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Sample records for caribbean equal access

  1. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  2. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  3. Granting Each Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Linda Lucas

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes federal legislation regarding equal access for students with disabilities and discusses environmental barriers to accessibility in the library media center. Solutions to these design problems are suggested in the following areas: material formats and space requirements; the physical setting, including furniture, floor coverings,…

  4. The Equal Access Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catron, J. Gregory

    1987-01-01

    Reviews past history of access of religious activities in public schools in relation to the establishment clause of the First Amendment and sets forth the prerequisites in the Equal Access Act of 1984 for creating a well-defined forum for student-initiated free speech including religious groups in public high schools. (MD)

  5. Equal Access to All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schettler, Joel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the Section 508 amendment to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 that directs the use of technology. Describes guidelines for online training accessibility with which vendors hoping for government business must fully comply. (JOW)

  6. 47 CFR 36.421 - Equal access expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... § 36.421 Equal access expenses. (a) Equal access expenses include only initial incremental pre-subscription costs and other initial incremental expenditures related directly to the provision of equal access...

  7. 45 CFR 98.43 - Equal access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.43 Equal access. (a) The Lead Agency shall certify that the payment rates for the provision of child care services under this part...

  8. 45 CFR 98.43 - Equal access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.43 Equal access. (a) The Lead Agency shall certify that the payment rates for the provision of child care services under this part...

  9. 45 CFR 98.43 - Equal access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.43 Equal access. (a) The Lead Agency shall certify that the payment rates for the provision of child care services under this part...

  10. 45 CFR 98.43 - Equal access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.43 Equal access. (a) The Lead Agency shall certify that the payment rates for the provision of child care services under this part...

  11. 45 CFR 98.43 - Equal access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements § 98.43 Equal access. (a) The Lead Agency shall certify that the payment rates for the provision of child care services under this part...

  12. Equality of Access to Ontario Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selleck, Laura

    Results of studies concerning socioeconomic inequality characteristic of student populations in most university systems and equality of opportunity at the point of university entrance are considered in relation to the accessibility of Ontario universities to students from low-income families. Important considerations in the design of such studies…

  13. Rethinking equal access: agency, quality, and norms.

    PubMed

    Ruger, J P

    2007-01-01

    In 2005 the Global Health Council convened healthcare providers, community organizers, policymakers and researchers at Health Systems: Putting Pieces Together to discuss health from a systems perspective. Its report and others have established healthcare access and quality as two of the most important issues in health policy today. Still, there is little agreement about what equal access and quality mean for health system development. At the philosophical level, few have sought to understand why differences in healthcare quality are morally so troubling. While there has been considerable work in medical ethics on equal access, these efforts have neglected health agency (individuals' ability to work toward health goals they value) and health norms, both of which influence individuals' ability to be healthy. This paper argues for rethinking equal access in terms of an alternative ethical aim: to ensure the social conditions in which all individuals have the capability to be healthy. This perspective requires that we examine injustices not just by the level of healthcare resources, but by the: (1) quality of those resources and their capacity to enable effective health functioning; (2) extent to which society supports health agency so that individuals can convert healthcare resources into health functioning; and (3) nature of health norms, which affect individuals' efforts to achieve functioning.

  14. 47 CFR 36.191 - Equal access equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equal access equipment. 36.191 Section 36.191... AND RESERVES FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES 1 Telecommunications Property Equal Access Equipment § 36.191 Equal access equipment. (a) Equal access investment includes only initial incremental...

  15. CCID - Making Caribbean Climate Data Accessible to the Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbourne, R. F.; Taylor, M. A.

    2006-05-01

    Arising out of an AIACC sponsored project investigating the link between climate and the incidence of dengue in the Caribbean, was a realization that a number of deficiencies existed when it came to access to and use of Caribbean climate data. Caribbean climate data are notoriously difficult to acquire, exist neither in a centralized location nor bundled in available data packages, and often require coding into sophisticated data analysis software for the generation of even simple plots. This has proven to be a deterrent to the pursuit of climate and climate related research in and about the region, and the development of interest in climate science at the primary and secondary school levels. The development of CCID - The Caribbean Climate Interactive Database - is an attempt to overcome these deficiencies. It does so by making available a subset of Caribbean station data in a format which facilitates easy use by technical and non-technical users. CCID Version 1 is a one-stop Caribbean climate database packaged within an easy to use interface which facilitates: (i) the storage of daily maximum and minimum temperatures and rainfall station data for at least one station for 24 Caribbean territories (ii) quick and easy retrieval of subsets of the data as specified by the users through a web interface (iii) simple statistical manipulations, and (iv) easy update of the database as new data becomes available. This study details the five modules which comprise CCID's design and gives an overview of each, as well as the supporting protocols. Examples of CCID's use are also offered, as are plans for its pilot testing within the region and its future development.

  16. 29 CFR 8.19 - Equal Access to Justice Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Equal Access to Justice Act. 8.19 Section 8.19 Labor Office... SERVICE CONTRACTS General Procedural Matters § 8.19 Equal Access to Justice Act. Proceedings under the... provisions of this part 8, the Board shall have no power or authority to award attorney fees and/or other...

  17. 29 CFR 8.19 - Equal Access to Justice Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equal Access to Justice Act. 8.19 Section 8.19 Labor Office... SERVICE CONTRACTS General Procedural Matters § 8.19 Equal Access to Justice Act. Proceedings under the... provisions of this part 8, the Board shall have no power or authority to award attorney fees and/or other...

  18. 29 CFR 8.19 - Equal Access to Justice Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equal Access to Justice Act. 8.19 Section 8.19 Labor Office... SERVICE CONTRACTS General Procedural Matters § 8.19 Equal Access to Justice Act. Proceedings under the... provisions of this part 8, the Board shall have no power or authority to award attorney fees and/or other...

  19. 29 CFR 530.414 - Equal Access to Justice Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equal Access to Justice Act. 530.414 Section 530.414 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT OF HOMEWORKERS IN CERTAIN INDUSTRIES Administrative Procedures § 530.414 Equal Access to Justice Act...

  20. 34 CFR 108.6 - Equal access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PUBLIC SCHOOL FACILITIES FOR THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA AND OTHER DESIGNATED YOUTH GROUPS § 108... group officially affiliated with the Boy Scouts or officially affiliated with any other Title 36 youth... including the membership or leadership criteria or oath of allegiance to God and country of the Boy...

  1. 34 CFR 108.6 - Equal access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PUBLIC SCHOOL FACILITIES FOR THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA AND OTHER DESIGNATED YOUTH GROUPS § 108... group officially affiliated with the Boy Scouts or officially affiliated with any other Title 36 youth... including the membership or leadership criteria or oath of allegiance to God and country of the Boy...

  2. 34 CFR 108.6 - Equal access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PUBLIC SCHOOL FACILITIES FOR THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA AND OTHER DESIGNATED YOUTH GROUPS § 108... group officially affiliated with the Boy Scouts or officially affiliated with any other Title 36 youth... including the membership or leadership criteria or oath of allegiance to God and country of the Boy...

  3. 34 CFR 108.6 - Equal access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PUBLIC SCHOOL FACILITIES FOR THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA AND OTHER DESIGNATED YOUTH GROUPS § 108... group officially affiliated with the Boy Scouts or officially affiliated with any other Title 36 youth... including the membership or leadership criteria or oath of allegiance to God and country of the Boy...

  4. 34 CFR 108.6 - Equal access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PUBLIC SCHOOL FACILITIES FOR THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA AND OTHER DESIGNATED YOUTH GROUPS § 108... group officially affiliated with the Boy Scouts or officially affiliated with any other Title 36 youth... including the membership or leadership criteria or oath of allegiance to God and country of the Boy...

  5. 47 CFR 36.191 - Equal access equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... excluded. In the case of independent telephone companies, intrastate toll service provided by the... July 1, 2001, through June 30, 2017, all study areas shall apportion Equal Access Equipment,...

  6. 47 CFR 36.191 - Equal access equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... excluded. In the case of independent telephone companies, intrastate toll service provided by the... July 1, 2001, through June 30, 2014, all study areas shall apportion Equal Access Equipment,...

  7. 47 CFR 36.191 - Equal access equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... excluded. In the case of independent telephone companies, intrastate toll service provided by the... July 1, 2001, through June 30, 2014, all study areas shall apportion Equal Access Equipment,...

  8. Consumer Response to Telecommunications Deregulation: The Equal Access Decision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cude, Brenda J.

    1989-01-01

    Results from 348 (of 986) questionnaires determined consumer response to equal access--the choice of a primary long distance carrier. A model suggests that those consumers who seek information in decision making acquire it through search or experience. (JOW)

  9. Access to Public Educational Facilities under the Equal Access Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, R. Craig; Goldblatt, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion centers on the legal bases by which school administrators permit access to public educational facilities by religiously and politically oriented student organizations. It concludes that access should be granted to students whose purposes do not disrupt teaching and learning. (JAM)

  10. Achieving Equality of Student Internet Access within Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Janet Ward; Davidson, Ann Locke

    One benefit often expected to flow from Internet use in schools is an increase in equality of educational opportunity as all kinds of schools gain access to the same extraordinary set of resources and opportunities for interaction with the outside world. Yet, prior research suggests that patterns of technology access often mirror existing…

  11. Equal Access Initiative HIV/AIDS Information Resources from NLM

    SciTech Connect

    Templin-Branner W. and N. Dancy

    2010-09-11

    The Equal Access Initiative: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine training is designed specifically for the National Minority AIDS Council 2010 Equal Access Initiative (EAI) Computer Grants Program awardees to provide valuable health information resources from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources to increase awareness of the wealth of treatment information and educational materials that are available on the Internet and to improve prevention and treatment education for their clients. These resources will also meet the needs of community-based

  12. State Centralization and Equal Access to Educational Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Vernon L.; Sederberg, Charles H.

    This study's purpose was to explore the premise that increasing state support for elementary/secondary schools increases equal student access to educational opportunity. Following a brief overview of the background of the problem, including a description of the so-called "Minnesota Miracle" or Omnibus Tax Law of 1971 with its provisions…

  13. State Lotteries: Their Effect on Equal Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Randall G.; Elrod, Henry E.

