitment to teaching. The authors discuss both the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  18. Career Choices Among Saudi Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Faris, Eiad; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 253 final-year students at the four Saudi medical schools found the most frequently-chosen specialties were internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology. Over one-fourth were unsure of career choice. Gender differences were found. Most common locations for postgraduate training were Saudi Arabia and Canada, and a…

  19. Turning to Teaching: Gender and Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raggl, Andrea; Troman, Geoff

    2008-01-01

    As the largest public sector institution in the United Kingdom, education is a key site for studying the context of "choice" and changes in the identities of professional workers in contemporary society. Recruitment and retention problems in education have led to the creation of new routes into teaching to attract career changers from…

  20. Program to Combat Stereotyping in Career Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Laurie R.

    Divided into three sections which deal with sex, race, and handicap stereotyping in career choice, the twenty-eight programs described here attempt to combat stereotypes among students and/or staff (K-12). Most descriptions list the goals of the program, target population, staffing and management, facilities and activities, program effectiveness…

  1. Program to Combat Stereotyping in Career Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Laurie R.

    Divided into three sections which deal with sex, race, and handicap stereotyping in career choice, the twenty-eight programs described here attempt to combat stereotypes among students and/or staff (K-12). Most descriptions list the goals of the program, target population, staffing and management, facilities and activities, program effectiveness…

  2. MLS Students' Choice of a Library Career.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van House, Nancy A.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of library school students examined: (1) preferences influencing career choice; (2) reasons for getting an MLS; (3) comparisons with alternative occupations; (4) accuracy of expectations about salaries and placement; (5) comparison of expectations of students with and without previous library experience; and (6) differences between male…

  3. Career Choices Among Saudi Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Faris, Eiad; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 253 final-year students at the four Saudi medical schools found the most frequently-chosen specialties were internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology. Over one-fourth were unsure of career choice. Gender differences were found. Most common locations for postgraduate training were Saudi Arabia and Canada, and a…

  4. Choice and Commitment to a Military Career.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tziner, Aharon

    1983-01-01

    Examined the factors in the choice of a military career, using a theoretical model. A number of factors are identified, including a need for security, a tendency to conformity, role status, and professional development that may be lost upon leaving the army. (JAC)

  5. Science policy as an alternative career path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellows, Jack; Payne, Jeff; Horrigan, Sarah

    The article on “alternative” careers (Eos, March 15, 1994) was timely and apt. We would like to make two additional points: 1) research careers may soon become the “alternative” in an era of shrinking research budgets and 2) an area you did not include is science policy. The three of us have found productive, meaningful, and exciting positions in science policy at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) within the Executive Office of the President. We all are AGU members, and have followed a similar path: a congressional fellowship under the auspices of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, leading to OMB, where we believe we are making a difference. In addition, although many fellows choose to return to their former positions, or to move into new positions with government agencies, a fair number remain in the employ of the U.S. Congress.

  6. Career Choice Status among Undergraduates and the Influence of Career Management Competencies and Perceived Employability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Denise; Wilton, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the influence of career management competencies and perceived employability on career choice status (CCS) among undergraduates. Making informed and appropriate career choices is positively linked with well-being, work performance and academic and career success. Early career decision-making is now critical if students wish to…

  7. Reinventing Your Career: Following the 5 New Paths to Career Fulfillment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, David C.; Kritzell, Bryan

    This book is designed to help individuals reinvent their careers by analyzing the current state of their careers, identifying career objectives suited to their individual and family needs, and developing personal strategic action plans for achieving career fulfillment in five new career path options: corporate climber, new entrepreneur,…

  8. Reinventing Your Career: Following the 5 New Paths to Career Fulfillment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, David C.; Kritzell, Bryan

    This book is designed to help individuals reinvent their careers by analyzing the current state of their careers, identifying career objectives suited to their individual and family needs, and developing personal strategic action plans for achieving career fulfillment in five new career path options: corporate climber, new entrepreneur,…

  9. Career paths and personality in pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Cordina, Maria; Lauri, Mary-Anne; Lauri, Josef

    2012-12-01

    Pharmacists choose different career paths which may have different requirements in terms of demands and environments, irrespective of knowledge and intellectual capability. A contributing factor could be personality whereby pharmacists seek to work in an environment which is compatible with their personality. To explore the relationship between personality and career paths taken by pharmacists. Data regarding pharmacists' personality profile as determined by The Gordon Personal Profile Inventory (GPPI) were gathered using an anonymous survey. The inventory booklet was mailed to all pharmacists registered to practice in Malta who were at the time residing in the country. Demographic data and information regarding areas of practice was also gathered. Analysis was carried out using variety of statistical tests including t-test, Manova and Multiple Correspondence Analysis. Most of the types of pharmacists considered, lie somewhat close to the average categories of the GPPI attributes, with those who work in importation and wholesale being the ones who stand out most from the rest by scoring high on self esteem, ascendency, original thinking, vigour, sociability. Those who work in industry and, especially, in hospitals are the two categories of pharmacists who seem to score low on the GPPI traits in general, while those who work in the Community scored high in personal relations and are a little more likely to score higher in cautiousness and responsibility. Pharmacists are not a homogeneous group of individuals. It is evident that their personality is a significant factor in the career path that they have chosen. Not all pharmacists possess personalities that are conducive to patient-oriented practice. Those that do not primarily possess the latter personality traits, appear to have chosen to practice in non-traditional areas where, possibly, they have found a good fit with their personality and other factors.

  10. A Path-Analytic Model of Career Indecision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Bruce W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Tested a path model reflecting developmental and chronic types of career indecision on counseling students (N=164) and high school students (N=155). Data from both samples supported the model, confirming the role of trait anxiety in career indecision. (JAC)

  11. Children's Conceptions of Career Choice and Attainment: Model Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly A. S.; Walsh, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a model of children's conceptions of two key career development processes: career choice and career attainment. The model of children's understanding of career choice and attainment was constructed with developmental research and theory into children's understanding of allied phenomena such as their understanding of illness,…

  12. Variables impacting an academic pharmacy career choice.

    PubMed

    Sheaffer, Elizabeth A; Brown, Bonnie K; Byrd, Debbie C; Gupchup, Gireesh V; Mark, Scott M; Mobley Smith, Miriam A; Rospond, Raylene M

    2008-06-15

    To identify the variables associated with an academic pharmacy career choice among the following groups: final professional-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, pharmacy residents, pharmacy faculty members within the first 5 years of academic employment, and clinical pharmacy practitioners. A cross-sectional design Web-based survey instrument was developed using the online tool SurveyMonkey. The survey link was distributed via e-mail and postcards, and data were collected anonymously. Quantitative analyses were used to describe the 2,494 survey respondents and compare their responses to 25 variables associated with an academic pharmacy career choice. Logistic regression models were used to predict the motivators/deterrents associated with an academic pharmacy career choice for each participant group. Across all participant groups, the potential need to generate one's salary was the primary deterrent and autonomy, flexibility, and the ability to shape the future of the profession were the primary motivators. Final-year pharmacy students who considered a career in academic pharmacy were significantly deterred by grant writing. The overall sample of participants who considered an academic pharmacy career was more likely to be motivated by the academic environment and opportunities to teach, conduct professional writing and reviews, and participate in course design and/or assessment. This study demonstrates specific areas to consider for improved recruitment and retention of pharmacy faculty. For example, providing experiences related to pharmacy academia, such as allowing student participation in teaching and research, may stimulate those individuals' interest in pursuing an academic pharmacy career.

  13. What Should I Do with My Life? An Interview with Will Crouch on the Ethics of Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions college students face. However, little academic work exists to help students evaluate the ethical implications of different career paths. This interview with Will Crouch, an Oxford University student, explores his controversial work on the ethics of career choice. He argues that to pursue a…

  14. What Should I Do with My Life? An Interview with Will Crouch on the Ethics of Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions college students face. However, little academic work exists to help students evaluate the ethical implications of different career paths. This interview with Will Crouch, an Oxford University student, explores his controversial work on the ethics of career choice. He argues that to pursue a…

  15. Navigating the Path to a Biomedical Science Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Andrea McNeely

    The number of biomedical PhD scientists being trained and graduated far exceeds the number of academic faculty positions and academic research jobs. If this trend is compelling biomedical PhD scientists to increasingly seek career paths outside of academia, then more should be known about their intentions, desires, training experiences, and career path navigation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand the process through which biomedical PhD scientists are trained and supported for navigating future career paths. In addition, the study sought to determine whether career development support efforts and opportunities should be redesigned to account for the proportion of PhD scientists following non-academic career pathways. Guided by the social cognitive career theory (SCCT) framework this study sought to answer the following central research question: How does a southeastern tier 1 research university train and support its biomedical PhD scientists for navigating their career paths? Key findings are: Many factors influence PhD scientists' career sector preference and job search process, but the most influential were relationships with faculty, particularly the mentor advisor; Planned activities are a significant aspect of the training process and provide skills for career success; and Planned activities provided skills necessary for a career, but influential factors directed the career path navigated. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

  16. Career Path Suggestion using String Matching and Decision Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Akshay; P. Panda, Supriya

    2015-05-01

    High school and college graduates seemingly are often battling for the courses they should major in order to achieve their target career. In this paper, we worked on suggesting a career path to a graduate to reach his/her dream career given the current educational status. Firstly, we collected the career data of professionals and academicians from various career fields and compiled the data set by using the necessary information from the data. Further, this was used as the basis to suggest the most appropriate career path for the person given his/her current educational status. Decision trees and string matching algorithms were employed to suggest the appropriate career path for a person. Finally, an analysis of the result has been done directing to further improvements in the model.

  17. The Relationship between Career Maturity Test Scores and Appropriateness of Career Choices: A Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Attempted to replicate study determining relationship between appropriateness of career choices and career maturity test scores in rural ninth grade students (N=112) using Goal Selection scale of Career Maturity Inventory Competence Test and American College Testing Program Career Planning Program. Found two career maturity measures correlated…

  18. Personality Influences Career Choice: Sensation Seeking in Professional Musicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuust, Peter; Gebauer, Line; Hansen, Niels Chr.; Jorgensen, Stine Ramsgaard; Moller, Arne; Linnet, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Despite the obvious importance of deciding which career to pursue, little is known about the influence of personality on career choice. Here we investigated the relation between sensation seeking, a supposedly innate personality trait, and career choice in classical and "rhythmic" students at the academies of music in Denmark. We…

  19. Personality Influences Career Choice: Sensation Seeking in Professional Musicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuust, Peter; Gebauer, Line; Hansen, Niels Chr.; Jorgensen, Stine Ramsgaard; Moller, Arne; Linnet, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Despite the obvious importance of deciding which career to pursue, little is known about the influence of personality on career choice. Here we investigated the relation between sensation seeking, a supposedly innate personality trait, and career choice in classical and "rhythmic" students at the academies of music in Denmark. We…

  20. Family and Career Path Characteristics as Predictors of Women's Objective and Subjective Career Success: Integrating Traditional and Protean Career Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valcour, Monique; Ladge, Jamie J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of family and career path characteristics on objective and subjective career success among 916 employed mothers. Among family variables, age at first childbirth was positively related and career priority favoring the husband was negatively related to both income and subjective career success; number of children was…

  1. Family and Career Path Characteristics as Predictors of Women's Objective and Subjective Career Success: Integrating Traditional and Protean Career Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valcour, Monique; Ladge, Jamie J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of family and career path characteristics on objective and subjective career success among 916 employed mothers. Among family variables, age at first childbirth was positively related and career priority favoring the husband was negatively related to both income and subjective career success; number of children was…

  2. Unconscious Influences on Career Choice: Entrepreneur vs. Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malach-Pines, Ayala

    2003-01-01

    Explores unconscious influences on career choice using a psychoanalytic-existential framework. Case studies illustrate how internalized images of their fathers led two men to management and entrepreneurial careers and influenced later feelings of burnout. (Contains 72 references.) (SK)

  3. The choice of career of consultant psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Brook, P

    1981-04-01

    All consultants in general psychiatry appointed in Britain between 1 October 1975 and 30 September 1978 were sent a questionnaire asking about their training and adequacy of experience before making a final decision. Over a quarter of the respondents were women, of whom a third had trained part-time. Family circumstances and availability of part-time posts were important determinants. Overseas graduates formed another quarter. For many psychiatry was not their first love but availability of posts and status were important factors in choice of career. Many consultants felt they lacked experience in the subspecialties within psychiatry.

  4. Interrelationship of Career Choice Competencies and Career Choice Attitudes of Ninth-Grade Pupils: Testing Hypotheses Derived from Crites' Model of Career Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.

    1976-01-01

    Presents the results of a study examining whether the two dimensions of Career Choice Attitudes and Career Choice Competencies are interrelated as hypothesized in the Crites model of career maturity. To test six associational hypotheses derived from the Crites model three career maturity instruments were administered to ninth-grade pupils (N=90).…

  5. Perspectives on an alternative career path in regulatory science

    PubMed Central

    Fields, F. Owen

    2013-01-01

    Perspectives are provided on an alternative career path in regulatory science for those currently involved in basic biology research. This path is compared and contrasted with basic research, and factors to be examined if one is considering such a path are discussed. PMID:23846346

  6. Perspectives on an alternative career path in regulatory science.

    PubMed

    Fields, F Owen

    2013-07-01

    Perspectives are provided on an alternative career path in regulatory science for those currently involved in basic biology research. This path is compared and contrasted with basic research, and factors to be examined if one is considering such a path are discussed.

  7. A systems theory approach to career development: Exploring factors that affect science as a career choice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liskey, Brian K.

    This research project was designed to examine the factors that affect students' choice in a career. Specifically, the factors of (a) achievement, (b) interest, (c) self-efficacy, (d) perceived preparation for a career, and (e) being informed about a career will be under investigation. Of key importance to the study is how these factors can affect a student's perception about choosing a science career. A quantitative analysis of secondary data from the 2006 and 2009 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) international assessment and attitudinal questionnaire provided data on student perceptions and aptitude in science. The sample from PISA included over 400,000 15 year-old students from 57 countries. From the 57 countries, 30 countries, comprised by Organization for Economic and Cooperative Development (OECD), were isolated for analysis. Within this group of 30, 11 were selected for comparison based on their questionnaire response to expectations for a career in science at age 30. The Institute for Educational Science's, International Data Explorer was utilized to acquire and analyze data from the 2006 and 2009 PISA international tests and questionnaires to determine significance between scaled scores and PISA indices. Variables were chosen as factors affecting student's perception on various systems outlined by the Systems Theory of Career Development (Patton & McMahon, 1997) and the Systems Theory of Career Development Framework (Patton & McMahon, 1999). Four country groups were established based on student responses to question 30a from the 2006 PISA attitudinal questionnaire, which asks what career students expected to have at age 30. The results from comparing country groups showed that countries in Group A, which showed the highest values for students expecting a career in science, also had the highest average values for achievement on the PISA science literacy assessment. Likewise, countries that had the lowest values for expecting a career in

  8. Career Development Resource Guide and User's Guide for "Career Choices in North Carolina."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efird, Barbara M.

    Ways in which educators can help students develop the skills and strategies needed for the workplace are outlined in this Resource and User's Guide. It begins with a series of lesson plans that address career choices, the career planning process, education planning, career decision making, career trends, and job seeking skills. The guide then…

  9. Relational Influences on Career Paths: Siblings in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultheiss, Donna E. Palladino; Palma, Thomas V.; Predragovich, Krista S.; Glasscock, Julie M. Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    This investigation examined participants' perceptions of sibling relational influence on career exploration and decision making. Career path influence on sibling relationships and times when these relationships were most important also were explored. Individual interviews were conducted with urban commuter college students, and narrative data were…

  10. Charting a Career Path in the Information Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Leslie M.; Goodfellow, R. A. H.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the evolving roles of academic librarians as information professionals, and the resulting career development in terms of professional issues, organizational issues, technological concerns, and required competencies. A career path model is presented which delineates primary roles, psychological issues, and strategies for attaining…

  11. Relational Influences on Career Paths: Siblings in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultheiss, Donna E. Palladino; Palma, Thomas V.; Predragovich, Krista S.; Glasscock, Julie M. Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    This investigation examined participants' perceptions of sibling relational influence on career exploration and decision making. Career path influence on sibling relationships and times when these relationships were most important also were explored. Individual interviews were conducted with urban commuter college students, and narrative data were…

  12. Home Economics Education Career Path Guide and Model Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Northridge.

    This curriculum guide developed in California and organized in 10 chapters, provides a home economics education career path guide and model curriculum standards for high school home economics programs. The first chapter contains information on the following: home economics education in California, home economics careers for the future, home…

  13. Home Economics Education Career Path Guide and Model Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Northridge.

    This curriculum guide developed in California and organized in 10 chapters, provides a home economics education career path guide and model curriculum standards for high school home economics programs. The first chapter contains information on the following: home economics education in California, home economics careers for the future, home…

  14. Motivation towards medical career choice and future career plans of Polish medical students.

    PubMed

    Gąsiorowski, Jakub; Rudowicz, Elżbieta; Safranow, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    This longitudinal study aimed at investigating Polish medical students' career choice motivation, factors influencing specialty choices, professional plans and expectations. The same cohort of students responded to the same questionnaire, at the end of Year 1 and Year 6. The Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U tests and logistic regression were used in analyses. The results showed that altruistic and scientific reasons were the main motives for choosing a medical career. The motives remained stable over time. The effect of gender on altruistic motivation was stronger at the end of the study, with females' rating higher. The most favored career paths were associated with non-primary care specializations and work in a hospital. Results of the multivariate logistic regression showed that primary care specializations were more attractive to females, final year students, those from small agglomerations, and those less concerned about high earnings. Preferences regarding sector of work were formed at later stages of training. A preference shift was observed, between Year 1 and Year 6, towards favoring work in the public sector. Predictors of the desire to work in the public sector were: being a male and the final year student, paying less attention to high earnings, wanting certainty of finding work, having a stronger need for interesting and socially important work. A significant decline in the level of interest in seeking employment abroad was observed with the progress of studies. Our findings are likely to provide useful information for educators, policy planners and policy makers.

  15. Factors in Career Choice among US Nephrologists

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Gearoid M.; Thomas, Lynette; Tucker, J. Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives There is a projected shortage of kidney specialists, and retention of trainees in nephrology is important. Determining factors that result in choosing a nephrology career could inform future strategies to attract nephrology fellows. Design, settings, participants, & measurements An anonymous, internet-based survey was sent to members of the American Society of Nephrology in June 2009. Respondents answered questions about demographics, training background, and career choices. Results Of the 3399 members, 913 (23%) returned the survey. Mean age was 51.1±10.5 years, and 46.1% were academic nephrologists. In addition, 38.4% of respondents graduated between 2000 and 2009. Interest in nephrology began early in training, with the intellectual aspects of nephrology, early mentoring, and participation in nephrology electives named as the most common reasons in choosing nephrology. Academic nephrologists were more likely to have participated in research in medical school, have a master’s degree or PhD, and successfully obtained research funding during training. Academic debt was higher among nonacademic nephrologists. Research opportunities and intellectual stimulation were the main factors for academic nephrologists when choosing their first postfellowship positions, whereas geographic location and work-life balance were foremost for nonacademic nephrologists. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of exposing medical students and residents to nephrology early in their careers through involvement in research, electives, and positive mentoring. Further work is needed to develop and implement effective strategies, including increasing early exposure to nephrology in preclinical and clinical years, as well as encouraging participation in research, in order to attract future nephrology trainees. PMID:22956263

  16. Career Specialty Choice: A Combined Research-Intervention Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leong, F.T.L.; Hardin, E.E.; Gaylor, M.

    2005-01-01

    This research describes and evaluates a workshop aimed at promoting career specialty choice and examines relationships between measured career specialty interests, work values, and personality type. Three consecutive classes of second-year medical students (N=161) participated in a two-session specialty choice workshop. All participants in the…

  17. A Canonical Analysis of Career Choice Crystallization and Vocational Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blustein, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Administered measures of vocational maturity and career choice crystallization to 158 community college students. Used canonical analysis to identify relationships between age, gender, career choice crystallization, and vocational maturity. Analysis yielded one significant canonical root, indicating most shared variance between variables was…

  18. Factors Influencing Career Choice of Management Students in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwala, Tanuja

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the influence of a range of factors on the career choice of management students in India. The importance of different individuals in the family and at work in making career choices among these students is also to be explored. In addition, the study seeks to address the relationship of the cultural values of…

  19. Factors Influencing Career Choice of Management Students in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwala, Tanuja

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the influence of a range of factors on the career choice of management students in India. The importance of different individuals in the family and at work in making career choices among these students is also to be explored. In addition, the study seeks to address the relationship of the cultural values of…

  20. Using Person Matching to Predict Career Specialty Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, Paul J.; Borges, Nicole J.; Jones, Bonnie J.

    2005-01-01

    Person matching promotes career exploration and choice by linking persons to persons in occupations based on inventory profile score similarity. We examined the efficacy of the procedure for career specialty choice. Medical students (N=196 women, 224 men) responded to the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) in their first year of…

  1. Using Person Matching to Predict Career Specialty Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, Paul J.; Borges, Nicole J.; Jones, Bonnie J.

    2005-01-01

    Person matching promotes career exploration and choice by linking persons to persons in occupations based on inventory profile score similarity. We examined the efficacy of the procedure for career specialty choice. Medical students (N=196 women, 224 men) responded to the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) in their first year of…

  2. Bridging the Gap: Career Paths in Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with three Native American telecommunications professionals explore careers in telecommunications for Native Americans. Included are discussions of the importance of telecommunications, courses and technical skills needed for various telecommunications careers, types of telecommunications degrees available, the importance of mentors and…

  3. Bridging the Gap: Career Paths in Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with three Native American telecommunications professionals explore careers in telecommunications for Native Americans. Included are discussions of the importance of telecommunications, courses and technical skills needed for various telecommunications careers, types of telecommunications degrees available, the importance of mentors and…

  4. Career Paths and Organizational Development: Expanding Alliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernes, K. B.; Magnusson, K. C.

    The Synergistic Model of Organizational Career Development is an attempt to combine best practice principles from two domains: organizational development and individual career planning. The model assumes three levels of intervention within an organization: philosophical, strategic, and practical. Interventions at any of the levels may be directed…

  5. Career choice selection and satisfaction among US adult nephrology fellows.

    PubMed

    Shah, Hitesh H; Jhaveri, Kenar D; Sparks, Matthew A; Mattana, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Although many anticipate that there will be an eventual shortage of practicing nephrologists, a complete understanding is lacking regarding the current factors that lead US adult nephrology fellows to choose nephrology as a career and their satisfaction with this choice. It is of great concern that interest in obtaining nephrology fellowship training continues to decline in the United States, especially among US medical graduates, and the reasons for this are unclear. The exposure that students and residents have to nephrology is likely to play an important role in the career choices that they make and their ultimate satisfaction with this career choice is likely influenced by several factors, including job opportunities. Some of the findings presented here suggest that there may be a high percentage of nephrology fellows who are dissatisfied with their career choice. Failure to understand the factors that influence trainees to choose nephrology as a career and those that affect their satisfaction with this choice may impair the ability to graduate a sufficient number of nephrologists to meet projected demand. In this article, a number of variables related to the choice of nephrology as a career and satisfaction with a career in nephrology are discussed. Some steps that the nephrology training community might take to help promote interest in nephrology and optimize the satisfaction that nephrology graduates derive from their careers are also proposed.

  6. Disgust sensitivity and the 'non-rational' aspects of a career choice in surgery.

    PubMed

    Consedine, Nathan S; Yu, Tzu-Chieh; Hill, Andrew G; Windsor, John A

    2013-03-15

    Fitting trainee physicians to career paths remains an ongoing challenge in a highly fluid health workforce environment. Studies attempting to explain low interest in surgical careers have typically examined the relative impact of career and lifestyle values. The current work argues that emotional proclivities are potentially more important and that disgust sensitivity may help explain both low surgical interest as well as the tendency for female students to avoid surgical careers. 216 medical students attending a required course in human behaviour completed measures of career intention, traditional predictors of career intention and dispositional disgust sensitivity. As predicted, logistic regression showed that greater disgust sensitivity predicted lower surgical career intention even when controlling for traditional career values (OR=0.45, 95%CI=0.21-0.95). Additionally, the gender effect indexing low female interest in surgical careers was no longer significant once disgust sensitivity was added to the model. The impact of disgust sensitivity on surgical interest was substantial and on par with established predictors of career intention. Disgust sensitivity may represent a potentially modifiable factor impacting surgical career choice, particularly among female students who are typically more disgust sensitive.

  7. Recent trends in resident career choices after plastic surgery training.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Fernando A; Chang, Eric I; Suliman, Ahmed; Tseng, Charles Y; Bradley, James P

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the initial career choice of plastic surgery residents after completion of training during the last five years and to identify any factors that may influence choice of career path. Demographic data were obtained from graduates of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited US plastic surgery residency programs between the years of 2005 and 2010. The type of practice and pursuit of fellowship were recorded for each graduate. Sex, age at graduation, marital status, dependents, advanced degrees, previous research, type of training program, primary residency, and length of plastic surgery training were also documented. Comparison of outcomes between the two plastic surgery training pathways (integrated vs independent) was analyzed. Data were collected for 424 graduates from 37 different training programs. Of these programs, 11% were from the West coast, 32% from Midwest, 33% from East coast, and 24% from the South. Seventy-nine percent of residents were male, mean age at graduation was 35 (2.89) years. Forty-nine percent of residents were married, 30% had one or more dependents, 6% had advanced degrees, and 18% had previous research experience. Fifty-eight percent of graduates were from independent programs. Forty-eight percent of residents pursued private practice immediately after graduation, 8% pursued academic practice, 41% pursued specialty fellowships, and 3% had military commitments. Most of the residents chose to pursue private practice on completion of residency. Independent residents were significantly more likely to pursue private practice immediately compared to integrated/combined residents. No other factors were significant for practice choice.

  8. Career Ladders: Choices for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelking, Jeri L.; Samuelson, Everett V.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a career ladder model intended as a guide to be implemented according to the particular circumstances of a school district. Addresses longitudinal career plans and enhancement of the professional work place. (SRT)

  9. Attachment, Career-Choice Pessimism, and Intrinsic Motivation as Predictors of College Students' Career Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Yun-Jeong; Lee, Ji-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-cultural validity of the effects of attachment, career-choice pessimism, and intrinsic motivation on career adaptability (CA) in American (n = 198) and Korean (n = 294) college students. We hypothesized that the association between attachment and CA is sequentially mediated by career-choice…

  10. Occupational Resources: Career Information. CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education). [Grade 5].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Hudson Migrant Education Center, New Paltz, NY.

    Designed to teach migrant students about the world of work and how academic subjects relate to jobs and careers, this illustrated CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education) Occupational Resources text provides career and job information and basic job market entry skills information for junior and senior high school students written at a…

  11. Occupational Resources: Career Information. CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education). [Grade 3].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Hudson Migrant Education Center, New Paltz, NY.

    Designed to teach migrant students about the world of work and how academic subjects relate to jobs and careers, this illustrated CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education) Occupational Resources text provides career and job information and basic job market entry skills information for junior and senior high school students written at a…

  12. Promoting nursing as a career choice.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Fewer young people are considering nursing as a career. This project was designed to present nursing as a viable career option to middle school students. A questionnaire was administered to six classes of middle school students before and after a presentation on nursing as a career. Results showed the presentation improved student attitudes and perceptions toward nursing as a career. Nurses can use this project as a stepping stone to develop additional programs to interest students in nursing as a career before the students discard the notion altogether.

  13. Shortcuts to Long-Term Career Paths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Cynthia W.; Nelson, Gary L.

    In the continuing search for skilled workers, employers are increasingly looking to community colleges as the primary training providers for welfare recipients, unemployed workers, and those seeking to increase skills and improve careers. Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) (North Carolina) provides individuals with the skills and education…

  14. Warriors on the Path to Academic Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poodry, Clifton A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical engineer Robert Whitman and microbiologist Gilbert John have pursued academic careers in order to advance their own research and serve as role models for Native American students. After receiving Ph.D.s, Whitman and John were appointed assistant professors at research-oriented universities. Sidebar addresses the role Native American…

  15. Warriors on the Path to Academic Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poodry, Clifton A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical engineer Robert Whitman and microbiologist Gilbert John have pursued academic careers in order to advance their own research and serve as role models for Native American students. After receiving Ph.D.s, Whitman and John were appointed assistant professors at research-oriented universities. Sidebar addresses the role Native American…

  16. The Relationship of Ethnic Identity and Gender Role Attitudes to the Development of Career Choice Goals among Black and Latina Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gushue, George V.; Whitson, Melissa L.

    2006-01-01

    This study is a preliminary exploration of how individual differences in gender role attitudes and ethnic identity might be related to career decision self-efficacy and the gender traditionality of career choice goals in a sample of 102 9th-grade Black and Latina girls. Extending social-cognitive career theory, the authors examined 2 path models…

  17. The Relationship of Ethnic Identity and Gender Role Attitudes to the Development of Career Choice Goals among Black and Latina Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gushue, George V.; Whitson, Melissa L.

    2006-01-01

    This study is a preliminary exploration of how individual differences in gender role attitudes and ethnic identity might be related to career decision self-efficacy and the gender traditionality of career choice goals in a sample of 102 9th-grade Black and Latina girls. Extending social-cognitive career theory, the authors examined 2 path models…

  18. A Content Analysis of Women's Career Choices in Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Tonya R.

    2010-01-01

    A feminist content analysis of 81 films was conducted as a means to assist mental health practitioners in guiding the career choices of young women and to explore the possibilities for change through this medium. The review of the 117 lead female characters revealed themes including: the idea that relationships should be secondary to careers in…

  19. A Content Analysis of Women's Career Choices in Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Tonya R.

    2010-01-01

    A feminist content analysis of 81 films was conducted as a means to assist mental health practitioners in guiding the career choices of young women and to explore the possibilities for change through this medium. The review of the 117 lead female characters revealed themes including: the idea that relationships should be secondary to careers in…

  20. CHOICES: Evaluation and Analysis of Effect on Career Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Tom L.

    Participants in CHOICES, a computerized career information program, were 40 female and 9 male freshmen psychology students at the University of Missouri at Columbia. After 4 weeks of program work, a questionnaire to assess a broad range of career-related concerns was administered to the participants and to a quasi-control group of 19 female and 7…

  1. Medical Students' Perceptions of Psychiatry as a Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Janis L.; Alspector, Sharon L.; Harding, Kelli J.; Wright, Leslie L.; Graham, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study describes medical students' perceptions of the field of psychiatry and identifies the impact of those perceptions on their career choices in order to explore the questions: Are we as a field doing all that we can to enhance the educational experience of all medical students, regardless of their career preferences? What are…

  2. Undergraduate female science-related career choices: A phenomenological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Kathy S.

    This qualitative phenomenological study used a modified Groenewald's five steps method with semi-structured, recorded, and transcribed interviews to focus on the underrepresentation of females in science-related careers. The study explored the lived experiences of a purposive sample of 25 senior female college students attending a college in Macon, Georgia. Ten major themes emerged from the research study that included (a) journey to a science-related career; (b) realization of career interest; (c) family support (d) society's role; (e) professors' treatment of students; (f) lack of mentors and models; (g) gender and career success; (h) females and other disadvantages in science-related careers; (i) rewards of the journey; and (j) advice for the journey. The three minor themes identified were (a) decision-making; (b) career awareness; and (c) guidance. The key findings revealed that females pursuing a science degree or subsequent science-related career, shared their experience with other females interested in science as a career choice, dealt with barriers standing in the way of their personal goals, lack role models, and received little or no support from family and friends. The study findings may offer information to female college students interested in pursuing science-related careers and further foundational research on gender disparities in career choice.

  3. Factors influencing career choice among medical students interested in surgery.

    PubMed

    Azizzadeh, Ali; McCollum, Charles H; Miller, Charles C; Holliday, Kelly M; Shilstone, Holly C; Lucci, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    The number of applicants to general surgery programs has recently declined. We set out to determine factors that influence career choice among medical students. survey; university medical center; fourth-year medical students; distribution and completion of the survey. PARTICIPANTS ranked 18 items coded on a Likert scale from 1 (not important) to 8 (very important). These factors were career opportunities, academic opportunities, experience on core rotation/subinternship, role model(s) in that specialty (mentors), length of training required, lifestyle during residency, work hours during residency, ability to obtain residency position, concern about loans/debt, call schedule, lifestyle after training, work hours after training, financial rewards after training, intellectual challenge, patient relationships/interaction, prestige, future patient demographics, and gender distribution in the specialty. Students were asked to provide gender, career choice, number of programs they applied to, and the number of programs at which they were interviewed. A total of 111 of the 160 surveys distributed were returned (69%). A total of 48 of the students were men, 31 were women, and 32 did not identify their gender. Nineteen students were interested in pursuing a career in surgery or a surgical subspecialty. Factors predicting surgery as a career choice were career opportunities (p < 0.04) and prestige (p < 0.003). Lifestyle during residency (p < 0.0007), work hours during residency (p < 0.008), and quality of patient/physician relationships (p < 0.05) were all significantly negatively correlated with the choice of a surgical career. Students pursuing a surgical career applied to greater than 31 programs compared with 11 to 15 for the nonsurgical students (p < 0.0001). Prestige and career opportunities are more important to students seeking surgical residencies. Concerns about lifestyle and work hours during residency and perceived quality of patient/physician relationships were

  4. Gender Equity and Nontraditional Career Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Carol A., Ed.

    This booklet is intended to help counselors guide high school students in exploring nontraditional career options. It provides a brief historical perspective on the significance gender role stereotyping has had on U.S. society in the past, the impact it continues to have on the career decisions being made by current generations of young men and…

  5. Impact of Retirement Choices of Early Career Marines: A Choice Analysis Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    benefits packages. Through the use of advanced multivariate statistical analysis , we will estimate the utility that different aspects of a career package...their answers. This CHR report aims to provide details of the successful application of choice analysis in two real life scenarios. The details...CHOICES OF EARLY CAREER MARINES: A CHOICE ANALYSIS MODEL by André G. La Taste Aaron Masaitis March 2013 Thesis Advisor: Michael Dixon

  6. The Importance of Good Communication Skills on "IS" Career Paths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkin, Mark G.

