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Sample records for carers pcq-c reliability

  1. [Preventing carer burnout].

    PubMed

    de Montety, Isabelle; Moussaoui, Edgar; Baleyte, Jean-Marc

    The issue of the burnout of carers of disabled family members has been raising concern for several years. It is essential to identify the signs of suffering in the carer in order to put in place adapted support which will also be beneficial for the person being cared for. Autism, a disability which has a significant impact on the family circle, is an example of a condition for which providing support to carers is essential.

  2. Caring for older people. Carers.

    PubMed Central

    Travers, A. F.

    1996-01-01

    Caring by families and friends is the backbone of community care. Carers face physical, emotional, social, and financial problems. They need recognition, information, and support from the health professionals with whom they and the person they care for come in contact. Much information is available to assist carers and to enable their doctors to help them in their caring role. Images p483-a p485-a PMID:8776323

  3. CarerSupport - An Innovative Approach to Informal Carers' Training and Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Lene; Moen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    EU and national policies for long-term care acknowledge the role of informal carers. However, there is still little adequate support to prepare or ease informal carers in terms of training to allow them improve their skills, alleviate psychosocial stress and maintain their own health and well-being. In the CarerSupport project, we seek to integrate services, deploy and test an integrated ICT platform enabling participation and collaboration of informal carers, psychologists and health professionals to collaborate, facilitate training and orientation, offer tele-consulting services and psychosocial support to carers. Based on this platform and its content, we will deploy and report on informal carers' experiences with the wide range of offered service. The poster will present the first experiences and suggest potentials for a service like CarerSupport.

  4. Grandparents as Educators and Carers in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyland, Berenice; Zeng, Xiaodong; Nyland, Chris; Tran, Ly

    2009-01-01

    Many grandparents play a significant role as educators and carers of children in the preschool years. Recently, this role has become the focus of much early childhood research as challenges facing grandparent carers and grandparent-headed households increasingly become an economic and social issue. Using survey data from China we explore the role…

  5. Discharge planning quality from the carer perspective.

    PubMed

    Grimmer, K A; Moss, J R; Gill, T K

    2000-01-01

    Discharge planning endeavours to assist the transition of patients from the acute hospital setting into the community. We examined the quality of discharge planning from the perspective of the carer. Spouses were the most common carers for the elderly patients in our study. Many carers were also elderly, with their own health problems. Using a new instrument (entitled PREPARED) (K. Grimmer and J. Moss, Int J Qual Health Care (in press)), carers rated the quality of planning for discharge much lower than did the patient, indicating that their needs were often not met when discharge was being planned. In free text responses, carers expressed their dissatisfaction over communication about how the family would cope once the patient went home. Carers generally had lower summary mental quality of life scores than the Australian norms (as measured by the SF-36 health survey (J. Ware and R. Sherbourne, Med Care 1992; 30: 473-483)), suggesting that the caring role may have impacted upon their emotional wellbeing. The rate of use of community services in the first week post-discharge was low, suggesting that carers and patients carried the majority of the burden immediately after discharge. We suggest that planning for hospital discharge requires more consideration of the carer.

  6. Stroke: the increasing complexity of carer needs.

    PubMed

    Ski, Chantal; O'Connell, Bev

    2007-06-01

    In Australia, more than 346,000 individuals who experience a stroke return to living in their homes with varying degrees of disability. They rely on emotional and physical support from informal carers, typically family members. Informal carers have an indispensable role in patient care poststroke, and the ability of carers to manage this role effectively is crucial for stroke survivors to be able to return home. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of the caring role on carers of stroke survivors, particularly the services provided and the levels of depression and well-being experienced. The study used a longitudinal design incorporating survey methods. Stroke survivors were assessed for functional ability, quality of life, and depression using three assessment tools: the Stroke Impact Scale, World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF scale, and Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. A total of 26 people were surveyed: 13 stroke survivors and their 13 carers. Carer knowledge of stroke support services was also explored. Information was collected by using survey methods and structured interviews at 3 weeks and at 3 months postdischarge. The main finding was that depression scores for carers and stroke survivors were below Australian norms at both assessment time points. The major concern identified by carers was poor follow-up procedures for initiating rehabilitation in the home. This study highlighted that a lack of appropriate discharge planning, in conjunction with early discharge of stroke survivors, can have an impact on the rehabilitation process and place increased and unrealistic demands on carers.

  7. Carers and the digital divide: factors affecting Internet use among carers in the UK.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Clare; Read, Janet; Hughes, Nathan

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents data from a cross-sectional survey of 3014 adult carers, examining use of the Internet and factors associated with it. Carers recruited from the databases of three local authorities and other carer organisations within their geographical boundaries and that of Carers UK, a national carers organisation, were sent a postal questionnaire (response rate: 40%). A comparison of our data with national data on carers suggests some under-representation of men and younger adult carers and some over-representation of those who had been caring for long periods and those with substantial caring responsibilities. Two measures of Internet use were used and are presented in this analysis: previous use (ever used vs never previously used) and frequency (less than once a week vs once a week or more). Bivariate analyses identified patterns of Internet use and socio-demographic and socio-economic factors and caring circumstances associated with them. Factors significantly associated with each measure of Internet use were entered into direct logistic regression analyses to identify factors significantly associated with each measure. Half (50%) of all carers had previously used the Internet. Of this group, 61% had used it once a week or more frequently. Factors significantly associated with having previously used the Internet were carer's age, employment status, housing tenure and number of hours per week they spent caring. Frequency of Internet use was significantly associated with carer's age, sex, employment status and number of hours spent caring. Our study suggests that a significant number of carers may not currently be Internet users and that age, gender, socio-economic status and caring responsibilities shape Internet use in particular ways. Given the targets set by government for the development of online services, it is important to address the digital divide among carers and to continue to develop other services and information systems to meet the needs of

  8. [Carers and the policy for autonomy].

    PubMed

    Naiditch, Michel

    2016-03-01

    Long-time invisible, the role of informal carers in providing assistance to elderly patients losing their autonomy is gaining recognition. A policy in favour of carers coordinated with that aimed at the people being cared for is necessary, but it is struggling to establish itself in France. Some progress can however be seen with the French bill on adapting society to the ageing of the population.

  9. Working in partnership with patients and carers.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Lesley

    2016-12-07

    Health policy and healthcare professional guidelines promote patient and carer involvement, which includes working in partnership with service users in all aspects of healthcare provision, research and education. This article explores the expectations for nurses to work in partnership with patients and carers, examines the definitions and theories of working in partnership and related concepts, as well as considering examples of partnership working in nursing practice.

  10. The Controllability Beliefs Scale Used with Carers of People with Intellectual Disabilities: Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagnan, D.; Hull, A.; McDonnell, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Beliefs about the controllability of behaviour have been consistently shown to be important in understanding the responses of carers to the challenging behaviour of people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). This paper reports the reliability and validity of the Controllability Beliefs Scale (CBS), a 15-item measure of beliefs…

  11. Psychometric properties of carer-reported outcome measures in palliative care: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Charlotte TJ; Boulton, Mary; Adams, Astrid; Wee, Bee; Peters, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background: Informal carers face many challenges in caring for patients with palliative care needs. Selecting suitable valid and reliable outcome measures to determine the impact of caring and carers’ outcomes is a common problem. Aim: To identify outcome measures used for informal carers looking after patients with palliative care needs, and to evaluate the measures’ psychometric properties. Design: A systematic review was conducted. The studies identified were evaluated by independent reviewers (C.T.J.M., M.B., M.P.). Data regarding study characteristics and psychometric properties of the measures were extracted and evaluated. Good psychometric properties indicate a high-quality measure. Data sources: The search was conducted, unrestricted to publication year, in the following electronic databases: Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index and Sociological Abstracts. Results: Our systematic search revealed 4505 potential relevant studies, of which 112 studies met the inclusion criteria using 38 carer measures for informal carers of patients with palliative care needs. Psychometric properties were reported in only 46% (n = 52) of the studies, in relation to 24 measures. Where psychometric data were reported, the focus was mainly on internal consistency (n = 45, 87%), construct validity (n = 27, 52%) and/or reliability (n = 14, 27%). Of these, 24 measures, only four (17%) had been formally validated in informal carers in palliative care. Conclusion: A broad range of outcome measures have been used for informal carers of patients with palliative care needs. Little formal psychometric testing has been undertaken. Furthermore, development and refinement of measures in this field is required. PMID:26407683

  12. Formal and informal support received by carers of elderly dependents.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D A; Vetter, N J

    1985-01-01

    This study describes the activity of informal carers who look after elderly dependents and particularly investigates the role of formal services in supporting these carers in maintaining dependent, elderly people in the community. The results lend no support to the view that families neglect their elderly relatives or that community services displace the role of informal carers, but rather suggest that carers support elderly dependents at great cost to themselves and with inadequate support from community services. PMID:3161579

  13. Abuse of elderly people by their carers.

    PubMed Central

    Homer, A C; Gilleard, C

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the prevalence of abuse of elderly people by their carers and the characteristics of abusers and the abused. DESIGN--Information on abuse and risk factors was collected over six months from carers and patients. Risk factors were identified in the abused group and compared with those in a non-abused control group. SETTING--Carers were interviewed at home; patients were examined in the wards of Putney and Barnes geriatric hospitals, London. SUBJECTS--All patients referred from any source for respite care to the geriatric services over a six month period and their carers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Amount of physical and verbal abuse or neglect. Quantification of risk factors and correlation with the presence or absence of abuse. RESULTS--45% Of carers openly admitted to some form of abuse. Few patients admitted abuse. The most significant risk factor for physical abuse was alcohol consumption by the carer (p less than 0.001). Other significant risk factors were a poor pre-morbid relationship and previous abuse over many years. Abuse was often reciprocated and was associated with social dysfunction in many patients. Service delivery, respite care, and level of mental and physical disability were not significantly associated with abuse. CONCLUSION--The high level of abuse found in elderly patients in respite care was particularly associated with alcohol abuse and long term relationships of poor quality, which are difficult to change. Even with increased provision of services, care in the community may not be the best solution for these people. PMID:2271883

  14. Validation of the Verbal and Social Interaction questionnaire: carers' focus in the carer-resident relationship in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities (VSI-SH).

    PubMed

    Brunt, D; Rask, M

    2013-04-01

    A questionnaire to measure the verbal and social interactions between carers and residents in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities has been developed. It is an adaptation of a questionnaire originally used in a forensic psychiatric setting. The aim of the present study was thus to investigate the construct validity and the reliability of this new version of the Verbal and Social Interactions questionnaire for use in supported housing facilities (VSI-SH). Two hundred and twenty-three carers from municipal and privately run housing facilities completed the questionnaire. A factor analysis was performed, which resulted in six factors. The number of items was reduced from the original 47 to 30 in order to minimize factorial complexity and multiple loadings. The reliability was tested with Cronbach's alpha and good internal consistency for the questionnaire and five of the six factors was found. The resulting six factors and the items were compared to the conceptual model and four of the six factors corresponded well with the categories in this original theoretical model. The questionnaire can be a useful contribution to the study of interactions between carers and residents in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities.

  15. Evaluating and Quantifying User and Carer Involvement in Mental Health Care Planning (EQUIP): Co-Development of a New Patient-Reported Outcome Measure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    International and national health policy seeks to increase service user and carer involvement in mental health care planning, but suitable user-centred tools to assess the success of these initiatives are not yet available. The current study describes the development of a new reliable and valid, interval-scaled service-user and carer reported outcome measure for quantifying user/carer involvement in mental health care planning. Psychometric development reduced a 70-item item bank to a short form questionnaire using a combination of Classical Test, Mokken and Rasch Analyses. Test-retest reliability was calculated using t-tests of interval level scores between baseline and 2–4 week follow-up. Items were worded to be relevant to both service users and carers. Nine items were removed following cognitive debriefing with a service user and carer advisory group. An iterative process of item removal reduced the remaining 61 items to a final 14-item scale. The final scale has acceptable scalability (Ho = .69), reliability (alpha = .92), fit to the Rasch model (χ2(70) = 97.25, p = .02), and no differential item functioning or locally dependent items. Scores remained stable over the 4 week follow-up period, indicating good test-retest reliability. The ‘Evaluating the Quality of User and Carer Involvement in Care Planning (EQUIP)’ scale displays excellent psychometric properties and is capable of unidimensional linear measurement. The scale is short, user and carer-centred and will be of direct benefit to clinicians, services, auditors and researchers wishing to quantify levels of user and carer involvement in care planning. PMID:26963252

  16. Instruments measuring the disease-specific quality of life of family carers of people with neurodegenerative diseases: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Page, Thomas E; Farina, Nicolas; Brown, Anna; Daley, Stephanie; Bowling, Ann; Basset, Thurstine; Livingston, Gill; Knapp, Martin; Murray, Joanna; Banerjee, Sube

    2017-01-01

    Objective Neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia, have a profound impact on those with the conditions and their family carers. Consequently, the accurate measurement of family carers' quality of life (QOL) is important. Generic measures may miss key elements of the impact of these conditions, so using disease-specific instruments has been advocated. This systematic review aimed to identify and examine the psychometric properties of disease-specific outcome measures of QOL of family carers of people with neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease and other dementias; Huntington's disease; Parkinson's disease; multiple sclerosis; and motor neuron disease). Design Systematic review. Methods Instruments were identified using 5 electronic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Scopus and the International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)) and lateral search techniques. Only studies which reported the development and/or validation of a disease-specific measure for adult family carers, and which were written in English, were eligible for inclusion. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) checklist. The psychometric properties of each instrument were examined. Results 676 articles were identified. Following screening and lateral searches, a total of 8 articles were included; these reported 7 disease-specific carer QOL measures. Limited evidence was available for the psychometric properties of the 7 instruments. Psychometric analyses were mainly focused on internal consistency, reliability and construct validity. None of the measures assessed either criterion validity or responsiveness to change. Conclusions There are very few measures of carer QOL that are specific to particular neurodegenerative diseases. The findings of this review emphasise the importance of developing and validating psychometrically robust disease

  17. Developing the knowledge base about carers and personalisation: contributions made by an exploration of carers' perspectives on personal budgets and the carer-service user relationship.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore an under-researched issue within the emerging body of research about carers and personalisation - the carer-service user relationship. It was carried out across 11 English local authorities between 2011 and 2012 and focused on the impact of a change in the service user's social care arrangements to a personal budget on this relationship. Using purposive sampling and explicit inclusion criteria, data were gathered through semi-structured in-depth interviews with 23 carers in long-term dyadic relationships with an adult in receipt of social care who had changed to a personal budget. The interviews explored carers' perceptions of the carer-service user relationship before and after the advent of the personal budget and changes that had occurred. The findings were thematically analysed and reflect the fact that in addition to the effects of the move to a personal budget on the carer-service user relationship, the interviewees talked at length about a range of other effects of this move. Just over half of those interviewed felt that the personal budget had enhanced the carer-service user relationship. The other effects were both positive and negative. Three quarters reported positive outcomes, such as feeling happier, healthier and having more control over their lives. Although two thirds experienced negative feelings about having less involvement in the service user's care, these feelings eased over time and if they had confidence in the quality of the care. Over half found administering the personal budget stressful. Further analysis of these findings showed the study contributes not only to existing knowledge about the carer-service user relationship within personalisation but also to knowledge about the effects of personalisation on carers more generally. It therefore simultaneously develops the emergent knowledge base about carers and personalisation. Recommendations based on this analysis are made about future practice and

  18. Working with carers in the next decade: the challenges.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Alison

    2010-03-01

    This paper outlines two challenges to community nurses as they work with unpaid carers. These reflect a changing culture in the way that health care will be delivered in the coming decade. The first of these challenges is a shift towards focusing on outcomes for both service users and adult carers. Outcomes evidence the impact a service has on a person's life. The second is the increasing focus on the concept of carers as partners in care.

  19. A telehealth behavioral coaching intervention for neurocognitive disorder family carers

    PubMed Central

    Gant, Judith R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the differential impact of two telehealth programs for women caring for an older adult with a neurocognitive disorder. Outcomes examined were depressive symptoms, upset following disruptive behaviors, anxious and angry mood states, and caregiving self‐efficacy. Methods Women cohabitating with a family member diagnosed with a neurocognitive disorder were assigned via random allocation to either of the following: (1) a 14‐week behavioral intervention using video instructional materials, workbook and telephone coaching in behavioral management, pleasant events scheduling, and relaxation or (2) a basic education guide and telephone support comparison condition. Telephone assessments were conducted by interviewers blind to treatment condition at pre‐intervention, post‐intervention, and 6 months following intervention. Results For those providing in‐home care at post‐treatment, depressive symptoms, upset following disruptive behaviors, and negative mood states were statistically lower in the behavioral coaching condition than in the basic education and support condition. Reliable change index analyses for Beck Depression Inventory II scores favored the behavioral coaching condition. Caregiving self‐efficacy scores for obtaining respite and for managing patient behavioral disturbances were significantly higher in the coaching condition. Effect sizes were moderate but not maintained at the 6‐month follow‐up. Conclusions This study provides some initial evidence for the efficacy of a telehealth behavioral coaching intervention compared with basic education and telephone support. Carers' abilities to maintain strategy use during progressive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease likely require longer intervention contact than provided in the current study. Dementia carers, including those living in rural areas, can benefit from accessible and empirically supported interventions that can be easily disseminated across distances

  20. Rural dementia carers: formal and informal sources of support.

    PubMed

    Orpin, Peter; Stirling, Christine; Hetherington, Sharon; Robinson, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Primary carers provide much of the day-to-day care for community-dwelling people living with dementia (PWD). Maintaining that contribution will require a more in-depth understanding of the primary carer role and the support needs that flow from that role. This study explored patterns of formal and informal support utilisation by people caring for a PWD in a rural-regional context. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 rural primary carers of a PWD and thematically analysed. Participant primary carers' almost total commitment to, and absorption in their role and their assumption of ultimate responsibility for the PWD's wellbeing meant that external social context, such as rurality, became less relevant. Carer networks effectively contracted to those key individuals who were central to supporting them in their caring task. External sources of support were tightly managed with strong boundaries around the provision of direct care to the PWD largely excluding all but professional providers. Primary carers are generally categorised along with other family and friends as informal care. However, in assuming primary responsible for the care and wellbeing for the PWD they effectively become the key care provider, suggesting that it would be productive in both research and practice to treat primary carers as key members of a care partnership alongside professional carers, rather than as adjuncts to formal care and/or another client.

  1. Carers perspective on home dialysis: support, facts and legislation.

    PubMed

    Holman, Cathy

    2011-12-01

    Carers provide unpaid care and support to ill, frail or disabled friends or family members. It is important for health professionals to give carers of home dialysis patients time, space and permission to talk about how caring impacts upon their lives and to look at how best to support them.

  2. Manipulating carer number versus brood size: complementary but not equivalent ways of quantifying carer effects on offspring

    PubMed Central

    Browning, L.E.; Russell, A.F.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments designed to quantify the effects of increasing numbers of carers on levels of offspring care are rare in cooperative breeding systems, where offspring are reared by individuals additional to the breeding pair. This paucity might stem from disagreement over the most appropriate manipulations necessary to elucidate these effects. Here, we perform both carer removal and brood enhancement experiments to test the effects of numbers of carers and carer:offspring ratios on provisioning rates in the cooperatively breeding chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps). Removing carers caused linear reductions in overall brood provisioning rates. Further analyses failed to provide evidence that this effect was influenced by territory quality or disruption of group dynamics stemming from the removals. Likewise, adding nestlings to broods caused linear increases in brood provisioning rates, suggesting carers are responsive to increasing offspring demand. However, the 2 experiments did not generate quantitatively equivalent results: Each nestling received more food following brood size manipulation than carer removal, despite comparable carer:offspring ratios in each. Following an at-hatching split-design cross-fostering manipulation to break any links between prehatching maternal effects and posthatching begging patterns, we found that begging intensity increased in larger broods after controlling for metrics of hunger. These findings suggest that manipulation of brood size can, in itself, influence nestling provisioning rates when begging intensity is affected by scramble competition. We highlight that carer number and brood size manipulations are complimentary but not equivalent; adopting both can yield greater overall insight into carer effects in cooperative breeding systems. PMID:27418754

  3. How Much Care is Enough? Carer's Guilt and Bergsonian Time.

    PubMed

    Johncock, Will

    2016-09-02

    Despite devoting their time to another person's needs, many carers paradoxically experience guilt during their caregiving tenure concerning whether they are providing enough care. When discussing the "enough" of anything, what is at stake is that thing's quantification. Given that there are seemingly no quantifiable units of care by which to measure the role, concerns regarding whether enough care is being provided often focus on what constitutes enough time as a carer. In exploring this aspect of the carer's experience, two key parameters emerge; (1) guilt, and, (2) quantified time. The guilt that carers report regarding whether they devote "enough time" to their caring responsibilities can be examined through Henri Bergson's philosophical conception of quantification. By integrating contemporary analyses of carers' guilt from the social sciences, most significantly via the sociology of Rebecca Olson, the relationship between quantified time and guilt becomes apparent. A quantified conception of time frames the assumption that spending more time on caregiving will reduce the amount of guilt felt by a carer. However, whilst care is structured according to quantified, clocked and calendared time, there are not comparable, quantifiable parameters for guilt. This means that suppositions of an inverse relationship between how much time one spends giving care, and how much guilt they will feel in terms of their caregiving, are problematic. These insights become relevant to health care policies via a coherence with calls to make the role of unpaid, caregiving, labour time more visible, and by explaining how understanding quantified time can help policies guide how caregivers negotiate guilt.

  4. Carers' representations of affective mental disorders in British Chinese communities.

    PubMed

    Koo, Kevin

    2012-11-01

    Infrequent use of and delayed presentation to professional services have increased the burden of mental illness in minority ethnic communities. Within the growing literature on informal carers, the Chinese remain relatively unstudied. This article reports a qualitative study of 14 carers to explore illness representations of affective disorders in British Chinese communities. Firstly, it places the study within a theoretical framework that permits an understanding of mental health and illness in different sociocultural belief systems. Next, it presents carers' narrative accounts in conceptualising mental illness, including its causes, manifestations and impact on patients and carers, and contextualises the findings within the existing literature. Finally, the article examines how the caring role may be constructed from the broader social experience of carers and their relationships within a community structure that values the group over the individual. Coping mechanisms are discussed in the context of the practice of caring as a moral obligation and of policy implications for more culturally appropriate support services for both Chinese carers and mental health patients.

  5. Tracing the successful incorporation of assistive technology into everyday life for younger people with dementia and family carers.

    PubMed

    Arntzen, Cathrine; Holthe, Torhild; Jentoft, Rita

    2016-07-01

    Research shows that people with late-onset dementia and their relatives can benefit from using assistive technology (AT). Few researchers have investigated the use and utility of AT in everyday life for younger people with dementia (YPD) and their family carers. The aim of this study is to explore what characterised the implementation process when the AT was experienced as beneficial to the YPD and the family carer in their daily life. The qualitative longitudinal study followed 12 younger people (i.e. those under 65 years of age), who had recently been diagnosed with dementia and 14 of their family carers. In-depth interviews and observations during the process were conducted at the beginning, and were repeated every 3rd month for up to 12 months. The data were analysed, and the participants' experiences further discussed on the basis of embodied, social- and everyday life-situated approaches, in order to provide a deeper understanding of the interactive processes involved in the trajectory. Five elements in the process were identified as important for the experience of usefulness and successful incorporation of AT. The AT had to: (1) be valuable by addressing practical, emotional, and relational challenges; (2) fit well into, or be a better solution for, habitual practice and established strategies; (3) generate positive emotions, and become a reliable and trustworthy tool; (4) be user-friendly, adaptable, and manageable; and (5) interest and engage the family carer. The study demonstrated the importance of understanding the use and utility of AT on the basis of embodied and social participation in daily life. The family carers played a significant role in whether or not, and in which ways, AT was absorbed into the everyday life practice of YPD.

  6. Carer Participation: Training for People with Intellectual Disabilities in a Chinese Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Gary C. T.; Chan, Zenobia C. Y.

    2012-01-01

    People with intellectual disabilities require training to improve independence, and carers are important partners in the process. Studies show that carers are able to motivate family members with intellectual disabilities to participate in training. In addition, family members may serve as cotrainers. To increase carers' participation, it is…

  7. Pilot Investigation of the Effectiveness of Respite Care for Carers of an Adult with Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jardim, Claudia; Pakenham, Kenneth I.

    2009-01-01

    Informal carers of an adult with mental illness have asked that respite care be an integral component of mental health service provision. The present study involved a pilot investigation of the effectiveness of accessing respite care for carers of individuals with a mental illness. It was hypothesised that compared to carers who have not accessed…

  8. Carer Knowledge and Perceptions of Healthy Lifestyles for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Craig A.; Hamilton, Sarah; Miller, Susan; Boyle, Susan; Robinson, Nicola; Pert, Carol; Hankey, Catherine R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Carers can have a significant impact supporting people with intellectual disabilities to make healthy lifestyle choices. This study examines carers' training needs on diet and physical activity. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken of the knowledge and perceptions of carers supporting adults with intellectual disabilities.…

  9. "It's All Changed:" Carers' Experiences of Caring for Adults Who Have Down's Syndrome and Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Katrina; Jones, Aled

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative interview study was undertaken to determine the information and support needs of carers of adults who have Down's syndrome and dementia. The data were analysed thematically. Carers' information and support needs were seen to change at pre-diagnosis, diagnosis and post-diagnosis. Helping carers to manage the changing nature of the…

  10. Staff Carers' Understanding of End of Life Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Sandra L.; Choueiri, Roula; Gilmore, Dana

    2008-01-01

    Staff carers in pediatric skilled nursing facilities (PSNF) deal directly with dying residents, and are on the forefront of communication with families. These providers have expressed misunderstandings regarding the meaning of resuscitation status and redirection of care. This descriptive study evaluated perceptions and understanding of end of…

  11. Burden for family carers at the end of life; a mixed-method study of the perspectives of family carers and GPs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since many patients spend most of the time at home at the end of life, this may affect the burden for family carers and constitute a risk factor for the patients’ hospitalisation. This study aimed to explore family carers’ burden in the final three months of the patient’s life, from the perspective of both carers and general practitioners (GPs), and to assess whether family burden, as defined by the GP, is associated with hospitalisation. Methods A cross-sectional nationwide survey among GPs and family carers was performed. Participants were 194 GPs and 74 family carers of patients who died non-suddenly. Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 family carers. For the quantitative analyses descriptive statistics, weighted Kappa and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. For the qualitative part thematic analysis was conducted. Results The proportion of family carers experiencing a fairly heavy or severe burden increased significantly from 32% (second and third months before death) to 66% (one week before death). Most carers (95%) felt an emotional burden and 29% felt a physical burden in the final week. Three-quarters of carers did not perceive their burden as a problem because caring often felt rewarding. No significant association was found between the characteristics of family caregivers or professional care and the degree of family caregiver burden. Also, there was no significant evidence that patients of family carers for whom the GP assessed a fairly heavy to severe burden, were more likely to be hospitalised. Conclusions The different overall assessment of family carers’ burden between GPs and family carers and the increasing emotional and physical burden of family carers towards the end constitute relevant information for GPs that will help them understand and anticipate carers’ personal needs. PMID:24678941

  12. Collaboration in crisis: Carer perspectives on police and mental health professional's responses to mental health crises.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Alice; Warren, Narelle; Peterson, Violeta; Hollander, Yitzchak; Boscarato, Kara; Lee, Stuart

    2016-10-01

    For many situations involving a mental health crisis, carers (e.g. family or friends) are present and either attempt to help the person overcome the crisis or request assistance from professional services (e.g. mental health or police). Comparatively, little research has explored how carers experience the crisis, the professional response and how the nature of the response, in turn, impacts carers. The current study was conducted to explore these issues during individual interviews with nine carers who had previous contact with police and mental health services during a crisis response. Collected data described the definition and perceived impact of a mental health crisis for carers, how carers had experienced a crisis response from police and mental health services, and how the professional response had impacted on carers. Of importance was the finding that carers were often themselves traumatized by witnessing or being involved in the crisis, however, were rarely offered direct education or support to help them cope or prevent future crises. A number of carers described a reluctance to request assistance from professional services due to previous poor experiences. This highlighted the importance of implementing strategies to deliver more timely, respectful, specialist and collaborative crisis responses to improve carer and consumer outcomes.

  13. Managing hope, denial or temporal anomie? Informal cancer carers' accounts of spouses' cancer diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Olson, Rebecca Eileen

    2011-09-01

    Carers of cancer patients' emotional responses to cancer diagnoses have been a central focus within psycho-oncology. Some of this literature asserts that the maladaptive coping strategy denial is prevalent amongst carers. Using semi-structured, longitudinal interviews with 32 Australian Capital Territory carers of a spouse with cancer and an interactionist sociology of emotions framework to understanding their emotions, this study aimed to both contribute to the literature on cancer carers' coping strategies and provide a richer sociological depiction of carers' emotional reactions to a cancer diagnosis. The results raise questions about the value of singularly examining denial in cancer carers. Instead, these data suggest that carers use a range of coping strategies in the short-term and do emotion work to adapt to a challenged temporal orientation. The term temporal anomie is offered to describe carers' disrupted orientations in time and facilitate further discussion on the link between time and emotion work. Findings also show the importance of medical professionals' casting of the prognosis, from imminent death to certain future, to this temporal re-orientation and emotion work process. Instead of 'managing hope,' as much of the cancer communication literature describes it, findings suggest that physicians address cancer carers' and patients' temporal anomie. Future research might benefit from moving beyond individualistic conceptualisations of carers' emotions to include the cultural, temporal and interactionist influences.

  14. Carers' quality of life and experiences of adult social care support in England.

    PubMed

    Rand, Stacey; Malley, Juliette

    2014-07-01

    Informal carers make a vital contribution to the well-being of the people they care for or look after. Against the policy background in England, the purpose of this study was to explore the views of carers who are in contact with adult social care support services. A qualitative study with 31 carers, who were recruited via local authorities and carers' organisations, was conducted between April and July 2012 to collect data on carers' experiences and perceptions of their quality of life (QoL) with and without adult social care and support for themselves or the person they look after. Through framework analysis, three key themes were identified: (i) definitions of social care services 'for' the carer or 'for' care recipient and social care outcomes; (ii) carers' access to social care services; and (iii) the meaning and value of informal care. We find that carers' QoL is affected by social care support directed at carers and support directed at those they care for, as well as access to services, the experience of stigma in communities, and in how individual needs and preferences are considered when making decisions about care. While there is much to welcome in the direction of policy in England, this study has shown that there are some gaps in thinking around these areas that will need to be addressed if the lives of carers are to be improved.

  15. The Formal Support Experiences of Family Carers of People with an Intellectual Disability Who Also Display Challenging Behaviour and/or Mental Health Issues: What Do Carers Say?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Neil

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a literature review of research that has explored the support experiences of family carers of a person with an intellectual disability who displays challenging behaviour and/or has a mental health problem. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the reported experiences of family carers from…

  16. Carers' Medication Administration Errors in the Domiciliary Setting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, Sara; Vincent, Charles; Franklin, Bryony Dean

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Medications are mostly taken in patients’ own homes, increasingly administered by carers, yet studies of medication safety have been largely conducted in the hospital setting. We aimed to review studies of how carers cause and/or prevent medication administration errors (MAEs) within the patient’s home; to identify types, prevalence and causes of these MAEs and any interventions to prevent them. Methods A narrative systematic review of literature published between 1 Jan 1946 and 23 Sep 2013 was carried out across the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, COCHRANE and CINAHL. Empirical studies were included where carers were responsible for preventing/causing MAEs in the home and standardised tools used for data extraction and quality assessment. Results Thirty-six papers met the criteria for narrative review, 33 of which included parents caring for children, two predominantly comprised adult children and spouses caring for older parents/partners, and one focused on paid carers mostly looking after older adults. The carer administration error rate ranged from 1.9 to 33% of medications administered and from 12 to 92.7% of carers administering medication. These included dosage errors, omitted administration, wrong medication and wrong time or route of administration. Contributory factors included individual carer factors (e.g. carer age), environmental factors (e.g. storage), medication factors (e.g. number of medicines), prescription communication factors (e.g. comprehensibility of instructions), psychosocial factors (e.g. carer-to-carer communication), and care-recipient factors (e.g. recipient age). The few interventions effective in preventing MAEs involved carer training and tailored equipment. Conclusion This review shows that home medication administration errors made by carers are a potentially serious patient safety issue. Carers made similar errors to those made by professionals in other contexts and a wide variety of contributory factors were

  17. The earnings of informal carers: wage differentials and opportunity costs.

    PubMed

    Heitmueller, Axel; Inglis, Kirsty

    2007-07-01

    A substantial proportion of working age individuals in Britain are looking after sick, disabled or elderly people, often combining their work and caring responsibilities. Previous research has shown that informal care is linked with substantial opportunity costs for the individual due to forgone wages as a result of non-labour market participation. In this paper we show that informal carers exhibit further disadvantages even when participating. Using the British Household Panel Study (BHPS) we decompose wage differentials and show that carers can expect lower returns for a given set of characteristics, with this wage penalty varying along the pay distribution and by gender. Furthermore, opportunity costs from forgone wages and wage penalties are estimated and found to be substantial.

  18. Carers' experiences of dysphagia in people treated for head and neck cancer: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-08-01

    The implication of dysphagia for people treated nonsurgically for head and neck cancer (HNC) and its detrimental effects on functioning and quality of life has been well documented. To date, however, there has been a paucity of research on the effects of dysphagia following HNC on carers, independent of the consequences of a gastrostomy. The objective of this qualitative study was to report on the experiences of carers of people with dysphagia (non-gastrostomy dependent) following nonsurgical treatment for HNC and to identify the support needs of this group. A purposive, maximum-variation sampling technique was adopted to recruit 12 carers of people treated curatively for HNC since 2007. Each participated in an in-depth interview, detailing their experience of caring for someone with dysphagia and the associated impact on their life. Thematic analysis was adopted to search the transcripts for key phases and themes that emerged from the discussions. Analysis of the transcripts revealed four themes: (1) dysphagia disrupts daily life, (2) carers make adjustments to adapt to their partner's dysphagia, (3) the disconnect between carers' expectations and the reality of dysphagia, and (4) experiences of dysphagia-related services and informal supports. Carers generally felt ill-prepared for their role in dysphagia management. The qualitative methodology successfully described the impact of dysphagia on the everyday lives of carers, particularly in regard to meal preparation, social events, and family lifestyle. Clinicians should provide adequate and timely training and support to carers and view carers as copartners in dysphagia management.

  19. Interactive health communication applications for chronic disease: patient and carer perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kerr, C; Murray, E; Stevenson, F; Gore, C; Nazareth, I

    2005-01-01

    Interactive health communication applications (IHCAs) may be particularly useful to patients and carers managing chronic disease. We have run eight focus groups with patients and two with carers involving a total of 40 participants. The focus groups were designed to seek patients' and carers' requirements of IHCAs and to identify the criteria they would use to assess them. Analysis revealed that many participants saw the value and potential of IHCAs. Even those with modest previous computer experience could use them with little tuition. The findings from this study have policy implications for the development of applications to maximize the potential benefit of IHCAs to patients and carers.

  20. Perspectives of carers on medication management in dementia: lessons from collaboratively developing a research proposal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The need for carers to manage medication-related problems for people with dementia living in the community raises dilemmas, which can be identified by carers and people with dementia as key issues for developing carer-relevant research projects. A research planning Public Patient Involvement (PPI) workshop using adapted focus group methodology was held at the Alzheimer’s Society’s national office, involving carers of people with dementia who were current members of the Alzheimer’s Society Research Network (ASRN) in dialogue with health professionals aimed to identify key issues in relation to medication management in dementia from the carer viewpoint. The group was facilitated by a specialist mental health pharmacist, using a topic guide developed systematically with carers, health professionals and researchers. Audio-recordings and field notes were made at the time and were transcribed and analysed thematically. The participants included nine carers in addition to academics, clinicians, and staff from DeNDRoN (Dementias and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Network) and the Alzheimer’s Society. Findings Significant themes, for carers, which emerged from the workshop were related to: (1) medication usage and administration practicalities, (2) communication barriers and facilitators, (3) bearing and sharing responsibility and (4) weighing up medication risks and benefits. These can form the basis for more in-depth qualitative research involving a broader, more diverse sample. Discussion The supported discussion enabled carer voices and perspectives to be expressed and to be linked to the process of identifying problems in medications management as directly experienced by carers. This was used to inform an agenda for research proposals which would be meaningful for carers and people with dementia. PMID:25048052

  1. Against the odds: foster carers' perceptions of family, commitment and belonging in successful placements.

    PubMed

    Oke, Nicholas; Rostill-Brookes, Helen; Larkin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study examines carer attributes associated with placement stability for teenagers growing up in long term foster care, focusing on unexpected placement success. We explored experiences and perceptions relating to family, belonging and commitment in a group of foster carers providing a stable placement for a young person who had not been expected to settle. These placements showed positive outcome, despite factors in the child's history that might have predicted otherwise. Seven foster carers were interviewed following a semi-structured guide, which covered their ideas about their relationship with the child in question, about the foster family, and the child's sense of belonging in foster and birth family. Analysis of carers' accounts of placements which had succeeded 'against the odds' revealed four major themes, described under the headings My Child--emotional bonding, the carers' enlarged view of family and their parental regard for the young person; Jam in the Sandwich--working within a 'compromised space' between Local Authority and birth family; Repair and Rebuild--the craft of fostering including managing the foster/birth family boundary; Sticking with It--resilience, tenacity and maintaining hopefulness. The carers' accounts offer pointers towards the ingredients of successful placements and prompt reflection on how these may be supported and promoted. They also highlight tensions inherent in the foster carer task relating to carers' parental functioning for young people in long-term foster care.

  2. Residential Carers' Knowledge and Attitudes towards Physiotherapy Interventions for Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Stephen; Macha, Ruth; Hebblethwaite, Amy; Hames, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Through the use of face-to-face interviews, this article explores residential carers' perceptions and understanding of a physiotherapy service provided to patients with a learning disability, with the aim of highlighting potential areas for improvement in the service. Carers involved in the study reported a good relationship with the…

  3. Attitude to Medication of Parents/Primary Carers of People With Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasaratnam, R.; Crouch, K.; Regan, A.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the influence of attitudes of carers of people with intellectual disability (ID) towards giving medication. Ninety-three carers of service users who are currently attending outpatients clinic (Harrow Learning Disability service) were interviewed, using the RAMS (Rating of Attitude to Medication Scale) interview schedule. A…

  4. Effective Communication Training Interventions for Paid Carers Supporting Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Seonaid; Melville, Craig A.; Jones, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Carer communication skills contribute to the well being of individuals with learning disabilities. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of communication training interventions, and there is a lack of robust measures of outcome. A communication self-efficacy measure relevant to carers supporting adults with learning disabilities was…

  5. Service Users and Carers: Preparing to Be Involved in Work-Based Practice Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearnley, Christine; Coulby, Ceridwen; Rhodes, Christine; Taylor, Jill; Coates, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the specific issues related to involving service users and carers in work-based practice assessment of health and social care students. The outcomes of a shared workshop that involved service users and carers, practice assessors and students in the development of an interprofessional assessment tool, will be…

  6. Carer Knowledge and Experiences with Menopause in Women with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Diane S.; Wishart, Jennifer G.; Muir, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    Overall life expectancy for women with intellectual disabilities (ID) is now significantly extended, and many will live long enough to experience menopause. Little is known about how carers support women with ID through this important stage in their lives. This study investigated carer knowledge of how menopause affects women with ID under their…

  7. A 10-year Plan for Quality Living for People with Disabilities and Their Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Jocelyn E.; Cartwright, Collen

    2015-01-01

    Background: The concerns of older carers of an adult with disabilities have been well documented. The sudden incapacity or death of the carer can result in a crisis response rather than a planned transition to a chosen sustainable alternative care arrangement for the person with disability. Building on previous "Futures Planning"…

  8. Mediators of Well-Being in Ageing Family Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnes, Patricia; Woodford, Lynn; Passey, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Background: Increasing numbers of adults with an intellectual disability are being cared for at home by ageing parents. The purpose of this study was to determine whether carer resources (i.e. social support and formal service use) and carer appraisals of ageing and stress/burden mediate the relationships between (1) maladaptive behaviour and…

  9. Reporting of Health Problems and Pain by Adults with an Intellectual Disability and by Their Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Vicky; Khattran, Sukhjinder; Kerry, Sally; Corney, Roslyn; Painter, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Background: Information about the health of people with ID is usually obtained from professionals and carers. Little is known about what health problems people with ID report they experience, and whether this differs from their carers' reports. Method: A secondary analysis of health information provided by participants with ID and/or their matched…

  10. Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Their Carers as Researchers and Participants in a RCT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Vicky; Leer, Geoffrey; Burchell, Sarah; Khattram, Sukhjinder; Corney, Roslyn; Rowlands, Gill

    2012-01-01

    Background: This article describes the process of including people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and carers of people with ID as researchers and participants in randomised controlled trial (RCT) research. People with ID are rarely involved in research about their health, either as researchers or participants. Carers are often included as…

  11. Assessing the Communication Skills of Carers Working with Multiple Learning Disabilities: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koski, Katja; Launonen, Kaisa

    2012-01-01

    Background: Speech and language therapists (SLTs) working with adults who have multiple learning disabilities and complex communication needs often deliver their care via indirect therapy where SLTs train carers to communicate with their clients. Yet, very little is known about how SLTs assess the carers' communication skills prior to the training…

  12. Family Carers' Experiences Using Support Services in Europe: Empirical Evidence from the EUROFAMCARE Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamura, Giovanni; Mnich, Eva; Nolan, Mike; Wojszel, Beata; Krevers, Barbro; Mestheneos, Liz; Dohner, Hanneli

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores the experiences of family carers of older people in using support services in six European countries: Germany, Greece, Italy, Poland, Sweden, and the UK. Design and Methods: Following a common protocol, data were collected from national samples of approximately 1,000 family carers per country and clustered into…

  13. Depressive Symptoms in Older Female Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Y. C.; Pu, C-Y.; Fu, L-Y.; Kroger, T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This survey study aims to examine the prevalence and factors associated with depressive symptoms among primary older female family carers of adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). Method: In total, 350 female family carers aged 55 and older took part and completed the interview in their homes. The survey package contained…

  14. The Internet as Social Support for Older Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Elizabeth A.; LaMartin, Kimberly M.

    2012-01-01

    Social support is a potentially powerful mediator of well-being for family carers. Given that social engagement often decreases with age, the Internet broadens the opportunities for aging carers of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) to provide support to one another. This article reviews what constitutes social…

  15. Recommendations to support informal carers of people living with motor neurone disease.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Susan; Mockford, Carole

    2016-10-02

    Informal carers are increasingly providing specialist care at home for people living with motor neurone disease. The carers may experience significant deterioration in their quality of life as a result of the physical and psychological burden they undertake. This systematic review seeks to provide evidence-based recommendations to enable healthcare professionals to support carers appropriately to maintain their wellbeing and to continue providing care at home. Inclusion criteria included articles focusing on the experience of informal carers of people with motor neurone disease, particularly when reporting on their perspective of professional services. Twenty-three studies were included and a thematic analysis was undertaken. Four key recommendations were identified: providing support, early access to palliative care, information regarding availability of services, and offering carers training for using specialist equipment. These recommendations offer healthcare professionals practical, cost-effective suggestions to improve existing services.

  16. Developing a person-centred approach to carer assessment and support.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Gail; Austin, Lynn; Diffin, Janet; Grande, Gunn

    2015-12-01

    Community nurses play an important role in providing palliative care and support for patients and carers at home. The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) provides practitioners with an evidence-based comprehensive tool to use with carers in palliative home care. As a practice tool, the CSNAT uses a person-centred approach-that is, the process of carer assessment and support is facilitated by practitioners but is carerled. In this paper, the CSNAT research team provides an overview of the development of the tool and the benefits for both carers and practitioners arising from using the CSNAT as a person-centred approach in practice. The authors outline the five stages of the CSNAT approach to assist practitioners wishing to implement the CSNAT in practice.

  17. Access to therapy services for people with disability in rural Australia: a carers' perspective.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Gisselle; Dew, Angela; Lincoln, Michelle; Bundy, Anita; Chedid, Rebecca Jean; Bulkeley, Kim; Brentnall, Jennie; Veitch, Craig

    2017-05-01

    In Australia and around the world, people with disability and their carers living in rural areas face additional challenges compared to their urban-dwelling counterparts. This cross-sectional study explored current access to therapy services for people with disability living in western New South Wales as reported by their primary carers. Data were collected using an online and paper survey distributed to carers, from December 2012 until June 2013. Information was sought about the carers, the person they care for, access to physiotherapy, speech pathology, occupational therapy and psychology services. A total of 166 carers participated. Respondents were mostly the carers of a son or daughter (83.6%) , the person they care for had an average age of 17.6 years (range 1-69 years) and more than half were males (56%). The majority of people with disability (73.5%) had received therapy services in the last 2 years. Waiting time and distance travelled to access physiotherapy, speech and occupational therapy services varied. People with disability had to wait an average of 6.6 months to receive speech pathology and had to travel an average of 2.6 hours to receive physiotherapy. The main provider of all services was the specialist disability government department, except for psychology, which is mainly provided in the private sector. From the carers' perspective, availability and accessibility to services are limited. Carers noted that availability of services was more restricted once people with disability reached adulthood. Lack of choice and frustration with the lack of availability of specialist disability services was reported frequently. Carers believed that timely allied health intervention prevented the development of more severe or complicated conditions that had a greater impact on carers, families, communities and the person with disabilities.

  18. Deliver us from evil: carer burden in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Martina

    2010-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disorder in today's developed world that is also increasingly picked out as a focal theme in fictional literature. In dealing with the subjectivity of human experience, such literature enhances the reader's empathy and is able to teach about moral, emotional and philosophical issues, offering the chance to see situations from a position otherwise possibly never taken by the reader. The understanding and insight so gained may well be unscientific, but the literary approach offers an insight into the whole person's perspective and the particularity and uniqueness of a situation that includes ethical conflicts. A key motif of fictional literature centred around dementia remains the burden the adult-child carer is confronted with, considering the parent's remorseless decline and personality change, the sudden demand for devoted and continuous care, and the constantly changing relationship with the declining parent. In the context of an ever increasing demand for a constructive public discussion regarding end-of-life treatment of demented patients, Christine Devars (Le Piano Désaccordé) and Andrés Barba (Ahora Tocad Música de Baile) illustrate how powerful and burdensome the impact of Alzheimer's disease is on both patient and carer and what extremes may be reached under such truly exceptional circumstances.

  19. Inconsistencies in the Roles of Family- and Paid- Carers in Monitoring Health Issues in People with Learning Disabilities: Some Implications for the Integration of Health and Social Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the living circumstances of people with learning disabilities have seen responsibility for their health become the provenance of paid-and family-carers. Thirteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with three family-carers and ten paid-carers. Findings revealed that the role of these carers was undefined, leading to difficulty in…

  20. Exploring the Potential for Family Carers to Support People With Mental Illness to Stop Smoking.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Sharon; Bowman, Jenny; Wye, Paula; Wiggers, John

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoking poses significant health burdens for people with mental illness. They die sooner than they should, and smoking is a major contributor to their high rates of morbid chronic physical health conditions and early mortality, compared to the general population. Family carers provide important support to people with mental illness. However, family carers' perspectives of smoking by their family members with mental illness are largely absent from the research literature and from practice, despite smoking rates remaining high and quit rates remaining low for this population. We know little about how family carers are or could be involved in supporting people with mental illness who smoke to stop smoking. This paper aims to provide a discussion of the opportunities for family carers to support their family member's smoking cessation and a discussion of our preliminary research on this topic. From the available literature, it appears that family carers are well placed to support smoking cessation for this population; however, they struggled physically, philosophically, and emotionally with perceived responsibilities involving their family member's smoking and the caring role. They felt isolated and asserted that there was limited support from service providers to assist them. We concluded that family carers are important agents within the person's immediate environment who could help them to improve their smoking cessation success. This suggests also that mental health services and other health service providers could benefit from including family carers in their efforts to support smoking cessation for people with mental illness who smoke.