    2004-01-01

    Many states (18 of 39) use revenue generated by lotteries to help fund higher education. The revenue is generated as a regressive tax disproportionately collected. As such, do state lotteries contribute toward facilitation of equal access to higher education for low-income and minority citizens? Given population trends, college enrollment, and…

  14. Expansion and Equality of Access to Higher Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Xiaohao

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the role of socio-economic status in determining access to higher education over time. Findings show that the overall equality of higher education opportunity has improved because of the inclusion of more marginal students into lower-tier higher education institutions (HEIs); however, students from higher socio-economic status…

  15. Immigrants’ Access to Health Insurance: No Equality without Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Dzúrová, Dagmar; Winkler, Petr; Drbohlav, Dušan

    2014-01-01

    The Czech government has identified commercial health insurance as one of the major problems for migrants’ access to health care. Non-EU immigrants are eligible for public health insurance only if they have employee status or permanent residency. The present study examined migrants’ access to the public health insurance system in Czechia. A cross-sectional survey of 909 immigrants from Ukraine and Vietnam was conducted in March and May 2013, and binary logistic regression was applied in data analysis. Among immigrants entitled to Czech public health insurance due to permanent residency/asylum, 30% were out of the public health insurance system, and of those entitled by their employment status, 50% were out of the system. Migrants with a poor knowledge of the Czech language are more likely to remain excluded from the system of public health insurance. Instead, they either remain in the commercial health insurance system or they simultaneously pay for both commercial and public health insurance, which is highly disadvantageous. Since there are no reasonable grounds to stay outside the public health insurance, it is concluded that it is lack of awareness that keeps eligible immigrants from entering the system. It is suggested that no equal access to health care exists without sufficient awareness about health care system. PMID:25026082

  16. Immigrants' access to health insurance: no equality without awareness.

    PubMed

    Dzúrová, Dagmar; Winkler, Petr; Drbohlav, Dušan

    2014-07-14

    The Czech government has identified commercial health insurance as one of the major problems for migrants' access to health care. Non-EU immigrants are eligible for public health insurance only if they have employee status or permanent residency. The present study examined migrants' access to the public health insurance system in Czechia. A cross-sectional survey of 909 immigrants from Ukraine and Vietnam was conducted in March and May 2013, and binary logistic regression was applied in data analysis. Among immigrants entitled to Czech public health insurance due to permanent residency/asylum, 30% were out of the public health insurance system, and of those entitled by their employment status, 50% were out of the system. Migrants with a poor knowledge of the Czech language are more likely to remain excluded from the system of public health insurance. Instead, they either remain in the commercial health insurance system or they simultaneously pay for both commercial and public health insurance, which is highly disadvantageous. Since there are no reasonable grounds to stay outside the public health insurance, it is concluded that it is lack of awareness that keeps eligible immigrants from entering the system. It is suggested that no equal access to health care exists without sufficient awareness about health care system.

  17. Accessing primary care: HIV+ Caribbean immigrants in the Bronx.

    PubMed

    Pivnick, Anitra; Jacobson, Audrey; Blank, Arthur E; Villegas, Maritza

    2010-08-01

    This article describes an ecology of health seeking behavior among Bronx residing HIV+ Caribbean immigrants participating in an arm of a U.S. government-funded multi-site evaluation of peer services in the utilization of HIV primary care. Standardized repeat measures were administered at baseline and three four-month intervals. Clinical markers were obtained through medical chart review. Additionally, local data included ethnographic interviews, focus groups, and progress notes. Clinical outcomes were positive for the 55 subjects, 23 of whom were undocumented. Alienation from family, women's vulnerability to family violence, and difficulties with disclosure, employment, and health care were compounded by undocumented immigration status. Retention was encouraged by the community based site, high levels of peer interaction, and supportive services. Without consideration of broader contexts, peer driven interventions are potentially limited and the realities of immigrant health care are misunderstood through lack of recognition of competing needs.

  18. [Gender, equality, and health services access: an empirical approximation].

    PubMed

    Gómez Gómez, Elsa

    2002-01-01

    This piece describes the conceptual framework and the objectives that guided a research initiative in the Region of the Americas that was called "Gender, Equity, and Access to Health Services" and that was sponsored in 2001 by the Pan American Health Organization. The piece does not summarize the results of the six projects that were carried under the initiative, whose analyses have not all been completed. Instead, the piece discusses some of the foundations of the initiative and provides a general introduction to the country studies that were done. The six studies were done in Barbados/Jamaica, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. The primary objective of the initiative was to stimulate the use of existing quantitative information in the countries, with the goal of starting a process of systematically documenting two things: 1) the unfair, unnecessary, and avoidable inequalities between men and women in their access to health care and 2) the linkages between those inequalities and other socioeconomic factors. The concept of gender equity that guided this examination of health care was not the usual one calling for the equal distribution of resources. Rather, it was the notion that resources should be allocated differentially, according to the particular needs of men and of women, and that persons should pay for health services according to their economic ability rather than their risk level. The starting point for the initiative was the premise that gender inequities in utilizing and paying for health care result from gender differences in the macroeconomic and microeconomic distribution of resources. The piece concludes that achieving equity in health care access will require a better understanding of the gender needs and gender barriers that are linked to social structures and health systems.

  19. Equal access for all? Access to medical information for European psychiatric trainees.

    PubMed

    Marques, João Gama; Stefanovic, Maja Pantovic; Mitkovic-Voncina, Marija; Riese, Florian; Guloksuz, Sinan; Holmes, Kevin; Kilic, Ozge; Banjac, Visnja; Palumbo, Claudia; Nawka, Alexander; Jauhar, Sameer; Andlauer, Olivier; Krupchanka, Dzmitry; da Costa, Mariana Pinto

    2016-04-30

    Access to medical information is important as lifelong scientific learning is in close relation with a better career satisfaction in psychiatry. This survey aimed to investigate how medical information sources are being used among members of the European Federation of Psychiatric Trainees. Eighty-three psychiatric trainees completed our questionnaire. A significant variation was found, and information availability levels were associated with training duration and average income. The most available sources were books and websites, but the most preferred ones were scientific journals. Our findings suggest that further steps should be taken to provide an equal access to medical information across Europe.

  20. Functioning and Challenges in Equality and Accessibility Among People with Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Pesola, Kirsti; Anttila, Heidi; Mäkitie, Outi; Leppäjoki, Sanna; Hiekkala, Sinikka

    2016-01-01

    Accessibility is not the same for all of us. This study concerns people with short stature, their functioning and challenges in equality and accessibility in our environment based on average measures.

  1. 20 CFR 655.1260 - Can Equal Access to Justice Act attorney fees be awarded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can Equal Access to Justice Act attorney fees... enforcement obligations with respect to H-1C Attestations? § 655.1260 Can Equal Access to Justice Act attorney... Justice Act, as amended, 5 U.S.C. 504. In such a proceeding, the administrative law judge shall have...

  2. 20 CFR 655.1260 - Can Equal Access to Justice Act attorney fees be awarded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can Equal Access to Justice Act attorney fees... enforcement obligations with respect to H-1C Attestations? § 655.1260 Can Equal Access to Justice Act attorney... Justice Act, as amended, 5 U.S.C. 504. In such a proceeding, the administrative law judge shall have...

  3. Paralympics 2012 Legacy: Accessible Housing and Disability Equality or Inequality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    The golden summer of sport is now over, but what is the legacy of London 2012 for disabled people? Nadia Ahmed, a disabled student, discusses the difficulties she has faced in finding accessible accommodation in London. She argues that while the Games are over, the United Kingdom still has lots of hurdles to leap when it comes to disability. The…

  4. Paralympics 2012 Legacy: Accessible Housing and Disability Equality or Inequality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    The golden summer of sport is now over, but what is the legacy of London 2012 for disabled people? Nadia Ahmed, a disabled student, discusses the difficulties she has faced in finding accessible accommodation in London. She argues that while the Games are over, the United Kingdom still has lots of hurdles to leap when it comes to disability. The…

  5. Equal Access to Education: A Peace Imperative for Burundi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Tony

    This report examines the status of Burundi's formal education system, focusing on elementary and secondary schooling. It addresses the issues of access to education and quality of education as well as the role of the state and donors in funding the system. It explains how the protracted civil war in Burundi has paralyzed the education system,…

  6. Canadian experiences in telehealth: equalizing access to quality care.

    PubMed

    Jennett, P A; Person, V L; Watson, M; Watanabe, M

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Conference "TExpo'98: Interactive Health" focused on four telehealth themes: community needs, Canadian experiences, industry perspectives, and access/security/interoperability issues. Health and socioeconomic needs have been the driving force behind telehealth initiatives; telelearning is one of the major Canadian initiatives. To encourage Canadian telehealth initiatives, the federal government is building a national health infrastructure. One element in this framework is concerned with empowering the public, strengthening health care services, and ensuring accountability. Technological advancements and innovative partnerships among health communities, government, users, professional bodies, and industry are critical to continued growth. Key issues including access, evaluation, implementation, privacy, confidentiality, security, and interoperability are of universal concern to participants. Research that examines the benefits and costs of telehealth is needed.

  7. [Access to equal employment: retrospective studies and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Tougas, F; Veilleux, F

    1991-09-01

    Reaching for more fair representation of women in all levels and in all areas of employment involves a fundamental change in mentalities and administrative practices. Following twenty years of efforts to improve women's situation, where are we now? Do men and women approve of the same strategies to eliminate sex discrimination? We will address these questions by relying on results obtained in the context of a research program developed at the University of Ottawa. The results of these studies lead us to question the human costs for women's slow access to employment equity.

  8. Race and Time from Diagnosis to Radical Prostatectomy: Does Equal Access Mean Equal Timely Access to the Operating Room?—Results from the SEARCH Database

    PubMed Central

    Bañez, Lionel L.; Terris, Martha K.; Aronson, William J.; Presti, Joseph C.; Kane, Christopher J.; Amling, Christopher L.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Background African American men with prostate cancer are at higher risk for cancer-specific death than Caucasian men. We determine whether significant delays in management contribute to this disparity. We hypothesize that in an equal-access health care system, time interval from diagnosis to treatment would not differ by race. Methods We identified 1,532 African American and Caucasian men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) from 1988 to 2007 at one of four Veterans Affairs Medical Centers that comprise the Shared Equal-Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database with known biopsy date. We compared time from biopsy to RP between racial groups using linear regression adjusting for demographic and clinical variables. We analyzed risk of potential clinically relevant delays by determining odds of delays >90 and >180 days. Results Median time interval from diagnosis to RP was 76 and 68 days for African Americans and Caucasian men, respectively (P = 0.004). After controlling for demographic and clinical variables, race was not associated with the time interval between diagnosis and RP (P = 0.09). Furthermore, race was not associated with increased risk of delays >90 (P = 0.45) or >180 days (P = 0.31). Conclusions In a cohort of men undergoing RP in an equal-access setting, there was no significant difference between racial groups with regard to time interval from diagnosis to RP. Thus, equal-access includes equal timely access to the operating room. Given our previous finding of poorer outcomes among African Americans, treatment delays do not seem to explain these observations. Our findings need to be confirmed in patients electing other treatment modalities and in other practice settings. PMID:19336564

  9. Race and time from diagnosis to radical prostatectomy: does equal access mean equal timely access to the operating room?--Results from the SEARCH database.