    1996-01-01

    Examines whether the same good writing and speaking skills required in general management positions are also important in computer jobs. Discusses the marriage between "computing" and "communicating" and what roles good communication skills play in advancing IS (information systems) career paths. Concludes that communication…

  7. Emotional Intelligence Abilities and Traits in Different Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafetsios, Konstantinos; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Aikaterini; Zammuner, Vanda L.; Zampetakis, Leonidas A.; Vouzas, Fotios

    2009-01-01

    Two studies tested hypotheses about differences in emotional intelligence (EI) abilities and traits between followers of different career paths. Compared to their social science peers, science students had higher scores in adaptability and general mood traits measured with the Emotion Quotient Inventory, but lower scores in strategic EI abilities…

  8. Emotional Intelligence Abilities and Traits in Different Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafetsios, Konstantinos; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Aikaterini; Zammuner, Vanda L.; Zampetakis, Leonidas A.; Vouzas, Fotios

    2009-01-01

    Two studies tested hypotheses about differences in emotional intelligence (EI) abilities and traits between followers of different career paths. Compared to their social science peers, science students had higher scores in adaptability and general mood traits measured with the Emotion Quotient Inventory, but lower scores in strategic EI abilities…

  9. Tracking the Career Paths of Marketing and Business Education Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Carol; Haltinner, Urs; Stanislawski, Debbie

    2006-01-01

    Marketing and business education faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) recently conducted a longitudinal study, spanning the entire 35 years of the program's existence, describing and analyzing its graduates' career paths. Data was collected through a questionnaire that utilized a combination of Likert-type responses, open-ended…

  10. The Career Paths of Primary School Principals in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ummanel, Azize; McNamara, Gerry; Stynes, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The key purpose of this paper is to offer an exploration of the career paths of a number of Irish school principals. The information presented is part of a comparative study in the area, involving three island states: Cyprus, Malta and Ireland. The study provides an insight into how individuals become principals and how they perceive themselves in…

  11. Hispanic Women's Perceptions of Their Career Paths in Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario-Schoenfeld, Wanda I.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to understand the perceptions of nine Latinas of Puerto Rican descent from an urban district in New York State about their career paths in the field of educational administration. Story narratives developed through semi-structured autobiographical interviews comprised the main data source. The findings indicated that interactions…

  12. The Career Paths of Primary School Principals in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ummanel, Azize; McNamara, Gerry; Stynes, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The key purpose of this paper is to offer an exploration of the career paths of a number of Irish school principals. The information presented is part of a comparative study in the area, involving three island states: Cyprus, Malta and Ireland. The study provides an insight into how individuals become principals and how they perceive themselves in…

  13. Survey and Analysis of Surface Warfare Officer Career Path Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    this specialization alternative are discussed in Swinger [Ref. 2:pp. 98-100]. 1. Hypothesis 1 The null hypothesis states that each specialization...Maior Career Path Change (NPRDC TN 89-5), Navy Personnel Research and Development Center, October 1988. 2. Swinger , A., "Talent at Sea," U. S. Naval

  14. Hispanic Women's Perceptions of Their Career Paths in Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario-Schoenfeld, Wanda I.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to understand the perceptions of nine Latinas of Puerto Rican descent from an urban district in New York State about their career paths in the field of educational administration. Story narratives developed through semi-structured autobiographical interviews comprised the main data source. The findings indicated that interactions…

  15. Career Paths in Educational Leadership: Examining Principals' Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parylo, Oksana; Zepeda, Sally J.; Bengtson, Ed

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study analyzes the career path narratives of active principals. Structural narrative analysis was supplemented with sociolinguistic theory and thematic narrative analysis to discern the similarities and differences, as well as the patterns in the language used by participating principals. Thematic analysis found four major themes…

  16. Career Paths in Educational Leadership: Examining Principals' Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parylo, Oksana; Zepeda, Sally J.; Bengtson, Ed

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study analyzes the career path narratives of active principals. Structural narrative analysis was supplemented with sociolinguistic theory and thematic narrative analysis to discern the similarities and differences, as well as the patterns in the language used by participating principals. Thematic analysis found four major themes…

  17. Mentoring and Leadership: A Practical Application for One's Career Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Kevin; Moore, Holly

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores mentoring and mentorship at the beginning and ending of one's career path and the role of mentoring in the process. It frames the mentoring and leadership discussion using the lens of a first year teacher in a LaSallian elementary school in Browning, Montana, on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. Topics examined in this paper…

  18. Examination about the effects of future career choice on time perspective in Japanese high school students.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Manabu

    2015-03-30

    This study investigated types of career choice in high school students and examined the effects of career paths on time perspective development. The participants were 4,756 third grade students from nine public high schools in Tokyo. The high school questionnaire survey was conducted throughout autumn of 2008, 2009, and 2010. One year later, 962 graduates participated in the follow-up questionnaire survey by post. Distinguishing gender difference among career paths was found. Girls tend to choose significantly shorter learning careers (p < .01), for example junior college or vocational school in comparison to boys. Career indecision, i.e., students who could not set a concrete future career in high school, had significantly more negative time perspective than other groups (p < .05), which was caused by a deficiency of their basic cognitive ability. Longitudinal data showed different patterns of fluctuation in time perspective between "school to school transition" and "school to work transition". It is suggested that the "school to work transition" tends to be more critical for adolescents and has negative effects on time perspective. These results suggest that the goal content in careers may promote or inhibit the formation of time perspectives during the graduation transition.

  19. Direct Patient Care: A Viable Career Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colavecchio, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    Examines nurses' attitudes about direct patient care in hospitals. Suggests a new perspective on nursing careers, one that should stimulate nursing administrators' thinking about developing programs that retain experienced clinicians, reward their practice, and acknowledge their contributions. (JOW)

  20. Risk and Career Choice: Evidence from Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caner, Asena; Okten, Cagla

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the college major choice decision in a risk and return framework using university entrance exam data from Turkey. Specifically we focus on the choice between majors with low income risk such as education and health and others with riskier income streams. We use a unique dataset that allows us to control for the choice set…

  1. Risk and Career Choice: Evidence from Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caner, Asena; Okten, Cagla

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the college major choice decision in a risk and return framework using university entrance exam data from Turkey. Specifically we focus on the choice between majors with low income risk such as education and health and others with riskier income streams. We use a unique dataset that allows us to control for the choice set…

  2. Career Choice and Primary Care in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Schiess, Nicoline; Ibrahim, Halah; Shaban, Sami; Perez, Maria Nichole; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Background  The low number of medical trainees entering primary care is contributing to the lack of access to primary care services in many countries. Despite the need for primary care physicians in the Middle East, there is limited information regarding trainees' career choices, a critical determinant in the supply of primary care physicians. Objective  We analyzed the career choices of medical students in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), with a larger goal of reforming postgraduate training in the region and enhancing the focus on primary care. Methods  We conducted a cross-sectional survey of applicants to a large established internal medicine residency program in the UAE. We calculated data for demographics, subspecialty choice, and factors affecting subspecialty choice, and we also reported descriptive statistics. Results  Our response rate was 86% (183 of 212). Only 25% of applicants (n = 46) were interested in general internal medicine. The majority of respondents (n = 126, 69%) indicated a desire to pursue subspecialty training, and the remainder chose careers in research or administration. A majority of respondents (73%) were women, unmarried, and childless. Educational debt or lifestyle were not indicated as important factors in career choice. Conclusions  Low interest in primary care was similar to that in many Western countries, despite a much higher percentage of female applicants and a reduced emphasis on lifestyle or income factors in career decisions. Reasons for the reduced interest in primary care deserve further exploration, as do tests of interventions to increase interest, such as improving the primary care clerkship experience. PMID:26692983

  3. Patterns of Career Choice and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gianakos, Irene

    1999-01-01

    A study of 172 subjects revealed four career-choice patterns developed in late adolescence/early adulthood: stable, conventional, multiple-trial, and unstable. The stable and multiple-trial groups had significantly higher career decision-making self-efficacy than the other two. The stable group was more likely to have professionals in their chosen…

  4. Project CHOICE. #63. A Career Unit for Grades 5 and 6. Physicians. (Health Occupations Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Physicians, is one in a series of curriculum guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking 5th and 6th grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. These eleven lessons about physicians explore…

  5. Internet Courses for Career Path Redirections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, David

    2011-03-01

    The Internet provides a cost-efficient means to reach out to larger audiences, not only to graduate students soon to enter the work force, but also to practicing scientists and engineers who wish to update their own knowledge base and perhaps consider new career directions. In this presentation we describe experience with several graduate courses at the University of California, Berkeley, that were broadcast live over the internet and posted first as Google videos and later at www.youtube.com. Full graduate class lectures, typically 28 per class, together with all presentation materials available for download, plus homeworks (and solutions upon request) are found at www.coe.berkeley.edu/AST/srms and www.coe.berkeley.edu/AST/sxr2009. The video lectures are also available at www.youtube.com by clicking on ``videos'' and then searching ``david attwood''. Based on e-mail queries and personal feedback it is clear that the lectures are widely viewed, both as training lectures in industry and as classes at various universities worldwide.

  6. Awareness of the Public versus Private Accounting Divide, and Its Impact on the Career Path Preference of Accounting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossman, H. Anthony

    2017-01-01

    This research assesses what knowledge upper-level accounting students possess about the distinctions between the public and private branches of accounting, as well as the influence such knowledge might have on their accounting branch choice. Overall, the study concluded that, before they were aware of the pros and cons of each career path,…

  7. Student Perceptions of Science Ability, Experiences, Expectations, and Career Choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherney, Michael; Cherney, I.

    2006-12-01

    The decision to study physics or astronomy is affected by many factors, including preferences, motivations, and expectations for success. Differing cognitive profiles contribute to the learning of science through a complex process in which intrinsic capacities are tuned both by everyday experience and by instruction. In an attempt to identify the developmental pathways and intrinsic factors that most strongly influence the choice to study science, we administered an extensive survey to a sample of 400 students. The survey questions were based on Eccles et al.’s model of achievement-related choices and findings showing that previous play experiences, spatial experiences, task beliefs, as well as perceived mathematics ability, motivational and personality characteristics affect mathematics achievement and science career choices. The perceptions of students planning a science career are compared with those planning a career in other areas. Gender differences are also discussed.

  8. Influencers of career choice among allied health students.

    PubMed

    Brown-West, A P

    1991-01-01

    This study focused on the factors that influence students' choice of an allied health profession. A survey of 153 students in three allied health programs at the University of Connecticut revealed that "the need to help others," "prestige," "professional autonomy," "opportunities for advancement," "income potential," and "the effect of the specialty on family and personal life," were the major influencers of career choice among allied health students. Only a few students regarded malpractice suits and AIDS as negative influencers. While medical laboratory science majors regarded these as important factors, dietetics and physical therapy majors did not. The article suggests further use of these findings by program directors and career counselors.

  9. Twenty Five Years in Cheminformatics - A Career Path ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Antony Williams is a Computational Chemist at the US Environmental Protection Agency in the National Center for Computational Toxicology. He has been involved in cheminformatics and the dissemination of chemical information for over twenty-five years. He has worked for a Fortune 500 company (Eastman Kodak), in two successful start-ups (ACD/Labs and ChemSpider), for the Royal Society of Chemistry (in publishing) and, now, at the EPA. Throughout his career path he has experienced multiple diverse work cultures and focused his efforts on understanding the needs of his employers and the often unrecognized needs of a larger community. Antony will provide a short overview of his career path and discuss the various decisions that helped motivate his change in career from professional spectroscopist to website host and innovator, to working for one of the world's foremost scientific societies and now for one of the most impactful government organizations in the world. Invited Presentation at ACS Spring meeting at CINF: Careers in Chemical Information session

  10. Motivation towards Medical Career Choice and Future Career Plans of Polish Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasiorowski, Jakub; Rudowicz, Elzbieta; Safranow, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study aimed at investigating Polish medical students' career choice motivation, factors influencing specialty choices, professional plans and expectations. The same cohort of students responded to the same questionnaire, at the end of Year 1 and Year 6. The Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U tests and logistic regression were used in…

  11. Motivation towards Medical Career Choice and Future Career Plans of Polish Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasiorowski, Jakub; Rudowicz, Elzbieta; Safranow, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study aimed at investigating Polish medical students' career choice motivation, factors influencing specialty choices, professional plans and expectations. The same cohort of students responded to the same questionnaire, at the end of Year 1 and Year 6. The Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U tests and logistic regression were used in…

  12. [Feliks Karol Koneczny - academic career path].

    PubMed

    Biliński, Piotr

    2005-01-01

    anthropology, sociology, philosophy, theology, ethnology, psychology, economics, history and law. This list, impressive as it may be, fails to do justice to the moral and personal dimension of his work. This loner by choice was the creator of Polish philosophy of history, a major Catholic thinker, a university professor and humanist in the most significant sense of the word.

  13. Encouraging Minority Undergraduates to Choose Science Careers: Career Paths Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarejo, Merna; Barlow, Amy E. L.; Kogan, Deborah; Veazey, Brian D.; Sweeney, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    To explore the reasons for the dearth of minorities in Ph.D.-level biomedical research and identify opportunities to increase minority participation, we surveyed high-achieving alumni of an undergraduate biology enrichment program for underrepresented minorities. Respondents were asked to describe their career paths and to reflect on the…

  14. Encouraging Minority Undergraduates to Choose Science Careers: Career Paths Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarejo, Merna; Barlow, Amy E. L.; Kogan, Deborah; Veazey, Brian D.; Sweeney, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    To explore the reasons for the dearth of minorities in Ph.D.-level biomedical research and identify opportunities to increase minority participation, we surveyed high-achieving alumni of an undergraduate biology enrichment program for underrepresented minorities. Respondents were asked to describe their career paths and to reflect on the…

  15. University students' reservations about dietetics as a career choice.

    PubMed

    Lordly, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Dietetics students' reservations about their career choice were investigated. In several dietetics programs in various provinces, an in-class or online survey was administered to students in the early or late stages of their education (n=397). Data were coded and analyzed, using descriptive statistics. Chi-square testing for independence was used to establish significant relationships. Forty-three percent (n=149) of those responding to the research question (n=344) indicated they had reservations about a dietetics career, primarily because of internship, salary, and employment concerns. Students enrolled in a coordinated internship/degree program experienced no reservations about internship. Students experienced fewer career reservations when they had made their career decision before grade 12, were influenced by a dietitian, or were in the later stages of their education. Findings have implications for dietetics recruitment, retention, research, and education. An understanding of sources of reservations about career choice will allow policy-makers, researchers, and educators to address issues to ensure that potential professionals are well informed about career components and that educational programs meet students' needs.

  16. Career Paths and Career Success in the Early Career Stages of Male and Female MBAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Taylor H.; Harquail, Celia V.

    1991-01-01

    Data from 125 females and 377 males (40 percent response) in managerial careers indicated that women had similar total promotions and career satisfaction but lower salary increases, fewer management promotions, and lower hierarchical levels. Starting salaries and job levels, job mobility, line experience, and seniority affected career success. (SK)

  17. Career Paths and Career Success in the Early Career Stages of Male and Female MBAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Taylor H.; Harquail, Celia V.

    1991-01-01

    Data from 125 females and 377 males (40 percent response) in managerial careers indicated that women had similar total promotions and career satisfaction but lower salary increases, fewer management promotions, and lower hierarchical levels. Starting salaries and job levels, job mobility, line experience, and seniority affected career success. (SK)

  18. Career choices for cardiology: cohort studies of UK medical graduates.

    PubMed

    Smith, Fay; Lambert, Trevor W; Pitcher, Alex; Goldacre, Michael J

    2013-01-25

    Cardiology is one of the most popular of the hospital medical specialties in the UK. It is also a highly competitive specialty in respect of the availability of higher specialty training posts. Our aims are to describe doctors' early intentions about seeking careers in cardiology, to report on when decisions about seeking a career in cardiology are made, to compare differences between men and women doctors in the choice of cardiology, and to compare early career choices with later specialty destinations. Questionnaire surveys were sent to all UK medical graduates in selected qualification years from 1974-2009, at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years after graduation. One year after graduation, the percentage of doctors specifying cardiology as their first choice of long-term career rose from the mid-1990s from 2.4% (1993 cohort) to 4.2% (2005 cohort) but then fell back to 2.7% (2009 cohort). Men were more likely to give cardiology as their first choice than women (eg 4.1% of men and 1.9% of women in the 2009 cohort). The percentage of doctors who gave cardiology as their first choice of career declined between years one and five after qualification: the fall was more marked for women. 34% of respondents who specified cardiology as their sole first choice of career one year post-graduation were later working in cardiology. 24% of doctors practising as cardiologists several years after qualification had given cardiology as their sole first choice in year one. The doctors' 'domestic circumstances' were a relatively unimportant influence on specialty choice for aspiring cardiologists, while 'enthusiasm/commitment', 'financial prospects', 'experiences of the job so far' and 'a particular teacher/department' were important. Cardiology grew as a first preference one year after graduation to 2005 but is now falling. It consistently attracts a higher percentage of men than women doctors. The correspondence between early choice and later destination was not particularly strong for

  19. Career choices for cardiology: cohort studies of UK medical graduates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiology is one of the most popular of the hospital medical specialties in the UK. It is also a highly competitive specialty in respect of the availability of higher specialty training posts. Our aims are to describe doctors’ early intentions about seeking careers in cardiology, to report on when decisions about seeking a career in cardiology are made, to compare differences between men and women doctors in the choice of cardiology, and to compare early career choices with later specialty destinations. Methods Questionnaire surveys were sent to all UK medical graduates in selected qualification years from 1974–2009, at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years after graduation. Results One year after graduation, the percentage of doctors specifying cardiology as their first choice of long-term career rose from the mid-1990s from 2.4% (1993 cohort) to 4.2% (2005 cohort) but then fell back to 2.7% (2009 cohort). Men were more likely to give cardiology as their first choice than women (eg 4.1% of men and 1.9% of women in the 2009 cohort). The percentage of doctors who gave cardiology as their first choice of career declined between years one and five after qualification: the fall was more marked for women. 34% of respondents who specified cardiology as their sole first choice of career one year post-graduation were later working in cardiology. 24% of doctors practising as cardiologists several years after qualification had given cardiology as their sole first choice in year one. The doctors’ ‘domestic circumstances’ were a relatively unimportant influence on specialty choice for aspiring cardiologists, while ‘enthusiasm/commitment’, ‘financial prospects’, ‘experiences of the job so far’ and ‘a particular teacher/department’ were important. Conclusions Cardiology grew as a first preference one year after graduation to 2005 but is now falling. It consistently attracts a higher percentage of men than women doctors. The correspondence between early

  20. The Influence of Role Models on Women's Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quimby, Julie L.; DeSantis, Angela M.

    2006-01-01

    This study of 368 female undergraduates examined self-efficacy and role model influence as predictors of career choice across J. L. Holland's (1997) 6 RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional) types. Findings showed that levels of self-efficacy and role model influence differed across Holland types. Multiple…

  1. Classroom Activities to Combat Stereotyping in Career Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    Designed to be used by classroom teachers in combatting sex, race, and handicap stereotyping with respect to career choice, this document contains examples of activities which are appropriate for students from Kindergarten to grade twelve. The twelve activities included in the section of sex role stereotyping are grouped into three broad…

  2. Androgyny and the Career Choices of Allied Health Professions Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukken, Kathleen M.

    1987-01-01

    This study was to determine what the distribution of the four types of gender-related personality categories was among allied health professions students and whether these personality categories were related to career choice. The androgynous personality was the most frequently occurring personality category, followed closely by feminine-typed…

  3. Career Choice in Management: Findings from US MBA Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Eddy S. W.; Burke, Ronald J.; Fiksenbaum, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to explore the role of values, family, and non-family influences on career choice in management among a sample of US MBA students. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires from 109 students in a mid-sized university located on the west coast of the USA. The respondents were in…

  4. Sex Differences in the Career Choices of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Ellen Piel

    1981-01-01

    A survey conducted to assess sex differences in college students' career choices yielded consistent preferences for enterprising, investigative, male-dominated occupations by men; and social, female-dominated occupations by women. Recommends that college student personnel be aware of the possible influence of sex-traditional occupational standards…

  5. Influencers of Career Choice among Allied Health Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-West, Anne P.

    1991-01-01

    Major influences on career choice among 153 allied health students were need to help others, prestige, autonomy, and advancement and income potential. Risk of malpractice suits and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome were negative influences for medical laboratory majors, but not for dietetics and physical therapy majors. (SK)

  6. Intelligence, Personality, and Interests in the Career Choice Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Phillip L.; Beier, Margaret E.

    2003-01-01

    Research and metaanalyses suggest fundamental commonalities among measures of cognition, affect, and conation, yielding trait complexes that are differentially related to career choices and intellectual development. A counseling framework involves movement away from typological representations of vocational and avocational interests,…

  7. Curricular Track, Career Choice, and Androgyny among Adolescent Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulff, Mary Beth; Steitz, Jean A.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates psychological androgyny among 40 high school girls enrolled in either an upper-level mathematics class or a vocational track cosmetology class. Results indicate that, contrary to ideas that career choices are linked to sex-role stereotypes, the cosmetology group was significantly more androgynous than was the upper-level mathematics…

  8. Choices & Careers; Free to Choose: Being a Special Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Cathaleen; Thompson, Marian

    The "Being a Special Person" segment of the Choices and Careers: Free to Choose program is based upon five areas of study; this document features summaries of the information in those five units along with the basic aims of each unit. "The Outside You" unit focuses on being natural and the importance of good health habits.…

  9. Factors That Inform Students' Choice of Study and Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theresa, Lawer Dede

    2015-01-01

    The research was conducted to find out factors that informed second cycle students' choices of programmes of study and career in the Kumasi Metropolis of Ghana. The descriptive survey was used for the study, and both questionnaire and interview guide were used in gathering the data. The questionnaire was administered on the students while the…

  10. Sex Differences in the Career Choices of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Ellen Piel

    1981-01-01

    A survey conducted to assess sex differences in college students' career choices yielded consistent preferences for enterprising, investigative, male-dominated occupations by men; and social, female-dominated occupations by women. Recommends that college student personnel be aware of the possible influence of sex-traditional occupational standards…

  11. Curricular Track, Career Choice, and Androgyny among Adolescent Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulff, Mary Beth; Steitz, Jean A.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates psychological androgyny among 40 high school girls enrolled in either an upper-level mathematics class or a vocational track cosmetology class. Results indicate that, contrary to ideas that career choices are linked to sex-role stereotypes, the cosmetology group was significantly more androgynous than was the upper-level mathematics…

  12. Career Choice in Management: Findings from US MBA Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Eddy S. W.; Burke, Ronald J.; Fiksenbaum, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to explore the role of values, family, and non-family influences on career choice in management among a sample of US MBA students. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires from 109 students in a mid-sized university located on the west coast of the USA. The respondents were in…

  13. Predictors of Sextypical and Asextypical Career Choice in College Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holleran, Paula R.; Lopez, Linda C.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the influence of sex, sex-role orientation, family size, birth order, and locus of control as predictors of sextypical career choice in 113 college students who completed the Bem Sex Role Inventory and Rotter I-E Scale. Results showed biological sex was the most influential predictor, especially for males. (JAC)

  14. Job Choice and Career Relevance for Today's College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Judith E.; LaPort, Kate A.; Pines, Harvey A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research on college student employment has focused on differences among students based on year of college attendance but included relatively few participants over the age of 25. The current study investigated the relationship between job choice, job/career relevance, and job satisfaction for students under age 20 (n = 143), students ages…

  15. The Influence of Role Models on Women's Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quimby, Julie L.; DeSantis, Angela M.

    2006-01-01

    This study of 368 female undergraduates examined self-efficacy and role model influence as predictors of career choice across J. L. Holland's (1997) 6 RIASEC (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, Conventional) types. Findings showed that levels of self-efficacy and role model influence differed across Holland types. Multiple…

  16. Cognitive Support for the Career Choices of College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Sandra

    1980-01-01

    Fifty college women were surveyed to determine to what extent maternal employment served as a role model. Results show that parent encouragement, daughter's sex role orientation, and the mother's attitudes and beliefs were the major factors in determining career choice and commitment. (Author/JLF)

  17. Classroom Activities to Combat Stereotyping in Career Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    Designed to be used by classroom teachers in combatting sex, race, and handicap stereotyping with respect to career choice, this document contains examples of activities which are appropriate for students from Kindergarten to grade twelve. The twelve activities included in the section of sex role stereotyping are grouped into three broad…

  18. Community-based education: The influence of role modeling on career choice and practice location.

    PubMed

    Amalba, A; Abantanga, F A; Scherpbier, A J J A; van Mook, W N K A

    2017-02-01

    Research findings in medical education support the importance of positive role models in enhancing learning and influencing the career path of medical students and graduates. The authors explored the characteristics of positive and negative role models during Community-Based Education and Service (COBES), as well as their effect on trainees' career paths. A cross-sectional survey was conducted by means of a questionnaire among medical students to explore the characteristics of positive and negative role models during COBES. Associations between gender, choice of specialty, and practice location were assessed using the chi-square test. All qualitative data analysis was performed using the principles of primary, secondary, and tertiary coding. The majority of the students indicated that role modeling during COBES will affect their choice of specialty and practice location with a significant gender difference in terms of practice location (p < 0.005). Qualitative data supported the finding that positive role modeling during COBES may influence graduates willingness to work in rural area. The desire and willingness to work in a rural community combined with good communication and excellent interpersonal skills as well as good leadership skills are attributes of good role modeling that could influence medical students' career choice during COBES.

  19. The Role of Personality and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in the Career Choice Commitment of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Naitian; Jome, LaRae M.; Haase, Richard F.; Bruch, Monroe A.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of personality and career decision-making self-efficacy on progress in career choice commitment in a sample of 184 college students. It was hypothesized that self-efficacy would mediate the relationship between neuroticism and extraversion and career choice commitment. Results revealed significant differences…

  20. The Role of Personality and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in the Career Choice Commitment of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Naitian; Jome, LaRae M.; Haase, Richard F.; Bruch, Monroe A.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of personality and career decision-making self-efficacy on progress in career choice commitment in a sample of 184 college students. It was hypothesized that self-efficacy would mediate the relationship between neuroticism and extraversion and career choice commitment. Results revealed significant differences…

  1. Medical students' views on selecting paediatrics as a career choice.

    PubMed

    Bindal, Taruna; Wall, David; Goodyear, Helen M

    2011-09-01

    Despite increasing numbers of UK medical students, the number of trainees selecting paediatrics as their specialty choice has decreased. Previous studies show that most students will choose their ultimate career during undergraduate training. We therefore explored the views of students in the final year at Birmingham University about a career in paediatrics. Students completed a 27-item questionnaire during the penultimate week of their paediatric clerkship (PC) and 97% responded (127/131). Prior to the PC, 29% (37/127) of students had considered a career in paediatrics, rising to 50% (63/127) after the PC (p < 0.001). Students felt that paediatricians were enthusiastic and keen on teaching, and the ward working atmosphere was good. However, students perceived paediatrics as a difficult specialty with high competition for training posts. Students felt their paediatric experience was too limited and advice was needed on paediatric careers early in undergraduate training. This study confirmed that focusing on improving the PC is not sufficient if we are to inspire medical students to consider a career in paediatrics. Exposure to the specialty is needed from year 1 of undergraduate training along with career advice to dispel current myths about specialty training. Students would then be able to make more informed career decisions.

  2. Project CHOICE: #171. A Career Unit for Grades K-2. The Supermarket. (Marketing and Distribution Occupations Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit on the supermarket is part of the Marketing and Distribution Occupations Career Cluster included in a series of career guidebooks developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education). The units are designed to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking first and second…

  3. Project CHOICE: #174. A Career Unit for Grades K-2. The Bakery. (Community and Personal Services Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit on the bakery is part of the Community and Personal Services Career Cluster included in a series of career guidebooks developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education). The units are designed to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking first and second grade classroom…

  4. Factors influencing career choice among high school students in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mugonzibwa, E A; Kikwilu, E N; Rugarabamu, P N; Ntabaye, M K

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that influenced career choice among high school students in Tanzania. The information obtained would be used to formulate effective recruitment strategies and counseling students on their career expectations in dentistry. All 352 high school students who were studying in five randomly selected high schools completed a pre-tested questionnaire containing twenty-four items addressing five factors. Image of a profession (good experiences from the work of professionals, professionals who are attractive to respondents, and professionals who command high respect in the community) was perceived as an important factor in career choice by the majority of respondents (over 88 percent). Work/profession characteristics (knowledge about work to be done, treating patients, giving medicines to patients, helping relatives, etc.) was ranked as the second most important factor, and course characteristics (availability of postgraduate studies, size of annual intake, pass rate, geographic location, etc.) was ranked third. Direct gains and advice from important persons were perceived as least important in career choice.

  5. The Influences and Motivations on Which Students Base Their Choice of Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniveton, Bromley H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the influences and motivations on which students base their choice of career. 348 young people aged 14-18 years completed a questionnaire and took part in an interview concerning their choice of career. It was found the greatest influence on their choice of career was their parents, followed by their teachers.…

  6. The Application of Social Cognitive Career Theory to Sport and Leisure Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, George B.; Bruening, Jennifer; Sartore, Melanie L.; Sagas, Michael; Fink, Janet S.

    2005-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory is used to investigate student intentions to enter the sport and leisure industry. Data are gathered from 197 undergraduate students from four universities located across the United States. Path analysis supports the general model, as self-efficacy and outcomes expectations hold positive associations with vocational…

  7. Women in construction management: Creating a theory of career choice and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jennifer Dawn

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a theory of women's career choice and development in the context of the construction industry. Focused on female constructors, or those engaged in the management of construction projects or companies, this study investigated the relevant factors, processes, and experiences of women who choose to enter the construction industry through construction management degree programs. The goal was to communicate as a theoretically and practically grounded theory of career choice and development an understanding of who female constructors are and those factors which led them to the construction industry and those influencing their career development. As a grounded theory research design, qualitative research methods were employed as the primary means of collecting and analyzing data. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to garner a sample of 24 women who had graduated within a ten year period and were actively employed as constructors. Participants' views and experiences, captured through small focus group interviews, were analyzed with quantitative data of demographics, education, construction experience, self-efficacy, personality, and career satisfaction and commitment gathered from a written questionnaire, to create a profile of female constructors used in this theory. The profiles completed from these data are complex, providing for an extensive understanding of their career choice and development process. The strongest common characteristic in the career development of these women was a mentor. This influence in cannot be overlooked, especially in light of the rather constant sense of isolation many of these women expressed as a significant minority in every facet of their careers. Recommendations for academia and industry are in many ways related to these findings. Recommendations for recruitment center on educating youth and those able to influence the career choice making process of youth about the career paths available

  8. Military Career Paths. Career Progression Patterns for Selected Occupations from the Military Career Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Military Entrance Processing Command (DOD), North Chicago, IL.

    This document was developed in response to requests from guidance professionals for information about career progression in the military. It presents descriptions of typical career development patterns over a 20-year period for 25 enlisted and 13 officer occupations. The enlisted occupations are: administrative support specialists, air crew…

  9. Influences on medical student career choice: gender or generation?

    PubMed

    Sanfey, Hilary A; Saalwachter-Schulman, Alison R; Nyhof-Young, Joyce M; Eidelson, Ben; Mann, Barry D

    2006-11-01

    We hypothesized that increased enrollment of female medical students and different priorities of the current generation of students would be important influences on the declining interest in surgical careers. Students scored statements on surgical careers on 5-point Likert scales regarding agreement and whether these statements encouraged them to pursue a career in surgery. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Qualitative comments were iteratively coded using a constant comparative method. Nine US medical schools. A Web-based survey on the Association for Surgical Education server was e-mailed to medical students. A total of 1300 of the 1365 respondents stated their sex. The survey asked questions pertaining to surgical life, surgical residency, surgeons as influence, equity, family, and other influences. A total of 680 (52%) of the 1300 respondents were male. Men and women disagreed about whether surgeons lead well-balanced lives (68% and 77%, respectively) and saw this as a deterrent. A total of 35% of women (3% men; P<.001) were discouraged by a lack of female role models. Compared with students unlikely to study surgery, lower percentages of male (74% vs 65%) and female students (85% vs 58%) likely to study surgery agreed that career choice was influenced by their decision to have a family (P=.01 for men, P<.001 for women). Of medical students who agreed that their skill sets were compatible with surgical careers, similar percentages were likely (30% men vs 24% women) and unlikely (49% men vs 54% women) to study surgery. All differences between men and women were less apparent when students likely to study surgery were compared with students unlikely to study surgery. The decision to have a family was a more significant influence for women than men, but family and lifestyle priorities were also important to male students, supporting our hypothesis that generation and gender are both important influences on career choices.

  10. Project CHOICE: #16. A Career Education Unit for Junior High School. An Introduction to the Career Center and an Introduction to Career Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This junior high teaching unit introducing career clusters is one in a series of career guidebooks developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking classroom experiences with the world of work. The unit follows a typical format that includes…

  11. The Relationship between Perceived Career Barriers and Career Decision Self-Efficacy on the Certainty of Initial Career Choice among Educational Opportunity Fund Program Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Nicole Pacheco

    2014-01-01

    This study was an investigation of the predictive value of perceived career barriers and career decision self-efficacy on the certainty of initial career choice among Educational Opportunity Fund Program (EOF) pre-freshman college students, an under-studied college population with respect to career development (Winograd & Shick Tryon, 2009).…

  12. Influence factors affecting career choice of preclinical medical technology students.

    PubMed

    Gleich, C

    1978-06-01

    Over a seven-year period, data were gathered on 249 declared medical technology majors enrolled in an Introduction to Medical Technology course at the University of Iowa. The Kendall Tau C test for significance (p = less than .05) was utilized in determining the influence of several variables or factors in the students' choice of medical technology as a career. Such factors as the type of work, demand for medical technologists, and desire to help people were found to be highly motivating factors in choice. It appeared the motivation was primarily internalized with assistance sought from various sources. The decision of medical technology as a career was predominantly made in the junior/senior year in high school or freshman/sophomore year in college.