  1. Stroke patients' and informal carers' experiences with life after stroke: an overview of qualitative systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Lou, Stina; Carstensen, Kathrine; Jørgensen, Carina Rumpelthiin; Nielsen, Camilla Palmhøj

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To provide a systematic overview of current qualitative systematic reviews and metasyntheses of patients' and informal carers' experiences with rehabilitation and life after stroke following discharge. Method A systematic literature search was performed based on PRISMA guidelines. Nine databases were systematically searched by a university librarian. The search yielded 1093 unique entries and screening by title/abstract identified 60 reviews for potential inclusion. After full-text assessment by two independent observers, 11 reviews satisfied the inclusion criteria. Following quality appraisal, four studies were excluded. Results Seven qualitative reviews (containing 108 primary studies) were included: five reviews of patients' experiences and two reviews of carers' experiences. Stroke causes profound disruption of life as known, and both patients and carers must engage in a process of adapting and rebuilding a post-stroke life and identity. This process of rehabilitation is described as temperamental and unstable rather than progressive. From the reviews, five key experiences in this process are identified: autonomy, uncertainty, engagement, hope and social relations. Conclusions The need for broad, qualitative syntheses of stroke patients' experiences is currently fulfilled. Future qualitative reviews could focus more on implications for practice, e.g., by grading the quality of the metafindings. Implications for Rehabilitation Stroke is a profound disruption of life as known, and patients and carers value information that helps them prepare for and adjust to this new situation. Optimal rehabilitation is a main concern and goal for patients and carers, and thus carers may be a valuable asset to professionals in the rehabilitation process. Practical and emotional support is important for patients and carers, and rehabilitation professionals should be aware of the increased risk of social isolation post-stroke. Hope is a strong motivational factor and

  2. Cultural competency: professional action and South Asian carers.

    PubMed

    Mir, Ghazala; Tovey, Philip

    2002-01-01

    Inequality and exclusion are characteristic of the experience of UK South Asian communities. In health care, community needs are often not addressed by health and social welfare services. An increase in cultural competency is now part of identified policy. The aim of this paper is to examine the extent to which there is evidence of cultural competency amongst professionals concerning South Asian parents caring for a person with cerebral palsy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with respondents from 19 service organisations. Results are presented on perceptions of service delivery and on the dynamics of service development: evidence is found that inadequate service delivery continues despite professional knowledge that it exists. Conditions necessary for the achievement of cultural competence are discussed. We suggest that service development to meet the needs of South Asian carers must form part of an overall strategy geared to change at different levels within and outside service organisations.

  3. End-of-life training for paid carers working with people with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Codling, Mary; Knowles, Jane; Vevers, Ann

    2014-04-01

    People with learning disabilities are living longer lives. Over the past few years, research has explored the needs of people with learning disabilities, their families and learning disability professionals in relation to end-of-life care and death. However, little is known about the needs of paid carers and their experience of end-of-life care. This article discusses the development, implementation and evaluation of a study day about end-of-life care that was delivered to paid carers on two separate occasions in Berkshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust. A total of 43 paid carers attended and the days were well evaluated. The need for further training for paid carers who work with people with learning disabilities at the end of life was highlighted.

  4. Exploring children's perspectives of engagement with their carers using factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Withington, Tania; Duplock, Ray; Burton, Judith; Eivers, Areana; Lonne, Bob

    2017-01-01

    Positive engagement between a child and carer in out-of-home care is understood to have long-term benefits for children who have experienced abuse or neglect. This study analysed data from the 'Views of Children and Young People in Foster Care 2009' survey of 937 children in out-of-home care in Queensland, Australia, to identify factors that supported or hindered engagement between a child and carer. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis and structural regression were used. Findings suggest that children's engagement with their carer is influenced by a range of internal and external factors including child characteristics, the care experience, contact with biological parents, and placement trajectory. Child engagement is important because it is central to positive outcomes such as placement stability in out-of-home care. Implications for policy and practice include the need for a structural response that supports building and maintaining positive child-carer relationships.

  5. Consumers with an intellectual disability and carers: perceptions of interactions with banks.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Susan C; Martin, Fiona B

    2007-03-01

    As more people with an intellectual disability reside independently in the community, there is both the need and the opportunity for them to use financial services, including banks and credit unions, and products such as cash machine cards, credit cards and loans. There is a dearth of information about interactions between consumers with intellectual disabilities and their carers, and financial service providers. This study investigated the perceptions of 94 consumers with an intellectual disability and 53 carers regarding interactions with financial service providers. Consumers and carers mentioned a number of problems with banks, and reported a low rate of successful resolution of these difficulties. Carers mentioned more problems than consumers, and more frequently reported intangible problems such as discrimination. The 'digital divide' was evident, with few consumers having access to Internet or telephone banking. People with intellectual disabilities need education programmes about electronic banking, their rights as consumers and their access to problem resolution strategies.

  6. Love stories: understanding the caring journeys of aged Greek-Australian carers.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, Debbie; Blignault, Ilse; Perry, Astrid; Antonopoulos, Penny

    2016-03-01

    This article documents the findings of a short-term longitudinal study that explored the caring journeys of aged Greek carers providing in-home care for their spouse. Through a deeper understanding of carers' decisions and decision-making and insights from service providers and community leaders, we aimed to inform policy makers, service managers and providers about how to develop and promote culturally appropriate support services, and negotiate them with carers and care recipients in a timely way. Initially, we conducted three focus groups and one follow-up forum with service providers and Greek community leaders. Then, over a 6-month period, we conducted two in-home interviews and two telephone interviews with 12 older Greek carers. We sought to understand factors influencing carers' decision-making regarding service uptake, and we provided information about services as required. Through our thematic analysis, we found that most carers wanted to remain as independent as possible and to avoid forced separation from the one they loved, through institutionalisation. They placed great value on their caring role which, while a struggle at times, gave them a sense of meaning, purpose and belonging. We also found that carers had great resourcefulness, strength and competence. They were all in long-term relationships, had negotiated coming to a foreign country and establishing themselves and were now in the process of negotiating old age and increasing frailty while at the same time providing care and support to family and friends. Our findings suggest that services need to be communicated in ways which support what carers value, not on outdated assumptions about cultural groups, otherwise providers will perpetuate exclusion. We propose an outreach in-home service model with an emphasis on ageing well and staying at home. This model of service provision is a model of care which emphasises relationships and community, and seeks to build social and cultural capital.

  7. Do they look after their own? Informal support for South Asian carers.

    PubMed

    Katbamna, Savita; Ahmad, Waqar; Bhakta, Padma; Baker, Richard; Parker, Gillian

    2004-09-01

    Policy on care in the community was founded on the premise that the care of frail elderly people with disabilities would be a joint responsibility for health and social care professionals, and family carers, supported by people within their social networks. The policy assumes that such social networks are common features of all communities in contemporary Britain, containing a reserve of people who can be called upon to provide support to carers. The present paper draws on material gathered for a qualitative study of the experiences carers in South Asian communities to examine the quality and quantity of informal support that was available in different types of households. Male and female carers were selected from the Punjabi Sikh, Gujarati Hindu, and Bangladeshi and Pakistani communities. A total of 105 carers participated in the project. Participants were caring for people in all age groups with physical and/or mental distress, and in some cases, with multiple and complex impairments. The analysis of carers' accounts suggested that, for a variety of reasons, the main carer, irrespective of gender, had limited support both in nuclear and extended households. In addition, societal attitudes towards disability and the fear of obligation prevented the seeking and accepting of help from wider social networks. The paper concludes that the evidence does not support the assumption about extended families, and their willingness and ability to support carers. Many issues highlighted in this paper have far-reaching implications for policy makers in many countries in the West where South Asian people have made their homes.

  8. Supporting activity engagement by family carers at home: maintenance of agency and personhood in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Pat Yin Fan; Ellis-Hill, Caroline; Coleman, Peter

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An explorative paper to describe how family carers, through the caregiving journey, reaffirm and promote the agency of people with dementia. Agency is an important concept in dementia care and is crucial to the promotion of wellbeing and the delivery of person-centred care. This article is based on one of the key findings of a study that explored family carers’ experiences of engaging their relatives in daily activities in domestic settings. Following research governance and ethical approval, 30 in-depth interviews (initial and follow-up) were carried out with 15 resident-carers of people with dementia who were recruited via local community mental health teams. Then five focus groups were conducted with 21 participants accessed through carers support groups. Interviews and focus groups were transcribed, coded and analysed using a grounded theory method. Findings showed the process in which family carers encouraged and sustained a sense of autonomy and control (agency) in their relative’s daily activities. Key strategies used by carers included: being non-judgemental; facilitating a sense of worth; taking calculated risks; maintaining the continuity of their relative’s identity; enhancing a sense of connection with their relative’s role and identity using enjoyable activities; preventing inactivity and attending to the bodily source of the agency. Lack of support for carers could ultimately pose a risk to the maintenance of the agency of people with dementia. This study provides a deeper insight into the process used by home carers to support the agency of people with dementia. This is essential if practitioners are to identify and develop more realistic intervention strategies and to work in effective partnership with family carers. The implications for the creation of dementia-friendly communities are discussed.

  9. Behavioural and psychological symptoms in dementia and the challenges for family carers: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Feast, Alexandra; Orrell, Martin; Charlesworth, Georgina; Melunsky, Nina; Poland, Fiona; Moniz-Cook, Esme

    2016-01-01

    Background Tailored psychosocial interventions can help families to manage behavioural and psychological symptoms in dementia (BPSD), but carer responses to their relative's behaviours contribute to the success of support programmes. Aims To understand why some family carers have difficulty in dealing with BPSD, in order to improve the quality of personalised care that is offered. Method A systematic review and meta-ethnographic synthesis was conducted of high-quality quantitative and qualitative studies between 1980 and 2012. Results We identified 25 high-quality studies and two main reasons for behaviours being reported as challenging by family carers: changes in communication and relationships, resulting in ‘feeling bereft’; and perceptions of transgressions against social norms associated with ‘misunderstandings about behaviour’ in the relative with dementia. The underlying belief that their relative had lost, or would inevitably lose, their identity to dementia was a fundamental reason why family carers experienced behaviour as challenging. Conclusions Family carers' perceptions of BPSD as challenging are associated with a sense of a declining relationship, transgressions against social norms and underlying beliefs that people with dementia inevitably lose their ‘personhood’. Interventions for the management of challenging behaviour in family settings should acknowledge unmet psychological need in family carers. PMID:26989095

  10. Depression and other psychiatric morbidity in carers of elderly people living at home.

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, G.; Manela, M.; Katona, C.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe the mental health of a community sample of carers of elderly people with dementia, depression, or physical disability and to compare that with the mental health of other adults living in the household and of those living alone. DESIGN--Assessment of psychiatric morbidity and physical disability with standardised questionnaire in randomly selected enumeration districts; subjects were interviewed at home. SETTING--London Borough of Islington. SUBJECTS--700 people aged > or = 65 and other coresidents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Depression measured with standardised interview. RESULTS--The prevalence of depression was not significantly higher in carers overall (15%) than in coresidents (11%). Being a woman carer was a significant predictor of psychiatric illness. Depression was more common in the carers of people with a psychiatric disorder than in coresidents (24% v 11%, P < 0.05) and in those living alone (19%). Depression was most common (47%) in women carers of people with dementia. CONCLUSION--The increase in psychiatric morbidity reported in carers of people with psychiatric disorders may reflect the lack of a confiding relationship. PMID:8563534

  11. Mental health recovery: Lived experience of consumers, carers and nurses.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sini; Munro, Ian; Taylor, Beverley Joan

    2014-09-06

    Abstract Background Mental health recovery is a prominent topic of discussion in the global mental health settings. The concept of mental health recovery brought about a major shift in the traditional philosophical views of many mental health systems. Aim The purpose of this article is to outline the results of a qualitative study on mental health recovery, which involved mental health consumers, carers and mental health nurses from an Area Mental Health Service in Victoria, Australia. This paper is part one of the results that explored the meaning of recovery. Methods The study used van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenology to analyse the data. Findings Themes suggested that the cohort had varying views on recovery that were similar and dissimilar. The similar views were categorised under two processes involving the self, an internal process and an external process. These two processes involved reclaiming various aspects of oneself, living life, cure or absence of symptoms and contribution to community. The dissimilar views involved returning to pre-illness state and recovery was impossible. Conclusion This study highlights the need for placing importance to the person's sense of self in the recovery process.

  12. Mental health recovery: lived experience of consumers, carers and nurses.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sini; Munro, Ian; Taylor, Beverley Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background Mental health recovery is a prominent topic of discussion in the global mental health settings. The concept of mental health recovery brought about a major shift in the traditional philosophical views of many mental health systems. Aim The purpose of this article is to outline the results of a qualitative study on mental health recovery, which involved mental health consumers, carers and mental health nurses from an Area Mental Health Service in Victoria, Australia. This paper is Part One of the results that explored the meaning of recovery. Methods The study used van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenology to analyse the data. Findings Themes suggested that the cohort had varying views on recovery that were similar and dissimilar. The similar views were categorised under two processes involving the self, an internal process and an external process. These two processes involved reclaiming various aspects of oneself, living life, cure or absence of symptoms and contribution to community. The dissimilar views involved returning to pre-illness state and recovery was impossible. Conclusion This study highlights the need for placing importance on the person's sense of self in the recovery process.

  13. Schizophrenia through the carers' eyes: results of a European cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Svettini, A; Johnson, B; Magro, C; Saunders, J; Jones, K; Silk, S; Hargarter, L; Schreiner, A

    2015-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder affecting approximately 29 million people worldwide. The ideal treatment and care of patients with schizophrenia should be provided by a multidisciplinary 'team' involving psychiatrists, nurses and other healthcare professionals, together with carers and patients. In light of the key role carers play in the care of patients with schizophrenia, the present survey was designed to assess the opinions of family members and friends of patients with schizophrenia across Europe and to ascertain their attitudes towards the illness, medication and adherence to medication. Among carers participating in this survey, there was widespread awareness of the issues involved in supporting patients with schizophrenia and the importance of their role in improving poor adherence to medication. Three differences in opinion emerged between the views of carers and psychiatrists; psychiatrists rely more on the patient themselves when assessing adherence than carers would recommend; in contrast to psychiatrists, many carers believe the illness itself contributes to non-adherence; two thirds of carers think that schizophrenia medication damages health (higher than estimated by psychiatrists). The findings from the present survey, taken together with the results from the Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia surveys of psychiatrists and nurses, support the need for a collaborative approach to the issue of treatment nonadherence. In particular, healthcare professionals should recognize the valuable contribution that family carers can make to improve treatment adherence and consequently clinical outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia carries a significant burden for families providing care. The Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia (ADHES) carers' survey was designed to assess the opinions of family and friends of patients with schizophrenia across Europe and ascertain their attitudes towards the illness, medication and

  14. The role of family carers in the use of personal budgets by people with mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Sarah; Szymczynska, Paulina; Clewett, Naomi; Manthorpe, Jill; Tew, Jerry; Larsen, John; Pinfold, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Personal budgets aim to increase choice and independence for people with social care needs but they remain underused by people with mental health problems compared to other disability groups. The use of personal budgets may impact on families in a variety of ways, both positive and negative. This paper draws on interviews, undertaken in 2012-2013 with 18 family carers and 12 mental health service users, that explored experiences of family involvement in accessing and managing personal budgets for a person with mental health-related social care needs. The sample was drawn from three sites across England, with additional carers being recruited via voluntary sector networks. Our findings show that for many people with severe mental health needs who lack motivation and confidence to negotiate access to personal budgets, carers may provide the necessary support to enable them to benefit from this form of social care support. We illustrate the role carers may play in initiating, pursuing and maximising the level of support available through personal budgets. However, some carers interviewed considered that personal budget funding was reduced because of practitioners' assumptions about carers' willingness and ability to provide support. We also report perceived tensions between family carers and practitioners around appropriate involvement in decision-making. The study findings have implications for local authorities, practitioners and family carers in supporting the involvement of family carers in support for people with severe mental health problems.

  15. An evaluation of Cognitive Stimulation Therapy sessions for people with dementia and a concomitant support group for their carers.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jan; Kingston, Paul; Alford, Simon; Taylor, Louise; Tolhurst, Edward

    2016-01-18

    This research aimed to ascertain the impact of a pragmatic Cognitive Stimulation Therapy course of 10 sessions on the cognitive function of people living with dementia and whether attending a concomitant carers support group was beneficial to carers. A mixed method quasi-experimental approach was adopted; data were collected pre- and post-intervention. The quantitative arm utilised three validated questionnaires rated by the carers. Qualitative data were collected via semi-structured interviews with carers regarding their perceptions of the impact of Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and the carers support group. Quantitative data analysis found no statistically significant differences within or between groups. The qualitative data demonstrated that carers perceived Cognitive Stimulation Therapy had some benefits for the people living with dementia, especially social benefits. Carers also perceived that attending the carers support group was beneficial for them in terms of gaining a better understanding of dementia, developing coping skills and having peer support. The study was limited in scale and further research with a larger sample, using direct measures of the impact of Cognitive Stimulation Therapy with people living with dementia and supplementary research exploring which characteristic of carers support groups are effective would be worthwhile.

  16. Reaching out or missing out: approaches to outreach with family carers in social care organisations.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Jo; Manthorpe, Jill; Cornes, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Outreach is advocated as a way of improving the uptake of services among underserved populations and of filling the gaps between mainstream services and the populations they are intended to support. Despite the policy emphasis on providing better help for family carers, research consistently shows that many of those providing unpaid care to a family member or friend report difficulties in finding out about the assistance to which they are entitled. This article presents results from a concurrent mixed-methods study, which aimed to describe different ways of working with family carers in adult social care departments and to collect the views of a range of stakeholders about the advantages and disadvantages of the approaches that were identified. A total of 86 semi-structured face-to-face interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of funders, carers' workers, representatives of voluntary organisations and family carers based in four contrasting localities. An email survey was sent to all local councils in England with social care responsibilities and resulted in a 53% response rate. Data collection took place in 2012, with a small number of interviews being completed in 2011. Our approach to data analysis combined methodological, data and theoretical triangulation. The findings presented here mainly draw on the interview data to highlight the different models of outreach that we identified. The article highlights important differences between outreach and the provision of information. It concludes that organisations providing support for carers need to consider the advantages and disadvantages of different models of outreach as they develop carers' support and the extent to which different models might be more effective than others in reaching particular types of carer.

  17. A randomized controlled trial of bibliotherapy for carers of young people with first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    McCann, Terence V; Lubman, Dan I; Cotton, Sue M; Murphy, Brendan; Crisp, Kingsley; Catania, Lisa; Marck, Claudia; Gleeson, John F M

    2013-11-01

    Caring for young people with first-episode psychosis (FEP) is challenging and can adversely affect carer well-being, with limited evidence-based support materials available. We aimed to examine whether completion of a self-directed problem-solving bibliotherapy among carers of young people with FEP led to a better experience of caring, less distress and expressed emotion, and better general health than carers who only received treatment as usual (TAU). A randomized controlled trial was conducted across two early-intervention psychosis services in Melbourne, Australia. A total of 124 carers were randomized to problem-solving bibliotherapy intervention (PSBI) or TAU and assessed at baseline, 6-week and 16-week follow-up. Intent-to-treat analyses were carried out and indicated that recipients of PSBI had a more favorable experience of caring than those receiving TAU, and these effects were sustained at both follow-up time points. Across the other measures, both groups demonstrated improvements by week 16, although the PBSI group tended to improve earlier. The PSBI group experienced a greater reduction in negative emotional evaluations of the need to provide additional support to young people with FEP than the TAU group by week 6, while the level of psychological distress decreased at a greater rate from baseline to 6 weeks in the PSBI compared with the TAU group. These findings support the use of problem-solving bibliotherapy for first-time carers, particularly as a cost-effective adjunct to TAU.

  18. Interprofessional teamwork in stroke care: Is it visible or important to patients and carers?

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Gillian; Sims, Sarah; Greenwood, Nan; Jones, Fiona; Ross, Fiona; Harris, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional teamwork is seen in healthcare policy and practice as a key strategy for providing safe, efficient and holistic healthcare and is an accepted part of evidence-based stroke care. The impact of interprofessional teamwork on patient and carer experience(s) of care is unknown, although some research suggests a relationship might exist. This study aimed to explore patient and carer perceptions of good and poor teamwork and its impact on experiences of care. Critical incident interviews were conducted with 50 patients and 33 carers in acute, inpatient rehabilitation and community phases of care within two UK stroke care pathways. An analytical framework, derived from a realist synthesis of 13 'mechanisms' (processes) of interprofessional teamwork, was used to identify positive and negative 'indicators' of teamwork. Participants identified several mechanisms of teamwork, but it was not a subject most talked about readily. This suggests that interprofessional teamwork is not a concept that is particularly important to stroke patients and carers; they do not readily perceive any impacts of teamwork on their experiences. These findings are a salient reminder that what might be expected by healthcare professionals to be important influences on experience may not be perceived to be so by patients and carers.

  19. Supporting working carers: do policies in England and The Netherlands reflect 'doulia rights'?

    PubMed

    Arksey, Hilary; Morée, Marjolein

    2008-12-01

    Governments of advanced European welfare states with ageing populations are struggling to reconcile what seem to be conflicting policies. On the one hand, they are trying to increase the labour market participation of women and older workers. On the other hand, they are making more demands on people to care for disabled, chronically ill and frail older relatives and friends. Those caregivers are more likely to be women and older people. In this paper, we present the policies and experiences of carers from two countries that differ in type of welfare state, health and social care system and labour market context: England and The Netherlands. The aim was to compare English and Dutch policy measures for carers and examine their impact with evidence from two studies of people who combine work and care. The analysis is informed by the theoretical concepts of 'doulia' (whereby the state, employers and other sections of society reciprocate carers and other dependency workers for their unpaid caregiving) and 'doulia rights' (a carer's right to provide care without the risk of impoverishment). The evidence suggests that English and Dutch carers' policies have different strengths and weaknesses, but in neither country do they show strong commitment to the right to doulia.

  20. Evaluation of quality of life of carers of Italian spinoni with idiopathic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    De Risio, Luisa; Freeman, Julia; Shea, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The carers of all UK Kennel Club registered Italian spinoni (IS) born between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011 were invited to participate in the study. The carers of 47 of 63 IS diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) returned the questionnaire, which included numerous questions on various aspects of IE including the effect of IE on the dog's carer's quality of life. Median epileptic seizure number in the three months before study end or death was five epileptic seizures, 72 per cent of dogs had cluster seizures, 94 per cent of dogs were administered one or more antiepileptic medications and 36 per cent of dogs were euthanased due to poorly controlled IE. Seventy-one per cent and 65 per cent of the participants were moderately to extremely worried about the frequency and severity of their dog's epileptic seizures, respectively. Caring for an IS with IE caused conflict with the carer's work, education or daily activity often or very often in 50 per cent of the participants. Overall the limitations on the carer's life due to caring for an IS with IE were considered as very to extremely bothersome in 29 per cent of the participants, a little to moderately bothersome in 40 per cent of the participants and not at all bothersome in 31 per cent of the participants. PMID:27403328

  1. Skilled interaction among professional carers in special accommodations for adult people with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Antonsson, H; Aström, S; Lundström, M; Graneheim, U H

    2013-09-01

    Communicative difficulties affect interactions between people with learning disabilities and their carers. Despite such difficulties, however, some carers seem to interact successfully with people who have limited ability to communicate verbally and exhibit challenging behaviour. This study aims to illuminate skilled interaction among carers working in special accommodations for people with learning disabilities. Interactions between 16 caregivers and 11 residents with learning disabilities were recorded on video. Verbal and non-verbal interaction skills among the carers were identified. Four caring situations with people with learning disabilities were chosen to illuminate skilled interaction. The transcribed text was subjected to qualitative content analysis and core stories were created. The results show that skilled interaction between the carers and the people with learning disabilities is based upon being confirming, sharing daily life experience, giving time and space, and using congruent and distinct language. In this paper we present examples that offer concrete suggestions of how to promote successful interaction and create meaning in the shared day-to-day life in special accommodations for people with learning disabilities.

  2. Exploring the Care Relationship between Grandparents/Older Carers and Children Infected with HIV in South-Western Uganda: Implications for Care for Both the Children and Their Older Carers

    PubMed Central

    Rutakumwa, Rwamahe; Zalwango, Flavia; Richards, Esther; Seeley, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The care of children orphaned by HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa is often undertaken by grandparents, yet little is known about the care relationship between grandparent and grandchild. Our aim was to examine this relationship to understand the needs and responsibilities of both the HIV positive child and older carer and the nature of the relationship, and to assess the implications for care for the children and the older carers. A qualitative study was conducted with 40 purposively sampled children (13–17 years) and their older carers (50 years and above). Participants were recruited from two clinics in south-western Uganda. Up to three semi-structured interviews were held with each participant. Data were analysed using a thematic framework approach. We found that the care relationship was mostly reciprocal: HIV positive children depended on carers for basic and health needs and carers counted on the children for performing tedious household tasks. The relationship was also characterised by challenges, sometimes causing tension between child and carer. We conclude that: (1) interventions targeting HIV positive children need to also address the needs of older carers, and (2) carers and children would benefit from psychosocial support and social protection. PMID:25689350

  3. A feasibility randomised controlled trial of the DECIDE intervention: dementia carers making informed decisions

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Kathryn; Livingston, Gill

    2017-01-01

    Summary Family carers report high levels of decisional conflict when deciding whether their relative with dementia can continue to be cared for in their own home. We tested, in a feasibility randomised controlled trial, the first decision aid (the DECIDE manual) aiming to reduce such conflict. Twenty family carers received the DECIDE intervention, and 21 received usual treatment. The intervention group had reduced decisional conflict compared with controls (mean difference −11.96, 95% confidence interval −20.10 to −3.83, P=0.005). All carers receiving the intervention completed and valued it, despite some still reporting difficulties with family conflict and problems negotiating services. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:28243460

  4. Depression among carers of AIDS-orphaned and other-orphaned children in Umlazi Township, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Caroline; Operario, Don; Cluver, Lucie

    2012-01-01

    South Africa faces the challenge of supporting the well-being of adults caring for growing numbers of AIDS-orphaned children. These adults play a critical role in responses to the epidemic, but little information exists in regard to their mental health needs. This paper reports on findings from n=1599 adults, recruited through representative household sampling, who serve as primary carers for children in Umlazi Township, an HIV-endemic community. Overall, 22% of participants were carers of AIDS-orphaned children, 11% were carers of other-orphaned children and 67% were carers of non-orphaned children. Prevalence of depression was 30.3%. Orphan carers, regardless of whether they cared for AIDS-orphaned or other-orphaned children, were significantly more likely than carers of non-orphaned children to meet the clinical threshold for depression (35.2% vs. 27.9%, p < 0.01). In multivariate logistic regressions, food insecurity and being a female carer were identified as additional risk factors for greater depression. In contrast, households with access to running water and households dependent on salaries as the main source of income were identified as protective factors for disparities in depression. Mental health interventions are urgently needed to address an increased risk for depression among all orphan carers, not just those caring for AIDS-orphaned children.

  5. Depression amongst carers of AIDS-orphaned and other-orphaned children in Umlazi Township, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Caroline; Operario, Don; Cluver, Lucie

    2011-01-01

    South Africa faces the challenge of supporting the well-being of adults caring for growing numbers of AIDS-orphaned children. These adults play a critical role in responses to the epidemic but little information exists in regards to their mental health needs. This paper reports on findings from n=1599 adults, recruited through representative household sampling, who serve as primary carers for children in Umlazi Township, a HIV endemic community. Overall, 22% of participants were carers of AIDS-orphaned children, 11% were carers of other-orphaned children, and 67% were carers of non-orphaned children. Prevalence of depression was 30.3%. Orphan carers, regardless of whether they cared for AIDS-orphaned and other-orphaned children, were significantly more likely than carers of non-orphaned children to meet the clinical threshold for depression (35.2% versus 27.9%, p<.01). In multivariate logistic regressions, food insecurity and being a female carer were identified as additional risk factors for greater depression. In contrast, households with access to running water and households dependent on salaries as the main source of income were identified as protective factors for disparities in depression. Mental health interventions are urgently needed to address an increased risk for depression amongst all orphan carers, not just those caring for AIDS-orphaned children. PMID:22081931

  6. Levels of Psychological Distress Experienced by Family Carers of Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities in an Urban Conurbation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric; Robertson, Janet; Wood, Justin

    2004-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to identify factors associated with the level of psychological distress reported by family carers of children with intellectual disability living in a large urban conurbation. Method: Information was collected by postal questionnaire (or interview for family carers who did not have English as their…

  7. Negative Impact and Positive Value in Caregiving: Validation of the COPE Index in a Six-Country Sample of Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balducci, Cristian; Mnich, Eva; McKee, Kevin J.; Lamura, Giovanni; Beckmann, Anke; Krevers, Barbro; Wojszel, Z. Beata; Nolan, Mike; Prouskas, Constantinos; Bien, Barbara; Oberg, Birgitta

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The present study attempts to further validate the COPE Index on a large sample of carers drawn from six European countries. Design and Methods: We used a cross-sectional survey, with approximately 1,000 carers recruited in each of six countries by means of a common standard evaluation protocol. Our saturation recruitment of a designated…

  8. Coping Well with Advanced Cancer: A Serial Qualitative Interview Study with Patients and Family Carers

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Diane; Appleton, Lynda; Calman, Lynn; Large, Paul; Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Grande, Gunn

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To understand successful strategies used by people to cope well when living with advanced cancer; to explore how professionals can support effective coping strategies; to understand how to support development of effective coping strategies for patients and family carers. Design Qualitative serial (4–12 week intervals) interview study with people with advanced cancer and their informal carers followed by focus groups. The iterative design had a novel focus on positive coping strategies. Interview analysis focused on patients and carers as individuals and pairs, exploring multiple dimensions of their coping experiences. Focus group analysis explored strategies for intervention development. Participants 26 people with advanced (stage 3–4) breast, prostate, lung or colorectal cancer, or in receipt of palliative care, and 24 paired nominated informal/family carers. Setting Participants recruited through outpatient clinics at two tertiary cancer centres in Merseyside and Manchester, UK, between June 2012 and July 2013. Results 45 patient and 41 carer interviews were conducted plus 4 focus groups (16 participants). People with advanced cancer and their informal/family carers develop coping strategies which enable effective management of psychological wellbeing. People draw from pre-diagnosis coping strategies, but these develop through responding to the experience of living with advanced cancer. Strategies include being realistic, indulgence, support, and learning from others, which enabled participants to regain a sense of wellbeing after emotional challenge. Learning from peers emerged as particularly important in promoting psychological wellbeing through the development of effective ‘everyday’, non-clinical coping strategies. Conclusions Our findings challenge current models of providing psychological support for those with advanced cancer which focus on professional intervention. It is important to recognise, enable and support peoples’ own

  9. Avoidance as a strategy of (not) coping: qualitative interviews with carers of Huntington's Disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Lowit, Alison; van Teijlingen, Edwin R

    2005-01-01

    Background Since Huntington's Disease (HD) is a familial disease with an average onset in the mid-thirties, one might expect that spousal carers are concerned with providing care for off-spring who may turn out to be affected. Methods This study involved ten face-to-face interviews with carers of spouses affected by HD in Northeast Scotland. Carers were recruited through two channels: a genetic clinic and the Scottish Huntington's Association (SHA). Interviews were conducted in carers' own homes. A thematic analysis of the transcripts was conducted. Results Although carers did worry about their children, they did not envisage being involved in their care. Many avoided talking about the disease, both within and outwith their family; this may have greatly reduced the level of support provided by family members. Conversely, avoidance was often accompanied by symptom-spotting. For example, several people had given up driving, before they were incapable of doing so. The explanation appears to be that they avoided getting into situations in which HD may express itself. Support meetings seem to be valued amongst patients with other serious diseases and their carers, however, although all participants had had contact with the SHA, only one regularly attended meetings. It was felt that seeing others with HD provided a constant reminder of the possible effect of HD on the wider family, which seemed to outweigh the benefit of attending. Overall, the analysis highlighted 'avoidance' as a key theme. Conclusion Many denied symptoms of HD in their spouses, pre-diagnosis. All had pretended at some point that it was not happening, through ignoring early signs and 'obvious' symptoms. Some partners had refused to go to the doctor until it was no longer possible to deny symptoms. Formal health and social care seemed to play a very small role compared to informal care arrangements. PMID:16162290

  10. How family carers engage with technical health procedures in the home: a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Janet; McKinlay, Eileen; Keeling, Sally; Levack, William

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences of family carers who manage technical health procedures at home and describe their learning process. Design A qualitative study using grounded theory. Participants New Zealand family carers (21 women, 5 men) who managed technical health procedures such as enteral feeding, peritoneal dialysis, tracheostomy care, a central venous line or urinary catheter. In addition, 15 health professionals involved in teaching carers were interviewed. Methods Semistructured interviews were coded soon after completion and preliminary analysis influenced subsequent interviews. Additional data were compared with existing material and as analysis proceeded, initial codes were grouped into higher order concepts until a core concept was described. Interviewing continued until no new ideas emerged and concepts were well defined. Results The response of carers to the role of managing technical health procedures in the home is presented in terms of five dispositions: (1) Embracing care, (2) Resisting, (3) Reluctant acceptance, (4) Relinquishing and (5) Being overwhelmed. These dispositions were not static and carers commonly changed between them. Embracing care included cognitive understanding of the purpose and benefits of a procedure; accepting a ‘technical’ solution; practical management; and an emotional response. Accepting embrace is primarily motivated by perceived benefits for the recipient. It may also be driven by a lack of alternatives. Resisting or reluctant acceptance results from a lack of understanding about the procedure or willingness to manage it. Carers need adequate support to avoid becoming overwhelmed, and there are times when it is appropriate to encourage them to relinquish care for the sake of their own needs. Conclusions The concept of embracing care encourages health professionals to extend their attention beyond simply the practical aspects of technical procedures to assessing and addressing carers’ emotional and

  11. A systematic review of the economic evidence for interventions for family carers of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Heslin, Margaret; Forster, Anne; Healey, Andy; Patel, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the economic evidence for interventions aimed at family carers of stroke patients. Data sources: Searches (limited to those published in English since 1990) were performed in key databases along with hand searches of relevant papers. Review methods: Papers were restricted to studies including any economic data (broadly defined) for any intervention targeting carers explicitly or explicitly referring to a carer element, beyond involving carers in the care or intervention for patients (i.e. more than just carers being invited to observe an intervention targeted at the patient). Two reviewers independently screened full papers and extracted data using guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and quality assessment using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (cohort studies), the Delphi list (randomised controlled trials) and guidelines on economic quality from the British Medical Journal. Data were reviewed descriptively as meta analyses were inappropriate due to non-comparability of studies. Results: Ten papers were included in the review. These were heterogeneous in their design, intervention and economic analyses making comparison difficult. Only three of the ten papers included economic evaluations. All three reported that the intervention was less costly and had better or equivalent outcomes than the control comparator although two of these were based on the same intervention using the same dataset. Conclusion: There is some limited evidence that interventions for family carers of stroke patients are effective and cost effective. However, due to variation in the types of interventions examined, little can be concluded regarding implications for clinical practice. PMID:25758943

  12. Self-reported physical and mental health of Australian carers: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Rafat; Dillon, Gina; Ryan, Peta

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report on self-reported physical and mental health of informal carers in rural regions of New South Wales, Australia. Methods A cross-sectional community-based sample (n=222) of carers completed a questionnaire incorporating self-reported measures of health from validated international instruments including Medical Outcomes Study Scale (SF-36), the Centre for Epidemiology-Depression (CES-D) and Kessler-10 (K-10) Psychological Distress Scales, along with information on participant demographics and other key caregiving characteristics such as health condition of care recipient. Results Rural carers’ self-reported health was poor as evident on the SF-36 Physical and Mental Health component scores as well as each individual domain of the SF-36. Results from the CES-D and K-10 scores indicated very high rates of depressive symptoms and psychological distress. Over 70% of carers within the current study had CES-D scores indicative of depressive symptoms. Scores on the K-10 indicate almost half the carers were experiencing high levels of psychological distress, which is over 4 times the rate reported in the general Australian population. Conclusions and implications Results from this study were compared to Australian population normative data and were found to be significantly below Australian age-matched population norms for SF-36, CES-D and K-10. These findings illustrate the poor health profile of informal carers relative to the general Australian population, especially in terms of depressive symptoms and psychological distress. This highlights the need for additional support for rural carers in order to ease the accumulated mental and physical health burdens of this group. PMID:27625059

  13. Parents' and carers' views about emollients for childhood eczema: qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Muller, I; Yardley, L; Lewis-Jones, S; Ersser, S; Little, P

    2016-01-01

    Objective Leave-on emollients form the mainstay of eczema treatment, but adherence is poor. We aimed to explore parents’/carers' views on effectiveness and acceptability of leave-on emollients for childhood eczema through secondary analysis of data from 2 qualitative data sets. Setting Study 1 recruited through mail-out from 6 general practices in southern England. Study 2 recruited from a feasibility trial of an intervention to support eczema self-care in 31 practices in the same area. Participants Study 1 included 28 interviews with carers of children aged ≤5 years with eczema. Study 2 included 26 interviews with carers of children aged ≤5 years with eczema. Methods Interviews followed semistructured guides: study 1 explored carers' understandings around eczema treatments in order to develop a web-based self-care support intervention; study 2 explored carers' understandings of eczema and eczema treatments after using the intervention. Interviews were carried out face to face or by telephone, audio-recorded and transcribed. Secondary analysis of data from both studies focused on views and experiences of emollient use. Data were analysed using an inductive thematic approach facilitated by NVivo V.10 software. Results In study 1, most participants felt emollients improved eczema but held mixed views about long-term use to prevent flare-ups. In study 2, where carers had used the web-based intervention, all participants held positive views about long-term emollient use. In both studies, participants expressed a range of preferences about emollient ‘thickness’; some felt that ‘thick’ emollients (ointments) were most effective, while others found these difficult to use. Carers described a process of ‘trial and error’, trying emollients suggested by professionals, friends and family, or bought over-the-counter. Carers expressed a need for understanding differences between products and their effective use. Conclusions Providing a rationale for long

  14. Physical health concerns of the patient, the family and the carer.

    PubMed

    McCrae, J

    2010-06-01

    Physical health monitoring is crucial in the light of current knowledge about the risks associated with schizophrenia and its treatment. Cooperation between psychiatrists, patients and informal carers can significantly enhance patient wellbeing in this regard. Moreover, an advocacy approach elevates patients from being passive recipients of care to active participants in an integrated system that has outcome benefits for all stakeholders. Considerable progress is being made in this regard, although there is still a long way to go to maximise the benefits of carer involvement in the global management of schizophrenia.

  15. Perceptions of the impact of health-care services provided to palliative care clients and their carers.

    PubMed

    Connell, Tanya; Fernandez, Ritin S; Griffiths, Rhonda; Tran, Duong; Agar, Meera; Harlum, Janeane; Langdon, Rachel

    2010-06-01

    A wide range of services are provided to palliative care clients to alleviate pain and improve their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of clients and their carers regarding palliative care services in New South Wales, Austalia. Ten patients and their carers (n = 7) were randomly selected from a sample of palliative care clients and were informed of the study and interviewed. Interview data were coded independently by three researchers and thematic analysis was undertaken. The themes identified were similar for both clients and carers and included: access to services; service provision; impact on way of life; usefulness of services; and staffing. An additional theme identified by clients was the burden of caregiving on carers. Knowledge of perceptions and concerns of client and carers is important to consider when planning palliative care services.

  16. Caring for a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Parents’ Quality of Life: Application of the CarerQol

    PubMed Central

    Payakachat, Nalin; van Exel, Job; Kuhlthau, Karen; Kovacs, Erica; Pyne, Jeffrey; Tilford, J. Mick

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the impact of caregiving on parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Secondly, we investigate construct validation of the care-related quality of life instrument (CarerQol) measuring impact of caregiving. Primary caregivers of children with ASDs were included. Many parents experienced considerable problems combining daily activities with care, had financial problems or suffered from depressive mood. Validity tests showed that a higher impact of caring on the CarerQol was positively associated with higher subjective burden and lower family quality of life. Most of the associations between CarerQol scores and background characteristics confirmed previous research. The CarerQol validly measures the impact of caregiving for children with ASDs on caregivers in our sample. The CarerQol may therefore be useful for including parent outcomes in research on ASDs. PMID:24577786

  17. Changes in Attributions as a Consequence of Training for Challenging and Complex Behaviour for Carers of People with Learning Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sophie; Dagnan, Dave; Rodgers, Jacqui; McDowell, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This paper reviews the evidence for changes in carers' attributions regarding the behaviour of people with intellectual disabilities as a consequence of carer training in challenging and complex behaviour. Method: Papers were included in the review if they reported outcomes for carer training on the behaviour of people with intellectual…

  18. Family Carers and the Prevention of Heroin Overdose Deaths: Unmet Training Need and Overlooked Intervention Opportunity of Resuscitation Training and Supply of Naloxone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, John; Manning, Victoria; Mayet, Soraya; Titherington, Emily; Offor, Liz; Semmler, Claudia; Williams, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess (a) carers' experiences of witnessing overdose; (b) their training needs; and (c) their interest in receiving training in overdose management. Design: Postal questionnaire distributed through consenting participating local carer group coordinators in England. Sample: 147 carers attending local support groups for friends and families…

  19. The Spanish Validation of the Accommodation and Enabling Scale for Eating Disorders Among Carers: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Quiles Marcos, Yolanda; Quiles Sebastián, María José; Pamies Aubalat, Lidia; Sepúlveda García, Ana Rosa; Treasure, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Literature suggests that families may accommodate patients' symptoms in attempts to alleviate family conflict and stress. These accommodating and enabling behaviours may have a negative impact on carers and those they care for. There are no self-report questionnaires validated in Spanish to measure accommodation among relatives of patients with an eating disorder. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Accommodation and Enabling Scale for Eating Disorders (AESED-S) among relatives of eating disorder patients. A cross-sectional study of 90 relatives was carried out to explore the factor structure, reliability and validity of the AESED-S. The internal consistency of the Spanish version of the AESED subscales was good, ranging from .89 to .81. The correlation of the five subscales with conceptually related measures (negative caregiving experience and distress) supports the convergent validity of this instrument in this sample. Results indicated that the Spanish version of the AESED provides a reliable and valid tool for assessing family accommodation in the context of having a relative with an eating disorder.

  20. The Caring Child: An Evaluative Case Study of the Cornwall Young Carers Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Allister H.; Astbury, Gaynor

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the Cornwall Young Carers project (jointly funded by social services and the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Health Action Zone), conducted during the period 2000-2002. A diverse range of methodological approaches were adopted (comparative national statistics, local pilot study, monthly and quarterly data…

  1. Self Stigma in People with Intellectual Disabilities and Courtesy Stigma in Family Carers: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Afia; Hassiotis, Angela; Strydom, Andre; King, Michael

    2012-01-01

    People with intellectual disability are one of the most stigmatised groups in society. Despite this, research in this area has been limited. This paper provides a review of studies examining self stigma in people with intellectual disability, and courtesy and affiliate stigma in family carers. An electronic search of studies published between 1990…

  2. Hearing Parents' and Carers' Voices: Experiences of Accessing Quality Long Day Care in Northern Regional Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Nonie; Tinning, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This article explores parents' and carers' experiences of accessing quality long day care in northern regional Australia. The data was gathered in 2009, after the collapse of ABC Developmental Learning Centres (herein referred to as ABC Learning) and before the implementation of the "National Quality Framework," and provides a snapshot…

  3. Determining Research Questions on Health Risks by People with Learning Disabilities, Carers and Care-Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Anita F.; Chesson, Rosemary A.

    2008-01-01

    Here we describe the process by which research questions were developed for reducing health risks for people with learning disabilities. A participatory approach was used to give service users and carers a clear voice in "deciding" questions, thereby setting the research agenda. Audio-taped interviews and focus groups were used. Forty people (20…

  4. Meeting the Cancer Information Needs of People with Learning Disabilities: Experiences of Paid Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Amelia; Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Bernal, Jane; Butler, Gary; Hollins, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on one of the findings of a small study that aimed to explore how people with learning disabilities accessed and were supported to use a pictorial cancer information book. Five people with learning disabilities who were affected by cancer and their paid carers participated in the study. Support staff in the study were the people…

  5. Gender Differences in Self-Silencing and Psychological Distress in Informal Cancer Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ussher, Jane M.; Perz, Janette

    2010-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in self-silencing, the relationship between self-silencing and psychological distress, and reasons for self-silencing in informal cancer carers (329 women, 155 men), using a mixed-method design. Men reported greater self-silencing than women on the Silencing the Self Scale; however, women reported higher…

  6. End-of-Life Care for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Paid Carer Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Karen; Guerin, Suzanne; Dodd, Philip; McEvoy, John

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known of paid carers' perspectives when caring for people with intellectual disabilities at the end-of-life. Materials and methods: Sixty four individuals from intellectual disability services took part in 12 focus groups. Interviews were analysed using framework analysis. Results: Participants wanted to provide palliative…

  7. Tracking an Elusive Population: Family Carers of Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Romandy (Switzerland)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jecker-Parvex, Maurice; Breitenbach, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Despite a long-standing tradition of institutional placement in Switzerland, many older adults with intellectual disabilities continue to be supported by aging parents and siblings. For various reasons, these carers and the adults concerned have been overlooked up to now. To find out how many such families are providing housing and care of this…

  8. The management of depressed elderly care recipients: family perspectives on the skills of professional carers.

    PubMed

    Mellor, David; Davison, Tanya; McCabe, Marita; George, Kuruvilla

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have identified high levels of depression among older people, both those in their own homes and those in residential care. With the world's population ageing, it is timely for health service providers to consider how the escalating population of depressed elderly people will be managed. Although treating general practitioners may be the health professionals most expected to detect, treat, and monitor depression among the elderly, professional carers are well placed to assist in the detection and monitoring of the disorder. This study conducted individual interviews with 15 family members of depressed aged-care recipients to determine their perceptions of the skills and knowledge of depression of professional carers. Family members reported that carers are more likely to avoid than engage with their clients about depressive symptomatology and do not communicate their concerns with managers or general practitioners (GPs). Family members believed that, in general, professional carers were undertrained in these areas. The implications of these findings for health service planning and staff training are discussed.

  9. Attendance, Achievement and Participation: Young Carers' Experiences of School in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Tim; McArthur, Morag; Morrow, Ros

    2009-01-01

    Schools play an important part in the lives of children and young people who have caring responsibilities for a family member with an illness, disability, alcohol or other drug problem or mental health condition but many of these "young carers" report difficulty in attending, achieving and participating in education. This qualitative…

  10. Menopause Experiences and Attitudes in Women with Intellectual Disability and in Their Family Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Lu, Zxy-Yann Jane; Pu, Cheng-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about how middle-aged and older women with intellectual disability (ID) cope with life transitions such as perimenopause and postmenopause. Method: A mixed methods approach was employed to explore the attitudes toward and experiences of menopause among women with ID and their family carers in one city in Taiwan.…

  11. The Professional Carers' Group: Supporting Group Work for Young Sexual Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Susanne; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes the context, format, and goals of the Professional Carers' Group, a professional network designed to support a centralized treatment project for young people who have sexually abused others. Ways that group-based work with potentially isolated local professionals may help a treatment program maintain a systemic perspective is discussed.…

  12. Teaching Intensive Interaction to Paid Carers: Using the "Communities of Practice" Model to Inform Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, Kelly; Bradley, Samantha; Johnson, Gemma; Mrozik, Jennifer H.; Appiah, Afua; Nagra, Maninder K.

    2016-01-01

    The engagement of people with learning disabilities in social communication is crucial to the development of relationships with others, a sense of social inclusion and self-worth. Intensive Interaction is an approach that can help carers develop their skills to engage people with severe and profound learning disabilities in personally relevant…

  13. An Exploration of Issues around Menstruation for Women with Down Syndrome and Their Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is little research on issues related to menstruation for women with Down syndrome, yet they may experience menstruation in a qualitatively different way from normal women, which impacts on their quality of life and that of their families and carers. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore issues with the women and/or…

  14. Shared decision-making in dementia: A review of patient and family carer involvement.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lyndsey M; Whitlatch, Carol J; Lyons, Karen S

    2016-09-01

    This paper reviews empirical findings concerning the decision-making process of persons with dementia and their family carers, with a particular focus on the extent and determinants of involvement of persons with dementia in the decision-making process. To be included in this review, studies needed to be published in peer-reviewed journals between 1999 and 2014, report empirical data from participants with dementia and/or their family carers, and pertain to the involvement of persons with dementia and their family carers in decisions about everyday care, medical care and treatment, or long-term care. A total of 36 studies were included. Results indicated that not all persons with dementia are excluded from participating in the decision-making process, but there is a broad spectrum of what constitutes shared decision-making in dementia. Studies concerning the determinants of shared decision-making mostly focused on non-modifiable factors. Future research is needed to better promote shared decision-making among persons with dementia and their family carers.

  15. Evaluation of a Web-Based Training Program for Professional Carers Working With People With Learning Disabilities and Challenging Behavior: A Pilot Study with SSED-Design.