    PubMed

    Bañez, Lionel L; Terris, Martha K; Aronson, William J; Presti, Joseph C; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2009-04-01

    African American men with prostate cancer are at higher risk for cancer-specific death than Caucasian men. We determine whether significant delays in management contribute to this disparity. We hypothesize that in an equal-access health care system, time interval from diagnosis to treatment would not differ by race. We identified 1,532 African American and Caucasian men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) from 1988 to 2007 at one of four Veterans Affairs Medical Centers that comprise the Shared Equal-Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database with known biopsy date. We compared time from biopsy to RP between racial groups using linear regression adjusting for demographic and clinical variables. We analyzed risk of potential clinically relevant delays by determining odds of delays >90 and >180 days. Median time interval from diagnosis to RP was 76 and 68 days for African Americans and Caucasian men, respectively (P = 0.004). After controlling for demographic and clinical variables, race was not associated with the time interval between diagnosis and RP (P = 0.09). Furthermore, race was not associated with increased risk of delays >90 (P = 0.45) or >180 days (P = 0.31). In a cohort of men undergoing RP in an equal-access setting, there was no significant difference between racial groups with regard to time interval from diagnosis to RP. Thus, equal-access includes equal timely access to the operating room. Given our previous finding of poorer outcomes among African Americans, treatment delays do not seem to explain these observations. Our findings need to be confirmed in patients electing other treatment modalities and in other practice settings.

  10. The Pursuit of Equality: Evaluating and Monitoring Accessibility to Post-Secondary Education in Ontario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anisef, Paul; And Others

    A report on the current status of accessibility to university education in Ontario has several major objectives: to review the social science literature on such concepts as equality of educational opportunity and accessibility, considering the social, political and intellectual climate of the times; to examine parliamentary minutes and reports of…

  11. Promoting Equal Access of Girls/Women to Technical and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Arun; Khanna, Pinki; Shrivastava, Nalini

    Despite United Nations' efforts, inequality of access for girls and women to technical and vocational education (TVE) persists in India. Challenges of the 21st century with regard to ensuring equal access of girls and women to TVE include: increasing the participation of girls (especially rural girls) in TVE; overcoming gender bias and…

  12. Caribbean Equal Access Program: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Nancy Dancy, NLM, and Wilma Templin-Branner, ORISE

    2009-01-01

    As the treatment and management of HIV/AIDS continues to evolve with new scientific breakthroughs, treatment discoveries, and management challenges, it is difficult for people living with HIV/AIDS and those who care for them to keep up with the latest information on HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and research. The National Library of Medicine, of the National Institutes of Health, has a wealth of health information resources freely available on the Internet to address these needs.

  13. Frequency-Domain Equalization for Broadband Single-Carrier Multiple Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Fumiyuki; Tomeba, Hiromichi; Takeda, Kazuki

    Single-carrier (SC) multiple access is a promising uplink multiple access technique because of its low peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) property and high frequency diversity gain that is achievable through simple one-tap frequency-domain equalization (FDE) in a strong frequency-selective channel. The multiple access capability can be obtained by combining either frequency division multiple access (FDMA) or code division multiple access (CDMA) with SC transmission. In this article, we review the recent research on the SC multiple access techniques with one-tap FDE. After introducing the principle of joint FDE/antenna diversity combining, we review various SC multiple access techniques with one-tap FDE, i.e., SC-FDMA, SC-CDMA, block spread CDMA, and delay-time/CDMA.

  14. Struggles for Modern Education: Egalitarian Liberalism and Its Quest for Equal Access to Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistone, Renee A.

    2010-01-01

    Egalitarian liberalism strives for equal access to opportunity and can achieve it. Every individual must be granted the chance to live his or her own life (Rawls, 1971). Our society must offer all citizens their own autonomy and live up to the egalitarian promises giving them respect. This paper disagrees with the notion that children raised in…

  15. 76 FR 11667 - Procedures Relating to Awards Under the Equal Access to Justice Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ...The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is amending its regulations implementing the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA) by raising the maximum hourly attorney fees rate from $125.00 to $150.00 for covered proceedings initiated on and after the effective date of this final rule.

  16. Ensuring Equal Access to Technology: Providing Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hwa; Templeton, Rosalyn

    2008-01-01

    With the passage of landmark federal laws, equal access to technology for all students, regardless of their abilities, has been getting increasing attention in the field of education. Although considering a continuum of assistive technology (AT) items and services for individuals with disabilities is a mandated practice, education and…

  17. Labor Law Reform: The Regulation of Free Speech and Equal Access in NLRB Representational Elections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Pennsylvania Law Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    After examining the existing legal standards governing free speech and equal access in representation elections, the author analyzes various reform possibilities and suggests a unified approach for legislative action. Available from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, 3400 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104; $3.00 sc.…

  18. Tort Liability, the First Amendment, Equal Access, and Commercialization of Electronic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perritt, Henry H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the legal concerns of free access to information, tort liability, and free speech in a commercial electronic networking environment. Recommends that legal questions be addressed through case law, Congressional hearings, and agency solicitations, and that network service providers protect themselves by posting notice of equal access…

  19. Equal Access of Ethnic Minority Students to Different Types of Higher Education Institutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jianxin; Verhoeven, Jef C.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we focus on answering the question "Is there equal access to different types of higher education institutions (HEIs) for ethnic minority (EM) students in Yunnan Province (China), and what explanation might be found for any differences?" In order to answer this question, we rely on the education attainment theory, and a…

  20. Access to medicines in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC): a scoping study

    PubMed Central

    Emmerick, Isabel Cristina Martins; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Azeredo, Thiago Botelho; Bigdeli, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess scientific publication and map research gaps on access to medicines (ATM) in Latin American and the Caribbean low-income and middle-income countries (LMIC). Design Scoping review. Two independent reviewers assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data from each study. Information sources Search strategies were developed and the following databases were searched: MEDLINE, ISI, SCOPUS and Lilacs, from 2000 to 2010. Eligibility criteria Research articles and reviews published in English, Spanish and Portuguese were included. Studies including only high-income countries were excluded, as well as those carried out in very limited settings and discussion papers. Results The 77 articles retained were categorised through consensus among the research team according to the level of the health system addressed, ATM domain and research issues covered. Publications on ATM have increased over time during the study period (r 0.93, p=0.00; R2 0.85). The top five countries covered were Brazil (68.8%), Mexico (15.6%), Colombia (11.7%), Argentina (10.4%) and Peru (10.4%). ‘Health services delivery’ and ‘patients, household and communities’ were the health system levels most frequently covered. The ATM domains ‘leadership and governance’, ‘sustainable financing, affordability and price of medicines’, ‘medicines selection and use’ and ‘availability of medicines’ were the top four explored. There are research gaps in important areas such as ‘human resources for health’, ‘global policies and human rights’, ‘production of medicines’ and ‘traditional medicine’. Conclusions The upward trend on scientific publication reflects a growing research capacity in the region, which is concentrated on research teams in selected countries. The gaps on research capacity could be overcome through research collaboration among countries. It is important to strengthen these collaborations, assuring that interests and needs from the LMIC are

  1. One and done? Equality of opportunity and repeated access to scarce, indivisible medical resources.

    PubMed

    Huesch, Marco D

    2012-05-24

    Existing ethical guidelines recommend that, all else equal, past receipt of a medical resource (e.g. a scarce organ) should not be considered in current allocation decisions (e.g. a repeat transplantation). One stated reason for this ethical consensus is that formal theories of ethics and justice do not persuasively accept or reject repeated access to the same medical resources. Another is that restricting attention to past receipt of a particular medical resource seems arbitrary: why couldn't one just as well, it is argued, consider receipt of other goods such as income or education? In consequence, simple allocation by lottery or first-come-first-served without consideration of any past receipt is thought to best afford equal opportunity, conditional on equal medical need.There are three issues with this view that need to be addressed. First, public views and patient preferences are less ambiguous than formal theories of ethics. Empirical work shows strong preferences for fairness in health care that have not been taken into account: repeated access to resources has been perceived as unfair. Second, while difficult to consider receipt of many other prior resources including non-medical resources, this should not be used a motive for ignoring the receipt of any and all goods including the focal resource in question. Third, when all claimants to a scarce resource are equally deserving, then use of random allocation seems warranted. However, the converse is not true: mere use of a randomizer does not by itself make the merits of all claimants equal. My conclusion is that not ignoring prior receipt of the same medical resource, and prioritizing those who have not previously had access to the medical resource in question, may be perceived as fairer and more equitable by society.