  13. Conceptions of Career Choice and Attainment: Developmental Levels in How Children Think about Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly A. S.; Walsh, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    Children's conceptions of career choice and attainment were evaluated in two studies to test whether reasoning levels varied by grade level (Studies 1 and 2) and perspective-taking complexity (Study 2). Results indicated that younger children (Grade K) were more likely to use reasoning strategies associated with fantasy and magical thinking and…

  14. The Factors Affecting the Career Choices of African Americans and Three Career Counseling Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Susan G.

    This paper identifies and explores three major factors that affect the career choices of African Americans. First, the future of the American employment market is strongly based in technology, yet approximately two-thirds of the African American population reported their level of education at high school completion and lower. Second, African…

  15. Career Choice and Career Commitment of Two-Year College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veres, Helen C.

    The influence of the mother in affecting her daughter's willingness to commit herself to a career as well as her perceptions of appropriate occupational choices were studied in a random sample of students in a two-year comprehensive community college. A structured questionnaire was administered to obtain basic demographic data and information…

  16. Early career choices and successful career progression in surgery in the UK: prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Changes to the structure of medical training worldwide require doctors to decide on their career specialty at an increasingly early stage after graduation. We studied trends in career choices for surgery, and the eventual career destinations, of UK graduates who declared an early preference for surgery. Methods Postal questionnaires were sent, at regular time intervals after qualification, to all medical qualifiers from all UK medical schools in selected qualification years between 1974 and 2005. They were sent in the first year after qualification, at year three and five years after qualification, and at longer time intervals thereafter. Results Responses were received from 27 749 of 38 280 doctors (73%) at year one, 23 468 of 33151 (71%) at year three, and 17 689 of 24 870 (71%) at year five. Early career preferences showed that surgery has become more popular over the past two decades. Looking forward from early career choice, 60% of respondents (64% of men, 48% of women) with a first preference for a surgical specialty at year one eventually worked in surgery (p < 0.001 for the male-female comparison). Looking backward from eventual career destinations, 90% of responders working in surgery had originally specified a first choice for a surgical specialty at year one. 'Match' rates between eventual destinations and early choices were much higher for surgery than for other specialties. Considering factors that influenced early specialty choice 'a great deal', comparing aspiring surgeons and aspiring general practitioners (GPs), a significantly higher percentage who chose surgery than general practice specified enthusiasm for the specialty (73% vs. 53%), a particular teacher or department (34% vs. 12%), inclinations before medical school (20% vs. 11%), and future financial prospects (24% vs. 13%); and a lower percentage specified that hours and working conditions had influenced their choice (21% vs. 71%). Women choosing surgery were influenced less than

  17. Early career choices and successful career progression in surgery in the UK: prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Goldacre, Michael J; Laxton, Louise; Harrison, Ewen M; Richards, Jennifer M J; Lambert, Trevor W; Parks, Rowan W

    2010-11-02

    Changes to the structure of medical training worldwide require doctors to decide on their career specialty at an increasingly early stage after graduation. We studied trends in career choices for surgery, and the eventual career destinations, of UK graduates who declared an early preference for surgery. Postal questionnaires were sent, at regular time intervals after qualification, to all medical qualifiers from all UK medical schools in selected qualification years between 1974 and 2005. They were sent in the first year after qualification, at year three and five years after qualification, and at longer time intervals thereafter. Responses were received from 27,749 of 38,280 doctors (73%) at year one, 23,468 of 33,151 (71%) at year three, and 17,689 of 24,870 (71%) at year five. Early career preferences showed that surgery has become more popular over the past two decades. Looking forward from early career choice, 60% of respondents (64% of men, 48% of women) with a first preference for a surgical specialty at year one eventually worked in surgery (p < 0.001 for the male-female comparison). Looking backward from eventual career destinations, 90% of responders working in surgery had originally specified a first choice for a surgical specialty at year one. 'Match' rates between eventual destinations and early choices were much higher for surgery than for other specialties. Considering factors that influenced early specialty choice 'a great deal', comparing aspiring surgeons and aspiring general practitioners (GPs), a significantly higher percentage who chose surgery than general practice specified enthusiasm for the specialty (73% vs. 53%), a particular teacher or department (34% vs. 12%), inclinations before medical school (20% vs. 11%), and future financial prospects (24% vs. 13%); and a lower percentage specified that hours and working conditions had influenced their choice (21% vs. 71%). Women choosing surgery were influenced less than men by their inclinations

  18. Factors influencing veterinary students career choices and attitudes to animals.

    PubMed

    Serpell, James A

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of demographic and experiential factors on first-year veterinary students career choices and attitudes to animal welfare/rights. The study surveyed 329 first-year veterinary students to determine the influence of demographic factors, farm experience, and developmental exposure to different categories of animals on their career preferences and on their attitudes to specific areas of animal welfare and/or rights. A significant male gender bias toward food-animal practice was found, and prior experience with particular types of animals--companion animals, equines, food animals--tended to predict career preferences. Female veterinary students displayed greater concern for possible instances of animal suffering than males, and prior experience with different animals, as well as rural background and farm experience, were also associated with attitude differences. Seventy-two percent of students also reported that their interactions with animals (especially pets) had strongly influenced the development of their values. Animals ranked second in importance after parents in this respect. The present findings illustrate the importance to issues of animal welfare of the cultural context of past experience and influences on attitude development. The results also suggest that previous interactions with animals play a critical role in guiding veterinary students into their chosen career, as well as in helping to determine their specific employment preferences within the veterinary profession. From an animal welfare perspective, the dearth of women choosing careers in food-animal practice is a source of concern.

  19. Surgeons can favorably influence career choices and goals for students interested in careers in medicine.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Jonathan; Al-Saadi, Sam; Boyle, Robert; Villadolid, Desireé; Ross, Sharona; Murr, Michele; Rosemurgy, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the impact of an academic summer research, shadowing, and mentorship program on students interested in medicine and surgery. Forty-four (92%) of 48 participants of a summer research, shadowing, and mentorship program returned blinded questionnaires that focused on the program's impact on their scholarly skills, career choices, and goals. The program interfaced academic surgeons with students interested in careers in medicine and enabled students to participate in research projects, attend daily lectures, and shadow physicians in the operating room, clinic, and hospital. Proficiency in scholarly skills, before and after the program, was scored by the participants using a Likert scale (0 = none to 10 = proficient). Ninety-three percent of participants were in or had completed college; only 7% had advanced degrees. With the program, proficiency in all categories assessed improved considerably, including medical terminology, abstract writing, statistical analysis, graph and table construction, article writing, and video production. During the last 5 years, participants coauthored 112 national presentations (29 video presentations), 46 published abstracts, and 57 peer-reviewed published articles. Ninety-two percent developed more favorable opinions of a career in medicine; 8% believed the experience deterred them from a career in medicine because of lifestyle and studious demands. Seventy-seven percent believed the program promoted a career in surgery; 82% believed it elevated their goals to become leaders in American medicine. Shadowing opportunities, mentoring, and didactic teaching of scholarly skills for college and graduate students foster academic productivity and elevation of career goals. Academic surgeons can favorably influence career choices and goals for students interested in careers in medicine and surgery.

  20. Word-Tool Match. Review Software for Basic CHOICE. CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Ilse M.; And Others

    CHOICE Word-Tool Match provides migrant youth the opportunity to use the computer in self-directed ways, while reinforcing job and role information presented in Basic Job and Role activity folders and workbooks. Learners select whether to play with one or two players, the career that will provide the theme for the game, and whether to play the…

  1. Aligning Athletes' Career Choices and Graduate Degree Pathways: Implications for 21st-Century Career Development Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haslerig, Siduri J.; Navarro, Kristina M.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education career development professionals are charged with more than understanding the challenges and needs of a diverse student body, and they must also prepare students for career fields in life after higher education. This empirical study explored the graduate degree choices and career aspirations of 14 college athletes who competed in…

  2. The Relation of Secondary Students' Career-Choice Readiness to a Six-Phase Model of Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschi, Andreas; Lage, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Based on common aspects of recent models of career decision making (CDM), a six-phase model of CDM for secondary students is presented and empirically evaluated. The study tests the hypothesis that students who are in later phases possess more career-choice readiness and consider different numbers of career alternatives. Two hundred sixty-six…

  3. Project CHOICE: #103. A Career Education Unit for Grades 3 and 4. Oceanographer. (Science and Engineering Occupations Career Cluster.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Oceanographer, is one in a series of career guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking third and fourth grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. Part of the Science and Engineering…

  4. Project CHOICE: #112. A Career Unit for Grades 3 and 4. The Optometrist. (Health Occupations Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, The Optometrist, is one in a series of career guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking third and fourth grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. Part of the Health Occupations Career…

  5. Project CHOICE: #100. A Career Unit for Grades 3 and 4. Ecology Workers. (Agriculture and Ecological Studies Occupations Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Ecology Workers, is one in a series of career guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking third and fourth grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. Part of the Agriculture and Ecological…

  6. Aligning Athletes' Career Choices and Graduate Degree Pathways: Implications for 21st-Century Career Development Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haslerig, Siduri J.; Navarro, Kristina M.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education career development professionals are charged with more than understanding the challenges and needs of a diverse student body, and they must also prepare students for career fields in life after higher education. This empirical study explored the graduate degree choices and career aspirations of 14 college athletes who competed in…

  7. Project CHOICE: #106. A Career Unit for Grades 3 and 4. Geologist. (Science and Engineering Occupations Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Geologist, is one in a series of career guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking third and fourth grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. Part of the Science and Engineering…

  8. Career Path Processes as Perceived by African American Female School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathers, Sonja

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to improve our understanding of factors that influence the career paths of African American female school principals in North Carolina. Three pertinent research questions were addressed in this study: (1) What formative experiences influence the career path decisions of African American females who want to become school…

  9. Career Path Processes as Perceived by African American Female School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathers, Sonja

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to improve our understanding of factors that influence the career paths of African American female school principals in North Carolina. Three pertinent research questions were addressed in this study: (1) What formative experiences influence the career path decisions of African American females who want to become school…

  10. Perceived Career Paths and Performance in Moderately Defined Roles: A Study of Project Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carden, Lila; Egan, Toby Marshall; Callahan, Jamie

    2008-01-01

    Those working in jobs not clearly defined as professions often rely on organizational signals to formulate reactions regarding their jobs and career futures. Responses from 644 project managers were used to test a hypothesized Path Reaction Performance Model. Findings suggest that the relationship between perceived career path and performance is…

  11. Teacher Pay and Career Paths in an Opportunity Culture: A Practical Policy Guide--Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassel, Emily Ayscue; Holly, Christen; Locke, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    To help all students reach their potential, district leaders must ensure that every student has consistent access to excellent teaching. Opportunity Culture compensation and career path structures help make that possible, and this guide shows how. "Teacher Pay and Career Paths in an Opportunity Culture: A Practical Policy Guide" shows…

  12. Teacher Pay and Career Paths in an Opportunity Culture: A Practical Policy Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassel, Emily Ayscue; Holly, Christen; Locke, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    To help all students reach their potential, district leaders must ensure that every student has consistent access to excellent teaching. Opportunity Culture compensation and career path structures help make that possible, and this guide shows how. "Teacher Pay and Career Paths in an Opportunity Culture: A Practical Policy Guide" shows…

  13. Relationship between Personality Types and Career Choices of Undergraduate Students: A Case of Moi University, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemboi, Rebecca J. Kimongo; Kindiki, Nyaga; Misigo, Benard

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between personality types and career choices of undergraduate students of Moi University. In Kenya, students are allowed to revise their career choices at various levels of education before they settle on one course of study in the University. The process of choosing careers begins in form three where…

  14. Career Choice Attitudes of Jordanian Adolescents Related to Educational Level of Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damin, Monther Abdel Hameed; Hodinko, Bernard A.

    A study examined how the educational level of parents related to the career-choice attitudes of adolescents. The Career Maturity Inventory Attitude Scale, Form A-1, was translated into Arabic and used to assess the attitudes and feelings about making a career choice and entering the working world of a sample of 841 students enrolled in 28 high…

  15. Choosing nursing as a career: a narrative analysis of Millennial nurses' career choice of virtue.

    PubMed

    Price, Sheri Lynn; McGillis Hall, Linda; Angus, Jan E; Peter, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    The growth and sustainability of the nursing profession depends on the ability to recruit and retain the upcoming generation of professionals. Understanding the career choice experiences and professional expectations of Millennial nurses (born 1980 or after) is a critical component of recruitment and retention strategies. This study utilized Polkinghorne's interpretive, narrative approach to understand how Millennial nurses explain, account for and make sense of their choice of nursing as a career. The positioning of nursing as a virtuous choice was both temporally and contextually influenced. The decision to enter the profession was initially emplotted around a traditional understanding of nursing as a virtuous profession: altruistic, noble, caring and compassionate. The centricity of virtues depicts one-dimensional understanding of the nursing profession that alone could prove dissatisfying to a generation of professionals who have many career choices available to them. The narratives reveal how participants' perceptions and expectations remain influenced by a stereotypical understanding of nursing, an image that remains prevalent in society and which holds implications for the future recruitment, socialization and retention strategies for upcoming and future generations of nurses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Gender differences in medical students' motives and career choice.

    PubMed

    Heiligers, Phil J M

    2012-08-23

    The main subject is the influence of gender and the stage of life on the choice of specialty in medical education. In particular we looked at the influence of intrinsic and external motives on this relationship. The choice of specialty was divided into two moments: the choice between medical specialties and general practice; and the preference within medical specialties. In earlier studies the topic of motivation was explored, mostly related to gender. In this study stage of life in terms of living with a partner -or not- and stage of education was added. A questionnaire concerning career preferences was used. The online questionnaire was sent to all student members of the KNMG (Royal Dutch Medical Association). 58% of these students responded (N = 2397). Only 1478 responses could be used for analyses (36%). For stipulating the motives that played a role, principal components factor analysis has been carried out. For testing the mediation effect a set of regression analyses was performed: logistic regressions and multiple regressions. Although basic findings about gender differences in motivations for preferred careers are consistent with earlier research, we found that whether or not living with a partner is determinant for differences in profession-related motives and external motives (lifestyle and social situation). Furthermore living with a partner is not a specific female argument anymore, since no interactions are found between gender and living with a partner. Another issue is that motives are mediating the relationship between, living with a partner, and the choice of GP or medical specialty. For more clarity in the mediating effect of motives a longitudinal study is needed to find out about motives and changing circumstances. The present study provides a contribution to the knowledge of career aspirations of medical students, especially the impact of motivation. Gender and living with a partner influence both choices, but they are not interacting, so

  17. Gender differences in medical students’ motives and career choice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The main subject is the influence of gender and the stage of life on the choice of specialty in medical education. In particular we looked at the influence of intrinsic and external motives on this relationship. The choice of specialty was divided into two moments: the choice between medical specialties and general practice; and the preference within medical specialties. In earlier studies the topic of motivation was explored, mostly related to gender. In this study stage of life in terms of living with a partner -or not- and stage of education was added. Methods A questionnaire concerning career preferences was used. The online questionnaire was sent to all student members of the KNMG (Royal Dutch Medical Association). 58% of these students responded (N = 2397). Only 1478 responses could be used for analyses (36%). For stipulating the motives that played a role, principal components factor analysis has been carried out. For testing the mediation effect a set of regression analyses was performed: logistic regressions and multiple regressions. Results Although basic findings about gender differences in motivations for preferred careers are consistent with earlier research, we found that whether or not living with a partner is determinant for differences in profession-related motives and external motives (lifestyle and social situation). Furthermore living with a partner is not a specific female argument anymore, since no interactions are found between gender and living with a partner. Another issue is that motives are mediating the relationship between, living with a partner, and the choice of GP or medical specialty. For more clarity in the mediating effect of motives a longitudinal study is needed to find out about motives and changing circumstances. Conclusions The present study provides a contribution to the knowledge of career aspirations of medical students, especially the impact of motivation. Gender and living with a partner influence both

  18. An Empirical Study of the Career Paths of Senior Educational Administrators in Manitoba, Canada: Implications for Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallin, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper conceptualizes queue theory (Tallerico & Blount, 2004) to discuss a mixed-methods study that determined the career patterns of senior educational administrators in public school divisions in Manitoba, Canada, compared by position, context and sex. Findings indicate that queue theory has merit for describing the career paths of…

  19. Promoting Viable Career Choice Goals through Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy and Career Maturity in Inner-City High School Students: A Test of Social Cognitive Career Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conkel Ziebell, Julia Louise

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to understand the viability of inner-city adolescents' career choice goals, the purpose of this study was to predict relationships among person factors, environmental factors, career maturity, career decision-making self-efficacy, vocational outcome expectations, and viable career choice goals within this population. I predicted that…

  20. Promoting Viable Career Choice Goals through Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy and Career Maturity in Inner-City High School Students: A Test of Social Cognitive Career Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conkel Ziebell, Julia Louise

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to understand the viability of inner-city adolescents' career choice goals, the purpose of this study was to predict relationships among person factors, environmental factors, career maturity, career decision-making self-efficacy, vocational outcome expectations, and viable career choice goals within this population. I predicted that…

  1. Predicting the Career Choice Attitudes of Rural Black, White, and Native American High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C.

    1984-01-01

    Studied self concept, parental influence, socioeconomic status, certainty, race and sex in relation to career choice attitudes in 520 Black, White and Native American rural 10th graders. Results suggested the importance of racial differences in predicting career maturity. (JAC)

  2. Predicting the Career Choice Attitudes of Rural Black, White, and Native American High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C.

    1984-01-01

    Studied self concept, parental influence, socioeconomic status, certainty, race and sex in relation to career choice attitudes in 520 Black, White and Native American rural 10th graders. Results suggested the importance of racial differences in predicting career maturity. (JAC)

  3. Fellowship and career path preferences in residents of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Golub, Justin S; Ossoff, Robert H; Johns, Michael M

    2011-04-01

    Assess fellowship and academic/private practice career track preferences in residents of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery. Cross-sectional survey. A total of 1,364 U.S. otolaryngology residents were surveyed. Questions addressed demographics, work hours and sleep, fellowship preference, and career track preference (academic/private practice). Trends in fellowship and career track preference were analyzed by year of clinical otolaryngology training. Data were additionally analyzed after stratification by sex. The response rate was 50%. The desire to complete a fellowship declined from 62% (year 2) to 58% (year 5), whereas the desire to not complete a fellowship increased from 31% (year 2) to 41% (year 5). Fellowship interest increased for rhinology and head and neck surgery by training year, whereas interest declined for neurotology and facial plastics. Expectation of an academic path increased from 29% (year 2) to 38% (year 5), whereas expectation of private practice declined slightly from 59% (year 2) to 57% (year 5). Women were initially more interested in both completing a fellowship (69% women, 60% men) and academics (40% women, 27% men). At the end of training, these sex differences were eliminated or reversed (59% men, 54% women for fellowship; 39% men, 35% women for academics). Residents interested in pursuing fellowship or academics reported working 2 hr/week more than those interested in no fellowship or private practice, respectively (P < 0.01). Fellowship and career track preferences suggest trends that may be useful to residency/fellowship program directors and residents making career choices. Inequalities producing differences according to sex should be addressed. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Defining surgical role models and their influence on career choice.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, P; Fitzgerald, J E F

    2011-04-01

    Positive encounters with surgeons have previously been shown to influence perceptions of surgical careers. Despite this, negative perceptions persist. We investigated whether identifying role models in surgery influences career choice and defined the ideal qualities of a surgical role model as perceived by newly qualified doctors. A 36-item questionnaire was distributed to newly qualified graduates from a large UK medical school. Results were analysed using GraphPad Prism 5.00. Questionnaires were returned by 208 of 320 graduates (65%). Median age was 24 years (range = 23-51); 63% female, 37% male; 71% standard undergraduate course, 28% graduate-entry course. Overall, 131 respondents (63%) felt they were able to identify a surgical role model; there were no statistically significant differences between gender or course type. There was a significant difference between identification of a surgical role model and interest in pursuing surgical careers (P = 0.0006), with 41% of those who identified a role model interested compared with 17% of those who did not. Overall, 564 key qualities for a surgical role model were suggested by respondents. These were grouped by theme, with common attributes including good teacher, enthusiastic, and approachable. Junior doctors were twice as likely to express interest in pursuing a surgical career if they identified a positive surgical role model. Changes in medical school demographics are occurring, with increasing proportions of female and graduate-entry doctors. These groups are less likely to choose a surgical career, so promoting interest in surgery will become increasingly important to maintain high-quality applicants. Defining and promoting perceptions of surgical role models to the wider surgical community may be one way of addressing this.

  5. Choice of School and Career, and Its System of Motivation in Hungary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Erno; Schuttler, Tamas

    In Hungary, a countrywide survey of school and/or career choice intentions among seventh-grade primary school pupils was complemented by an examination of the motives playing a role in the choice. School achievement was the strongest factor that decides the tendency of the intention of choosing a secondary school. Regarding career choices, the…

  6. The effect of a career choice guidance on self-reported psychological problems.

    PubMed

    Kunnen, E S

    2014-01-01

    Late adolescents with career choice problems often have psychological problems as well. The starting point of this study was the question of career choice counselors whether potential clients with career choice problems and psychological problems could be accepted in career choice intervention, or whether it was better to advise them to seek help for their psychological problems. We investigated whether a successful career choice intervention reduced psychological problems, and whether this program was equally effective in participants with low and with high levels of psychological problems. Participants were 45 Dutch students (age 17-24) with career choice problems. They had above average levels of self-reported psychological problems before the start of the intervention. These problems decreased significantly following the intervention. With regard to vocational commitment development, the intervention was equally effective for participants with low or average and with (very) high levels of psychological problems before the start of the intervention.

  7. The effect of a career choice guidance on self-reported psychological problems

    PubMed Central

    Kunnen, E. S.

    2014-01-01

    Late adolescents with career choice problems often have psychological problems as well. The starting point of this study was the question of career choice counselors whether potential clients with career choice problems and psychological problems could be accepted in career choice intervention, or whether it was better to advise them to seek help for their psychological problems. We investigated whether a successful career choice intervention reduced psychological problems, and whether this program was equally effective in participants with low and with high levels of psychological problems. Participants were 45 Dutch students (age 17–24) with career choice problems. They had above average levels of self-reported psychological problems before the start of the intervention. These problems decreased significantly following the intervention. With regard to vocational commitment development, the intervention was equally effective for participants with low or average and with (very) high levels of psychological problems before the start of the intervention. PMID:24926278

  8. Project CHOICE: #17. A Career Education Unit for Junior High School. Architecture. (Industrial and Construction Occupations Career Cluster) (Fine Arts and Humanities Career Clusters).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This junior high teaching unit on architecture occupations is one in a series of career guidebooks developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking classroom experiences with the world of work. The unit follows a typical format that includes…

  9. Theme: Career Ladders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larke, Alvin, Jr.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Consists of eight articles on the topic of career progression for agriculture teachers. Specific issues covered include (1) merit pay, (2) career development, (3) educational reform, (4) the state perspective, (5) agriculture as a career choice, (6) agribusiness occupations, (7) multiple career paths, and (8) realizing potential. (CH)

  10. Australian medical students and their choice of surgery as a career: a review.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Megan; Arora, Manit; Diwan, Ashish D

    2014-09-01

    Surgery is an emotionally, physically and mentally challenging profession, and medical students factor in many variables when choosing surgery as a career choice. The aim of this study is to review the available literature on the factors influencing Australian medical students' choice of surgery as their career. A search of EMBASE and MEDLINE with the search terms 'medical students' AND 'surgery'; 'medical students' AND 'career pathways'; 'medical students' AND 'career choices' was conducted. Additionally, Google Scholar and the reference list of some articles were canvassed for suitable areas of study. Lifestyle factors were the main reason influencing medical student's career choices. A balance between work, family and lifestyle was found to be important, and a surgical career choice was not always compatible with this. In particular, female students placed more importance on family and lifestyle factors when opting for non-surgical careers. Positive exposure and/or experiences in a surgical environment, perceived prestige and perceived financial reward were associated with surgical career choice. There is a need to better understand the factors influencing surgical and non-surgical career choice among Australian medical students, and develop appropriate interventions to promote surgery as a career. This article does not discuss personality traits of people who go into surgery. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  11. Gender difference and specialty preference in medical career choice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Woo

    2013-03-01

    We are entering a new era of medicine in which an equal number of men and women are becoming doctors. Many factors combine in complex and poorly understood ways to influence a medical student's career and choice of specialty. This study investigated the preferences of medical students with regard to specialty and examined differences between genders. We administered a survey to medical students at the end of their third- or fourth-year clinical clerkships. In addition to demographic data and specialty choice, medical students selected factors that were importance to their choice of specialty. One hundred forty-one medical students completed the survey (81 males, 57%). For medical students who had chosen a specialty, the most common specialty was internal medicine (20.5%). Significant gender differences were observed in choosing orthopedic surgery and family medicine-17 male students chose orthopedic surgery (10.5%) versus 3.3% of female students (p=0.02), and 11 females (9.2%) were drawn toward family medicine compared with 4 male students (2.5%). More female medical students chose lower workloads (19.9%) and low-risk work (14%) than male students (p<0.05). Lifestyle and income have become more important to medical students regarding their choice of specialty. There were significant gender differences concerning the choice of medical specialty. Controllable lifestyle remains an important factor for female medical students who are choosing a specialty. We must begin to make meaningful and thoughtful changes in medical center policies that affect a balance between work and home.

  12. Project CHOICE: #67. A Career Unit for Grades 5 and 6. Introduction to Advertising. (Marketing and Distribution Occupations Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Introduction to Advertising, is one in a series of curriculum guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking 5th and 6th grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. These ten lessons on…

  13. Project CHOICE: #67. A Career Unit for Grades 5 and 6. Introduction to Advertising. (Marketing and Distribution Occupations Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Introduction to Advertising, is one in a series of curriculum guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking 5th and 6th grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. These ten lessons on…

  14. Project CHOICE. #59. A Career Unit for Grades 5 and 6. Actors and Actresses. (Fine Arts and Humanities Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Actors and Actresses, is one in a series of curriculum guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking 5th and 6th grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. These eight lessons review some of…

  15. Influence of an Academic Intervention Program on Minority Student Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Jennifer K.; Villarejo, Merna

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, retrospective study explored how educational experiences provided as part of an undergraduate intervention program helped to shape career decisions for minority biology students. A key goal for the program is to increase minority entry into science research and teaching careers, yet actual career choice has not been studied.…

  16. The Relationship between Choice of Major and Career, Experience of University and Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willcoxson, Lesley; Wynder, Monte

    2010-01-01

    This study builds on earlier findings that clear choice of major and clarity of career direction is associated with university student retention. Data on business students' experience of university were correlated with data on intention to leave for two distinct major or career groupings--students who had committed themselves to a career-related…

  17. Influence of an Academic Intervention Program on Minority Student Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Jennifer K.; Villarejo, Merna

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, retrospective study explored how educational experiences provided as part of an undergraduate intervention program helped to shape career decisions for minority biology students. A key goal for the program is to increase minority entry into science research and teaching careers, yet actual career choice has not been studied.…

  18. The Influence of Cultural Social Identity on Graduate Student Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Karen J.; Jaeger, Audrey J.; Levin, John S.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines and enriches understanding of the career choice process for graduate students of color. Social identity theory (SIT) is used as a framework to expand our understanding of how and why graduate students choose (or do not choose) faculty careers. Graduate students' cultural social identities influenced their career choice…

  19. The Influence of Cultural Social Identity on Graduate Student Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Karen J.; Jaeger, Audrey J.; Levin, John S.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines and enriches understanding of the career choice process for graduate students of color. Social identity theory (SIT) is used as a framework to expand our understanding of how and why graduate students choose (or do not choose) faculty careers. Graduate students' cultural social identities influenced their career choice…

  20. Factors Affecting Career Choice among Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Larissa; Pellowski, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation assessed the factors affecting career choice among 474 current undergraduate and graduate speech-language pathology and audiology students (from four universities). A 14-item questionnaire was developed that included questions related to general influence of career choice and whether or not the participants had previously been,…

  1. Defense Styles Influencing Career Choice of Visually Challenged Students at Undergraduate Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, S. Raja

    2016-01-01

    Visually challenged students' career choice is influenced by many factors, including life context, personal aptitudes, and educational attainment. This study focuses the defense styles of visually challenged students and also study about their career choice. Survey method has been adopted in this investigation. Totally 77 samples were collected…

  2. Factors that Influence Career Choice among Native American and African American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett-Smith, Keisha K.

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for research in the area of career choice of minority students in the United States. This descriptive study examined the factors that may influence Native American and African American high school students' career choices. These factors include such variables as parental educational level, family composition, and potential grade…

  3. Career Interest and Education Choices: It's My Plan! Introduction for the Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEPNet 2, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Career Interests and Education Choices: It's My Plan!" will help students discover their interests and abilities. By learning about themselves, "It's My Plan!" will help students match their characteristics to career options and postsecondary education choices. "It's My Plan!" has four lessons: (1) Getting to Know Yourself; (2) Determine a Career…

  4. Career Interest and Education Choices: It's My Plan! Introduction for the Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEPNet 2, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Career Interests and Education Choices: It's My Plan!" will help students discover their interests and abilities. By learning about themselves, "It's My Plan!" will help students match their characteristics to career options and postsecondary education choices. "It's My Plan!" has four lessons: (1) Getting to Know Yourself; (2) Determine a Career…

  5. Factors Responsible for Career Choice among Sampled Nigerian Teenagers in Bendel State of Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odebunmi, Akin

    Male and female students in four urban locations of Bendel State of Nigeria were administered a questionnaire on choice of careers. The sample consisted of 640 students, 160 in each location ranging in age from 14 to 17. It was hypothesized that factors influencing career choice were money-yielding prospects, desire to work in state of origin,…

  6. Finding Fulfillment: Women's Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Career Choices in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunert, Megan L.; Bodner, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that self-efficacy beliefs are effective predictors of academic major and career choices in middle school, high school, and early college populations. There is little understanding, however, of how these beliefs develop and what influence they have on academic and career choices in women at the advanced undergraduate and…

  7. Testing a Model of Nontraditional Career Choice Goals with Mexican American Adolescent Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Lisa Y.; Navarro, Rachel L.; Smith, Jamie L.; Ploszaj, Ann M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the nontraditional career choice goals of 302 Mexican American adolescent men using an extended version of Lent, Brown, and Hacketts (1994) career choice model. It was hypothesized that several background contextual variables (e.g., acculturation level, parental support, perceived occupational gender barriers) would predict…

  8. Career-Choice Readiness in Adolescence: Developmental Trajectories and Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschi, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Developing career-choice readiness is an important task in adolescence, but current theory and research has provided a rather static view of the phenomenon. The present study investigated the development of career-choice readiness among a group of 325 Swiss students assessed four times every 5 months from seventh through eighth grade. A…

  9. Adolescents' and Young Adults' Reasoning about Career Choice and the Role of Parental Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bregman, George; Killen, Melanie

    1999-01-01

    Examined adolescents' and young adults' evaluations of reasons for career decisions, and the role of parental influence. Found that subjects supported career choices for reasons of personal growth and rejected choices when decisions were based on interpersonal relationships or hedonism. Parental influence was judged most important when…

  10. Factors that Influence Career Choice among Native American and African American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett-Smith, Keisha K.

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for research in the area of career choice of minority students in the United States. This descriptive study examined the factors that may influence Native American and African American high school students' career choices. These factors include such variables as parental educational level, family composition, and potential grade…

  11. The Influence of Parent's Occupation on the Career Choice of Vocationally Undecided Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Marlene

    Not only is the child's perspective of his parents and their occupation influential in his career choice, but the parents' perspective of themselves can also be important in shaping the child's occupational desires. College students (N=93) completed questionnaires to determine the most influential factors on their career choices, and to ascertain…

  12. Factors Affecting Career Choice among Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Larissa; Pellowski, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation assessed the factors affecting career choice among 474 current undergraduate and graduate speech-language pathology and audiology students (from four universities). A 14-item questionnaire was developed that included questions related to general influence of career choice and whether or not the participants had previously been,…

  13. The "Body Pedagogics" of an Elite Footballer's Career Path--Analysing Zlatan Ibrahimovic's Biography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Joacim; Maivorsdotter, Ninitha

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pedagogical research on career is encouraged to not limit sport learning to athletic skills, coaching effectiveness and coach-athlete relationships, but to also focus on learning in a multidimensional sense in the context of an athlete's individual and social biography. This article examines an elite athlete's career path as a body…

  14. Career Paths and Work Patterns of Women in Mid-Management Roles in Busines and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Carole

    To obtain more information about the characteristics, work patterns, and career paths of women in middle management roles, this study collected structured interview data from 45 managerial women in business and education. During summer 1987, each student in the Women and Careers class at Texas Woman's University interviewed two female managers,…

  15. Diversity Exiting the Academy: Influential Factors for the Career Choice of Well-Represented and Underrepresented Minority Scientists

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Rebekah L.; Brandt, Patrick D.; Freeman, Ashalla M.; Harrell, Jessica R.; Hall, Joshua D.; Sinche, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    A national sample of PhD-trained scientists completed training, accepted subsequent employment in academic and nonacademic positions, and were queried about their previous graduate training and current employment. Respondents indicated factors contributing to their employment decision (e.g., working conditions, salary, job security). The data indicate the relative importance of deciding factors influencing career choice, controlling for gender, initial interest in faculty careers, and number of postgraduate publications. Among both well-represented (WR; n = 3444) and underrepresented minority (URM; n = 225) respondents, faculty career choice was positively associated with desire for autonomy and partner opportunity and negatively associated with desire for leadership opportunity. Differences between groups in reasons endorsed included: variety, prestige, salary, family influence, and faculty advisor influence. Furthermore, endorsement of faculty advisor or other mentor influence and family or peer influence were surprisingly rare across groups, suggesting that formal and informal support networks could provide a missed opportunity to provide support for trainees who want to stay in faculty career paths. Reasons requiring alteration of misperceptions (e.g., limited leadership opportunity for faculty) must be distinguished from reasons requiring removal of actual barriers. Further investigation into factors that affect PhDs’ career decisions can help elucidate why URM candidates are disproportionately exiting the academy. PMID:27587854

  16. Diversity Exiting the Academy: Influential Factors for the Career Choice of Well-Represented and Underrepresented Minority Scientists.