    PubMed

    Antonsson, Helena; Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren; Isaksson, Ulf; Åström, Sture; Lundström, Mats O

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between people with intellectual disabilities and professional carers is often influenced by communicative difficulties contributing challenging behaviours. The aims of this study were to evaluate to a web-based training program aimed at improving carers' abilities to interact with people with learning disabilities who exhibit challenging behaviours and to explore carers' experiences of participating in such a program. A single-subject experimental design and mixed methods were used to integrate qualitative and quantitative data. Triangulation of questionnaires, interviews with carers, and assessments of one woman's behaviour was performed. The participants were professional carers aged 20 to 55 years. The web-based training program increased carers' abilities to handle challenging behaviours and decreased challenging behaviours in daily care. The program improved the opportunities to offer training to carers who work in community-based accommodations with limited time to receive training.

  16. Perceptions of unmet needs for community social care services in England. A comparison of working carers and the people they care for.

    PubMed

    Brimblecombe, Nicola; Pickard, Linda; King, Derek; Knapp, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Previous UK research has found expressed unmet need for services by unpaid working carers and among disabled and older people. There are, however, suggestions from research that views on unmet needs for services differ between carers and care-recipients. Working carers in the UK say that the care-recipient is sometimes reluctant to accept services and the few international comparative dyad studies that have been carried out find that carers perceive higher unmet need than care-recipients. Recent policy discussions in England have also recognised that there may be differences of opinion. We collected data in 2013 from working carer/care-recipient dyads in England about perceived need for services for the care-recipient, disability, unpaid care hour provision and individual and socio-demographic characteristics. We find that care-recipients as well as their carers perceive high unmet need for services, although carers perceive higher unmet need. For carers, unmet need is associated with the disability of the carer-recipient and being the daughter or son of the care-recipient; for care-recipients it is associated with unpaid care hours, carers' employment status and carers' health. The majority of dyads agree on need for services, and agreement is higher when the working carer provides care for 10 hours or more hours a week. Services for care-recipients may enable working carers to remain in employment so agreement on needs for services supports the implementation of legislation, policy and practice that has a duty to, or aims to, support carer's employment.

  17. Adapting a SSKIN bundle for carers to aid identification of pressure damage and ulcer risks in the community.

    PubMed

    McCoulough, Siobhan

    2016-06-01

    If pressure damage is identified and addressed at an early stage, it may be reversed. Otherwise, it may quickly progress into a serious deep tissue injury. In the community, most daily skin care is undertaken by formal and informal carers. They therefore need to know how to identify signs that pressure ulcers may develop and what immediate actions to take. NICE guidance on pressure ulcer prevention is too extensive to be a simple tool for carers, so a SSKIN bundle was adapted for community use. This ensures carers know how to prevent and identify pressure damage, and includes skin care, repositioning and use of equipment. Carers need training. This is the responsibility of all involved with the patient, including health-care and local authority services.

  18. A randomized controlled pilot study to evaluate a technology platform for the assisted living of people with dementia and their carers.

    PubMed

    Torkamani, Mariam; McDonald, Louise; Saez Aguayo, Ignasi; Kanios, Christos; Katsanou, Maria-Nefeli; Madeley, Laura; Limousin, Patricia D; Lees, Andrew J; Haritou, Maria; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    The use of telemedicine is becoming increasingly popular in assisting with the home management of People with Dementia (PwD) by offering services to the carers that may enhance their ability to care for their relative for longer. A computerized platform, ALADDIN, was evaluated in its usefulness to reduce carer burden and distress and to improve their quality of life, in an attempt to delay institutionalization of PwD. ALADDIN offers educational material about dementia to carers and provides the opportunity to contact other carers and clinicians. ALADDIN also facilitates remote monitoring of the PwD and their carers by the clinicians to enable speedy delivery of appropriate intervention. The ALADDIN platform was piloted at three European sites, and used by thirty carers of PwD living in the community (platform group). The platform group and a control group of thirty PwD and their carers were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The results showed a significant improvement in the quality of life of the carers in the platform group, with some reduction in carer burden and distress. The platform was useful in monitoring the patients and facilitating contact with other professionals. Access to and use of the ALADDIN platform was rated positively by carers and clinicians. The ALADDIN platform's usefulness and applicability for prolonging the home management of PwD are discussed.

  19. Not worth the risk? Attitudes of adults with learning difficulties, and their informal and formal carers to the hazards of everyday life.

    PubMed

    Heyman, B; Huckle, S

    1993-12-01

    Twenty adults with learning difficulties (adults) living at home with informal carers, mostly parents, and attending Adult Training Centres (ATCs) were interviewed about their everyday lives and information was also obtained from informal and formal carers. The problem of dealing with the hazards of everyday life emerged as an important theme. The thinking of adults and informal carers could be understood in terms of the moral dimension of hazards, through the distinction between risks, to be calculated, and dangers, to be avoided. Adults and informal carers within families largely agreed in their categorization of hazards but differences were found. In families where the head of the household had had a professional or skilled manual occupation, adults and informal carers were most likely to agree that hazards for the adult were dangers to be avoided. In families which had a history of unemployment or unskilled occupations, adults and informal carers were most likely to treat certain hazards as risks to be taken. The latter families were also less likely to have 2 informal carers. Adults from more risk-tolerant families appeared to be achieving more of their potential in everyday living skills. Formal carers at ATCs were more accepting of risks for adults with learning difficulties than informal carers and there was misunderstanding and conflict between formal and informal carers as a result.

  20. Service User- and Carer-Reported Measures of Involvement in Mental Health Care Planning: Methodological Quality and Acceptability to Users

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Chris J.; Bee, Penny E.; Walker, Lauren; Price, Owen; Lovell, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing service user and carer involvement in mental health care planning is a key healthcare priority but one that is difficult to achieve in practice. To better understand and measure user and carer involvement, it is crucial to have measurement questionnaires that are both psychometrically robust and acceptable to the end user. Methods: We conducted a systematic review using the terms “care plan$,” “mental health,” “user perspective$,” and “user participation” and their linguistic variants as search terms. Databases were searched from inception to November 2012, with an update search at the end of September 2014. We included any articles that described the development, validation or use of a user and/or carer-reported outcome measures of involvement in mental health care planning. We assessed the psychometric quality of each instrument using the “Evaluating the Measurement of Patient-Reported Outcomes” (EMPRO) criteria. Acceptability of each instrument was assessed using novel criteria developed in consultation with a mental health service user and carer consultation group. Results: We identified eleven papers describing the use, development, and/or validation of nine user/carer-reported outcome measures. Psychometric properties were sparsely reported and the questionnaires met few service user/carer-nominated attributes for acceptability. Where reported, basic psychometric statistics were of good quality, indicating that some measures may perform well if subjected to more rigorous psychometric tests. The majority were deemed to be too long for use in practice. Discussion: Multiple instruments are available to measure user/carer involvement in mental health care planning but are either of poor quality or poorly described. Existing measures cannot be considered psychometrically robust by modern standards, and cannot currently be recommended for use. Our review has identified an important knowledge gap, and an urgent need to

  1. 'Doubly deprived': a post-death qualitative study of primary carers of people who died in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Keesing, Sharon; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2011-11-01

    This paper explores the daily experiences and occupational needs of family carers of people who were dying, with particular reference to their daily routines and ability to undertake other varied activities during the period of care. The impact of the caring experience on these occupations was then examined to determine how, and if, these occupational needs were addressed in the community using potential and available services. An exploratory approach using grounded theory was employed to examine these experiences. Participants were recruited from metropolitan (n = 10) and rural (n = 4) locations across Western Australia between February and June 2009, using a purposive sampling method. A semi-structured interview guide was developed following consultation with the literature, expert opinion and piloting. Interviews were conducted in participants' homes and questions were asked about their experiences as a carer including routines, engagement in usual activities and the impact of the caring role on their daily life during and after the period of care. Each interview was transcribed verbatim and analysed to determine potential themes. Two important themes were identified: (1) Carers experienced disengagement and deprivation from their usual occupations during and after the period of care; and (2) Participants described significant disempowerment in their role as carer. Carers are 'doubly disadvantaged' as a result of their caring role; they are unable to participate in their usual occupations and they are not recognised for their contributions as carers. Carers experienced disengagement and deprivation from their usual occupations, contributing to physical, psychological and emotional difficulties and this may result in long term consequences for health and well-being. In addition, the current services and support available for carers in the community are deemed inadequate; placing further stress on a health care system which needs to cope with increasing

  2. Specialist nursing and community support for the carers of people with dementia living at home: an evidence synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bunn, Frances; Goodman, Claire; Pinkney, Emma; Drennan, Vari M

    2016-01-01

    Specialist nurses are one way of providing support for family carers of people with dementia, but relatively little is known about what these roles achieve, or if they are more effective than roles that do not require a clinical qualification. The aim of this review was to synthesise the literature on the scope and effectiveness of specialist nurses, known as Admiral Nurses, and set this evidence in the context of other community-based initiatives to support family carers of people with dementia. We undertook a systematic review of the literature relating to the scope and effectiveness of Admiral Nurses and a review of reviews of interventions to support the family carers of people with dementia. To identify studies, we searched electronic databases, undertook lateral searches and contacted experts. Searches were undertaken in November 2012. Results are reported narratively with key themes relating to Admiral Nurses identified using thematic synthesis. We included 33 items relating to Admiral Nurses (10 classified as research) and 11 reviews evaluating community-based support for carers of people with dementia. There has been little work to evaluate specific interventions provided by Admiral Nurses, but three overarching thematic categories were identified: (i) relational support, (ii) co-ordinating and personalising support and (iii) challenges and threats to the provision of services by Admiral Nurses. There was an absence of clearly articulated goals and service delivery was subject to needs of the host organisation and the local area. The reviews of community-based support for carers of people with dementia included 155 studies but, in general, evidence that interventions reduced caregiver depression or burden was weak, although psychosocial and educational interventions may reduce depression in carers. Community support for carers of people with dementia, such as that provided by Admiral Nurses, is valued by family carers, but the impact of such initiatives is

  3. Role of domiciliary and family carers in individualised nutrition support for older adults living in the community.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Skye; Agarwal, Ekta; Young, Adrienne; Isenring, Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is common amongst people aged 65 years and older, has a multifactorial aetiology, and numerous negative outcomes. Domiciliary carers (non-clinical paid carers) and family carers (including family, friends and neighbours) are required to support the increasing demand for in-home assistance with activities of daily living due to the ageing population. This review provides insight into the role of both domiciliary and family carers in providing individualised nutrition support for older, community-dwelling adults with malnutrition. Four electronic databases were searched for intervention studies from database inception to December 2016. Both domiciliary and family carers are well placed to monitor the dietary intake and nutritional status of older adults; to assist with many food-related tasks such as the sourcing and preparation of meals, and assisting with feeding when necessary; and to act as a conduit between the care recipient and formal nutrition professionals such as dietitians. There is moderate evidence to support the role of domiciliary carers in implementing nutrition screening and referral pathways, and emerging evidence suggests they may have a role in malnutrition interventions when supported by health professionals. Moderate evidence also supports the engagement of family carers as part of the nutrition care team for older adults with malnutrition. Interventions such as group education, skill-development workshops and telehealth demonstrate promise and have significantly improved outcomes in older adults with dementia. Further interventional and translational research is required to demonstrate the efficacy of engaging with domiciliary and family carers of older adults in the general community.

  4. Experiences with using information and communication technology to build a multi-municipal support network for informal carers.

    PubMed

    Torp, Steffen; Bing-Jonsson, Pia C; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    This multi-municipal intervention study explored whether informal carers of frail older people and disabled children living at home made use of information and communication technology (ICT) to gain knowledge about caring and to form informal support networks, thereby improving their health. Seventy-nine informal carers accessed web-based information about caring and an e-based discussion forum via their personal computers. They were able to maintain contact with each other using a web camera and via normal group meetings. After the first 12 months, 17 informal carers participated in focus group interviews and completed a short questionnaire. Four staff members were also interviewed. Participant carers who had prior experiences with a similar ICT-based support network reported greater satisfaction and more extensive use of the network than did participants with no such prior experience. It seems that infrequent usage of the service may be explained by too few other carers to identify with and inappropriate recruitment procedures. Nevertheless, carers of disabled children reported that the intervention had resulted in improved services across the participant municipalities. To achieve optimal effects of an ICT-based support network due attention must be given to recruitment processes and social environment building for which care practitioners require training and support.

  5. The chicken or the egg? Endogeneity in labour market participation of informal carers in England.

    PubMed

    Heitmueller, Axel

    2007-05-01

    Around 14% of the UK labour force has informal care responsibilities and almost everyone in society will be an informal carer in their lifetime. A well-known fact in the small economic literature on informal care is the apparent negative relation between care responsibilities and labour market participation. Yet, caring and labour market participation may be endogenous. Using an instrumental variable approach and panel data techniques and employing data from the British Household Panel Study from 1991 to 2002, this paper shows that not accommodating for endogeneity in the labour market participation equation may significantly overestimate the impact care exhibits on the employment decision of informal carers. Moreover, it is shown that a negative impact on employment only applies to some care-types. Policy implications are derived.

  6. Barriers to Co-Designing Mobile Technology with Persons with Dementia and Their Carers.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Mair, Frances S

    2016-01-01

    Mobile applications can be used to help manage different aspects of long-term illnesses but many are not designed to meet the specific needs of people with dementia or their carers. This case study explores the barriers experienced when co-producing a memory and reminiscence app. A focus group and interviews were conducted with patient/carer dyads, an occupational therapist, project manager and software engineer involved in the design of the app. Data was analysed thematically using the framework approach. Several limitations such as poor technical knowledge and skills, negative attitudes and inaccurate perceptions of people with dementia slowed down or changed how the mobile app was developed. Compromises also had to be made over the final design of the app. More research to explore how mobile apps are co-designed with patients is needed.

  7. Conversations between carers and people with schizophrenia: a qualitative analysis using leximancer.

    PubMed

    Cretchley, Julia; Gallois, Cindy; Chenery, Helen; Smith, Andrew

    2010-12-01

    We examined conversations between people with schizophrenia (PwS) and family or professional carers with whom they interacted frequently. We allocated PwS to one of two communication profiles: Low-activity communicators talked much less than their conversational partners, whereas high-activity communicators talked much more. We used Leximancer text analytics software to analyze the conversations. We found that carers used different strategies to accommodate to the PwS's behavior, depending on the PwS's communication profile and their relationship. These findings indicate that optimal communication strategies depend on the PwS's conversational tendencies and the relationship context. They also suggest new opportunities for qualitative assessment via intelligent text analytics technologies.

  8. 'It's the system working for the system': carers' experiences of learning disability services in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Power, Andrew

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the experiences of families with young adults with learning disabilities trying to access services. The landscape of disability services for this group is made up of day care, special vocational training and respite places. It aims to identify the extent of an implementation gap between government rhetoric and the degree to which services are characterised as being non-supportive interactions on the ground. Using Ireland as a case study, during a time when the economy is booming and government rhetoric claims unparalleled developments in allocating resources and extra respite 'places', this article identifies the main challenges faced by family carers associated with accessing appropriate services for their disabled adult child, in their attempt to achieve greater independence. This article reports the findings of a qualitative study in which individual semistructured interviews were held with family carers (n = 25) and representatives from national carer organisations (n = 6) in Ireland. These were people caring for an adult (18-30 years) with a learning disability and their experiences were also useful in cross-checking the carer organisation interviews. The findings show that there is limited flexibility, choice and availability in meeting the preferences of the service-users, and throughout the study, services were characterised as being non-supportive interactions. This is not simply symptomatic of a lack of resources. Despite improved funding, supportive attitudes and flexibility are still crucial in meeting user requirements at the level of delivery; thus highlighting that often the system works for the system, not for the user.

  9. Investigating consumers' and informal carers' views and preferences for consumer directed care: A discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Kaambwa, Billingsley; Lancsar, Emily; McCaffrey, Nicola; Chen, Gang; Gill, Liz; Cameron, Ian D; Crotty, Maria; Ratcliffe, Julie

    2015-09-01

    Consumer directed care (CDC) is currently being embraced internationally as a means to promote autonomy and choice for consumers (people aged 65 and over) receiving community aged care services (CACSs). CDC involves giving CACS clients (consumers and informal carers of consumers) control over how CACSs are administered. However, CDC models have largely developed in the absence of evidence on clients' views and preferences. We explored CACS clients' preferences for a variety of CDC attributes and identified factors that may influence these preferences and potentially inform improved design of future CDC models. Study participants were clients of CACSs delivered by five Australian providers. Using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) approach undertaken in a group setting between June and December 2013, we investigated the relative importance to CACS consumers and informal (family) carers of gradations relating to six salient features of CDC (choice of service provider(s), budget management, saving unused/unspent funds, choice of support/care worker(s), support-worker flexibility and level of contact with service coordinator). The DCE data were analysed using conditional, mixed and generalised logit regression models, accounting for preference and scale heterogeneity. Mean ages for 117 study participants were 80 years (87 consumers) and 74 years (30 informal carers). All participants preferred a CDC approach that allowed them to: save unused funds from a CACS package for future use; have support workers that were flexible in terms of changing activities within their CACS care plan and; choose the support workers that provide their day-to-day CACSs. The CDC attributes found to be important to both consumers and informal carers receiving CACSs will inform the design of future CDC models of service delivery. The DCE approach used in this study has the potential for wide applicability and facilitates the assessment of preferences for elements of potential future aged care

  10. Service-user and carer perspectives on compliance and compulsory treatment in community mental health services.

    PubMed

    Gault, Iris

    2009-09-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study analyzing service-user (SU) and carer perspectives on medication compliance and their experience of compulsory treatment. Eleven SUs and eight carers were interviewed. The research is set against the background of changes to mental health legislation in England, in the form of Supervised Community Treatment. This signals a change in community mental health practice and urges a reconsideration of concepts such as compliance, concordance and coercion. These concepts are discussed in the context of legislative changes and in relation to the perspectives of service-SUs and carers. Five themes emerged from qualitative interview data, analysed using an adapted form of grounded theory: loss of credible identity, playing the game, medicalization, therapeutic competence and incompetence and increased control. The findings suggest that SUs are initially reluctant to comply with mental health treatment, but do eventually accept the need for treatment; they also stress the significance of respectful relationships with professionals and the importance of communicative competence.

  11. Peer support and reminiscence therapy for people with dementia and their family carers: a factorial pragmatic randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, Karen; Crellin, Nadia; Hoare, Zoe; Hoe, Juanita; Knapp, Martin; Russell, Ian; Wenborn, Jennifer; Woods, Bob; Orrell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate peer support and reminiscence therapy, separately and together, in comparison with usual care for people with dementia and their family carers. Design Factorial pragmatic randomised trial, analysed by treatment allocated, was used for this study. Setting The trial ran in Community settings in England. Participants People with dementia and their family carers were the participants. Interventions Treatment as usual (TAU) plus one of the following: one-to-one peer support to family carers from experienced carers (Carer Supporter Programme; CSP), group reminiscence therapy (Remembering Yesterday, Caring Today; RYCT) for people with dementia and carers, both or neither. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes included health-related quality of life (SF-12) for carers and quality of life (QoL-AD) for people with dementia; secondary outcomes included quality of relationship for carers and people with dementia; both were collected by blinded assessors at baseline, 5 and 12 months (primary end point). Results Of 291 pairs recruited, we randomised 145 (50%) to CSP (71% uptake) and 194 (67%) to RYCT (61% uptake). CSP and RYCT, separately or together, were not effective in improving primary outcomes or most secondary outcomes. For CSP versus ‘no CSP’, adjusted difference in means was 0.52 points on the SF-12 (95% CI −1.28 to 2.32) and −0.08 points on the QoL-AD (95% CI −1.70 to 1.56). For RYCT versus ‘no RYCT’, the difference was 0.10 points on the SF-12 (95% CI −1.72 to 1.93) and 0.51 points on the QoL-AD (95% CI −1.17 to 2.08). However, carers reported better relationships with the people with dementia (difference 1.11, 95% CI 0.00 to 2.21, p=0.05). Comparison of combined intervention with TAU, and of intervention received, suggested differential impacts for carers and persons with dementia. Conclusions There is no evidence from the trial that either peer support or reminiscence is effective in

  12. The experiences of working carers of older people regarding access to a web-based family care support network offered by a municipality.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Stefan; Erlingsson, Christen; Magnusson, Lennart; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Policy makers in Sweden and other European Member States pay increasing attention as to how best support working carers; carers juggling providing unpaid family care for older family members while performing paid work. Exploring perceived benefits and challenges with web-based information and communication technologies as a means of supporting working carers' in their caregiving role, this paper draws on findings from a qualitative study. The study aimed to describe working carers' experiences of having access to the web-based family care support network 'A good place' (AGP) provided by the municipality to support those caring for an older family member. Content analysis of interviews with nine working carers revealed three themes: A support hub, connections to peers, personnel and knowledge; Experiencing ICT support as relevant in changing life circumstances; and Upholding one's personal firewall. Findings indicate that the web-based family care support network AGP is an accessible, complementary means of support. Utilising support while balancing caregiving, work obligations and responsibilities was made easier with access to AGP; enabling working carers to access information, psychosocial support and learning opportunities. In particular, it provided channels for carers to share experiences with others, to be informed, and to gain insights into medical and care issues. This reinforced working carers' sense of competence, helping them meet caregiving demands and see positive aspects in their situation. Carers' low levels of digital skills and anxieties about using computer-based support were barriers to utilising web-based support and could lead to deprioritising of this support. However, to help carers overcome these barriers and to better match web-based support to working carers' preferences and situations, web-based support must be introduced in a timely manner and must more accurately meet each working carer's unique caregiving needs.

  13. A review of patient and carer participation and the use of qualitative research in the development of core outcome sets

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background To be meaningful, a core outcome set (COS) should be relevant to all stakeholders including patients and carers. This review aimed to explore the methods by which patients and carers have been included as participants in COS development exercises and, in particular, the use and reporting of qualitative methods. Methods In August 2015, a search of the Core Outcomes Measures in Effectiveness Trials (COMET) database was undertaken to identify papers involving patients and carers in COS development. Data were extracted to identify the data collection methods used in COS development, the number of health professionals, patients and carers participating in these, and the reported details of qualitative research undertaken. Results Fifty-nine papers reporting patient and carer participation were included in the review, ten of which reported using qualitative methods. Although patients and carers participated in outcome elicitation for inclusion in COS processes, health professionals tended to dominate the prioritisation exercises. Of the ten qualitative papers, only three were reported as a clear pre-designed part of a COS process. Qualitative data were collected using interviews, focus groups or a combination of these. None of the qualitative papers reported an underpinning methodological framework and details regarding data saturation, reflexivity and resource use associated with data collection were often poorly reported. Five papers reported difficulty in achieving a diverse sample of participants and two reported that a large and varied range of outcomes were often identified by participants making subsequent rating and ranking difficult. Conclusions Consideration of the best way to include patients and carers throughout the COS development process is needed. Additionally, further work is required to assess the potential role of qualitative methods in COS, to explore the knowledge produced by different qualitative data collection methods, and to evaluate

  14. Mental health of carers of children affected by HIV attending community-based programmes in South Africa and Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Skeen, Sarah; Tomlinson, Mark; Macedo, Ana; Croome, Natasha; Sherr, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    There is strong evidence that both adults and children infected with and affected by HIV have high levels of mental health burden. Yet there have been few studies investigating carer mental health outcomes in the context of HIV in Malawi and South Africa. The objective of this study was to assess the mental health of carers of children affected by HIV as a part of the Child Community Care study, which aims to generate evidence on the effectiveness of community-based organisation (CBO) services to improve child outcomes. In a cross sectional study, we interviewed 952 carers of children (aged 4 to 13 years) attending 28 randomly selected CBOs funded by 11 major donors in South Africa and Malawi. Psychological morbidity was measured using the Shona Symptom Questionnaire (SSQ) and suicidal ideation was measured using an item from the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Carers were asked about care-seeking for emotional problems. Overall, 28% of carers scored above the clinical cut-off for current psychological morbidity and 12.2% reported suicidal ideation. We used logistic regression models to test factors associated with poor outcomes. Household unemployment, living with a sick family member, and perceived lack of support from the community were associated with both psychological morbidity and suicidal ideation in carers. Reported child food insecurity was also associated with psychological morbidity. In addition, carers living in South Africa were more likely to present with psychological morbidity and suicidal ideation than carers in Malawi. Rates of help-seeking for mental health problems were low. Carers of children affected by HIV are at risk for mental health problems as a result of HIV, socio-economic, care-giving and community factors. We call for increased recognition of the potential role of CBOs in providing mental health care and support for families as a means to improve equity in mental health care. Specifically, we highlight the need for increased

  15. Family carers' experiences of receiving the news of a diagnosis of Motor Neurone Disease: A national survey.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Samar M; Breen, Lauren J; Oliver, David; Henderson, Robert D; Edis, Robert; O'Connor, Margaret; Howting, Denise; Harris, Rodney; Birks, Carol

    2017-01-15

    Family carers have a central role in the care and support of people with MND and face the challenges of the disease from diagnosis to progression and the multiple losses of MND, but their support needs are often neglected. This study aimed to investigate the experiences of family carers at the time of diagnosis and their satisfaction with receiving the news. An anonymous postal survey was facilitated by all MND Associations in Australia (2014) and 190 family carers completed the questionnaire. The questions centred on the SPIKES protocol for communicating bad news. Two-thirds of family carers rated the skills of their neurologists as above average and were satisfied with the delivery of the diagnosis, in terms of having a significantly longer consultation time, the neurologist being warm and caring, satisfaction with the amount and content of information they received and relevant supports, and a plan for following up support. Conversely those who rated the neurologist's skills as below average commented on the difficulties they encountered and the long term emotional stress engendered by poor communication. The study emphasises previous research that suggested that neurologists may require education and training in communicating the diagnosis and this should include family carers as a vital member in MND care.

  16. Information and communication technologies for informal carers and paid assistants: benefits from micro-, meso-, and macro-levels.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Stephanie; Stewart, James; Centeno, Clara

    The aim of this study was to explore the benefits of information and communication technologies (ICT)-based services for informal carers and paid assistants of older people living in the community. We cross-case analysed the effects of twelve initiatives in the EU, the USA and Canada, based on their individual analysis documented through interviews with promoters and a literature review. We carried out the cross-case analysis following a variables-oriented strategy on seven dimensions of impact at micro-, meso- and macro-levels: the quality of life of informal carers and paid assistants, quality of life of care recipients, quality of care, care efficiency and sustainability, acceptability, and infrastructure and accessibility. ICT-based services for informal carers and paid assistants improve the quality of life of older people and their carers and access to qualified care. They also generate savings which contribute to the sustainability of the care systems. These findings constitute a first look at the benefits of the use of ICT-based services for informal carers and paid assistants. Nevertheless, more research using experimental methods is needed to demonstrate the impact of these ICT-based services at meso- and macro-levels. This would help to support policy-makers to deploy these technologies for long-term care delivery.

  17. Unwillingness to be violated: carers' experiences of caring for a person acting in a disturbing manner. An interview study.

    PubMed

    Hellzen, O; Asplund, K; Sandman, P O; Norberg, A

    1999-11-01

    Carers working in psychiatric care are sometimes exposed to insane, unpredictable and violent actions. In rare cases a patient appears to be resistant to all forms of pharmacological treatment. Fifteen carers (four registered nurses, 11 enrolled nurses) on a psychiatric ward in Sweden were interviewed about their experiences when caring for a person who acted in a disturbing manner. Narrative interviews were conducted and interpreted using a method inspired by Ricoeur. Four themes were formulated which describe the carers' uncertainty about the future, their inability to interpret the patient's disturbing behaviour and their own overall feeling of meaninglessness. The carers were of the opinion that the patient had the power and ruled the ward, which led to them feeling they were subjugated victims. The interviews also revealed the carers' recognition of forbidden feelings and actions and unknown negative sides. These results were interpreted and reflected on in the light of an ethical framework in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the text. This paper shows that an ethical perspective is important when searching for the meaning of caring for patients acting in a disturbing manner. The study raises the question: 'Is it possible to establish good when evil has dominion?'.

  18. The place for emotions in professional carers' thinking: reflections on two cases.

    PubMed

    Koren, E

    2010-12-01

    How do carers know what is right for their patient? What can they do further to relying on the two pillars of knowledge and ethics? Knowledge foregrounds rational decision-making based on scientific evidence. It allows cost-benefit rationalization and the choice of the best feasible objective. The steady advance of medical science drives responsible carers to keep their knowledge and skills up-to-date. Bioethics grants primary attention to the prevention of causing harm in general, to pursuant of patients' subjective wellbeing and to allow the latter enjoy their autonomy and to guarantee them the sense of justice. There are, however, cases where these values collide and any care decision violates one principle or another. How are carers expected to act then? This article concerns the choices made by carers, as presented and discussed in two cases. These cases deal with a clash between two principles: parenthood vs. fertility, religious rite vs. social affiliation. This class has generated an ethical dilemma. In each case carers try to justify their choices by expert knowledge and other ethical values, but later reflection reveals that the predominant element in 'solving' these dilemmas was "emotions." Professional training submits that: 'Set aside feelings in order to keep your thinking 'straight.' However, reality proves this simply infeasible. The more complex the medical-ethical situation, it is more likely that "emotions" take over. We have no choice as responsible carers but to allow our emotions the status of a factor of influence in their own right. Nowadays, a basic medical training for doctors and nurses offers an integrated body of knowledge and therapeutic skills. In addition, trainees are introduced to bioethics, supposedly sufficient to guide their future steps in their chosen profession. But how does this training in fact shape their future ethical conduct, if at all? How does it affect their ability to maintain ethical responsibility throughout

  19. Interprofessional education in the care of people diagnosed with dementia and their carers: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Marcus; Pelone, Ferruccio; Reeves, Scott; Hassenkamp, Anne Marie; Emery, Claire; Titmarsh, Kumud; Greenwood, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This systematic review is linked to the multifaceted social, economic and personal challenges of dementia and the international recognition of the value of interprofessional education (IPE) and its influence on health and social care outcomes. This review therefore aimed to identify, describe and evaluate the impact of IPE interventions on health and social care practitioners (prequalification and postqualification) understanding of dementia, the quality of care for people with dementia and support for their carers. Methods Following PRISMA guidelines, 9 databases were searched (MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Healthcare Management Information Consortium, ERIC and British Education Index). Narrative analysis of the findings was undertaken. Design Systematic review. Results 6 studies meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. The majority of studies were conducted in North America. Participants in 4 studies were health and social care practitioners caring for people with dementia, whereas the remaining studies focused on training graduate or undergraduate students. Diverse IPE activities with varying content, delivery mode and duration were reported. Although some studies reported more positive attitudes to interprofessional working as a result of the interventions, none reported benefits to patients or carers. The quality of the included studies varied. Overall, the evidence for the reported outcomes was considered weak. Conclusions This review identified 6 studies describing IPE interventions intended to improve collaborative knowledge, skills, interprofessional practice and organisational awareness of dementia and dementia care. The small number of studies, their varied nature, scope and settings combined with poor quality of evidence limits our understanding of the effectiveness of IPE on the care and support of people with dementia and their carers. Further research is

  20. An emotive subject: insights from social, voluntary and healthcare professionals into the feelings of family carers for people with mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ben; Robinson, Catherine A; Seddon, Diane; Roberts, Angela

    2009-03-01

    Caring for people with mental health problems can generate a whole range of positive and negative emotions, including fear, disbelief, guilt and chaos as well as a sense of purpose, pride and achievement. This paper explores the emotions of family carers from the perspectives of social, voluntary and healthcare professionals. Sixty-five participants were interviewed, the sample included directors, managers and senior staff from social, voluntary and healthcare organisations. Participants were encouraged to talk in detail about their understanding of the emotions of family carers. Findings highlight a rich understanding of the broad spectrum of carer emotions and the huge emotional adjustments that are often involved. Diagnosis was seen to be imbued with negative emotions, such as fear, anger and denial. However, feelings of hopelessness and desolation were often counterbalanced by feelings of hope, satisfaction and the emotional rewards of caring for a loved one. Participants noted a clear lack of emotional support for family carers, with accompanying feelings of marginalisation, particularly during transitions and especially involving young carers as well as ethnic minorities. By way of contrast, carer support groups were suggested by professionals to be a holistic, effective and economical way of meeting carers' emotional needs. This paper explores the challenge of family carer emotions from the perspective of managers and practitioners and draws out implications for research, policy and practice.

  1. Family Carers' Experience of the Need for Admission of Their Relative with an Intellectual Disability to an Assessment and Treatment Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is limited research that explores the experiences of family carers of individuals with an intellectual disability requiring admission to a specialist National Health Service Assessment and Treatment Unit. Accordingly, this study aimed to explore family carers' experience in respect of this phenomenon and their relationships with…

  2. Health Status, Social Support, and Quality of Life among Family Carers of Adults with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities (PIMD) in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Chiao, Chi; Fu, Li-Yeh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Primary family carers of adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) experience a range of considerable demands. Method: A census survey was conducted in a city of Taiwan; 796 family carers of adults (aged 18 or older) diagnosed with intellectual disability and/or with multiple disabilities living with the family…

  3. Self-efficacy and health-related quality of life in family carers of people with dementia: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Crellin, Nadia E.; Orrell, Martin; McDermott, Orii; Charlesworth, Georgina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This review aims to explore the role of self-efficacy (SE) in the health-related quality of life (QoL) of family carers of people with dementia. Methods: A systematic review of literature identified a range of qualitative and quantitative studies. Search terms related to caring, SE, and dementia. Narrative synthesis was adopted to synthesise the findings. Results: Twenty-two studies met the full inclusion criteria, these included 17 quantitative, four qualitative, and one mixed-method study. A model describing the role of task/domain-specific SE beliefs in family carer health-related QoL was constructed. This model was informed by review findings and discussed in the context of existing conceptual models of carer adaptation and empirical research. Review findings offer support for the application of the SE theory to caring and for the two-factor view of carer appraisals and well-being. Findings do not support the independence of the negative and positive pathways. The review was valuable in highlighting methodological challenges confronting this area of research, particularly the conceptualisation and measurement issues surrounding both SE and health-related QoL. Conclusions: The model might have theoretical implications in guiding future research and advancing theoretical models of caring. It might also have clinical implications in facilitating the development of carer support services aimed at improving SE. The review highlights the need for future research, particularly longitudinal research, and further exploration of domain/task-specific SE beliefs, the influence of carer characteristics, and other mediating/moderating variables. PMID:24943873

  4. Unmet Needs of People with Severe Multiple Sclerosis and Their Carers: Qualitative Findings for a Home-Based Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Borreani, Claudia; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Pietrolongo, Erika; Rossi, Ilaria; Cilia, Sabina; Giuntoli, Miranda; Giordano, Andrea; Confalonieri, Paolo; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Patti, Francesco; Grasso, Maria Grazia; de Carvalho, Laura Lopes; Palmisano, Lucia; Zaratin, Paola; Battaglia, Mario Alberto; Solari, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Few data on services for people with severe multiple sclerosis (MS) are available. The Palliative Network for Severely Affected Adults with MS in Italy (PeNSAMI) developed a home palliative care program for MS patients and carers, preceded by a literature review and qualitative study (here reported). Objective To identify unmet needs of people with severe MS living at home by qualitative research involving key stakeholders, and theorize broad areas of intervention to meet those needs. Method Data were collected from: at least 10 personal interviews with adults with severe MS (primary/secondary progressive, EDSS≥8.0); three focus group meetings (FGs) of carers of people with severe MS; and two FGs of health professionals (HPs). Grounded theory guided the analysis of interview and FG transcripts, from which the areas of intervention were theorized. Results Between October 2012 and May 2013, 22 MS patients, 30 carers and 18 HPs participated. Forty-eight needs themes were identified, grouped into 14 categories and four domains. Seven, highly interdependent intervention areas were theorized. Patients had difficulties expressing needs; experiences of burden and loneliness were prominent, chiefly in dysfunctional, less affluent families, and among parent carers. Needs differed across Italy with requirements for information and access to services highest in the South. All participants voiced a strong need for qualified personnel and care coordination in day-to-day home care. Personal hygiene emerged as crucial, as did the need for a supportive network and preservation of patient/carer roles within family and community. Conclusions Unmet needs transcended medical issues and embraced organizational and psychosocial themes, as well as health policies. The high interdependence of the seven intervention areas theorized is in line with the multifaceted approach of palliative care. At variance with typical palliative contexts, coping with disability rather than end

  5. Psychosis seminars: an open forum for service users, carers and professionals

    PubMed Central

    Dirik, Aysegul; Tulloch, Simon; Priebe, Stefan; Giacco, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychosis seminars enable service users, their carers and mental health professionals to meet outside of a formal care setting, increase understanding of mental illness and help establish a dialogue. Aims To explore feasibility of psychosis seminars in the UK and the experiences of participants. Method Seven meetings attended by 25 people were held over a 3-month period. An open-ended questionnaire was returned by ten participants. Responses were subjected to content analysis. Results Benefits experienced were having an open forum for talking freely about mental health issues in a neutral space, learning from others about psychosis and hearing different views. Suggested adjustments were clarifying expectations of participants at the beginning, strengthening facilitation and increasing attendance. Conclusions Psychosis seminars may help to establish a dialogue among users, carers and professionals and seem feasible in the UK, although adjustment to delivery can help their implementation. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license. PMID:27822382

  6. Activities enjoyed by patients with dementia together with their spouses and psychological morbidity in carers.

    PubMed

    Searson, R; Hendry, A M; Ramachandran, R; Burns, A; Purandare, N

    2008-03-01

    Caring for a spouse with dementia is stressful and respite care is sometimes used to reduce this burden. Spouses may find some aspects of caring rewarding but the literature on positive aspects of caring is limited. To describe activities enjoyed by patients with dementia together with their spouses, and examine their relationship with psychological morbidity in carers. A convenience sample of 46 patients with mild to moderate dementia (91% with Alzheimer's disease, AD) and their spouses were interviewed at home. Spouses completed the Pleasant Events Schedule (PES-AD) to identify activities enjoyed by patients and spouses on their own and together. Psychological morbidity in spouses was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Cognitive functions, and non-cognitive symptoms were also assessed in patients. Multiple regression analysis using age, Mini-Mental State Examination, Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, Revised Memory and Behaviour Problems (RMBP) checklist frequency, and PES-AD- together scores as independent variables found PES-AD-together and RMBP-frequency to be independent predictors of GHQ-12 scores in spouses, but the model could explain only 28% of variance. Facilitating activities that are enjoyed by both patients with dementia and spouses may be an alternative intervention strategy to reduce carer burden.

  7. A systematic review on the factors associated with positive experiences in carers of someone with cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, J; Snowden, A

    2016-07-27

    The aim of this review was to identify the factors associated with positive experiences in non-professional carers of someone with a cancer diagnosis. A systematic search of the following electronic databases was undertaken: Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SocINDEX and Medline. Literature was searched using terms relating to cancer, caring and positive experiences. Additional records were identified through a manual search of relevant reference lists. The search included studies published in English from 1990 to June 2015. Two raters were involved in data extraction, quality appraisal, coding, synthesis and analysis. Evolutionary concept analysis was used as a guiding framework in order to focus on attributes associated with positive experiences. Fifty-two articles were included in this review. Analysis identified four overarching attributes: "gender," "personal resources," "finding meaning" and "social context." Despite the challenges associated with caring, this combination of internal and external factors enabled some carers to report positive experiences related to caring. This knowledge may be clinically helpful when designing supportive interventions. Strengths and limitations of these claims are discussed. Systematic review registration number: CRD42014014129.

  8. Reliability training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, Vincent R. (Editor); Malec, Henry A. (Editor); Dillard, Richard B.; Wong, Kam L.; Barber, Frank J.; Barina, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is failure physics, the study of how products, hardware, software, and systems fail and what can be done about it. The intent is to impart useful information, to extend the limits of production capability, and to assist in achieving low cost reliable products. A review of reliability for the years 1940 to 2000 is given. Next, a review of mathematics is given as well as a description of what elements contribute to product failures. Basic reliability theory and the disciplines that allow us to control and eliminate failures are elucidated.

  9. Person Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, James

    1977-01-01

    Person changes can be of three kinds: developmental trends, swells, and tremors. Person unreliability in the tremor sense (momentary fluctuations) can be estimated from person characteristic curves. Average person reliability for groups can be compared from item characteristic curves. (Author)

  10. Pre- and post-training evaluation of dental efficacy and activation measures in carers of adults with disabilities in South Australia - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Archana; Keuskamp, Dominic; Brennan, David

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to train carers to provide oral care for adults with disabilities and to evaluate the training programme. Forty-one carers of 103 care recipients from three disability organisations in South Australia were trained in providing oral care for adults with disabilities (April 2013-April 2014). The training included an oral presentation and practical session by a special needs dentist on completing oral health assessments (OHA), developing oral healthcare plans, providing oral hygiene care and assessing the need for dental referral. Continued support was provided via home visits by dental hygienists for the first 2 months and a dentist visit at 3 months. At 6 months, agreement on OHAs between the dentist and trained carers was assessed. Pre- and post-training questionnaires (at 6 months) collected information on dental behaviours of carers and psychosocial factors: carer activation measure-knowledge (CAM-Knowledge), carer activation measure-skills (CAM-Skills), carer activation measure-confidence (CAM-Confidence) and carer dental efficacy (CDE) items (carer diligence, self-efficacy and priority). Post-training (among 16 retained carers), there were significant increases in the mean scores of CAM-Knowledge and CAM-Confidence, but not for CAM-Skills (paired-samples t-tests, α = 0.05). Per cent agreement of CDE items varied little between questionnaires. Carer-dentist agreement on OHAs was generally high with kappa values ranging from 0.63 for the assessment of gums to 1.0 for the assessment of tongue, roof of mouth, denture and dental pain. Further, carers were able to assess the need for referral of their care recipients' oral health similar to the dentist. These findings suggest that with combined theoretical and practical training and continued support, non-dental professionals like carers can improve their knowledge and confidence in providing oral care for adults with disabilities. However, the findings of this pilot study need

  11. The Relationship between Carers' Report of Autistic Traits and Clinical Diagnoses of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhaumik, Sabyasachi; Tyrer, Freya; Barrett, Mary; Tin, Nyunt; McGrother, Catherine W.; Kiani, Reza

    2010-01-01

    It is often difficult to determine the triad of impairments and whether autistic features are the consequence of intellectual impairment or autism spectrum disorders in people with intellectual disability (ID). The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between carer-reported autistic traits and independent diagnoses of…

  12. Carer-Reported Contemporary Health Problems in People with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disability and Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Katy; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl; Moss, Joanna; Oliver, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Identifying health problems in people with severe and profound disabilities and genetic syndromes can be problematic, and unidentified or unmanaged health problems may adversely impact an individual's quality of life. The authors studied carer-reported contemporary health problems in three genetic syndromes (Angelman, Cornelia de Lange, and Cri du…

  13. "Stroppy" or "Confident"? Do Carers and Professionals View the Impact of Transition Support on Young People Differently?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaehne, Axel; Beyer, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The study examined the effects of transition employment support to two cohorts of young people who were in their last year in school or college in 2005/2006 and 2006/2007. This paper reports the views of carers, teachers and support workers of the impact this additional support made to the young people. Analysis of the data reveals a difference…

  14. "People Are Suspicious of Us": A Critical Examination of Father Primary Carers and English Early Childhood Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts-Holmes, Guy P.

    2009-01-01

    Positive father involvement and investment in the early years is of importance for children's later emotional, cognitive and social well-being. This article critically examines the multiple motivations and barriers experienced by the growing number of father primary carers. The small-scale research study presented suggests that for a…

  15. Sexuality and Personal Relationships for People with an Intellectual Disability. Part II: Staff and Family Carer Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, D. S.; McGuire, B. E.; Healy, E.; Carley, S. N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent ideological shifts in service provision promote appropriate sexual expression for people with an intellectual disability (ID), although there is little evidence that such advances in ideology are matched by current service provision. Part II of the current two-part study assessed the attitudes of staff and family carers to the…

  16. The experience of family carers attending a joint reminiscence group with people with dementia: A thematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melunsky, Nina; Crellin, Nadia; Dudzinski, Emma; Orrell, Martin; Wenborn, Jennifer; Poland, Fiona; Woods, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Reminiscence therapy has the potential to improve quality of life for people with dementia. In recent years reminiscence groups have extended to include family members, but carers’ experience of attending joint sessions is undocumented. This qualitative study explored the experience of 18 family carers attending ‘Remembering Yesterday Caring Today’ groups. Semi-structured interviews were transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Five themes were identified: experiencing carer support; shared experience; expectations (met and unmet), carer perspectives of the person with dementia’s experience; and learning and comparing. Family carers’ experiences varied, with some experiencing the intervention as entirely positive whereas others had more mixed feelings. Negative aspects included the lack of respite from their relative, the lack of emphasis on their own needs, and experiencing additional stress and guilt through not being able to implement newly acquired skills. These findings may explain the failure of a recent trial of joint reminiscence groups to replicate previous findings of positive benefit. More targeted research within subgroups of carers is required to justify the continued use of joint reminiscence groups in dementia care. PMID:24381218

  17. Health Status and Coping Strategies among Older Parent-Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in an Australian Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; McConnell, David; Gething, Lindsay; Cant, Rosemary; Kendig, Hal

    2010-01-01

    Background: Older parent-carers in Australia are the subject of increasing policy and practice attention due to concerns about their ongoing ability to care in the light of their own ageing and the ageing of their adult son or daughter. This paper examines health status and the coping strategies of a group of older Australian parents caring for an…

  18. The Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour to Diet in Carers of People with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Catherine M.; McKenzie, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Background: The utility of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in predicting the intentions of care staff to encourage healthy eating behaviour in those they supported was examined. Method: A quantitative, within-participant, questionnaire based design was used with 112 carers to assess the performance of two TPB models. The first contained the…

  19. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Positive Therapeutic Change for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Client, Carer and Clinical Psychologist Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsden, Sarah; Tickle, Anna; Dawson, David L.; Harris, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Studies have highlighted successful outcomes of psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities. However, processes underlying these outcomes are uncertain. Thematic analysis was used to explore the perceptions of three clinical psychologists, six clients and six carers of barriers and facilitators to therapeutic change for…

  20. Addressing the mental health needs of looked after children in foster care: the experiences of foster carers.

    PubMed

    York, W; Jones, J

    2017-03-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: In the UK and internationally, the number of looked after children is increasing year on year. Mental health problems among looked after children are significantly higher than in the general population, and the uptake of mental health services for these children is low. There is a poor prognosis for children with untreated mental health problems; this is further compounded if the child is within the care system. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to our understanding of foster carers' experiences of the mental health needs of looked after children and demonstrates some of the challenges associated with accessing appropriate and timely mental health services. New knowledge derived from this research is that the barriers to accessing Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) are not at the time of initial referral as previously reported, but later, once within the mental health system with long waiting times experienced particularly for specialist services. This study provides new insights into the experience of being a foster carer and the levels of support and resources needed that directly relate to the viability of the placement. The majority of the foster carers interviewed were from a Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) background, previously under-represented in this research area. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: A number of areas in current CAMHS provision need addressing with a focus on accessibility, consultation and support for foster carers. Waiting times need to be addressed, and improved communication with other agencies is also highlighted. CAMHS nurses are well placed to develop and deliver a comprehensive care package to foster carers, offering more tailored support to them whilst enabling the children and young people in their care to access and engage more effectively with mental health services.