  2. One and done? Equality of opportunity and repeated access to scarce, indivisible medical resources

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Existing ethical guidelines recommend that, all else equal, past receipt of a medical resource (e.g. a scarce organ) should not be considered in current allocation decisions (e.g. a repeat transplantation). Discussion One stated reason for this ethical consensus is that formal theories of ethics and justice do not persuasively accept or reject repeated access to the same medical resources. Another is that restricting attention to past receipt of a particular medical resource seems arbitrary: why couldn’t one just as well, it is argued, consider receipt of other goods such as income or education? In consequence, simple allocation by lottery or first-come-first-served without consideration of any past receipt is thought to best afford equal opportunity, conditional on equal medical need. There are three issues with this view that need to be addressed. First, public views and patient preferences are less ambiguous than formal theories of ethics. Empirical work shows strong preferences for fairness in health care that have not been taken into account: repeated access to resources has been perceived as unfair. Second, while difficult to consider receipt of many other prior resources including non-medical resources, this should not be used a motive for ignoring the receipt of any and all goods including the focal resource in question. Third, when all claimants to a scarce resource are equally deserving, then use of random allocation seems warranted. However, the converse is not true: mere use of a randomizer does not by itself make the merits of all claimants equal. Summary My conclusion is that not ignoring prior receipt of the same medical resource, and prioritizing those who have not previously had access to the medical resource in question, may be perceived as fairer and more equitable by society. PMID:22624597

  3. 'Race' and prostate cancer mortality in equal-access healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Graham-Steed, Tisheeka; Uchio, Edward; Wells, Carolyn K; Aslan, Mihaela; Ko, John; Concato, John

    2013-12-01

    Reports suggest worse health-related outcomes among black (vs white) men diagnosed with prostate cancer, but appropriate cause-effect inferences are complicated by the relationship of race and other prognostic factors. We searched the literature to find contemporary articles focusing on mortality among black and white men with prostate cancer in equal-access healthcare systems. We also directly assessed the association of race and prostate cancer mortality by conducting an observational cohort analysis of 1270 veterans diagnosed with prostate cancer and followed for 11 to 16 years at 9 medical centers within the Veterans Health Administration. Among 5 reports providing quantitative results for the association of race and mortality among men with prostate cancer in equal-access systems, outcomes were similar for black and white men. Race also was not a prognostic factor in the observational cohort analysis of US veterans, with an adjusted hazard ratio for black (vs white) men and prostate cancer mortality of 0.90 (95% confidence interval, 0.58-1.40; P = .65). Mortality among black and white patients with prostate cancer is similar in equal-access healthcare systems. Studies that find racial differences in mortality (including cause-specific mortality) among men with prostate cancer may not account fully for socioeconomic and clinical factors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. 76 FR 4193 - Equal Access to Housing in HUD Programs-Regardless of Sexual Orientation or Gender Identity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    .... Equal Access to Housing in HUD Programs--Regardless of Sexual Orientation or Gender Identity; Proposed... Equal Access to Housing in HUD Programs--Regardless of Sexual Orientation or Gender Identity AGENCY... orientation or gender identity. DATES: Comment Due Date: March 25, 2011. ADDRESSES: Interested persons are...

  5. The Equal Access Act: Implications for Secondary School Policies. Public Law No. 98-377, Effective: August 11, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian Legal Society, Oak Park, IL.

    These guidelines are intended to inform school administrators about the scope and limitations of the Equal Access Act (Title VIII of Public Law 98-377), which provides equal access to school facilities for students who wish to meet for religious, political, philosophical, or other discourse. First, an overview of the act describes its various…

  6. Do Low-Income Students Have Equal Access to the Highest-Performing Teachers? Technical Appendix. NCEE 2011-4016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazerman, Steven; Max, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    This appendix describes the methods and provides further detail to support the evaluation brief, "Do Low-Income Students Have Equal Access to the Highest-Performing Teachers?" (Contains 8 figures, 6 tables and 5 footnotes.) [For the main report, "Do Low-Income Students Have Equal Access to the Highest-Performing Teachers? NCEE…

  7. Is Equal Access to Higher Education in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa Achievable by 2030?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilie, Sonia; Rose, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Higher education is back in the spotlight, with post-2015 sustainable development goals emphasising equality of access. In this paper, we highlight the long distance still to travel to achieve the goal of equal access to higher education for all, with a focus on poorer countries which tend to have lower levels of enrolment in higher education.…

  8. Is Equal Access to Higher Education in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa Achievable by 2030?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilie, Sonia; Rose, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Higher education is back in the spotlight, with post-2015 sustainable development goals emphasising equality of access. In this paper, we highlight the long distance still to travel to achieve the goal of equal access to higher education for all, with a focus on poorer countries which tend to have lower levels of enrolment in higher education.…

  9. Enabling Equal Access to Molecular Diagnostics: What Are the Implications for Policy and Health Technology Assessment?

    PubMed

    Plun-Favreau, Juliette; Immonen-Charalambous, Kaisa; Steuten, Lotte; Strootker, Anja; Rouzier, Roman; Horgan, Denis; Lawler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics can offer important benefits to patients and are a key enabler of the integration of personalised medicine into health care systems. However, despite their promise, few molecular diagnostics are embedded into clinical practice (especially in Europe) and access to these technologies remains unequal across countries and sometimes even within individual countries. If research translation and the regulatory environments have proven to be more challenging than expected, reimbursement and value assessment remain the main barriers to providing patients with equal access to molecular diagnostics. Unclear or non-existent reimbursement pathways, together with the lack of clear evidence requirements, have led to significant delays in the assessment of molecular diagnostics technologies in certain countries. Additionally, the lack of dedicated diagnostics budgets and the siloed nature of resource allocation within certain health care systems have significantly delayed diagnostics commissioning. This article will consider the perspectives of different stakeholders (patients, health care payers, health care professionals, and manufacturers) on the provision of a research-enabled, patient-focused molecular diagnostics platform that supports optimal patient care. Through the discussion of specific case studies, and building on the experience from countries that have successfully integrated molecular diagnostics into clinical practice, this article will discuss the necessary evolutions in policy and health technology assessment to ensure that patients can have equal access to appropriate molecular diagnostics.

  10. Can equal access to care eliminate racial disparities in pediatric asthma outcomes?

    PubMed

    Forester, Joseph P; Ong, Bruce A; Fallot, André

    2008-04-01

    A survey was given to the parents of 80 children with asthma between the ages of 3 and 18 years at the Pediatric Pulmonology Clinics of three military treatment facilities to evaluate asthma management and outcomes for different racial groups. Results demonstrated that management practices for the three groups were similar and that there were no significant differences in emergency department visits, prescription of oral steroids, or in the number of hospitalizations across the three groups. These findings suggest that equal access to care may allow children of different racial backgrounds to receive similar asthma care and achieve similar outcomes.

  11. Colon cancer treatment: Are there racial disparities in an equal-access healthcare system?

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Abegail A.; Enewold, Lindsey; Zahm, Shelia H.; Shriver, Craig D.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Zhu, Kangmin

    2014-01-01

    Background In the general US population, blacks and whites have been shown to undergo colon cancer treatment at disproportionate rates. Accessibility to medical care may be the most important factor influencing differences in colon cancer treatment among whites and blacks. Objective This study assessed whether racial disparities in colon cancer surgery and chemotherapy existed in an equal-access healthcare system. Additionally, we sought to examine whether racial differences varied by demographic and tumor characteristics. Design and Setting Database research using the United States Department of Defense’s (DoD) Military Health System. Patients Patients included 2,560 Non-Hispanic Whites (NHW) and Non-Hispanic Blacks (NHB) with colon cancer diagnosed from 1998 to 2007. Main Outcome Measures Logistic regression was used to assess the associations between race and the receipt of colon cancer surgery or chemotherapy, while controlling for available potential confounders, both overall and stratified by age at diagnosis, sex, and tumor stage. Results After multivariate adjustment, the odds of receiving colon cancer surgery or chemotherapy NHBs versus NHWs were similar (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.37–1.53; OR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.59–1.04; respectively). Additionally, no effect modification by age at diagnosis, sex, and tumor stage were observed. Limitations Treatment data might not be complete for beneficiaries who also had non-DoD health insurance. Conclusions When access to medical care is equal, racial disparities in the provision of colon cancer surgery and chemotherapy were not apparent. Thus, it is possible that the inequalities in access to care play a major role in the racial disparities seen in colon cancer treatment in the general population. PMID:25101601

  12. Colorectal Cancer Screening and Race in an Equal Access Medical System.

    PubMed

    Haddad, James D; You, David M

    2016-02-01

    National colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates have improved, but significant racial disparities have been identified. Improved access to care has been proposed as a solution to eliminate such disparities. To determine if racial disparities in CRC screening rates persist in a medical system without barriers to access or cost. A retrospective review study was performed, examining the healthcare effectiveness data and information set data from patients between the ages of 50 and 65 years who were eligible for CRC screening. Data on the type of CRC screening and rates of up-to-date screening were also examined. Data were available for 14,196 patients of whom 8809 (62%) reported race. Subjects included were 53% male and 47% female, with breakdown by race as follows: 53% White, 34% Asian/Pacific Islander, 11% Black, 1% Hispanic, and <1% Native-American. Overall, CRC screening and up-to-date rates were higher than the national average (81 and 72%, respectively). Blacks were less likely than non-Blacks to have undergone CRC screening (75 vs. 82%, p < 0.001), and were also less likely to be up-to-date with CRC screening (66 vs. 72%, p < 0.001). Despite elimination of access and cost barriers, racial disparities in CRC screening persist. Equal access to CRC screening tools will be necessary, but not sufficient, to eliminate the currently observed national trends. Further study should focus on elucidating patient-specific barriers to successful completion and maintenance of CRC screening.

  13. Socio-economic status influences blood pressure control despite equal access to care.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, M S; Andersen, M; Munck, A P; Larsen, P V; Hansen, D G; Jacobsen, I A; Larsen, M L; Christensen, B; Sondergaard, J

    2012-10-01

    Denmark has a health care system with free and equal access to care irrespective of age and socio-economic status (SES). We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate a possible association between SES and blood pressure (BP) control of hypertensive patients treated in general practice. We enrolled 184 general practices and 5260 hypertensive patients. The general practitioners reported information about BP and diagnosis of diabetes. Information about education, income, antihypertensive drug treatment and other co-morbidity was retrieved from relevant registers from Statistics Denmark. The outcome measure was BP control defined as BP <140/90 mmHg in general and <130/80 mmHg in diabetics. Patients <65 years and with an educational level of 10-12 years had increased odds ratio (OR) of BP control compared to patients with an educational level <10 years. Patients ≥65 years had increased OR of BP control if they were married/cohabiting as compared to being single, whereas education and income had no impact in this age group. Diabetics had significantly reduced odds of BP control irrespective of age, educational or income level. Despite equal access to care for all patients, SES had significant impact on BP control in this survey. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease also had a substantial influence irrespective of age, educational and income level.