    PubMed

    Layton, Rebekah L; Brandt, Patrick D; Freeman, Ashalla M; Harrell, Jessica R; Hall, Joshua D; Sinche, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    A national sample of PhD-trained scientists completed training, accepted subsequent employment in academic and nonacademic positions, and were queried about their previous graduate training and current employment. Respondents indicated factors contributing to their employment decision (e.g., working conditions, salary, job security). The data indicate the relative importance of deciding factors influencing career choice, controlling for gender, initial interest in faculty careers, and number of postgraduate publications. Among both well-represented (WR; n = 3444) and underrepresented minority (URM; n = 225) respondents, faculty career choice was positively associated with desire for autonomy and partner opportunity and negatively associated with desire for leadership opportunity. Differences between groups in reasons endorsed included: variety, prestige, salary, family influence, and faculty advisor influence. Furthermore, endorsement of faculty advisor or other mentor influence and family or peer influence were surprisingly rare across groups, suggesting that formal and informal support networks could provide a missed opportunity to provide support for trainees who want to stay in faculty career paths. Reasons requiring alteration of misperceptions (e.g., limited leadership opportunity for faculty) must be distinguished from reasons requiring removal of actual barriers. Further investigation into factors that affect PhDs' career decisions can help elucidate why URM candidates are disproportionately exiting the academy.

  17. More options and better job security required in career paths of physiotherapist researchers: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Julie; Tang, Lili Shyn-Li

    2008-01-01

    What career paths have physiotherapist researchers taken? What should career paths for physiotherapist researchers look like? Observational study with questionnaire. Australian physiotherapists who had a completed a Doctor of Philosophy degree by 2006. Fifty-six of 87 physiotherapists with a doctorate degree (response rate 64%) completed the questionnaire. Over half had completed the doctorate since 2000. An interest in clinical research was the strongest driver for undertaking a doctorate degree. Of the respondents, 52% worked in traditional academic roles while those who pursued other mixed clinical/research or pure research paths reported a lack of job security; 38% continued to work clinically, with a further 43% reporting they would like to but had insufficient time or a career structure that did not allow clinical work. 54% felt that the profession valued research, while 63% felt that research was valued by clinicians. The four main suggestions for improving current research career paths were: 1) develop research careers that allow mixed clinical/research and academic/clinical roles; 2) improve funding for training, particularly post-doctoral positions, and secure appropriately funded physiotherapy research positions; 3) improve co-operation between academic (university) and clinical researchers; and 4) develop more flexible research careers to accommodate private practitioner researchers and others wishing to combine clinical work with teaching and research. Physiotherapist researchers need broader career options and seek greater opportunity to link with clinical practice. Encouraging a vibrant research culture should foster professional excellence and enhance our reputation in the community.

  18. A Study Analyzing the Career Path of Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noh, Younghee

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to identify the career movement patterns of librarians, analyze factors influencing their career movements, and compare differences in such factors between librarians and chief librarians. Findings showed that the jobs with the highest retention rate were those in public libraries, that library automation system developers showed…

  19. A Study Analyzing the Career Path of Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noh, Younghee

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to identify the career movement patterns of librarians, analyze factors influencing their career movements, and compare differences in such factors between librarians and chief librarians. Findings showed that the jobs with the highest retention rate were those in public libraries, that library automation system developers showed…

  20. The Apprenticeship of Observation in Career Contexts: A Typology for the Role of Modeling in Teachers' Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinke, Carol R.; Mawhinney, Lynnette; Park, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    This article extends the literature on teachers' career paths by attending to the experiences of educators when they were students in secondary classrooms. Grounded in the perspective that biography is central to teaching, we investigate undergraduate pre-service teachers' educational experiences, views on teaching and learning, and professional…

  1. The Apprenticeship of Observation in Career Contexts: A Typology for the Role of Modeling in Teachers' Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinke, Carol R.; Mawhinney, Lynnette; Park, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    This article extends the literature on teachers' career paths by attending to the experiences of educators when they were students in secondary classrooms. Grounded in the perspective that biography is central to teaching, we investigate undergraduate pre-service teachers' educational experiences, views on teaching and learning, and professional…

  2. Unconscious influences on a choice of a career: implications for organizational consultation.

    PubMed

    Malach-Pines, A; Yafe-Yanai, O

    1999-01-01

    The choice of a career is a highly significant and highly complex process that includes all the spheres of a person's life and continues throughout life. Psychodynamic theory makes a significant contribution to current models of career counseling and organizational consultation by adding the dimension of unconscious career choice. The unconscious determinants of vocational choice are internalized "objects" and "object relations" that reflect the individual's personal and familial history. People choose an occupation that enables them to replicate significant childhood experiences, fulfill needs that were unfulfilled in their childhood or actualize occupational dreams, professional patterns and expectations passed on to them by the familial heritage. The addition of the component of unconscious selection is critical to the full understanding of career choices and the prediction of success and satisfaction in that career. An example that demonstrates this point is presented.

  3. Nurse entrepreneurship: an alternative career choice worth considering.

    PubMed

    Sanoshy, J

    1998-07-01

    With consistent downsizing in today's healthcare arena, many nurses are considering alternative careers. Several ONS members have found creative ways to parlay their nursing education and experience into successful careers that are both fulfilling and profitable.

  4. Career Choices: Working toward a Better Environment. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This brief guide to environmental careers first provides a history of this job market and then in two sections (covering six pages), describes specific jobs and steps to planning a career. The first section describes each job in each of the major categories of careers in the environmental field: (1) Environmental Equipment Operation (attendants…

  5. Motivations for Choosing Teaching as a Career: An International Comparison Using the FIT-Choice Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Helen M. G.; Richardson, Paul W.; Klusmann, Uta; Kunter, Mareike; Beyer, Beate; Trautwein, Ulrich; Baumert, Jurgen

    2012-01-01

    Motivations for preservice teachers' choice of teaching as a career were investigated using the Factors Influencing Teaching Choice scale (FIT-Choice scale; Watt & Richardson, 2007). This scale was initially developed and validated in the Australian context; our study applied it across international samples from Australia, the United States,…

  6. What's Wrong with a Career in Hospitality? An Examination of Student Choice. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Simon; Angliss, William

    2009-01-01

    The preference of students to choose a career in events management over hospitality despite low demand for skills is the focus of this paper. The need for greater involvement of external stakeholders is identified as important in ensuring that students make an informed decision when choosing a career path. A model representing the ideal situation…

  7. Intellectually Gifted Individuals' Career Choices and Work Satisfaction: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persson, Roland S.

    2009-01-01

    This study set out to investigate which career path a group of intellectually gifted individuals chose, if any. How did they actually like their work, and what were the reasons for satisfaction or dissatisfaction with their chosen career? In all, 287 Mensa members (216 men and 71 women) constituted the research group. Their average age was 34.4…

  8. Intellectually Gifted Individuals' Career Choices and Work Satisfaction: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persson, Roland S.

    2009-01-01

    This study set out to investigate which career path a group of intellectually gifted individuals chose, if any. How did they actually like their work, and what were the reasons for satisfaction or dissatisfaction with their chosen career? In all, 287 Mensa members (216 men and 71 women) constituted the research group. Their average age was 34.4…

  9. Curricular Influences on Female Afterschool Facilitators' Computer Science Interests and Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Melissa; Gorges, Torie

    2016-01-01

    Underrepresented populations such as women, African-Americans, and Latinos/as often come to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) careers by less traditional paths than White and Asian males. To better understand how and why women might shift toward STEM, particularly computer science, careers, we investigated the education and…

  10. Curricular Influences on Female Afterschool Facilitators' Computer Science Interests and Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Melissa; Gorges, Torie

    2016-01-01

    Underrepresented populations such as women, African-Americans, and Latinos/as often come to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) careers by less traditional paths than White and Asian males. To better understand how and why women might shift toward STEM, particularly computer science, careers, we investigated the education and…

  11. Burnout and career choice motivation in medical students.

    PubMed

    Pagnin, Daniel; De Queiroz, Valéria; De Oliveira Filho, Márcio Amaral; Gonzalez, Naira Vanessa Anomal; Salgado, Ana Emília Teófilo; Cordeiro e Oliveira, Bernardo; Lodi, Caio Silva; Melo, Raquel Muniz Da Silva

    2013-05-01

    Burnout is a stress-induced syndrome, which affects medical students. Some environmental and personal factors can favor burnout onset and its serious consequences as dropping out, sleep disorders, depression, and suicide. The motivation for choosing medicine is a personal aspect that can modulate the distress with academic demands. We applied self-administered questionnaires in 277 medical students to investigate the predictive role of career choice motivations on burnout dimensions. Specifically, we studied the influence of the main reasons for choosing medicine on emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and academic efficacy. Intellectual curiosity, professional autonomy, altruism, and interest in human relationships were the most common reasons for choosing medicine. However, the medical students motivated by personal illness or family member's illness or death revealed a significant greater emotional exhaustion when compared with the students with other motivations. The students who apply for medical school motivated by illness/death experiences are at a great risk for burnout. We suggest that students who are at risk for emotional exhaustion can be identified at the admission of medical school. Primary prevention strategies for burnout should consider this risk group.

  12. Characteristics of dental hygienists based on Holland's career choice theory.

    PubMed

    Monson, Angela L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey 1,800 current licensed dental hygienists in the U.S. and identify broad and basic interest patterns within Holland's 6 General Occupational Themes. A national stratified random sample of 1,800 members of the American Dental Hygienists' Association was surveyed. Paper and online surveys included the Strong Interest Inventory and the Skills Confidence Inventory. Descriptive statistics and independent t-tests were used to analyze the data. A total of 928 participants (51.9%) completed and returned the paper survey, while 436 participants (24.4%) also completed the online surveys. Results support coding the dental hygiene profession as Investigative - Social - Realistic using the General Occupational Themes. Dental hygienists had the most significant mean differences in the Healthcare Services, Medical Science and Science Basic Interest Scales as compared to the General Representative Sample. Holland's 6 General Occupational Themes have the potential to help guide student choice regarding dental hygiene as a career.

  13. The “new normal”: Adapting doctoral trainee career preparation for broad career paths in science

    PubMed Central

    St. Clair, Rebekah; Hutto, Tamara; MacBeth, Cora; Newstetter, Wendy; McCarty, Nael A.

    2017-01-01

    Doctoral recipients in the biomedical sciences and STEM fields are showing increased interest in career opportunities beyond academic positions. While recent research has addressed the interests and preferences of doctoral trainees for non-academic careers, the strategies and resources that trainees use to prepare for a broad job market (non-academic) are poorly understood. The recent adaptation of the Social Cognitive Career Theory to explicitly highlight the interplay of contextual support mechanisms, individual career search efficacy, and self-adaptation of job search processes underscores the value of attention to this explicit career phase. Our research addresses the factors that affect the career search confidence and job search strategies of doctoral trainees with non-academic career interests and is based on nearly 900 respondents from an NIH-funded survey of doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in the biomedical sciences at two U.S. universities. Using structural equation modeling, we find that trainees pursuing non-academic careers, and/or with low perceived program support for career goals, have lower career development and search process efficacy (CDSE), and receive different levels of support from their advisors/supervisors. We also find evidence of trainee adaptation driven by their career search efficacy, and not by career interests. PMID:28542304

  14. The influence of parenting style on academic achievement and career path

    PubMed Central

    ZAHED ZAHEDANI, ZAHRA; REZAEE, RITA; YAZDANI, ZAHRA; BAGHERI, SINA; NABEIEI, PARISA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several factors affect the academic performance of college students and parenting style is one significant factor. The current study has been done with the purpose of investigating the relationship between parenting styles, academic achievement and career path of students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.     Methods This is a correlation study carried out at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Among 1600 students, 310 students were selected randomly as the sample. Baumrind’s Parenting Style and Moqimi’s Career Path questionnaires were used and the obtained scores were correlated with the students' transcripts. To study the relation between variables Pearson correlation coefficient was used. Results There was a significant relationship between authoritarian parenting style and educational success (p=0.03). Also findings showed a significant relationship between firm parenting style and Career Path of the students, authoritarian parenting style and Career Path of the students, educational success and Career Path of the students (p=0.001). Conclusion Parents have an important role in identifying children’s talent and guiding them. Mutual understanding and close relationship between parents and children are recommended. Therefore, it is recommended that the methods of correct interaction of parents and children be more valued and parents familiarize their children with roles of businesses in society and the need for employment in legitimate businesses and this important affair should be more emphasized through mass media and family training classes. PMID:27382580

  15. The influence of parenting style on academic achievement and career path.

    PubMed

    Zahed Zahedani, Zahra; Rezaee, Rita; Yazdani, Zahra; Bagheri, Sina; Nabeiei, Parisa

    2016-07-01

    Several factors affect the academic performance of college students and parenting style is one significant factor. The current study has been done with the purpose of investigating the relationship between parenting styles, academic achievement and career path of students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This is a correlation study carried out at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Among 1600 students, 310 students were selected randomly as the sample. Baumrind's Parenting Style and Moqimi's Career Path questionnaires were used and the obtained scores were correlated with the students' transcripts. To study the relation between variables Pearson correlation coefficient was used. There was a significant relationship between authoritarian parenting style and educational success (p=0.03). Also findings showed a significant relationship between firm parenting style and Career Path of the students, authoritarian parenting style and Career Path of the students, educational success and Career Path of the students (p=0.001). Parents have an important role in identifying children's talent and guiding them. Mutual understanding and close relationship between parents and children are recommended. Therefore, it is recommended that the methods of correct interaction of parents and children be more valued and parents familiarize their children with roles of businesses in society and the need for employment in legitimate businesses and this important affair should be more emphasized through mass media and family training classes.

  16. The Role of Career Barriers in High School Students' Career Choice Behavior in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley; Wang, Ying-Fen; Liu, Ling-Chun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of career barriers in social cognitive career theory (R. W. Lent, S. D. Brown, & G. Hackett, 1994). The participants were 584 high school students in Taiwan, Republic of China. The gender differences in perceived career barriers and career self-efficacy were significant. Results of hierarchical…

  17. The Role of Career Barriers in High School Students' Career Choice Behavior in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley; Wang, Ying-Fen; Liu, Ling-Chun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of career barriers in social cognitive career theory (R. W. Lent, S. D. Brown, & G. Hackett, 1994). The participants were 584 high school students in Taiwan, Republic of China. The gender differences in perceived career barriers and career self-efficacy were significant. Results of hierarchical…

  18. How Did I Get Here? - The Role of Unconscious Bias in Career Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezek, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    I will discuss how an individual's implicit biases and those of the educators, mentors, and potential employers he or she interacts with can impact career decisions all along the career path. I will present ideas about how an individual can identify his or her own interests, skills, and talents, and promote those to potential employers as well as ideas for those serving on search committees to minimize the impact of unconscious bias during the entire hiring process.

  19. An Expanded Conceptual Framework of Medical Students' Primary Care Career Choice.

    PubMed

    Pfarrwaller, Eva; Audétat, Marie-Claude; Sommer, Johanna; Maisonneuve, Hubert; Bischoff, Thomas; Nendaz, Mathieu; Baroffio, Anne; Junod Perron, Noëlle; Haller, Dagmar M

    2017-04-04

    In many countries, the number of graduating medical students pursuing a primary care career does not meet demand. These countries face primary care physician shortages. Students' career choices have been widely studied, yet many aspects of this process remain unclear. Conceptual models are useful to plan research and educational interventions in such complex systems.The authors developed a framework of primary care career choice in undergraduate medical education, which expands on previously published models. They used a group-based, iterative approach to find the best way to represent the vast array of influences identified in previous studies, including in a recent systematic review of the literature on interventions to increase the proportion of students choosing a primary care career. In their framework, students enter medical school with their personal characteristics and initial interest in primary care. They complete a process of career decision making, which is subject to multiple interacting influences, both within and outside medical school, throughout their medical education. These influences are stratified into four systems-microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem, and macrosystem-which represent different levels of interaction with students' career choices.This expanded framework provides an updated model to help understand the multiple factors that influence medical students' career choices. It offers a guide for the development of new interventions to increase the proportion of students choosing primary care careers and for further research to better understand the variety of processes involved in this decision.

  20. Feeling the Threat: Stereotype Threat as a Contextual Barrier to Women's Science Career Choice Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deemer, Eric D.; Thoman, Dustin B.; Chase, Justin P.; Smith, Jessi L.

    2014-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994, 2000) holds that contextual barriers inhibit self-efficacy and goal choice intentions from points both near and far from the active career development situation. The current study examined the influence of one such proximal barrier, stereotype threat, on attainment of these…

  1. Perceived Influences on the Career Choices of Children and Youth: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly A. S.; Flanagan, Sean; Castine, Eleanor; Walsh, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Children's understanding of factors influencing their career choices was examined. Seventy-two children, in grades kindergarten, 4, and 8, responded to questions about their perceptions of career influences. Responses were coded to capture the nature of the influences identified, including the global versus specific and linear versus interacting…

  2. Underneath It All: Gender Role Identification and Women Chemists' Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunert, Megan L.; Bodner, George M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes results from a study on the career choices of women earning doctorates in chemistry in the United States. Presented here are findings related to the participants' identification with traditional female gender roles and expectations for behavior in the male-dominated field of chemistry. Underlying a career decision-making model…

  3. Enhancing Interest in Nursing as a Career Choice with Fifth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Pamela Lee

    2008-01-01

    This research was designed to provide information on the career development of fifth-grade students and to explore the influence of an education program on children's interest in nursing as a career choice, especially related to gender. Interest in nursing is conceptualized as interest, competence perception, and desire to help other people. A…

  4. Teaching Teachers about Supply Chain Management to Influence Students' Career and Education Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Leslie L.

    2013-01-01

    Since teachers are influential in high school students' career choices, enabling high school teachers to introduce educational and career opportunities in supply chain management is a viable strategy for reaching high school students about these opportunities. This article presents a pilot program of supply chain workshops to educate high school…

  5. Increasing the Career Choice Readiness of Young Adolescents: An Evaluation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschi, Andreas; Lage, Damian

    2008-01-01

    A career workshop that applies models of the Cognitive Information Processing Approach (Sampson, Reardon, Peterson, & Lenz, 2004) and incorporates critical ingredients (Brown and Ryan Krane, 2000) to promote the career choice readiness of young adolescents was developed and evaluated with 334 Swiss students in seventh grade applying a Solomon…

  6. Women Leaders in Student Affairs: A Case Study Exploring Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor-Costello, Julie

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative, multiple case study explored what women working in student affairs reported as influences on their career choices and the impact that the type and level of student interaction has on their careers. Data from semi-structured interviews and journal entries were obtained from ten women working in student affairs at private,…

  7. Factors Influencing the Career Choice of Undergraduate Students at a Historically Disadvantaged South African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Fatima; Jano, Rukhsana; van Lill, Burger

    2015-01-01

    During the apartheid years in South Africa, career guidance amongst disadvantaged learners was largely absent and, for many, career choices were limited and governed by politics. Despite South Africa having celebrated 20 years of democracy, this situation has improved only slightly. Therefore, the aims of the study were to determine the factors…

  8. Enhancing Interest in Nursing as a Career Choice with Fifth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Pamela Lee

    2008-01-01

    This research was designed to provide information on the career development of fifth-grade students and to explore the influence of an education program on children's interest in nursing as a career choice, especially related to gender. Interest in nursing is conceptualized as interest, competence perception, and desire to help other people. A…

  9. Women Leaders in Student Affairs: A Case Study Exploring Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor-Costello, Julie

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative, multiple case study explored what women working in student affairs reported as influences on their career choices and the impact that the type and level of student interaction has on their careers. Data from semi-structured interviews and journal entries were obtained from ten women working in student affairs at private,…

  10. The Effects of Framing Vocational Choices on Young Adults' Sets of Career Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Daniel C.; Whitcomb, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The present paper examines the effects of two decision-framing inductions on young adults' set of career options: first, whether young adults use abilities or interests as the grounds for their vocational choices and, second, whether young adults approach the decision-making task by including all career options to which they feel…

  11. Perceived Influences on the Career Choices of Children and Youth: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly A. S.; Flanagan, Sean; Castine, Eleanor; Walsh, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Children's understanding of factors influencing their career choices was examined. Seventy-two children, in grades kindergarten, 4, and 8, responded to questions about their perceptions of career influences. Responses were coded to capture the nature of the influences identified, including the global versus specific and linear versus interacting…

  12. Factors Influencing the Career Choice of Undergraduate Students at a Historically Disadvantaged South African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Fatima; Jano, Rukhsana; van Lill, Burger

    2015-01-01

    During the apartheid years in South Africa, career guidance amongst disadvantaged learners was largely absent and, for many, career choices were limited and governed by politics. Despite South Africa having celebrated 20 years of democracy, this situation has improved only slightly. Therefore, the aims of the study were to determine the factors…

  13. Effects of Social Supports on the Career Choice Consideration of Chinese Farmers: A Social Cognitive Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Li

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from social cognitive career theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994), this study explored social supports' influence on the career choice consideration of farmers during China's current process of urbanization. A questionnaire was designed based on interviews with 140 people and a pretest with a sample of 419 participants. A total of 628…

  14. Teaching Teachers about Supply Chain Management to Influence Students' Career and Education Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Leslie L.

    2013-01-01

    Since teachers are influential in high school students' career choices, enabling high school teachers to introduce educational and career opportunities in supply chain management is a viable strategy for reaching high school students about these opportunities. This article presents a pilot program of supply chain workshops to educate high school…

  15. Prospective Teachers' Interest in Teaching, Professional Plans about Teaching and Career Choice Satisfaction: A Relevant Framework?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eren, Altay

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationships among prospective teachers' interest in teaching, professional engagement and career development aspirations, and career choice satisfaction. A total of 602 prospective teachers from various primary (for example, primary school teaching) and secondary (for example, English language teaching) teacher…

  16. Values and Career Choice at the Beginning of the MBA Educational Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigoda-Gadot, Eran; Grimland, Shmuel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: With the change in global and local markets and the emergence of new types of careers such as protean careers (which are values-driven), individual values (i.e. citizenship behaviors, altruistic standards, and helping activities) seem to have a growing effect on decisions people make about significant choices in their lives such as the…

  17. Second-Generation Psychologists: An Examination of Parental Impact on Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roland, Elisabeth Zal

    2010-01-01

    This research examined the issue of psychologists' career choice, focusing on the presence of a psychologist parent as a contributing factor, and explored the reasons why children of psychologists might choose a career in psychology. Additionally, this research sought to establish if there was a consistent relationship between psychologist parent…

  18. Feeling the Threat: Stereotype Threat as a Contextual Barrier to Women's Science Career Choice Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deemer, Eric D.; Thoman, Dustin B.; Chase, Justin P.; Smith, Jessi L.

    2014-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994, 2000) holds that contextual barriers inhibit self-efficacy and goal choice intentions from points both near and far from the active career development situation. The current study examined the influence of one such proximal barrier, stereotype threat, on attainment of these…

  19. Prospective Teachers' Interest in Teaching, Professional Plans about Teaching and Career Choice Satisfaction: A Relevant Framework?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eren, Altay

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationships among prospective teachers' interest in teaching, professional engagement and career development aspirations, and career choice satisfaction. A total of 602 prospective teachers from various primary (for example, primary school teaching) and secondary (for example, English language teaching) teacher…

  20. Inner--Other Direction as the Critical Factor in Scientific Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, V. R.

    1969-01-01

    Presents the procedures, results, and conclusions of a study of the personality traits of 108 high school seniors planning careers in the physical sciences. The hypothesis that students who scored low on the physical science scales of the Strong Vocational Blank, but who indicated physical science as their career choice were motivated by their…

  1. Chance, Choice, and Opportunity in the Careers of Four Women Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Beth

    Life history interviews with four women holding doctorates in educational administration are presented in this paper, which examines how chances and choice affect women administrators' career decisions. A second focus is on how organizational structure in educational organizations can enhance career opportunities for women educators. Three…

  2. It's About Time: Parental Activities To Help Middle Grade Students Begin To Think About Career Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Suzanne; Gahris, Cynthia; Reeder, Marcia; Tizzano, Anthony

    This document, which is intended for parents of Ohio students in grade 8, explains the purpose and content of the Individual Career Plan (ICP) and provides activities through which parents can help their children begin to think about career choice. The document begins with an overview of the ICP, which is a scrapbook-like document that Ohio…

  3. The Effects of Framing Vocational Choices on Young Adults' Sets of Career Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Daniel C.; Whitcomb, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The present paper examines the effects of two decision-framing inductions on young adults' set of career options: first, whether young adults use abilities or interests as the grounds for their vocational choices and, second, whether young adults approach the decision-making task by including all career options to which they feel…

  4. Effects of Social Supports on the Career Choice Consideration of Chinese Farmers: A Social Cognitive Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Li

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from social cognitive career theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994), this study explored social supports' influence on the career choice consideration of farmers during China's current process of urbanization. A questionnaire was designed based on interviews with 140 people and a pretest with a sample of 419 participants. A total of 628…

  5. Career and Program Choice of Students of Color in Student Affairs Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Chris; Simmons, Cara Winston

    2015-01-01

    Student affairs educators have long advocated increasing the racial diversity of student affairs. To improve the recruitment of Students of Color to student affairs, we engaged critical race methodology to examine career and graduate program choice of 29 students of Color in 26 graduate programs. Participants chose careers in student affairs…

  6. Career and Program Choice of Students of Color in Student Affairs Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Chris; Simmons, Cara Winston

    2015-01-01

    Student affairs educators have long advocated increasing the racial diversity of student affairs. To improve the recruitment of Students of Color to student affairs, we engaged critical race methodology to examine career and graduate program choice of 29 students of Color in 26 graduate programs. Participants chose careers in student affairs…

  7. Experience and Observations on the Choice of Career among Disadvantaged Students in North-Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlovitz, János Tibor; Gyukits, György

    2016-01-01

    It appears--and this is apparent from school documentation--that every school considers its duty to support career orientation. At the same time, it is obvious that guiding the process of making career choices exists only on the level of references. As we did not question teachers, we have only tiny fragments what is done for the sake of career…

  8. Student pharmacists' career choices: a survey of three Nigerian schools of pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Ubaka, Chukwuemeka M; Ochie, Uche M; Adibe, Maxwell O

    2013-07-01

    There is little data on the preferences of pharmacy students as regards their future pharmacy job choices in Africa and this has created concerns amongst licensing bodies, employers and also the institutions they graduate from. Career choices and factors that influence these choices of pre-registration pharmacists were assessed. Final and fourth year students from three schools of pharmacy were approached with a previously validated and employed questionnaire comprising questions on future job choices and reasons for that job choice. Data collected were subjected to descriptive and inferential analysis. Four hundred and eighty eight students took part in the study (response rate 71.5%). Majority (78.8%) was younger than 26 years and had a work experience (68.2%). Job flexibility was significantly more important to females, while younger students considered salary most important (p<0.05). Hospital and community practice were most preferred career choices. Other demographic factors (especially gender, marital status, previous degree and previous work experience) significantly affected career choices. Age, gender, and previous work experience affect career choices of graduating pharmacy students. Patient-oriented practices (e.g. hospital and community) remain the most preferred careers.

  9. Student pharmacists’ career choices: a survey of three Nigerian schools of pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Ubaka, Chukwuemeka M.; Ochie, Uche M.; Adibe, Maxwell O.

    Background There is little data on the preferences of pharmacy students as regards their future pharmacy job choices in Africa and this has created concerns amongst licensing bodies, employers and also the institutions they graduate from. Objective Career choices and factors that influence these choices of pre-registration pharmacists were assessed. Methods Final and fourth year students from three schools of pharmacy were approached with a previously validated and employed questionnaire comprising questions on future job choices and reasons for that job choice. Data collected were subjected to descriptive and inferential analysis. Results Four hundred and eighty eight students took part in the study (response rate 71.5%). Majority (78.8%) was younger than 26 years and had a work experience (68.2%). Job flexibility was significantly more important to females, while younger students considered salary most important (p<0.05). Hospital and community practice were most preferred career choices. Other demographic factors (especially gender, marital status, previous degree and previous work experience) significantly affected career choices. Conclusions Age, gender, and previous work experience affect career choices of graduating pharmacy students. Patient-oriented practices (e.g. hospital and community) remain the most preferred careers. PMID:24223080

  10. Examining Middle School Students' Awareness of Their Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsuwaidi, Sultan A.

    2012-01-01

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) education system is missing an educational plan that can provide students the necessary information to learn about themselves and the world of work and help them make a smooth transition from primary school to secondary schools and the workplace. To address this gap, this study examined 9th graders' career awareness…

  11. From Senior to Freshman: Career Paths Workshop for Women Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Barbara R.; D'Lugin, Victor

    A career planning workshop program was conducted for New York City twelfth-grade female students intending to enroll in community colleges. Its purpose was to assist them in the transition to college while motivating them to consider nontraditional courses of study. In an attempt to increase participants' interest in male-dominated career…

  12. The Interrupted Managerial Career Path: A Longitudinal Study of MBAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneer, Joy A.; Reitman, Frieda

    1997-01-01

    From a sample of 925 business administration graduates in 1987 and 676 in 1993, data from 513 employed full time at both periods were analyzed. Early career gaps had negative effects on employment level and income; midcareer gaps negatively affected women only. However, those with discontinuous employment histories did not have diminished career…

  13. Examining Middle School Students' Awareness of Their Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsuwaidi, Sultan A.

    2012-01-01

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) education system is missing an educational plan that can provide students the necessary information to learn about themselves and the world of work and help them make a smooth transition from primary school to secondary schools and the workplace. To address this gap, this study examined 9th graders' career awareness…

  14. New Paths to Success. Book Excerpt/Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pensias, Arno

    1995-01-01

    As a result of technology, tomorrow's worker will be able to spend more time away from the office, connecting with customers, partners, suppliers, and colleagues. Managers' ability to create coherence through shared vision and a common set of professional values will rank among their more important career assets. (Author/JOW)

  15. Career choice and perceptions of nursing among healthcare students in higher educational institutions.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Sok Ying; Wu, Ling Ting; Chow, Yeow Leng; Lim, Siriwan; Tan, Khoon Kiat

    2017-05-01

    Due to the ageing population and competition from other healthcare courses, a greater demand in the healthcare workforce has made it challenging for educational institutions to attract school leavers to enter nursing courses. Understanding the considerations of students who have chosen non-nursing healthcare courses and their perceptions of nursing can help identify specific strategies to enhance the attractiveness of nursing course. This study aims to examine the differences between healthcare career choices and perceptions of nursing as a career choice among first-year non-nursing healthcare students. A descriptive survey design was conducted at the beginning of the healthcare courses of seven healthcare groups and from four higher educational institutions in Singapore. A total of 451 students responded, yielding an overall response rate of 52.7%. The online survey was administered using a valid and reliable 35-item parallel scale, known as the Healthcare Career Choice and Nursing Career Choice. The participants perceived prior healthcare exposure as the most influential factor and self-efficacy as the least influential factor when choosing nursing as a career. In comparison to their own healthcare career choices, nursing was perceived to have greater gender stigma and, as nurses, they would be less likely to achieve higher qualifications and career advancements, and they would be less likely to enjoy fulfilling careers. They also perceived that they would be less likely to gain their parents' support to pursue nursing and to make their parents proud. This study provides educators and policy-makers with vital information to develop key strategies to improve nursing enrolment in educational institutions. These strategies include early exposure to nursing as a rewarding career during school years, addressing the issue of gender stigma, and promoting information on the career and educational advancement of a registered nurse to parents of school leavers. Copyright

  16. Career paths of 1988 and 1998 nurse graduates in Switzerland: nurses at work pilot study.

    PubMed

    Addor, V; Jeannin, A; Schwendimann, R; Roulet Jeanneret, F

    2017-05-01

    To investigate career paths and nurses' reasons to quit their job in Switzerland. Increasing the duration of employment is the most efficient measure to reduce the worldwide nursing shortage. The results of the pilot phase for the retrospective cohort nurses at work study are presented. In 2012, 1085 graduates' names of two test-cohorts (1988 and 1998) from 26 Swiss nursing schools were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire. A snowball method was applied to recruit their graduate mates, together with advertisements through employers, study partners and a press release. The overall participation rate was 26.5% (n = 287). The median duration of employment in nursing was 23 and 14 years, respectively, and 80% of the potential employment time was spent within nursing. Half of the respondents reported they had left a sector of care, or nursing altogether, at least once, for personal choices, work-family conflict, heavy schedules, high workload, underused skills, lack of participation in decision-making or unsupportive nursing management. Most Swiss-trained nurses were still employed in nursing 24 and 14 years after graduation, respectively, with a third having worked part-time periods. Provisional retention recommendations are provided, which will be tested in the full study with validated instruments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Behavioral Exploration of Career and Specialty Choice in Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the process by which students naturally construct and internalize their educational experiences relating to career development is important to career counseling. The author investigated how exploratory behaviors during a community-based field experience course contributed to the vocational development of 1st-year medical students.…

  18. Sex and Race as Career Choice Determinants in the Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, Elaine F.; Sieferth, Berniece B.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of community college students discloses the power of stereotypes in career decision making for women and minorities. Neutralization of such stereotypes is vital to development of a balanced work force in technical careers. Survey procedures, findings, and recommendations are included. (CT)

  19. Sex and Race as Career Choice Determinants in the Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, Elaine F.; Sieferth, Berniece B.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of community college students discloses the power of stereotypes in career decision making for women and minorities. Neutralization of such stereotypes is vital to development of a balanced work force in technical careers. Survey procedures, findings, and recommendations are included. (CT)

  20. Behavioral Exploration of Career and Specialty Choice in Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the process by which students naturally construct and internalize their educational experiences relating to career development is important to career counseling. The author investigated how exploratory behaviors during a community-based field experience course contributed to the vocational development of 1st-year medical students.…

  1. Ten Critical Choices for Combining Career and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stryker, Sandy

    1989-01-01

    Ways to combine family and career include viewing work and family life as interconnected; choosing satisfying career with scheduling flexibility and salary adjustment potential; choosing partner and time to marry; choosing whether and when to have children and how to care for them; setting priorities at home and work; and obtaining education and…

  2. Pharmacy career deciding: making choice a "good fit".

    PubMed

    Willis, Sarah Caroline; Shann, Phillip; Hassell, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore factors influencing career deciding amongst pharmacy students and graduates in the U.K. Group interviews were used to devise a topic guide for five subsequent focus groups with pharmacy students and graduates. Focus groups were tape-recorded, recordings transcribed, and transcripts analysed. Key themes and interlinking factors relating to pharmacy career deciding were identified in the transcripts, following a constructivist approach. Participants' described making a "good fit" between themselves, their experiences, social networks etc. and pharmacy. Central to a coherent career deciding narrative were: having a job on graduation; and the instrumental advantage of studying a vocational course. Focusing on career deciding of UK pharmacy students and graduates may limit the study's generalisability to other countries. However, our findings are relevant to those interested in understanding students' motivations for healthcare careers, since our results suggest that making a "good fit" describes a general process of matching between a healthcare career and personal experience. As we have found that pharmacy career deciding was not, usually, a planned activity, career advisors and those involved in higher education recruitment should take into account the roles played by personal preferences and values in choosing a degree course. A qualitative study like this can illustrate how career deciding occurs and provide insight into the process from a student's perspective. This can help inform guidance processes, selection to healthcare professions courses within the higher education sector, and stimulate debate amongst those involved with recruitment of healthcare workers about desirable motivators for healthcare careers.