  1. Psychological treatments for common mental health problems experienced by informal carers of adults with chronic physical health conditions (Protocol)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improved life expectancy is resulting in increased outpatient treatment of people with chronic physical health conditions and reliance on the provision of informal care in the community. However, informal care is also associated with increased risk of experiencing common mental health difficulties such as depression and anxiety. Currently there is a lack of evidence-based treatments for such difficulties, resulting in poor health outcomes for both the informal carer and care recipient. Methods/Design Electronic databases will be systemically searched for randomised controlled trials examining the effectiveness of psychological interventions targeted at treating depression or anxiety experienced by informal carers of patients with chronic physical health conditions. Database searches will be supplemented by contact with experts, reference and citation checking and grey literature. Both published and unpublished research in English language will be reviewed with no limitations on year or source. Individual, group and patient-carer dyad focused interventions will be eligible. Primary outcomes of interest will be validated self-report or clinician administered measures of depression or anxiety. If data allows a meta-analysis will examine: (1) the overall effectiveness of psychological interventions in relation to outcomes of depression or anxiety; (2) intervention components associated with effectiveness. Discussion This review will provide evidence on the effectiveness of psychological interventions for depression and anxiety experienced by informal carers of patients with chronic physical health conditions. In addition, it will examine intervention components associated with effectiveness. Results will inform the design and development of a psychological intervention for carers of people with chronic physical health conditions experiencing depression and anxiety. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42012003114 PMID:23369319

  2. A pilot investigation of quality of life and lung function following choral singing in cancer survivors and their carers

    PubMed Central

    Gale, NS; Enright, S; Reagon, C; Lewis, I; van Deursen, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of cancer creates a wide range of social and emotional problems to patients and carers. However, delivering effective psychological, emotional, and social support remains a challenge. This pilot study evaluated quality of life (QoL) and lung function before and after three months of choral singing in cancer survivors and their carers. Methods: At baseline, 30 cancer survivors and their carers, mean (standard deviation) age 60 (10), completed questions about QoL (SF-36), anxiety and depression, and the multidimensional fatigue score. Lung function was measured by spirometry, and respiratory musclestrength (maximal inspiratory pressure, MIP; maximal expiratory pressure, MEP) was also measured. Assessments were repeated after three months of singing in the choir, and 10 participants completed semi-structured interviews to explore their experience of the choir. Results: After three months of choral singing, 20 subjects repeated the assessments. Several domains of the SF-36 improved, including vitality, social functioning, mental health, and bodily pain. There was also a trend of reduced anxiety and depression, despite no change in fatigue. Spirometric measures of lung function were unchanged; however, there was a trend of increased MEP. Themes from the interviews revealed that the choir provided a focus, so the future participants felt uplifted and had greater confidence and self-esteem. Conclusions: This pilot project provides preliminary data which suggest choral singing may improve QoL and depression, despite no physiological change in cancer survivors and their carers. Choral groups offer a support mechanism applicable to cancer patients, carers, and supporters, and may be relevant to other chronic conditions. Further research examining the efficacy of this intervention in a larger controlled study is warranted. PMID:22837766

  3. Barriers to access and minority ethnic carers' satisfaction with social care services in the community: a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative literature.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Nan; Habibi, Ruth; Smith, Raymond; Manthorpe, Jill

    2015-01-01

    As populations age, the numbers of carers overall and numbers of carers from minority ethnic groups in particular are rising. Evidence suggests that carers from all sections of the community and particularly carers from minority groups often fail to access care services. This may relate to barriers in accessing services and service dissatisfaction. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and summarise minority ethnic carers' perceptions of barriers to accessing community social care services and their satisfaction with these services if accessed. The following databases were searched from their start until July 2013: Social Care Online, Social Policy and Research, Scopus, PsychINFO, HMIC, ASSIA, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL Plus and AMED. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Most investigated either barriers to access or satisfaction levels, although three explored both. Only 4 studies investigated minority ethnic carers' satisfaction with social care, although 12 studies reported perceived barriers to accessing services. Few studies compared minority ethnic carers' perceptions with majority ethnic groups, making it difficult to identify issues specific to minority groups. Most barriers described were potentially relevant to all carers, irrespective of ethnic group. They included attitudinal barriers such as not wanting to involve outsiders or not seeing the need for services and practical barriers such as low awareness of services and service availability. Issues specific to minority ethnic groups included language barriers and concerns about services' cultural or religious appropriateness. Studies investigating satisfaction with services reported a mixture of satisfaction and dissatisfaction. Barriers common to all groups should not be underestimated and a better understanding of the relationship between perceived barriers to accessing services and dissatisfaction with services is needed before the experiences of all carers can be improved.

  4. Barriers to access and minority ethnic carers' satisfaction with social care services in the community: a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative literature

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Nan; Habibi, Ruth; Smith, Raymond; Manthorpe, Jill

    2015-01-01

    As populations age, the numbers of carers overall and numbers of carers from minority ethnic groups in particular are rising. Evidence suggests that carers from all sections of the community and particularly carers from minority groups often fail to access care services. This may relate to barriers in accessing services and service dissatisfaction. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and summarise minority ethnic carers' perceptions of barriers to accessing community social care services and their satisfaction with these services if accessed. The following databases were searched from their start until July 2013: Social Care Online, Social Policy and Research, Scopus, PsychINFO, HMIC, ASSIA, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL Plus and AMED. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Most investigated either barriers to access or satisfaction levels, although three explored both. Only 4 studies investigated minority ethnic carers' satisfaction with social care, although 12 studies reported perceived barriers to accessing services. Few studies compared minority ethnic carers' perceptions with majority ethnic groups, making it difficult to identify issues specific to minority groups. Most barriers described were potentially relevant to all carers, irrespective of ethnic group. They included attitudinal barriers such as not wanting to involve outsiders or not seeing the need for services and practical barriers such as low awareness of services and service availability. Issues specific to minority ethnic groups included language barriers and concerns about services' cultural or religious appropriateness. Studies investigating satisfaction with services reported a mixture of satisfaction and dissatisfaction. Barriers common to all groups should not be underestimated and a better understanding of the relationship between perceived barriers to accessing services and dissatisfaction with services is needed before the experiences of all carers can be improved. PMID

  5. Developing an information pack for the Asian carers of people with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Dobson, S; Upadhyaya, S; McNeil, J; Venkateswaran, S; Gilderdale, D

    2001-01-01

    An investigation is described which forms the basis for the development of an information package for the Asian carers of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and learning disabilities. The results of semi-structured interviews and planning for questionnaires with three different linguistic Asian groups (Urdu, Gujarati and Bengali) are presented. The views, attitudes and awareness of autism, knowledge of support services and perceived priority of needs are analysed for the three different communities. The investigation concludes with recommendations as to whether separate information is needed by each culture or whether a single information pack can be used and presented in each language format. The possible presentation format in which the information can be produced is also discussed.

  6. Reliability physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Speakers whose topics relate to the reliability physics of solar arrays are listed and their topics briefly reviewed. Nine reports are reviewed ranging in subjects from studies of photothermal degradation in encapsulants and polymerizable ultraviolet stabilizers to interface bonding stability to electrochemical degradation of photovoltaic modules.

  7. Singing modulates mood, stress, cortisol, cytokine and neuropeptide activity in cancer patients and carers.

    PubMed

    Fancourt, Daisy; Williamon, Aaron; Carvalho, Livia A; Steptoe, Andrew; Dow, Rosie; Lewis, Ian

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that psychosocial interventions can have psychological benefits for people affected by cancer, including improved symptoms of mental health and wellbeing and optimised immune responses. However, despite growing numbers of music interventions, particularly singing, in cancer care, there is less research into their impact. We carried out a multicentre single-arm preliminary study to assess the impact of singing on mood, stress and immune response in three populations affected by cancer: carers (n = 72), bereaved carers (n = 66) and patients (n = 55). Participants were excluded if pregnant or if they were currently being treated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or oral immunosuppressive drugs. Participants were regular participants in five choirs across South Wales and took part in one hour of group singing. Before and after singing, visual analogue mood scales, stress scales and saliva samples testing for cortisol, beta-endorphin, oxytocin and ten cytokines were taken. Across all five centres and in all four participant groups, singing was associated with significant reductions in negative affect and increases in positive affect (p < .01) alongside significant increases in cytokines including GM-CSF, IL17, IL2, IL4 and sIL-2rα (all p < .01). In addition, singing was associated with reductions in cortisol, beta-endorphin and oxytocin levels. This study provides preliminary evidence that singing improves mood state and modulates components of the immune system. Further work is needed to ascertain how this differs for more specific patient groups and whether repeat exposure could lead to meaningful, longitudinal effects.

  8. Singing modulates mood, stress, cortisol, cytokine and neuropeptide activity in cancer patients and carers

    PubMed Central

    Fancourt, Daisy; Williamon, Aaron; Carvalho, Livia A; Steptoe, Andrew; Dow, Rosie; Lewis, Ian

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that psychosocial interventions can have psychological benefits for people affected by cancer, including improved symptoms of mental health and wellbeing and optimised immune responses. However, despite growing numbers of music interventions, particularly singing, in cancer care, there is less research into their impact. We carried out a multicentre single-arm preliminary study to assess the impact of singing on mood, stress and immune response in three populations affected by cancer: carers (n = 72), bereaved carers (n = 66) and patients (n = 55). Participants were excluded if pregnant or if they were currently being treated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or oral immunosuppressive drugs. Participants were regular participants in five choirs across South Wales and took part in one hour of group singing. Before and after singing, visual analogue mood scales, stress scales and saliva samples testing for cortisol, beta-endorphin, oxytocin and ten cytokines were taken. Across all five centres and in all four participant groups, singing was associated with significant reductions in negative affect and increases in positive affect (p < .01) alongside significant increases in cytokines including GM-CSF, IL17, IL2, IL4 and sIL-2rα (all p < .01). In addition, singing was associated with reductions in cortisol, beta-endorphin and oxytocin levels. This study provides preliminary evidence that singing improves mood state and modulates components of the immune system. Further work is needed to ascertain how this differs for more specific patient groups and whether repeat exposure could lead to meaningful, longitudinal effects. PMID:27170831

  9. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Carer Stress on Subsequent Institutionalisation of Community-Dwelling Older People

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Nora-Ann; Hickey, Anne; Burns, Annette; Murphy, Paul; Doyle, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background In the caregiving literature there is a common assertion that a higher level of carer stress is a critical determinant of premature ending of homecare. However, this contention has not been systematically assessed. We therefore systematically reviewed and meta-analysed the prospective association between various forms of carer stress and subsequent institutionalisation of community-dwelling older people. Methods Systematic literature search of prospective studies measuring carer stress at baseline and institutionalisation at follow-up. Given substantial interchangeability in the measurement of carer stress, we included a wide number of exposure measures, namely: carer stress, burden, depression, distress, anxiety, burnout, and strain. Institutionalisation included both acute and long-term care utilisation. The standardised mean difference between stressed and non-stressed carers was the primary measure of effect. We assessed study quality with the Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool (CCAT). Pre-planned sensitivity analysis included examination of estimates according to study size; decade published; study quality according to quartiles of CCAT scores; population; follow-up period; study design and impact of adjusted or unadjusted estimates. Results The search yielded 6,963 articles. After exclusions, we analysed data from 54 datasets. The meta-analysis found that while carer stress has a significant effect on subsequent institutionalisation of care recipients, the overall effect size was negligible (SMD=0·05, 95% CI=0·04–0·07). Sensitivity analyses found that, the effect size was higher for measurements of stress than for other measures, though still relatively small (SMD=0·23, 95% CI=0·09–0·38). Thus, whether analysing the association between carer stress, burden, distress, or depression with either acute or long-term care, the effect size remains small to negligible. Concurrently, we found estimates reduce over time and were smaller with larger

  10. EQUIP training the trainers: an evaluation of a training programme for service users and carers involved in training mental health professionals in user-involved care planning.

    PubMed

    Fraser, C; Grundy, A; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Lovell, K

    2017-01-20

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: UK NHS policy highlights the importance of user and carer involvement in health professional training. We know little about service user and carer motivations and experiences of accessing training courses for delivering training to health professionals and how well such courses prepare them for delivering training to healthcare professionals. 'Involvement' in training has often been tokenistic and too narrowly focused on preregistration courses. There is limited data on how best to prepare and support potential service user and carer trainers. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to the international literature by highlighting service user and carer motivations for accessing a training course for delivering training to health professionals. Service users and carers wanted to gain new skills and confidence in presentation/facilitation as well as to make a difference to healthcare practice. We also learned that service users desired different levels of involvement in training facilitation - some wanted to take a more active role than others. A one-size-fits-all approach is not always appropriate. Encountering resistance from staff in training was a previously unidentified challenge to service user and carers' experience of delivering training in practice and is a key challenge for trainers to address in future. Professional training involvement can be enhanced via specialist training such as the EQUIP training the trainers programme evaluated here. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: When training service users and carers to deliver training to mental health professionals, it is important that service users are equipped to deal with resistance from staff. It is important that service user and carer roles are negotiated and agreed prior to delivering training to healthcare professionals to accommodate individual preferences and allay anxieties. Training for service users and carers must be offered

  11. Acquiring a Pet Dog Significantly Reduces Stress of Primary Carers for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Prospective Case Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, H. F.; Hall, S.; Hames, A.; Hardiman, J.; Mills, R.; Mills, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the impact of pet dogs on stress of primary carers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Stress levels of 38 primary carers acquiring a dog and 24 controls not acquiring a dog were sampled at: Pre-intervention (17 weeks before acquiring a dog), post-intervention (3-10 weeks after acquisition) and follow-up…

  12. Network reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1985-01-01

    Network control (or network management) functions are essential for efficient and reliable operation of a network. Some control functions are currently included as part of the Open System Interconnection model. For local area networks, it is widely recognized that there is a need for additional control functions, including fault isolation functions, monitoring functions, and configuration functions. These functions can be implemented in either a central or distributed manner. The Fiber Distributed Data Interface Medium Access Control and Station Management protocols provide an example of distributed implementation. Relative information is presented here in outline form.

  13. Feasibility Testing and Refinement of a Supportive Educational Intervention for Carers of Patients with High-Grade Glioma - a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Halkett, Georgia K B; Lobb, Elizabeth A; Miller, Lisa; Shaw, Thérèse; Moorin, Rachael; Long, Anne; King, Anne; Clarke, Jenny; Fewster, Stephanie; Nowak, Anna K

    2017-02-11

    The aim of this pilot study was to test the feasibility and acceptability of a family carer intervention for carers of patients with high-grade glioma (HGG). The intervention consisted of: (1) an initial telephone assessment of carer needs; (2) a personalised tabbed resource file; (3) nurse-led home visit; and (4) ongoing telephone support. Two consumer representatives reviewed the intervention resources. The intervention was then piloted with participants who were the primary carer for patients undergoing treatment for HGG in Western Australia. Two consumers provided feedback on the resource, and 10 carers participated in the pilot. Positive feedback was received about the resource manual and intervention. Suggestions were also made for changes which were implemented into the trial. The surveys were shortened based on feedback. Participants identified a large range of issues during nursing assessments which would not otherwise be identified or addressed for carers receiving routine care. As a result of providing the intervention, the nurse was able to make referrals to address needs that were identified. This pilot study enabled us to refine and test the Care-IS intervention and test the feasibility and acceptability of proposed survey instruments. We were also able to estimate recruitment and retention and the overall study timeline required for the randomised controlled trial we are now conducting. It has also demonstrated the role of the nurse who delivered the intervention and allowed us to refine communication and referral pathways.

  14. Accessibility and equity of health and social care services: exploring the views and experiences of Bangladeshi carers in South Wales, UK.

    PubMed

    Merrell, Joy; Kinsella, Faye; Murphy, Fiona; Philpin, Sue; Ali, Amina

    2006-05-01

    There is a paucity of information regarding the extent and nature of caring provided by minority ethnic communities. The proportion of older people from these communities will dramatically increase in the next 20 years, which will be accompanied by increasing health and social care needs and an increased demand for carers. A qualitative, exploratory study was conducted to identify the health and social care needs of informal carers, who were caring for a dependent adult from a Bangladeshi community in South Wales, UK. This paper focuses on Bangladeshi carers' access to formal support services provided by the statutory, private and voluntary sectors to assist them with their caring responsibilities. The findings are based on data collected using face-to-face, focused interviews with 20 Bangladeshi carers. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to recruit the sample. The data were analysed using thematic content analysis. The dimensions of accessibility and equity of quality of care were drawn upon to aid understanding of the findings. Bangladeshi carers faced a number of barriers in accessing health and social service provision, which impeded uptake of these services. Additionally, there was evidence of inequity in service provision. Recommendations for improving the accessibility of health and social care services are proposed, which may assist in promoting more equitable services for carers from the Bangladeshi community.

  15. Technology-based tools and services for people with dementia and carers: Mapping technology onto the dementia care pathway.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Klara; Freddolino, Paul P; Comas-Herrera, Adelina; Knapp, Martin; Damant, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    The extent to which technology may be able to support people with dementia and their carers along the care pathway and in different care settings is of interest to policy makers and governments. In this paper we provide an overview of the role of technology in dementia care, treatment and support by mapping existing technologies - by function, target user and disease progression. Technologies identified are classified into seven functions: memory support, treatment, safety and security, training, care delivery, social interaction and other. Different groups of potential users are distinguished: people with mild cognitive impairment and early stages of dementia, people with moderate to severe dementia and unpaid carers and health- and social care professionals. We also identified the care settings, in which the technologies are used (or for which the technologies are developed): at home in the community and in institutional care settings. The evidence has been drawn from a rapid review of the literature, expert interviews and web and social media searches. The largest number of technologies identified aim to enhance the safety and security of people with dementia living in the community. These devices are often passive monitors, such as smoke detectors. Other safety interventions, such as panic buttons, require active intervention. The second largest number of interventions aims to enhance people's memory and includes global positioning systems devices and voice prompts. These technologies mostly target people in the early stages of dementia. A third group focusing on treatment and care delivery emerged from the literature. These interventions focus on technology-aided reminiscence or therapeutic aspects of care for people with dementia and their carers. While the review found a range of technologies available for people with dementia and carers there is very little evidence of widespread practical application. Instead, it appears that stakeholders frequently rely

  16. From Provider to Enabler of Care? Reconfiguring Local Authority Support for Older People and Carers in Leeds, 2008 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Yeandle, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article explores developments in the support available to older people and carers (i.e., caregivers) in the city of Leeds, United Kingdom, and examines provision changes during a period characterized by unprecedented resource constraint and new developments in national-local governance. Using documentary evidence, official statistics, and findings from recent studies led by the author, the effects of these changes on service planning and delivery and the approach taken by local actors to mitigate their impact are highlighted. The statistical data show a marked decline in some types of services for older people during a 5-year period during which the city council took steps to mobilize citizens and develop new services and system improvements. The analysis focuses on theories of social quality as a framework for analysis of the complex picture of change related to service provision. It concludes that although citizen involvement and consultations exerted a positive influence in delivering support to some older people and carers, research over a longer timescale is needed to show if these changes are adequate to protect older people and carers from the effects of ongoing budgetary constraints. PMID:27019540

  17. Guilt, shame and expressed emotion in carers of people with long-term mental health difficulties: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Mary Gemma; Taylor, Peter James; Brown, Stephen Lloyd; Rigby, Jake Wilfred; Sellwood, William

    2017-03-01

    Expressed emotion (EE) is a global index of familial emotional climate, whose primary components are emotional over-involvement (EOI) and critical comments (CC)/hostility. There is a strong theoretical rationale for hypothesising that carers' guilt and shame may be differentially associated with their EOI and CC/hostility respectively. This systematic review investigates the magnitude of these theorised associations in carers of people with long-term mental health difficulties. Electronic searches (conducted in May 2016 across Medline, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO and ProQuest) were supplemented with iterative hand searches. Ten papers, reporting data from eight studies, were included. Risk of bias was assessed using a standardised checklist. Relevant data were extracted and synthesised narratively. EOI was positively associated with both guilt and shame, whereas CC/hostility was positively associated with shame. The strength of associations varied depending on whether or not guilt and shame were assessed within the context of the caring relationship. Based on these data, an argument can be made for the refinement, development and evaluation of systemic and individual interventions designed to target carers' guilt and shame. However, more research is needed to clarify the strength of these associations and their direction of effect before firm conclusions can be drawn.

  18. Coping strategies and styles of family carers of persons with enduring mental illness: a mixed methods analysis.

    PubMed

    Kartalova-O'Doherty, Yulia; Doherty, Donna Tedstone

    2008-03-01

    A qualitative exploratory study investigated the experiences and needs of family carers of persons with enduring mental illness in Ireland. The current mixed-methods secondary study used content analysis and statistical procedures to identify and explore the coping strategies emerging from the original interviews. The majority of family carers reported use of active behavioural coping strategies, sometimes combined with active cognitive or avoidance strategies. The percentage of cares reporting use of active cognitive strategies was the lowest among those whose ill relative lived in their home, and the highest among those whose relative lived independently. Participants with identified active cognitive strategies often reported that their relative was employed or in training. Participants who reported use of avoidance strategies were significantly younger than participants who did not report use of such strategies. The lowest percentage of avoidance strategies was among participants whose ill relative lived independently, whereas the highest was among carers whose relative lived in their home. The findings of this study highlight the importance of a contextual approach to studying coping styles and processes. Further research questions and methodological implications are discussed.

  19. Strain and its correlates among carers of people with dementia in low-income and middle-income countries. A 10/66 Dementia Research Group population-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Martin; Brodaty, Henry; Uwakwe, Richard; Acosta, Daisy; Ferri, Cleusa P; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Jacob, KS; Llibre Rodriguez, Juan J; Salas, Aquiles; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Williams, Joseph D; Jotheeswaran, AT; Liu, Zhaorui

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In a multi-site population-based study in several middle-income countries, we aimed to investigate relative contributions of care arrangements and characteristics of carers and care recipients to strain among carers of people with dementia. Based on previous research, hypotheses focused on carer sex, care inputs, behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) and socioeconomic status, together with potential buffering effects of informal support and employing paid carers. Methods In population-based catchment area surveys in 11 sites in Latin America, India and China, we analysed data collected from people with dementia and care needs, and their carers. Carer strain was assessed with the Zarit Burden Interview. Results With 673 care recipient/carer dyads interviewed (99% of those eligible), mean Zarit Burden Interview scores ranged between 17.1 and 27.9 by site. Women carers reported more strain than men. The most substantial correlates of carer strain were primary stressors BPSD, dementia severity, needs for care and time spent caring. Socioeconomic status was not associated with carer strain. Those cutting back on work experienced higher strain. There was tentative evidence for a protective effect of having additional informal or paid support. Conclusions Our findings underline the global impact of caring for a person with dementia and support the need for scaling up carer support, education and training. That giving up work to care was prevalent and associated with substantial increased strain emphasizes the economic impact of caring on the household. Carer benefits, disability benefits for people with dementia and respite care should all be considered. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22460403

  20. Feasibility of brief psychological distress screening by a community-based telephone helpline for cancer patients and carers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Up to one-third of people affected by cancer experience ongoing psychological distress and would benefit from screening followed by an appropriate level of psychological intervention. This rarely occurs in routine clinical practice due to barriers such as lack of time and experience. This study investigated the feasibility of community-based telephone helpline operators screening callers affected by cancer for their level of distress using a brief screening tool (Distress Thermometer), and triaging to the appropriate level of care using a tiered model. Methods Consecutive cancer patients and carers who contacted the helpline from September-December 2006 (n = 341) were invited to participate. Routine screening and triage was conducted by helpline operators at this time. Additional socio-demographic and psychosocial adjustment data were collected by telephone interview by research staff following the initial call. Results The Distress Thermometer had good overall accuracy in detecting general psychosocial morbidity (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale cut-off score ≥ 15) for cancer patients (AUC = 0.73) and carers (AUC = 0.70). We found 73% of participants met the Distress Thermometer cut-off for distress caseness according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (a score ≥ 4), and optimal sensitivity (83%, 77%) and specificity (51%, 48%) were obtained with cut-offs of ≥ 4 and ≥ 6 in the patient and carer groups respectively. Distress was significantly associated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores (total, as well as anxiety and depression subscales) and level of care in cancer patients, as well as with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale anxiety subscale for carers. There was a trend for more highly distressed callers to be triaged to more intensive care, with patients with distress scores ≥ 4 more likely to receive extended or specialist care. Conclusions Our data suggest that it was feasible for community

  1. Identifying changes in the support networks of end-of-life carers using social network analysis.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Rosemary; Horsfall, Debbie; Noonan, Kerrie

    2015-06-01

    End-of-life caring is often associated with reduced social networks for both the dying person and for the carer. However, those adopting a community participation and development approach, see the potential for the expansion and strengthening of networks. This paper uses Knox, Savage and Harvey's definitions of three generations social network analysis to analyse the caring networks of people with a terminal illness who are being cared for at home and identifies changes in these caring networks that occurred over the period of caring. Participatory network mapping of initial and current networks was used in nine focus groups. The analysis used key concepts from social network analysis (size, density, transitivity, betweenness and local clustering) together with qualitative analyses of the group's reflections on the maps. The results showed an increase in the size of the networks and that ties between the original members of the network strengthened. The qualitative data revealed the importance between core and peripheral network members and the diverse contributions of the network members. The research supports the value of third generation social network analysis and the potential for end-of-life caring to build social capital.

  2. [Information and communication technology interventions supporting carers of people with Alzheimer's disease: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Faucounau, Véronique; de Rotrou, Jocelyne; Riguet, Mathilde; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2009-09-01

    Caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease or related disorders are exposed to many stress factors which increase the risk of developing physical and psychological disturbances. To limit these negative effects, different psychosocial interventions for carers have been proposed. With progress in technologies, telephone or the internet can offer flexible and tailored means to deliver this kind of interventions. In this literature review, we listed and analysed the articles devoted to this topic. Sixteen papers concerning nine intervention programs were selected. The analysis shows that the internet, as a means to deliver an intervention programme, is more interactive, attractive and less intrusive than telephone. Efficacy of the interventions via this kind of technologies can be compared to that observed in face to face ones: despite weak methodology and inconsistent outcomes of the studies, they showed some improvement in burden, anxiety, depression and self-efficacy. Finally, before implementation of this kind of technologies, it is necessary to test learnability, adaptability and acceptability. Usability of a technology is a key factor for its adoption and efficacy.

  3. Cultural safety, diversity and the servicer user and carer movement in mental health research.

    PubMed

    Cox, Leonie G; Simpson, Alan

    2015-12-01

    This study will be of interest to anyone concerned with a critical appraisal of mental health service users' and carers' participation in research collaboration and with the potential of the postcolonial paradigm of cultural safety to contribute to the service user research (SUR) movement. The history and nature of the mental health field and its relationship to colonial processes provokes a consideration of whether cultural safety could focus attention on diversity, power imbalance, cultural dominance and structural inequality, identified as barriers and tensions in SUR. We consider these issues in the context of state-driven approaches towards SUR in planning and evaluation and the concurrent rise of the SUR movement in the UK and Australia, societies with an intimate involvement in processes of colonisation. We consider the principles and motivations underlying cultural safety and SUR in the context of the policy agenda informing SUR. We conclude that while both cultural safety and SUR are underpinned by social constructionism constituting similarities in principles and intent, cultural safety has additional dimensions. Hence, we call on researchers to use the explicitly political and self-reflective process of cultural safety to think about and address issues of diversity, power and social justice in research collaboration.

  4. Evaluation of the Digital Alzheimer Center: Testing Usability and Usefulness of an Online Portal for Patients with Dementia and Their Carers

    PubMed Central

    Droes, Rose-Marie; Sikkes, Sietske; Oostra, Ellen; Lemstra, Afina W

    2016-01-01

    Background Dementia is a progressive and highly disabling neurodegenerative disease that will likely become highly prevalent in the future due to the globally aging population. To improve health care efficiency and quality for dementia care, eHealth could help with, for example, an online portal, such as the Digital Alzheimer Center (DAC) of the Vrije Universiteit Medical Center Amsterdam. It provides up-to-date disease information, peer-to-peer contact, and methods for contacting the hospital and health professionals. Objective We aimed to investigate the usability and usefulness of the DAC for patients with dementia and carers to get insight into the feasibility and value of this eHealth app in dementia care and to recommend potential improvements. Methods A descriptive study among patients, carers, and health care professionals was performed. Mixed methods were used, consisting of observations (n=10, 4 people with dementia, 6 carers), an online survey (n=287; 88 patients, 199 carers), and semistructured interviews (n=18; 6 patients, 6 carers, 6 health care professionals). During the observations, participants performed a set of five different prescribed tasks on the portal. Speed, number of errors, and navigation were noted. The online survey aimed to assess users’ opinions on the portal’s usability and usefulness. Semistructured interviews were conducted in a subsample of patients, carers, and health care professionals to gain more in-depth information. Results In the usability assessment, eight categories of errors were distinguished, of which three were of critical, two of medium, and three of low severity. In the survey, 45% (40/88) of the patients and 53% (105/199) of the carers indicated they used the portal. In all, 33% (12/36) of patients and 61% (62/102) of carers found it easy to learn to work with the portal. Most considered the DAC generally useful: 65% (17/26) of patients and 78% (67/86) of carers found the DAC useful, especially for

  5. Silent strain of caregiving: exploring the best predictors of distress in family carers of geriatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Bień-Barkowska, Katarzyna; Doroszkiewicz, Halina; Bień, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this article was to identify the best predictors of distress suffered by family carers (FCs) of geriatric patients. Methods A cross-sectional study of 100 FC-geriatric patient dyads was conducted. The negative impact of care (NIoC) subscale of the COPE index was dichotomized to identify lower stress (score of ≤15 on the scale) and higher stress (score of ≥16 on the scale) exerted on FCs by the process of providing care. The set of explanatory variables comprised a wide range of sociodemographic and care-related attributes, including patient-related results from comprehensive geriatric assessments and disease profiles. The best combination of explanatory variables that provided the highest predictive power for distress among FCs in the multiple logistic regression (LR) model was determined according to statistical information criteria. The statistical robustness of the observed relationships and the discriminative power of the model were verified with the cross-validation method. Results The mean age of FCs was 57.2 (±10.6) years, whereas that of geriatric patients was 81.7 (±6.4) years. Despite the broad initial set of potential explanatory variables, only five predictors were jointly selected for the best statistical model. A higher level of distress was independently predicted by lower self-evaluation of health; worse self-appraisal of coping well as a caregiver; lower sense of general support; more hours of care per week; and the motor retardation of the cared-for person measured with the speed of the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. Conclusion Worse performance on the TUG test was only the patient-related predictor of distress among the variables examined as contributors to the higher NIoC. Enhancing the mobility of geriatric patients through suitably tailored kinesitherapeutic methods during their hospital stay may mitigate the burden endured by FCs. PMID:28203067

  6. Exploring the views of GPs, people with dementia and their carers on assistive technology: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Lisa; Dickinson, Claire; Gibson, Grant; Brittain, Katie; Robinson, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the views and experiences of people with dementia, their family carers and general practitioners (GPs) on their knowledge and experience of accessing information about, and use of, assistive technology (AT) in dementia care. Design Qualitative methods with semistructured interviews and thematic analysis. Participants 56 participants comprising 17 GPs, 13 people with dementia and 26 family carers. Setting Community care settings in the North East of England. Results 4 main themes emerged: awareness and experience of AT; accessing information on AT; roles and responsibilities in the current care system and the future commissioning of AT services. All participants had practical experience of witnessing AT being used in practice. For people with dementia and their families, knowledge was usually gained from personal experience rather than from health and social care professionals. For GPs, knowledge was largely gained through experiential, patient-led learning. All groups acknowledged the important role of the voluntary sector but agreed a need for clear information pathways for AT; such pathways were perceived to be essential to both service providers and service commissioners. Conclusions People with dementia and their family carers appear to be mainly responsible for driving a gradual increase in both awareness and the use of AT in dementia care. GPs should be equipped with the relevant knowledge to ensure families living with dementia receive appropriate information and support to enable them to live independently for as long as possible. There is an urgent need to simplify current complex community care pathways; as demonstrated in other chronic health conditions, a single point of access and a named lead professional may improve future care. PMID:27178978

  7. Illness careers and continuity of care in mental health services: a qualitative study of service users and carers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian Rees; Ahmed, Nilufar; Catty, Jocelyn; McLaren, Susan; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til; Burns, Tom

    2009-08-01

    Continuity of care is considered by patients and clinicians as an essential feature of good quality care in long-term disorders, yet there is general agreement that it is a complex concept and the lack of clarity in its conceptualisation and operationalisation has been linked to a deficit of user involvement. In this paper we utilise the concept of the 'patient career' to frame patient accounts of their experiences of the mental health care system. We aimed to capture the experiences and views of users and carers focusing on the meanings associated with particular (dis)continuities and transitional episodes that occurred over their illness career. As part of a large longitudinal study of continuity of care in mental health a sub-sample of 31 users was selected together with 14 of their carers. Qualitative interviews framed around the service user's illness career explored general experiences of relationship with services, care, continuity and transition from both user and carer perspectives. Five key themes emerged: relational (dis)continuity; depersonalised transitions; invisibility and crisis; communicative gaps and social vulnerability. One of the important findings was the fragility of continuity and its relationship to levels of satisfaction. Supportive, long-term relationships could be quickly undermined by a range of factors and satisfaction levels were often closely related to moments of transition where these relationships were vulnerable. Examples of continuity and well managed transitions highlighted the importance of professionals personalising transitions and situating them in the context of the daily life of service users. Further research is required to identify how best to negotiate these key points of transition in the future.

  8. Measuring the Impact of Cognitive Prosthetics on the Daily Life of People with Dementia and Their Carers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiland, Franka; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan

    Assistive technologies to support persons with dementia and their carers are used increasingly often. However, little is known about the effectiveness of most assistive devices. Much technology is put on the market without having been properly tested with potential end-users. To increase the chance that an assistive device is well accepted and useful for the target group, it is important, especially in the case of disabled persons, to involve potential users in the development process and to evaluate the impact of using the device on them before implementing it in the daily care and support. When evaluating the impact, decisions have to be made regarding the selection of measuring instruments. Important considerations in the selection process are the underlying domains to be addressed by the assistive technology, the target group and the availability of standardized instruments with good psychometric properties. In this chapter the COGKNOW project is used as a case example to explain how the impact of cognitive prosthetics on the daily lives of people with dementia and their carers can be measured. In COGKNOW a cognitive prosthetic device is being developed to improve the quality of life and autonomy of persons with dementia and to help them to remember and remind, to have social contact, to perform daily activities and to enhance feelings of safety. For all these areas, potential measuring instruments are described. Besides (standardized) measuring instruments, other data collection methods are used as well, such as semi-structured interviews and observations, diaries and in situ measurement. Within the COGKNOW project a first uncontrolled small-scale impact measurement takes place during the development process of the assistive device. However, it is recommended to perform a larger randomized controlled study as soon as the final product is ready to evaluate the impact of the device on persons with dementia and carers before it is released on the market.

  9. Carers and families: life and suffering among Bangladeshi psychiatric patients and their families in London - an interview study 3.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Roland; Dein, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks at the role of Bangladeshi families in the provision of care and help seeking: the burden on family members but also their presumed role in the causation of illness. It deploys data deriving from an interview study examining understandings and health-related practices among British Bangladeshis with mental and physical illness and their carers. While families generally support the mentally ill, the emotional and physical burden on them can be extensive. Conflicts between individuals may result in accusations of sorcery, especially when envy is suspected. Regular travel between desh and bidesh attempts to maintain family unity and continues traditional understandings of serious sickness and disability.

  10. Acquiring a Pet Dog Significantly Reduces Stress of Primary Carers for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Prospective Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Wright, H F; Hall, S; Hames, A; Hardiman, J; Mills, R; Mills, D S

    2015-08-01

    This study describes the impact of pet dogs on stress of primary carers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Stress levels of 38 primary carers acquiring a dog and 24 controls not acquiring a dog were sampled at: Pre-intervention (17 weeks before acquiring a dog), post-intervention (3-10 weeks after acquisition) and follow-up (25-40 weeks after acquisition), using the Parenting Stress Index. Analysis revealed significant improvements in the intervention compared to the control group for Total Stress, Parental Distress and Difficult Child. A significant number of parents in the intervention group moved from clinically high to normal levels of Parental Distress. The results highlight the potential of pet dogs to reduce stress in primary carers of children with an ASD.

  11. Matching and accepting assistive technology in multiple sclerosis: A focus group study with people with multiple sclerosis, carers and occupational therapists.

    PubMed

    Squires, Luke A; Williams, Nefyn; Morrison, Val L

    2016-11-15

    To explore experiences and perceptions of assistive technology, 14 people with multiple sclerosis, 5 carers and 4 occupational therapists participated in focus groups. Transcripts were analysed thematically drawing from illness self-regulation theory. Identified themes are as follows: critical multiple sclerosis events (developing symptoms/disability, delayed diagnosis and coping, public reaction and multiple sclerosis progression to assistive technology), matching assistive technology for continued use (acceptance of multiple sclerosis and assistive technology, realistic expectations, occupational therapist responsiveness, timing is crucial and carers and others) and impact of assistive technology (promoting or losing independence, stigma and embarrassment and redefining the carer). Acceptance and communication among those involved ensures assistive technology matches needs and maximises health and psychosocial outcomes.

  12. How can web-based training facilitate a more carer friendly practice in community-based health and social care services in Norway? Staff experiences and implementation challenges.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Helene; Norheim, Anne; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    It is a central feature of current Norwegian health and social care policy to see informal carers as active partners. However, research has revealed that carers often experience a lack of recognition by professionals. In 2010, the Norwegian Directorate of Health initiated a web-based competence-building programme (CBP) for health and social care practitioners aimed at facilitating collaboration with carers. The programme comprised case presentations, e-lectures, exercises and topics for discussion, and was introduced in 2012. It was flexible and free of charge. This article is based on a study (2012-2013) that followed the piloting of this CBP in four settings. The study aimed to explore factors that influenced the implementation of the programme and whether or not using it affected health and social care practitioners' attitudes and perceived capacity for collaboration with carers. The study employed a mixed-methods design. A questionnaire was distributed to all staff before and 5 months after the CBP was introduced, followed by focus group interviews with a sample of staff members and individual interviews with the leadership in the involved settings and those who introduced the programme. The quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, which subsequently formed the basis for the focus group interviews. The qualitative data were analysed by means of content analysis. The programme's introduction was similar across all research settings. Nevertheless, whether or not it was adopted depended to a large extent on leadership commitment and engagement. In settings where the programme's use was monitored, supported by management and formed part of on-the-job training, there seemed to be a positive impact on staff attitudes concerning collaboration with carers. Participant staff reported that their awareness of, motivation for and confidence in collaboration with carers were all strengthened. In contrast, the programme was of minimal benefit in

  13. The relationship between carers' report of autistic traits and clinical diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders in adults with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, Sabyasachi; Tyrer, Freya; Barrett, Mary; Tin, Nyunt; McGrother, Catherine W; Kiani, Reza

    2010-01-01

    It is often difficult to determine the triad of impairments and whether autistic features are the consequence of intellectual impairment or autism spectrum disorders in people with intellectual disability (ID). The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between carer-reported autistic traits and independent diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Data were collected on carers' subjective report of autistic traits and clinical diagnoses of ASD. Of 1145 adults with ID identified, 220 (19%) individuals had a diagnosis of ASD, and 778 (68%) individuals had at least one autistic trait. Optimal sensitivity and specificity were achieved with two or more autistic traits (sensitivity 63%; specificity 79%) and the positive predictive value increased substantially as the number of autistic traits increased. However, a significant proportion of individuals with ID who did not have a diagnosis of ASD also displayed autistic traits. Our findings suggest that in the absence of other measures, the presence of autistic traits can serve as a useful proxy measure for ASD in research (and/or clinical settings). However, although information on autistic traits may help healthcare practitioners to identify people with possible ASD, it cannot be used alone to make a formal diagnosis.

  14. Recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder: A Systematic Review of the Perspectives of Consumers, Clinicians, Family and Carers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Fiona Y. Y.; Bourke, Marianne E.; Grenyer, Brin F. S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Longitudinal studies support that symptomatic remission from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is common, but recovery from the disorder probably involves a broader set of changes in psychosocial function over and above symptom relief. A systematic review of literature on both symptomatic and personal recovery from BPD was conducted including the views of consumers, clinicians, family and carers. Materials and Methods A PRISMA guided systematic search identified research examining the process of recovery from BPD. Longitudinal studies with a follow-up period of five or more years were included to avoid treatment effects. Results There were 19 studies, representing 11 unique cohorts (1,122 consumers) meeting the review criteria. There was a limited focus on personal recovery and the views of family and carers were absent from the literature. Rates of remission and recovery differ depending upon individual and methodological differences between studies. Data on symptomatic remission, recurrence and diagnosis retainment suggests that BPD is a stable condition, where symptomatic remission is possible and the likelihood of recurrence following a period of remission is low. Conclusion Symptomatic remission from BPD is common. However, recovery including capacities such as engaging in meaningful work was seldom described. Future research needs broader measures of recovery as a sub-syndromal experience, monitoring consumer engagement in meaningful vocation and relationships, with or without the limitations of BPD. PMID:27504634

  15. United States - The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: Working with patients, carers and hospital professionals to improve awareness, treatment and patient choice.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    By working locally with patients and carers from diagnosis and treatment through to aftercare, helping professionals to improve their knowledge and awareness about blood cancers and best practice treatment, while also advocating at the national level, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is working to strengthen coordination between patients, carers and professionals along the whole care pathway. By helping patients to become more engaged and empowered to make informed choices, improve treatment for blood cancers through education, LLS is working to enhance patient-centred care in a largely privatized and fragmented health services system in the United States. By providing web-based resources and a free national helpline, alongside a face to face local support network, LLS is helping patients to learn more about their condition, treatment choices and the care pathways they can access. Free professional development and education seminars are also offered to nurses, oncologists and social workers in hospitals, highlighting new approaches to treatment and care with a patient-centred approach.

  16. People with dementia and carers' experiences of dementia care and services: Outcomes of a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Caroline L; Roe, Brenda; Jasper, Rowan; Jolley, David; Challis, David J

    2015-11-01

    An ageing population and an associated increase in the prevalence of dementia are of increasing concern in the United Kingdom and worldwide. Recently, the United Kingdom and other European countries implemented national dementia strategies to address this. This paper reports on the outcomes of a focus group study involving people with dementia and carers on their experiences of dementia care and support services in relation to government and third sector agencies' objectives and recommendations. Three focus groups comprising carers and people with dementia (n = 27) were undertaken covering topics related to experiences, service receipt, information sharing and service development. Some participants experienced difficulties or delays in receiving a dementia diagnosis and in accessing appropriate care. The provision of training, timeliness of information, access to appropriate advice, and consistent and flexible services were deemed important. The findings suggest that some issues raised by participants were highlighted in earlier policy objectives and recommendations but remain of central concern. The projected growth in the number of people with dementia coupled with reduced availability of informal care and increased demand for services emphasises the need to transform dementia care in the United Kingdom.

  17. Caring for a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Parents' Quality of Life: Application of the CarerQol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoefman, Renske; Payakachat, Nalin; van Exel, Job; Kuhlthau, Karen; Kovacs, Erica; Pyne, Jeffrey; Tilford, J. Mick

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the impact of caregiving on parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Secondly, we investigate construct validation of the care-related quality of life instrument (CarerQol) measuring impact of caregiving. Primary caregivers of children with ASDs were included. Many parents experienced considerable problems…

  18. Respite Care as a Community Care Service: Factors Associated with the Effects on Family Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disability in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Tzou, Ping-Yi; Pu, Cheng-Yun; Kroger, Teppo; Lee, Wan-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study examines the effects and associated factors of respite care, which was legislated as a community service for adults with an intellectual disability (ID) in Taiwan in 1997. Method: A total of 116 family carers who live with an adult with ID and have utilised the respite care program were surveyed using standardised measures.…

  19. The Mutual Benefits of Listening to Young People in Care, with a Particular Focus on Grief and Loss: An Irish Foster Carer's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Deirdre; Jenkinson, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the mutual benefits for social workers and young people of active listening within a collaborative partnership incorporating foster carers, allowing the possibility to create a virtuous circle. The benefits for young people of increased self-esteem, positive identity and resilience among others are explored. The benefits for…

  20. "It Is Hard to Stay in England": Itineraries, Routes, and Dead Ends--An (Im)mobility Study of Nurses Who Became Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuban, Sondra

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from an Economic Social Research Council (ESRC) study on the roles of education in the trajectories of health care professionals who migrated to England and became carers. The study looks at the downward mobility and deskilling of these women, and their struggles to reverse their bungled career paths. The author maps…

  1. Beating the blues after Cancer: randomised controlled trial of a tele-based psychological intervention for high distress patients and carers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The diagnosis and treatment of cancer is a major life stress such that approximately 35% of patients experience persistent clinically significant distress and carers often experience even higher distress than patients. This paper presents the design of a two arm randomised controlled trial with patients and carers who have elevated psychological distress comparing minimal contact self management vs. an individualised tele-based cognitive behavioural intervention. Methods/design 140 patients and 140 carers per condition (560 participants in total) will been recruited after being identified as high distress through caller screening at two community-based cancer helplines and randomised to 1) a single 30-minute telephone support and education session with a nurse counsellor with self management materials 2) a tele-based psychologist delivered five session individualised cognitive behavioural intervention. Session components will include stress reduction, problem-solving, cognitive challenging and enhancing relationship support and will be delivered weekly. Participants will be assessed at baseline and 3, 6 and 12 months after recruitment. Outcome measures include: anxiety and depression, cancer specific distress, unmet psychological supportive care needs, positive adjustment, overall Quality of life. Discussion The study will provide recommendations about the efficacy and potential economic value of minimal contact self management vs. tele-based psychologist delivered cognitive behavioural intervention to facilitate better psychosocial adjustment and mental health for people with cancer and their carers. Trial Registration ACTRN12609000301268. PMID:19531265

  2. "Every Child Matters": Change for Parents/Carers and Families? Can Schools Work with Families to Promote Knowledge and Understanding of Government Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argent, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The "Every Child Matters" agenda places emphasis on the need for parents/carers and families to work in partnership with schools. At the heart of this is the importance of a shared definition of family learning that values parents as equal partners. The extent to which schools are responsible for putting government policy into practice…

  3. A General Practice-Based Prevalence Study of Epilepsy among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and of Its Association with Psychiatric Disorder, Behaviour Disturbance and Carer Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, T.; Weston, N.; Baxter, H.; Felce, D.; Kerr, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although the elevated occurrence of epilepsy in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is well recognized, the nature of seizures and their association with psychopathology and carer strain are less clearly understood. The aims were to determine the prevalence and features of epilepsy in a community-based population of adults with…

  4. Children Missing from School Systems: Exploring Divergent Patterns of Disengagement in the Narrative Accounts of Parents, Carers, Children and Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadhurst, Karen; Paton, Helen; May-Chahal, Corinne

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and re-present the experiences and views of a sample of children who have been 'missing' from education, and those of their parents/carers. Access to this hard to reach population has been possible as a result of an innovative interventionist tracking system, responding to pupil mobility, developed by the…

  5. Professionals' Views on the Roles and Needs of Family Carers of Adults with Cerebral Palsy and Complex Communication Needs in Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemsley, Bronwyn; Balandin, Susan; Togher, Leanne

    2008-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore the views of hospital and disability service staff on the roles and needs of family carers of adults with cerebral palsy (CP) and complex communication needs (CCN) in hospital. Method: We conducted a focus group with six hospital and disability service staff, analysed the content themes of the group…

  6. Psycho-educational support for relatives of people with a recent diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia: an evaluation of a 'Course for Carers'.

    PubMed

    Milne, Alisoun; Guss, Reinhard; Russ, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Currently there are 820,000 people with dementia in the UK, a figure projected to reach 1.7 million by 2050. Policy and practice emphasis on early intervention in dementia and support of family carers foreground a need to explore service efficacy for relatives of those with a recent diagnosis. Existing evidence suggests that psycho-educational interventions can significantly enhance carer well being especially when well targeted and group based. A rolling programme of seven psycho-educational Courses for 'new carers' in one area of England was the subject of a systematic evaluation incorporating a quantitative rating scale and qualitative data. Findings suggest that the Courses achieved a number of intersecting aims: they provided psychological support; offered advice; enhanced coping skills; boosted confidence; increased knowledge; and prepared the carer for the future. That the Courses were designed and delivered by specialist staff - primarily psychologists, offered a social dimension, were time limited and free are noteworthy features. The evaluation suggests that as a model the Course has considerable short and longer term preventive potential; also that it could be replicated elsewhere in the country and achieve similar outcomes.

  7. Brief Report: Impact of Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) on Carer Burden and Community Participation in Challenging Behaviour--Results from a Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassiotis, A.; Robotham, D.; Canagasabey, A.; Marston, L.; Thomas, B.; King, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Applied behaviour analysis (ABA) reduces challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability. There is interest, however, in whether such interventions reduce carer burden and increase community participation in this group. Methods: A 6-month randomised controlled trial was followed by a longer-term naturalistic follow-up of…

  8. Reliability model generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMann, Catherine M. (Inventor); Cohen, Gerald C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved method and system for automatically generating reliability models for use with a reliability evaluation tool is described. The reliability model generator of the present invention includes means for storing a plurality of low level reliability models which represent the reliability characteristics for low level system components. In addition, the present invention includes means for defining the interconnection of the low level reliability models via a system architecture description. In accordance with the principles of the present invention, a reliability model for the entire system is automatically generated by aggregating the low level reliability models based on the system architecture description.