  14. South Africa's protracted struggle for equal distribution and equitable access - still not there.

    PubMed

    van Rensburg, Hendrik C J

    2014-05-08

    The purpose of this contribution is to analyse and explain the South African HRH case, its historical evolution, and post-apartheid reform initiatives aimed at addressing deficiencies and shortfalls. HRH in South Africa not only mirrors the nature and diversity of challenges globally, but also the strategies pursued by countries to address these challenges. Although South Africa has strongly developed health professions, large numbers of professional and mid-level workers, and also well-established training institutions, it is experiencing serious workforce shortages and access constraints. This results from the unequal distribution of health workers between the well-resourced private sector over the poorly-resourced public sector, as well as from distributional disparities between urban and rural areas. During colonial and apartheid times, disparities were aggravated by policies of racial segregation and exclusion, remnants of which are today still visible in health-professional backlogs, unequal provincial HRH distribution, and differential access to health services for specific race and class groups. Since 1994, South Africa's transition to democracy deeply transformed the health system, health professions and HRH establishments. The introduction of free-health policies, the district health system and the prioritisation of PHC ensured more equal distribution of the workforce, as well as greater access to services for deprived groups. However, the HIV/AIDS epidemic brought about huge demands for care and massive patient loads in the public-sector. The emigration of health professionals to developed countries and to the private sector also undermines the strength and effectiveness of the public health sector. For the poor, access to care thus remains constrained and in perpetual shortfall. The post-1994 government has introduced several HRH-specific strategies to recruit, distribute, motivate and retain health professionals to strengthen the public sector and to

  15. South Africa’s protracted struggle for equal distribution and equitable access – still not there

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to analyse and explain the South African HRH case, its historical evolution, and post-apartheid reform initiatives aimed at addressing deficiencies and shortfalls. HRH in South Africa not only mirrors the nature and diversity of challenges globally, but also the strategies pursued by countries to address these challenges. Although South Africa has strongly developed health professions, large numbers of professional and mid-level workers, and also well-established training institutions, it is experiencing serious workforce shortages and access constraints. This results from the unequal distribution of health workers between the well-resourced private sector over the poorly-resourced public sector, as well as from distributional disparities between urban and rural areas. During colonial and apartheid times, disparities were aggravated by policies of racial segregation and exclusion, remnants of which are today still visible in health-professional backlogs, unequal provincial HRH distribution, and differential access to health services for specific race and class groups. Since 1994, South Africa’s transition to democracy deeply transformed the health system, health professions and HRH establishments. The introduction of free-health policies, the district health system and the prioritisation of PHC ensured more equal distribution of the workforce, as well as greater access to services for deprived groups. However, the HIV/AIDS epidemic brought about huge demands for care and massive patient loads in the public-sector. The emigration of health professionals to developed countries and to the private sector also undermines the strength and effectiveness of the public health sector. For the poor, access to care thus remains constrained and in perpetual shortfall. The post-1994 government has introduced several HRH-specific strategies to recruit, distribute, motivate and retain health professionals to strengthen the public sector and to

  16. Universal Design and LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, Bisexual, and Queer) Issues: Creating Equal Access and Opportunities for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Jennifer R.; Geiger, Tracy J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors extend the ideals set forth by the universal design (UD) framework seeking to include the unique needs of students in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) community. Universal design is a philosophy that, when applied to higher education, constitutes acceptance of, equal access for, and equal opportunities for…

  17. The Benefits To All Of Ensuring Equal And Timely Access To Influenza Vaccines In Poor Communities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Brown, Shawn T.; Bailey, Rachel R.; Zimmerman, Richard K.; Potter, Margaret A.; McGlone, Sarah M.; Cooley, Philip C.; Grefenstette, John J.; Zimmer, Shanta M.; Wheaton, William D.; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Voorhees, Ronald E.; Burke, Donald S.

    2012-01-01

    When influenza vaccines are in short supply, allocating vaccines equitably among different jurisdictions can be challenging. But justice is not the only reason to ensure that poorer counties have the same access to influenza vaccines as do wealthier ones. Using a detailed computer simulation model of the Washington, D.C., metropolitan region, we found that limiting or delaying vaccination of residents of poorer counties could raise the total number of influenza infections and the number of new infections per day at the peak of an epidemic throughout the region—even in the wealthier counties that had received more timely and abundant vaccine access. Among other underlying reasons, poorer counties tend to have high-density populations and more children and other higher-risk people per household, resulting in more interactions and both increased transmission of influenza and greater risk for worse influenza outcomes. Thus, policy makers across the country, in poor and wealthy areas alike, have an incentive to ensure that poorer residents have equal access to vaccines. PMID:21653968

  18. Equality, accessibility, and availability of physical therapy services in Israel-Perception of national directors.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Tamar; Parag, Ayala

    2015-07-01

    To date no research has described Israeli physical therapy (PT) services to determine whether they are provided in the spirit intended by the National Health Insurance Law (NHIL). This study aimed to assess the equality, accessibility, and availability of PT services in Israel. Qualitative research was based on semi-structured, personal interviews with all national directors of PT services in Israel, followed by content analysis of the data obtained. According to the findings, PT services are provided by all Health Maintenance Organisations (HMOs) throughout Israel. In peripheral areas, access to services is limited; availability of services at most clinics is poor, a problem which is solved mainly by referring patients to PT outsourcing. The number of treatment sessions is determined by the NHIL; however, all directors agreed that the number of treatments provided should be based on a professional decision following patient evaluation and progress, rather than on administrative considerations. Inequality of service to peripheral areas could be reduced by creating cooperation between HMOs, thereby establishing clinics capable of providing services that are both accessible and equitable. In addition, the number of sessions provided to patients in the health-care basket should be reassessed, and a set of uniform criteria should be created for determining the optimal number of PT sessions. This could lead to greater uniformity in distribution of PT services provided by the HMOs.

  19. Formulary availability and regulatory barriers to accessibility of opioids for cancer pain in Latin America and the Caribbean: a report from the Global Opioid Policy Initiative (GOPI).

    PubMed

    Cleary, J; De Lima, L; Eisenchlas, J; Radbruch, L; Torode, J; Cherny, N I

    2013-12-01

    The nations of the Caribbean, Central America and South America form a heterogeneous region with substantial variability in economic, social and palliative care development. Palliative care provision is at varied stages of development throughout the region. The consumption of opioids in Latin America and the Caribbean is variable with moderate levels of consumption by international standards (1-10 mg morphine equivalents/capita/year) observed in Argentine, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Costa Rica, Uruguay and most of the Caribbean but relatively low levels of consumption in other countries particularly Guatemala, Honduras and Bolivia. Data for Latin American and Caribbean is reported on the availability and accessibility of opioids for the management of cancer pain in 24 of the 33 countries surveyed. The results of this survey are relevant to 560 million of the region's 595 million people (94%). Opioid availability continues to be low throughout most of Latin America and the Caribbean. While formularies in this region generally include all recommended morphine formulations, access is significantly impaired by widespread over-regulation that continues to be pervasive across the region.

  20. Screening or Symptoms? How Do We Detect Colorectal Cancer in an Equal Access Health Care System?

    PubMed

    Hatch, Quinton M; Kniery, Kevin R; Johnson, Eric K; Flores, Shelly A; Moeil, David L; Thompson, John J; Maykel, Justin A; Steele, Scott R

    2016-02-01

    Detection of colorectal cancer ideally occurs at an early stage through proper screening. We sought to establish methods by which colorectal cancers are diagnosed within an equal access military health care population and evaluate the correlation between TNM stage at colorectal cancer diagnosis and diagnostic modality (i.e., symptomatic detection vs screen detection). A retrospective chart review of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients from January 2007 to August 2014 was conducted at the authors' equal access military institution. We evaluated TNM stage relative to diagnosis by screen detection (fecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoidoscopy, CT colonography, colonoscopy) or symptomatic evaluation (diagnostic colonoscopy or surgery). Of 197 colorectal cancers diagnosed (59 % male; mean age 62 years), 50 (25 %) had stage I, 47 (24 %) had stage II, 70 (36 %) had stage III, and 30 (15 %) had stage IV disease. Twenty-five percent of colorectal cancers were detected via screen detection (3 % by fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), 0.5 % by screening CT colonography, 17 % by screening colonoscopy, and 5 % by surveillance colonoscopy). One hundred forty-eight (75 %) were diagnosed after onset of signs or symptoms. The preponderance of these was advanced-stage disease (stages III-IV), although >50 % of stage I-II disease also had signs or symptoms at diagnosis. The most common symptoms were rectal bleeding (45 %), abdominal pain (35 %), and change in stool caliber (27 %). The most common overall sign was anemia (60 %). Screening FOBT (odds ratio (OR) 8.7, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0-78.3; P = 0.05) independently predicted early diagnosis with stage I-II disease. Patient gender and ethnicity were not associated with cancer stage at diagnosis. Despite equal access to colorectal cancer screening, diagnosis after development of symptomatic cancer remains more common. Fecal occult blood screen detection is associated with early stage at

  1. Research and data systems to promote equal access to postacute rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda

    2013-07-23

    The first national study in Israel of post-acute rehabilitation service use for elderly patients with stroke and hip fracture reported regional variation in care receipt. Although lower likelihood of admission to inpatient rehabilitation was observed in districts with known shortages of rehabilitation beds, supply alone did not explain the findings. This commentary explores other potential contributing factors. It argues that greater uniformity in the process and documentation of discharge planning in combination with decision support would help to standardize provider behavior. Implementation of a system of functional status data collection that is linked to administrative data is recommended to enable examination of the impact of care receipt and variation. Additional research is needed to provide a clearer understanding of factors contributing to regional variation and to identify solutions to ensure equal access to post-acute rehabilitation services in Israel.