  3. Military Careers: A Guide to Military Occupations and Selected Military Career Paths, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This book was developed to help educators and youth learn about career opportunities in the military. It is a compendium of military occupational, training, and career information and is designed for use by students interested in the military. The first section, military occupations, contains descriptions of 197 enlisted and officer occupations.…

  4. The career paths of women (and men) in French research.

    PubMed

    de Cheveigné, Suzanne

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents results from a qualitative study of perceptions of science careers in the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), the main research institution in France. Its aim is to understand the 'glass ceiling' effect, which reduces the proportion of women at the higher levels of the career hierarchy. Long interviews were carried out with men, as well as women, support staff and researchers. Factors such as tension between individual and collective dimensions of research activity, and long-term time-management problems, were identified: these affect both men and women but in different ways. Organizations bear an important responsibility through the way they reinforce or alleviate difficulties that women and men face in contributing to scientific research at all levels.

  5. Preparing Future Scholars for Academia and Beyond: A Mixed Method Investigation of Doctoral Students' Preparedness for Multiple Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cason, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This action research study is a mixed methods investigation of doctoral students' preparedness for multiple career paths. PhD students face two challenges preparing for multiple career paths: lack of preparation and limited engagement in conversations about the value of their research across multiple audiences. This study focuses on PhD students'…

  6. Preparing Future Scholars for Academia and Beyond: A Mixed Method Investigation of Doctoral Students' Preparedness for Multiple Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cason, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This action research study is a mixed methods investigation of doctoral students' preparedness for multiple career paths. PhD students face two challenges preparing for multiple career paths: lack of preparation and limited engagement in conversations about the value of their research across multiple audiences. This study focuses on PhD students'…

  7. Becoming a nurse: a meta-study of early professional socialization and career choice in nursing.

    PubMed

    Price, Sheri L

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a report of a meta-study of early professional socialization and career choice in nursing. The current and growing shortage of nurses is a global issue, and nursing recruitment and retention are recognized priorities internationally. The future of nursing will lie in the ability to recruit and retain the next generation to the profession. Studies were identified through a search of the CINAHL, PsycInfo, Sociological Abstracts, PubMed; Medline and Embase databases from 1990 to 2007. Studies were included if they gave insight into the experience of choosing nursing as a career, used qualitative methodology and methods, and were published in English. Analysis was undertaken using Paterson et al.'s framework for qualitative meta-synthesis. Ten primary studies were included in the review. Their methodologies included: ethnography (4); descriptive qualitative (3); grounded theory (2); and phenomenology (1). The location of the research was Canada (3), United Kingdom (2), United States of America (2), Australia (1), Japan (1) and Sweden (1). Three main themes were identified: influence of ideals; paradox of caring and role of others. Career choice and early professional socialization are influenced by multiple factors. In future recruitment and retention strategies to address the critical nursing shortage, it is important to consider the role of mentors, peers and role models in the formulation of career expectations, and career choice decisions. It is also necessary to consider the role of mentors, peers and role models in the formulation of career expectations, and career choice decisions.

  8. Future directions for career choice research in nursing: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Price, Sheri

    2009-02-01

    The last few decades have seen considerable changes in the characteristics of the healthcare workplace and workforce. There is a significant emphasis on recruitment and retention of healthcare providers internationally especially within the profession of Nursing, where there is a critical and growing shortage of nurses. Career choice is a critical component of recruitment and retention strategies and has significant organizational implications in regards to person-environment fit, career satisfaction and commitment. Many extant career choice theories fail to capture the challenges, complexities and uncertainties of the 21st century. Moreover, some early theories do not recognize the unique characteristics of upcoming generational cohorts and the multivariate influences on their career decisions. An extensive review and synthesis of the related literature provide the basis for a critical discussion on the adoption of new methodological approaches to exploring career choice in Nursing. The use of qualitative and mixed method approaches, a focus on generational differences and an exploration of adaptive and adjustment processes to career change provide a foundation for future career choice research and theoretical development which are reflective of the characteristics of the contemporary employee and the reality of modern healthcare organizations.

  9. Focused Career Choices: How Teacher Educators Can Assist Students with Purposeful Career Decision-Making throughout a Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, Jennifer; Packman, Jill

    2011-01-01

    The authors believe that many teacher educators are charged with teaching and advising those seeking initial teacher licensure. They must make a concerted effort to have students reflect seriously on the meanings they are constructing of their work. They need to ask them to gauge continually their confidence in their career choice when they are…

  10. Transitions in Leisure Careers and Their Parallels in Work Careers: The Effect of Constraints on Choice and Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Fiona A. E.; Jackson, Edgar L.

    2002-01-01

    Literature was reviewed on constraints on leisure time choices and on serious leisure (continuous engagement in an activity, which becomes a leisure "career"). Insights include the following: (1) constraints are not necessarily insurmountable but may be negotiated; (2) responses to constraints are not necessarily passive; and (3)…

  11. Seekers, Finders, Settlers, and Stumblers: Identifying the Career Paths of Males in the Genetic Counseling Profession.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anthony; Veach, Pat McCarthy; Schoonveld, Cheri; Zierhut, Heather

    2017-03-14

    Genetic counseling is a female-dominated profession, with 96% of counselors self-identifying as female. Research suggests gender diversification benefits healthcare professionals and the populations they serve. Therefore, this study explored how men choose a genetic counseling career, associations between career satisfaction and their career entry dynamics and experience levels, and differences due to experience level in how they decide on this profession. Twenty-five novice, experienced, or seasoned male counselors and 8 male genetic counseling students participated in semi-structured phone interviews. Interpretive content and cross-case analyses of interview data were informed by Simpson's "Seekers, Finders, and Settlers" theory describing career entry dynamics of men in non-traditional (i.e., female-dominated) fields. Results revealed 13 interviewees were Seekers, who initially knew they wanted a career in genetic counseling, actively chose the profession, and were satisfied with their decision. Eleven were Settlers, who had tried different, traditional jobs, with limited satisfaction before actively finding and choosing genetic counseling. Two were Finders, who discovered genetic counseling while in the career decision making process and made a passive choice to pursue it as they had no feasible, satisfactory alternative. Seven men fit a new category, we termed "Stumblers," who were in another career and satisfied, but changed to genetic counseling after happening to hear about it. Prevalent themes pertaining to participants' experiences in the career include desire for a multidisciplinary career; lack of a priori knowledge of genetic counselor roles; late exposure to the profession; and varied perceptions of being in a non-traditional career. There were few differences due to experience level and career satisfaction was high across the sample. Results suggest earlier exposure to the career and availability of detailed descriptions of its multidisciplinary

  12. What Are Faculty Advisors To Do When Their Own Career Path Does Not Satisfy Their Students?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    As graduate students seek advice on broad career options, many faculty advisors do not know what to do. It is easy for them to do nothing. They may do nothing because they assume that their own students are interested only in an academic research career like theirs. The mistake here can be that the advisors' verbal and non-verbal communication deters students from mentioning their interests in the first place or pursuing those interests, if mentioned. Or advisors may do nothing by assuming that it is not their responsibility to advise students about career options other than being an academic researcher. The advisors' lack of knowledge about other careers may lead them to avoid the issue. The mistake here is obvious. So what are advisors to do? They can encourage students to think of their graduate study as part of their career preparation, not just a task to obtain a research degree. Creating a risk-free environment for career discussion will enable faculty advisors to learn each student's career priorities and validate exploration of broad career options. Advisors should not feel inadequate by being unable to advise about everything. No one expects them to. They can encourage their students to meet together, on their own if necessary, to discuss common career concerns, even to invite speakers, including alums, to talk about different careers and the preparation required. They can encourage their students to seek additional mentors, people more knowledgeable about careers of interest to the students. They can encourage students to take courses for career preparation, particularly courses outside of science, even though these courses "take them away from their research." And advisors should not hold students at fault if they change their minds about career paths. More information often changes minds. These are a few of the many things that advisors can do. It is essential that faculty advisors not resent students' decisions to follow a career path different from

  13. Social Cognitive Career Theory and the Prediction of Interests and Choice Goals in the Computing Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, Robert W.; Lopez, Antonio M., Jr.; Lopez, Frederick G.; Sheu, Hung-Bin

    2008-01-01

    We tested the fit of the social cognitive choice model [Lent, R.W., Brown, S.D., & Hackett, G. (1994). "Toward a unifying social cognitive theory of career and academic interest, choice, and performance [Monograph]." "Journal of Vocational Behavior," 45, 79-122] to the data across gender, educational level, and type of university among students in…

  14. Self-Definition in Thought, Action, and Life Path Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Sharon Rae

    1996-01-01

    Internally-developed identity and behavior patterns were related to plans, actions, rationales, and life outcomes over 14 years in a sample of 118 women. Self-defining women showed more autonomy in personal relationship and took more initiatives than socially-defined women, who reported more career indecision and more role conflict. (JPS)

  15. The Bands Culture in Victoria, Australia: Live Music Benefits Career Paths, Employment and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Amanda; Forrest, David

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the career paths, employment, business opportunities and community contributions made available through the provision and development of the contemporary performance bands' culture in the State of Victoria. It is framed with the support given to live music performers by Arts Victoria, Small Business Victoria and Music Victoria.…

  16. Women Chief Academic Officers of Public Community Colleges: Significant Predictors for Their Career Paths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Cynthia B.; Cejda, Brent D.

    As women now comprise 39% of the chief academic officer (CAO) positions, the focus of this investigation was the career paths and mobility factors of women CAOs in public comprehensive community colleges. This survey of 142 women resulted in eight distinct, common pathways by which women attain this rank. The typical profile of a female CAO is a…

  17. Social Cognitive Career Theory, Conscientiousness, and Work Performance: A Meta-Analytic Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Steven D.; Lent, Robert W.; Telander, Kyle; Tramayne, Selena

    2011-01-01

    We performed a meta-analytic path analysis of an abbreviated version of social cognitive career theory's (SCCT) model of work performance (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994). The model we tested included the central cognitive predictors of performance (ability, self-efficacy, performance goals), with the exception of outcome expectations. Results…

  18. Undergraduate Music Program Alumni's Career Path, Retrospective Institutional Satisfaction, and Financial Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter; Hime, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine undergraduate music education and performance alumni's career path, retrospective institutional satisfaction, and financial status. Data for this study were drawn from respondents from the 2010 administration of the nationwide, multi-institutional survey conducted by the Strategic National Arts Alumni…

  19. Career Path Trends of Alumni from a U.S. TESOL Graduate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priddis, Eimi; Tanner, Mark W.; Henrichsen, Lynn E.; Warner, Ben; Anderson, Neil J.; Dewey, Dan P.

    2013-01-01

    As English expands across the world, quality English teachers are increasingly needed. However, reports that even degree-holding TESOL professionals have a hard time obtaining stable employment are prevalent. This study sought to provide empirical evidence about career paths in TESOL based on survey responses from 250 alumni of a well-established…

  20. Enlisted Career Paths for Top Snipes and Combat Systems Maintenance Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Enlisted Career Paths for Top Snipes and Combat Systems Maintenance Managers Warren T. Sutton • Yevgeniya K. Pinelis with David L. Reese...sea. The Navy remains confident in the capabilities of the sailors selected for these key senior positions at sea. At the heart of the proficiency

  1. Undergraduate Music Program Alumni's Career Path, Retrospective Institutional Satisfaction, and Financial Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter; Hime, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine undergraduate music education and performance alumni's career path, retrospective institutional satisfaction, and financial status. Data for this study were drawn from respondents from the 2010 administration of the nationwide, multi-institutional survey conducted by the Strategic National Arts Alumni…

  2. Social Cognitive Career Theory, Conscientiousness, and Work Performance: A Meta-Analytic Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Steven D.; Lent, Robert W.; Telander, Kyle; Tramayne, Selena

    2011-01-01

    We performed a meta-analytic path analysis of an abbreviated version of social cognitive career theory's (SCCT) model of work performance (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994). The model we tested included the central cognitive predictors of performance (ability, self-efficacy, performance goals), with the exception of outcome expectations. Results…

  3. Highways and Byways: The Career Paths of Senior Student Affairs Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tull, Ashley; Miller, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    The highways and byways, or career paths, to the Senior Student Affairs Officer (SSAO) position differ based on a variety of variables. This study examined several variables including the induction or graduate preparation process, professional pathways, and professional and academic involvement of more than half of current land grant SSAOs. Data…

  4. Career Path Decisions of Masters-Level Mathematics Students: A Comparative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Chris; Hemasinha, Rohan

    2012-01-01

    There has been a flurry of research activity, in recent years, on the various aspects of STEM programs in the U.S. Yet there is scant research on vocational selection and career path aspirations of mathematics (hereon, math) students during their graduate-level education. The current study, based on a mixed-design, from data obtained on a small…

  5. Career Path Decisions of Masters-Level Mathematics Students: A Comparative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Chris; Hemasinha, Rohan

    2012-01-01

    There has been a flurry of research activity, in recent years, on the various aspects of STEM programs in the U.S. Yet there is scant research on vocational selection and career path aspirations of mathematics (hereon, math) students during their graduate-level education. The current study, based on a mixed-design, from data obtained on a small…

  6. Examining the Career Paths and Transition Services of Students with Disabilities Exiting High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Robert M.; Flexer, Robert W.; Dennis, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Career paths and transition services were investigated for students with disabilities who were exiting special education for comparison with two models of transition developed by Siegel (1998) and Greene (2003). Teachers and parent-mentors from 52 local education agencies (LEAs) conducted a record review and an exit interview of 741 students with…

  7. Nonstandard Career Paths and Profiles of Commitment to Life Roles: A Complex Relation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Genevieve; Lachance, Lise; Bujold, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The career paths (ascending, interesting, uninteresting, descending) of 124 White Canadian francophones (62 men, 62 women) who had experienced nonstandard and precarious work for the last three years were examined in relation to the participants' profiles of commitment to three life roles (work, family, and duality, that is, investment in both…

  8. Examining the Career Paths and Transition Services of Students with Disabilities Exiting High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Robert M.; Flexer, Robert W.; Dennis, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Career paths and transition services were investigated for students with disabilities who were exiting special education for comparison with two models of transition developed by Siegel (1998) and Greene (2003). Teachers and parent-mentors from 52 local education agencies (LEAs) conducted a record review and an exit interview of 741 students with…

  9. Project CHOICE: #111. A Career Education Unit for Grades 3 and 4. Introduction to Dairy Occupations. (Agriculture and Ecological Studies Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Introduction to Dairy Occupations, is one in a series of career guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking third and fourth grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. Part of the…

  10. A conceptual model for determining career choice of CHROME alumna based on farmer's conceptual models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Lisa Simmons

    This qualitative program evaluation examines the career decision-making processes and career choices of nine, African American women who participated in the Cooperating Hampton Roads Organization for Minorities in Engineering (CHROME) and who graduated from urban, rural or suburban high schools in the year 2000. The CHROME program is a nonprofit, pre-college intervention program that encourages underrepresented minority and female students to enter science, technically related, engineering, and math (STEM) career fields. The study describes career choices and decisions made by each participant over a five-year period since high school graduation. Data was collected through an Annual Report, Post High School Questionnaires, Environmental Support Questionnaires, Career Choice Questionnaires, Senior Reports, and standardized open-ended interviews. Data was analyzed using a model based on Helen C. Farmer's Conceptual Models, John Ogbu's Caste Theory and Feminist Theory. The CHROME program, based on its stated goals and tenets, was also analyzed against study findings. Findings indicated that participants received very low levels of support from counselors and teachers to pursue STEM careers and high levels of support from parents and family, the CHROME program and financial backing. Findings of this study also indicated that the majority of CHROME alumna persisted in STEM careers. The most successful participants, in terms of undergraduate degree completion and occupational prestige, were the African American women who remained single, experienced no critical incidents, came from a middle class to upper middle class socioeconomic background, and did not have children.

  11. Career choices for paediatrics: national surveys of graduates of 1974-2002 from UK medical schools.

    PubMed

    Turner, G; Lambert, T W; Goldacre, M J; Turner, Steve

    2007-05-01

    Knowledge of UK doctors' career intentions and pathways is essential for understanding future workforce requirements. The aim of this study was to report career choices for and career progression in paediatrics in the UK. Postal questionnaire surveys of qualifiers from all UK medical schools in nine qualification years since 1974. In total, 74% (24 621/33 412) and 73% (20 720/28 459) of doctors responded at 1 and 3 years after graduation. Choices for paediatrics 1 year after qualifying fell from 7.8% of 1974 graduates to 5.0% of 1983 graduates, increased to 7.2% of 1993 graduates, and since the level has remained fairly constant. Approximately twice the percentage of women graduates than men graduates indicated a long-term career choice for paediatrics. A total of 44% of those who chose paediatrics 1 year after graduation were working in it 10 years after qualifying. Experience of the subject as a student, and enthusiasm/commitment: what I really want to do, affected long-term career choices more for paediatrics than for other medical careers. The proportion of junior doctors wishing to become paediatricians has not changed much during the last 30 years. The planned increase in the number of medical school graduates is necessary to increase the number of UK-trained consultant paediatricians. Medical students who experience enthusiastic and stimulating training in paediatrics may be more likely to become paediatricians.

  12. Differences in medical students’ academic interest and performance across career choice motivations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate medical students’ career choice motivation and its relationship with their academic interest and performance. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in a sample (n=207) of medical students at a private medical school in Korea, stratified by year of medical course. Data about participant demographics, career choice motivation and academic interest were collected using a self-report questionnaire. The item on career choice motivation enquired about the respondents’ main reason for applying for medical school among 8 possible response options, which comprised two components of career choice motivation: intrinsic and extrinsic. The participants’ levels of academic interest were measured in a Likert-type question. Participants’ academic interest and Grade Point Averages (GPAs) were compared across the groups of different career motivations along with analyses of their admission scores for baseline comparisons. Results A total of 195 students completed the questionnaire (94%response rate). Seventy-four percent, (n=145; the intrinsic group) of the participants chose reasons related to intrinsic motivation, 22% (n=42; the extrinsic group) chose reasons pertaining to extrinsic motivation, and 4% (n = 8) chose other reasons for applying to medical school. The intrinsic group outperformed the extrinsic group in their GPAs, although their prior academic achievements did not differ significantly. The intrinsic group showed significantly higher levels of academic interest and also performed better in the admission interviews. Conclusions Our study illustrates differences in medical students’ academic interest and performance across career choice motivations. Further research is warranted to establish the predictive power of medical students’ career choice motivation and academic interest on their academic performance. PMID:26878567

  13. Differences in medical students' academic interest and performance across career choice motivations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee Y; Kwon, Bum S

    2016-02-15

    To investigate medical students' career choice motivation and its relationship with their academic interest and performance. We conducted a cross-sectional study in a sample (n=207) of medical students at a private medical school in Korea, stratified by year of medical course. Data about participant demographics, career choice motivation and academic interest were collected using a self-report questionnaire. The item on career choice motivation enquired about the respondents' main reason for applying for medical school among 8 possible response options, which comprised two components of career choice motivation: intrinsic and extrinsic. The participants' levels of academic interest were measured in a Likert-type question. Participants' academic interest and Grade Point Averages (GPAs) were compared across the groups of different career motivations along with analyses of their admission scores for baseline comparisons. A total of 195 students completed the questionnaire (94%response rate). Seventy-four percent, (n=145; the intrinsic group) of the participants chose reasons related to intrinsic motivation, 22% (n=42; the extrinsic group) chose reasons pertaining to extrinsic motivation, and 4% (n = 8) chose other reasons for applying to medical school. The intrinsic group outperformed the extrinsic group in their GPAs, although their prior academic achievements did not differ significantly. The intrinsic group showed significantly higher levels of academic interest and also performed better in the admission interviews. Our study illustrates differences in medical students' academic interest and performance across career choice motivations. Further research is warranted to establish the predictive power of medical students' career choice motivation and academic interest on their academic performance.

  14. Women Using Physics: Alternate Career Paths, The Private Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tams, Jessica

    2006-12-01

    For those who have spent their careers inside the safe walls of academia, the word is a little scary. Can I compete? Will I fit in? What do I need to know? Am I prepared? Will I succeed? While many would say: Yes! You are ready to excel! This isn’t actually the case. The private sector comes with many unanticipated shocks to many of us, especially women. This isn’t a group project. This session will discuss entering a quickly growing and competitive technical field and what one can do to prepare for continued success. Preparing and Entering the Private Sector * Women with technical skills are a desired part of the private workforcein general women posses stronger people skills, are more reliable and often more well rounded than their male counterparts. Key factors we will discuss to landing that first job: · Expand your knowledge base with current applications of technology · Preparing a solid employment pitch to highlight strengths: Overcoming stereotypes · Don’t show them your bad side: Why some student projects may hurt you · The private sector attitude toward performance and entry level expectations Excelling in the Private Sector * Now that we have landed a job * for better or worse we are now all about making money and exerting control. What to keep in mind while working in the private sector: · The formative first years: focus on your weaknesses and practice, practice, practice · Men & Women in the workplace: what women subconsciously do to hurt their careers · Politics: Working in a team environment · Polish & Detail & Reliabilit

  15. Competing Choices: Men's and Women's Paths after Earning a Bachelor's Degree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clune, Michael S.; Nunez, Anne-Marie; Choy, Susan P.

    2001-01-01

    Studied the paths that women and men take in the first 4 years after earning their bachelor's degree and sought to identify how decisions about graduate school, employment, marriage, and parenthood are interrelated. Data from the 1993 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study show how choices about marriage and family compete with choices about…

  16. Choice Paths in the Swedish Upper Secondary Education--A Critical Discourse Analysis of Recent Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Decentralisation policy in Sweden emphasises school capitation allowance, the local upper secondary schools' decision-making and pupils' choices in contrast to previous bureaucratic governing. The aim of this article is to discuss how pupils' educational choice paths are a part of the different kinds of integration and differentiation processes…

  17. Swiss residents' speciality choices – impact of gender, personality traits, career motivation and life goals

    PubMed Central

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Klaghofer, Richard; Abel, Thomas; Buddeberg, Claus

    2006-01-01

    Background The medical specialities chosen by doctors for their careers play an important part in the development of health-care services. This study aimed to investigate the influence of gender, personality traits, career motivation and life goal aspirations on the choice of medical speciality. Methods As part of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates on career development, 522 fourth-year residents were asked in what speciality they wanted to qualify. They also assessed their career motivation and life goal aspirations. Data concerning personality traits such as sense of coherence, self-esteem, and gender role orientation were collected at the first assessment, four years earlier, in their final year of medical school. Data analyses were conducted by univariate and multivariate analyses of variance and covariance. Results In their fourth year of residency 439 (84.1%) participants had made their speciality choice. Of these, 45 (8.6%) subjects aspired to primary care, 126 (24.1%) to internal medicine, 68 (13.0%) to surgical specialities, 31 (5.9%) to gynaecology & obstetrics (G&O), 40 (7.7%) to anaesthesiology/intensive care, 44 (8.4%) to paediatrics, 25 (4.8%) to psychiatry and 60 (11.5%) to other specialities. Female residents tended to choose G&O, paediatrics, and anaesthesiology, males more often surgical specialities; the other specialities did not show gender-relevant differences of frequency distribution. Gender had the strongest significant influence on speciality choice, followed by career motivation, personality traits, and life goals. Multivariate analyses of covariance indicated that career motivation and life goals mediated the influence of personality on career choice. Personality traits were no longer significant after controlling for career motivation and life goals as covariates. The effect of gender remained significant after controlling for personality traits, career motivation and life goals. Conclusion Gender had the

  18. Swiss residents' speciality choices--impact of gender, personality traits, career motivation and life goals.

    PubMed

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Klaghofer, Richard; Abel, Thomas; Buddeberg, Claus

    2006-10-23

    The medical specialties chosen by doctors for their careers play an important part in the development of health-care services. This study aimed to investigate the influence of gender, personality traits, career motivation and life goal aspirations on the choice of medical specialty. As part of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates on career development, 522 fourth-year residents were asked in what specialty they wanted to qualify. They also assessed their career motivation and life goal aspirations. Data concerning personality traits such as sense of coherence, self-esteem, and gender role orientation were collected at the first assessment, four years earlier, in their final year of medical school. Data analyses were conducted by univariate and multivariate analyses of variance and covariance. In their fourth year of residency 439 (84.1%) participants had made their specialty choice. Of these, 45 (8.6%) subjects aspired to primary care, 126 (24.1%) to internal medicine, 68 (13.0%) to surgical specialties, 31 (5.9%) to gynaecology & obstetrics (G&O), 40 (7.7%) to anaesthesiology/intensive care, 44 (8.4%) to paediatrics, 25 (4.8%) to psychiatry and 60 (11.5%) to other specialties. Female residents tended to choose G&O, paediatrics, and anaesthesiology, males more often surgical specialties; the other specialties did not show gender-relevant differences of frequency distribution. Gender had the strongest significant influence on specialty choice, followed by career motivation, personality traits, and life goals. Multivariate analyses of covariance indicated that career motivation and life goals mediated the influence of personality on career choice. Personality traits were no longer significant after controlling for career motivation and life goals as covariates. The effect of gender remained significant after controlling for personality traits, career motivation and life goals. Gender had the greatest impact on specialty and career choice, but

  19. Curricular Influences on Female Afterschool Facilitators' Computer Science Interests and Career Choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Melissa; Gorges, Torie

    2016-10-01

    Underrepresented populations such as women, African-Americans, and Latinos/as often come to STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) careers by less traditional paths than White and Asian males. To better understand how and why women might shift toward STEM, particularly computer science, careers, we investigated the education and career direction of afterschool facilitators, primarily women of color in their twenties and thirties, who taught Build IT, an afterschool computer science curriculum for middle school girls. Many of these women indicated that implementing Build IT had influenced their own interest in technology and computer science and in some cases had resulted in their intent to pursue technology and computer science education. We wanted to explore the role that teaching Build IT may have played in activating or reactivating interest in careers in computer science and to see whether in the years following implementation of Build IT, these women pursued STEM education and/or careers. We reached nine facilitators who implemented the program in 2011-12 or shortly after. Many indicated that while facilitating Build IT, they learned along with the participants, increasing their interest in and confidence with technology and computer science. Seven of the nine participants pursued further STEM or computer science learning or modified their career paths to include more of a STEM or computer science focus. Through interviews, we explored what aspects of Build IT influenced these facilitators' interest and confidence in STEM and when relevant their pursuit of technology and computer science education and careers.

  20. The career paths of mathematics and science teachers in high need schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Allison Lynette

    High-poverty schools typically have higher levels of attrition than other schools, particularly in mathematics and science. Financial incentives have often been used to attract teachers to high need schools and subjects. Despite extensive investments in these incentives and extensive research regarding recruitment and retention, little is known about how these areas interact with one another over teachers' careers. The purpose of this study is to address the lack of integration of these areas by investigating the career paths of 38 Noyce scholars. Acceptance of the Noyce funding requires teaching in high-need schools for two years. Grounded theory methodology was guided by the research question: What are Noyce scholars' reasons for the decisions made on the career path of becoming and remaining teachers in high need schools? Analysis resulted in an explanatory model of the "pathway to retention in high need schools." The model indicates that the career paths of teachers in high need schools are complex and interactive. Interactions among the reasons the scholars chose to enter teaching, their school setting, community, teacher education and the Noyce funding appear to play a role in their eventual satisfaction and retention. The study has implications for the recruitment and retention of teachers in high need schools.

  1. The influence of developmental, education, and mentorship experiences on career paths in cultural psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Boehnlein, James K

    2011-04-01

    Career paths in cultural psychiatry and other areas of medicine often are influenced by a combination of developmental, academic and training experiences. One of the satisfactions for the cultural psychiatrist is the opportunity to integrate lifelong interests that are not central to medical training, such as anthropology, philosophy, history or geography into one's daily work and career path, and this is not necessarily just applicable to clinical work or research. A background in social sciences can be very helpful in navigating the political and interpersonal challenges of working in an academic medical center or designing effective education programs across the career spectrum in medicine. This article traces the development of my career in academic cultural psychiatry and illustrates the way my clinical and academic interests were influenced both by early developmental and educational experiences and by positive career experiences as a clinician, teacher and researcher in the context of effective mentorship and professional peer relationships. The future of cultural psychiatry is exciting and its continued growth will be dependent on effective nurturance of young physicians who have a broad vision of the important place of cultural psychiatry and how it influences medicine, mental health, and society at large.

  2. Making fair choices on the path to universal health coverage: a précis.

    PubMed

    Voorhoeve, Alex; Ottersen, Trygve; Norheim, Ole F

    2016-01-01

    We outline key conclusions of the World Health Organisation's report 'Making Fair Choices on the Path to Universal Health Coverage (UHC)'. The Report argues that three principles should inform choices on the path to UHC: I. Coverage should be based on need, with extra weight given to the needs of the worse off; II. One aim should be to generate the greatest total improvement in health; III. Contributions should be based on ability to pay and not need. We describe how these principles determine which trade-offs are (un)acceptable. We also discuss which institutions contribute to fair and accountable choices.

  3. The Influence of Introductory Accounting Courses on Career Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cangelosi, James S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study investigated what factors affect undergraduate students' consideration of careers in accounting as they matriculate through a typical sequence of introductory accounting courses. Findings indicate that students believe that accountants are likely to find secure positions, those positions are likely to provide healthy incomes, and…

  4. Interest Scores as Indicators of Career Choice for Male Pharmacists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Harry A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The capacity of the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory to discriminate among members of 12 pharmacy career groups (independent pharmacy owners and staff, chain managers and staff, hospital directors and staff, medical service representatives, marketing/administrative pharmacists, manufacturing and quality control, research and development,…

  5. Exploration as a Predictor of Congruence in Adolescents' Career Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotevant, Harold D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    High school seniors completed an ego identity interview with occupations considered coded for occupational prestige, substantive complexity, interest environment, and gender dominance; the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory; and a verbal ability measure. Breadth of exploration in the four career dimensions, particularly in gender dominance…

  6. Using Media to Broaden Students' Knowledge about Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Chantal; Reckker, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Today's media have great influence on young people. Television programs, for instance, play a big role in the stereotyping of many occupations, and this affects the way the youth view these careers. This article highlights some of the stereotypes and what can be done to foster media literacy. The authors stress that CTE instructors should make it…

  7. Responsible Inspiration: The Role of Arts Educators in Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whorton, Rachel Tuggle

    2016-01-01

    The realities of a career in the performing arts can exist in shocking contrast to the sterilized glamour found in bright lights and awards shows. So how might teaching artists continue to cultivate this passion while truly preparing students for continued educational opportunities in their fields and then for the real world? Through responsible…

  8. Responsible Inspiration: The Role of Arts Educators in Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whorton, Rachel Tuggle

    2016-01-01

    The realities of a career in the performing arts can exist in shocking contrast to the sterilized glamour found in bright lights and awards shows. So how might teaching artists continue to cultivate this passion while truly preparing students for continued educational opportunities in their fields and then for the real world? Through responsible…

  9. Undergraduate Female Science-Related Career Choices: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Kathy S.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study used a modified Groenewald's five steps method with semi-structured, recorded, and transcribed interviews to focus on the underrepresentation of females in science-related careers. The study explored the lived experiences of a purposive sample of 25 senior female college students attending a college in…

  10. Undergraduate Female Science-Related Career Choices: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Kathy S.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study used a modified Groenewald's five steps method with semi-structured, recorded, and transcribed interviews to focus on the underrepresentation of females in science-related careers. The study explored the lived experiences of a purposive sample of 25 senior female college students attending a college in…

  11. Does Early Research Experience Affect Subsequent Career Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pechmann, Connie A.; Pichert, James W.