  9. ‘Doing the hard yards’: carer and provider focus group perspectives of accessing Aboriginal childhood disability services

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite a high prevalence of disability, Aboriginal Australians access disability services in Australia less than non-Aboriginal Australians with a disability. The needs of Aboriginal children with disability are particularly poorly understood. They can endure long delays in treatment which can impact adversely on development. This study sought to ascertain the factors involved in accessing services and support for Aboriginal children with a disability. Methods Using the focus group method, two community forums, one for health and service providers and one for carers of Aboriginal children with a disability, were held at an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) in the Sydney, metropolitan area of New South Wales, Australia. Framework analysis was applied to qualitative data to elucidate key issues relevant to the dimensions of access framework. Independent coding consistency checks were performed and consensus of analysis verified by the entire research team, several of whom represented the local Aboriginal community. Results Seventeen health and social service providers representing local area government and non-government-funded health and social service organisations and five carers participated in two separate forums between September and October 2011. Lack of awareness of services and inadequate availability were prominent concerns in both groups despite geographic proximity to a major metropolitan area with significant health infrastructure. Carers noted racism, insufficient or non-existent services, and the need for an enhanced role of ACCHSs and AHWs in disability support services. Providers highlighted logistical barriers and cultural and historical issues that impacted on the effectiveness of mainstream services for Aboriginal people. Conclusions Despite dedicated disability services in an urban community, geographic proximity does not mitigate lack of awareness and availability of support. This paper has enumerated a number of

  10. A qualitative study into the use of formal services for dementia by carers from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background People with dementia and their family carers need to be able to access formal services in the community to help maintain their wellbeing and independence. While knowing about and navigating one’s way through service systems is difficult for most people, it is particularly difficult for people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. This study addresses a lack of literature on the use of formal services for dementia by people from CALD backgrounds by examining the experiences and perceptions of dementia caregiving within four CALD communities – Italian, Chinese, Spanish and Arabic-speaking – in south western Sydney, Australia. Methods The study used a qualitative design and the methods included focus groups with family carers and one-to-one interviews with bilingual/bicultural community workers, bilingual general practitioners and geriatricians. A total of 121 family carers participated in 15 focus groups and interviews were held with 60 health professionals. All fieldwork was audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Results People from CALD communities are often unfamiliar with the concept of formal services and there may be strong cultural norms about maintaining care within the family, rather than relying on external services. CALD communities often have limited knowledge of services. There is a preference for services that will allow families to keep their relative at home, for safety as well as cultural reasons, and they are particularly reluctant to use residential care. While there is a preference for ethno-specific or multicultural services, mainstream services also need to ensure they are more flexible in providing culturally appropriate care. Positive outcomes occur when ethno-specific services work in partnership with mainstream programs. Dementia service providers need to develop a trusting relationship with their local CALD communities and promote their services in a way that is understandable

  11. Healthcare organisation and delivery for people with dementia and comorbidity: a qualitative study exploring the views of patients, carers and professionals

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, Frances; Burn, Anne-Marie; Robinson, Louise; Poole, Marie; Rait, Greta; Brayne, Carol; Schoeman, Johan; Goodman, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Objectives People living with dementia (PLWD) have a high prevalence of comorbidty. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of dementia on access to non-dementia services and identify ways of improving service delivery for this population. Design Qualitative study involving interviews and focus groups. Thematic content analysis was informed by theories of continuity of care and access to care. Setting Primary and secondary care in the South and North East of England. Participants PLWD who had 1 of the following comorbidities—diabetes, stroke, vision impairment, their family carers and healthcare professionals (HCPs) in the 3 conditions. Results We recruited 28 community-dwelling PLWD, 33 family carers and 56 HCPs. Analysis resulted in 3 overarching themes: (1) family carers facilitate access to care and continuity of care, (2) the impact of the severity and presentation of dementia on management of comorbid conditions, (3) communication and collaboration across specialities and services is not dementia aware. We found examples of good practice, but these tended to be about the behaviour of individual practitioners rather than system-based approaches; current systems may unintentionally block access to care for PLWD. Conclusions This study suggests that, in order to improve access and continuity for PLWD and comorbidity, a significant change in the organisation of care is required which involves: coproduction of care where professionals, PLWD and family carers work in partnership; recognition of the way a patient's diagnosis of dementia affects the management of other long-term conditions; flexibility in services to ensure they are sensitive to the changing needs of PLWD and their family carers over time; and improved collaboration across specialities and organisations. Research is needed to develop interventions that support partnership working and tailoring of care for PLWD and comorbidity. PMID:28100562

  12. Reliability Generalization: "Lapsus Linguae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julie M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the proposed Reliability Generalization (RG) method for studying reliability. RG employs the application of meta-analytic techniques similar to those used in validity generalization studies to examine reliability coefficients. This study explains why RG does not provide a proper research method for the study of reliability,…

  13. A pilot of an intervention delivered to Chinese- and Spanish-speaking carers of people with dementia in Australia.

    PubMed

    Leone, Desiree; Carragher, Natacha; Santalucia, Yvonne; Draper, Brian; Thompson, Larry W; Shanley, Christopher; Mollina, Angelica; Chen, Langduo; Kyriazopoulos, Helena; Thompson, Dolores Gallagher

    2014-02-01

    There are limited language- and culture-specific support programs for carers of people with dementia living in Australia. A group intervention for use with Chinese and Spanish speakers in the United States was adapted to the Australian context, and a pilot study was undertaken with these 2 communities. The intervention is based on a cognitive behavioral therapy approach and was delivered by bilingual health professionals. The adapted material comprised 7 sessions, spanning 2 hours in duration. All 22 participants completed the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-Short form (DASS-21) pre- and postintervention. A significant decrease in depression, anxiety, and stress was observed among Spanish speakers; a significant decrease in depression and anxiety was present among the Chinese speakers. The implications are considered in the context of Australia's changing aged care service system.

  14. Perceived barriers and facilitators to positive therapeutic change for people with intellectual disabilities: Client, carer and clinical psychologist perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Sarah; Tickle, Anna; Dawson, David L; Harris, Samantha

    2016-09-01

    Studies have highlighted successful outcomes of psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities. However, processes underlying these outcomes are uncertain. Thematic analysis was used to explore the perceptions of three clinical psychologists, six clients and six carers of barriers and facilitators to therapeutic change for people with intellectual disabilities. Six themes were identified relating to: what the client brings as an individual and with regard to their wider system; therapy factors, including the therapeutic relationship and adaptations; psychologists acting as a 'mental health GP' to coordinate care; systemic dependency; and the concept of the revolving door in intellectual disability services. The influence of barriers and facilitators to change is complex, with facilitators overcoming barriers and yet simultaneously creating more barriers. Given their potential impact on the psychologists' roles and access to therapy for people with intellectual disabilities, findings suggest these factors should be formulated as part of the therapeutic process.

  15. The impact of chronic conditions of care recipients on the labour force participation of informal carers in Australia: which conditions are associated with higher rates of non-participation in the labour force?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of personal and other characteristics of care recipients on the behaviour of carers. The aim of this study is to examine the association between the main chronic (disabling) condition of care recipients and the likelihood of their (matched) primary carers aged 15–64 years being out of the labour force. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2009 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) for people aged 15–64 years. We estimated the rates of exit from the labour force for primary carers and non-carers; rates of chronic disease occurrence for care recipients living with their main carers; odds ratios of primary carers being out of the labour force associated with the main chronic condition of their care recipient who lives with them. Results From the 2009 SDAC, we identified 1,268 out of 37,186 eligible participants who were primary carers of a care recipient who lived with them. Of these, 628 (49.5%) were out of the labour force. Most common diseases of care recipients were: back problems (12%); arthritis and related disorders (10%); diseases of the nervous system (such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, cerebral palsy) (7.4%); and conditions originating in the perinatal period or congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (5.1%). When adjusted for age, sex, education and whether have a long term chronic condition of informal carers, the five conditions of care recipients associated with the highest odds of their carers being out of the labour force were: head injury/acquired brain damage; neoplasms, blood diseases, disorders of the immune system; leg/knee/foot/hip damage from injury/accident; dementia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease; and diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (osteoporosis). Conclusions This study identifies the type of conditions that have the greatest impact on

  16. Can There Be Reliability without "Reliability?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    An "Educational Researcher" article by Pamela Moss (1994) asks the title question, "Can there be validity without reliability?" Yes, she answers, if by reliability one means "consistency among independent observations intended as interchangeable" (Moss, 1994, p. 7), quantified by internal consistency indices such as…

  17. Reliability and validity of a new Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) for the psychoses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, K; Kulkarni, J; Sergejew, A A

    2000-05-05

    Medication compliance is one of the foremost problems affecting neuroleptic efficacy in psychiatric patients. To date, compliancy has most commonly been assessed with the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI) developed by Hogan et al. (Hogan, T.P., Awad, A.G., Eastwood, R., 1983. A self-report scale predictive of drug compliance in schizophrenics: reliability and discriminative validity. Psychol. Med. 13, 177-183). The present study identified several deficiencies in the DAI. Using the partial credit version of the Item Response Theory measurement model, the DAI was refined with the aim of greater validity and clinical utility. The new inventory was administered to 66 patients, the majority of whom were diagnosed with schizophrenia. When available, lithium levels and carer ratings of compliance were also recorded and used to verify compliancy. The new inventory appears to be a valid and reliable measure of compliancy for psychoactive medications.

  18. Assuring reliability program effectiveness.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide simple identification and description of techniques that have proved to be most useful either in developing a new product or in improving reliability of an established product. The first reliability task is obtaining and organizing parts failure rate data. Other tasks are parts screening, tabulation of general failure rates, preventive maintenance, prediction of new product reliability, and statistical demonstration of achieved reliability. Five principal tasks for improving reliability involve the physics of failure research, derating of internal stresses, control of external stresses, functional redundancy, and failure effects control. A final task is the training and motivation of reliability specialist engineers.

  19. Power electronics reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

    2009-12-01

    This report provides the DOE and industry with a general process for analyzing power electronics reliability. The analysis can help with understanding the main causes of failures, downtime, and cost and how to reduce them. One approach is to collect field maintenance data and use it directly to calculate reliability metrics related to each cause. Another approach is to model the functional structure of the equipment using a fault tree to derive system reliability from component reliability. Analysis of a fictitious device demonstrates the latter process. Optimization can use the resulting baseline model to decide how to improve reliability and/or lower costs. It is recommended that both electric utilities and equipment manufacturers make provisions to collect and share data in order to lay the groundwork for improving reliability into the future. Reliability analysis helps guide reliability improvements in hardware and software technology including condition monitoring and prognostics and health management.

  20. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  1. Supporting the provision of palliative care in the home environment: a proof-of-concept single-arm trial of a PalliativE Carers Education Package (PrECEPt)

    PubMed Central

    Haraldsdottir, Erna; Lewis, Marsha; Hepburn, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Practical educational interventions for palliative carers are needed. Current supports frequently rely on carers travelling to a central venue to receive education. A substantial gap therefore exists around determining how high-quality relevant information can be delivered nationally, with limited cost implications, using educational methods that are acceptable to carers in palliative care. This study seeks to design and assess feasibility and acceptability of a distance-learning approach to educating carers. Methods This is an embedded mixed-method feasibility and acceptability study. It embeds an unblinded 1-arm pilot test, with subsequent qualitative interviews which will be used to inform the assessment of the intervention's acceptability and feasibility. The theoretical framework is self-efficacy theory, whereby we seek to impact carers' beliefs in their ability to carry out and succeed in caring tasks and situations. The educational materials focused on pain and nutrition/hydration will be developed in phase 1 with former carers (n=8) providing input into the content and style of materials. The educational package privileges adult-learning styles, recognising and responding to the learner's context including their learning needs, prior knowledge and motivations for engaging in education. The materials will be tested with up to 24 current carers. Analysis Analysis will focus on determining recruitment processes for a full-scale study, data collection procedures/completion rates, queries directed to the hospice from carers involved in the feasibility work, mode of delivery and content of the materials. The primary outcome measure is self-efficacy, with other measures focused on caregiver preparedness and caregiving tasks, consequences and needs questionnaire. Adherence to educational components will also be collected and reported. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been provided by the participating site, Calvary Healthcare, Canberra

  2. Integrated avionics reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alikiotis, Dimitri

    1988-01-01

    The integrated avionics reliability task is an effort to build credible reliability and/or performability models for multisensor integrated navigation and flight control. The research was initiated by the reliability analysis of a multisensor navigation system consisting of the Global Positioning System (GPS), the Long Range Navigation system (Loran C), and an inertial measurement unit (IMU). Markov reliability models were developed based on system failure rates and mission time.

  3. Reliable Design Versus Trust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation focuses on reliability and trust for the users portion of the FPGA design flow. It is assumed that the manufacturer prior to hand-off to the user tests FPGA internal components. The objective is to present the challenges of creating reliable and trusted designs. The following will be addressed: What makes a design vulnerable to functional flaws (reliability) or attackers (trust)? What are the challenges for verifying a reliable design versus a trusted design?

  4. Reliability and structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    An analytic model is developed to calculate the reliability of a structure after it is inspected for cracks. The model accounts for the growth of undiscovered cracks between inspections and their effect upon the reliability after subsequent inspections. The model is based upon a differential form of Bayes' Theorem for reliability, and upon fracture mechanics for crack growth.

  5. Reliability model generator specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald C.; Mccann, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    The Reliability Model Generator (RMG), a program which produces reliability models from block diagrams for ASSIST, the interface for the reliability evaluation tool SURE is described. An account is given of motivation for RMG and the implemented algorithms are discussed. The appendices contain the algorithms and two detailed traces of examples.

  6. Viking Lander reliability program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilny, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Viking Lander reliability program is reviewed with attention given to the development of the reliability program requirements, reliability program management, documents evaluation, failure modes evaluation, production variation control, failure reporting and correction, and the parts program. Lander hardware failures which have occurred during the mission are listed.

  7. Theory of reliable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to refine the current notion of system reliability by identifying and investigating attributes of a system which are important to reliability considerations. Techniques which facilitate analysis of system reliability are included. Special attention was given to fault tolerance, diagnosability, and reconfigurability characteristics of systems.

  8. Predicting software reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littlewood, B.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed look is given to software reliability techniques. A conceptual model of the failure process is examined, and some software reliability growth models are discussed. Problems for which no current solutions exist are addressed, emphasizing the very difficult problem of safety-critical systems for which the reliability requirements can be enormously demanding.

  9. REMCARE: Pragmatic Multi-Centre Randomised Trial of Reminiscence Groups for People with Dementia and their Family Carers: Effectiveness and Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, Martin; Bruce, Errollyn; Edwards, Rhiannon T.; Hounsome, Barry; Keady, John; Orgeta, Vasiliki; Rees, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Background Joint reminiscence groups, involving people with dementia and family carers together, are popular, but the evidence-base is limited. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of joint reminiscence groups as compared to usual care. Methods This multi-centre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial had two parallel arms: intervention group and usual-care control group. A restricted dynamic method of randomisation was used, with an overall allocation ratio of 1:1, restricted to ensure viable sized intervention groups. Assessments, blind to treatment allocation, were carried out at baseline, three months and ten months (primary end-point), usually in the person's home. Participants were recruited in eight centres, mainly through NHS Memory Clinics and NHS community mental health teams. Included participants were community resident people with mild to moderate dementia (DSM-IV), who had a relative or other care-giver in regular contact, to act as informant and willing and able to participate in intervention. 71% carers were spouses. 488 people with dementia (mean age 77.5)were randomised: 268 intervention, 220 control; 350 dyads completed the study (206 intervention, 144 control). The intervention evaluated was joint reminiscence groups (with up to 12 dyads) weekly for twelve weeks; monthly maintenance sessions for further seven months. Sessions followed a published treatment manual and were held in a variety of community settings. Two trained facilitators in each centre were supported by volunteers. Primary outcome measures were self-reported quality of life for the person with dementia (QoL-AD), psychological distress for the carer (General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-28). Secondary outcome measures included: autobiographical memory and activities of daily living for the person with dementia; carer stress for the carer; mood, relationship quality and service use and costs for both. Results The intention to treat analysis (ANCOVA

  10. 'Singing for the Brain': A qualitative study exploring the health and well-being benefits of singing for people with dementia and their carers.

    PubMed

    Osman, Sara Eldirdiry; Tischler, Victoria; Schneider, Justine

    2016-11-01

    Dementia has detrimental effects on cognitive, psychological and behavioural functioning, as well as significant impact on those who provide care. There is a need to find suitable psychosocial interventions to help manage the condition, enhance well-being, and to provide support for caregivers. This study explored the impact of Singing for the Brain™, an intervention based on group singing activities developed by The Alzheimer's Society for people with dementia and their carers. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with people with dementia and their carers. Ten interviews involving 20 participants were analysed thematically. Social inclusiveness and improvements in relationships, memory and mood were found to be especially important to participants. As well as enjoying the sessions, participants found that attending Singing for the Brain™ helped in accepting and coping with dementia.

  11. Managing people with mental health presentations in emergency departments--a service exploration of the issues surrounding responsiveness from a mental health care consumer and carer perspective.

    PubMed

    Morphet, Julia; Innes, Kelli; Munro, Ian; O'Brien, Anthony; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Reed, Fiona; Kudinoff, Teresa

    2012-08-01

    Mainstreaming of mental health services (MHS) within the Australian medical system has generated a fundamental transformation in the way consumers and carers access emergency MHS. People present to the Emergency Department (ED) with many health issues which can often include the management of their mental illness, physical co morbidity, or substance use. This paper discusses the issues surrounding access to EDs for clients, families and staff in the context of presentations for mental health problems at a southern metropolitan hospital in Victoria. The pilot project utilised focus groups with mental health care consumers and carers to collaboratively focus on and document the mental health client's 'journey of care' in the ED. There is evidence to suggest from this project that the ED mental health client journey needs continuous improvement and evaluation.

  12. The value of involvement from the perspective of service users and carers engaged in practitioner education: not just a cash nexus.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Mick; Malihi-Shoja, Lisa; Hogarth, Russell; Jones, Fiona; Holt, Keith; Sullivan, Peter; Lunt, John; Vella, Jacqui; Hough, Graham; Rawcliffe, Lou; Mather, Marie

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents qualitative findings emergent from a participatory action research (PAR) study focused on developing service user and carer involvement in a university setting. The involvement of these experts by experience in practitioner education for health and social care, and nursing in particular, is now an international phenomenon. Adhering to the philosophy and practices of PAR, the project and the writing of this paper have been collectively produced. Data has been organised using simple thematic analysis into three broad themes accounting for different ways in which participating service users and carers obtain a sense of value from their involvement. We have titled these themes: a more positive sense of self; social and relational benefits; altruism in activism. Drawing on these participant narratives we develop an understanding of the relationship between involvement and reward that does not simply reflect value in payment.

  13. ‘Singing for the Brain’: A qualitative study exploring the health and well-being benefits of singing for people with dementia and their carers

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Sara Eldirdiry; Schneider, Justine

    2014-01-01

    Dementia has detrimental effects on cognitive, psychological and behavioural functioning, as well as significant impact on those who provide care. There is a need to find suitable psychosocial interventions to help manage the condition, enhance well-being, and to provide support for caregivers. This study explored the impact of Singing for the Brain™, an intervention based on group singing activities developed by The Alzheimer’s Society for people with dementia and their carers. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with people with dementia and their carers. Ten interviews involving 20 participants were analysed thematically. Social inclusiveness and improvements in relationships, memory and mood were found to be especially important to participants. As well as enjoying the sessions, participants found that attending Singing for the Brain™ helped in accepting and coping with dementia. PMID:25425445

  14. Developing a model of short-term integrated palliative and supportive care for frail older people in community settings: perspectives of older people, carers and other key stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Anna E.; Morgan, Myfanwy; Maddocks, Matthew; Sleeman, Katherine E.; Wright, Juliet; Taherzadeh, Shamim; Ellis-Smith, Clare; Higginson, Irene J.; Evans, Catherine J.

    2016-01-01

    Background understanding how best to provide palliative care for frail older people with non-malignant conditions is an international priority. We aimed to develop a community-based episodic model of short-term integrated palliative and supportive care (SIPS) based on the views of service users and other key stakeholders in the United Kingdom. Method transparent expert consultations with health professionals, voluntary sector and carer representatives including a consensus survey; and focus groups with older people and carers were used to generate recommendations for the SIPS model. Discussions focused on three key components of the model: potential benefit of SIPS, timing of delivery and processes of integrated working between specialist palliative care and generalist practitioners. Content and descriptive analysis was employed and findings were integrated across the data sources. Findings we conducted two expert consultations (n = 63), a consensus survey (n = 42) and three focus groups (n = 17). Potential benefits of SIPS included holistic assessment, opportunity for end of life discussion, symptom management and carer reassurance. Older people and carers advocated early access to SIPS, while other stakeholders proposed delivery based on complex symptom burden. A priority for integrated working was the assignment of a key worker to co-ordinate care, but the assignment criteria remain uncertain. Interpretation key stakeholders agree that a model of SIPS for frail older people with non-malignant conditions has potential benefits within community settings, but differ in opinion on the optimal timing and indications for this service. Our findings highlight the importance of consulting all key stakeholders in model development prior to feasibility evaluation. PMID:27586857

  15. "I Can't Go to School and Leave Her in so Much Pain": Educational Shortfalls among Adolescent "Young Carers" in the South African AIDS Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cluver, L.; Operario, D.; Lane, T.; Kganakga, M.

    2012-01-01

    "I go to the hospital with my mother when she is sick. I can't go to school and leave her in so much pain. I won't concentrate." Millions of adolescents live with AIDS-affected parents or primary caregivers. Little is known about educational impacts of living in an AIDS-affected home, or of acting as a "young carer" in the…

  16. START (STrAtegies for RelaTives) coping strategy for family carers of adults with dementia: qualitative study of participants’ views about the intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sommerlad, Andrew; Manela, Monica; Cooper, Claudia; Rapaport, Penny; Livingston, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To analyse the experience of individual family carers of people with dementia who received a manual-based coping strategy programme (STrAtegies for RelaTives, START), demonstrated in a randomised-controlled trial to reduce affective symptoms. Design A qualitative study using self-completed questionnaires exploring the experience of the START intervention. Two researchers transcribed, coded and analysed completed questionnaires thematically. Setting Three mental health and one neurology dementia clinic in South East England. Participants Participants were primary family carers of a patient diagnosed with dementia who provided support at least weekly to their relative. We invited those in the treatment group remaining in the START study at 2 years postrandomisation (n=132) to participate. 75 people, comprising a maximum variation sample, responded. Primary and secondary outcome measures (1) Important aspects of the therapy. (2) Continued use of the intervention after the end of the therapy. (3) Unhelpful aspects of the therapy and suggestions for improvement. (4) Appropriate time for intervention delivery. Results Carers identified several different components as important: relaxation techniques, education about dementia, strategies to help manage the behaviour of the person with dementia, contact with the therapist and changing unhelpful thoughts. Two-thirds of the participants reported that they continue to use the intervention's techniques at 2-year follow up. Few participants suggested changes to the intervention content, but some wanted more sessions and others wanted the involvement of more family members. Most were happy with receiving the intervention shortly after diagnosis, although some relatives of people with moderate dementia thought it should have been delivered at an earlier stage. Conclusions Participants’ varied responses about which aspects of START were helpful suggest that a multicomponent intervention is suited to the differing

  17. 'The living death of Alzheimer's' versus 'Take a walk to keep dementia at bay': representations of dementia in print media and carer discourse.

    PubMed

    Peel, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Understanding dementia is a pressing social challenge. This article draws on the 'Dementia talking: care conversation and communication' project which aims to understand how talk about, and to people living with dementia is constructed. In this article I draw on the construction of dementia manifest in two data sets - a corpus of 350 recent UK national newspaper articles and qualitative data derived from in-depth interviews with informal carers. These data were analysed using a thematic discursive approach. A 'panic-blame' framework was evident in much of the print media coverage. Dementia was represented in catastrophic terms as a 'tsunami' and 'worse than death', juxtaposed with coverage of individualistic behavioural change and lifestyle recommendations to 'stave off' the condition. Contrary to this media discourse, in carers' talk there was scant use of hyperbolic metaphor or reference to individual responsibility for dementia, and any corresponding blame and accountability. I argue that the presence of individualistic dementia 'preventative' behaviour in media discourse is problematic, especially in comparison to other more 'controllable' and treatable chronic conditions. Engagement with, and critique of, the nascent panic-blame cultural context may be fruitful in enhancing positive social change for people diagnosed with dementia and their carers.

  18. Development of self-report scales measuring collaborative vs. directive support: Assessing beliefs and behaviors in carers of adults with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Michel A; Geller, Josie; Iyar, Megumi

    2016-12-01

    Collaboration is more acceptable and likely to produce favorable outcomes when providing care to individuals with eating disorders compared to directive care. We developed two self-report instruments that assess the extent to which carers (e.g., family, friends) of individuals with eating disorders provide collaborative vs. directive support (Support Behaviors Scale; SBH) and the extent to which carers believe that such approaches are helpful (Support Beliefs Scale; SBL). Participants were mothers, fathers, partners, friends and siblings (N=141) of eating disorder patients in hospital or residential treatment. Confirmatory factor analyses were used to test measurement models comprising collaborative and directive approaches identified in previous research. A 19-item three-factor model exhibited best fit for each scale and included three distinct caregiving approaches: two that were collaborative (encouraging, concerned), and one that was directive. The scales exhibited acceptable internal consistency. Reported caregiving behaviors (SBH) were correlated with beliefs about caregiving (SBL). The scales can be used to assess caregiving stance and outcomes for interventions aimed at promoting collaboration in carers.

  19. It Is Always on Your Mind: Experiences and Perceptions of Falling of Older People and Their Carers and the Potential of a Mobile Falls Detection Device

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Veronika; Victor, Christina R.; McCrindle, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Falls and fear of falling present a major risk to older people as both can affect their quality of life and independence. Mobile assistive technologies (AT) fall detection devices may maximise the potential for older people to live independently for as long as possible within their own homes by facilitating early detection of falls. Aims. To explore the experiences and perceptions of older people and their carers as to the potential of a mobile falls detection AT device. Methods. Nine focus groups with 47 participants including both older people with a range of health conditions and their carers. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analysed. Results. Four key themes were identified relating to participants' experiences and perceptions of falling and the potential impact of a mobile falls detector: cause of falling, falling as everyday vulnerability, the environmental context of falling, and regaining confidence and independence by having a mobile falls detector. Conclusion. The perceived benefits of a mobile falls detector may differ between older people and their carers. The experience of falling has to be taken into account when designing mobile assistive technology devices as these may influence perceptions of such devices and how older people utilise them. PMID:24454358

  20. The views of patients and carers in treatment decision making for chronic kidney disease: systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies

    PubMed Central

    Tong, A; Howard, K; Snelling, P; Webster, A C

    2010-01-01

    Objective To synthesise the views of patients and carers in decision making regarding treatment for chronic kidney disease, and to determine which factors influence those decisions. Design Systematic review of qualitative studies of decision making and choice for dialysis, transplantation, or palliative care, and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies. Data sources Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Embase, social work abstracts, and digital theses (database inception to week 3 October 2008) to identify literature using qualitative methods (focus groups, interviews, or case studies). Review methods Thematic synthesis involved line by line coding of the findings of the primary studies and development of descriptive and analytical themes. Results 18 studies that reported the experiences of 375 patients and 87 carers were included. 14 studies focused on preferences for dialysis modality, three on transplantation, and one on palliative management. Four major themes were identified as being central to treatment choices: confronting mortality (choosing life or death, being a burden, living in limbo), lack of choice (medical decision, lack of information, constraints on resources), gaining knowledge of options (peer influence, timing of information), and weighing alternatives (maintaining lifestyle, family influences, maintaining the status quo). Conclusions The experiences of other patients greatly influenced the decision making of patients and carers. The problematic timing of information about treatment options and synchronous creation of vascular access seemed to predetermine haemodialysis and inhibit choice of other treatments, including palliative care. A preference to maintain the status quo may explain why patients often remain on their initial therapy. PMID:20085970

  1. The needs of older people with mental health problems: a particular focus on dementia patients and their carers.

    PubMed

    Passos, Joaquim; Sequeira, Carlos; Fernandes, Lia

    2012-01-01

    The problems and needs of older people are often associated with mental illness, characterized by a set of clinical manifestations, which constitute important domains for investigation and clinical practice. This paper presents the results of a pilot study whose main purpose was to identify met and unmet needs and to analyze the relationship between those needs, psychopathology and functionality in older people with mental health problems. A sample of 75 patients aged 65 or over, of both sexes, diagnosed with mental illness using ICD-9. The main diagnoses were depression (36%) and dementia (29.3%). Most patients had cognitive impairment (MMSE, 52%; CDT, 66.7%), depression (GDS, 61.3%), anxiety (ZAS, 81.3%), and moderate dependence (BI, 49.3% and LI, 77.3%). The main unmet needs found were daytime activities (40%), social benefits (13.3%), company (10.7%), psychological distress (9.3%), and continence (8%). The majority of these unmet needs occur with dementia patients. The majority of the carers of these patients had global needs (met and unmet) in terms of psychological distress. Findings also reveal that a low level of functionality is associated with dementia diagnoses. The association analyses suggest that dementia is an important determinant of the functional status and needs.

  2. Reasons for measles cases not being vaccinated with MMR: investigation into parents' and carers' views following a large measles outbreak.

    PubMed

    McHale, P; Keenan, A; Ghebrehewet, S

    2016-03-01

    Uptake rates for the combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine have been below the required 95% in the UK since a retracted and discredited article linking the MMR vaccine with autism and inflammatory bowel disease was released in 1998. This study undertook semi-structured telephone interviews among parents or carers of 47 unvaccinated measles cases who were aged between 13 months and 9 years, during a large measles outbreak in Merseyside. Results showed that concerns over the specific links with autism remain an important cause of refusal to vaccinate, with over half of respondents stating this as a reason. A quarter stated child illness during scheduled vaccination time, while other reasons included general safety concerns and access issues. Over half of respondents felt that more information or a discussion with a health professional would help the decision-making process, while a third stated improved access. There was clear support for vaccination among respondents when asked about current opinions regarding MMR vaccine. The findings support the hypothesis that safety concerns remain a major barrier to MMR vaccination, and also support previous evidence that experience of measles is an important determinant in the decision to vaccinate.

  3. Efficacy of a self-help manual in increasing resilience in carers of adults with depression in Thailand.

    PubMed

    McCann, Terence V; Songprakun, Wallapa; Stephenson, John

    2016-02-01

    Caring for a person with a mental illness can have adverse effects on caregivers; however, little is known about how best to help such caregivers. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of a cognitive behaviour therapy-guided self-help manual in increasing resilience in caregivers of individuals with depression, in comparison to caregivers who receive routine support only. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted, following CONSORT guidelines, with 54 caregivers allocated to parallel intervention (self-help manual) (n = 27) or control (standard support) (n = 27) groups. Resilience was assessed at baseline, post-test (week 8), and follow up (week 12). Intention-to-treat analyses were undertaken. Repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a significant difference in resilience scores between the three time points, showing a large effect. Pairwise comparisons between intervention and control groups indicated resilience to be significantly different between baseline and post-test, and between baseline and follow up, but not between post-test and follow up. Overall, the intervention group showed a slightly greater increase in resilience over time than the control group; however, the time-group interaction was not significant. Guided self-help is helpful in improving caregivers' resilience and could be used as an adjunct to the limited support provided to carers by mental health nurses and other clinicians.

  4. The Needs of Older People with Mental Health Problems: A Particular Focus on Dementia Patients and Their Carers

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Joaquim; Sequeira, Carlos; Fernandes, Lia

    2012-01-01

    The problems and needs of older people are often associated with mental illness, characterized by a set of clinical manifestations, which constitute important domains for investigation and clinical practice. This paper presents the results of a pilot study whose main purpose was to identify met and unmet needs and to analyze the relationship between those needs, psychopathology and functionality in older people with mental health problems. A sample of 75 patients aged 65 or over, of both sexes, diagnosed with mental illness using ICD-9. The main diagnoses were depression (36%) and dementia (29.3%). Most patients had cognitive impairment (MMSE, 52%; CDT, 66.7%), depression (GDS, 61.3%), anxiety (ZAS, 81.3%), and moderate dependence (BI, 49.3% and LI, 77.3%). The main unmet needs found were daytime activities (40%), social benefits (13.3%), company (10.7%), psychological distress (9.3%), and continence (8%). The majority of these unmet needs occur with dementia patients. The majority of the carers of these patients had global needs (met and unmet) in terms of psychological distress. Findings also reveal that a low level of functionality is associated with dementia diagnoses. The association analyses suggest that dementia is an important determinant of the functional status and needs. PMID:23193496

  5. Software Reliability 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Dolores R.

    2003-01-01

    In FY01 we learned that hardware reliability models need substantial changes to account for differences in software, thus making software reliability measurements more effective, accurate, and easier to apply. These reliability models are generally based on familiar distributions or parametric methods. An obvious question is 'What new statistical and probability models can be developed using non-parametric and distribution-free methods instead of the traditional parametric method?" Two approaches to software reliability engineering appear somewhat promising. The first study, begin in FY01, is based in hardware reliability, a very well established science that has many aspects that can be applied to software. This research effort has investigated mathematical aspects of hardware reliability and has identified those applicable to software. Currently the research effort is applying and testing these approaches to software reliability measurement, These parametric models require much project data that may be difficult to apply and interpret. Projects at GSFC are often complex in both technology and schedules. Assessing and estimating reliability of the final system is extremely difficult when various subsystems are tested and completed long before others. Parametric and distribution free techniques may offer a new and accurate way of modeling failure time and other project data to provide earlier and more accurate estimates of system reliability.

  6. Recalibrating software reliability models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brocklehurst, Sarah; Chan, P. Y.; Littlewood, Bev; Snell, John

    1990-01-01

    In spite of much research effort, there is no universally applicable software reliability growth model which can be trusted to give accurate predictions of reliability in all circumstances. Further, it is not even possible to decide a priori which of the many models is most suitable in a particular context. In an attempt to resolve this problem, techniques were developed whereby, for each program, the accuracy of various models can be analyzed. A user is thus enabled to select that model which is giving the most accurate reliability predicitons for the particular program under examination. One of these ways of analyzing predictive accuracy, called the u-plot, in fact allows a user to estimate the relationship between the predicted reliability and the true reliability. It is shown how this can be used to improve reliability predictions in a completely general way by a process of recalibration. Simulation results show that the technique gives improved reliability predictions in a large proportion of cases. However, a user does not need to trust the efficacy of recalibration, since the new reliability estimates prodcued by the technique are truly predictive and so their accuracy in a particular application can be judged using the earlier methods. The generality of this approach would therefore suggest that it be applied as a matter of course whenever a software reliability model is used.

  7. Recalibrating software reliability models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brocklehurst, Sarah; Chan, P. Y.; Littlewood, Bev; Snell, John

    1989-01-01

    In spite of much research effort, there is no universally applicable software reliability growth model which can be trusted to give accurate predictions of reliability in all circumstances. Further, it is not even possible to decide a priori which of the many models is most suitable in a particular context. In an attempt to resolve this problem, techniques were developed whereby, for each program, the accuracy of various models can be analyzed. A user is thus enabled to select that model which is giving the most accurate reliability predictions for the particular program under examination. One of these ways of analyzing predictive accuracy, called the u-plot, in fact allows a user to estimate the relationship between the predicted reliability and the true reliability. It is shown how this can be used to improve reliability predictions in a completely general way by a process of recalibration. Simulation results show that the technique gives improved reliability predictions in a large proportion of cases. However, a user does not need to trust the efficacy of recalibration, since the new reliability estimates produced by the technique are truly predictive and so their accuracy in a particular application can be judged using the earlier methods. The generality of this approach would therefore suggest that it be applied as a matter of course whenever a software reliability model is used.

  8. Reliability, Recursion, and Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henriksen, Melvin, Ed.; Wagon, Stan, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The discrete mathematics topics of trees and computational complexity are implemented in a simple reliability program which illustrates the process advantages of the PASCAL programing language. The discussion focuses on the impact that reliability research can provide in assessment of the risks found in complex technological ventures. (Author/JJK)

  9. Monte Carlo Reliability Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    to Stochastic Processes , Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1975. (5) R. E. Barlow and F. Proscham, Statistical TheorX of Reliability and Life...Lewis and Z. Tu, "Monte Carlo Reliability Modeling by Inhomogeneous ,Markov Processes, Reliab. Engr. 16, 277-296 (1986). (4) E. Cinlar, Introduction

  10. Hawaii electric system reliability.

    SciTech Connect

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

    2012-09-01

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  11. Hawaii Electric System Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Loose, Verne William; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto

    2012-08-01

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers’ views of reliability “worth” and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers’ views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  12. Chapter 9: Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Algora, Carlos; Espinet-Gonzalez, Pilar; Vazquez, Manuel; Bosco, Nick; Miller, David; Kurtz, Sarah; Rubio, Francisca; McConnell,Robert

    2016-04-15

    This chapter describes the accumulated knowledge on CPV reliability with its fundamentals and qualification. It explains the reliability of solar cells, modules (including optics) and plants. The chapter discusses the statistical distributions, namely exponential, normal and Weibull. The reliability of solar cells includes: namely the issues in accelerated aging tests in CPV solar cells, types of failure and failures in real time operation. The chapter explores the accelerated life tests, namely qualitative life tests (mainly HALT) and quantitative accelerated life tests (QALT). It examines other well proven and experienced PV cells and/or semiconductor devices, which share similar semiconductor materials, manufacturing techniques or operating conditions, namely, III-V space solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs). It addresses each of the identified reliability issues and presents the current state of the art knowledge for their testing and evaluation. Finally, the chapter summarizes the CPV qualification and reliability standards.

  13. The impact of the carer support needs assessment tool (CSNAT) in community palliative care using a stepped wedge cluster trial.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Samar M; Grande, Gunn; Howting, Denise; Deas, Kathleen; Toye, Chris; Troeung, Lakkhina; Stajduhar, Kelli; Ewing, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Family caregiving towards the end-of-life entails considerable emotional, social, financial and physical costs for caregivers. Evidence suggests that good support can improve caregiver psychological outcomes. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the impact of using the carer support needs assessment tool (CSNAT), as an intervention to identify and address support needs in end of life home care, on family caregiver outcomes. A stepped wedge design was used to trial the CSNAT intervention in three bases of Silver Chain Hospice Care in Western Australia, 2012-14. The intervention consisted of at least two visits from nurses (2-3 weeks apart) to identify, review and address caregivers' needs. The outcome measures for the intervention and control groups were caregiver strain and distress as measured by the Family Appraisal of Caregiving Questionnaire (FACQ-PC), caregiver mental and physical health as measured by SF-12v2, and caregiver workload as measured by extent of caregiver assistance with activities of daily living, at baseline and follow up. Total recruitment was 620. There was 45% attrition for each group between baseline and follow-up mainly due to patient deaths resulting in 322 caregivers completing the study (233 in the intervention group and 89 in the control group). At follow-up, the intervention group showed significant reduction in caregiver strain relative to controls, p=0.018, d=0.348 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.41). Priority support needs identified by caregivers included knowing what to expect in the future, having time for yourself in the day and dealing with your feelings and worries. Despite the challenges at the clinician, organisational and trial levels, the CSNAT intervention led to an improvement in caregiver strain. Effective implementation of an evidence-informed and caregiver-led tool represents a necessary step towards helping palliative care providers better assess and address caregiver needs, ensuring adequate family caregiver support

  14. Reliability Analysis Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    RAM program determines probability of success for one or more given objectives in any complex system. Program includes failure mode and effects, criticality and reliability analyses, and some aspects of operations, safety, flight technology, systems design engineering, and configuration analyses.

  15. The rating reliability calculator

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, David J

    2004-01-01

    Background Rating scales form an important means of gathering evaluation data. Since important decisions are often based on these evaluations, determining the reliability of rating data can be critical. Most commonly used methods of estimating reliability require a complete set of ratings i.e. every subject being rated must be rated by each judge. Over fifty years ago Ebel described an algorithm for estimating the reliability of ratings based on incomplete data. While his article has been widely cited over the years, software based on the algorithm is not readily available. This paper describes an easy-to-use Web-based utility for estimating the reliability of ratings based on incomplete data using Ebel's algorithm. Methods The program is available public use on our server and the source code is freely available under GNU General Public License. The utility is written in PHP, a common open source imbedded scripting language. The rating data can be entered in a convenient format on the user's personal computer that the program will upload to the server for calculating the reliability and other statistics describing the ratings. Results When the program is run it displays the reliability, number of subject rated, harmonic mean number of judges rating each subject, the mean and standard deviation of the averaged ratings per subject. The program also displays the mean, standard deviation and number of ratings for each subject rated. Additionally the program will estimate the reliability of an average of a number of ratings for each subject via the Spearman-Brown prophecy formula. Conclusion This simple web-based program provides a convenient means of estimating the reliability of rating data without the need to conduct special studies in order to provide complete rating data. I would welcome other researchers revising and enhancing the program. PMID:15117416

  16. Multidisciplinary System Reliability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code, developed under the leadership of NASA Glenn Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multidisciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

  17. Metrology automation reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, Elizabeth E.

    1996-09-01

    At Motorola's MOS-12 facility automated measurements on 200- mm diameter wafers proceed in a hands-off 'load-and-go' mode requiring only wafer loading, measurement recipe loading, and a 'run' command for processing. Upon completion of all sample measurements, the data is uploaded to the factory's data collection software system via a SECS II interface, eliminating the requirement of manual data entry. The scope of in-line measurement automation has been extended to the entire metrology scheme from job file generation to measurement and data collection. Data analysis and comparison to part specification limits is also carried out automatically. Successful integration of automated metrology into the factory measurement system requires that automated functions, such as autofocus and pattern recognition algorithms, display a high degree of reliability. In the 24- hour factory reliability data can be collected automatically on every part measured. This reliability data is then uploaded to the factory data collection software system at the same time as the measurement data. Analysis of the metrology reliability data permits improvements to be made as needed, and provides an accurate accounting of automation reliability. This reliability data has so far been collected for the CD-SEM (critical dimension scanning electron microscope) metrology tool, and examples are presented. This analysis method can be applied to such automated in-line measurements as CD, overlay, particle and film thickness measurements.

  18. Patient and carer experience of hospital-based rehabilitation from intensive care to hospital discharge: mixed methods process evaluation of the RECOVER randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Pam; Huby, Guro; Merriweather, Judith; Salisbury, Lisa; Rattray, Janice; Griffith, David; Walsh, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore and compare patient/carer experiences of rehabilitation in the intervention and usual care arms of the RECOVER trial (ISRCTN09412438); a randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention of post-intensive care unit (ICU) acute hospital-based rehabilitation following critical illness. Design Mixed methods process evaluation including comparison of patients' and carers' experience of usual care versus the complex intervention. We integrated and compared quantitative data from a patient experience questionnaire (PEQ) with qualitative data from focus groups with patients and carers. Setting Two university-affiliated hospitals in Scotland. Participants 240 patients discharged from ICU who required ≥48 hours of mechanical ventilation were randomised into the trial (120 per trial arm). Exclusion criteria comprised: primary neurologic diagnosis, palliative care, current/planned home ventilation and age <18 years. 182 patients completed the PEQ at 3 months postrandomisation. 22 participants (14 patients and 8 carers) took part in focus groups (2 per trial group) at >3 months postrandomisation. Interventions A complex intervention of post-ICU acute hospital rehabilitation, comprising enhanced physiotherapy, nutritional care and information provision, case-managed by dedicated rehabilitation assistants (RAs) working within existing ward-based clinical teams, delivered between ICU discharge and hospital discharge. Comparator was usual care. Outcome measures A novel PEQ capturing patient-reported aspects of quality care. Results The PEQ revealed statistically significant between-group differences across 4 key intervention components: physiotherapy (p=0.039), nutritional care (p=0.038), case management (p=0.045) and information provision (p<0.001), suggesting greater patient satisfaction in the intervention group. Focus group data strongly supported and helped explain these findings. Specifically, case management by dedicated RAs facilitated

  19. Statistical modelling of software reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    During the six-month period from 1 April 1991 to 30 September 1991 the following research papers in statistical modeling of software reliability appeared: (1) A Nonparametric Software Reliability Growth Model; (2) On the Use and the Performance of Software Reliability Growth Models; (3) Research and Development Issues in Software Reliability Engineering; (4) Special Issues on Software; and (5) Software Reliability and Safety.

  20. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986--1990. The reliability Photo Voltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warranties available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  1. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrig, L.

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986 to 1990. The reliability photovoltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warrantees available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the U.S., PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  2. Orbiter Autoland reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, D. Phillip

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter is the only space reentry vehicle in which the crew is seated upright. This position presents some physiological effects requiring countermeasures to prevent a crewmember from becoming incapacitated. This also introduces a potential need for automated vehicle landing capability. Autoland is a primary procedure that was identified as a requirement for landing following and extended duration orbiter mission. This report documents the results of the reliability analysis performed on the hardware required for an automated landing. A reliability block diagram was used to evaluate system reliability. The analysis considers the manual and automated landing modes currently available on the Orbiter. (Autoland is presently a backup system only.) Results of this study indicate a +/- 36 percent probability of successfully extending a nominal mission to 30 days. Enough variations were evaluated to verify that the reliability could be altered with missions planning and procedures. If the crew is modeled as being fully capable after 30 days, the probability of a successful manual landing is comparable to that of Autoland because much of the hardware is used for both manual and automated landing modes. The analysis indicates that the reliability for the manual mode is limited by the hardware and depends greatly on crew capability. Crew capability for a successful landing after 30 days has not been determined yet.

  3. Proposed reliability cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1973-01-01

    The research investigations which were involved in the study include: cost analysis/allocation, reliability and product assurance, forecasting methodology, systems analysis, and model-building. This is a classic example of an interdisciplinary problem, since the model-building requirements include the need for understanding and communication between technical disciplines on one hand, and the financial/accounting skill categories on the other. The systems approach is utilized within this context to establish a clearer and more objective relationship between reliability assurance and the subcategories (or subelements) that provide, or reenforce, the reliability assurance for a system. Subcategories are further subdivided as illustrated by a tree diagram. The reliability assurance elements can be seen to be potential alternative strategies, or approaches, depending on the specific goals/objectives of the trade studies. The scope was limited to the establishment of a proposed reliability cost-model format. The model format/approach is dependent upon the use of a series of subsystem-oriented CER's and sometimes possible CTR's, in devising a suitable cost-effective policy.

  4. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  5. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.; Keller, J.; Glinsky, C.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation was given at the Sandia Reliability Workshop in August 2013 and provides information on current statistics, a status update, next steps, and other reliability research and development activities related to the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative.

  6. Reliability Engineering Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1964-06-01

    INTEVAL 00 0 542 917 1953 OPERATING TIME IN HOURS Figure 6-4. TWT Reliability Function, Showing the 90% Confidence Interval 6-7 6-2-4 to 6-2-5 NAVWEPS...the lower one-sided 90% greater than 977 hours, or 90% confidence confidence limit on 0 is (.704)(530) = 373 that 0 lies between these two bounds . R...6-4 6-2-2 Measurement of Reliability (Application of Confidence Limits).. 6-4 6-2-3 Procedural Steps

  7. Assuring Software Reliability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    resources.sei.cmu.edu/asset_files/WhitePaper/2009_019_001_29066.pdf [Boydston 2009] Boydston, A. & Lewis , W. Qualification and Reliability of...Woody, Carol . Survivability Analysis Framework (CMU/SEI-2010-TN-013). Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, 2010. http

  8. Parametric Mass Reliability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) systems are designed based upon having redundant systems with replaceable orbital replacement units (ORUs). These ORUs are designed to be swapped out fairly quickly, but some are very large, and some are made up of many components. When an ORU fails, it is replaced on orbit with a spare; the failed unit is sometimes returned to Earth to be serviced and re-launched. Such a system is not feasible for a 500+ day long-duration mission beyond low Earth orbit. The components that make up these ORUs have mixed reliabilities. Components that make up the most mass-such as computer housings, pump casings, and the silicon board of PCBs-typically are the most reliable. Meanwhile components that tend to fail the earliest-such as seals or gaskets-typically have a small mass. To better understand the problem, my project is to create a parametric model that relates both the mass of ORUs to reliability, as well as the mass of ORU subcomponents to reliability.

  9. Sequential Reliability Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiting, Mindert H.

    1991-01-01

    A method is proposed for sequential evaluation of reliability of psychometric instruments. Sample size is unfixed; a test statistic is computed after each person is sampled and a decision is made in each stage of the sampling process. Results from a series of Monte-Carlo experiments establish the method's efficiency. (SLD)

  10. Designing reliability into accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.

    1992-08-01

    For the next generation of high performance, high average luminosity colliders, the ``factories,`` reliability engineering must be introduced right at the inception of the project and maintained as a central theme throughout the project. There are several aspects which will be addressed separately: Concept; design; motivation; management techniques; and fault diagnosis.

  11. Designing reliability into accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.

    1992-08-01

    For the next generation of high performance, high average luminosity colliders, the factories,'' reliability engineering must be introduced right at the inception of the project and maintained as a central theme throughout the project. There are several aspects which will be addressed separately: Concept; design; motivation; management techniques; and fault diagnosis.