  2. Treatment Trends for Stage I Testicular Seminoma in an Equal-Access Medical System.

    PubMed

    Wingate, Jonathan T; Etzioni, Ruth; Macdonald, Dusten M; Brand, Timothy C

    2016-10-01

    The practice patterns for adjuvant therapies for stage I seminoma are rapidly evolving, and surveillance is currently preferred. How these recommendations have affected contemporary practice in an equal-access US population is unknown. A total of 436 men diagnosed with clinical stage IA-IB seminoma from 2001 to 2011 were identified in the Automated Central Tumor Registry (ACTUR). The ACTUR is the cancer registry system for the Department of Defense. Logistic regression models analyzed the association between patient characteristics and adjuvant therapy. Overall and recurrence-free survival were determined from Kaplan-Meier analysis. The use of adjuvant radiotherapy in this population decreased significantly from 2001 to 2011. In 2001, 83.9% of patients received radiotherapy compared with only 24.0% in 2011. During that period, a concomitant increase occurred in the use of chemotherapy from 0% to 38.0%. A later year of diagnosis was significantly associated with a greater rate of receiving chemotherapy relative to radiotherapy (P < .001 for 2006-2011 vs. 2001-2005; relative rate ratio, 19.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.04-46.13). A later year of diagnosis was not significantly associated with the receipt of surveillance (P = .412 for 2006-2011 vs. 2001-2005; odds ratio, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.54-1.29). Black race or age was not significantly associated with adjuvant therapy. With a median follow-up period of 4.7 years, the 5-year overall and recurrence-free survival rates were 98.0% and 77.0%, respectively. The use of adjuvant radiotherapy has been replaced by chemotherapy for clinical stage I testicular seminoma in an equal-access system. The lack of an increase in active surveillance in our cohort might represent overtreatment of the population. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Equalizing access to pandemic influenza vaccines through optimal allocation to public health distribution points

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bismark; Morton, David P.; Johnson, Gregory P.; Clements, Bruce; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2017-01-01

    Vaccines are arguably the most important means of pandemic influenza mitigation. However, as during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, mass immunization with an effective vaccine may not begin until a pandemic is well underway. In the U.S., state-level public health agencies are responsible for quickly and fairly allocating vaccines as they become available to populations prioritized to receive vaccines. Allocation decisions can be ethically and logistically complex, given several vaccine types in limited and uncertain supply and given competing priority groups with distinct risk profiles and vaccine acceptabilities. We introduce a model for optimizing statewide allocation of multiple vaccine types to multiple priority groups, maximizing equal access. We assume a large fraction of available vaccines are distributed to healthcare providers based on their requests, and then optimize county-level allocation of the remaining doses to achieve equity. We have applied the model to the state of Texas, and incorporated it in a Web-based decision-support tool for the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS). Based on vaccine quantities delivered to registered healthcare providers in response to their requests during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, we find that a relatively small cache of discretionary doses (DSHS reserved 6.8% in 2009) suffices to achieve equity across all counties in Texas. PMID:28854244

  4. Not All Lexical Access Tasks Are Created Equal: Lexical Development between Three and Five

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isacoff, Nora M.; Stromswold, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Lexical access tasks are designed to measure efficiency of lexical access, but task demands and methods vary greatly. Many lexical access tasks do not account for confounding factors including competence in other linguistic abilities. In this study, preschoolers were given two lexical access tasks. In the single-category naming (SCN) task,…

  5. Not All Lexical Access Tasks Are Created Equal: Lexical Development between Three and Five

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isacoff, Nora M.; Stromswold, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Lexical access tasks are designed to measure efficiency of lexical access, but task demands and methods vary greatly. Many lexical access tasks do not account for confounding factors including competence in other linguistic abilities. In this study, preschoolers were given two lexical access tasks. In the single-category naming (SCN) task,…

  6. Disability as Diversity: Assessing the Perceptions of Students with Physical Disabilities regarding Access and Equal Opportunity in Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lisa Marie

    2012-01-01

    The initial purpose of this study was to utilize the Higher Education and Students with Physical Disabilities Survey (HESPDS) to develop a better understanding of the perceptions of students with physical disabilities regarding the extent to which private, residential colleges and universities provide access and equal opportunity. The significance…

  7. Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy in Adults with Learning Disability: Current Uptake and Adjustments to Facilitate Equality of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilling, Rachel F.

    2015-01-01

    Equality of access to health care for adults with learning disability has been in the spotlight in the UK in recent years due to publication of several reports. Adults with learning disability are thought to account for a significant proportion of the diabetic population in the UK. A list of adults known to the learning disability health…

  8. Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy in Adults with Learning Disability: Current Uptake and Adjustments to Facilitate Equality of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilling, Rachel F.

    2015-01-01

    Equality of access to health care for adults with learning disability has been in the spotlight in the UK in recent years due to publication of several reports. Adults with learning disability are thought to account for a significant proportion of the diabetic population in the UK. A list of adults known to the learning disability health…

  9. Office for Civil Rights Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report to Congress. Guaranteeing Equal Access to High-Standards Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    The mission of the Office for Civil Rights is to ensure equal access to a high-quality education for all students through the vigorous enforcement of civil rights. This report outlines the legal responsibilities and goals of the organization and shows how these were met in the year 2000. There are explanations of how the agency provides…

  10. Managing an Open Access, Multi-Institutional, International Digital Library: The Digital Library of the Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooldridge, Brooke; Taylor, Laurie; Sullivan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Developing an Open Access, multi-institutional, multilingual, international digital library requires robust technological and institutional infrastructures that support both the needs of individual institutions alongside the needs of the growing partnership and ensure continuous communication and development of the shared vision for the digital…

  11. Managing an Open Access, Multi-Institutional, International Digital Library: The Digital Library of the Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooldridge, Brooke; Taylor, Laurie; Sullivan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Developing an Open Access, multi-institutional, multilingual, international digital library requires robust technological and institutional infrastructures that support both the needs of individual institutions alongside the needs of the growing partnership and ensure continuous communication and development of the shared vision for the digital…

  12. The Access to Higher Schools in Poland (In the Aspect of Social Equality and Economic Development).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomala, Jerzy; And Others

    Analyzing the effects of higher education accessibility, the present state of difficulties re: accessibility, and the functioning of various means of accessibility compensation, this paper presents the development of Polish education in terms of the social, political, and economic systems operative during the inter-war period (1918-39) and the…

  13. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy by people accessing services from non-governmental HIV support organisations in three Caribbean countries.

    PubMed

    Allen, C F; Simon, Y; Edwards, J; Simeon, D T

    2011-06-01

    To identify factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence in order to guide the development of strategies to improve the situation. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with people living with HIV (PLHIV) who receive services from non-governmental organisations affiliated to the Caribbean Regional Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (CRN+) in Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada and Trinidad and Tobago. PLHIV from CRN+, traced potential participants, administered informed consent procedures and carried out structured interviews. The main outcome measure was 95% to 100% adherence over the previous seven days. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to identify associations with demographic characteristics, psychological status, health and support service use, sexual behaviour and substance abuse. Of 394 respondents, 69.5% were currently taking ART. Of these, 70.1% took 95% to 100% of their prescribed pills. One in 20 took more pills than prescribed, all of whom were prescribed fewer or equal to the median pill number. Factors independently associated with adherence were use of a counselling service (OR 3.20; 95% CI 1.55, 6.61), revelation of HIV status without consent (OR 2.31; 95% CI 1.13, 4.74), alcohol consumption (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.23, 0.96) and side effects (OR 0.32; 95% CI 0.15, 0.68). Drug resistance to ART was reported by 6% of users. Improvements in ART adherence may be achieved by counselling, focussed attention to alcohol users and developing drugs with reduced side effects. Such measures are critical to maintain PLHIV quality of life gains and prevent the proliferation of drug resistant HIV strains.

  14. Do Disadvantaged Students Have Equal Access to Effective Teaching? NCEE Study Snapshot. NCEE 2014-4001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study snapshot offers a summary of "Access to Effective Teaching for Disadvantaged Students. NCEE 2014-4001," the first report from a study initiated by the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences to examine access to effective teaching for disadvantaged students in 29 diverse school districts. The study…

  15. Equal Access to State Funding: The Case of Muslim Schools in Britain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker-Jenkins, Marie

    The recent decision to award government funding to two independent Muslim schools in Britain has brought attention to the use of public funds for private institutions. This paper provides an overview of the movement for equal treatment of Muslim institutions and explores the issues surrounding equitable treatment of religious minorities. The paper…

  16. Access or Inclusion? Conceptualisation and Operationalisation of Gender Equality in Zimbabwean State Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauraya, Efiritha

    2014-01-01

    This article explores concerns about gender inequality in Zimbabwean state universities. The researcher's interest arose from the realisation of persistent gender inequalities despite initiatives to close gender gaps. Of particular concern is the conceptualization and operationalisation of gender equality in institutions. Focusing only on the…

  17. Access or Inclusion? Conceptualisation and Operationalisation of Gender Equality in Zimbabwean State Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauraya, Efiritha

    2014-01-01

    This article explores concerns about gender inequality in Zimbabwean state universities. The researcher's interest arose from the realisation of persistent gender inequalities despite initiatives to close gender gaps. Of particular concern is the conceptualization and operationalisation of gender equality in institutions. Focusing only on the…

  18. Achieving Technological Equity and Equal Access to the Learning Tools of the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Curman L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discusses issues involved in equitable access to technology in public education based on a Saint Paul, Minnesota, school district's experiences. Highlights include funding, uses of technology for teaching and learning, facilities design, strategic planning, inservice training, and evaluation. (AEF)

  19. Breast cancer screening patterns among military beneficiaries: racial variations in screening eliminated in an equal-access model.

    PubMed

    Oseni, Tawakalitu O; Soballe, Peter W

    2014-10-01

    African American women present with more aggressive breast tumors and at later stages than white women. Many factors have been proposed to explain these findings, including socioeconomic status, cultural beliefs, and access to medical care. The purpose of this project was to determine if stage at presentation would be equivalent in a system providing equal access to care and if screening was equivalent. The Naval Medical Center San Diego (NMCSD) tumor registry from 2007 to 2012 was queried for this cross-sectional study. Eligible women included all those diagnosed and treated for breast cancer at NMCSD. Distribution of tumor stage (early vs. advanced) between racial groups was compared by age, treatment, and receptor status. A total of 624 women were eligible; 88 % were early stage (0-II) and 12 % presented with advanced stage (III or IV). Racial differences in distribution were significant among African American and Hispanic women for early versus advanced presentation (p = 0.011). No racial disparity was seen in screening patterns among women. In a military health system with equal access to care and standard screening recommendations, screening patterns did not vary with race but did vary with stage and active duty status. African American women present with breast cancer at later stages and with more hormone-receptor negative tumors, suggesting that biology rather than socioeconomic or access factors may be the most important determinant of stage at presentation of breast cancer for African American women.