    The Vanderbilt Summer Research Program in diabetes, which was designed to interest medical students in research careers and diabetes care, was evaluated. The program provides stipends to 20 sophomore and junior medical students for 12 weeks of preceptor-supervised laboratory research work, clinical experience, and classroom instruction. The…

  12. Interest Scores as Indicators of Career Choice for Male Pharmacists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Harry A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The capacity of the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory to discriminate among members of 12 pharmacy career groups (independent pharmacy owners and staff, chain managers and staff, hospital directors and staff, medical service representatives, marketing/administrative pharmacists, manufacturing and quality control, research and development,…

  13. Enhancing nursing as a career choice with fifth-grade students.

    PubMed

    Turner, Pamela L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of a career education program on children's interest in nursing as a career choice, especially related to gender in fifth-grade students. A within-subjects design compared interest in nursing as a career of 70 fifth-grade students before and after participation in a 4-week career education program about nursing. There was a 61% (N = 70, p < 0.001) increase of students expressing they would consider nursing as a career after participating in the career education program. This positive effect was discovered among both male and female students. Further results provided a pre and post-career assessment of the students' development that was congruent with findings from previous vocational studies. The results underscore the positive effect career education can have on children's career interests and substantiate the importance of exposing students to practicing nurses as a key strategy to stimulate interest in nursing to help maintain a steady recruitment of young people into the future nursing workforce.

  14. College student perceptions of science teachers and the effect on science teaching as a career path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cost, Michael George

    2000-10-01

    Past research documented that student perceptions of scientists constituted a stereotypical image that had a negative effect on the students' attitudes towards science and resulted in low numbers of students studying to become scientists and engineers in college. The present study paralleled the research on student perceptions of scientists to investigate to what extent student perceptions of science teachers affect their willingness to consider science teaching as a career. This was accomplished by surveying 91 college students and 25 science teachers at the beginning, middle, and end of the collegiate career path of becoming a science teacher. Each survey contained quantitative data utilizing seven-point semantic differential scales and written open response questions. In-depth interviews with two members of each level were conducted to supplement the survey data. The study found that college students begin college with a positive perception of teaching as a career and highly rank teachers, especially science teachers, as having a positive influence on their career path. The qualities of job enjoyment, job stability, and helping others that are characteristic of teaching were also found to be of high importance. Perceptions of the personal, social, professional, and career qualities of a science teacher were found to differ from a scientist. While both science teachers and scientists were found to be responsible, persistent, and productive, science teachers were perceived as being a distinct career possessing qualities that make them more personable, sociable, and wise than scientists. Some gender differences were detected but there was no evidence of gender bias affecting students choosing a career path to science teaching. Science teachers were perceived to be very supportive of females pursuing scientific career paths. The study also found evidence that some introductory level college students steer away from science teaching because of low salary, the lack of

  15. Recursos de Trabajo: Informacion sobre Carreras (Occupational Resources: Career Information). CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam and Northern Westchester Counties Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Yorktown Heights, NY.

    Part of a two-level career education curriculum initially developed for migrant children, the book is the first of three secondary level texts designed to provide high school students with self-awareness, job and role information, and decision-making/goal attaining information related to career education. The text provides job and role information…

  16. The Relationship between Career Competencies, Career Identity, Motivation and Quality of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka; Gundy, Chad

    2013-01-01

    In this article we focus on the effects of career education and guidance among students (ages 12-19) enrolled in prevocational and secondary vocational education in The Netherlands. Our study included 3,499 students and 166 teachers in 226 classes in 34 schools. The results showed that career competencies positively contributed to learning…

  17. Generation Y and Career Choice: The Impact of Retail Career Perceptions, Expectations and Entitlement Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Jessica L.; Good, Linda K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The transition from higher education to employment is a major life change for many college seniors (currently, the Generation Y cohort). The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of Generation Y and to present new insights regarding Gen Y's retail career expectations, perceptions of retail careers, future psychological…

  18. The Relationship between Career Competencies, Career Identity, Motivation and Quality of Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka; Gundy, Chad

    2013-01-01

    In this article we focus on the effects of career education and guidance among students (ages 12-19) enrolled in prevocational and secondary vocational education in The Netherlands. Our study included 3,499 students and 166 teachers in 226 classes in 34 schools. The results showed that career competencies positively contributed to learning…

  19. Generation Y and Career Choice: The Impact of Retail Career Perceptions, Expectations and Entitlement Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Jessica L.; Good, Linda K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The transition from higher education to employment is a major life change for many college seniors (currently, the Generation Y cohort). The purpose of this paper is to enhance the understanding of Generation Y and to present new insights regarding Gen Y's retail career expectations, perceptions of retail careers, future psychological…

  20. Career Anchors and Career Paths: A Panel Study of Management School Graduates. Technical Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schein, Edgar H.

    The first of a series, this report describes a 10-year followup study of a sample of 44 graduates of the Sloan School of Management, analyzing the interaction of personal values and career events in the lives of managers in organizations. All 44 participants were located, interviewed, and given the same attitude surveys as in the early 1960's.…

  1. Career choices of medical students: a national survey of 1780 students.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Jérémie H; Roupret, Morgan; Kerneis, Solen; Karila, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    OBJECTIVES Many factors influence the career specialty decisions made by medical students. The aim of this study was to broaden consideration of the determinants of specialty choice in a large population of medical students in their sixth year of study. METHODS A total of 2588 students distributed across all of the 39 medical schools in France participated in a National Practice Examination in December 2008, after which an electronic questionnaire was administered. Study criteria were: population characteristics; demographics, and motivation for and drawbacks to medical specialty choice. RESULTS A total of 1780 students (1111 women, 62%) responded to the questionnaire (69% response rate). The mean age of respondents was 23.8 years (22-35 years). Of these, 1555 students (87%) stated their preferred medical specialty. Surgical and medical specialties were the two specialties selected most frequently by students (n = 729, 47%). General practice was chosen by 20%. Gender influenced the choice of specialty: 88% of future paediatricians, 82% of gynaecologists and 77% of general practitioners (GPs) were women (p < 0.05). Main motivating factors included interesting diseases, opportunities for private practice and patient contact. Main drawbacks limiting the choice of other specialties were poor quality of life, an exclusively hospital-based career and loss of patient contact. Gender was the criterion most associated with significant differences in factors of motivation for or discouragement from a career. Patient contact and opportunities for private practice were significantly highlighted by future GPs compared with students opting for the medical or surgical specialties (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Students' career choices regarding specialties or general practice result from the interplay among several factors. Career interest in general practice is particularly low. Initiatives to address the factors affecting student career choices regarding less favoured specialties

  2. The impact of the NASA Administrator's Fellowship Program on fellows' career choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Eva M.

    Maintaining diversity in the technical workforce and in higher education has been identified as one way to increase the outreach, recruitment and retention of students and other faculty from underrepresented, underserved and minority populations, especially in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) courses of study and careers. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Administrator's Fellowship Program (NAFP) is a professional development program targeting faculty at Minority Serving Institutions and NASA civil servant employees for a two year work-based professional development experience toward increasing the likelihood of retaining them in STEM careers and supporting the recruitment and retention of minority students in STEM courses of study. This evaluation links the activities of the fellowship program to the impact on fellows' career choices as a result of participation through a series of surveys and interviews. Fellows' personal and professional perceptions of themselves and colleagues' and administrators' beliefs about their professional capabilities as a result of selection and participation were also addressed as they related to career outcomes. The findings indicated that while there was no direct impact on fellows' choice of careers, the exposure, direction and focus offered through travel, mentoring, research and teaching had an impact their perceptions of their own capabilities and, their colleagues' and administrators' beliefs about them as professionals and researchers. The career outcomes reported were an increase in the number publications, promotions, change in career and an increased awareness of the culture of science and engineering.

  3. Medical students' attitudes towards general practice and factors affecting career choice: a questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    Garnham, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Background The current issue of general practice recruitment is a significant challenge and concern. In order to address this, it is vital to understand medical students' attitudes towards general practice and what influences their choice of intended career. Method We used a questionnaire study to examine these attitudes across all years at Imperial College Medical School and to understand what a group of London medical students' current intended career choices were. Results We found that only 13% of students ranked general practice as their first choice career despite having a generally realistic and positive attitude towards the speciality. They highlighted that the main influence on future career choice was interest in the specific speciality and that lifestyle factors did not seem to be so important. Conclusion Exposure to general practice, primary care research and student GP societies might play some part in increasing interest, but more work is needed to understand why students are rejecting general practice and what we can do collectively to attract students into choosing a career in primary care. PMID:25949732

  4. Development and psychometric testing of an instrument to compare career choice influences and perceptions of nursing among healthcare students.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Sok Ying; Wu, Ling Ting; Lopez, Violeta; Chow, Yeow Leng; Lim, Siriwan; Holroyd, Eleanor; Tan, Khoon Kiat; Wang, Wenru

    2017-04-27

    With the availability of more healthcare courses and an increased intake of nursing students, education institutions are facing challenges to attract school leavers to enter nursing courses. The comparison of career choice influences and perception of nursing among healthcare students can provide information for recruitment strategies. An instrument to compare the influences of healthcare career choice is lacking. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of an instrument to compare the influences of healthcare career choice with perceptions of nursing as a career choice. The study was conducted in two phases. In phase one, two sets of scales with parallel items that measure the influences of healthcare career choice and perceptions of nursing as a career choice were developed through an earlier qualitative study, literature review, and expert validation. Phase two involved testing the construct validity, concurrent validity and reliability with a convenience sample of 283 first year healthcare students who were recruited at two education institutions in Singapore. An exploratory factor analysis revealed 35-parallel items in a six-factor solution (personal interest, prior healthcare exposure, self-efficacy, perceived nature of work, job prospects, and social influences) that explained 59 and 64% of the variance for healthcare career choice and nursing as a career choice respectively. A high correlation (r = 0.76, p < 0.001) was obtained with an existing tool, confirming the concurrent validity. The internal consistency was sufficient with Cronbach's alpha of 0.93 for healthcare career choice and 0.94 for nursing as a career choice. The test-retest reliability was acceptable with an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient of 0.63 for healthcare career choice and 0.60 for nursing as a career choice. The instrument provides opportunities for understanding the differences between influences of healthcare career choice and

  5. Examining Influences on Environmental Concern and Career Choice among a Cohort of Environmental Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tarah S. A.; Wyatt, S. Lilith

    2008-01-01

    Although there is considerable literature discussing influence of environmental concern in the general population, and some literature specific to certain populations, to date there has not been a study that investigates the influences on environmental concern and career path for environmental scientists. With complex environmental issues becoming…

  6. Implications of the Theory of Successful Intelligence for Career Choice and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Successful intelligence is the ability to attain life goals by adapting to, shaping, and selecting environments and recognizing and dealing with strengths and weaknesses. Research on the measurement of analytical, creative, and practical abilities validates the theory and the usefulness of triarchic instruction in finding a career path. (Contains …

  7. Implications of the Theory of Successful Intelligence for Career Choice and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Successful intelligence is the ability to attain life goals by adapting to, shaping, and selecting environments and recognizing and dealing with strengths and weaknesses. Research on the measurement of analytical, creative, and practical abilities validates the theory and the usefulness of triarchic instruction in finding a career path. (Contains …

  8. Career choices of United Kingdom medical graduates of 2002: questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J; Turner, Gill

    2006-06-01

    To report the specialty choices of UK medical graduates of 2002, and to compare their choices with those of qualifiers in previous years and with the profile of career grade doctors in different specialties in England. We carried out a postal questionnaire survey in the UK and drew comparisons with official data for numbers of specialists. The response rate was 65.3% (2778/4257). A total of 22.7% of the medical graduates of 2002 (28.1% of women, 14.5% of men) expressed a preference for a longterm career in general practice, compared with 25.3% of 1999 and 2000 graduates combined. A total of 31.1% of men and 11.9% of women chose surgical specialties; 0.7% of men and 3.4% of women chose obstetrics and gynaecology; 3.4% of men and 7.9% of women chose paediatrics. There was a large mismatch between the percentage choosing each specialty group and the percentage of senior National Health Service doctors working in the same specialty group. In all, 71% of graduates regarded their career choice as definite or probable and 80% definitely or probably intended to pursue a longterm career in medicine in the UK, compared with 75% of qualifiers in 1999 and 2000. Career choices for general practice remain low: only 1 in 4 women and 1 in 7 men now choose general practice at this career stage. Very few men choose obstetrics and gynaecology, despite a recent increase in training opportunities. There is no evidence of an increase, compared with recent previous cohorts, in the percentage of junior doctors who do not want a longterm career in British medicine.

  9. The impact of environmental factors on emergency medicine resident career choice.

    PubMed

    Stern, S A; Kim, H M; Neacy, K; Dronen, S C; Mertz, M

    1999-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of environmental factors on emergency medicine (EM) resident career choice. Program directors of all U.S. EM residencies were surveyed in November 1997. A 22-item questionnaire assessed resources allocated to research, fellowship availability, academic productivity of faculty and residents, and career choices of residency graduates. The response rate was 83%. The program director (mean+/-SD) estimates of resident career choice were as follows: 27.8+/-19.1% pursued academic positions with emphasis on teaching, 5.4+/-9.8% pursued academic positions with emphasis on research, and 66.8+/-23.1%, pursued private practice positions. In addition, 5.70+/-6.13% of the residency graduates were estimated to seek fellowship training. Univariate analyses demonstrated that increasing departmental funding for research, having substantial resource availability (defined as having at least two of the following: dedicated laboratory space; support for a laboratory research technician/assistant, a clinical research nurse or study coordinator, a statistician, or an assistant with a PhD degree), a greater number of peer-reviewed publications by residents (r = 0.22; p = 0.08), and a greater number of peer-reviewed publications by faculty (r = 0.26; p = 0.04) positively correlated with the percentage of graduates who pursue academic research careers. Using multiple regression, however, increasing intramural funding and the presence of substantial resource availability were the only variables predictive of resident pursuit of an academic research career. Modification of the EM training environment may influence the career choices of graduates. Specifically, greater commitment of departmental funds and support of resources for research may enhance the likelihood of a trainee's choosing an academic research career.

  10. Short report: factors that affect specialty choice and career plans of Wisconsin's medical students.

    PubMed

    Knox, Kjersti E; Getzin, Anne; Bergum, Alison; McBride, Patrick; Rieselbach, Richard; Friedsam, Donna

    2008-12-01

    To identify factors that influence specialty choice among Wisconsin medical students and provide insight into approaches to encourage more students to pursue careers in primary care. The importance of several factors in medical student career choice was surveyed using a Web survey convenience sample of all Wisconsin medical students. Students intending to pursue a career in primary care and in other specialties were compared. Respondents, regardless of specialty choice or gender, identified a similar group of factors as highly influential, and similar group of factors as non-influential in their decision-making. However, significantly more primary care students than other specialty students considered interest in underserved populations, relationships with patients, scope of practice, and role models important in their career choice. Significantly more primary care students than other specialty students responded that salary and competitiveness were "not at all" important. A greater number of other specialty students than primary care students stated that interest in scope of practice, role models, and training years were "not at all" important. Debt-related factors were reported as "not at all" important by nearly one-third of respondents. Although primary care and other specialty students report making their career plans based on the impact of similar factors, significant differences between primary care and other specialty students were reported in key areas. These results validate many previously reported factors, and indicate that salary and years of training may have been overemphasized in understanding student career choice. The results of this survey may be useful for Wisconsin medical schools in order to sustain, support, and foster student interest in primary care.

  11. The Different Paths in the Franchising Entrepreneurship Choice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaras, Petros; Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos; Zondiros, Dimitris

    2007-12-01

    This study aims to testify the scientific veracity of the question: is the franchisees' choice on entrepreneurial start-up univocal or many-valued? Two variables are examined by registering daily activities of the entrepreneurial franchisees, as they appear by the answers given to a closed-ended questionnaire. We proceeded with a multiple variable statistical analysis (principal component analysis) of survey data collected from franchisees of a Greece-based franchise system. The results of the research indicate that among different value standards, the entrepreneurs conclude in choosing the franchising.

  12. Residents' reasons for specialty choice: influence of gender, time, patient and career.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, Klazine; Siegrist, Michael; Orlow, Pascale; Giger, Max

    2010-06-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examined reasons for specialty choice among Swiss residents (post graduate doctors training in specialties). METHODS In 2006, a questionnaire was sent to 8626 Swiss residents registered in postgraduate medical training programmes to obtain specialist qualifications. The response rate was 65% (n = 5631). As residents are allowed to decide on the specialty they want to acquire later in the training process, only residents who had already chosen a specific specialty were included (n = 5038). In responding, residents rated the importance of 19 factors in making their choice of specialty. Categorical principal component analysis was conducted to obtain underlying dimensions within the reasons for choice. A two-way analysis of variance was performed for each dimension to compare the mean object scores for the 10 specialties chosen by the most residents and to examine possible interactions by gender and year of graduation. Contrasts between the specialties were analysed with Scheffe post hoc tests. RESULTS Categorical principal component analyses yielded three factors underlying residents' choice of specialty, which explained 40.8% of the variance in responses: work and time-related aspects; career-related aspects, and patient orientation. Women considered work and time-related aspects and patient orientation to be more important factors in their choice, and career-related aspects to be less important, than did men. Career-related aspects became less important with advancing training status. CONCLUSIONS This study showed that reasons for specialty choice differ according to gender, year of graduation and specialty. With progressing training status, gender differences in reasons for choice and specialty choice may become more pronounced, especially regarding career aspects, which may lead to a change in preferred specialty. Therefore, a modular constructed postgraduate training programme might give residents the flexibility to change from one specialty

  13. Career choices for ophthalmology made by newly qualified doctors in the United Kingdom, 1974–2005

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J; Bron, Anthony J

    2008-01-01

    Background The paper aims to report trends in career choices for ophthalmology among UK medical graduates. Methods Postal questionnaire surveys were undertaken of qualifiers from all UK medical schools in nine qualification years since 1974. Data were analysed by univariate cross-tabulation. The significance of comparisons between groups of doctors were calculated by the use of chi-squared tests and adjusted residuals. Results Ophthalmology was the first choice of long term career for 2.3% of men and 1.5% of women one year after qualification; 2.0% of men and 1.4% of women three years after; and 1.8% of men and 1.2% of women at five years. Comparing early choices with eventual destinations, 64% who chose ophthalmology in year one, 84% in year three, and 92% in year five eventually practised in the specialty. The concordance between year one choice and eventual destination was higher for ophthalmology than for most other specialties. 'Enthusiasm for and commitment to the specialty' was the most important single factor in influencing career choice. The prospect of good working hours and conditions was also an important influence: it influenced career choice a great deal for a higher percentage of those who chose ophthalmology (66% in the third year) than those who made other surgical choices (23%). Conclusion Those choosing ophthalmology show a high level of commitment to it. Their commitment is strengthened by the prospect of attractive hours and working conditions. Many doctors who become ophthalmologists have already made their choice by the end of their first post-qualification year. PMID:18318905

  14. Career choices for ophthalmology made by newly qualified doctors in the United Kingdom, 1974-2005.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J; Bron, Anthony J

    2008-03-04

    The paper aims to report trends in career choices for ophthalmology among UK medical graduates. Postal questionnaire surveys were undertaken of qualifiers from all UK medical schools in nine qualification years since 1974. Data were analysed by univariate cross-tabulation. The significance of comparisons between groups of doctors were calculated by the use of chi-squared tests and adjusted residuals. Ophthalmology was the first choice of long term career for 2.3% of men and 1.5% of women one year after qualification; 2.0% of men and 1.4% of women three years after; and 1.8% of men and 1.2% of women at five years. Comparing early choices with eventual destinations, 64% who chose ophthalmology in year one, 84% in year three, and 92% in year five eventually practised in the specialty. The concordance between year one choice and eventual destination was higher for ophthalmology than for most other specialties. 'Enthusiasm for and commitment to the specialty' was the most important single factor in influencing career choice. The prospect of good working hours and conditions was also an important influence: it influenced career choice a great deal for a higher percentage of those who chose ophthalmology (66% in the third year) than those who made other surgical choices (23%). Those choosing ophthalmology show a high level of commitment to it. Their commitment is strengthened by the prospect of attractive hours and working conditions. Many doctors who become ophthalmologists have already made their choice by the end of their first post-qualification year.

  15. "The Land of Opportunity Doesn't Apply to Everyone": The Immigrant Experience, Race, and Asian American Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, OiYan

    2014-01-01

    Despite their popular portrayal as high achieving and structurally incorporated, race continues to shape the career choices of Asian American college students. As second-generation Americans, Asian Americans negotiate a constellation of factors when deciding their career choices, most notably, pressures from immigrant parents, awareness of labor…

  16. The School Counsellor and Students' Career Choice in High School: The Assessor's Perspective in a Ghanaian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amoah, Samuel Asare; Kwofie, Isaac; Kwofie, Faustina Akosua Agyeiwaa

    2015-01-01

    School counsellors play significant role in the total development of students in respect to career choices. In view of that career development interventions are provide to support the provision of information to guide students make well informed choices in personal, academic and social aspects. This study thus, aimed to examine whether the role of…

  17. Factors Influencing Career Choice of African American and Hispanic Graduates of a Land-Grant College of Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Wash A.; Larke, Alvin, Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 139 Hispanic and African American agriculture graduates indicated that the probability of their choice of agriculture careers was not affected by when they took their first agriculture course. Significant others, fathers in agriculture-related occupations, and job opportunities were influential in the agriculture career choice.…

  18. The Influence of Role-Specific Self-Concept and Sex-Role Identity on Career Choices in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dale R.

    1987-01-01

    Research focused on two factors that may be influencing females in choice of careers. Factors are role-specific self-concept in science and self-perception in terms of stereotypical masculine and feminine characteristics. Logical ability and mathematics and science courses were also examined as factors in career choice. Results of data for 177…

  19. "Not Only Satisfied and Responsible, but Also Hopeful": Prospective Teachers' Career Choice Satisfaction, Hope, and Personal Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eren, Altay

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the relationships between prospective teachers' career choice satisfaction, hope, and sense of personal responsibility, with the intention of exploring the mediating role of hope in the relationship between career choice satisfaction and sense of personal responsibility. A total of 563 prospective teachers…

  20. "Not Only Satisfied and Responsible, but Also Hopeful": Prospective Teachers' Career Choice Satisfaction, Hope, and Personal Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eren, Altay

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the relationships between prospective teachers' career choice satisfaction, hope, and sense of personal responsibility, with the intention of exploring the mediating role of hope in the relationship between career choice satisfaction and sense of personal responsibility. A total of 563 prospective teachers…

  1. A Personal Value-Based Model of College Students' Aptitudes and Expected Choice Behavior Regarding Retailing Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Soyeon; Warrington, Patti; Goldsberry, Ellen

    1999-01-01

    A study of 754 retail management students developed a value-based model of career attitude and expected choice behavior. Findings indicate that personal values had an influence on all aspects of retail career attitudes, which then had a direct effect on expected choice behavior. (Contains 55 references.) (Author/JOW)

  2. Senior Medical Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry as a Career Choice before and after an Undergraduate Psychiatry Internship in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amini, Homayoun; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Nejatisafa, Ali-Akbar; Esmaeili, Sara; Kaviani, Hosein; Shoar, Saeed; Shabani, Amir; Samimi-Ardestani, Mehdi; Akhlaghi, Amir Abbas Keshavarz; Noroozi, Alireza; Mafi, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to assess 1) the attitudes of medical students in the sixth and seventh years (known as interns in Iran) toward psychiatry as a career choice, and 2) the degree of attractiveness of psychiatry as a career choice, with regard to various defined aspects, before and after an undergraduate psychiatry internship (similar to…

  3. Organizational Culture, Performance and Career Choices of Ph.D.s: A Case Study of Dutch Medical Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Weijden, Inge; de Gilder, Dick; Groenewegen, Peter; Geerling, Maaike

    2008-01-01

    Increasing demands for accountability and applicability raise the question of how organizational factors affect researchers' performance and career choices. In a study of Dutch medical Ph.D. student's experiences, organizational culture and climate and attitudes towards research quality are related to performance and career choices. Ph.D.s who…

  4. "The Land of Opportunity Doesn't Apply to Everyone": The Immigrant Experience, Race, and Asian American Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, OiYan

    2014-01-01

    Despite their popular portrayal as high achieving and structurally incorporated, race continues to shape the career choices of Asian American college students. As second-generation Americans, Asian Americans negotiate a constellation of factors when deciding their career choices, most notably, pressures from immigrant parents, awareness of labor…

  5. The Development and Initial Validation of Social Cognitive Career Theory Instruments to Measure Choice of Medical Specialty and Practice Location

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory served as the basis for the instrument development for scales assessing self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and goals to predict medical career choice. Lent and Brown's conceptualization of social cognitive constructs guided the development of items to measure choice of medical specialty and practice location. Study…

  6. The Influence of Role-Specific Self-Concept and Sex-Role Identity on Career Choices in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dale R.

    1987-01-01

    Research focused on two factors that may be influencing females in choice of careers. Factors are role-specific self-concept in science and self-perception in terms of stereotypical masculine and feminine characteristics. Logical ability and mathematics and science courses were also examined as factors in career choice. Results of data for 177…

  7. Organizational Culture, Performance and Career Choices of Ph.D.s: A Case Study of Dutch Medical Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Weijden, Inge; de Gilder, Dick; Groenewegen, Peter; Geerling, Maaike

    2008-01-01

    Increasing demands for accountability and applicability raise the question of how organizational factors affect researchers' performance and career choices. In a study of Dutch medical Ph.D. student's experiences, organizational culture and climate and attitudes towards research quality are related to performance and career choices. Ph.D.s who…

  8. The Development and Initial Validation of Social Cognitive Career Theory Instruments to Measure Choice of Medical Specialty and Practice Location

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory served as the basis for the instrument development for scales assessing self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and goals to predict medical career choice. Lent and Brown's conceptualization of social cognitive constructs guided the development of items to measure choice of medical specialty and practice location. Study…

  9. High School Students' Career Decision-Making Process: Development and Validation of the Study Choice Task Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germeijs, Veerle; Verschueren, Karine

    2006-01-01

    During adolescence, one important career-related decision is the choice of a study in higher education. In this article, a new set of measures for different tasks (i.e., orientation, exploration, commitment) that can be distinguished during this career decision-making process was constructed: the Study Choice Task Inventory (SCTI). A sample of 946…

  10. Factors Affecting Student Choice of Career in Science and Engineering: Parallel Studies in Australia, Canada, China, England, Japan and Portugal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolnough, Brian E.; Guo, Yuying; Leite, Maria Salete; Jose de Almeida, Maria; Ryu, Tae; Wang, Zhen; Young, Deidra

    1997-01-01

    Describes studies that utilized questionnaires and interviews to explore the factors affecting the career choices of students. Reveals differences between scientists and nonscientists with regard to their preferred learning styles and relates these differences to career choice and self-perception. (DDR)

  11. Senior Medical Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry as a Career Choice before and after an Undergraduate Psychiatry Internship in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amini, Homayoun; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Nejatisafa, Ali-Akbar; Esmaeili, Sara; Kaviani, Hosein; Shoar, Saeed; Shabani, Amir; Samimi-Ardestani, Mehdi; Akhlaghi, Amir Abbas Keshavarz; Noroozi, Alireza; Mafi, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to assess 1) the attitudes of medical students in the sixth and seventh years (known as interns in Iran) toward psychiatry as a career choice, and 2) the degree of attractiveness of psychiatry as a career choice, with regard to various defined aspects, before and after an undergraduate psychiatry internship (similar to…

  12. Making healthy connections: introducing nursing as a career choice to middle school students.

    PubMed

    Knight, Margaret; Abdallah, Lisa; Findeisen, Mary; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Dowling, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    The current economic climate has resulted in many experienced nurses returning to the workforce. Despite this, the nursing shortage is looming in our future and the recruitment of a diverse nursing workforce reflective of the population remains a high priority. The Merrimack Valley in northeastern Massachusetts has two large cities, Lawrence and Lowell, in which the Hispanic and the Southeast Asian populations are disproportionately higher than state and national levels. Through the University of Massachusetts Lowell's Bring Diversity to Nursing Project, partnerships with both city school systems were developed and after-school programs aimed at highlighting nursing as a career choice were initiated. Mr. Thompson's Heart is the focus of a middle school, pre-entry program developed by faculty. Introducing career choices in middle school gives students fundamental information about careers and how to begin investigating them. Mr. Thompson's Heart introduces nursing as a career choice combining career information with a focus on developing healthy lifestyle habits. Multiple hands on activities create excitement and interest in the nursing profession. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Career choice and attitudes towards dental education amongst dental students in Japan and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Karibe, H; Kawakami, T; Suzuki, A; Warita, S; Ogata, K; Aoyagi, K; Agholme, M B; Dahllöf, G

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the perspectives of dental students towards their career choice and dental education in Japan and Sweden. One hundred and fourteen dental students from the Nippon Dental University, Japan and 43 dental students from the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden participated in this study. Information was derived from a self-answered questionnaire consisting of five items for career choice and six items for dental education. Chi-square test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for comparison. Significant differences were detected for 10 questionnaire items between the two countries. Regarding motivation towards the career choice, 44% of Swedish students indicated interpersonal motives related to helping other people, whereas 32% of Japanese students indicated expectations of their family in the dental profession. As future career options, 64% of Japanese and 47% of Swedish students planned to work as general dentists. More Swedish students (37%) preferred specialisation than Japanese students (17%). Nearly three-quarters of the Swedish students were satisfied with the teaching faculty of their school, whilst only 32% of the Japanese students indicated content. The perspectives of dental students were different in Japan and Sweden. This study provides a description of the perspectives of Japanese and Swedish dental students and enables better understanding of career decision and dental curriculum issues.

  14. Not choosing nursing: work experience and career choice of high academic achieving school leavers.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, James G

    2010-01-01

    Work experience has been a feature of the secondary school curriculum in the United Kingdom for a number of years. Usually requested by the pupil, it aims to provide opportunities for school pupils to enhance their knowledge and understanding of an occupation. The main benefits are claimed to be that it can help pupils develop an insight into the skills and attitudes required for an occupation and an awareness of career opportunities. However the quality and choice of placements are considered to be of great importance in this process and in influencing career choice [Department for Education and Skills (DfES), 2002a. Work Experience: A Guide for Employers. Department for Education and Skills, London]. As university departments of nursing experience a decline in the number of school pupils entering student nurse education programmes, and with the competition for school leavers becoming even greater, it is important to consider whether school pupils have access to appropriate work placements in nursing and what influence their experience has on pursuing nursing as a career choice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving fifth and sixth year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger survey sample (n=1062), who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. This was partly reported by Neilson and Lauder [Neilson, G.R., Lauder, W., 2008. What do high academic achieving school pupils really think about a career in nursing: analysis of the narrative from paradigmatic case interviews. Nurse Education Today 28(6), 680-690] which examined what high academic achieving school pupils really thought about a career in nursing. However, the data was particularly striking in revealing the poor quality of nursing work experience for the pupils, and also their proposal that there was a need

  15. Factors influencing surgical career choices and advancement in Ireland and Britain.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Mark A; Shields, Conor J; Redmond, Henry P

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the factors that influence the advancement and the career choices of doctors and medical students. Using the combined databases of the iformix and surgent websites, 450 doctors and medical students were invited to complete an internet-based survey. Surgent (http://www.surgent.ie) and iformix (http://www.iformix.com) are two free internet services administered by the authors. Surgent is a medical educational website, while iformix facilitates the online submission of abstracts to surgical and medical conferences across Britain and Ireland. The combined database of these two websites is approximately 4500 entries. Four hundred and fifty users represented a 10% sample based on an expected 40%-45% response rate. This was anticipated to yield between 180 and 202 respondents, statistically sufficient to analyze the data. A detailed Likert scale assessed the importance of "academic," "clinical," and "lifestyle" factors in determining career choice and progression. Analysis included descriptive statistics and inferential testing. Fifty percent (N = 222) of surveys were returned; 142 men and 78 women. Thirty-seven percent of respondents were Irish, 28% British, and 35% non-European. Fifteen percent were undergraduates, 4% interns, 12% had 2-4 years of clinical experience, while 69% had completed more than 4 years. Fifty-six percent had decided upon a career in general surgery. Overall, the most important factors for career choice were intellectual challenge (95%), academic opportunities (61%), and research opportunities(54%). Doctors with more than 4 years of experience deemed duration of training (p = 0.002), lifestyle during training (p = 0.02), and stress (0.005) as less important factors when considering career choice. Correlation analyses demonstrated that prestige (p = 0.002), patient relationships (p = 0.006), and advice from friends or family (p = 0.01) were more important influencing factors for interns. In terms of career

  16. Career Choices: A Comparison of Two Occupational Therapy Practice Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Seanne; Rosenthal, Carolyn

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of 20 occupational therapists in gerontology with 20 in pediatrics found that societal and personal values, opportunity structures, attitudes and beliefs, experiences, and the context of work influenced choice of practice setting. Academic and clinical experiences were very influential for those in pediatrics. Those in gerontology felt…

  17. Gender differences in financial risk aversion and career choices are affected by testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Paola; Zingales, Luigi; Maestripieri, Dario

    2009-01-01

    Women are generally more risk averse than men. We investigated whether between- and within-gender variation in financial risk aversion was accounted for by variation in salivary concentrations of testosterone and in markers of prenatal testosterone exposure in a sample of >500 MBA students. Higher levels of circulating testosterone were associated with lower risk aversion among women, but not among men. At comparably low concentrations of salivary testosterone, however, the gender difference in risk aversion disappeared, suggesting that testosterone has nonlinear effects on risk aversion regardless of gender. A similar relationship between risk aversion and testosterone was also found using markers of prenatal testosterone exposure. Finally, both testosterone levels and risk aversion predicted career choices after graduation: Individuals high in testosterone and low in risk aversion were more likely to choose risky careers in finance. These results suggest that testosterone has both organizational and activational effects on risk-sensitive financial decisions and long-term career choices. PMID:19706398

  18. Gender stereotypes among women engineering and technology students in the UK: lessons from career choice narratives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Abigail; Dainty, Andrew; Bagilhole, Barbara

    2012-12-01

    In the UK, women remain under-represented in engineering and technology (E&T). Research has, therefore, investigated barriers and solutions to women's recruitment, retention and progression. Recruitment into the sector may be supported by exploring the career decisions of women and men who have chosen to study E&T. Triangulating quantitative and qualitative data from E&T students at a UK university, this paper examines the gendered nature of career choice narratives. It finds that women often maintain contradictory views; upholding gendered stereotypes about women's suitability for the so-called masculine work, yet also subscribing to ideals that the sector is accessible to all who wish to work in it. This is explained using an individualist framework in which women construct an autonomous sense of self, yet are also shaped by a gendered self. Women's discourse around career choice, therefore, reveals the problematic nature of gender norms for achieving gender equity in E&T.