  12. Reliable solar cookers

    SciTech Connect

    Magney, G.K.

    1992-12-31

    The author describes the activities of SERVE, a Christian relief and development agency, to introduce solar ovens to the Afghan refugees in Pakistan. It has provided 5,000 solar cookers since 1984. The experience has demonstrated the potential of the technology and the need for a durable and reliable product. Common complaints about the cookers are discussed and the ideal cooker is described.

  13. Software reliability report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Larry

    1991-01-01

    There are many software reliability models which try to predict future performance of software based on data generated by the debugging process. Unfortunately, the models appear to be unable to account for the random nature of the data. If the same code is debugged multiple times and one of the models is used to make predictions, intolerable variance is observed in the resulting reliability predictions. It is believed that data replication can remove this variance in lab type situations and that it is less than scientific to talk about validating a software reliability model without considering replication. It is also believed that data replication may prove to be cost effective in the real world, thus the research centered on verification of the need for replication and on methodologies for generating replicated data in a cost effective manner. The context of the debugging graph was pursued by simulation and experimentation. Simulation was done for the Basic model and the Log-Poisson model. Reasonable values of the parameters were assigned and used to generate simulated data which is then processed by the models in order to determine limitations on their accuracy. These experiments exploit the existing software and program specimens which are in AIR-LAB to measure the performance of reliability models.

  14. Reliability Design Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    prediction, failure modes and effects analysis ( FMEA ) and reliability growth techniques represent those prediction and design evaluation methods that...Assessment Production Operation Ö Maintenance MIL-HDBK- 217 Bayesian Techniques Probabilistic Design FMEA I R Growth " I...devices suffer thermal aging; oxidation and other chemical reactions are enhanced; viscosity reduction and evaporation of lubricants are problems

  15. Reliability Generalization (RG) Analysis: The Test Is Not Reliable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warne, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Literature shows that most researchers are unaware of some of the characteristics of reliability. This paper clarifies some misconceptions by describing the procedures, benefits, and limitations of reliability generalization while using it to illustrate the nature of score reliability. Reliability generalization (RG) is a meta-analytic method…

  16. Space Shuttle Propulsion System Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welzyn, Ken; VanHooser, Katherine; Moore, Dennis; Wood, David

    2011-01-01

    This session includes the following sessions: (1) External Tank (ET) System Reliability and Lessons, (2) Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), Reliability Validated by a Million Seconds of Testing, (3) Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Reliability via Process Control, and (4) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Reliability via Acceptance and Testing.

  17. Human Reliability Program Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, John; Rogers, Erin; Gerke, Gretchen

    2014-05-18

    A Human Reliability Program (HRP) is designed to protect national security as well as worker and public safety by continuously evaluating the reliability of those who have access to sensitive materials, facilities, and programs. Some elements of a site HRP include systematic (1) supervisory reviews, (2) medical and psychological assessments, (3) management evaluations, (4) personnel security reviews, and (4) training of HRP staff and critical positions. Over the years of implementing an HRP, the Department of Energy (DOE) has faced various challenges and overcome obstacles. During this 4-day activity, participants will examine programs that mitigate threats to nuclear security and the insider threat to include HRP, Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Enhancement, and Employee Assistance Programs. The focus will be to develop an understanding of the need for a systematic HRP and to discuss challenges and best practices associated with mitigating the insider threat.

  18. Reliable broadcast protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, T. A.; Birman, Kenneth P.

    1989-01-01

    A number of broadcast protocols that are reliable subject to a variety of ordering and delivery guarantees are considered. Developing applications that are distributed over a number of sites and/or must tolerate the failures of some of them becomes a considerably simpler task when such protocols are available for communication. Without such protocols the kinds of distributed applications that can reasonably be built will have a very limited scope. As the trend towards distribution and decentralization continues, it will not be surprising if reliable broadcast protocols have the same role in distributed operating systems of the future that message passing mechanisms have in the operating systems of today. On the other hand, the problems of engineering such a system remain large. For example, deciding which protocol is the most appropriate to use in a certain situation or how to balance the latency-communication-storage costs is not an easy question.

  19. Compact, Reliable EEPROM Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A compact, reliable controller for an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) has been developed specifically for a space-flight application. The design may be adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for reliability in general and, in particular, for prevention of inadvertent writing of data in EEPROM cells. Inadvertent writes pose risks of loss of reliability in the original space-flight application and could pose such risks in other applications. Prior EEPROM controllers are large and complex and do not provide all reasonable protections (in many cases, few or no protections) against inadvertent writes. In contrast, the present controller provides several layers of protection against inadvertent writes. The controller also incorporates a write-time monitor, enabling determination of trends in the performance of an EEPROM through all phases of testing. The controller has been designed as an integral subsystem of a system that includes not only the controller and the controlled EEPROM aboard a spacecraft but also computers in a ground control station, relatively simple onboard support circuitry, and an onboard communication subsystem that utilizes the MIL-STD-1553B protocol. (MIL-STD-1553B is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical-interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. MIL-STD- 1553B is commonly used in defense and space applications.) The intent was to both maximize reliability while minimizing the size and complexity of onboard circuitry. In operation, control of the EEPROM is effected via the ground computers, the MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem, and the onboard support circuitry, all of which, in combination, provide the multiple layers of protection against inadvertent writes. There is no controller software, unlike in many prior EEPROM controllers; software can be a major contributor to unreliability, particularly in fault

  20. Designing reliability into accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, A.

    1992-07-01

    Future accelerators will have to provide a high degree of reliability. Quality must be designed in right from the beginning and must remain a central theme throughout the project. The problem is similar to the problems facing US industry today, and examples of the successful application of quality engineering will be given. Different aspects of an accelerator project will be addressed: Concept, Design, Motivation, Management Techniques, and Fault Diagnosis. The importance of creating and maintaining a coherent team will be stressed.

  1. Reliability and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Werner

    1996-01-01

    Reliability and its interdependence with testing are important topics for development and manufacturing of successful products. This generally accepted fact is not only a technical statement, but must be also seen in the light of 'Human Factors.' While the background for this paper is the experience gained with electromechanical/electronic space products, including control and system considerations, it is believed that the content could be also of interest for other fields.

  2. Laser System Reliability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    NEALE CAPT. RANDALL D. GODFREY CAPT. JOHN E. ACTON HR. DAVE B. LEMMING (ASD) :,^ 19 . ••^w**** SECTION III RELIABILITY PREDICTION...Dete Exchange Program) failure rate date bank. In addition, some data have been obtained from Hughes. Rocketdyne , Garrett, and the AFWL’s APT Failure...Central Ave, Suite 306, Albuq, NM 87108 R/M Systems, Inc (Dr. K. Blemel), 10801 Lomas 81vd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112 Rocketdyne 01 v, Rockwell

  3. Spacecraft transmitter reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A workshop on spacecraft transmitter reliability was held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on September 25 and 26, 1979, to discuss present knowledge and to plan future research areas. Since formal papers were not submitted, this synopsis was derived from audio tapes of the workshop. The following subjects were covered: users' experience with space transmitters; cathodes; power supplies and interfaces; and specifications and quality assurance. A panel discussion ended the workshop.

  4. Software reliability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppa, Mary Ann; Wilson, Larry W.

    1994-01-01

    There are many software reliability models which try to predict future performance of software based on data generated by the debugging process. Our research has shown that by improving the quality of the data one can greatly improve the predictions. We are working on methodologies which control some of the randomness inherent in the standard data generation processes in order to improve the accuracy of predictions. Our contribution is twofold in that we describe an experimental methodology using a data structure called the debugging graph and apply this methodology to assess the robustness of existing models. The debugging graph is used to analyze the effects of various fault recovery orders on the predictive accuracy of several well-known software reliability algorithms. We found that, along a particular debugging path in the graph, the predictive performance of different models can vary greatly. Similarly, just because a model 'fits' a given path's data well does not guarantee that the model would perform well on a different path. Further we observed bug interactions and noted their potential effects on the predictive process. We saw that not only do different faults fail at different rates, but that those rates can be affected by the particular debugging stage at which the rates are evaluated. Based on our experiment, we conjecture that the accuracy of a reliability prediction is affected by the fault recovery order as well as by fault interaction.

  5. Clinical effectiveness of a manual based coping strategy programme (START, STrAtegies for RelaTives) in promoting the mental health of carers of family members with dementia: pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Julie; Rapaport, Penny; Knapp, Martin; Griffin, Mark; King, Derek; Mummery, Cath; Walker, Zuzana; Hoe, Juanita; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Cooper, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess whether a manual based coping strategy compared with treatment as usual reduces depression and anxiety symptoms in carers of family members with dementia. Design Randomised, parallel group, superiority trial. Setting Three mental health community services and one neurological outpatient dementia service in London and Essex, UK. Participants 260 carers of family members with dementia. Intervention A manual based coping intervention comprising eight sessions and delivered by supervised psychology graduates to carers of family members with dementia. The programme consisted of psychoeducation about dementia, carers’ stress, and where to get emotional support; understanding behaviours of the family member being cared for, and behavioural management techniques; changing unhelpful thoughts; promoting acceptance; assertive communication; relaxation; planning for the future; increasing pleasant activities; and maintaining skills learnt. Carers practised these techniques at home, using the manual and relaxation CDs. Main outcome measures Affective symptoms (hospital anxiety and depression total score) at four and eight months. Secondary outcomes were depression and anxiety caseness on the hospital anxiety and depression scale; quality of life of both the carer (health status questionnaire, mental health) and the recipient of care (quality of life-Alzheimer’s disease); and potentially abusive behaviour by the carer towards the recipient of care (modified conflict tactics scale). Results 260 carers were recruited; 173 were randomised to the intervention and 87 to treatment as usual. Mean total scores on the hospital anxiety and depression scale were lower in the intervention group than in the treatment as usual group over the eight month evaluation period: adjusted difference in means −1.80 points (95% confidence interval −3.29 to −0.31; P=0.02) and absolute difference in means −2.0 points. Carers in the intervention group were less likely to

  6. General Aviation Aircraft Reliability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Duane; Turnbull, Andrew; Roelant, Henk A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This reliability study was performed in order to provide the aviation community with an estimate of Complex General Aviation (GA) Aircraft System reliability. To successfully improve the safety and reliability for the next generation of GA aircraft, a study of current GA aircraft attributes was prudent. This was accomplished by benchmarking the reliability of operational Complex GA Aircraft Systems. Specifically, Complex GA Aircraft System reliability was estimated using data obtained from the logbooks of a random sample of the Complex GA Aircraft population.

  7. The acute hospital setting as a place of death and final care: a qualitative study on perspectives of family physicians, nurses and family carers.

    PubMed

    Reyniers, Thijs; Houttekier, Dirk; Cohen, Joachim; Pasman, H Roeline; Deliens, Luc

    2014-05-01

    While the focus of end-of-life care research and policy has predominantly been on 'death in a homelike environment', little is known about perceptions of the acute hospital setting as a place of final care or death. Using a qualitative design and constant comparative analysis, the perspectives of family physicians, nurses and family carers were explored. Participants generally perceived the acute hospital setting to be inadequate for terminally ill patients, although they indicated that in some circumstances it might be a 'safe haven'. This implies that a higher quality of end-of-life care provision in the acute hospital setting needs to be ensured, preferably by improving communication skills. At the same time alternatives to the acute hospital setting need to be developed or expanded.

  8. CR reliability testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Rill, Lynn; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a method for systematically testing the reliability of a CR system under realistic daily loads in a non-clinical environment prior to its clinical adoption. Once digital imaging replaces film, it will be very difficult to revert back should the digital system become unreliable. Prior to the beginning of the test, a formal evaluation was performed to set the benchmarks for performance and functionality. A formal protocol was established that included all the 62 imaging plates in the inventory for each 24-hour period in the study. Imaging plates were exposed using different combinations of collimation, orientation, and SID. Anthropomorphic phantoms were used to acquire images of different sizes. Each combination was chosen randomly to simulate the differences that could occur in clinical practice. The tests were performed over a wide range of times with batches of plates processed to simulate the temporal constraints required by the nature of portable radiographs taken in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Current patient demographics were used for the test studies so automatic routing algorithms could be tested. During the test, only three minor reliability problems occurred, two of which were not directly related to the CR unit. One plate was discovered to cause a segmentation error that essentially reduced the image to only black and white with no gray levels. This plate was removed from the inventory to be replaced. Another problem was a PACS routing problem that occurred when the DICOM server with which the CR was communicating had a problem with disk space. The final problem was a network printing failure to the laser cameras. Although the units passed the reliability test, problems with interfacing to workstations were discovered. The two issues that were identified were the interpretation of what constitutes a study for CR and the construction of the look-up table for a proper gray scale display.

  9. Ultimately Reliable Pyrotechnic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.; Hinkel, Todd

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the methods by which NASA has designed, built, tested, and certified pyrotechnic devices for high reliability operation in extreme environments and illustrates the potential applications in the oil and gas industry. NASA's extremely successful application of pyrotechnics is built upon documented procedures and test methods that have been maintained and developed since the Apollo Program. Standards are managed and rigorously enforced for performance margins, redundancy, lot sampling, and personnel safety. The pyrotechnics utilized in spacecraft include such devices as small initiators and detonators with the power of a shotgun shell, detonating cord systems for explosive energy transfer across many feet, precision linear shaped charges for breaking structural membranes, and booster charges to actuate valves and pistons. NASA's pyrotechnics program is one of the more successful in the history of Human Spaceflight. No pyrotechnic device developed in accordance with NASA's Human Spaceflight standards has ever failed in flight use. NASA's pyrotechnic initiators work reliably in temperatures as low as -420 F. Each of the 135 Space Shuttle flights fired 102 of these initiators, some setting off multiple pyrotechnic devices, with never a failure. The recent landing on Mars of the Opportunity rover fired 174 of NASA's pyrotechnic initiators to complete the famous '7 minutes of terror.' Even after traveling through extreme radiation and thermal environments on the way to Mars, every one of them worked. These initiators have fired on the surface of Titan. NASA's design controls, procedures, and processes produce the most reliable pyrotechnics in the world. Application of pyrotechnics designed and procured in this manner could enable the energy industry's emergency equipment, such as shutoff valves and deep-sea blowout preventers, to be left in place for years in extreme environments and still be relied upon to function when needed, thus greatly enhancing

  10. Reliability Growth Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    the Duane model because: *e ’he reliability gSod’ data analyzed were reflective of a single Lesr- for • each equipment as opposed to a series of zest ...fabrication) and costs wbich are a function of test length (e.g., chamber operations). A life -cycle cost model, Ref. 14 for example, can be exercised tc...J. Gibson and K. K. Mcain APPROVED FOR FUBLIC RE1EAS NI ODSrRUTIG1,N UY-LUlHfF :-:-4 ROME AIR DEVELOPMENT CENTER Air Force Systems Command Griffiss

  11. Blade reliability collaborative :

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2013-04-01

    The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

  12. Reliable VLSI sequential controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Maki, G.; Shamanna, M.

    1990-01-01

    A VLSI architecture for synchronous sequential controllers is presented that has attractive qualities for producing reliable circuits. In these circuits, one hardware implementation can realize any flow table with a maximum of 2(exp n) internal states and m inputs. Also all design equations are identical. A real time fault detection means is presented along with a strategy for verifying the correctness of the checking hardware. This self check feature can be employed with no increase in hardware. The architecture can be modified to achieve fail safe designs. With no increase in hardware, an adaptable circuit can be realized that allows replacement of faulty transitions with fault free transitions.

  13. Ferrite logic reliability study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, J. A.; Clark, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Development and use of digital circuits called all-magnetic logic are reported. In these circuits the magnetic elements and their windings comprise the active circuit devices in the logic portion of a system. The ferrite logic device belongs to the all-magnetic class of logic circuits. The FLO device is novel in that it makes use of a dual or bimaterial ferrite composition in one physical ceramic body. This bimaterial feature, coupled with its potential for relatively high speed operation, makes it attractive for high reliability applications. (Maximum speed of operation approximately 50 kHz.)

  14. Ethical issues arising from a research, technology and development project to support frail older people and their family carers at home.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Lennart; Hanson, Elizabeth Jane

    2003-09-01

    The present paper provides an overview of the application of the key ethical issues which arose in an EU-funded research, technology and development project, Assisting Carers using Telematics Interventions to meet Older Persons' Needs (ACTION). The primary aim of the ACTION project was to support frail older people and their family carers in their own homes across England, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Sweden and Portugal via the use of user-friendly information and communication technology. Ethical guidelines were developed in the project and used as a tool to enable the multidisciplinary project team to increase their awareness of ethical issues in their everyday work, and to act as a useful ethical framework for regular team discussions at international and local meetings across the partner countries. A range of ethical issues arose during the field-study phases of the project when the ACTION services were introduced into a number of families' own homes. It can be argued that these ethical issues reflect factors relating both to the application of research into practice, as well as those relating more directly to the use of new technology by families and care professionals. Key issues centre upon the ethical concepts of autonomy, independence, quality of life, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice, and more specifically, on ethical issues of security, privacy and confidentiality, increased expectations, and withdrawal of the service. This paper is intended to facilitate dialogue and debate in the area of enabling (assistive) technology in home care for older people and their families.

  15. Experiences and Preferences for End-of-Life Care for Young Adults with Cancer and Their Informal Carers: A Narrative Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Nothando; Kenten, Charlotte; Jones, Louise; Gibson, Faith; Pearce, Susie; Flatley, Mary; Hough, Rachael; Stirling, L Caroline; Taylor, Rachel M; Wong, Geoff; Whelan, Jeremy

    2017-01-11

    To review the qualitative literature on experiences of and preferences for end-of-life care of people with cancer aged 16-40 years (young adults) and their informal carers. A systematic review using narrative synthesis of qualitative studies using the 2006 UK Economic and Social Research Council research methods program guidance. Seven electronic bibliographic databases, two clinical trials databases, and three relevant theses databases were searched from January 2004 to October 2015. Eighteen articles were included from twelve countries. The selected studies included at least 5% of their patient sample within the age range 16-40 years. The studies were heterogeneous in their aims, focus, and sample, but described different aspects of end-of-life care for people with cancer. Positive experiences included facilitating adaptive coping and receiving palliative home care, while negative experiences were loss of "self" and nonfacilitative services and environment. Preferences included a family-centered approach to care, honest conversations about end of life, and facilitating normality. There is little evidence focused on the end-of-life needs of young adults. Analysis of reports including some young adults does not explore experience or preferences by age; therefore, it is difficult to identify age-specific issues clearly. From this review, we suggest that supportive interventions and education are needed to facilitate open and honest communication at an appropriate level with young people. Future research should focus on age-specific evidence about the end-of-life experiences and preferences for young adults with cancer and their informal carers.

  16. Patient and carer experiences of clinical uncertainty and deterioration, in the face of limited reversibility: A comparative observational study of the AMBER care bundle

    PubMed Central

    Bristowe, Katherine; Carey, Irene; Hopper, Adrian; Shouls, Susanna; Prentice, Wendy; Caulkin, Ruth; Higginson, Irene J; Koffman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical uncertainty is emotionally challenging for patients and carers and creates additional pressures for those clinicians in acute hospitals. The AMBER care bundle was designed to improve care for patients identified as clinically unstable, deteriorating, with limited reversibility and at risk of dying in the next 1–2 months. Aim: To examine the experience of care supported by the AMBER care bundle compared to standard care in the context of clinical uncertainty, deterioration and limited reversibility. Design: A comparative observational mixed-methods study using semi-structured qualitative interviews and a followback survey. Setting/participants: Three large London acute tertiary National Health Service hospitals. Nineteen interviews with 23 patients and carers (10 supported by AMBER care bundle and 9 standard care). Surveys completed by next of kin of 95 deceased patients (59 AMBER care bundle and 36 standard care). Results: The AMBER care bundle was associated with increased frequency of discussions about prognosis between clinicians and patients (χ2 = 4.09, p = 0.04), higher awareness of their prognosis by patients (χ2 = 4.29, p = 0.04) and lower clarity in the information received about their condition (χ2 = 6.26, p = 0.04). Although the consistency and quality of communication were not different between the two groups, those supported by the AMBER care bundle described more unresolved concerns about caring for someone at home. Conclusion: Awareness of prognosis appears to be higher among patients supported by the AMBER care bundle, but in this small study this was not translated into higher quality communication, and information was judged less easy to understand. Adequately powered comparative evaluation is urgently needed. PMID:25829443

  17. Testing of reliability - Analysis tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1989-01-01

    An outline is presented of issues raised in verifying the accuracy of reliability analysis tools. State-of-the-art reliability analysis tools implement various decomposition, aggregation, and estimation techniques to compute the reliability of a diversity of complex fault-tolerant computer systems. However, no formal methodology has been formulated for validating the reliability estimates produced by these tools. The author presents three states of testing that can be performed on most reliability analysis tools to effectively increase confidence in a tool. These testing stages were applied to the SURE (semi-Markov Unreliability Range Evaluator) reliability analysis tool, and the results of the testing are discussed.

  18. Understanding the Elements of Operational Reliability: A Key for Achieving High Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews operational reliability and its role in achieving high reliability through design and process reliability. The topics include: 1) Reliability Engineering Major Areas and interfaces; 2) Design Reliability; 3) Process Reliability; and 4) Reliability Applications.

  19. Load Control System Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, Daniel

    2015-04-03

    This report summarizes the results of the Load Control System Reliability project (DOE Award DE-FC26-06NT42750). The original grant was awarded to Montana Tech April 2006. Follow-on DOE awards and expansions to the project scope occurred August 2007, January 2009, April 2011, and April 2013. In addition to the DOE monies, the project also consisted of matching funds from the states of Montana and Wyoming. Project participants included Montana Tech; the University of Wyoming; Montana State University; NorthWestern Energy, Inc., and MSE. Research focused on two areas: real-time power-system load control methodologies; and, power-system measurement-based stability-assessment operation and control tools. The majority of effort was focused on area 2. Results from the research includes: development of fundamental power-system dynamic concepts, control schemes, and signal-processing algorithms; many papers (including two prize papers) in leading journals and conferences and leadership of IEEE activities; one patent; participation in major actual-system testing in the western North American power system; prototype power-system operation and control software installed and tested at three major North American control centers; and, the incubation of a new commercial-grade operation and control software tool. Work under this grant certainly supported the DOE-OE goals in the area of “Real Time Grid Reliability Management.”

  20. Integrated circuit reliability testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Sayah, Hoshyar R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A technique is described for use in determining the reliability of microscopic conductors deposited on an uneven surface of an integrated circuit device. A wafer containing integrated circuit chips is formed with a test area having regions of different heights. At the time the conductors are formed on the chip areas of the wafer, an elongated serpentine assay conductor is deposited on the test area so the assay conductor extends over multiple steps between regions of different heights. Also, a first test conductor is deposited in the test area upon a uniform region of first height, and a second test conductor is deposited in the test area upon a uniform region of second height. The occurrence of high resistances at the steps between regions of different height is indicated by deriving the measured length of the serpentine conductor using the resistance measured between the ends of the serpentine conductor, and comparing that to the design length of the serpentine conductor. The percentage by which the measured length exceeds the design length, at which the integrated circuit will be discarded, depends on the required reliability of the integrated circuit.

  1. Integrated circuit reliability testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Sayah, Hoshyar R. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A technique is described for use in determining the reliability of microscopic conductors deposited on an uneven surface of an integrated circuit device. A wafer containing integrated circuit chips is formed with a test area having regions of different heights. At the time the conductors are formed on the chip areas of the wafer, an elongated serpentine assay conductor is deposited on the test area so the assay conductor extends over multiple steps between regions of different heights. Also, a first test conductor is deposited in the test area upon a uniform region of first height, and a second test conductor is deposited in the test area upon a uniform region of second height. The occurrence of high resistances at the steps between regions of different height is indicated by deriving the measured length of the serpentine conductor using the resistance measured between the ends of the serpentine conductor, and comparing that to the design length of the serpentine conductor. The percentage by which the measured length exceeds the design length, at which the integrated circuit will be discarded, depends on the required reliability of the integrated circuit.

  2. The Reliability of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Theodore Holmes

    1970-01-01

    The prevalent probabilistic view is virtually untestable; it remains a plausible belief. The cases usually cited can not be taken as evidence for it. Several grounds for this conclusion are developed. Three issues are distinguished in an attempt to clarify a murky debate: (a) the utility of probabilistic methods in data reduction, (b) the value of models that assume indeterminacy, and (c) the validity of the inference that the nervous system is largely indeterministic at the neuronal level. No exception is taken to the first two; the second is a private heuristic question. The third is the issue to which the assertion in the first two sentences is addressed. Of the two kinds of uncertainty, statistical mechanical (= practical unpredictability) as in a gas, and Heisenbergian indeterminancy, the first certainly exists, the second is moot at the neuronal level. It would contribute to discussion to recognize that neurons perform with a degree of reliability. Although unreliability is difficult to establish, to say nothing of measure, evidence that some neurons have a high degree of reliability, in both connections and activity is increasing greatly. An example is given from sternarchine electric fish. PMID:5462670

  3. Reliable Entanglement Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrazola, Juan; Gittsovich, Oleg; Donohue, John; Lavoie, Jonathan; Resch, Kevin; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2013-05-01

    Entanglement plays a central role in quantum protocols. It is therefore important to be able to verify the presence of entanglement in physical systems from experimental data. In the evaluation of these data, the proper treatment of statistical effects requires special attention, as one can never claim to have verified the presence of entanglement with certainty. Recently increased attention has been paid to the development of proper frameworks to pose and to answer these type of questions. In this work, we apply recent results by Christandl and Renner on reliable quantum state tomography to construct a reliable entanglement verification procedure based on the concept of confidence regions. The statements made do not require the specification of a prior distribution nor the assumption of an independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) source of states. Moreover, we develop efficient numerical tools that are necessary to employ this approach in practice, rendering the procedure ready to be employed in current experiments. We demonstrate this fact by analyzing the data of an experiment where photonic entangled two-photon states were generated and whose entanglement is verified with the use of an accessible nonlinear witness.

  4. Testing for PV Reliability (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Bansal, S.

    2014-09-01

    The DOE SUNSHOT workshop is seeking input from the community about PV reliability and how the DOE might address gaps in understanding. This presentation describes the types of testing that are needed for PV reliability and introduces a discussion to identify gaps in our understanding of PV reliability testing.

  5. Making Reliability Arguments in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Jay; Giron, Tilia

    2006-01-01

    Reliability methodology needs to evolve as validity has done into an argument supported by theory and empirical evidence. Nowhere is the inadequacy of current methods more visible than in classroom assessment. Reliability arguments would also permit additional methodologies for evidencing reliability in classrooms. It would liberalize methodology…

  6. Discrete Reliability Projection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Defense, Handbook MIL - HDBK -189C, 2011 Hall, J. B., Methodology for Evaluating Reliability Growth Programs of Discrete Systems, Ph.D. thesis, University...pk,i ] · [ 1− (1− θ̆k) · ( N k · T )]k−m , (2.13) 5 2 Hall’s Model where m is the number of observed failure modes and d∗i estimates di (either based...Mode Failures FEF Ni d ∗ i 1 1 0.95 2 1 0.70 3 1 0.90 4 1 0.90 5 4 0.95 6 2 0.70 7 1 0.80 Using equations 2.1 and 2.2 we can calculate the failure

  7. Computational methods for efficient structural reliability and reliability sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.-T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents recent developments in efficient structural reliability analysis methods. The paper proposes an efficient, adaptive importance sampling (AIS) method that can be used to compute reliability and reliability sensitivities. The AIS approach uses a sampling density that is proportional to the joint PDF of the random variables. Starting from an initial approximate failure domain, sampling proceeds adaptively and incrementally with the goal of reaching a sampling domain that is slightly greater than the failure domain to minimize over-sampling in the safe region. Several reliability sensitivity coefficients are proposed that can be computed directly and easily from the above AIS-based failure points. These probability sensitivities can be used for identifying key random variables and for adjusting design to achieve reliability-based objectives. The proposed AIS methodology is demonstrated using a turbine blade reliability analysis problem.

  8. The challenges of uncertainty and interprofessional collaboration in palliative care for non-cancer patients in the community: A systematic review of views from patients, carers and health-care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Murtagh, Fliss EM

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary care has the potential to play significant roles in providing effective palliative care for non-cancer patients. Aim: To identify, critically appraise and synthesise the existing evidence on views on the provision of palliative care for non-cancer patients by primary care providers and reveal any gaps in the evidence. Design: Standard systematic review and narrative synthesis. Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Applied Social Science Abstract and the Cochrane library were searched in 2012. Reference searching, hand searching, expert consultations and grey literature searches complemented these. Papers with the views of patients/carers or professionals on primary palliative care provision to non-cancer patients in the community were included. The amended Hawker’s criteria were used for quality assessment of included studies. Results: A total of 30 studies were included and represent the views of 719 patients, 605 carers and over 400 professionals. In all, 27 studies are from the United Kingdom. Patients and carers expect primary care physicians to provide compassionate care, have appropriate knowledge and play central roles in providing care. The roles of professionals are unclear to patients, carers and professionals themselves. Uncertainty of illness trajectory and lack of collaboration between health-care professionals were identified as barriers to effective care. Conclusions: Effective interprofessional work to deal with uncertainty and maintain coordinated care is needed for better palliative care provision to non-cancer patients in the community. Research into and development of a best model for effective interdisciplinary work are needed. PMID:24821710

  9. Reliability of Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dâmaso, Antônio; Rosa, Nelson; Maciel, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) consist of hundreds or thousands of sensor nodes with limited processing, storage, and battery capabilities. There are several strategies to reduce the power consumption of WSN nodes (by increasing the network lifetime) and increase the reliability of the network (by improving the WSN Quality of Service). However, there is an inherent conflict between power consumption and reliability: an increase in reliability usually leads to an increase in power consumption. For example, routing algorithms can send the same packet though different paths (multipath strategy), which it is important for reliability, but they significantly increase the WSN power consumption. In this context, this paper proposes a model for evaluating the reliability of WSNs considering the battery level as a key factor. Moreover, this model is based on routing algorithms used by WSNs. In order to evaluate the proposed models, three scenarios were considered to show the impact of the power consumption on the reliability of WSNs. PMID:25157553

  10. Nuclear weapon reliability evaluation methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.L.

    1993-06-01

    This document provides an overview of those activities that are normally performed by Sandia National Laboratories to provide nuclear weapon reliability evaluations for the Department of Energy. These reliability evaluations are first provided as a prediction of the attainable stockpile reliability of a proposed weapon design. Stockpile reliability assessments are provided for each weapon type as the weapon is fielded and are continuously updated throughout the weapon stockpile life. The reliability predictions and assessments depend heavily on data from both laboratory simulation and actual flight tests. An important part of the methodology are the opportunities for review that occur throughout the entire process that assure a consistent approach and appropriate use of the data for reliability evaluation purposes.

  11. ‘The living death of Alzheimer's’ versus ‘Take a walk to keep dementia at bay’: representations of dementia in print media and carer discourse

    PubMed Central

    Peel, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Understanding dementia is a pressing social challenge. This article draws on the ‘Dementia talking: care conversation and communication’ project which aims to understand how talk about, and to people living with dementia is constructed. In this article I draw on the construction of dementia manifest in two data sets – a corpus of 350 recent UK national newspaper articles and qualitative data derived from in-depth interviews with informal carers. These data were analysed using a thematic discursive approach. A ‘panic-blame’ framework was evident in much of the print media coverage. Dementia was represented in catastrophic terms as a ‘tsunami’ and ‘worse than death’, juxtaposed with coverage of individualistic behavioural change and lifestyle recommendations to ‘stave off’ the condition. Contrary to this media discourse, in carers' talk there was scant use of hyperbolic metaphor or reference to individual responsibility for dementia, and any corresponding blame and accountability. I argue that the presence of individualistic dementia ‘preventative’ behaviour in media discourse is problematic, especially in comparison to other more ‘controllable’ and treatable chronic conditions. Engagement with, and critique of, the nascent panic-blame cultural context may be fruitful in enhancing positive social change for people diagnosed with dementia and their carers. PMID:24935028

  12. A fourth generation reliability predictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Martensen, Anna L.

    1988-01-01

    A reliability/availability predictor computer program has been developed and is currently being beta-tested by over 30 US companies. The computer program is called the Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP). HARP was developed to fill an important gap in reliability assessment capabilities. This gap was manifested through the use of its third-generation cousin, the Computer-Aided Reliability Estimation (CARE III) program, over a six-year development period and an additional three-year period during which CARE III has been in the public domain. The accumulated experience of the over 30 establishments now using CARE III was used in the development of the HARP program.

  13. Stirling Convertor Fasteners Reliability Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor; Kovacevich, Tiodor; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Onboard Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) being developed for NASA s deep-space science and exploration missions require reliable operation for up to 14 years and beyond. Stirling power conversion is a candidate for use in an RPS because it offers a multifold increase in the conversion efficiency of heat to electric power and reduced inventory of radioactive material. Structural fasteners are responsible to maintain structural integrity of the Stirling power convertor, which is critical to ensure reliable performance during the entire mission. Design of fasteners involve variables related to the fabrication, manufacturing, behavior of fasteners and joining parts material, structural geometry of the joining components, size and spacing of fasteners, mission loads, boundary conditions, etc. These variables have inherent uncertainties, which need to be accounted for in the reliability assessment. This paper describes these uncertainties along with a methodology to quantify the reliability, and provides results of the analysis in terms of quantified reliability and sensitivity of Stirling power conversion reliability to the design variables. Quantification of the reliability includes both structural and functional aspects of the joining components. Based on the results, the paper also describes guidelines to improve the reliability and verification testing.

  14. The Reliability of Density Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crothers, Charles

    1978-01-01

    Data from a land-use study of small- and medium-sized towns in New Zealand are used to ascertain the relationship between official and effective density measures. It was found that the reliability of official measures of density is very low overall, although reliability increases with community size. (Author/RLV)

  15. Computer-Aided Reliability Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, S. J.; Stiffler, J. J.; Bryant, L. A.; Petersen, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    CARE III (Computer-Aided Reliability Estimation, Third Generation) helps estimate reliability of complex, redundant, fault-tolerant systems. Program specifically designed for evaluation of fault-tolerant avionics systems. However, CARE III general enough for use in evaluation of other systems as well.

  16. The Validity of Reliability Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, G. M.

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates that some commonly used indices can be misleading in their quantification of reliability. The effects are most pronounced on gain or difference scores. Proposals are made to avoid sources of invalidity by using a procedure to assess reliability in terms of upper and lower limits for the true scores of each examinee. (Author/JDH)

  17. Reliability in CMOS IC processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shreeve, R.; Ferrier, S.; Hall, D.; Wang, J.

    1990-01-01

    Critical CMOS IC processing reliability monitors are defined in this paper. These monitors are divided into three categories: process qualifications, ongoing production workcell monitors, and ongoing reliability monitors. The key measures in each of these categories are identified and prioritized based on their importance.

  18. Essay Reliability: Form and Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shale, Doug

    This study is an attempt at a cohesive characterization of the concept of essay reliability. As such, it takes as a basic premise that previous and current practices in reporting reliability estimates for essay tests have certain shortcomings. The study provides an analysis of these shortcomings--partly to encourage a fuller understanding of the…

  19. Reliability-based design optimization using efficient global reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Bichon, Barron J.; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Eldred, Michael Scott

    2010-05-01

    Finding the optimal (lightest, least expensive, etc.) design for an engineered component that meets or exceeds a specified level of reliability is a problem of obvious interest across a wide spectrum of engineering fields. Various methods for this reliability-based design optimization problem have been proposed. Unfortunately, this problem is rarely solved in practice because, regardless of the method used, solving the problem is too expensive or the final solution is too inaccurate to ensure that the reliability constraint is actually satisfied. This is especially true for engineering applications involving expensive, implicit, and possibly nonlinear performance functions (such as large finite element models). The Efficient Global Reliability Analysis method was recently introduced to improve both the accuracy and efficiency of reliability analysis for this type of performance function. This paper explores how this new reliability analysis method can be used in a design optimization context to create a method of sufficient accuracy and efficiency to enable the use of reliability-based design optimization as a practical design tool.

  20. Photovoltaic performance and reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was the sixth in a series of workshops sponsored by NREL/DOE under the general subject of photovoltaic testing and reliability during the period 1986--1993. PV performance and PV reliability are at least as important as PV cost, if not more. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities, and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in the field were brought together to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this evolving field of PV reliability. The papers presented here reflect this effort since the last workshop held in September, 1992. The topics covered include: cell and module characterization, module and system testing, durability and reliability, system field experience, and standards and codes.

  1. Statistical modeling of software reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Douglas R.

    1992-01-01

    This working paper discusses the statistical simulation part of a controlled software development experiment being conducted under the direction of the System Validation Methods Branch, Information Systems Division, NASA Langley Research Center. The experiment uses guidance and control software (GCS) aboard a fictitious planetary landing spacecraft: real-time control software operating on a transient mission. Software execution is simulated to study the statistical aspects of reliability and other failure characteristics of the software during development, testing, and random usage. Quantification of software reliability is a major goal. Various reliability concepts are discussed. Experiments are described for performing simulations and collecting appropriate simulated software performance and failure data. This data is then used to make statistical inferences about the quality of the software development and verification processes as well as inferences about the reliability of software versions and reliability growth under random testing and debugging.

  2. Software Reliability, Measurement, and Testing Software Reliability and Test Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    process rariables on software reliability A guidebook was produced to help pro- gram managers control and manage softwar~e reliability and testing...Integrated Reliability Management System "IRMS" 17 1.6 Organization of Report 17 2.0 SURVEYS 20 2.1 Software Projects Survey 20 2.1.1 Candidate Projects...Systems 103 4.2.2.3 Compiler 103 4.2.2.4 Data Management and Analysis 103 4.2.3 Test/Support Tools 103 4.2.3.1 DEC Test Manager 103 4.2.3.2 SDDL 103

  3. A reliable multicast for XTP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Bert J.; Weaver, Alfred C.

    1990-01-01

    Multicast services needed for current distributed applications on LAN's fall generally into one of three categories: datagram, semi-reliable, and reliable. Transport layer multicast datagrams represent unreliable service in which the transmitting context 'fires and forgets'. XTP executes these semantics when the MULTI and NOERR mode bits are both set. Distributing sensor data and other applications in which application-level error recovery strategies are appropriate benefit from the efficiency in multidestination delivery offered by datagram service. Semi-reliable service refers to multicasting in which the control algorithms of the transport layer--error, flow, and rate control--are used in transferring the multicast distribution to the set of receiving contexts, the multicast group. The multicast defined in XTP provides semi-reliable service. Since, under a semi-reliable service, joining a multicast group means listening on the group address and entails no coordination with other members, a semi-reliable facility can be used for communication between a client and a server group as well as true peer-to-peer group communication. Resource location in a LAN is an important application domain. The term 'semi-reliable' refers to the fact that group membership changes go undetected. No attempt is made to assess the current membership of the group at any time--before, during, or after--the data transfer.

  4. Calculating system reliability with SRFYDO

    SciTech Connect

    Morzinski, Jerome; Anderson - Cook, Christine M; Klamann, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    SRFYDO is a process for estimating reliability of complex systems. Using information from all applicable sources, including full-system (flight) data, component test data, and expert (engineering) judgment, SRFYDO produces reliability estimates and predictions. It is appropriate for series systems with possibly several versions of the system which share some common components. It models reliability as a function of age and up to 2 other lifecycle (usage) covariates. Initial output from its Exploratory Data Analysis mode consists of plots and numerical summaries so that the user can check data entry and model assumptions, and help determine a final form for the system model. The System Reliability mode runs a complete reliability calculation using Bayesian methodology. This mode produces results that estimate reliability at the component, sub-system, and system level. The results include estimates of uncertainty, and can predict reliability at some not-too-distant time in the future. This paper presents an overview of the underlying statistical model for the analysis, discusses model assumptions, and demonstrates usage of SRFYDO.

  5. (Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CRDO))

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M J

    1987-04-21

    One of the primary goals of the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) is to be an international focal point for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of liquid metal reactor (LMR) component reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) data. During FY-1985, the Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a Specific Memorandum of Agreement (SMA) with Japan's Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) regarding cooperative data exchange efforts. This agreement was CREDO's first step toward internationalization and represented an initial realization of the previously mentioned goal. DOE's interest in further internationalization of the CREDO system was the primary motivation for the traveler's attendance at the Reliability '87 conference.

  6. Integrated modular engine - Reliability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsley, R. C.; Ward, T. B.

    1992-07-01

    A major driver in the increased interest in integrated modular engine configurations is the desire for ultra reliability for future rocket propulsion systems. The concept of configuring multiple sets of turbomachinery networked to multiple thrust chamber assemblies has been identified as an approach with potential to achieve significant reliability enhancement. This paper summarizes the results of a reliability study comparing networked systems vs. discrete engine installations, both with and without major module and engine redundancy. The study was conducted for gas generator, expander, and staged combustion cycles. The results are representative of either booster or upper-stage applications and are indicative of either plug or nonplug installation philosophies.

  7. Aerospace reliability applied to biomedicine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Vargo, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented that indicates that the reliability and quality assurance methodology selected by NASA to minimize failures in aerospace equipment can be applied directly to biomedical devices to improve hospital equipment reliability. The Space Electric Rocket Test project is used as an example of NASA application of reliability and quality assurance (R&QA) methods. By analogy a comparison is made to show how these same methods can be used in the development of transducers, instrumentation, and complex systems for use in medicine.

  8. Reliability science and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Luria, Joseph W; Muething, Stephen E; Schoettker, Pamela J; Kotagal, Uma R

    2006-12-01

    Reliability is failure-free operation over time--the measurable capability of a process, procedure, or service to perform its intended function. Reliability science has the potential to help health care organizations reduce defects in care, increase the consistency with which care is delivered, and improve patient outcomes. Based on its principles, the Institute for Health care Improvement has developed a three-step model to prevent failures, mitigate the failures that occur, and redesign systems to reduce failures. Lessons may also be learned from complex organizations that have already adopted the principles of reliability science and operate with high rates of reliability. They share a preoccupation with failure, reluctance to simplify interpretations, sensitivity to operations, commitment to resilience, and underspecification of structures.

  9. How Reliable Is Laboratory Testing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: Was this page helpful? Overview | Key Concepts | Quality Control | Role of Testing | Conclusion | Sources What are the ... but is constantly monitored for reliability through comprehensive quality control and quality assurance procedures. Therefore, when your blood ...

  10. Reliability and Maintainability (RAM) Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, Vincent R. (Editor); Malec, Henry A. (Editor); Packard, Michael H. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The theme of this manual is failure physics-the study of how products, hardware, software, and systems fail and what can be done about it. The intent is to impart useful information, to extend the limits of production capability, and to assist in achieving low-cost reliable products. In a broader sense the manual should do more. It should underscore the urgent need CI for mature attitudes toward reliability. Five of the chapters were originally presented as a classroom course to over 1000 Martin Marietta engineers and technicians. Another four chapters and three appendixes have been added, We begin with a view of reliability from the years 1940 to 2000. Chapter 2 starts the training material with a review of mathematics and a description of what elements contribute to product failures. The remaining chapters elucidate basic reliability theory and the disciplines that allow us to control and eliminate failures.

  11. Accelerator Availability and Reliability Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Suhring

    2003-05-01

    Maintaining reliable machine operations for existing machines as well as planning for future machines' operability present significant challenges to those responsible for system performance and improvement. Changes to machine requirements and beam specifications often reduce overall machine availability in an effort to meet user needs. Accelerator reliability issues from around the world will be presented, followed by a discussion of the major factors influencing machine availability.

  12. Reliability Validation and Improvement Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    discover and remove bugs using various test cover- age metrics to determine test sufficiency. Failure-probability density function based on code met- rics ...Coverage Metrics Traditional reliability engineering has focused on fault density and reliability growth as key met- rics . These are statistical...abs_all.jsp?arnumber=781027 [Kwiatkowska 2010] Kwiatkowska, M., Norman, G., & Parker , D. “Advances and Challenges of Probabilistic Model Checking

  13. Robust fusion with reliabilities weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandin, Jean-Francois; Marques, Miguel

    2002-03-01

    The reliability is a value of the degree of trust in a given measurement. We analyze and compare: ML (Classical Maximum Likelihood), MLE (Maximum Likelihood weighted by Entropy), MLR (Maximum Likelihood weighted by Reliability), MLRE (Maximum Likelihood weighted by Reliability and Entropy), DS (Credibility Plausibility), DSR (DS weighted by reliabilities). The analysis is based on a model of a dynamical fusion process. It is composed of three sensors, which have each it's own discriminatory capacity, reliability rate, unknown bias and measurement noise. The knowledge of uncertainties is also severely corrupted, in order to analyze the robustness of the different fusion operators. Two sensor models are used: the first type of sensor is able to estimate the probability of each elementary hypothesis (probabilistic masses), the second type of sensor delivers masses on union of elementary hypotheses (DS masses). In the second case probabilistic reasoning leads to sharing the mass abusively between elementary hypotheses. Compared to the classical ML or DS which achieves just 50% of correct classification in some experiments, DSR, MLE, MLR and MLRE reveals very good performances on all experiments (more than 80% of correct classification rate). The experiment was performed with large variations of the reliability coefficients for each sensor (from 0 to 1), and with large variations on the knowledge of these coefficients (from 0 0.8). All four operators reveal good robustness, but the MLR reveals to be uniformly dominant on all the experiments in the Bayesian case and achieves the best mean performance under incomplete a priori information.

  14. MEMS reliability: coming of age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Michael R.

    2008-02-01

    In today's high-volume semiconductor world, one could easily take reliability for granted. As the MOEMS/MEMS industry continues to establish itself as a viable alternative to conventional manufacturing in the macro world, reliability can be of high concern. Currently, there are several emerging market opportunities in which MOEMS/MEMS is gaining a foothold. Markets such as mobile media, consumer electronics, biomedical devices, and homeland security are all showing great interest in microfabricated products. At the same time, these markets are among the most demanding when it comes to reliability assurance. To be successful, each company developing a MOEMS/MEMS device must consider reliability on an equal footing with cost, performance and manufacturability. What can this maturing industry learn from the successful development of DLP technology, air bag accelerometers and inkjet printheads? This paper discusses some basic reliability principles which any MOEMS/MEMS device development must use. Examples from the commercially successful and highly reliable Digital Micromirror Device complement the discussion.

  15. Reliability of plantar pressure platforms.

    PubMed

    Hafer, Jocelyn F; Lenhoff, Mark W; Song, Jinsup; Jordan, Joanne M; Hannan, Marian T; Hillstrom, Howard J

    2013-07-01

    Plantar pressure measurement is common practice in many research and clinical protocols. While the accuracy of some plantar pressure measuring devices and methods for ensuring consistency in data collection on plantar pressure measuring devices have been reported, the reliability of different devices when testing the same individuals is not known. This study calculated intra-mat, intra-manufacturer, and inter-manufacturer reliability of plantar pressure parameters as well as the number of plantar pressure trials needed to reach a stable estimate of the mean for an individual. Twenty-two healthy adults completed ten walking trials across each of two Novel emed-x(®) and two Tekscan MatScan(®) plantar pressure measuring devices in a single visit. Intraclass correlation (ICC) was used to describe the agreement between values measured by different devices. All intra-platform reliability correlations were greater than 0.70. All inter-emed-x(®) reliability correlations were greater than 0.70. Inter-MatScan(®) reliability correlations were greater than 0.70 in 31 and 52 of 56 parameters when looking at a 10-trial average and a 5-trial average, respectively. Inter-manufacturer reliability including all four devices was greater than 0.70 for 52 and 56 of 56 parameters when looking at a 10-trial average and a 5-trial average, respectively. All parameters reached a value within 90% of an unbiased estimate of the mean within five trials. Overall, reliability results are encouraging for investigators and clinicians who may have plantar pressure data sets that include data collected on different devices.

  16. 18 CFR 39.11 - Reliability reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reliability reports. 39... RELIABILITY ORGANIZATION; AND PROCEDURES FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT, APPROVAL, AND ENFORCEMENT OF ELECTRIC RELIABILITY STANDARDS § 39.11 Reliability reports. (a) The Electric Reliability Organization shall...