  20. The Effect of Race and Socioeconomic Status on Surgical Margins and Biochemical Outcomes in an Equal-access Healthcare Setting: Results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) Database

    PubMed Central

    Chu, David I.; Moreira, Daniel M.; Gerber, Leah; Presti, Joseph C.; Aronson, William J.; Terris, Martha K.; Kane, Christopher J.; Amling, Christopher L.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The impact of race and socioeconomic status (SES) in prostate cancer (CaP) outcomes has been well-studied, but controversy remains. We explored in an equal-access setting the associations of race/SES with intermediate CaP outcomes including positive surgical margin (PSM) and biochemical recurrence (BCR). Methods Data were retrospectively collected from 2502 men in the Shared Equal-Access Regional Cancer Hospitals (SEARCH)database who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1989–2010. SES (income, education, employment, and poverty) was estimated from linkage of home zip-code to census data. Logistic regression with adjustment for pre-and post-operative covariates estimated risk for associations between race/SES and pathologic outcomes. Cox proportional hazards models estimated risk for associations between race/SES and time to BCR. Results Black men were more likely to have lower SES than white men (p<0.001). On multivariate analysis, race was not associated with PSM, but higher SES was associated with less PSM and fewer Gleason sum ≥ 7 pathologic tumors when SES was assessed by education, employment, or poverty (p-trend ≤ 0.051) and income, employment, or poverty (p-trend ≤ 0.059), respectively. Crude Cox models showed black men had higher BCR risk (Hazards Ratio [HR] 1.20, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.05–1.38, p=0.009) that persisted after adjustment for covariates including SES (HR ≥ 1.18, p ≤ 0.040). Higher SES measured by income and poverty were associated with less BCR but only for black men (p-trend ≤ 0.048). Conclusions Even in an equal-access setting, higher SES predicted lower PSM risk, and race persisted in predicting BCR despite adjustment for SES. Low SES black patients may be at greatest risk for post-prostatectomy BCR. PMID:22415377

  1. Effect of race and socioeconomic status on surgical margins and biochemical outcomes in an equal-access health care setting: results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database.

    PubMed

    Chu, David I; Moreira, Daniel M; Gerber, Leah; Presti, Joseph C; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2012-10-15

    The impact of race and socioeconomic status (SES) in prostate cancer (CaP) outcomes has been well-studied, but controversy remains. The associations of race/SES with intermediate CaP outcomes, including positive surgical margin (PSM) and biochemical recurrence (BCR), were explored in an equal-access setting. Data were retrospectively collected from 2502 men in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospitals (SEARCH) database who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1989 to 2010. SES (income, education, employment, and poverty) was estimated from linkage of home ZIP code to census data. Logistic regression with adjustment for pre- and postoperative covariates estimated risk for associations between race/SES and pathologic outcomes. Cox proportional hazards models estimated risk for associations between race/SES and time to BCR. Black men were more likely to have lower SES than white men (P < .001). On multivariate analysis, race was not associated with PSM, but higher SES was associated with less PSM and fewer Gleason sum ≥ 7 pathologic tumors when SES was assessed by education, employment, or poverty (P trend ≤ .051) and income, employment, or poverty (P trend ≤ 0.059), respectively. Crude Cox models showed black men had higher BCR risk (hazards ratio = 1.20, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.38, P = .009) that persisted after adjustment for covariates including SES (hazards ratio ≥ 1.18, P ≤ .040). Higher SES measured by income and poverty were associated with less BCR, but only for black men (P trend ≤ .048). Even in an equal-access setting, higher SES predicted lower PSM risk, and race persisted in predicting BCR despite adjustment for SES. Low SES black patients may be at greatest risk for postprostatectomy BCR. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  2. What's in Your Refrigerator? Children's Views on Equality, Work, Money and Access to Food

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Libby-Lee; Hesterman, Sandra; Knaus, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates young children's theorising about families and their differential access to food from a perspective of wealth and poverty. Fifty-two children, aged 6-7 years, attending a Western Australian school were invited to share their perspectives on this global issue. The single case study method utilised three children's focus…

  3. MOOCs: When Opening Doors to Education, Institutions Must Ensure That People with Disabilities Have Equal Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasopoulos, Nicholas; Baer, Amanda Marie

    2013-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses ("MOOCs") are free online courses offered by institutions of higher education to individuals across the world, without any admissions criteria. Through web-based courses hosted by MOOC platforms, student-participants learn by accessing media, including documents, pictures and uploaded lectures on the course…

  4. Equal Access to Early Childhood Education in South Korea Using the Geographic Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jin; Jang, Youn Joo

    2017-01-01

    While the importance of early childhood education is well documented, scant attention is afforded to the access to institutions for early childhood education. Uneven distribution of institutions for early childhood education in segregated metropolitan areas can cause inequality of educational opportunity. By using the Geographic Information System…

  5. What's in Your Refrigerator? Children's Views on Equality, Work, Money and Access to Food

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Libby-Lee; Hesterman, Sandra; Knaus, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates young children's theorising about families and their differential access to food from a perspective of wealth and poverty. Fifty-two children, aged 6-7 years, attending a Western Australian school were invited to share their perspectives on this global issue. The single case study method utilised three children's focus…

  6. MOOCs: When Opening Doors to Education, Institutions Must Ensure That People with Disabilities Have Equal Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasopoulos, Nicholas; Baer, Amanda Marie

    2013-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses ("MOOCs") are free online courses offered by institutions of higher education to individuals across the world, without any admissions criteria. Through web-based courses hosted by MOOC platforms, student-participants learn by accessing media, including documents, pictures and uploaded lectures on the course…

  7. Equity and Equality in Access to Higher Education: The Experiences of Students with Disabilities in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwaipopo, Rosemarie Nyigulila; Lihamba, Amandina; Njewele, Delphine Cosmas

    2011-01-01

    Social development policies in Tanzania are exemplary in terms of their recognition of the rights of access to higher education institutions by specific demographic groups. Policy documents such as the 2005 "National Strategy for Growth and Reduction of Poverty" (known as the MKUKUTA) and the 2004 "National Policy on…

  8. Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY) for adults at risk for glaucoma: study rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Owsley, Cynthia; Rhodes, Lindsay A; McGwin, Gerald; Mennemeyer, Stephen T; Bregantini, Mary; Patel, Nita; Wiley, Demond M; LaRussa, Frank; Box, Dan; Saaddine, Jinan; Crews, John E; Girkin, Christopher A

    2015-11-18

    Primary open angle glaucoma is a chronic, progressive eye disease that is the leading cause of blindness among African Americans. Glaucoma progresses more rapidly and appears about 10 years earlier in African Americans as compared to whites. African Americans are also less likely to receive comprehensive eye care when glaucoma could be detected before irreversible blindness. Screening and follow-up protocols for managing glaucoma recommended by eye-care professional organizations are often not followed by primary eye-care providers, both ophthalmologists and optometrists. There is a pressing need to improve both the accessibility and quality of glaucoma care for African Americans. Telemedicine may be an effective solution for improving management and diagnosis of glaucoma because it depends on ocular imaging and tests that can be electronically transmitted to remote reading centers where tertiary care specialists can examine the results. We describe the Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community project (EQUALITY), set to evaluate a teleglaucoma program deployed in retail-based primary eye care practices serving communities with a large percentage of African Americans. We conducted an observational, 1-year prospective study based in two Walmart Vision Centers in Alabama staffed by primary care optometrists. EQUALITY focuses on new or existing adult patients who are at-risk for glaucoma or already diagnosed with glaucoma. Patients receive dilated comprehensive examinations and diagnostic testing for glaucoma, followed by the optometrist's diagnosis and a preliminary management plan. Results are transmitted to a glaucoma reading center where ophthalmologists who completed fellowship training in glaucoma review results and provide feedback to the optometrist, who manages the care of the patient. Patients also receive eye health education about glaucoma and comprehensive eye care. Research questions include diagnostic and management agreement

  9. Equal and universal access?: water at mealtimes, inequalities, and the challenge for schools in poor and rural communities.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Sarah M; Stafford, Randall

    2013-05-01

    As a result of the rising national obesity rates, public health researchers and advocates have initiated a number of obesity prevention interventions to reduce the rates of overweight and obesity along with their related medical conditions and costs. Policymakers have also initiated a wide range of environmental and policies to support healthy eating and physical activity. Policies such as California's SB1413, which requires that free drinking water be served in school cafeterias during mealtimes, and subsequently the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, assume an equal access to safe and healthy drinking water. As a result, these policies and their application may unintentionally, exacerbate the inequities already present. Unless we take reasonable steps to address the needs of high-need communities, these one-size-fits-all policy efforts may result in an unequal patchwork of disparities and may have a greater negative impact in high-need poor and rural areas.

  10. Equal and Universal Access? Water at Mealtimes, Inequalities, and the Challenge for Schools in Poor and Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Sarah M.; Stafford, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the rising national obesity rates, public health researchers and advocates have initiated a number of obesity prevention interventions to reduce the rates of overweight and obesity along with their related medical conditions and costs. Policymakers have also initiated a wide range of environmental and policies to support healthy eating and physical activity. Policies such as California’s SB1413, which requires that free drinking water be served in school cafeterias during mealtimes, and subsequently the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, assume an equal access to safe and healthy drinking water. As a result, these policies and their application may unintentionally, exacerbate the inequities already present. Unless we take reasonable steps to address the needs of high-need communities, these one-size-fits-all policy efforts may result in an unequal patchwork of disparities and may have a greater negative impact in high-need poor and rural areas. PMID:23728054

  11. The association between race and prostate cancer risk on initial biopsy in an equal access, multiethnic cohort.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Alexis R; Turner, Elizabeth L; Moorman, Patricia G; Freedland, Stephen J; Keto, Christopher J; McPhail, Megan E; Grant, Delores J; Vidal, Adriana C; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2014-08-01

    Population-based studies have established a link between race and prostate cancer (PC) risk, but whether race predicts PC after adjusting for clinical characteristics is unclear. We investigated the association between race and risk of low- and high-grade PC in men undergoing initial prostate biopsy in an equal access medical center. We conducted a retrospective record review of 887 men (48.6 % black, 51.4 % white) from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center who underwent initial prostate biopsy between 2001 and 2009. Multivariable logistic regression analysis of race and biopsy outcome was conducted adjusting for age, body mass index, number of cores taken, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and digital rectal examination findings. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test the association between black race and PC grade (Gleason <7 vs. ≥7). Black men were younger at biopsy (61 vs. 65 years, p < 0.001) and had a higher pre-biopsy PSA (6.6 vs. 5.8 ng/ml, p = 0.001). A total of 499 men had PC on biopsy (245 low grade; 254 high grade). In multivariable analyses, black race was significantly predictive of PC overall [odds ratio 1.50, p = 0.006] and high-grade PC [relative risk ratio (RRR) 1.84, p = 0.001], but was not significantly associated with low-grade PC (RRR 1.29, p = 0.139). In an equal access healthcare facility, black race was associated with greater risk of PC detection on initial biopsy and of high-grade PC after adjusting for clinical characteristics. Additional investigation of mechanisms linking black race and PC risk and PC aggressiveness is needed.