  19. Career Choice and Unemployment Length: A Study of Graduates from a South African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mncayi, Precious; Dunga, Steven Henry

    2016-01-01

    Graduate unemployment is especially problematic in a country where much emphasis is placed on furthering academic studies for economic and personal rewards. This article investigates the relationship between career choice and unemployment length among graduates from a South African university. Data were collected by means of a survey questionnaire…

  20. Chinese Opportunities in Career Education (Project CHOICE). 1990-91 Final Evaluation Profile. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    An evaluation was done of New York City Public Schools' Chinese Opportunities in Career Education Program (Project CHOICE), which served economically disadvantaged Chinese American high school students of limited English proficiency. The project operated at two Manhattan high schools and served 523 students, of whom 94.6 percent were eligible for…

  1. Demographic, Educational, and Psychosocial Factors Influencing the Choices of Primary Care and Academic Medical Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubeck, Robert F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 246 primary care and 90 academic physicians found that for the former, length of training, direct patient contact, and threats of malpractice suits were significant influences in career choice. For the latter, long-term research participation, intellectual stimulation, specialty content, and mentor or role model were more significant…

  2. Demographic, Educational, and Psychosocial Factors Influencing the Choices of Primary Care and Academic Medical Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubeck, Robert F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 246 primary care and 90 academic physicians found that for the former, length of training, direct patient contact, and threats of malpractice suits were significant influences in career choice. For the latter, long-term research participation, intellectual stimulation, specialty content, and mentor or role model were more significant…

  3. The Role of Culture and Gender in the Choice of a Career in Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malach-Pines, Ayala; Kaspi-Baruch, Oshrit

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The paper addresses the influence of culture and gender on the choice of a management career among men and women MBA students in Israel, the USA, the UK, Turkey, Cyprus, Hungary and India. The culture by gender comparison enabled an examination of five theories: two that focused on culture (Hofstede's and an application of Schneider's ASA…

  4. Parental Influence on Exploratory Students' College Choice, Major, and Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores parental influence on exploratory students' college choice, major, and career decision making. The research began with examination of a first year academic advising model and Living Learning Community. Parental influence emerged as a key theme in student decision making processes. The project was conducted using grounded…

  5. Are Computer Science and Information Technology Still Masculine Fields? High School Students' Perceptions and Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastergiou, M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated Greek high school students' intentions and motivation towards and against pursuing academic studies in Computer Science (CS), the influence of the family and the scholastic environment on students' career choices, students' perceptions of CS and the Information Technology (IT) profession as well as students' attendance at…

  6. Career Choice among Second-Generation Korean-Americans: Reflections of a Cultural Model of Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eun-Young

    1993-01-01

    Examines the pattern of career choice among 23 female and 17 male Korean-American college students in California, and analyzes how this pattern reflects their immigrant parents' cultural model of success and subsequent educational strategies. Explores the model as a family and community force, and considers its costs. (SLD)

  7. Factors Affecting Students' Career Choice in Accounting: The Case of a Turkish University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uyar, Ali; Güngörmüs, Ali Haydar; Kuzey, Cemil

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the reasons that influence students' career choices in accounting. In order to determine these reasons, a questionnaire survey has been employed. The empirical findings can be divided into two categories. First, students who have a desire to work in accounting field assume that accounting field provides good job…

  8. Influence of Role Models and Mentors on Female Graduate Students' Choice of Science as a Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fried, Toni; MacCleave, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the source, nature, and degree of influence of role models and mentors on female graduate students' choice of science as a career. Also examined was the existence of gender or area-of-study (engineering, biological science, physical sciences) differences. Results of a factor analysis of the Influence of…

  9. Social Support for Career Choices and Academic Achievement: An Empirical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglehart, Marita; Brown, Donald R.

    This study investigated the influence of social support on a person's career choice and its impact on later achievement, testing the hypotheses that social support that pressures a person into entering a given field will lead to lower achievement, and that social support that contributes to the person's development of a professional identity will…

  10. Career Choice and Unemployment Length: A Study of Graduates from a South African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mncayi, Precious; Dunga, Steven Henry

    2016-01-01

    Graduate unemployment is especially problematic in a country where much emphasis is placed on furthering academic studies for economic and personal rewards. This article investigates the relationship between career choice and unemployment length among graduates from a South African university. Data were collected by means of a survey questionnaire…

  11. Career Choices in Engineering: The Influence of Peers and Parents Implication for Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alika, Henrietta Ijeoma

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between parental and peer group influence on career choice in engineering profession among adolescents. The research design adopted was correlational because it sought to establish the relationship between the independent variable and the dependent variable. One research question and one…

  12. Career Choice among Second-Generation Korean-Americans: Reflections of a Cultural Model of Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eun-Young

    1993-01-01

    Examines the pattern of career choice among 23 female and 17 male Korean-American college students in California, and analyzes how this pattern reflects their immigrant parents' cultural model of success and subsequent educational strategies. Explores the model as a family and community force, and considers its costs. (SLD)

  13. Demographic Characteristics of Ghanaian Optometry Students and Factors Influencing Their Career Choice and Institution of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boadi-Kusi, Samuel Bert; Kyei, Samuel; Mashige, Khathutshelo Percy; Abu, Emmanuel Kwasi; Antwi-Boasiako, Daniel; Halladay, Abraham Carl

    2015-01-01

    Optometry is only provided at tertiary level in two institutions in Ghana, with an average of 50 students graduating each year for a population of approximately 24.6 million. No information on the demography of optometry students and factors that influence their choice of optometry as a career and institution of learning is available. This…

  14. The Influence of Science Summer Camp on African-American High School Students' Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Sumita; Mead, Timothy P.; Nathaniel, Rajkumar

    2011-01-01

    This study explored if a weeklong science camp changed Louisiana African-American high school students' perception of science. A semi-structured survey was used before and after the camp to determine the changes in science attitudes and career choices. Among the perceived benefits were parental involvement, increased science academic ability, and…

  15. Predicting Burnout and Career Choice Satisfaction in Counseling Psychology Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heddy Kovach; Murdock, Nancy L.; Koetting, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Counseling psychology doctoral students (N = 284) from 53 training programs throughout the United States anonymously completed online measures of burnout, career choice satisfaction, global stress, role conflict, social support (from family/friends, advisors, other students) and psychological sense of community (SOC) in the doctoral program. Two…

  16. The impact of the educational environment on career choice and attitudes toward psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, Rathi; Lim, Haikel A; Verma, Swapna; Kua, Ee Heok

    2015-05-01

    The educational environment may influence students' attitudes towards medical specialties, which in turn can affect specialty career choices. The present study sought to establish if perceptions of the educational environment in a psychiatry rotation influenced attitudinal changes towards psychiatry in medical students and impacts decisions about psychiatry as a career choice. The modified Attitudes to Psychiatry Scale, Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure, and questions specific to career choice in psychiatry were administered to 100 undergraduates in a psychiatry rotation. Significant improvements in attitudes toward psychiatry were highly correlated with the educational environment, particularly when it was perceived as providing inspiration and enabling students to recognize the merits of psychiatry and the effectiveness of treatment. However, there was a worsening trend in the stigma to psychiatry in the posting, and only the positive attitudinal change (but not educational environment) influenced a career choice in psychiatry. While the educational environment contributes towards positive attitudinal changes in a specialty rotation, stigma of psychiatry continues to be a limiting factor, which is, unfortunately, not clearly addressed in the curriculum. The findings support the urgent need for interventions in this area.

  17. [Intersection between gender and socioeconomic status in medical sciences career choice].

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Hernández, Georgina; Ortiz-Hernández, Luis; Compeán-Dardón, Sandra; Verde-Flota, Elizabeth; Delgado-Sáncnchez, Guadalupe; Tamez-González, Silivia

    2006-01-01

    Analyze the relationship between gender identity and socioeconomic level associated with career choice among undergraduate students selecting the area of health sciences. Our sample was comprised of first year medical nutrition, dentistry and nursing students (n=637) admitted to the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Xochimilco. A self administered questionnaire was used. The dependent variable was career choice. Independent variables included socioeconomic status, gender norms in student's homes, and gender stereotype internalization. More female nursing students came from low socioeconomic strata, while medical students had a higher socioeconomic status. Among males, more nursing and medical students belonged to a higher socioeconomicstrata. Nutrition and dentistry students belonged to a medium strata. In comparison with males from high socioeconomic strata more male participants reported that household chores were divided among men and women. For women, as the socioeconomic level increased, the participation of men and women also increased. In the indicators of internalization of gender stereotypes, nursing students had the highest rates in the submission scale, but the lowest for masculinity and machismo. As the socioeconomic strata increased, the characteristics of masculinity and machismo also increased. The present results seem to indicate that among women of low socioeconomic strata more traditional gender stereotypes prevail which lead them to seek career choices considered femenine. Among men, there is a clear relationship between career choice, socioeconomic level and internalization of gender stereotypes.

  18. Demographic Characteristics of Ghanaian Optometry Students and Factors Influencing Their Career Choice and Institution of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boadi-Kusi, Samuel Bert; Kyei, Samuel; Mashige, Khathutshelo Percy; Abu, Emmanuel Kwasi; Antwi-Boasiako, Daniel; Halladay, Abraham Carl

    2015-01-01

    Optometry is only provided at tertiary level in two institutions in Ghana, with an average of 50 students graduating each year for a population of approximately 24.6 million. No information on the demography of optometry students and factors that influence their choice of optometry as a career and institution of learning is available. This…

  19. Beyond Numbers: Quantitative and Qualitative Research with Alumni Regarding Physician Career Choice and Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Denise D.; Borges, Nicole J.

    This paper describes a research project at a medical college in northeastern Ohio using personality data from 10 graduating classes regarding physician career choice and satisfaction. The project began with the intention of analyzing existing personality data and developing group profiles for medical specialties. It was expanded to relate these…

  20. Career Choices in Engineering: The Influence of Peers and Parents Implication for Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alika, Henrietta Ijeoma

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between parental and peer group influence on career choice in engineering profession among adolescents. The research design adopted was correlational because it sought to establish the relationship between the independent variable and the dependent variable. One research question and one…

  1. The Role of Culture and Gender in the Choice of a Career in Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malach-Pines, Ayala; Kaspi-Baruch, Oshrit

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The paper addresses the influence of culture and gender on the choice of a management career among men and women MBA students in Israel, the USA, the UK, Turkey, Cyprus, Hungary and India. The culture by gender comparison enabled an examination of five theories: two that focused on culture (Hofstede's and an application of Schneider's ASA…

  2. Factors Affecting Career Choice: Comparison between Students from Computer and Other Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, P. M.; Holmner, M.; Lotriet, H. H.; Matthee, M. C.; Pieterse, H. V.; Naidoo, S.; Twinomurinzi, H.; Jordaan, D.

    2011-01-01

    The number of student enrolments in computer-related courses remains a serious concern worldwide with far reaching consequences. This paper reports on an extensive survey about career choice and associated motivational factors amongst new students, only some of whom intend to major in computer-related courses, at two South African universities.…

  3. The Influence of Science Summer Camp on African-American High School Students' Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Sumita; Mead, Timothy P.; Nathaniel, Rajkumar

    2011-01-01

    This study explored if a weeklong science camp changed Louisiana African-American high school students' perception of science. A semi-structured survey was used before and after the camp to determine the changes in science attitudes and career choices. Among the perceived benefits were parental involvement, increased science academic ability, and…

  4. Key Influencers on the Career Directions and Choices of Black University Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Lee N.; Fooks, Gordon M.

    1980-01-01

    The key influencers on occupational preference and occupational choice tend to be persons in the job and parents, particularly mothers. Survey results support the need to increase the number of Black professionals in a variety of occupations who can influence the career development of youth. (Author)

  5. Personal Choices, Personal Power. Career Survival Kit for Teen Education and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, A. Frances

    This workbook is one component of the Career Survival Kit prepared for teenage parents in Wisconsin. The workbook is designed to help teen parents identify their choices in preventing another pregnancy. It presents some thoughts about sexual decisions and responsibility. Birth control methods are described to help teens decide the best method for…

  6. Choices & Careers; Free to Choose: Being an Indian Woman - Unit for Adults. Leaders Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Lois Metoxen

    This leaders' guide, composed of three sections, is based on other booklets of the "Choices and Careers" series. "Traditional Roles" uses "Being an Indian Woman" for background information and promotes discussion of traditional roles of Indian women and points out stereotypes still existing. Bridging the gap between…

  7. Choices & Careers; Free to Choose: Being a Special Person - Unit for Adults. Leaders Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Cathaleen; Thompson, Marian

    This leaders' guide is for use in group sessions or individual meetings with parents of girls participating in the Choices & Careers: Free to Choose program. It is based upon units the girls study, including "The Outside You,""Your Money,""Food and You,""Alcoholism,""Coping with Parents," and…

  8. Predicting dentists' career choices using the Myers-Briggs type indicator.

    PubMed

    Grandy, T G; Westerman, G H; Ocanto, R A; Erskine, C G

    1996-02-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is a psychological measure designed to determine personality preferences, learning styles and management styles and to assist with career choices. The authors surveyed 1,117 practicing dentists to determine if the MBTI was useful in determining which respondents were most likely to be specialists. They found no significant differences between general practitioners and specialists.

  9. Career choice and future plan of Chinese 8-year stomatology medical doctor program students.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xu; Zhang, Xinwen; Shen, Yong; Yi, Zhe; Wu, Lin; Ai, Hongjun

    2015-09-01

    This elite education reform that commenced in 2001 aims to improve the quality of Chinese dentists. It is expected to be one of the biggest drivers that lead dental education of China to a new stage. The authors identified and analyzed the perspectives of Chinese 8-year stomatology medical doctor (SMD) program students toward their career choice and future plan. The data from a self-administered questionnaire (4 items regarding career choice and 6 items about future plan), administered to 87 8-year SMD program students from the School of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing, China, were used. The authors performed a comparison of the students of different sexes and home locations using the Chi-square test. Of the students, 34.5% indicated interpersonal motives as the reason to choose the 8-year SMD program, and only 52.9% thought that they had made good choices. The top three popular careers were those of prosthodontists (20.7%), oral surgeons (14.9%), and orthodontists (13.8%). The majority of students preferred first-tier cities (85.7%) and university hospitals (71.3%). In China, most 8-year S.M.D students would like to work as clinical dentists of university hospitals in first-tier cities. The top three career choices of graduates would be prosthodontists, oral surgeons, and orthodontists. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  10. Predicting Burnout and Career Choice Satisfaction in Counseling Psychology Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heddy Kovach; Murdock, Nancy L.; Koetting, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Counseling psychology doctoral students (N = 284) from 53 training programs throughout the United States anonymously completed online measures of burnout, career choice satisfaction, global stress, role conflict, social support (from family/friends, advisors, other students) and psychological sense of community (SOC) in the doctoral program. Two…

  11. In-School Adolescents and Career Choice: The Case of Ekiti State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osakinle, E. O.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines in-school adolescents and career choices in Ekiti State, Nigeria. The sample consists of two hundred randomly selected parents and in-school adolescents from four local government areas in Ekiti State. Two hypotheses were generated and tested at 0.05 level of significance using t-test statistical analysis. The results showed…

  12. Parental Influence on Exploratory Students' College Choice, Major, and Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores parental influence on exploratory students' college choice, major, and career decision making. The research began with examination of a first year academic advising model and Living Learning Community. Parental influence emerged as a key theme in student decision making processes. The project was conducted using grounded…

  13. Factors Affecting Career Choice: Comparison between Students from Computer and Other Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, P. M.; Holmner, M.; Lotriet, H. H.; Matthee, M. C.; Pieterse, H. V.; Naidoo, S.; Twinomurinzi, H.; Jordaan, D.

    2011-01-01

    The number of student enrolments in computer-related courses remains a serious concern worldwide with far reaching consequences. This paper reports on an extensive survey about career choice and associated motivational factors amongst new students, only some of whom intend to major in computer-related courses, at two South African universities.…

  14. Defining Advancement Career Paths and Succession Plans: Critical Human Capital Retention Strategies for High-Performing Advancement Divisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croteau, Jon Derek; Wolk, Holly Gordon

    2010-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence whether a highly talented staff member will build a career within an institution or use it as a stepping stone. This article defines and explores the notions of developing career paths and succession planning and why they are critical human capital investment strategies in retaining the highest performers…

  15. Effects of Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy and Degree Utility on Student Persistence: A Path Analytic Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shari L.; delMas, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    Constructed a path model mapping the effect of career decision-making self-efficacy (CDMSE) and degree utility on persistence of underprepared college students. Found that students who believed college would provide employment opportunities and better careers were more likely to persist, and that CDMSE has a direct effect on social and academic…

  16. Defining Advancement Career Paths and Succession Plans: Critical Human Capital Retention Strategies for High-Performing Advancement Divisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croteau, Jon Derek; Wolk, Holly Gordon

    2010-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence whether a highly talented staff member will build a career within an institution or use it as a stepping stone. This article defines and explores the notions of developing career paths and succession planning and why they are critical human capital investment strategies in retaining the highest performers…

  17. Why not nursing? A systematic review of factors influencing career choice among healthcare students.

    PubMed

    Wu, L T; Low, M M J; Tan, K K; Lopez, V; Liaw, S Y

    2015-12-01

    A global shortage of healthcare professionals calls for effective recruitment and retention strategies. The nursing profession faces greater staffing shortages compared with other healthcare professions. Identifying these factors for choosing a career in health care is an important step in structuring future nursing recruitment strategies. This systematic review examined the motivations for choosing a career in health care, then compared them to factors that influence the choice to pursue a career in nursing. A literature search of the CINAHL, PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus databases for articles published between 2002 and 2013 was conducted. The search included studies that focused on factors influencing career choice among undergraduate medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and nursing students. A total of 29 papers were included in the review. The themes and subthemes that emerged from this review included: (1) intrinsic factors, including a desire to help others and a personal interest in health care, (2) extrinsic factors, such as financial remuneration, job security, professional prestige and job autonomy, (3) socio-demographic factors such as gender and socio-economic status, and (4) interpersonal factors, encompassing the influence of family and other professional individuals. Healthcare professionals were generally motivated by intrinsic factors. However, public perceptions of nursing as a low-paying and low-status job have significantly hindered the participants' choice to pursue it as a career. Nursing institutions could provide more platforms to help school leavers better understand the nursing career. In turn, hospital administrators could invite parents to nursing career fairs, increase financial remuneration for nurses, and provide decision-making avenues aimed at recruiting and retaining more nurses. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  18. Socioeconomic Influences on the Educational and Career Paths of Kentucky High School Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rever, Philip R.; And Others

    The report is a response to Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority's concern about limiting factors which constrain students' choices of paths to follow after leaving high school, specifically unacceptable factors that prohibit students (1) from pursuing postsecondary education and (2) from entering postsecondary institutions of their…

  19. An Assessment of Energy-Related Career Paths of Senior Industrial Assessment Center Program Alumni

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.A.

    2003-10-20

    The purpose of this study was to assess the career paths of alumni from the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program. IAC was originally named the Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program when it began in association with four schools in 1976. The current IAC program provides funding to 26 engineering colleges, located in centers across the United States, to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small- to medium-sized manufacturing establishments within their respective regions. Through part-time employment with the university, students receive training and in turn conduct assessments for local manufacturers, under the direct supervision of engineering faculty. Annually, IAC participants conduct over 700 assessments, and each assessment generates recommendations for energy savings, energy cost savings, and waste and productivity cost savings customized for individual clients. An earlier study determined that energy savings could be attributed to alumni of the IAC program who take their IAC experiences with them to the professional workplace. During their careers, the alumni conduct additional energy assessments as well as influence energy efficiency through design, teaching and training, and other activities. Indeed, a significant level of program benefits can be attributed to the alumni. This project addressed such specific questions as: How many years after graduation are IAC alumni involved in energy-efficiency activities? What different methods do they use to influence energy-efficiency decisions? To answer these questions, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT) surveyed IAC senior alumni, defined as those who graduated in 1995 or earlier. Section 2 describes the survey used in this research. The actual survey can be found in Appendix A. Section 3 describes our approach to data collection. Section 4 presents descriptive statistics about the senior alumni who responded to the survey. Section 5

  20. Factors associated with the choice of general medicine as a career among Japanese medical students.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Ninomiya, Daisuke; Kasai, Yoshihisa; Kusunoki, Tomo; Ohtsuka, Nobuyuki; Kumagi, Teru; Abe, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Background In Japan, there is a shortage of young physicians in various specialties; the present situation of general medicine or family medicine (GM/FM) in particular is risky. The factors influencing the career choice of Japanese medical students are poorly understood. This study aims to identify factors related to choosing GM/FM as a career. Methods The study was designed as a cross-sectional survey. Students at one medical school in Japan filled out a questionnaire. Students were asked to state their intended medical specialty, and they rated the importance of specific individual and occupational aspects using a 4-point likert scale. Factor analysis was performed on the variables. Reliability of the factor scores was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficients; biserial correlations between the factors and career choices were calculated. Furthermore, multiple linear regression analysis was performed using career choice (GM/FM vs. others) as the criterion variable and the factors plus demographic characteristics as confounding variables. Results Factor analysis produced six factors that explained future career plans. Medical students in this study had a positive and realistic idea about GM/FM, but only 18.8% of them chose GM/FM first as a career. The significant variables associated with choosing GM/FM first as a career were: 'Admission from hometown' (β=0.189, P=0.001), 'Student preparing for the entrance exam' (β=0.172; P=0.001), 'Intent for rural practice' (β=0.123, P=0.016), and 'Work-life balance' (β=0.126, P=0.013). While significant variables that were negatively associated with choosing GM/FM were 'Presence of medical relatives' (β=-0.107, P=0.037) and 'Scientific orientation' (β=-0.125, P=0.013). Conclusions Strategies have been suggested, such as recruiting medical students with significant variables that were associated with choosing GM/FM first as a career. By engaging students early in their choice of career, we may be able to increase

  1. Factors associated with the choice of general medicine as a career among Japanese medical students

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Ninomiya, Daisuke; Kasai, Yoshihisa; Kusunoki, Tomo; Ohtsuka, Nobuyuki; Kumagi, Teru; Abe, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Background In Japan, there is a shortage of young physicians in various specialties; the present situation of general medicine or family medicine (GM/FM) in particular is risky. The factors influencing the career choice of Japanese medical students are poorly understood. This study aims to identify factors related to choosing GM/FM as a career. Methods The study was designed as a cross-sectional survey. Students at one medical school in Japan filled out a questionnaire. Students were asked to state their intended medical specialty, and they rated the importance of specific individual and occupational aspects using a 4-point likert scale. Factor analysis was performed on the variables. Reliability of the factor scores was estimated using Cronbach‘s alpha coefficients; biserial correlations between the factors and career choices were calculated. Furthermore, multiple linear regression analysis was performed using career choice (GM/FM vs. others) as the criterion variable and the factors plus demographic characteristics as confounding variables. Results Factor analysis produced six factors that explained future career plans. Medical students in this study had a positive and realistic idea about GM/FM, but only 18.8% of them chose GM/FM first as a career. The significant variables associated with choosing GM/FM first as a career were: ‘Admission from hometown’ (β=0.189, P=0.001), ‘Student preparing for the entrance exam’ (β=0.172; P=0.001), ‘Intent for rural practice’ (β=0.123, P=0.016), and ‘Work–life balance’ (β=0.126, P=0.013). While significant variables that were negatively associated with choosing GM/FM were ‘Presence of medical relatives’ (β=−0.107, P=0.037) and ‘Scientific orientation’ (β=−0.125, P=0.013). Conclusions Strategies have been suggested, such as recruiting medical students with significant variables that were associated with choosing GM/FM first as a career. By engaging students early in their choice of career

  2. Career choice and future design of dental students in China and Japan.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xu; Zhang, Xinwen; Jinno, Yohei; Tachibana, Keishu; Gao, Jie; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Ai, Hongjun; Shen, Yong

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare career choice and future plans of dental students in China and Japan. Information was derived from a self-answered questionnaire. Significant differences were detected for eight items between the two countries. Regarding motivation towards career choice, 41% of Japanese students indicated positive motives related to helping others, achieving self-worth and health-care related interests, whereas Chinese students indicated that their choice was mainly for financial and prestige reasons, and for 32% of them, dentistry was a passive choice. More Chinese dental students (74%) wanted further education compared with Japanese students (22%). The majority of Japanese students (56.9%) planned to work as general dentists. Conversely, Chinese students were more likely to specialise (50%). More than 50% of Japanese students wanted to work in dental offices, but the majority of Chinese students (65%) preferred university hospital. We found it is strange that nearly one-fourth of the Chinese students did not want to be a clinical dentist mainly because of the poor health-care environment. This study provides a description of the perspectives of Japanese and Chinese dental students and enables a better understanding of career choices and future course design issues. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  3. Flight Plan: Toward a Career Choice. School and Community as Co-Pilots of Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drews, Pearl A.

    Based on collaboration efforts in Akron, Ohio, this manual is designed to help interested communities implement or expand collaboration of career education among the formal education system, the home-family structure, business, labor, industry, government, the professions, service organizations, and others. Topics discussed include the following:…

  4. Career Alternatives: Providing a Cafeteria of Choices through Career Alternative Dollars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, K. Edward

    1986-01-01

    Part of the crisis in higher education is due to the age and tenure distribution of the faculty and their escalating future salary costs. Universities must find ways to gain financial and academic flexibility. Career alternatives that can provide inducements for faculty to leave the university are described. (Author/MLW)

  5. [Choice of career by French medical students after the national ranking exam in 2012].

    PubMed

    Rivière, Etienne; Quinton, André; Roux, Xavier; Boyer, Alexandre; Delas, Hélène; Bernard, Catherine; Pélissier, Philippe; Pellegrin, Jean-Luc; Gruson, Didier

    2013-12-01

    Since 2011, the French medical students ranked after a national ranking exam (NRE) are making their career choice among 11 disciplines detailing the chosen one. Before 2011, this precise choice was unknown. Our work is the first descriptive study of French medical students choice of career after the NRE, precising the medical specialty chosen and the city of practical formation. We analyzed the Excel(®) file transmitted by the 'Agence régionale de santé d'Aquitaine' once students choice done after the 2012 NRE. A median range analysis was made for disciplines and city formation choices. For medical and surgery specialties, the analysis was compared to regional medical densities. According to the median national choice, the first sixth disciplines chosen are ophthalmology, nephrology, internal medicine, radiology, cardiology and dermatology. Women are more attracted by medical gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, or dermatology; men mostly by neurosurgery, general surgery, nuclear medicine or cardiology. The most rated cities of formation according to their national median range of choice are Lyon, Montpellier and Paris. A majority of students (59 %) moved to another city to obtain the desired specialty. Among general practitioners, 56 % of students stayed in the city where they had been trained. Our study may provide concrete objectives for French medical students accomplishing their second cycle of medical studies, as well as supplemental data for French medical demographic management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Career choices for radiology: national surveys of graduates of 1974-2002 from UK medical schools.

    PubMed

    Turner, G; Lambert, T W; Goldacre, M J

    2006-12-01

    To report on trends in career choices for radiology among UK medical graduates. One and 3 years after graduation, and at longer time intervals thereafter, postal questionnaire surveys were sent to all doctors who graduated from UK medical schools in 1974, 1977, 1980, 1983, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000 and 2002. Doctors were asked to specify their choice of long-term career and to identify factors influencing their choice. Employment details were also collected. Results were analysed using chi(2) statistics and binary logistic regression. Seventy-four percent (24,621/33,412) and 73% (20,720/28,459) of doctors responded 1 and 3 years after graduation. Choices for radiology in year 1 increased significantly over time (1.7% of 1974 graduates to 3.2% of 2002 graduates; chi(2) test for trend=15.3, p<0.001). In particular, there has been a steady increase from the cohorts of 1993 onwards. Thirty-eight percent of those who chose radiology in year 1, and 80% who chose radiology in year 3, were still working in radiology 10 years after graduation. Hours and working conditions influenced long-term career choices more for radiology than for other careers. The proportion of UK trained junior doctors who want to become radiologists has increased in recent years. However, although medical school intake and the numbers making an early choice for radiology have risen, it is unclear whether sufficient UK graduates will be attracted to radiology to fulfil future service requirements from UK trained graduates alone.

  7. Japan Women's University Multi-Career Path Support Model for Female Researchers (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Yoshikazu; Kodate, Kashiko

    2009-04-01

    The overall goal of this project, funded by MEXT-Japan (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, and Technology), is to implement prototypical programs to foster and proactively engage female researchers. The project aims to provide comprehensive support for female researchers who wish to raise a family and pursue an academic career, and increase opportunities for female researchers to play more active roles. To achieve these objectives, three core actions are taken. First, with out-of-office/out-of-lab research support (ubiquitous research support), an assistant researcher is provided to help perform experiments while the ubiquitous researcher is out of the laboratory. A communication network is introduced to connect the laboratory with home to facilitate in-home research. Second, with human resources support, researchers' career paths, abilities, and experiences are accumulated in e-portfolios. This enables researchers coming from different fields of employment to pursue other career paths. Third, a follow-up survey and project planning are conducted. We believe through science education, science can be demystified, and made more accessible and fascinating for children. This would bode well for future generations. Alumni questionnaires show that 80% of respondents were very satisfied to have graduated with a science background.

  8. Using Accuracy of Self-Estimated Interest Type as a Sign of Career Choice Readiness in Career Assessment of Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschi, Andreas; Lage, Damian

    2008-01-01

    A frequent applied method in career assessment to elicit clients' self-concepts is asking them to predict their interest assessment results. Accuracy in estimating one's interest type is commonly taken as a sign of more self-awareness and career choice readiness. The study evaluated the empirical relation of accuracy of self-estimation to career…

  9. Using Accuracy of Self-Estimated Interest Type as a Sign of Career Choice Readiness in Career Assessment of Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschi, Andreas; Lage, Damian

    2008-01-01

    A frequent applied method in career assessment to elicit clients' self-concepts is asking them to predict their interest assessment results. Accuracy in estimating one's interest type is commonly taken as a sign of more self-awareness and career choice readiness. The study evaluated the empirical relation of accuracy of self-estimation to career…

  10. Project CHOICE: #50. A Career Education Unit for Fifth and Sixth Grades. Introduction to Clothing Design. (Fine Arts and Humanities Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Introduction to Clothing Design, is one in a series of curriculum guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking 5th and 6th grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. These ten clothing design…

  11. Applying to plastic surgery residency: factors associated with medical student career choice.

    PubMed

    Greene, Arin K; May, James W

    2008-03-01

    Applications to plastic surgery residency increased 34 percent from 2002 to 2005, despite decreasing applications to other surgical subspecialties. During this period, medical education, reimbursement, work hours, and media coverage have changed. To determine factors responsible for rising applications to plastic surgery residencies, medical student applicants to plastic surgery residencies for 2005 were surveyed. Applicants recorded exposure to plastic surgery during medical school and graded the influence of personality, lifestyle, income potential, and media coverage on their decision to choose plastic surgery training. To further study the effects of plastic surgery exposure on career choice, the percentage of graduating students applying to plastic surgery residency was compared between medical schools with and without plastic surgery training programs. Medical schools that provided greater exposure to plastic surgery and schools with plastic surgery training programs had a higher percentage of graduates applying to plastic surgery residency (p < 0.001). Applicants rated compatibility with the personality of plastic surgeons as a significant factor in their career choice. Lifestyle and income potential were moderately important, whereas media coverage minimally affected career decision. Applicants typically decided on a plastic surgical career during the third year of medical school. Medical student exposure to plastic surgery is the most influential factor in a student's decision to pursue a career in plastic surgery. To continue the increasing applicant trend toward plastic surgery, plastic surgeon engagement of medical students should be emphasized, ideally before the third year of medical school.

  12. The social context of career choice among millennial nurses: implications for interprofessional practice.

    PubMed

    Price, Sheri; McGillis Hall, Linda; Angus, Jan; Peter, Elizabeth

    2013-11-01

    Health human resource and workforce planning is a global priority. Given the critical nursing shortage, and the fact that nurses are the largest group of healthcare providers, health workforce planning must focus on strategies to enhance both recruitment and retention of nurses. Understanding early socialization to career choice can provide insight into professional perceptions and expectations that have implications for recruitment, retention and interprofessional collaboration. This interpretive narrative inquiry utilized Polkinghorne's theory of narrative emplotment to understand the career choice experiences of 12 millennial nurses (born between 1980 and 2000) in Eastern Canada. Participants were interviewed twice, face-to-face, 4 to 6 weeks apart prior to commencing their nursing program. The narratives present career choice as a complex consideration of social positioning. The findings provide insight into how nursing is perceived to be positioned in relation to medicine and how the participants struggled to locate themselves within this social hierarchy. Implications of this research highlight the need to ensure that recruitment messaging and organizational policies promote interprofessional collaboration from the onset of choosing a career in the health professions. Early professional socialization strategies during recruitment and education can enhance future collaboration between the health professions.