  17. Cost effectiveness of a manual based coping strategy programme in promoting the mental health of family carers of people with dementia (the START (STrAtegies for RelaTives) study): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    King, Derek; Romeo, Renee; Schehl, Barbara; Barber, Julie; Griffin, Mark; Rapaport, Penny; Livingston, Debbie; Mummery, Cath; Walker, Zuzana; Hoe, Juanita; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Cooper, Claudia; Livingston, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the START (STrAtegies for RelatTives) intervention added to treatment as usual is cost effective compared with usual treatment alone. Design Cost effectiveness analysis nested within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Setting Three mental health and one neurological outpatient dementia service in London and Essex, UK. Participants Family carers of people with dementia. Intervention Eight session, manual based, coping intervention delivered by supervised psychology graduates to family carers of people with dementia added to usual treatment, compared with usual treatment alone. Primary outcome measures Costs measured from a health and social care perspective were analysed alongside the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale total score (HADS-T) of affective symptoms and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) in cost effectiveness analyses over eight months from baseline. Results Of the 260 participants recruited to the study, 173 were randomised to the START intervention, and 87 to usual treatment alone. Mean HADS-T scores were lower in the intervention group than the usual treatment group over the 8 month evaluation period (mean difference −1.79 (95% CI −3.32 to −0.33)), indicating better outcomes associated with the START intervention. There was a small improvement in health related quality of life as measured by QALYs (0.03 (−0.01 to 0.08)). Costs were no different between the intervention and usual treatment groups (£252 (−28 to 565) higher for START group). The cost effectiveness calculations suggested that START had a greater than 99% chance of being cost effective compared with usual treatment alone at a willingness to pay threshold of £30 000 per QALY gained, and a high probability of cost effectiveness on the HADS-T measure. Conclusions The manual based coping intervention START, when added to treatment as usual, was cost effective compared with treatment as usual alone by reference to both outcome measures

  18. Reliability model for planetary gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Paridon, C. A.; Coy, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    A reliability model is presented for planetary gear trains in which the ring gear is fixed, the Sun gear is the input, and the planet arm is the output. The input and output shafts are coaxial and the input and output torques are assumed to be coaxial with these shafts. Thrust and side loading are neglected. This type of gear train is commonly used in main rotor transmissions for helicopters and in other applications which require high reductions in speed. The reliability model is based on the Weibull distribution of the individual reliabilities of the transmission components. The transmission's basic dynamic capacity is defined as the input torque which may be applied for one million input rotations of the Sun gear. Load and life are related by a power law. The load life exponent and basic dynamic capacity are developed as functions of the component capacities.

  19. Electronics reliability and measurement technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A summary is presented of the Electronics Reliability and Measurement Technology Workshop. The meeting examined the U.S. electronics industry with particular focus on reliability and state-of-the-art technology. A general consensus of the approximately 75 attendees was that "the U.S. electronics industries are facing a crisis that may threaten their existence". The workshop had specific objectives to discuss mechanisms to improve areas such as reliability, yield, and performance while reducing failure rates, delivery times, and cost. The findings of the workshop addressed various aspects of the industry from wafers to parts to assemblies. Key problem areas that were singled out for attention are identified, and action items necessary to accomplish their resolution are recommended.

  20. A Review of Score Reliability: Contemporary Thinking on Reliability Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Gerald A.

    2004-01-01

    Bruce Thompson's edited volume begins with a basic principle, one might call it a basic truth, "reliability is a property that applies to scores, and not immutably across all conceivable uses everywhere of a given measure." (p. 3). The author claims that this principle is little known and-or little understood. While that is an arguable point, the…

  1. Designing magnetic systems for reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzenroeder, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    Designing magnetic system is an iterative process in which the requirements are set, a design is developed, materials and manufacturing processes are defined, interrelationships with the various elements of the system are established, engineering analyses are performed, and fault modes and effects are studied. Reliability requires that all elements of the design process, from the seemingly most straightforward such as utilities connection design and implementation, to the most sophisticated such as advanced finite element analyses, receives a balanced and appropriate level of attention. D.B. Montgomery's study of magnet failures has shown that the predominance of magnet failures tend not to be in the most intensively engineered areas, but are associated with insulation, leads, ad unanticipated conditions. TFTR, JET, JT-60, and PBX are all major tokamaks which have suffered loss of reliability due to water leaks. Similarly the majority of causes of loss of magnet reliability at PPPL has not been in the sophisticated areas of the design but are due to difficulties associated with coolant connections, bus connections, and external structural connections. Looking towards the future, the major next-devices such as BPX and ITER are most costly and complex than any of their predecessors and are pressing the bounds of operating levels, materials, and fabrication. Emphasis on reliability is a must as the fusion program enters a phase where there are fewer, but very costly devices with the goal of reaching a reactor prototype stage in the next two or three decades. This paper reviews some of the magnet reliability issues which PPPL has faced over the years the lessons learned from them, and magnet design and fabrication practices which have been found to contribute to magnet reliability.

  2. 78 FR 58492 - Generator Verification Reliability Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 40 Generator Verification Reliability Standards AGENCY: Federal... approve the following Reliability Standards that were submitted to the Commission for approval by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation, the Commission-certified Electric...

  3. 76 FR 16277 - System Restoration Reliability Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 40 System Restoration Reliability Standards AGENCY: Federal... Act, the Commission approves three Emergency Operations and Preparedness (EOP) Reliability Standards... Resource'' submitted to the Commission for approval by the North American Electric Reliability...

  4. 18 CFR 39.5 - Reliability Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... competition. (d) An approved Reliability Standard or modification to a Reliability Standard shall take effect... will not defer to the Electric Reliability Organization or a Regional Entity with respect to the...

  5. Photovoltaic power system reliability considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.

    1980-01-01

    An example of how modern engineering and safety techniques can be used to assure the reliable and safe operation of photovoltaic power systems is presented. This particular application is for a solar cell power system demonstration project designed to provide electric power requirements for remote villages. The techniques utilized involve a definition of the power system natural and operating environment, use of design criteria and analysis techniques, an awareness of potential problems via the inherent reliability and FMEA methods, and use of fail-safe and planned spare parts engineering philosophy.

  6. Metrological Reliability of Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Monteiro, E.; Leon, L. F.

    2015-02-01

    The prominent development of health technologies of the 20th century triggered demands for metrological reliability of physiological measurements comprising physical, chemical and biological quantities, essential to ensure accurate and comparable results of clinical measurements. In the present work, aspects concerning metrological reliability in premarket and postmarket assessments of medical devices are discussed, pointing out challenges to be overcome. In addition, considering the social relevance of the biomeasurements results, Biometrological Principles to be pursued by research and innovation aimed at biomedical applications are proposed, along with the analysis of their contributions to guarantee the innovative health technologies compliance with the main ethical pillars of Bioethics.

  7. Mechanically reliable scales and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Alexander, K.B.

    1995-07-01

    As the first stage in examining the mechanical reliability of protective surface oxides, the behavior of alumina scales formed on iron-aluminum alloys during high-temperature cyclic oxidation was characterized in terms of damage and spallation tendencies. Scales were thermally grown on specimens of three iron-aluminum composition using a series of exposures to air at 1000{degrees}C. Gravimetric data and microscopy revealed substantially better integrity and adhesion of the scales grown on an alloy containing zirconium. The use of polished (rather than just ground) specimens resulted in scales that were more suitable for subsequent characterization of mechanical reliability.

  8. Reliability Analysis of Money Habitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgadillo, Lucy M.; Bushman, Brittani S.

    2015-01-01

    Use of the Money Habitudes exercise has gained popularity among various financial professionals. This article reports on the reliability of this resource. A survey administered to young adults at a western state university was conducted, and each Habitude or "domain" was analyzed using Cronbach's alpha procedures. Results showed all six…

  9. Reliability and cost analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suich, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    In the design phase of a system, how does a design engineer or manager choose between a subsystem with .990 reliability and a more costly subsystem with .995 reliability? When is the increased cost justified? High reliability is not necessarily an end in itself but may be desirable in order to reduce the expected cost due to subsystem failure. However, this may not be the wisest use of funds since the expected cost due to subsystem failure is not the only cost involved. The subsystem itself may be very costly. We should not consider either the cost of the subsystem or the expected cost due to subsystem failure separately but should minimize the total of the two costs, i.e., the total of the cost of the subsystem plus the expected cost due to subsystem failure. This final report discusses the Combined Analysis of Reliability, Redundancy, and Cost (CARRAC) methods which were developed under Grant Number NAG 3-1100 from the NASA Lewis Research Center. CARRAC methods and a CARRAC computer program employ five models which can be used to cover a wide range of problems. The models contain an option which can include repair of failed modules.

  10. Interactive Maximum Reliability Cluster Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Robert

    1978-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for clustering variables using the alpha coefficient of reliability is described. For batch operation, a rule for stopping the agglomerative precedure is available. The conversational version of the program allows the user to intervene in the process in order to test the final solution for sensitivity to changes. (Author/JKS)

  11. The Reliability of College Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Adam S.; Walmsley, Philip T.; Sackett, Paul R.; Kuncel, Nathan R.; Koch, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the reliability of college grades relative to how prominently they are used in educational research, and the results to date tend to be based on small sample studies or are decades old. This study uses two large databases (N > 800,000) from over 200 educational institutions spanning 13 years and finds that both first-year…

  12. Becoming a high reliability organization.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Marlys K; Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Miller, Melissa A; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft carriers, electrical power grids, and wildland firefighting, though seemingly different, are exemplars of high reliability organizations (HROs)--organizations that have the potential for catastrophic failure yet engage in nearly error-free performance. HROs commit to safety at the highest level and adopt a special approach to its pursuit. High reliability organizing has been studied and discussed for some time in other industries and is receiving increasing attention in health care, particularly in high-risk settings like the intensive care unit (ICU). The essence of high reliability organizing is a set of principles that enable organizations to focus attention on emergent problems and to deploy the right set of resources to address those problems. HROs behave in ways that sometimes seem counterintuitive--they do not try to hide failures but rather celebrate them as windows into the health of the system, they seek out problems, they avoid focusing on just one aspect of work and are able to see how all the parts of work fit together, they expect unexpected events and develop the capability to manage them, and they defer decision making to local frontline experts who are empowered to solve problems. Given the complexity of patient care in the ICU, the potential for medical error, and the particular sensitivity of critically ill patients to harm, high reliability organizing principles hold promise for improving ICU patient care.

  13. Wind turbine reliability database update.

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Valerie A.; Hill, Roger Ray; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.; Veers, Paul S.

    2009-03-01

    This report documents the status of the Sandia National Laboratories' Wind Plant Reliability Database. Included in this report are updates on the form and contents of the Database, which stems from a fivestep process of data partnerships, data definition and transfer, data formatting and normalization, analysis, and reporting. Selected observations are also reported.

  14. Wanted: A Solid, Reliable PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses PC reliability, one of the most pressing issues regarding computers. Nearly a quarter century after the introduction of the first IBM PC and the outset of the personal computer revolution, PCs have largely become commodities, with little differentiating one brand from another in terms of capability and performance. Most of…

  15. The Humanities versus Interrater Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RiCharde, R. Stephen

    2008-01-01

    A persistent conflict between assessment professionals and faculty members in the humanities seems to focus inevitably on resistance to the concept of interrater reliability. While humanities faculty are often willing to engage in course-embedded assessment that uses some type of scoring rubric, when the demand for agreement in scoring is…

  16. Photovoltaic performance and reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B

    1996-10-01

    This proceedings is the compilation of papers presented at the ninth PV Performance and Reliability Workshop held at the Sheraton Denver West Hotel on September 4--6, 1996. This years workshop included presentations from 25 speakers and had over 100 attendees. All of the presentations that were given are included in this proceedings. Topics of the papers included: defining service lifetime and developing models for PV module lifetime; examining and determining failure and degradation mechanisms in PV modules; combining IEEE/IEC/UL testing procedures; AC module performance and reliability testing; inverter reliability/qualification testing; standardization of utility interconnect requirements for PV systems; need activities to separate variables by testing individual components of PV systems (e.g. cells, modules, batteries, inverters,charge controllers) for individual reliability and then test them in actual system configurations; more results reported from field experience on modules, inverters, batteries, and charge controllers from field deployed PV systems; and system certification and standardized testing for stand-alone and grid-tied systems.

  17. Power Quality and Reliability Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attia, John O.

    2001-01-01

    One area where universities and industry can link is in the area of power systems reliability and quality - key concepts in the commercial, industrial and public sector engineering environments. Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU) has established a collaborative relationship with the University of'Texas at Arlington (UTA), NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC), and EP&C Engineering and Technology Group (EP&C) a small disadvantage business that specializes in power quality and engineering services. The primary goal of this collaboration is to facilitate the development and implementation of a Strategic Integrated power/Systems Reliability and Curriculum Enhancement Program. The objectives of first phase of this work are: (a) to develop a course in power quality and reliability, (b) to use the campus of Prairie View A&M University as a laboratory for the study of systems reliability and quality issues, (c) to provide students with NASA/EPC shadowing and Internship experience. In this work, a course, titled "Reliability Analysis of Electrical Facilities" was developed and taught for two semesters. About thirty seven has benefited directly from this course. A laboratory accompanying the course was also developed. Four facilities at Prairie View A&M University were surveyed. Some tests that were performed are (i) earth-ground testing, (ii) voltage, amperage and harmonics of various panels in the buildings, (iii) checking the wire sizes to see if they were the right size for the load that they were carrying, (iv) vibration tests to test the status of the engines or chillers and water pumps, (v) infrared testing to the test arcing or misfiring of electrical or mechanical systems.

  18. Reliability prediction for a class of highly reliable digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Allan L.

    1992-01-01

    Three theorems which show that the reliability of a popular class of systems can be computed using small and simple models are presented. This class consists of systems that are assemblages of subsystems where each subsystem is a majority-voting threeplex plus spares or majority-voting fourplex plus spares. The theorems are error bounds for model reduction and simplification. The error bounds are given in terms of readily available system parameters. The three theorems have been applied to a system that has been used as an example that generates extremely large reliability models; the system considered is one version of AIPS (Advanced Information Processing System) for IAPSA (Integrated Airframe Propulsion System Architecture).

  19. Reliability prediction for a class of highly reliable digital systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Allan L.

    Three theorems which show that the reliability of a popular class of systems can be computed using small and simple models are presented. This class consists of systems that are assemblages of subsystems where each subsystem is a majority-voting threeplex plus spares or majority-voting fourplex plus spares. The theorems are error bounds for model reduction and simplification. The error bounds are given in terms of readily available system parameters. The three theorems have been applied to a system that has been used as an example that generates extremely large reliability models; the system considered is one version of AIPS (Advanced Information Processing System) for IAPSA (Integrated Airframe Propulsion System Architecture).

  20. Babies and toddlers in non-parental daycare can avoid stress and anxiety if they develop a lasting secondary attachment bond with one carer who is consistently accessible to them.

    PubMed

    Bowlby, Richard

    2007-12-01

    Babies and toddlers will have their attachment seeking response activated in the absence of the primary or a secondary attachment figure when they are in the presence of a stranger and in unfamiliar surroundings. Between the ages of about 6 months and 30 months, babies and toddlers can only terminate their attachment seeking response by reaching proximity to an attachment figure, and unless this can be achieved their attachment seeking response will remain unterminated. This is the experience of many babies and toddlers each day during certain forms of non-parental daycare. Day-care without access to a secondary attachment figure is more likely to be the case in group settings such as day-nurseries, than when care is provided by an individual carer such as a childminder, nanny, or grandmother, who is more likely to be a secondary attachment figure. This paper discusses the likelihood of babies and toddlers being able to terminate their attachment seeking response during different forms of non-parental daycare, and discusses some of the psychological defence processes (including dissociation), that may be activated when the attachment seeking response remains unterminated throughout the day. This paper briefly examines a model of non-parental daycare that actively promotes and monitors long-term secondary attachment bonds between baby and carer.

  1. 78 FR 38311 - Reliability Technical Conference Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference Agenda Reliability Technical Docket No. AD13-6-000 Conference. North American Electric Docket No. RC11-6-004 Reliability Corporation. North American Electric Docket No. RR13-2-000 Reliability Corporation. Not consolidated. As announced in...

  2. 75 FR 71625 - System Restoration Reliability Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 40 System Restoration Reliability Standards November 18, 2010... to approve Reliability Standards EOP-001-1 (Emergency Operations Planning), EOP- 005-2 (System... Commission by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation, the Electric Reliability Organization...

  3. Neural Networks, Reliability and Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Neural network technology has been surveyed with the intent of determining the feasibility and impact neural networks may have in the area of...automated reliability tools. Data analysis capabilities of neural networks appear to be very applicable to reliability science due to similar mathematical...tendencies in data.... Neural networks , Reliability, Data analysis, Automated reliability tools, Automated intelligent information processing, Statistical neural network.

  4. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Bearing Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, J.

    2011-10-01

    NREL has initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) to investigate the root cause of the low wind turbine gearbox reliability. The GRC follows a multi-pronged approach based on a collaborative of manufacturers, owners, researchers and consultants. The project combines analysis, field testing, dynamometer testing, condition monitoring, and the development and population of a gearbox failure database. At the core of the project are two 750kW gearboxes that have been redesigned and rebuilt so that they are representative of the multi-megawatt gearbox topology currently used in the industry. These gearboxes are heavily instrumented and are tested in the field and on the dynamometer. This report discusses the bearing calibrations of the gearboxes.

  5. Three approaches to reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    It is noted that current reliability analysis tools differ not only in their solution techniques, but also in their approach to model abstraction. The analyst must be satisfied with the constraints that are intrinsic to any combination of solution technique and model abstraction. To get a better idea of the nature of these constraints, three reliability analysis tools (HARP, ASSIST/SURE, and CAME) were used to model portions of the Integrated Airframe/Propulsion Control System architecture. When presented with the example problem, all three tools failed to produce correct results. In all cases, either the tool or the model had to be modified. It is suggested that most of the difficulty is rooted in the large model size and long computational times which are characteristic of Markov model solutions.

  6. Kepler Reliability and Occurrence Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler mission has produced tables of exoplanet candidates (``KOI table''), as well as tables of transit detections (``TCE table''), hosted at the Exoplanet Archive (http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu). Transit detections in the TCE table that are plausibly due to a transiting object are selected for inclusion in the KOI table. KOI table entries that have not been identified as false positives (FPs) or false alarms (FAs) are classified as planet candidates (PCs, Mullally et al. 2015). A subset of PCs have been confirmed as planetary transits with greater than 99% probability, but most PCs have <99% probability of being true planets. The fraction of PCs that are true transiting planets is the PC reliability rate. The overall PC population is believed to have a reliability rate >90% (Morton & Johnson 2011).

  7. Bioantioxidants: the systems reliability standpoint.

    PubMed

    Koltover, V K

    2009-01-01

    The antioxidant power of the so-called antioxidants is negligible because their rate constants and concentrations are too small to compete with the specialized defense enzymes, like superoxide dismutase (SOD), for the reactive oxygen species. In this short review, we present a number of experimental data of our group, along with the relevant literature data, to show that in-vivo antioxidants increase the systems reliability in other tacks. For example, butylated hydroxytoluene can prevent production of O2*- in mitochondria, whereas flavonoids can induce expression of antioxidant enzymes, SOD and catalase. We suggest that the timely introduction of antioxidants can provide the beneficial physiological effects through the prophylactic reliability maintenance against reactive forms of oxygen via the hormonal system.

  8. Assessment of NDE Reliability Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, B. G. W.; Chang, F. H.; Covchman, J. C.; Lemon, G. H.; Packman, P. F.

    1976-01-01

    Twenty sets of relevant Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) reliability data have been identified, collected, compiled, and categorized. A criterion for the selection of data for statistical analysis considerations has been formulated. A model to grade the quality and validity of the data sets has been developed. Data input formats, which record the pertinent parameters of the defect/specimen and inspection procedures, have been formulated for each NDE method. A comprehensive computer program has been written to calculate the probability of flaw detection at several confidence levels by the binomial distribution. This program also selects the desired data sets for pooling and tests the statistical pooling criteria before calculating the composite detection reliability. Probability of detection curves at 95 and 50 percent confidence levels have been plotted for individual sets of relevant data as well as for several sets of merged data with common sets of NDE parameters.

  9. Ensuring reliability in expansion schemes.

    PubMed

    Kamal-Uddin, Abu Sayed; Williams, Donald Leigh

    2005-01-01

    Existing electricity power supplies must serve, or be adapted to serve, the expansion of hospital buildings. With the existing power supply assets of many hospitals being up to 20 years old, assessing the security and reliability of the power system must be given appropriate priority to avoid unplanned outages due to overloads and equipment failures. It is imperative that adequate contingency is planned for essential and non-essential electricity circuits. This article describes the methodology undertaken, and the subsequent recommendations that were made, when evaluating the security and reliability of electricity power supplies to a number of major London hospitals. The methodology described aligns with the latest issue of NHS Estates HTM 2011 'Primary Electrical Infrastructure Emergency Electrical Services Design Guidance' (to which ERA Technology has contributed).

  10. Nonelectronic Parts Reliability Data 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    design trade-off decisions involving factors such as cost , weight, power, performance, etc. A parts stress type prediction is typically refined to...provide a quantitative means of estimating the relative cost -benefit of these and other system level trade-off considerations. Predictions which are...Package Watt Wattage Freq Frequency Pop Population Wdg Winding Herm Hermeticity Pos Position X-Sec Cross Section Imp Impedance Reliability Analysis

  11. Reliability of Naval Radar Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    the driver uses as much prime power to produce a few watts as the output tube does to produce several kilo- watts. Large klystrons , such as the ones...ITEMS: transmitter ANTENNA SITE: 214 diam (7’) power resistors, sero amplifiers, ANTENNA GAIN (d): 41 encoder, klystron (4) POLARIZATION: horizontal...whM.ch will be developed are the differences in mission, power levels, stress, and costs allowed for the development and assurance of reliability. (U

  12. Reliability Research for Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes research approach used to improve reliability of photovoltaic modules. Aimed at raising useful module lifetime to 20 to 30 years. Development of cost-effective solutions to module-lifetime problem requires compromises between degradation rates, failure rates, and lifetimes, on one hand, and costs of initial manufacture, maintenance, and lost energy, on other hand. Life-cycle costing integrates disparate economic terms, allowing cost effectiveness to be quantified, allowing comparison of different design alternatives.

  13. Storage Reliability of Reserve Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    batteries – Environmental concerns, lack of business – Non-availability of some critical materials • Lithium Oxyhalides are systems of choice – Good...exhibit good corrosion resistance to neutral electrolytes (LiAlCl4 in thionyl chloride and sulfuryl chloride ) • Using AlCl3 creates a much more corrosive...Storage Reliability of Reserve Batteries Jeff Swank and Allan Goldberg Army Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 301-394-3116 jswank@arl.army.mil ll l

  14. Reliability Prediction for Aerospace Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-20

    methodology can be extended to include radiation effects, frequency, and even packaging and solder joint effects to give a complete system...assume that there is no failure analysis (FA) of the devices after the HTOL test, or that the manufacturer will not report FA results to the...effects, frequency and even packaging and solder joint effects to give a complete system reliability evaluation framework. This matrix gives a very

  15. Mission reliability model programmers guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Joseph M.; Simonson, Jonathan H.; Veatch, Michael H.

    1986-12-01

    The Mission Reliability Model (MIREM) has been developed to evaluate the reliability and sustained operating capability of advanced electronic circuits during the early stages of development. MIREM is applicable to integrated systems that achieve fault tolerance through dynamic fault detection, fault isolation, and reconfiguration. The model can also be valuable in evaluating designs that employ only dedicated or hard-wired redundancy. The most unique feature of MIREM is its ability to accurately reflect the impact of reconfigurable, competing functions on system reliability. The user defines the resources necessary to support a required function, e.g., Global Positioning System (GPS), and the model will compute the probability of losing that functional capability over a certain operating time. A critical failure occurs when there is not a sufficient number of working resources to support a specified function. As an analytic model, MIREM determines a value for Mean Time Between Critical Failure, Mission Completion Success Probability, and Failure Resiliency. The MIREM Programmers Guide addresses the model's program structure, function of routines, interdependence of subprograms and common blocks, and file usage. The information needed to port the model to other computer systems is also provided.

  16. LAMPF reliability history and program

    SciTech Connect

    van Dyck, O.

    1994-09-01

    Many years of service of the 800-MeV LAMPF H{sup +}/H{sup {minus}} linac offers the opportunity to evaluate the long-term reliability characteristics of a high-power machine, which with up to 800-kW beam power available is as close to an ADTT machine as exists in the world today. Records from the last 15 years of operation were analyzed for trends and areas of deteriorating reliability or disproportionate downtime and used to support engineering judgment on facility refurbishment to regain beam availability. This round of analysis has helped define a further level of detail and automation to be implemented in availability recording. Interesting features which emerge from the history include a clear measurement of the lower availability in the first operating cycle following extended maintenance periods, and a consistent picture of the highest availability to be expected in extended operating periods with the facility as used and maintained. The results provide a starting point for informed discussion of reliability goals.

  17. "They Say Every Child Matters, but They Don't": An Investigation into Parental and Carer Perceptions of Access to Leisure Facilities and Respite Care for Children and Young People with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or Attention Deficit, Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, David; Emira, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the experiences and perceptions of parents and carers with respect to children accessing a variety of leisure activities, as well as short breaks and respite care. The children in question have wide-ranging needs and, for example, will be across the Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The findings are based upon focus group…

  18. Applicability and Limitations of Reliability Allocation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Reliability allocation process may be described as the process of assigning reliability requirements to individual components within a system to attain the specified system reliability. For large systems, the allocation process is often performed at different stages of system design. The allocation process often begins at the conceptual stage. As the system design develops, more information about components and the operating environment becomes available, different allocation methods can be considered. Reliability allocation methods are usually divided into two categories: weighting factors and optimal reliability allocation. When properly applied, these methods can produce reasonable approximations. Reliability allocation techniques have limitations and implied assumptions that need to be understood by system engineers. Applying reliability allocation techniques without understanding their limitations and assumptions can produce unrealistic results. This report addresses weighting factors, optimal reliability allocation techniques, and identifies the applicability and limitations of each reliability allocation technique.

  19. 76 FR 58101 - Electric Reliability Organization Interpretation of Transmission Operations Reliability Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... of Reliability Standard, TOP-001-1, Requirement R8, which pertains to the restoration of real and... Requirement R8 in Commission-approved NERC Reliability Standard TOP-001-1-- Reliability Responsibilities and... 107 Reliability Standards filed by NERC, including Reliability Standard TOP-001-1.\\4\\ \\2\\...

  20. Decision theory in structural reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. M.; Hanagud, S.; Hawk, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Some fundamentals of reliability analysis as applicable to aerospace structures are reviewed, and the concept of a test option is introduced. A decision methodology, based on statistical decision theory, is developed for determining the most cost-effective design factor and method of testing for a given structural assembly. The method is applied to several Saturn V and Space Shuttle structural assemblies as examples. It is observed that the cost and weight features of the design have a significant effect on the optimum decision.

  1. A highly reliable LAN protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, A. C.

    1986-10-01

    As a research project for NASA's Langley Research Center, a variation on the military standard for avionics buses was developed to increase fault tolerance. The resulting protocol, called implicit token passing (ITP), replaces an explicit token with brief 'soundoff' messages from all nodes participating on the LAN. ITP features high throughput and bounded message delay, and achieves high reliability through tolerance of failed nodes and automatic resynchronization when failed nodes are revived. The protocol is ideally suited for a bus topology and fiber optic media.

  2. Designing for Reliability and Robustness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svetlik, Randall G.; Moore, Cherice; Williams, Antony

    2017-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight has a negative effect on the human body, and exercise countermeasures are used on-board the International Space Station (ISS) to minimize bone and muscle loss, combatting these effects. Given the importance of these hardware systems to the health of the crew, this equipment must continue to be readily available. Designing spaceflight exercise hardware to meet high reliability and availability standards has proven to be challenging throughout the time the crewmembers have been living on ISS beginning in 2000. Furthermore, restoring operational capability after a failure is clearly time-critical, but can be problematic given the challenges of troubleshooting the problem from 220 miles away. Several best-practices have been leveraged in seeking to maximize availability of these exercise systems, including designing for robustness, implementing diagnostic instrumentation, relying on user feedback, and providing ample maintenance and sparing. These factors have enhanced the reliability of hardware systems, and therefore have contributed to keeping the crewmembers healthy upon return to Earth. This paper will review the failure history for three spaceflight exercise countermeasure systems identifying lessons learned that can help improve future systems. Specifically, the Treadmill with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization System (TVIS), Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization System (CEVIS), and the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) will be reviewed, analyzed, and conclusions identified so as to provide guidance for improving future exercise hardware designs. These lessons learned, paired with thorough testing, offer a path towards reduced system down-time.

  3. Reliable vision-guided grasping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicewarner, Keith E.; Kelley, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Automated assembly of truss structures in space requires vision-guided servoing for grasping a strut when its position and orientation are uncertain. This paper presents a methodology for efficient and robust vision-guided robot grasping alignment. The vision-guided grasping problem is related to vision-guided 'docking' problems. It differs from other hand-in-eye visual servoing problems, such as tracking, in that the distance from the target is a relevant servo parameter. The methodology described in this paper is hierarchy of levels in which the vision/robot interface is decreasingly 'intelligent,' and increasingly fast. Speed is achieved primarily by information reduction. This reduction exploits the use of region-of-interest windows in the image plane and feature motion prediction. These reductions invariably require stringent assumptions about the image. Therefore, at a higher level, these assumptions are verified using slower, more reliable methods. This hierarchy provides for robust error recovery in that when a lower-level routine fails, the next-higher routine will be called and so on. A working system is described which visually aligns a robot to grasp a cylindrical strut. The system uses a single camera mounted on the end effector of a robot and requires only crude calibration parameters. The grasping procedure is fast and reliable, with a multi-level error recovery system.

  4. Reliability of steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Kadokami, E.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents results on studies made of the reliability of steam generator (SG) tubing. The basis for this work is that in Japan the issue of defects in SG tubing is addressed by the approach that any detected defect should be repaired, either by plugging the tube or sleeving it. However, this leaves open the issue that there is a detection limit in practice, and what is the effect of nondetectable cracks on the performance of tubing. These studies were commissioned to look at the safety issues involved in degraded SG tubing. The program has looked at a number of different issues. First was an assessment of the penetration and opening behavior of tube flaws due to internal pressure in the tubing. They have studied: penetration behavior of the tube flaws; primary water leakage from through-wall flaws; opening behavior of through-wall flaws. In addition they have looked at the question of the reliability of tubing with flaws during normal plant operation. Also there have been studies done on the consequences of tube rupture accidents on the integrity of neighboring tubes.

  5. 75 FR 71613 - Mandatory Reliability Standards for Interconnection Reliability Operating Limits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 40 Mandatory Reliability Standards for Interconnection Reliability Operating Limits November 18, 2010. AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice... Regulatory Commission proposes to approve three new Interconnection Reliability Operations and...

  6. Multi-Agent System for Resource Reliability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    1 research and development of a prototype for network resource reliability has laid the groundwork for the Phase 2 implementation of MASRR, a Multi - Agent System for Resource Reliability, and its eventual commercialization.

  7. What do we know about the attitudes, experiences and needs of Black and minority ethnic carers of people with dementia in the United Kingdom? A systematic review of empirical research findings.

    PubMed

    Johl, Nicholas; Patterson, Tom; Pearson, Lesley

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews recent literature on the experiences, attitudes and needs of caring for someone with dementia in Black and minority ethnic communities in the United Kingdom. Eight articles, which investigated carer experiences from Black and minority ethnic communities when caring for someone with dementia, were critically appraised. All eight studies used a qualitative methodology. The review identified several themes and issues across the qualitative studies. These included memory loss being viewed as a normal process of ageing, care being perceived as an extension of an existing responsibility, a poor understanding of what support services provide, the influence of migration, the impact of stigma and increased female responsibility. Methodological limitations of the research literature studies are also highlighted and clinically relevant implications are discussed, alongside recommendations for future research in this area.

  8. Methodology for Software Reliability Prediction. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    models to express software reliability in terms of fault density (the number of faults per executable lines of code) and failure rate (the number of...Reliability Measurements ..................... 3-1 0 3.1 Software Quality Measurement Framework ............ 3-1 3.2 A Software Reliability Measurement Model ...3-3 3.2.1 A Model of the Software Failure Process .... 3-3 3.2.2 Organization of Software Reliability Measurements

  9. Structural reliability assessment capability in NESSUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H.; Wu, Y.-T.

    1992-01-01

    The principal capabilities of NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress), an advanced computer code developed for probabilistic structural response analysis, are reviewed, and its structural reliability assessed. The code combines flexible structural modeling tools with advanced probabilistic algorithms in order to compute probabilistic structural response and resistance, component reliability and risk, and system reliability and risk. An illustrative numerical example is presented.

  10. 46 CFR 169.619 - Reliability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reliability. 169.619 Section 169.619 Shipping COAST... Electrical Steering Systems § 169.619 Reliability. (a) Except where the OCMI judges it impracticable, the... be below that necessary for the safe navigation of the vessel. (c) The strength and reliability...

  11. Making statistical inferences about software reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Douglas R.

    1988-01-01

    Failure times of software undergoing random debugging can be modelled as order statistics of independent but nonidentically distributed exponential random variables. Using this model inferences can be made about current reliability and, if debugging continues, future reliability. This model also shows the difficulty inherent in statistical verification of very highly reliable software such as that used by digital avionics in commercial aircraft.

  12. How Reliable Are Informal Reading Inventories?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Janet E.

    2005-01-01

    Informal Reading Inventories (IRI) are often recommended as instructionally relevant measures of reading. However, they have also been criticized for inattention to technical quality. Examination of reliability evidence in nine recently revised IRIs revealed that fewer than half report reliability. Several appear to have sufficient reliability for…

  13. Making statistical inferences about software reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Douglas R.

    1986-01-01

    Failure times of software undergoing random debugging can be modeled as order statistics of independent but nonidentically distributed exponential random variables. Using this model inferences can be made about current reliability and, if debugging continues, future reliability. This model also shows the difficulty inherent in statistical verification of very highly reliable software such as that used by digital avionics in commercial aircraft.

  14. Reliability of the hypernephroma halo

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.S.; Cochran, S.T.; Waisman, J.

    1981-11-01

    The excretory urograms and renal arteriograms of 68 patients with renal adenocarcinoma and 84 patients with renal masses other than renal adenocarcinoma were reviewed. The radiographs were examined for the presence or absence of the ''hypernephroma halo.'' The sensitivity of this sign was observed to be only 6% and 35% on excretory urography and arteriography, respectively. The specificity was 92% and 77%. However, the overall accuracy for this sign was only 54% and 59%. The relation between the halo and its postulated structural correlate, the tumor capsule, was also examined. There was no significant association demonstrable. It was concluded that the hypernephroma halo is not a reliable sign for diagnosing renal adenocarcinoma and that it probably does not represent the tumor capsule.

  15. Confidence bounds on structural reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. R.; Cruse, T. A.; Mahadevan, S.

    1993-01-01

    Different approaches for quantifying physical, statistical, and model uncertainties associated with the distribution parameters which are aimed at determining structural reliability are described. Confidence intervals on the distribution parameters of the input random variables are estimated using four algorithms to evaluate uncertainty of the response. Design intervals are evaluated using either Monte Carlo simulation or an iterative approach. A first order approach can be used to compute a first approximation of the design interval, but its accuracy is not satisfactory. The regression approach which combines the iterative approach with Monte Carlo simulation is capable of providing good results if the performance function can be accurately represented using regression analysis. It is concluded that the design interval-based approach seems to be quite general and takes into account distribution and model uncertainties.

  16. Reliability on ISS Talk Outline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misiora, Mike

    2015-01-01

    1. Overview of ISS 2. Space Environment and it effects a. Radiation b. Microgravity 3. How we ensure reliability a. Requirements b. Component Selection i. Note: I plan to stay away from talk about Rad Hardened components and talk about why we use older processors because they are less susceptible to SEUs. c. Testing d. Redundancy / Failure Tolerance e. Sparing strategies 4. Operational Examples a. Multiple MDM Failures on 6A due to hard drive failure In general, my plan is to only talk about data that is currently available via normal internet sources to ensure that I stay away from any topics that would be Export Controlled, ITAR, or NDA-controlled. The operational example has been well-reported on in the media and those are the details that I plan to cover. Additionally I am not planning on using any slides or showing any photos during the talk.

  17. Software reliability modeling and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, F.-W.

    1986-01-01

    A discrete and, as approximation to it, a continuous model for the software reliability growth process are examined. The discrete model is based on independent multinomial trials and concerns itself with the joint distribution of the first occurrence time of its underlying events (bugs). The continuous model is based on the order statistics of N independent nonidentically distributed exponential random variables. It is shown that the spacings between bugs are not necessarily independent or exponentially (geometrically) distributed. However, there is a statistical rationale for viewing them so conditionally. Some identifiability problems are pointed out and resolved. In particular, it appears that the number of bugs in a program is not identifiable. Estimated upper bounds and confidence bounds for the residual program eror content are given based on the spacings of the first k bugs removed.

  18. 78 FR 24107 - Version 5 Critical Infrastructure Protection Reliability Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Electric Reliability Corporation, the Commission-certified Electric Reliability Organization. The proposed Reliability Standards, which pertain to the cyber security of the bulk electric system, represent an... Information), Office of Electric Reliability, Division of Reliability Standards and Security, Federal...

  19. Software reliability models for critical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, H.; Pham, M.

    1991-12-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the ongoing EG&G Idaho, Inc. Software Reliability Research Program. The program is studying the existing software reliability models and proposes a state-of-the-art software reliability model that is relevant to the nuclear reactor control environment. This report consists of three parts: (1) summaries of the literature review of existing software reliability and fault tolerant software reliability models and their related issues, (2) proposed technique for software reliability enhancement, and (3) general discussion and future research. The development of this proposed state-of-the-art software reliability model will be performed in the second place. 407 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Software reliability models for critical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, H.; Pham, M.

    1991-12-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the ongoing EG G Idaho, Inc. Software Reliability Research Program. The program is studying the existing software reliability models and proposes a state-of-the-art software reliability model that is relevant to the nuclear reactor control environment. This report consists of three parts: (1) summaries of the literature review of existing software reliability and fault tolerant software reliability models and their related issues, (2) proposed technique for software reliability enhancement, and (3) general discussion and future research. The development of this proposed state-of-the-art software reliability model will be performed in the second place. 407 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. 76 FR 23222 - Electric Reliability Organization Interpretation of Transmission Operations Reliability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ...) proposed interpretation of Reliability Standard, TOP-001-1, Requirement R8. DATES: Comments are due June 27... Requirement R8 in Commission-approved NERC Reliability Standard TOP-001-1 -- Reliability Responsibilities and... by NERC, including Reliability Standard TOP-001-1.\\5\\ \\3\\ Rules Concerning Certification of...

  2. 76 FR 42534 - Mandatory Reliability Standards for Interconnection Reliability Operating Limits; System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Reliability Operating Limits; System Restoration Reliability Standards AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory... necessary to analyze and monitor Interconnection Reliability Operating Limits (IROL) within its Wide-Area... Interconnection Reliability Operating Limits, Order No. 748, 134 FERC ] 61,213 (2011). \\2\\ The term...

  3. Theory of reliable systems. [reliability analysis and on-line fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Research is reported in the program to refine the current notion of system reliability by identifying and investigating attributes of a system which are important to reliability considerations, and to develop techniques which facilitate analysis of system reliability. Reliability analysis, and on-line fault diagnosis are discussed.

  4. Evaluation of MHTGR fuel reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Wichner, R.P.; Barthold, W.P.

    1992-07-01

    Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) concepts that house the reactor vessel in a tight but unsealed reactor building place heightened importance on the reliability of the fuel particle coatings as fission product barriers. Though accident consequence analyses continue to show favorable results, the increased dependence on one type of barrier, in addition to a number of other factors, has caused the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to consider conservative assumptions regarding fuel behavior. For this purpose, the concept termed ``weak fuel`` has been proposed on an interim basis. ``Weak fuel`` is a penalty imposed on consequence analyses whereby the fuel is assumed to respond less favorably to environmental conditions than predicted by behavioral models. The rationale for adopting this penalty, as well as conditions that would permit its reduction or elimination, are examined in this report. The evaluation includes an examination of possible fuel-manufacturing defects, quality-control procedures for defect detection, and the mechanisms by which fuel defects may lead to failure.

  5. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  6. MEMS reliability in shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    TANNER,DANELLE M.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; HELGESEN,KAREN SUE; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; BROWN,FREDERICK A.; SMITH,NORMAN F.; MASTERS,NATHAN

    2000-02-09

    In order to determine the susceptibility of the MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) devices to shock, tests were performed using haversine shock pulses with widths of 1 to 0.2 ms in the range from 500g to 40,000g. The authors chose a surface-micromachined microengine because it has all the components needed for evaluation: springs that flex, gears that are anchored, and clamps and spring stops to maintain alignment. The microengines, which were unpowered for the tests, performed quite well at most shock levels with a majority functioning after the impact. Debris from the die edges moved at levels greater than 4,000g causing shorts in the actuators and posing reliability concerns. The coupling agent used to prevent stiction in the MEMS release weakened the die-attach bond, which produced failures at 10,000g and above. At 20,000g the authors began to observe structural damage in some of the thin flexures and 2.5-micron diameter pin joints. The authors observed electrical failures caused by the movement of debris. Additionally, they observed a new failure mode where stationary comb fingers contact the ground plane resulting in electrical shorts. These new failure were observed in the control group indicating that they were not shock related.

  7. Fundamental mechanisms of micromachine reliability

    SciTech Connect

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; REDMOND,JAMES M.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; MAYER,THOMAS K.

    2000-01-01

    Due to extreme surface to volume ratios, adhesion and friction are critical properties for reliability of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS), but are not well understood. In this LDRD the authors established test structures, metrology and numerical modeling to conduct studies on adhesion and friction in MEMS. They then concentrated on measuring the effect of environment on MEMS adhesion. Polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) is the primary material of interest in MEMS because of its integrated circuit process compatibility, low stress, high strength and conformal deposition nature. A plethora of useful micromachined device concepts have been demonstrated using Sandia National Laboratories' sophisticated in-house capabilities. One drawback to polysilicon is that in air the surface oxidizes, is high energy and is hydrophilic (i.e., it wets easily). This can lead to catastrophic failure because surface forces can cause MEMS parts that are brought into contact to adhere rather than perform their intended function. A fundamental concern is how environmental constituents such as water will affect adhesion energies in MEMS. The authors first demonstrated an accurate method to measure adhesion as reported in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 through 5, they then studied the effect of water on adhesion depending on the surface condition (hydrophilic or hydrophobic). As described in Chapter 2, they find that adhesion energy of hydrophilic MEMS surfaces is high and increases exponentially with relative humidity (RH). Surface roughness is the controlling mechanism for this relationship. Adhesion can be reduced by several orders of magnitude by silane coupling agents applied via solution processing. They decrease the surface energy and render the surface hydrophobic (i.e. does not wet easily). However, only a molecular monolayer coats the surface. In Chapters 3-5 the authors map out the extent to which the monolayer reduces adhesion versus RH. They find that adhesion is independent of

  8. Lessons from NASA. [spacecraft reliability engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    Particular requirements related to the design and the operation of spacecraft have forced NASA to take a reliability approach that differs somewhat from that used in many other applications. NASA has found that some of the traditional tools of reliability engineering, such as life testing, reliability demonstration testing, maintainability analysis, and direct failure analysis, are impractical for spacecraft. In place of a statistical approach, the space agency uses an engineering approach to mission reliability. Reliability is to be obtained with the aid of three different approaches, including the application of effective design principles, the control and screening of all parts, and the testing of the entire spacecraft or its prototype for predicted capabilities. Attention is given to failure-mode analysis, the enhancement of Voyager reliability by autonomous operation, the redundancy in Shuttle design, the weeding out of bad hardware, and the preference for off-the-shelf devices.

  9. Reliability Growth in Space Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2014-01-01

    A hardware system's failure rate often increases over time due to wear and aging, but not always. Some systems instead show reliability growth, a decreasing failure rate with time, due to effective failure analysis and remedial hardware upgrades. Reliability grows when failure causes are removed by improved design. A mathematical reliability growth model allows the reliability growth rate to be computed from the failure data. The space shuttle was extensively maintained, refurbished, and upgraded after each flight and it experienced significant reliability growth during its operational life. In contrast, the International Space Station (ISS) is much more difficult to maintain and upgrade and its failure rate has been constant over time. The ISS Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) reliability has slightly decreased. Failures on ISS and with the ISS CDRA continue to be a challenge.

  10. Reliability assurance for regulation of advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.; Lofaro, R.; Samanta, P.

    1991-12-31

    The advanced nuclear power plants must achieve higher levels of safety than the first generation of plants. Showing that this is indeed true provides new challenges to reliability and risk assessment methods in the analysis of the designs employing passive and semi-passive protection. Reliability assurance of the advanced reactor systems is important for determining the safety of the design and for determining the plant operability. Safety is the primary concern, but operability is considered indicative of good and safe operation. This paper discusses several concerns for reliability assurance of the advanced design encompassing reliability determination, level of detail required in advanced reactor submittals, data for reliability assurance, systems interactions and common cause effects, passive component reliability, PRA-based configuration control system, and inspection, training, maintenance and test requirements. Suggested approaches are provided for addressing each of these topics.

  11. Creating Highly Reliable Accountable Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Vogus, Timothy J; Singer, Sara J

    2016-12-01

    Accountable Care Organizations' (ACOs) pursuit of the triple aim of higher quality, lower cost, and improved population health has met with mixed results. To improve the design and implementation of ACOs we look to organizations that manage similarly complex, dynamic, and tightly coupled conditions while sustaining exceptional performance known as high-reliability organizations. We describe the key processes through which organizations achieve reliability, the leadership and organizational practices that enable it, and the role that professionals can play when charged with enacting it. Specifically, we present concrete practices and processes from health care organizations pursuing high-reliability and from early ACOs to illustrate how the triple aim may be met by cultivating mindful organizing, practicing reliability-enhancing leadership, and identifying and supporting reliability professionals. We conclude by proposing a set of research questions to advance the study of ACOs and high-reliability research.

  12. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrova, Olga; Flicker, Jack David; Johnson, Jay; Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Schindelholz, Eric John; Sorensen, Neil R.; Yang, Benjamin Bing-Yeh

    2015-12-01

    The continued exponential growth of photovoltaic technologies paves a path to a solar-powered world, but requires continued progress toward low-cost, high-reliability, high-performance photovoltaic (PV) systems. High reliability is an essential element in achieving low-cost solar electricity by reducing operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and extending system lifetime and availability, but these attributes are difficult to verify at the time of installation. Utilities, financiers, homeowners, and planners are demanding this information in order to evaluate their financial risk as a prerequisite to large investments. Reliability research and development (R&D) is needed to build market confidence by improving product reliability and by improving predictions of system availability, O&M cost, and lifetime. This project is focused on understanding, predicting, and improving the reliability of PV systems. The two areas being pursued include PV arc-fault and ground fault issues, and inverter reliability.

  13. Impact of Nonoperating Periods on Equipment Reliability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    the ability to predict the component nonoperating failure rate and reliability as a function of the characteristics of the devices, technology employed...equipment reliability . A series of nonoperating failure rate prediction models were developed at the component level. The models are capable of...failure rate prediction methodology is intended to provide the ability to predict the component nonoperating failure rate and reliability as a function

  14. Reliability engineering in solar energy: workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, G.

    1980-03-01

    A workshop to reveal the scope of reliability-related activities in solar energy conversion projects and in nonsolar segments of industry is described. Two reliability programs, one in heating and cooling and one in photovoltaics, are explicated. This document also presents general suggestions for the establishment of a unified program for reliability, durability, maintainability, and safety (RDM and S) in present and future solar projects.

  15. MEMS Reliability Assurance Activities at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayali, S.; Lawton, R.; Stark, B.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) reliability assurance and qualification activities at JPL is presented along with the a discussion of characterization of MEMS structures implemented on single crystal silicon, polycrystalline silicon, CMOS, and LIGA processes. Additionally, common failure modes and mechanisms affecting MEMS structures, including radiation effects, are discussed. Common reliability and qualification practices contained in the MEMS Reliability Assurance Guideline are also presented.