  13. The prospect of anatomy as a career choice among clinical year medical students in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Onakpoya, Oluwatoyin H; Onakpoya, Uvie U; Adereti, Grace E

    2009-01-01

    Medical doctors are potential important source of anatomy teachers. The aim of this study was to determine the choice of anatomy as a career option among medical students in a Nigerian medical school Descriptive survey of second- and third-year medical students using a self-administered questionnaire to asses age, sex, perception of anatomy as a subject, anatomy training experience and choice of anatomy as a career among respondents. Analysis was conducted using the SPSS and statistical significance inferred at P RESULTS: Three hundred and fifty three (85.3% response rate) who completely filled questionnaire were returned and analyzed of which 195 (55.2%) were males and 158(44.8%) were females. Their ages ranged between 18 and 37 years with a mean of 22.4 9.9 years. Although most students agreed that anatomy was an important subject in medical sciences 346 (98%), they had benefited from anatomy training in their clinical classes 320 (90.7%), and the knowledge of anatomy is useful in investigating patients with certain diseases 251 (71.1%), only 22 (6.2%) would choose anatomy as a career. Male students were more likely to choose anatomy as a career (P=0.026). Textbooks were the most common 334 (94.5%), while radiological means were the least 23 (6.5%) method employed in learning anatomy. Anatomy as a subject is perceived positively by clinical medical students, but the choice as a career option is low; attempt at increasing career interest is needful.

  14. Why neurology? Factors which influence career choice in neurology.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dara V; Hoyle, Chad; Yin, Han; McCoyd, Matthew; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the factors which influence the decision to pursue a career in neurology. An anonymous survey was developed using a Likert scale to rate responses. The survey was sent to adult and child neurology faculty, residents and fellows, as well as medical students applying for neurology. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the factors of influence. Respondents were subsequently categorized into pre-neurology trainees, neurology trainees, child neurologists and adult neurologists, and differences between the groups were analysed using Pearson's chi-square test. One hundred and thirty-three anonymous responses were received. The respondents were neurologists across all levels of training and practice. Across all respondents, the most common factor of high importance was intellectual content of specialty, challenging diagnostic problems, type of patient encountered and interest in helping people. Responses were similar across the groups; however, the earliest trainees cited interest in helping people as most important, while those in neurology training and beyond cite intellectual content of the specialty as most important. As trainees transition from their earliest levels of clinical experience into working as residents and faculty, there is a shift in the cited important factors. Lifestyle and financial factors seem to be the least motivating across all groups. Encouragement from peers, mentors, faculty and practicing physicians is considered high influences in a smaller number of neurologists. This may present an opportunity for practicing neurologists to make connections with medical students early in their education in an effort to encourage and mentor candidates.

  15. [Gender and career paths of female primary care physicians in Andalusia, Spain, at the beginning of 21st century].

    PubMed

    Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; Delgado, Ana; Ortiz-Gómez, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to study, from a feminist perspective, the diversity and homogeneity in the career paths of female primary care physicians from Andalusia, Spain in the early 21st century, by analyzing the meanings they give to their careers and the influence of personal, family and professional factors. We conducted a qualitative study with six discussion groups. Thirty-two female primary care physicians working in urban health centers of the public health system of Andalusia participated in the study. The discourse analysis revealed that most of the female physicians did not plan for professional goals and, when they did plan for them, the goals were intertwined with family needs. Consequently, their career paths were discontinuous. In contrast, career paths oriented towards professional development and the conscious planning of goals were more common among the female doctors acting as directors of health care centers.

  16. A path model of the relationship between career indecision, androgyny, self-efficacy, and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Wulff, M B; Steitz, J A

    1999-06-01

    Utilizing a path model, this study investigated the relationship between Androgyny and career decision-making among 91 high school girls. The constructs included in the model were Androgyny as assessed by the Bem Sex-role Inventory, Self-esteem as assessed by the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Self-efficacy as assessed by the Wulff-Steitz Career Self-efficacy Scale, and Career Indecision as assessed by the Osipow Career Decision Scale. The results indicated that Androgyny scores were significantly associated with those on Self-esteem, Self-esteem with Self-efficacy, and Self-efficacy with Career Indecision. The results are discussed in terms of the usefulness of path models in clarifying complex interrelationships.

  17. Survey of Retired Military Pharmacist's Transition to a Civilian Pharmacy Career Path.

    PubMed

    Bennett, David; Wellman, Greg; Mahmood, Maysaa; Freye, Ryan; Remund, Daniel; Samples, Phil L

    2015-12-01

    To explore variables relevant to transition to civilian pharmacy career path for retiring military pharmacists. A cross-sectional survey was designed to collect information from retired military pharmacists including demographics, military service information, postretirement employment and perceptions of transition, satisfaction, level of responsibility, work environment, rewards (level of financial compensation, opportunities for professional development and career advancement, health benefits), and level of supervisory support. The questionnaire also included additional items asking about their perception of their military experience, transition to civilian work and the impact the military career had on their personal and family life. Respondents included 140 retired pharmacists from the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, or Coast Guard. Factors found to be significant predictors of transition to civilian career included: bureaucracy in current job, time elapsed since retirement, extent to which an individual misses military structure and chain of command, access to military facilities and Veterans Administration benefits, and reporting little or no stress in committed long-term personal relationship while in the military. Findings suggest that the majority of retired military pharmacists perceived the transition to civilian professional sector was about what they expected or easier than expected. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. Factors affecting career choice among the next generation of academic vascular surgeons.

    PubMed

    Danczyk, Rachel C; Sevdalis, Nick; Woo, Karen; Hingorani, Anil P; Landry, Gregory J; Liem, Timothy K; Moneta, Gregory L; Mitchell, Erica L

    2012-05-01

    Few studies have examined factors that influence an individual's decision to enter an academic medical career after residency training. We sought to evaluate whether sex, ethnicity, child care issues, and debt burden influenced residents' choice for a career in academic vascular surgery. A 39-item Web survey, designed to elucidate which factors motivated residents to seek a career in academic vascular surgery, was sent to 295 vascular surgery residents currently enrolled in Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-accredited training programs. A total of 128 responses (43%) were received. Of these, 53% of respondents were white and 47% were nonwhite and 34 (27%) were women and 94 (73%) were men. Fifty-seven percent of minorities anticipate a career in academic vascular surgery. There were no statistical differences between sex and ethnicity for factors influencing career choice, including training paradigm, presence of a life partner or dependents, mentorship role, participation in research, service, and teaching, anticipated salary, and debt burden (P > .05). Seventy-seven percent of respondents carry significant debt; of those with debt, 81% owe >$100,000 and 40% owe >$200,000. Seventy-three percent of 0+5 trainees anticipated choosing an academic practice compared with 42% of 5+2 trainees (P < .01). Respondents planning an academic career cited procedural variation, breadth and depth of practice/tertiary referral experience, and research opportunities as the most important drivers of career choice. Income potential, strength of the job market, and child care needs were deemed less important. This study shows that academic vascular surgery is a popular career option for current vascular surgery trainees, especially those in 0+5 programs. Choosing a career in academic vascular surgery appears not to be influenced by sex, ethnicity, child care concerns, salary expectations, or debt burden, even though most trainees carry enormous debt. The data imply

  19. Agricultural consultancy--a career choice for veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K L; Swan, R A; Chapman, H M

    2000-07-01

    To document the personal, educational and professional skills that characterise veterinarians pursuing careers as agricultural consultants and to determine the future direction for veterinary-related advisory services to agriculture in Australia. Thirty-six veterinarians practising as consultants in agriculture throughout Australia were sent a postal survey in 1994. A descriptive analysis was chosen because of the relatively small population available to sample. Comparisons were made on a percentage basis where appropriate. Twenty-four useable responses to the questionnaire were received. Consultants were mostly men with an agricultural background, aged 31 to 40 years. They considered their undergraduate veterinary studies to be a stepping stone into further education and practical experience and ultimately consultancy. Consultants predicted an increased reliance for their work on corporate farms, private agribusiness, research and development and sub-contracted work, rather than on family-owned farms. Consultants disagreed on the wisdom of combining consultancy activities with alternative businesses (for instance mixed veterinary practice). Only 13 consultants derived greater than 76% of their income from consultancy and 14 combined another business with consulting. The need for continuing education was considered important. Consultants predicted various future prospects for the industry. Many predicted that there would not be enough veterinarians to fulfill the demand for this type of work. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE VETERINARY PROFESSION: Results from this survey suggest that veterinary consulting will extend into finance, agronomy and marketing in addition to current skills in animal nutrition, parasite control and animal reproduction. As clients demand specialised skills and knowledge, the formation of co-operatives or companies of specialists may be beneficial to both client and consultant in the future. The consultant's role can be characterised as one of

  20. Medical students' choices of specialty in The Gambia: the need for career counseling.

    PubMed

    Bittaye, Mustapha; Odukogbe, Akin-Tunde Ademola; Nyan, Ousman; Jallow, Bintou; Omigbodun, Akinyinka O

    2012-08-08

    Understanding preferences for specialties by medical students and the factors driving choices assists policy makers in ensuring optimal spread of personnel across disciplines. This cross-sectional survey using self-administered structured questionnaires was conducted on consenting students of the first medical school in The Gambia, established in 1999. Data collection was in June/July 2011. Questions were on sociodemographic characteristics of students, their parents, factors related to career preferences and opinions about counseling services. Data were analysed using JMP 8.0 software. Respondents were 52.4% of 202 eligible students. Mean age was 24.1 ± 5.0 years. Females constituted 54.7%. Muslims were 72.7% while Gambians formed 77.0%. Commonest specialties chosen by females were Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Surgery in that order, while males preferred Internal Medicine, Surgery and Obstetrics/Gynaecology. Commonest factors influencing choices by females were 'focus on urgent care' (65.5%) and 'intellectual content of specialty' (56.9%). For males, these were 'intellectual content of specialty' (60.4%) and 'focus on urgent care' / 'individual's competence' (50.0% each). More females (30.0%) than males (23.0%) had ever received career counseling, but all students desired it. Significant gender differences exist in specialty choices and factors influencing these choices amongst these students. All want career counseling.

  1. Medical students’ choices of specialty in The Gambia: the need for career counseling

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding preferences for specialties by medical students and the factors driving choices assists policy makers in ensuring optimal spread of personnel across disciplines. Methods This cross-sectional survey using self-administered structured questionnaires was conducted on consenting students of the first medical school in The Gambia, established in 1999. Data collection was in June/July 2011. Questions were on sociodemographic characteristics of students, their parents, factors related to career preferences and opinions about counseling services. Data were analysed using JMP 8.0 software. Results Respondents were 52.4% of 202 eligible students. Mean age was 24.1 ± 5.0 years. Females constituted 54.7%. Muslims were 72.7% while Gambians formed 77.0%. Commonest specialties chosen by females were Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Surgery in that order, while males preferred Internal Medicine, Surgery and Obstetrics/Gynaecology. Commonest factors influencing choices by females were ‘focus on urgent care’ (65.5%) and ‘intellectual content of specialty’ (56.9%). For males, these were ‘intellectual content of specialty’ (60.4%) and ‘focus on urgent care’ / ‘individual’s competence’ (50.0% each). More females (30.0%) than males (23.0%) had ever received career counseling, but all students desired it. Conclusions Significant gender differences exist in specialty choices and factors influencing these choices amongst these students. All want career counseling. PMID:22873698

  2. Variation in Predictors of Primary Care Career Choice by Year and Stage of Training

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Maureen T; Sullivan, Amy M; Peters, Antoinette S; Clark-Chiarelli, Nancy; Zotov, Natasha; Martin, Nina; Simon, Steven R; Singer, Judith D; Block, Susan D

    2003-01-01

    CONTEXT It is not known whether factors associated with primary care career choice affect trainees differently at different times or stages of medical education. OBJECTIVE To examine how role models, encouragement, and personal characteristics affect career choice at different stages (medical school vs residency) and periods (1994 vs 1997) of training. DESIGN A split-panel design with 2 cross-sectional telephone surveys and a panel survey in 1994 and 1997. PARTICIPANTS A national probability sample of fourth-year students (307 in 1994, 219 in 1997), 645 second-year residents in 1994, and 494 third-year residents in 1997. Of the fourth-year students interviewed in 1994, 241 (78.5%) were re-interviewed as third-year residents in 1997. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Primary care (general internal medicine, general pediatrics, or family medicine) career choice. RESULTS Having a primary care role model was a stronger predictor of primary care career choice for residents (odds ratio [OR], 18.0; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 11.2 to 28.8 in 1994; OR, 43.7; 95% CI, 24.4 to 78.3 in 1997) than for students (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 4.3 to 10.2; no variation by year). Likewise, peer encouragement was more predictive for residents (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 3.3 to 8.9 in 1994; OR, 16.6; 95% CI; 9 .7 to 28.4 in 1997) than for students (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.3 to 3.2; no variation by year). Orientation to the emotional aspects of care was consistently associated with primary care career choice across stages and years of training. CONCLUSIONS The effect of peer encouragement and role models on career choice differed for students and residents and, in the case of residents, by year of training, suggesting that interventions to increase the primary care workforce should be tailored to stage of training. PMID:12648246

  3. Becoming a general practitioner--which factors have most impact on career choice of medical students?

    PubMed

    Kiolbassa, Kathrin; Miksch, Antje; Hermann, Katja; Loh, Andreas; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Joos, Stefanie; Goetz, Katja

    2011-05-09

    In Germany, there is a shortage of young physicians in several specialties, the situation of general practitioners (GP) being especially precarious. The factors influencing the career choice of German medical students are poorly understood. This study aims to identify factors influencing medical students' specialty choice laying a special focus on general practice. The study was designed as a cross-sectional survey. In 2010, students at the five medical schools in the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany) filled out an online-questionnaire. On 27 items with 5-point Likert scales, the students rated the importance of specified individual and occupational aspects. Furthermore, students were asked to assign their intended medical specialty. 1,299 students participated in the survey. Thereof, 1,114 students stated a current choice for a specialty, with 708 students choosing a career in one of the following 6 specialties: internal medicine, surgery, gynaecology and obstetrics, paediatrics, anaesthetics and general practice. Overall, individual aspects ('Personal ambition', 'Future perspective', 'Work-life balance') were rated as more important than occupational aspects (i.e. 'Variety in job', 'Job-related ambition') for career choice. For students favouring a career as a GP individual aspects and the factor 'Patient orientation' among the occupational aspects were significantly more important and 'Job-related ambition' less important compared to students with other specialty choices. This study confirms that future GPs differ from students intending to choose other specialties particularly in terms of patient-orientation and individual aspects such as personal ambition, future perspective and work-life balance. Improving job-conditions in terms of family compatibility and work-life balance could help to increase the attractiveness of general practice. Due to the shortage of GPs those factors should be made explicit at an early stage at medical school to increase

  4. Becoming a general practitioner - Which factors have most impact on career choice of medical students?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Germany, there is a shortage of young physicians in several specialties, the situation of general practitioners (GP) being especially precarious. The factors influencing the career choice of German medical students are poorly understood. This study aims to identify factors influencing medical students' specialty choice laying a special focus on general practice. Methods The study was designed as a cross-sectional survey. In 2010, students at the five medical schools in the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany) filled out an online-questionnaire. On 27 items with 5-point Likert scales, the students rated the importance of specified individual and occupational aspects. Furthermore, students were asked to assign their intended medical specialty. Results 1,299 students participated in the survey. Thereof, 1,114 students stated a current choice for a specialty, with 708 students choosing a career in one of the following 6 specialties: internal medicine, surgery, gynaecology and obstetrics, paediatrics, anaesthetics and general practice. Overall, individual aspects ('Personal ambition', 'Future perspective', 'Work-life balance') were rated as more important than occupational aspects (i.e. 'Variety in job', 'Job-related ambition') for career choice. For students favouring a career as a GP individual aspects and the factor 'Patient orientation' among the occupational aspects were significantly more important and 'Job-related ambition' less important compared to students with other specialty choices. Conclusions This study confirms that future GPs differ from students intending to choose other specialties particularly in terms of patient-orientation and individual aspects such as personal ambition, future perspective and work-life balance. Improving job-conditions in terms of family compatibility and work-life balance could help to increase the attractiveness of general practice. Due to the shortage of GPs those factors should be made explicit at an

  5. Demographic characteristics of Ghanaian optometry students and factors influencing their career choice and institution of learning.

    PubMed

    Boadi-Kusi, Samuel Bert; Kyei, Samuel; Mashige, Khathutshelo Percy; Abu, Emmanuel Kwasi; Antwi-Boasiako, Daniel; Carl Halladay, Abraham

    2015-03-01

    Optometry is only provided at tertiary level in two institutions in Ghana, with an average of 50 students graduating each year for a population of approximately 24.6 million. No information on the demography of optometry students and factors that influence their choice of optometry as a career and institution of learning is available. This information is important as it will assist optometry institutions to formulate effective student recruitment strategies. To assess the demographic characteristics of Ghanaian optometry students, the factors that influence their selection of optometry as a career and institution of learning. We conducted a cross sectional study among Ghanaian optometry students using a structured questionnaire to collect data on the demographic characteristics and factors that might influence their choice of optometry as a career as well as choice of institution of learning. Two hundred and eighty students from the two optometry training institutions in Ghana; University of Cape Coast (48.2%) and Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (51.8%) responded to the questionnaire. Their ages ranged from 17 to 28 years with most being males (72.5%), and the majority (79%) being from urban areas. The main factors that influenced their career choice were job availability after graduation (90%) and desire to help other people (89.2%). Factors that influenced their institution choice were preference for an institution (36.8%) and proximity to home (24.4%). In the absence of adequate optometry jobs in the public health sector, women will remain marginalised specifically those in rural areas. This marginalisation is however, a reflection of a broader societal disadvantage for women. Greater effort needs to be made to recruit high school students from rural areas to study optometry and more institutions need to provide optometry instruction throughout the country.

  6. Primary care specialty career choice among Canadian medical students: Understanding the factors that influence their decisions.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Heather Ann; Glicksman, Jordan T; Brandt, Michael G; Doyle, Philip C; Fung, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    To identify which factors influence medical students' decision to choose a career in family medicine and pediatrics, and which factors influence their decision to choose careers in non-front-line specialties. Survey that was created based on a comprehensive literature review to determine which factors are considered important when choosing practice specialty. Ontario medical school. An open cohort of medical students in the graduating classes of 2008 to 2011 (inclusive). The main factors that influenced participants' decision to choose a career in primary care or pediatrics, and the main factors that influenced participants' decision to choose a career in a non-front-line specialty. A total of 323 participants were included in this study. Factors that significantly influenced participants' career choice in family medicine or pediatrics involved work-life balance (acceptable hours of practice [P = .005], acceptable on-call demands [P = .012], and lifestyle flexibility [P = .006]); a robust physician-patient relationship (ability to promote individual health promotion [P = .014] and the opportunity to form long-term relationships [P < .001], provide comprehensive care [P = .001], and treat patients and their families [P = .006]); and duration of residency program (P = .001). The career-related factors that significantly influenced participants' decision to choose a non-front-line specialty were as follows: becoming an expert (P < .001), maintaining a focused scope of practice (P < .001), having a procedure-focused practice (P = .001), seeing immediate results from one's actions (P < .001), potentially earning a high income (P < .001), and having a perceived status among colleagues (P < .001). In this study, 8 factors were found to positively influence medical students' career choice in family medicine and pediatrics, and 6 factors influenced the decision to choose a career in a non-front-line specialty. Medical students can be encouraged to explore a

  7. Influence of Career Information on Choice of Degree Programme among Regular and Self-Sponsored Students in Public Universities, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gacohi, Jane Njeri; Sindabi, Aggrey M.; Chepchieng, Micah C.

    2017-01-01

    Choosing a degree programme to study in the university is a critical career task that is a major turning point in a student's life which not only is a start to workplace readiness, but also establishes the student in a career path that opens as well as closes life opportunities. Failure to achieve this task may cause dissatisfaction within the…

  8. The negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, Jim

    2013-03-01

    The International Council of Nurses proposes that the shortage of nurses is global in scale and is expected to become much worse in the years ahead. A major factor impacting on the worldwide nursing shortage is the diminishing number of young people choosing nursing as a career (International Council of Nurses, 2008). One important dimension of the school pupils' career choice process is their interactions with significant others and the influence of these significant others (Hodkinson and Sparkes, 1997). As Schools/Departments of Nursing endeavour to attract more intellectual school leavers it is important to examine what advice and opinions are significant others giving regarding nursing as a career choice and how influential is this advice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving 5th and 6th year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger sample, who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. The data was particularly striking in revealing the negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career. The influence of significant others, these being specifically parents, guardians, guidance teachers and career advisors was very apparent in the data in that they had a very negative view regarding nursing as a career choice for high academic achieving school pupils. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Engagement in adolescent career preparation: social support, personality and the development of choice decidedness and congruence.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Andreas; Niles, Spencer G; Akos, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    This longitudinal panel study investigated predictors and outcomes of active engagement in career preparation among 349 Swiss adolescents from the beginning to the end of eighth grade. Latent variable structural equation modeling was applied. The results showed that engagement in terms of self- and environmental-exploration and active career planning related positively to interindividual increases in career decidedness and choice congruence. More perceived social support, early goal decidedness, and particular personality traits predicted more engagement. Support and personality impacted outcomes only mediated through engagement. Early decidedness and congruence were significant predictors of their respective later levels. Implications for practice are presented. Copyright © 2009 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of preresidency peer-reviewed publications with radiation oncology resident choice of academic versus private practice career.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Shearwood; Thomas, Charles R; Wilson, Lynn D; Holliday, Emma B; Jaboin, Jerry J

    The decision of radiation oncology residents to pursue academic versus private practice careers plays a central role in shaping the present and future of the field, but factors that are potentially predictive of this decision are lacking. This study was performed to examine the role of several factors publicly available before residency on postresidency career choice, including preresidency peer-reviewed publications (PRPs), which have been associated with resident career choice in comparably competitive subspecialties such as neurosurgery. Using a combination of Internet searches, telephone interviews, and the 2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology directory, a list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates was compiled, along with their postresidency career choice. PRP was defined as the number of PubMed publications encompassing the end of the calendar year (2010) in which residency applications were due; this number was then correlated with career choice. A total of 163 residents from 76 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-certified programs were examined: 78% were male, 22% were MDs/PhDs, and 79 graduates (48%) chose academic careers. Fifty-two percent of graduates had at least 1 PRP at the time of application to radiation oncology residency; 35% had more than 1 PRP. Regarding career choice, the difference between 0 and 1+ PRP was statistically significant (odds ratio, 3.3; P < .01), but not between 1 and >1 PRP. Sex, PhD, or non-PhD dual degree status were not associated with career choice. Radiation oncology residency graduates with 1 or more PRPs at the time of residency application were roughly 2 times more likely to choose an academic career as their initial career choice than graduates with no preresidency PRPs. This information may prove useful to medical students, medical school advisors, and residency program directors and deserves further prospective investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation

  11. Reaching Our Successors: Millennial Generation Medical Students and Plastic Surgery as a Career Choice

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Abdulrasheed; Asuku, Malachy E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research shows that career choices are made as a result of preconceived ideas and exposure to a specialty. If plastic surgery is to continue to attract the best, factors that may dissuade the millennial generation medical students from pursuing plastic surgery as a career must be identified and addressed. We explored the determinants of interest in plastic surgery as a career choice amongst millennial generation medical students. Materials and Methods: A survey regarding factors considered important in choosing plastic surgery was conducted amongst final year medical students in September 2011. Participants were asked to rate their agreement or disagreement with 18 statements on a four-point Likert scale (1 = very unimportant; 4 = very important). Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square test to compare categorical variables between male and female medical students. Values of P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: The most important factors influencing the decision of medical students to choose plastic surgery as a career include; plastic surgeons appear happy in their work 93 (85%), Plastic surgeons have rewarding careers 78 (71%), and plastic surgeons provide good role models for medical students 96 (87%). An overall score of > 3.0 was seen in all the subscales except in gender equity and life style concerns. There were statistically significant differences between male and female students in opinions of a spouse, a significant other, or family members in choosing plastic surgery P < 0.5 and my choice of plastic surgery will be influenced by my decision to have a family P < 0.5. Conclusion: Factors influencing the decision of medical students to choose plastic surgery were related to the perceived quality of life as a plastic surgeon and the ability of plastic surgeons to provide good role models for medical students. Female medical students were more concerned with gender equity and work-life balance in selecting plastic surgery

  12. Reaching Our Successors: Millennial Generation Medical Students and Plastic Surgery as a Career Choice.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdulrasheed; Asuku, Malachy E

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that career choices are made as a result of preconceived ideas and exposure to a specialty. If plastic surgery is to continue to attract the best, factors that may dissuade the millennial generation medical students from pursuing plastic surgery as a career must be identified and addressed. We explored the determinants of interest in plastic surgery as a career choice amongst millennial generation medical students. A survey regarding factors considered important in choosing plastic surgery was conducted amongst final year medical students in September 2011. Participants were asked to rate their agreement or disagreement with 18 statements on a four-point Likert scale (1 = very unimportant; 4 = very important). Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square test to compare categorical variables between male and female medical students. Values of P < 0.05 were considered significant. The most important factors influencing the decision of medical students to choose plastic surgery as a career include; plastic surgeons appear happy in their work 93 (85%), Plastic surgeons have rewarding careers 78 (71%), and plastic surgeons provide good role models for medical students 96 (87%). An overall score of > 3.0 was seen in all the subscales except in gender equity and life style concerns. There were statistically significant differences between male and female students in opinions of a spouse, a significant other, or family members in choosing plastic surgery P < 0.5 and my choice of plastic surgery will be influenced by my decision to have a family P < 0.5. Factors influencing the decision of medical students to choose plastic surgery were related to the perceived quality of life as a plastic surgeon and the ability of plastic surgeons to provide good role models for medical students. Female medical students were more concerned with gender equity and work-life balance in selecting plastic surgery compared to male medical students.

  13. Pre-residency peer-reviewed publications are associated with neurosurgery resident choice of academic compared to private practice careers.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Shearwood

    2010-03-01

    Factors predictive of neurosurgery resident or applicant choice of an academic career compared to private practice are highly desired and difficult to discern. Neither medical school choice, student induction to faculty membership, age nor gender predict academic versus private practice choice among neurosurgery residents. This study was performed to examine the role of pre-residency peer-reviewed publications (PRP) in post-residency career choice. Over five years (2001-05) the number of PRP prior to onset of residency of 422 graduates from 79 neurosurgery residency programs certified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education was retrospectively examined. The number of publications until the end of the calendar year prior to the start of residency was determined using PubMed (www.pubmed.org). This number was then correlated with the choice of an academic or private practice neurosurgery career. A minority of graduates (46.2%) chose academic neurosurgery careers, 32.2% of graduates had at least one PRP at the time of application to neurosurgery residency, with 16.4% having more than one. A total of 41.6% of graduates with no PRP chose academic careers, compared to 53.7% with one PRP, and 58.0% with more than one. With regard to choice of academic career, the difference between no PRP and at least one were statistically significant (p<0.01), but not between one PRP and more than one. Graduates with at least one PRP were 1.34 times more likely to choose an academic career than graduates with no PRP. Therefore, peer-reviewed PRP are strongly associated with resident choice of an academic over private practice neurosurgery career. This information might be useful in predicting the career choices of neurosurgery residents and residency applicants. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Decisions behind career choice for nurse practitioners: independent versus collaborative practice and motivational-needs behavior.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, S B; Corey, E H

    2000-09-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) can take an active role in defining and establishing their careers. Prepared as advanced practice nurses with specific assessment skills, primary care NPs have the opportunity to become independent or collaborative practitioners. This report examines the published work in the area of practice choice and motivational-needs behavior. Interviews with collaborative and independent primary care NPs were conducted. Against the framework of well-established personality testing methods, open-ended interview questions were developed to elicit specific motivational-needs-based behavior characteristics. The motivational needs examined included the need for achievement, power, and affiliation. The interview findings were then synthesized using needs-based behavior theory. This new platform for role decision ultimately can prepare NPs to make informed career choices.

  15. Have predictors of obstetrics and gynecology career choice among contemporary US medical graduates changed over time?

    PubMed

    McAlister, Rebecca P; Andriole, Dorothy A; Rowland, Pamela A; Jeffe, Donna B

    2007-03-01

    We sought to identify predictors of obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN) specialty choice among US medical graduates over time. We examined OBGYN specialty choice for its association with 16 items on the 1997, 2000, and 2004 AAMC Graduation Questionnaire (GQ). Multivariate logistic regression identified independent predictors of OBGYN specialty choice for each year. Eighty-three percent of US graduates completed the GQ in the 3 years studied. Fewer responders chose OBGYN over time (1997, 8.2%; 2000, 6.5%; 2004, 6.2%). Women, blacks, and graduates with more positive ratings of the OBGYN clerkship were more likely to choose OBGYN in each year (each P < .001). Graduates reporting more positive beliefs about the practice of medicine and preferring academic careers were less likely to choose OBGYN (each P < .05). Predictors of OBGYN specialty choice from among the GQ variables tested have remained stable over time, but with a smaller pool of likely applicants.

  16. Career Choice and Longevity in U.S. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Robbi K; Diefenbeck, Cynthia A; Brown, Carlton G

    2015-06-01

    The demand for mental health services in the United States taxes the existing care continuum and is projected to increase as federal initiatives such as the Affordable Care Act and mental health parity improve access to, and coverage for, mental health services. Quality health care providers, such as psychiatric-mental health nurses, are needed to bolster the mental health system. Prior research has focused on the unpopularity of psychiatric nursing as a career choice for nursing students. The purpose of this study is to understand how seasoned psychiatric nurses came to choose and remain in the specialty; descriptive phenomenology is used. In a face-to-face interview, eight registered nurses described their experiences with psychiatric nursing as a student, their entry into psychiatric nursing, and factors related to their longevity in the specialty. Giorgi's Existential Phenomenological Research Method was employed to analyze the interview data. Three themes emerged related to career choice: Interest Developed Prior to or While in Nursing School, Personal Relevance, and Validation of Potential. Three themes emerged related to retention: Overcoming Stereotypes to Develop Career Pride, Positive Team Dynamics, and Remaining Hopeful. Nurse educators play an important role in identifying talent, validating capability, enhancing interest, and increasing students' confidence to pursue a psychiatric nursing career, while nursing administrators and clinical specialists play a key role in retention. Findings also stimulate pertinent questions surrounding the long-term viability of the psychiatric-mental health nursing specialty.

  17. Optimal Path Choice in Railway Passenger Travel Network Based on Residual Train Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Fei; Yan, Kai; Huang, Yakun; Jia, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Passenger's optimal path choice is one of the prominent research topics in the field of railway passenger transport organization. More and more different train types are available, increasing path choices from departure to destination for travelers are unstoppable. However, travelers cannot avoid being confused when they hope to choose a perfect travel plan based on various travel time and cost constraints before departure. In this study, railway passenger travel network is constructed based on train timetable. Both the generalized cost function we developed and the residual train capacity are considered to be the foundation of path searching procedure. The railway passenger travel network topology is analyzed based on residual train capacity. Considering the total travel time, the total travel cost, and the total number of passengers, we propose an optimal path searching algorithm based on residual train capacity in railway passenger travel network. Finally, the rationale of the railway passenger travel network and the optimal path generation algorithm are verified positively by case study. PMID:25097867

  18. Optimal path choice in railway passenger travel network based on residual train capacity.

    PubMed

    Dou, Fei; Yan, Kai; Huang, Yakun; Wang, Li; Jia, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Passenger's optimal path choice is one of the prominent research topics in the field of railway passenger transport organization. More and more different train types are available, increasing path choices from departure to destination for travelers are unstoppable. However, travelers cannot avoid being confused when they hope to choose a perfect travel plan based on various travel time and cost constraints before departure. In this study, railway passenger travel network is constructed based on train timetable. Both the generalized cost function we developed and the residual train capacity are considered to be the foundation of path searching procedure. The railway passenger travel network topology is analyzed based on residual train capacity. Considering the total travel time, the total travel cost, and the total number of passengers, we propose an optimal path searching algorithm based on residual train capacity in railway passenger travel network. Finally, the rationale of the railway passenger travel network and the optimal path generation algorithm are verified positively by case study.

  19. Nursing as a Career Choice by Hispanic/Latino College Students: A Multi-Institutional Study.

    PubMed

    Stroup, Linda M; Kuk, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Despite rapid growth in the Hispanic/Latino population, there is significant underrepresentation of Hispanic/Latino individuals in the nursing workforce and nursing programs. This study investigated college students' interest in and self-efficacy for nursing as a career choice, and factors that students believe will impact their success in a nursing program. A nonexperimental, associational research study using a survey instrument was conducted at three comprehensive, public state universities and one community college in the western United States in an area with a significant Hispanic/Latino population. Descriptive and multivariable correlation statistical analysis suggested that college students' interest in and self-efficacy for nursing as a career choice was similar for both Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic/Latino students in the sample. Perceived facilitators for success in a nursing program were identified. Findings can be used to develop strategies and programs to enhance the success of Hispanic/Latino students interested in nursing as a career choice. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Academic achievement and career choice in science: Perceptions of African American urban high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sheila Kay

    2007-12-01

    Low test scores in science and fewer career choices in science among African American high school students than their White counterparts has resulted in lower interest during high school and an underrepresentation of African Americans in science and engineering fields. Reasons for this underachievement are not known. This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to examine what influence parental involvement, ethnic identity, and early mentoring had on the academic achievement in science and career choice in science of African American urban high school 10th grade students. Using semi-structured open-ended questions in individual interviews and focus groups, twenty participants responded to questions about African American urban high school student achievement in science and their career choice in science. The median age of participants was 15 years; 85% had passed either high school biology or physical science. The findings of the study revealed influences and interactions of selected factors on African American urban high school achievement in science. Sensing potential emerged as the overarching theme with six subthemes; A Taste of Knowledge, Sounds I Hear, Aromatic Barriers, What Others See, The Touch of Others, and The Sixth Sense. These themes correlate to the natural senses of the human body. A disconnect between what science is, their own individual learning and success, and what their participation in science could mean for them and the future of the larger society. Insight into appropriate intervention strategies to improve African American urban high school achievement in science was gained.