  16. Reliability based design optimization: Formulations and methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Harish

    Modern products ranging from simple components to complex systems should be designed to be optimal and reliable. The challenge of modern engineering is to ensure that manufacturing costs are reduced and design cycle times are minimized while achieving requirements for performance and reliability. If the market for the product is competitive, improved quality and reliability can generate very strong competitive advantages. Simulation based design plays an important role in designing almost any kind of automotive, aerospace, and consumer products under these competitive conditions. Single discipline simulations used for analysis are being coupled together to create complex coupled simulation tools. This investigation focuses on the development of efficient and robust methodologies for reliability based design optimization in a simulation based design environment. Original contributions of this research are the development of a novel efficient and robust unilevel methodology for reliability based design optimization, the development of an innovative decoupled reliability based design optimization methodology, the application of homotopy techniques in unilevel reliability based design optimization methodology, and the development of a new framework for reliability based design optimization under epistemic uncertainty. The unilevel methodology for reliability based design optimization is shown to be mathematically equivalent to the traditional nested formulation. Numerical test problems show that the unilevel methodology can reduce computational cost by at least 50% as compared to the nested approach. The decoupled reliability based design optimization methodology is an approximate technique to obtain consistent reliable designs at lesser computational expense. Test problems show that the methodology is computationally efficient compared to the nested approach. A framework for performing reliability based design optimization under epistemic uncertainty is also developed

  17. Reliability: A Comparison of Absence Measures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    1965). Other methods of estimating internal consistency, such as Kuder - Richardson formula 20, involve analysis of item variance and are more... formula . The results show the frequency indices to be very reliable , but that a carefully defined and measured index like sick leave hours lost can provide... formulas show that reliability is interpreted as a coefficient of determination (Guilford, 1954). The conceptual difference is that reliability concerns

  18. Interrater reliability of the Blessed Dementia Scale.

    PubMed

    Cole, M G

    1990-05-01

    This study examined the interrater reliability of the Blessed Dementia Scale. On consecutive days, two raters, working independently, interviewed each of the caretakers of 47 demented subjects. Interrater reliability of total scale scores was determined by calculation of the Pearson correlation coefficient (r), the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), and the limits of agreement (d +/- 2 s). By all three methods of calculation, the interrater reliability of the Blessed Dementia Scale was low.

  19. Evaluation of competing software reliability predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Ghaly, A. A.; Chan, P. Y.; Littlewood, B.

    1986-01-01

    Different software reliability models can produce very different answers when called upon to predict future reliability in a reliability growth context. Users need to know which, if any, of the competing predictions are trustworthy. Some techniques are presented which form the basis of a partial solution to this problem. Rather than attempting to decide which model is generally best, the approach adopted here allows a user to decide upon the most appropriate model for each application.

  20. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer–resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism. PMID:24068354

  1. Integrated reliability program for Scout research vehicle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, B. V.; Welch, R. C.

    1967-01-01

    Integrated reliability program for Scout launch vehicle in terms of design specification, review functions, malfunction reporting, failed parts analysis, quality control, standardization and certification

  2. NEPP DDR Device Reliability FY13 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guertin, Steven M.; Armbar, Mehran

    2014-01-01

    This document reports the status of the NEPP Double Data Rate (DDR) Device Reliability effort for FY2013. The task targeted general reliability of > 100 DDR2 devices from Hynix, Samsung, and Micron. Detailed characterization of some devices when stressed by several data storage patterns was studied, targeting ability of the data cells to store the different data patterns without refresh, highlighting the weakest bits. DDR2, Reliability, Data Retention, Temperature Stress, Test System Evaluation, General Reliability, IDD measurements, electronic parts, parts testing, microcircuits

  3. 76 FR 30341 - Reliable Storage 1 LLC;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-12865] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [Project No. 14152-000] Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of... Competing Applications On March 25, 2011, Reliable Storage 1 LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4... storage project would consist of the following: (1) A 70-foot-high, 7,500-foot-long earth embankment...

  4. Stability Reliability of the Behavior Rating Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellers, Robert A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined test-retest stability of Behavior Rating Profile for students grades l-12 (N=198), parents (N=212), and teachers (N=176) on 3 norm-referenced scales. Found Teacher Rating scale reliable across all grades for screening and eligibility, Parent Rating scale reliable for Grade 3-12 screening and Grade 3-6,ll, and l2, eligibility. Found…

  5. Common-Reliability Cumulative-Binomial Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuer, Ernest, M.; Bowerman, Paul N.

    1989-01-01

    Cumulative-binomial computer program, CROSSER, one of set of three programs, calculates cumulative binomial probability distributions for arbitrary inputs. CROSSER, CUMBIN (NPO-17555), and NEWTONP (NPO-17556), used independently of one another. Point of equality between reliability of system and common reliability of components found. Used by statisticians and users of statistical procedures, test planners, designers, and numerical analysts. Program written in C.

  6. Reliability and Expected Loss: A Unifying Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooil, Bruce; Rust, Roland T.

    1994-01-01

    It is proposed that proportional reduction in loss (PRL) be used as a theoretical basis to derive, justify, and interpret reliability measures to gauge reliability on a zero-to-one scale. This PRL approach simplifies the interpretation of existing measures (e.g., generalizability-theory measures). (SLD)

  7. On the Reliability of Categorically Scored Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupermintz, Haggai

    2004-01-01

    A decision-theoretic approach to the question of reliability in categorically scored examinations is explored. The concepts of true scores and errors are discussed as they deviate from conventional psychometric definitions and measurement error in categorical scores is cast in terms of misclassifications. A reliability measure based on…

  8. 40 CFR 75.42 - Reliability criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reliability criteria. 75.42 Section 75.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Alternative Monitoring Systems § 75.42 Reliability criteria. To...

  9. Coefficient Alpha and Reliability of Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almehrizi, Rashid S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of large-scale assessments develop various score scales that are either linear or nonlinear transformations of raw scores for better interpretations and uses of assessment results. The current formula for coefficient alpha (a; the commonly used reliability coefficient) only provides internal consistency reliability estimates of raw…

  10. Power and Reliability for Correlation and ANOVA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.; Kanyongo, Gibbs Y.; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia; Gocmen, Gulsah

    Unfortunately, researchers do not usually have measurement instruments that provide perfectly reliable scores. Therefore, the researcher may want to account for the level of unreliability by appropriately increasing the sample size. For example, the results of a pilot study may indicate that a particular instrument is not as reliable with a given…

  11. Scale Reliability Evaluation with Heterogeneous Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2015-01-01

    A latent variable modeling approach for scale reliability evaluation in heterogeneous populations is discussed. The method can be used for point and interval estimation of reliability of multicomponent measuring instruments in populations representing mixtures of an unknown number of latent classes or subpopulations. The procedure is helpful also…

  12. Validity and Reliability Issues in Measurement Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmage, Harriet; Rasher, Sue Pinzur

    1981-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of validity and reliability as concepts related to the overall quality of test instruments. Describes the nature and interpretation of content, face, criterion, and construct validity and identifies several approaches for measurement and improvement of reliability. (Author/CS)

  13. Simulation of reliability in multiserver computer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkevičius, Saulius

    2012-11-01

    The performance in terms of reliability of computer multiserver networks motivates this paper. The probability limit theorem is derived on the extreme queue length in open multiserver queueing networks in heavy traffic and applied to a reliability model for multiserver computer networks where we relate the time of failure of a multiserver computer network to the system parameters.

  14. Calculation reliability in vehicle accident reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wach, Wojciech

    2016-06-01

    The reconstruction of vehicle accidents is subject to assessment in terms of the reliability of a specific system of engineering and technical operations. In the article [26] a formalized concept of the reliability of vehicle accident reconstruction, defined using Bayesian networks, was proposed. The current article is focused on the calculation reliability since that is the most objective section of this model. It is shown that calculation reliability in accident reconstruction is not another form of calculation uncertainty. The calculation reliability is made dependent on modeling reliability, adequacy of the model and relative uncertainty of calculation. All the terms are defined. An example is presented concerning the analytical determination of the collision location of two vehicles on the road in the absence of evidential traces. It has been proved that the reliability of this kind of calculations generally does not exceed 0.65, despite the fact that the calculation uncertainty itself can reach only 0.05. In this example special attention is paid to the analysis of modeling reliability and calculation uncertainty using sensitivity coefficients and weighted relative uncertainty.

  15. Reliability measurement for operational avionics software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, J.; Ovadia, F.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative measures of reliability for operational software in embedded avionics computer systems are presented. Analysis is carried out on data collected during flight testing and from both static and dynamic simulation testing. Failure rate is found to be a useful statistic for estimating software quality and recognizing reliability trends during the operational phase of software development.

  16. Immodest Witnesses: Reliability and Writing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Chris W.

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a survey of three reliability theories in writing assessment: positivist, hermeneutic, and rhetorical. Drawing on an interdisciplinary investigation of the notion of "witnessing," this survey emphasizes the kinds of readers and readings each theory of reliability produces and the epistemological grounds on which it…

  17. The Meaning and Consequences of "Reliability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Pamela A.

    2004-01-01

    The concern behind my question, "Can there be validity without reliability?" (Moss, 1994), was about the influence of measurement practices on the quality of education. I argued that conventional operationalizations of reliability in the measurement literature, which I summarized as "consistency, quantitatively defined, among independent…

  18. Shoe Shopping and the Reliability Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogosa, David

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates that there is a critical distinction between reliability and accuracy, explaining through a hypothetical example of shoe fitting that high test reliability does not guarantee good accuracy without consideration of percentile rank scoring, complex measurement models, and other technical detail. (SLD)

  19. 76 FR 58730 - Version 4 Critical Infrastructure Protection Reliability Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), the Electric Reliability Organization certified by the Commission...), Office of Electric Reliability, Division of Logistics and Security, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...), Office of Electric Reliability, Division of Logistics and Security, Federal Energy Regulatory...

  20. Refining network reconstruction based on functional reliability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunjun; Ouyang, Qi; Geng, Zhi

    2014-07-21

    Reliable functioning is crucial for the survival and development of the genetic regulatory networks in living cells and organisms. This functional reliability is an important feature of the networks and reflects the structural features that have been embedded in the regulatory networks by evolution. In this paper, we integrate this reliability into network reconstruction. We introduce the concept of dependency probability to measure the dependency of functional reliability on network edges. We also propose a method to estimate the dependency probability and select edges with high contributions to functional reliability. We use two real examples, the regulatory network of the cell cycle of the budding yeast and that of the fission yeast, to demonstrate that the proposed method improves network reconstruction. In addition, the dependency probability is robust in calculation and can be easily implemented in practice.

  1. Software reliability experiments data analysis and investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. Leslie; Caglayan, Alper K.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives are to investigate the fundamental reasons which cause independently developed software programs to fail dependently, and to examine fault tolerant software structures which maximize reliability gain in the presence of such dependent failure behavior. The authors used 20 redundant programs from a software reliability experiment to analyze the software errors causing coincident failures, to compare the reliability of N-version and recovery block structures composed of these programs, and to examine the impact of diversity on software reliability using subpopulations of these programs. The results indicate that both conceptually related and unrelated errors can cause coincident failures and that recovery block structures offer more reliability gain than N-version structures if acceptance checks that fail independently from the software components are available. The authors present a theory of general program checkers that have potential application for acceptance tests.

  2. 76 FR 16240 - Mandatory Reliability Standards for Interconnection Reliability Operating Limits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... system operating limits other than interconnection reliability operating limits. DATES: Effective Date.... Documented Methodology to Identify System 33 Operating Limit Information 3. Current Practices for the... for the reliability coordinator to monitor and analyze system operating limits (SOL) \\4\\ other...

  3. Estimating the Reliability of a Crewed Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutomski, M. G.; Garza, J.

    2012-01-01

    Now that the Space Shuttle Program has been retired, the Russian Soyuz Launcher and Soyuz Spacecraft are the only means for crew transportation to and from the International Space Station (ISS). Are the astronauts and cosmonauts safer on the Soyuz than the Space Shuttle system? How do you estimate the reliability of such a crewed spacecraft? The recent loss of the 44 Progress resupply flight to the ISS has put these questions front and center. The Soyuz launcher has been in operation for over 40 years. There have been only two Loss of Crew (LOC) incidents and two Loss of Mission (LOM) incidents involving crew missions. Given that the most recent crewed Soyuz launcher incident took place in 1983, how do we determine current reliability of such a system? How do all of the failures of unmanned Soyuz family launchers such as the 44P impact the reliability of the currently operational crewed launcher? Does the Soyuz exhibit characteristics that demonstrate reliability growth and how would that be reflected in future estimates of success? In addition NASA has begun development of the Orion or Multi-Purpose Crewed Vehicle as well as started an initiative to purchase Commercial Crew services from private firms. The reliability targets are currently several times higher than the last Shuttle reliability estimate. Can these targets be compared to the reliability of the Soyuz arguably the highest reliable crewed spacecraft and launcher in the world to determine whether they are realistic and achievable? To help answer these questions this paper will explore how to estimate the reliability of the Soyuz launcher/spacecraft system over its mission to give a benchmark for other human spaceflight vehicles and their missions. Specifically this paper will look at estimating the Loss of Mission (LOM) and Loss of Crew (LOC) probability for an ISS crewed Soyuz launcher/spacecraft mission using historical data, reliability growth, and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques.

  4. Mission Reliability Estimation for Repairable Robot Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Dolan, John; Stancliff, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A mission reliability estimation method has been designed to translate mission requirements into choices of robot modules in order to configure a multi-robot team to have high reliability at minimal cost. In order to build cost-effective robot teams for long-term missions, one must be able to compare alternative design paradigms in a principled way by comparing the reliability of different robot models and robot team configurations. Core modules have been created including: a probabilistic module with reliability-cost characteristics, a method for combining the characteristics of multiple modules to determine an overall reliability-cost characteristic, and a method for the generation of legitimate module combinations based on mission specifications and the selection of the best of the resulting combinations from a cost-reliability standpoint. The developed methodology can be used to predict the probability of a mission being completed, given information about the components used to build the robots, as well as information about the mission tasks. In the research for this innovation, sample robot missions were examined and compared to the performance of robot teams with different numbers of robots and different numbers of spare components. Data that a mission designer would need was factored in, such as whether it would be better to have a spare robot versus an equivalent number of spare parts, or if mission cost can be reduced while maintaining reliability using spares. This analytical model was applied to an example robot mission, examining the cost-reliability tradeoffs among different team configurations. Particularly scrutinized were teams using either redundancy (spare robots) or repairability (spare components). Using conservative estimates of the cost-reliability relationship, results show that it is possible to significantly reduce the cost of a robotic mission by using cheaper, lower-reliability components and providing spares. This suggests that the

  5. Scaled CMOS Technology Reliability Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The desire to assess the reliability of emerging scaled microelectronics technologies through faster reliability trials and more accurate acceleration models is the precursor for further research and experimentation in this relevant field. The effect of semiconductor scaling on microelectronics product reliability is an important aspect to the high reliability application user. From the perspective of a customer or user, who in many cases must deal with very limited, if any, manufacturer's reliability data to assess the product for a highly-reliable application, product-level testing is critical in the characterization and reliability assessment of advanced nanometer semiconductor scaling effects on microelectronics reliability. A methodology on how to accomplish this and techniques for deriving the expected product-level reliability on commercial memory products are provided.Competing mechanism theory and the multiple failure mechanism model are applied to the experimental results of scaled SDRAM products. Accelerated stress testing at multiple conditions is applied at the product level of several scaled memory products to assess the performance degradation and product reliability. Acceleration models are derived for each case. For several scaled SDRAM products, retention time degradation is studied and two distinct soft error populations are observed with each technology generation: early breakdown, characterized by randomly distributed weak bits with Weibull slope (beta)=1, and a main population breakdown with an increasing failure rate. Retention time soft error rates are calculated and a multiple failure mechanism acceleration model with parameters is derived for each technology. Defect densities are calculated and reflect a decreasing trend in the percentage of random defective bits for each successive product generation. A normalized soft error failure rate of the memory data retention time in FIT/Gb and FIT/cm2 for several scaled SDRAM generations is

  6. A Survey of Reliability, Maintainability, Supportability, and Testability Software Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    5 1.101 Reliability Prediction Tools ......................... 6 1.102 Reliability Modeling Tools ........................... 14 1.103...M/S/T TOOL SUMMARIES 1.1 RELIABILITY TOOLS 1.101 Reliability Prediction Tools 1.102 Reliability Modeling Tools 1.103 Fault Tree Analysis Tools 1.104...Thermal Analysis Tools 1.115 Structural Reliability Evaluation Tools 5 1.101 RELIABILITY PREDICTION TOOLS NAME: ARM - Advanced Reliability Modeling

  7. Engineering Design Handbook. Development Guide for Reliability. Part Four. Reliability Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    PREFACE This handbook, Reliability Measurement, is the third in a series of five on reliability. The series is directed largely toward the working ...stresses, and reliabil- ity. The reliability tests performed during development answer the basic question of whether or not the design really works ...smallest, but since it is so rarely done in reliability work , all illustrations will be in the usual way. In order to plot the data points, a method

  8. Reliability Analysis and Reliability-Based Design Optimization of Circular Composite Cylinders Under Axial Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the preliminary results of an investigation on component reliability analysis and reliability-based design optimization of thin-walled circular composite cylinders with average diameter and average length of 15 inches. Structural reliability is based on axial buckling strength of the cylinder. Both Monte Carlo simulation and First Order Reliability Method are considered for reliability analysis with the latter incorporated into the reliability-based structural optimization problem. To improve the efficiency of reliability sensitivity analysis and design optimization solution, the buckling strength of the cylinder is estimated using a second-order response surface model. The sensitivity of the reliability index with respect to the mean and standard deviation of each random variable is calculated and compared. The reliability index is found to be extremely sensitive to the applied load and elastic modulus of the material in the fiber direction. The cylinder diameter was found to have the third highest impact on the reliability index. Also the uncertainty in the applied load, captured by examining different values for its coefficient of variation, is found to have a large influence on cylinder reliability. The optimization problem for minimum weight is solved subject to a design constraint on element reliability index. The methodology, solution procedure and optimization results are included in this report.

  9. Assessing the Reliability of Beck Depression Inventory Scores: Reliability Generalization across Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Ping; Fan, Xitao

    2000-01-01

    Performed a meta-analysis of reliability estimates for Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) (A. Beck and others, 1961) scores across studies. Only 7.5% of studies reviewed (n=1,200) reported meaningful reliability estimates. Analysis results suggest that standard errors of measurement should be considered in addition to reliability estimates when…

  10. Towards cost-effective reliability through visualization of the reliability option space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.

    2004-01-01

    In planning a complex system's development there can be many options to improve its reliability. Typically their sum total cost exceeds the budget available, so it is necessary to select judiciously from among them. Reliability models can be employed to calculate the cost and reliability implications of a candidate selection.

  11. Probabilistic fatigue methodology for six nines reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Bartlett, F. D., Jr.; Elber, Wolf

    1990-01-01

    Fleet readiness and flight safety strongly depend on the degree of reliability that can be designed into rotorcraft flight critical components. The current U.S. Army fatigue life specification for new rotorcraft is the so-called six nines reliability, or a probability of failure of one in a million. The progress of a round robin which was established by the American Helicopter Society (AHS) Subcommittee for Fatigue and Damage Tolerance is reviewed to investigate reliability-based fatigue methodology. The participants in this cooperative effort are in the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM) and the rotorcraft industry. One phase of the joint activity examined fatigue reliability under uniquely defined conditions for which only one answer was correct. The other phases were set up to learn how the different industry methods in defining fatigue strength affected the mean fatigue life and reliability calculations. Hence, constant amplitude and spectrum fatigue test data were provided so that each participant could perform their standard fatigue life analysis. As a result of this round robin, the probabilistic logic which includes both fatigue strength and spectrum loading variability in developing a consistant reliability analysis was established. In this first study, the reliability analysis was limited to the linear cumulative damage approach. However, it is expected that superior fatigue life prediction methods will ultimately be developed through this open AHS forum. To that end, these preliminary results were useful in identifying some topics for additional study.

  12. Integrating Reliability Analysis with a Performance Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Ulrey, Michael

    1995-01-01

    A large number of commercial simulation tools support performance oriented studies of complex computer and communication systems. Reliability of these systems, when desired, must be obtained by remodeling the system in a different tool. This has obvious drawbacks: (1) substantial extra effort is required to create the reliability model; (2) through modeling error the reliability model may not reflect precisely the same system as the performance model; (3) as the performance model evolves one must continuously reevaluate the validity of assumptions made in that model. In this paper we describe an approach, and a tool that implements this approach, for integrating a reliability analysis engine into a production quality simulation based performance modeling tool, and for modeling within such an integrated tool. The integrated tool allows one to use the same modeling formalisms to conduct both performance and reliability studies. We describe how the reliability analysis engine is integrated into the performance tool, describe the extensions made to the performance tool to support the reliability analysis, and consider the tool's performance.

  13. a Reliability Evaluation System of Association Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiangping; Feng, Wanshu; Luo, Minghai

    2016-06-01

    In mining association rules, the evaluation of the rules is a highly important work because it directly affects the usability and applicability of the output results of mining. In this paper, the concept of reliability was imported into the association rule evaluation. The reliability of association rules was defined as the accordance degree that reflects the rules of the mining data set. Such degree contains three levels of measurement, namely, accuracy, completeness, and consistency of rules. To show its effectiveness, the "accuracy-completeness-consistency" reliability evaluation system was applied to two extremely different data sets, namely, a basket simulation data set and a multi-source lightning data fusion. Results show that the reliability evaluation system works well in both simulation data set and the actual problem. The three-dimensional reliability evaluation can effectively detect the useless rules to be screened out and add the missing rules thereby improving the reliability of mining results. Furthermore, the proposed reliability evaluation system is applicable to many research fields; using the system in the analysis can facilitate obtainment of more accurate, complete, and consistent association rules.

  14. Reliability Degradation Due to Stockpile Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, David G.

    1999-04-01

    The objective of this reseach is the investigation of alternative methods for characterizing the reliability of systems with time dependent failure modes associated with stockpile aging. Reference to 'reliability degradation' has, unfortunately, come to be associated with all types of aging analyes: both deterministic and stochastic. In this research, in keeping with the true theoretical definition, reliability is defined as a probabilistic description of system performance as a funtion of time. Traditional reliability methods used to characterize stockpile reliability depend on the collection of a large number of samples or observations. Clearly, after the experiments have been performed and the data has been collected, critical performance problems can be identified. A Major goal of this research is to identify existing methods and/or develop new mathematical techniques and computer analysis tools to anticipate stockpile problems before they become critical issues. One of the most popular methods for characterizing the reliability of components, particularly electronic components, assumes that failures occur in a completely random fashion, i.e. uniformly across time. This method is based primarily on the use of constant failure rates for the various elements that constitute the weapon system, i.e. the systems do not degrade while in storage. Experience has shown that predictions based upon this approach should be regarded with great skepticism since the relationship between the life predicted and the observed life has been difficult to validate. In addition to this fundamental problem, the approach does not recognize that there are time dependent material properties and variations associated with the manufacturing process and the operational environment. To appreciate the uncertainties in predicting system reliability a number of alternative methods are explored in this report. All of the methods are very different from those currently used to assess stockpile

  15. Challenges Regarding IP Core Functional Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    For many years, intellectual property (IP) cores have been incorporated into field programmable gate array (FPGA) and application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design flows. However, the usage of large complex IP cores were limited within products that required a high level of reliability. This is no longer the case. IP core insertion has become mainstream including their use in highly reliable products. Due to limited visibility and control, challenges exist when using IP cores and subsequently compromise product reliability. We discuss challenges and suggest potential solutions to critical application IP insertion.

  16. Vibration-thermal screening reliability prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenoweth, H. B.

    The method developed by Coffin-Manson and extended by Lambert for predicting low-level fatigue failure for electronic assemblies is utilized to determine the expected reliability. The reliability is determined for small damping, inelastic low-cycle fatigue with a catastrophic failure mode with a thermal cycling failure mode (correlated). These are integrated into a model to produce a method of characterizing the reliability benefit of screening methodology in terms of material parameters, thermal characteristics, and dynamic variables. An example is developed and a prediction generated.

  17. Reliability and reproducibility of Kienbock's disease staging.

    PubMed

    Goeminne, S; Degreef, I; De Smet, L

    2010-09-01

    We evaluated the interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of the Lichtman et al. classification for Kienböck's disease by getting four observers with different experience to look at 70 sets of wrist radiographs at different points in time. These observers staged each set of radiographs. Paired comparisons of the observations identified an agreement in 63% of cases and a mean weighted kappa coefficient of 0.64 confirming interobserver reliability. The stage of the involved lunate was reproduced in 78% of the observations with a mean weighted kappa coefficient of 0.81 showing intraobserver reproducibility. This classification for Kienböck's disease has good reliability and reproducibility.

  18. B-52 stability augmentation system reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowling, T. C.; Key, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    The B-52 SAS (Stability Augmentation System) was developed and retrofitted to nearly 300 aircraft. It actively controls B-52 structural bending, provides improved yaw and pitch damping through sensors and electronic control channels, and puts complete reliance on hydraulic control power for rudder and elevators. The system has experienced over 300,000 flight hours and has exhibited service reliability comparable to the results of the reliability test program. Development experience points out numerous lessons with potential application in the mechanization and development of advanced technology control systems of high reliability.

  19. WWW media distribution via Hopwise reliable multicast

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelley, J.E.

    1994-12-01

    Repeated access to WWW pages currently makes inefficient use of available network bandwidth. A Distribution Point Model is proposed where large and relatively static sets of pages (e.g. magazines or other such media) are distributed via bulk multicast to LAN distribution points for local access. Some access control issues are discussed. Hopwise Reliable Multicast (HRM) is proposed to simplify reliable multicast of non real time bulk data between LANs. HRM uses TCP for reliability and flow control on a hop by hop basis throughout a multicast distribution tree created by today`s Internet MBone.

  20. Apollo experience report: Reliability and quality assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sperber, K. P.

    1973-01-01

    The reliability of the Apollo spacecraft resulted from the application of proven reliability and quality techniques and from sound management, engineering, and manufacturing practices. Continual assessment of these techniques and practices was made during the program, and, when deficiencies were detected, adjustments were made and the deficiencies were effectively corrected. The most significant practices, deficiencies, adjustments, and experiences during the Apollo Program are described in this report. These experiences can be helpful in establishing an effective base on which to structure an efficient reliability and quality assurance effort for future space-flight programs.

  1. MEMS reliability: The challenge and the promise

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.M.; Tanner, D.M.; Miller, S.L.; Peterson, K.A.

    1998-05-01

    MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) that think, sense, act and communicate will open up a broad new array of cost effective solutions only if they prove to be sufficiently reliable. A valid reliability assessment of MEMS has three prerequisites: (1) statistical significance; (2) a technique for accelerating fundamental failure mechanisms, and (3) valid physical models to allow prediction of failures during actual use. These already exist for the microelectronics portion of such integrated systems. The challenge lies in the less well understood micromachine portions and its synergistic effects with microelectronics. This paper presents a methodology addressing these prerequisites and a description of the underlying physics of reliability for micromachines.

  2. Reliability techniques in the petroleum industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    Quantitative reliability evaluation methods used in the Apollo Spacecraft Program are translated into petroleum industry requirements with emphasis on offsetting reliability demonstration costs and limited production runs. Described are the qualitative disciplines applicable, the definitions and criteria that accompany the disciplines, and the generic application of these disciplines to the chemical industry. The disciplines are then translated into proposed definitions and criteria for the industry, into a base-line reliability plan that includes these disciplines, and into application notes to aid in adapting the base-line plan to a specific operation.

  3. A reliability measure of protein-protein interactions and a reliability measure-based search engine.

    PubMed

    Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2010-02-01

    Many methods developed for estimating the reliability of protein-protein interactions are based on the topology of protein-protein interaction networks. This paper describes a new reliability measure for protein-protein interactions, which does not rely on the topology of protein interaction networks, but expresses biological information on functional roles, sub-cellular localisations and protein classes as a scoring schema. The new measure is useful for filtering many spurious interactions, as well as for estimating the reliability of protein interaction data. In particular, the reliability measure can be used to search protein-protein interactions with the desired reliability in databases. The reliability-based search engine is available at http://yeast.hpid.org. We believe this is the first search engine for interacting proteins, which is made available to public. The search engine and the reliability measure of protein interactions should provide useful information for determining proteins to focus on.

  4. Reliability assessment of home health care services.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, Stergiani; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Lekka, Irini; Maglaveras, Nicos; Pappas, Costas

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a model of reliability assessment of services in Home Health Care Delivery is presented. Reliability is an important quality dimension for services and is included in non-functional requirements of a system. A stochastic Markov model for reliability assessment is applied to patient communication services, in the field of home health care delivery. The methodology includes the specification of scenarios, the definition of failures in scenarios as well as the application of the analytical model. The results of the methodology reveal the critical states of the Home Health Care System and recommendations for improvement of the services are proposed. The model gives valuable results in predicting service reliability and, independently of the error types, it can be applied to all fields of Regional Health Network (RHN).

  5. On the reliability of reverse engineering results.

    PubMed

    Amotchkina, Tatiana V; Trubetskov, Michael K; Pervak, Vladimir; Romanov, Boris; Tikhonravov, Alexander V

    2012-08-01

    Determination of actual parameters of manufactured optical coatings (reverse engineering of optical coatings) provides feedback to the design-production chain and thus plays an important role in raising the quality of optical coatings production. In this paper, the reliability of reverse engineering results obtained using different types of experimental data is investigated. Considered experimental data include offline normal incidence transmittance data, offline ellipsometric data, and online transmittance monitoring data recorded during depositions of all coating layers. Experimental data are obtained for special test quarter-wave mirrors with intentional errors in some layers. These mirrors were produced by a well-calibrated magnetron-sputtering process. The intentional errors are several times higher than estimated errors of layer thickness monitoring, and the reliability of their detection is used as a measure of reliability of reverse engineering results. It is demonstrated that the most reliable results are provided by online transmittance data.

  6. CSP Assembly Reliability: Commercial and Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, R.; Kim, N.; Selk, K.; Bjorndahl, B.; Bonner, J.; Barr, S.

    1999-01-01

    The JPL-led CSP Consortium of enterprises representing government agencies and private companies has jointed together to pool in-kind resources for developing the quality and reliability of chip scale packages (CSPs) for a variety of projects.

  7. Infants prefer to imitate a reliable person.

    PubMed

    Poulin-Dubois, Diane; Brooker, Ivy; Polonia, Alexandra

    2011-04-01

    Research has shown that preschoolers prefer to learn from individuals who are a reliable source of information. The current study examined whether the past reliability of a person's emotional signals influences infants' willingness to imitate that person. An emotional referencing task was first administered to infants in order to demonstrate the experimenter's credibility or lack thereof. Next, infants in both conditions watched as the same experimenter turned on a touch light using her forehead. Infants were then given the opportunity to reproduce this novel action. As expected, infants in the unreliable condition developed the expectation that the person's emotional cues were misleading. Thus, these infants were subsequently more likely to use their hands than their foreheads when attempting to turn on the light. In contrast, infants in the reliable group were more likely to imitate the experimenter's action using their foreheads. These results suggest that the reliability of the model influences infants' imitation.

  8. Semiconductor Reliability--Another Field for Physicists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derman, Samuel; Anderson, Wallace T.

    1994-01-01

    Stresses that an important industrial area is product reliability, especially for semiconductors. Suggests that physics students would benefit from training in semiconductors: the many modes of failure, radiation effects, and electrical contact problems. (MVL)

  9. Operational reliability of standby safety systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, G.M.; Atwood, C.L.; Gentillon, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is evaluating the operational reliability of several risk-significant standby safety systems based on the operating experience at US commercial nuclear power plants from 1987 through 1993. The reliability assessed is the probability that the system will perform its Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) defined safety function. The quantitative estimates of system reliability are expected to be useful in risk-based regulation. This paper is an overview of the analysis methods and the results of the high pressure coolant injection (HPCI) system reliability study. Key characteristics include (1) descriptions of the data collection and analysis methods, (2) the statistical methods employed to estimate operational unreliability, (3) a description of how the operational unreliability estimates were compared with typical PRA results, both overall and for each dominant failure mode, and (4) a summary of results of the study.

  10. MOV reliability evaluation and periodic verification scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Bunte, B.D.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish a periodic verification testing schedule based on the expected long term reliability of gate or globe motor operated valves (MOVs). The methodology in this position paper determines the nominal (best estimate) design margin for any MOV based on the best available information pertaining to the MOVs design requirements, design parameters, existing hardware design, and present setup. The uncertainty in this margin is then determined using statistical means. By comparing the nominal margin to the uncertainty, the reliability of the MOV is estimated. The methodology is appropriate for evaluating the reliability of MOVs in the GL 89-10 program. It may be used following periodic testing to evaluate and trend MOV performance and reliability. It may also be used to evaluate the impact of proposed modifications and maintenance activities such as packing adjustments. In addition, it may be used to assess the impact of new information of a generic nature which impacts safety related MOVs.

  11. Reliability of chemical analyses of water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Beardon, R.

    1989-11-01

    Ground-water quality investigations require reliable chemical analyses of water samples. Unfortunately, laboratory analytical results are often unreliable. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s solution to this problem was to establish a two phase quality assurance program for the analysis of water samples. In the first phase, eight laboratories analyzed three solutions of known composition. The analytical accuracy of each laboratory was ranked and three laboratories were awarded contracts. The second phase consists of on-going monitoring of the reliability of the selected laboratories. The following conclusions are based on two years experience with the UMTRA Project`s Quality Assurance Program. The reliability of laboratory analyses should not be taken for granted. Analytical reliability may be independent of the prices charged by laboratories. Quality assurance programs benefit both the customer and the laboratory.

  12. Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Brendan J

    2006-12-01

    Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

  13. Reliability Issues for Photovoltaic Modules (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.

    2009-10-01

    Si modules good in field; new designs need reliability testing. CdTe & CIGS modules sensitive to moisture; carefully seal. CPV in product development stage; benefits from expertise in other industries.

  14. Reliability modelling and analysis of thermal MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratet, Sylvaine; Lavu, Srikanth; Fourniols, Jean-Yves; Bell, George; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a MEMS reliability study methodology based on the novel concept of 'virtual prototyping'. This methodology can be used for the development of reliable sensors or actuators and also to characterize their behaviour in specific use conditions and applications. The methodology is demonstrated on the U-shaped micro electro thermal actuator used as test vehicle. To demonstrate this approach, a 'virtual prototype' has been developed with the modeling tools MatLab and VHDL-AMS. A best practice FMEA (Failure Mode and Effect Analysis) is applied on the thermal MEMS to investigate and assess the failure mechanisms. Reliability study is performed by injecting the identified defaults into the 'virtual prototype'. The reliability characterization methodology predicts the evolution of the behavior of these MEMS as a function of the number of cycles of operation and specific operational conditions.

  15. Reliability of AIDS knowledge scales: conceptual issues.

    PubMed

    Zimet, G D

    1992-01-01

    A common approach to evaluating the reliability of AIDS knowledge scales has relied on the demonstration of internal consistency through the use of Kuder-Richardson formula 20 (KR-20) or coefficient alpha. In this study, the argument was made that, in a knowledge-based scale with diverse content (exemplified by AIDS knowledge scales), internal consistency does not make sense conceptually and underestimates the scale's true reliability. It was therefore hypothesized that a split-half approach, in which items in each half were matched for content, would provide superior estimates of reliability when compared to either KR-20 or an odd-even split-half approach. Reliability analyses performed on a knowledge scale developed by the author supported this hypothesis.

  16. The reliable multicast protocol application programming interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery , Todd; Whetten, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The Application Programming Interface for the Berkeley/WVU implementation of the Reliable Multicast Protocol is described. This transport layer protocol is implemented as a user library that applications and software buses link against.

  17. Flight control electronics reliability/maintenance study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dade, W. W.; Edwards, R. H.; Katt, G. T.; Mcclellan, K. L.; Shomber, H. A.

    1977-01-01

    Collection and analysis of data are reported that concern the reliability and maintenance experience of flight control system electronics currently in use on passenger carrying jet aircraft. Two airlines B-747 airplane fleets were analyzed to assess the component reliability, system functional reliability, and achieved availability of the CAT II configuration flight control system. Also assessed were the costs generated by this system in the categories of spare equipment, schedule irregularity, and line and shop maintenance. The results indicate that although there is a marked difference in the geographic location and route pattern between the airlines studied, there is a close similarity in the reliability and the maintenance costs associated with the flight control electronics.

  18. Generation and analysis of large reliability models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Nicol, David M.

    1990-01-01

    An effort has been underway for several years at NASA's Langley Research Center to extend the capability of Markov modeling techniques for reliability analysis to the designers of highly reliable avionic systems. This effort has been focused in the areas of increased model abstraction and increased computational capability. The reliability model generator (RMG), a software tool which uses as input a graphical, object-oriented block diagram of the system, is discussed. RMG uses an automated failure modes-effects analysis algorithm to produce the reliability model from the graphical description. Also considered is the ASSURE software tool, a parallel processing program which uses the ASSIST modeling language and SURE semi-Markov solution technique. An executable failure modes-effects analysis is used by ASSURE. The successful combination of the power of graphical representation, automated model generation, and parallel computation leads to the conclusion that large system architectures can now be analyzed.

  19. PV Module Reliability Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its PV module reliability research. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed and recent publications are listed.

  20. Photovoltaic Reliability and Engineering (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Photovoltaic Reliability and Engineering. One-sided sheet that includes Scope, Core Competencies and Capabilities, and Contact/Web information.

  1. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) Description and Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Oyague, F.

    2011-11-01

    This document describes simulated turbine load cases in accordance to the IEC 61400-1 Ed.3 standard, which is representative of the typical wind turbine design process. The information presented herein is intended to provide a broad understanding of the gearbox reliability collaborative 750kW drivetrain and turbine configuration. In addition, fatigue and ultimate strength drivetrain loads resulting from simulations are presented. This information provides the bases for the analytical work of the gearbox reliability collaborative effort.

  2. Reliability of Search and Rescue Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burciu, Zbigniew

    2012-06-01

    Determination of the reliability of Search and Rescue action system allows the SAR Mission Coordinator to increase the effectiveness of the action through the proper selection of operational characteristics of the system elements, in particular the selection of the rescue units and auxiliary units. The paper presents the example of the influence of water temperature and time of the action on the reliability of search and rescue action in the case of rescuing a survivor in the water.

  3. Developing Confidence Limits For Reliability Of Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1991-01-01

    Technique developed for estimating reliability of software by use of Moranda geometric de-eutrophication model. Pivotal method enables straightforward construction of exact bounds with associated degree of statistical confidence about reliability of software. Confidence limits thus derived provide precise means of assessing quality of software. Limits take into account number of bugs found while testing and effects of sampling variation associated with random order of discovering bugs.

  4. Space Vehicle Reliability Modeling in DIORAMA

    SciTech Connect

    Tornga, Shawn Robert

    2016-07-12

    When modeling system performance of space based detection systems it is important to consider spacecraft reliability. As space vehicles age the components become prone to failure for a variety of reasons such as radiation damage. Additionally, some vehicles may lose the ability to maneuver once they exhaust fuel supplies. Typically failure is divided into two categories: engineering mistakes and technology surprise. This document will report on a method of simulating space vehicle reliability in the DIORAMA framework.

  5. Thin-film reliability and engineering overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The reliability and engineering technology base required for thin film solar energy conversions modules is discussed. The emphasis is on the integration of amorphous silicon cells into power modules. The effort is being coordinated with SERI's thin film cell research activities as part of DOE's Amorphous Silicon Program. Program concentration is on temperature humidity reliability research, glass breaking strength research, point defect system analysis, hot spot heating assessment, and electrical measurements technology.

  6. Analyzing network reliability using structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Khorramzadeh, Yasamin; Youssef, Mina; Eubank, Stephen; Mowlaei, Shahir

    2015-04-01

    This paper uses the reliability polynomial, introduced by Moore and Shannon in 1956, to analyze the effect of network structure on diffusive dynamics such as the spread of infectious disease. We exhibit a representation for the reliability polynomial in terms of what we call structural motifs that is well suited for reasoning about the effect of a network's structural properties on diffusion across the network. We illustrate by deriving several general results relating graph structure to dynamical phenomena.

  7. Reliability Assessment of SMART Reactor Protection System

    SciTech Connect

    Won Young, Yun; Choong Heui, Jeong; Seong Hun, Kim; Sang Yong, Lee

    2006-07-01

    Component failure rates and integrated system reliability of the SMART reactor protection system were analyzed. The analysis tool of the study was the RELEX 7 computer program developed by Relex Software Corporation. The RELEX software is a PC based computer program which includes the part stress analysis models and the RBD analysis model to calculate component and system reliability. The component failure rate data for the study was selected from the MIL-HDBK-217F. (authors)

  8. Reliability Estimates for Flawed Mortar Projectile Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate reliability. Measured distributions of wall thickness, defect rate, material strength, and applied loads...element analysis Case study Monte Carlo simulation a b s t r a c t The Army routinely screens mortar projectiles for defects in safety-critical parts. In...of a safety-critical failure. Limit state functions and Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate reliability. Measured distributions of wall

  9. Production Facility System Reliability Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Crystal Buchanan; Klein, Steven Karl

    2015-10-06

    This document describes the reliability, maintainability, and availability (RMA) modeling of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) design for the Closed Loop Helium Cooling System (CLHCS) planned for the NorthStar accelerator-based 99Mo production facility. The current analysis incorporates a conceptual helium recovery system, beam diagnostics, and prototype control system into the reliability analysis. The results from the 1000 hr blower test are addressed.

  10. System Reliability for LED-Based Products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J Lynn; Mills, Karmann; Lamvik, Michael; Yaga, Robert; Shepherd, Sarah D; Bittle, James; Baldasaro, Nick; Solano, Eric; Bobashev, Georgiy; Johnson, Cortina; Evans, Amy

    2014-04-07

    Results from accelerated life tests (ALT) on mass-produced commercially available 6” downlights are reported along with results from commercial LEDs. The luminaires capture many of the design features found in modern luminaires. In general, a systems perspective is required to understand the reliability of these devices since LED failure is rare. In contrast, components such as drivers, lenses, and reflector are more likely to impact luminaire reliability than LEDs.

  11. Reliability Model for Planetary Gear Trains.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    the input, and the planet arm is the output. The input and output shafts are co- axial and the input and output torques are assumed to be co- axial ...are co- axial , carrying simple torque loads. The reliability model is based on the reliabilities of the individual gears and bearings and is Weibul in...FB - + (7) It should be noted that this analysis assumes that the planet forces are contained in a radial plane of the transmission so no nutating

  12. Taped Random Spectra for Reliability Demonstration Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    undertaken to develop an economical test technique for Reliability Demonstration tests in accord- ance with MIL- STD -78 IC. This has been accomplished...Demonstrotion tests in accordance with MIL-- STD -781C. In order td accomplish the above, two different methods were evaluated: * Multiplex System...user with the necessary information to perform Reliability Demonstration Tests in accordance with MIL- STD -781C. Appendix A describes the Multiplex

  13. Hardware and software reliability estimation using simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swern, Frederic L.

    1994-01-01

    The simulation technique is used to explore the validation of both hardware and software. It was concluded that simulation is a viable means for validating both hardware and software and associating a reliability number with each. This is useful in determining the overall probability of system failure of an embedded processor unit, and improving both the code and the hardware where necessary to meet reliability requirements. The methodologies were proved using some simple programs, and simple hardware models.

  14. A method for setting reliability performance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.J.; Turcotte, R.T.

    1996-08-01

    Reliability performance criteria are required for monitoring under the Maintenance Rule. This paper presents a probabilistic approach for establishing these performance criteria on a plant-specific basis. Results are presented for a number of case studies, and are summarized in terms of a deterministic formula. This formula was used to develop and document reliability performance criteria for all Maintenance Rule systems/subsystems at the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station.

  15. Reliability-based pricing of electricity service

    SciTech Connect

    Hagazy, Y.A.

    1993-01-01

    This research has two objectives: (a) to develop a price structure that unbundles electricity service by reliability levels, and (b) to analyze the implications of such a structure on economic welfare, system operation, load management, and energy conservation. The authors developed a pricing mechanism for electricity service that combines priority (reliability differentiation) pricing with real-time Ramsey type pricing. The electric utility is assumed to be a single welfare-maximizing firm able to set and communicate prices instantly. At time of supply shortages, the utility has direct control over customer loads and follows a rationing method among customers willing to accept power interruptions. Therefore, customers are given the choice either to be served with a high reliability [open quotes]firm[close quotes] service, or to be subject to interruption. To encourage customers to make rational reliability choices, a payment/compensation mechanism was integrated into the welfare-maximization model. In order to account for uncertainties associated with the operation of electric power systems, a stochastic production cost simulation is also integrated with the model. The stochastic production cost simulation yields the estimation of the expected production, cost, marginal costs, and system reliability level at total demand. The authors examine the welfare gain and energy and reserve saving possibilities due to different pricing schemes. The results show that reliability-based pricing yields higher economic efficiency and energy and power saving than both spot and Ramsey pricing when system imperfect reliability is considered. Therefore, the implication of this research is that reliability-based pricing provides a feasible solution to electric utilities as a substitute for power purchases, and/or new capacity investment.

  16. Structural reliability of road accidents reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wach, Wojciech

    2013-05-10

    Reconstruction of road accidents combines objective and subjective action. The former concerns science, the latter assessment of human behavior in the context of objective findings. It is not uncommon for experts equipped with an arsenal of tools to obtain similar results of calculations, but to present radically different conclusions about the cause of the accident. The use of sophisticated methods of uncertainty analysis does not guarantee improvement in quality of reconstruction, because, increasingly, the most serious source of reduced reliability of reconstruction is problems in logical inference. In the article the structure of uncertainty and reliability of accident reconstruction was described. A definition of reliability of road accident reconstruction based on the theory of conditional probability and Bayesian network, as a function of modeling, data and expert reliability (defined in the text) was proposed. The uncertainty of reconstruction was made dependent only on the uncertainty of the data. This separation makes it possible to conduct a qualitative and quantitative analysis of reconstruction reliability and to analyze its sensitivity to component parameters, independently of the uncertainty analysis. An example of calculation was presented. The proposed formalism constitutes a tool helpful to explain, among other things, the paradox of reliable reconstruction despite its uncertain results or unreliable reconstruction despite high precision of results. This approach is of great importance in the reconstruction of road accidents, which goes far beyond the analysis of a single, homogeneous subsystem.

  17. Reliability evaluation methodology for NASA applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taneja, Vidya S.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid rocket engine technology has been characterized by the development of complex systems containing large number of subsystems, components, and parts. The trend to even larger and more complex system is continuing. The liquid rocket engineers have been focusing mainly on performance driven designs to increase payload delivery of a launch vehicle for a given mission. In otherwords, although the failure of a single inexpensive part or component may cause the failure of the system, reliability in general has not been considered as one of the system parameters like cost or performance. Up till now, quantification of reliability has not been a consideration during system design and development in the liquid rocket industry. Engineers and managers have long been aware of the fact that the reliability of the system increases during development, but no serious attempts have been made to quantify reliability. As a result, a method to quantify reliability during design and development is needed. This includes application of probabilistic models which utilize both engineering analysis and test data. Classical methods require the use of operating data for reliability demonstration. In contrast, the method described in this paper is based on similarity, analysis, and testing combined with Bayesian statistical analysis.

  18. Test-retest reliability of cognitive EEG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEvoy, L. K.; Smith, M. E.; Gevins, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Task-related EEG is sensitive to changes in cognitive state produced by increased task difficulty and by transient impairment. If task-related EEG has high test-retest reliability, it could be used as part of a clinical test to assess changes in cognitive function. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of the EEG recorded during the performance of a working memory (WM) task and a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). METHODS: EEG was recorded while subjects rested quietly and while they performed the tasks. Within session (test-retest interval of approximately 1 h) and between session (test-retest interval of approximately 7 days) reliability was calculated for four EEG components: frontal midline theta at Fz, posterior theta at Pz, and slow and fast alpha at Pz. RESULTS: Task-related EEG was highly reliable within and between sessions (r0.9 for all components in WM task, and r0.8 for all components in the PVT). Resting EEG also showed high reliability, although the magnitude of the correlation was somewhat smaller than that of the task-related EEG (r0.7 for all 4 components). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that under appropriate conditions, task-related EEG has sufficient retest reliability for use in assessing clinical changes in cognitive status.

  19. A Bayesian approach to reliability and confidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Ron

    1989-01-01

    The historical evolution of NASA's interest in quantitative measures of reliability assessment is outlined. The introduction of some quantitative methodologies into the Vehicle Reliability Branch of the Safety, Reliability and Quality Assurance (SR and QA) Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) was noted along with the development of the Extended Orbiter Duration--Weakest Link study which will utilize quantitative tools for a Bayesian statistical analysis. Extending the earlier work of NASA sponsor, Richard Heydorn, researchers were able to produce a consistent Bayesian estimate for the reliability of a component and hence by a simple extension for a system of components in some cases where the rate of failure is not constant but varies over time. Mechanical systems in general have this property since the reliability usually decreases markedly as the parts degrade over time. While they have been able to reduce the Bayesian estimator to a simple closed form for a large class of such systems, the form for the most general case needs to be attacked by the computer. Once a table is generated for this form, researchers will have a numerical form for the general solution. With this, the corresponding probability statements about the reliability of a system can be made in the most general setting. Note that the utilization of uniform Bayesian priors represents a worst case scenario in the sense that as researchers incorporate more expert opinion into the model, they will be able to improve the strength of the probability calculations.

  20. Multi-Disciplinary System Reliability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code developed under the leadership of NASA Lewis Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multi-disciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.