  12. Virologic response differences between African Americans and European Americans initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy with equal access to care.

    PubMed

    Weintrob, Amy C; Grandits, Greg A; Agan, Brian K; Ganesan, Anuradha; Landrum, Michael L; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Johnson, Erica N; Ordóñez, Claudia E; Wortmann, Glenn W; Marconi, Vincent C

    2009-12-01

    Studies comparing virologic response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) between African Americans (AA) and European Americans (EA) have been confounded by differences in duration of HIV infection and access to health care. We evaluated virologic response to HAART between ethnicities in a large cohort with fewer confounders. The odds of attaining viral suppression at 6- and 12-months post-HAART were determined by multivariate logistic regression for HIV-infected AA and EA prospectively followed in a large US military cohort. Time-to-event methods were used to compare maintenance of suppression. A total of 1363 subjects (51% AA, 92% men) with viral load results available 6 months after HAART initiation were included. There was no difference between ethnicities in time from seroconversion to HIV diagnosis or HAART initiation or in HAART regimens. Adjusted for multiple demographic and HIV-related factors, AA had significantly lower odds of obtaining undetectable viral loads after 6 (odds ratio 0.6, 95% confidence interval 0.4-0.8, P < 0.001) and 12 months (odds ratio 0.6, 95% confidence interval 0.4-0.8, P = 0.002) of HAART. Once undetectable, there was no difference in time to virologic failure between AA and EA. Despite similar durations of HIV infection and equal access to health care, AAs were significantly less likely to achieve viral suppression compared with EA.

  13. Book review: Inside the Equal Access to Justice Act: Environmental litigation and the crippling battle over America's lands, endangered species, and critical habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Organ, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Review info:  Inside the equal access to justice act: Environmental litigation and the crippling battle over America's lands, endangered species, and critical habitats. By Lowell E. Baier, 2016. ISBN: 978-1442257443, 678 pp.

  14. Equality or Equity, Player or Guardian? The Dutch Government and Its Role in Providing Access Opportunities for Government Sponsored International Secondary Education, 1979-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickarts, Boris

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the Dutch government's International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) Pilot, allowing Dutch pre-university students to take part in the IB DP. Is it likely to create "equal", or rather "equitable", access opportunities for government-sponsored Dutch international secondary schools? The article…

  15. Equal Access to Health Care: Patient Dumping. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (July 22, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Government Operations.

    This document presents witnesses' testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the issue of equal access to health care and the practice of patient dumping which may take the form of transferring a patient to another hospital, refusing to treat a patient, or subjecting a patient to long delays, and which may…

  16. Promotion of the Equal Access of Girls and Women to Technical and Vocational Education. Studies on Technical and Vocational Education 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This monograph includes the final report of the International Expert Meeting on the Promotion of Equal Access of Girls and Women to Technical and Vocational Education (TVE) held in Seoul, Republic of Korea, and country discussion papers. The final report is composed of an introduction that proposes that many Member States require special measures…

  17. Equality or Equity, Player or Guardian? The Dutch Government and Its Role in Providing Access Opportunities for Government Sponsored International Secondary Education, 1979-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickarts, Boris

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the Dutch government's International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) Pilot, allowing Dutch pre-university students to take part in the IB DP. Is it likely to create "equal", or rather "equitable", access opportunities for government-sponsored Dutch international secondary schools? The article…

  18. Adaptive equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, S. U. H.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical work which has been effective in improving data transmission by telephone and radio links using adaptive equalization (AE) techniques is reviewed. AE has been applied to reducing the temporal dispersion effects, such as intersymbol interference, caused by the channel accessed. Attention is given to the Nyquist telegraph transmission theory, least mean square error adaptive filtering and the theory and structure of linear receive and transmit filters for reducing error. Optimum nonlinear receiver structures are discussed in terms of optimality criteria as a function of error probability. A suboptimum receiver structure is explored in the form of a decision-feedback equalizer. Consideration is also given to quadrature amplitude modulation and transversal equalization for receivers.

  19. Caribbean Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kris

    1991-01-01

    The Caribbean is a rich breeding ground for African-derived music. A synopsis is given of the music of the following countries and styles: (1) Jamaica; (2) Trinidad and Tobago; (3) Calypso; (4) steel pan; (5) Haiti; (6) Dominican Republic; (7) Cuba; (8) Puerto Rico; and (9) other islands. (SLD)

  20. Emulation of Equal Open Access and Competition Creation in the Wireline Telecommunications Local and Last Mile Market Segments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Epps, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Expanded telecommunications was deemed a serious need for end users. The "Local Market" and "Last Mile" market segments have largely consolidated into "natural utilities". Competition and access problems occur if new providers enter the local market and desire competitive access and service to end users. Local and…

  1. Emulation of Equal Open Access and Competition Creation in the Wireline Telecommunications Local and Last Mile Market Segments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Epps, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Expanded telecommunications was deemed a serious need for end users. The "Local Market" and "Last Mile" market segments have largely consolidated into "natural utilities". Competition and access problems occur if new providers enter the local market and desire competitive access and service to end users. Local and…

  2. From Equal Access to Equal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh-Reuss, Diana; Moore, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Over the past three years, the Riverside County Office of Education's County Achievement Team, as a recipient of a California Department of Education (CDE) grant, has worked with eight pilot schools and districts in the state to bring about systems change with equitable attention and results for each subgroup. The project, Riverside County…

  3. Caribbean Luxury

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Caribbean Luxury - April 24th, 2003 Description: The Caicos Islands (pronounced KAY-kohss) in the northern Caribbean are a popular tourist attraction, renowned for their beautiful beaches, clear waters, scuba diving, and luxury resorts. The islands lie primarily along the northern perimeter of the submerged Caicos Bank (turquoise), a shallow limestone platform formed of sand, algae, and coral reefs covering 6,140 square kilometers (2,370 square miles). Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  4. 77 FR 5661 - Equal Access to Housing in HUD Programs Regardless of Sexual Orientation or Gender Identity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... governments share the concern over equal housing opportunity for LGBT individuals and families. Twenty states, the District of Columbia, and over 200 localities have enacted laws prohibiting discrimination in... occupant's sex where the housing involves the sharing of sleeping areas or bathrooms. This prohibition...

  5. Two plus blue equals green: grapheme-color synesthesia allows cognitive access to numerical information via color.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J Daniel; Barnes, Lianne N; Alvarez, Bryan D; Caplovitz, Gideon Paul

    2013-12-01

    In grapheme-color synesthesia, graphemes (e.g., numbers or letters) evoke color experiences. It is generally reported that the opposite is not true: colors will not generate experiences of graphemes or their associated information. However, recent research has provided evidence that colors can implicitly elicit symbolic representations of associated graphemes. Here, we examine if these representations can be cognitively accessed. Using a mathematical verification task replacing graphemes with color patches, we find that synesthetes can verify such problems with colors as accurately as with graphemes. Doing so, however, takes time: ~250 ms per color. Moreover, we find minimal reaction time switch-costs for switching between computing with graphemes and colors. This demonstrates that given specific task demands, synesthetes can cognitively access numerical information elicited by physical colors, and they do so as accurately as with graphemes. We discuss these results in the context of possible cognitive strategies used to access the information. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Two plus blue equals green: Grapheme-color synesthesia allows cognitive access to numerical information via color

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, J. Daniel; Barnes, Lianne N.; Alvarez, Bryan D.; Caplovitz, Gideon Paul

    2013-01-01

    In grapheme-color synesthesia, graphemes (e.g., numbers or letters) evoke color experiences. It is generally reported that the opposite is not true: colors will not generate experiences of graphemes or their associated information. However, recent research has provided evidence that colors can implicitly elicit symbolic representations of associated graphemes. Here, we examine if these representations can be cognitively accessed. Using a mathematical verification task replacing graphemes with color patches, we find that synesthetes can verify such problems with colors as accurately as with graphemes. Doing so, however, takes time: ~250ms per color. Moreover, we find minimal reaction time switch-costs for switching between computing with graphemes and colors. This demonstrates that given specific task demands, synesthetes can cognitively access numerical information elicited by physical colors, and they do so as accurately as with graphemes. We discuss these results in the context of possible cognitive strategies used to access the information. PMID:24100131

  7. Literacy and Access to the Written Culture by Youth and Adults Excluded from the School System . A cross-country field study in nine countries in Latin America and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Rosa-Maria

    2008-11-01

    LITERACY AND ACCESS TO THE WRITTEN CULTURE BY YOUTH AND ADULTS EXCLUDED FROM THE SCHOOL SYSTEM - The title of this article refers to a field study carried out in 2006-2007 in nine countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. The article summarizes the basic concepts, aims, methodology and findings of the study. In conclusion, the author points out a number of important policy changes that are called for in this domain. While the study itself was carried out in a particular region, the findings have implications for a wider international audience.

  8. Stakeholders’ perspectives on access-to-medicines policy and research priorities in Latin America and the Caribbean: face-to-face and web-based interviews

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to rank policy concerns and policy-related research issues in order to identify policy and research gaps on access to medicines (ATM) in low- and middle-income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), as perceived by policy makers, researchers, NGO and international organization representatives, as part of a global prioritization exercise. Methods Data collection, conducted between January and May 2011, involved face-to-face interviews in El Salvador, Colombia, Dominican Republic, and Suriname, and an e-mail survey with key-stakeholders. Respondents were asked to choose the five most relevant criteria for research prioritization and to score policy/research items according to the degree to which they represented current policies, desired policies, current research topics, and/or desired research topics. Mean scores and summary rankings were obtained. Linear regressions were performed to contrast rankings concerning current and desired policies (policy gaps), and current and desired research (research gaps). Results Relevance, feasibility, and research utilization were the top ranked criteria for prioritizing research. Technical capacity, research and development for new drugs, and responsiveness, were the main policy gaps. Quality assurance, staff technical capacity, price regulation, out-of-pocket payments, and cost containment policies, were the main research gaps. There was high level of coherence between current and desired policies: coefficients of determination (R2) varied from 0.46 (Health system structure; r = 0.68, P <0.01) to 0.86 (Sustainable financing; r = 0.93, P <0.01). There was also high coherence between current and desired research on Rational selection and use of medicines (r = 0.71, P <0.05, R2 = 0.51), Pricing/affordability (r = 0.82, P <0.01, R2 = 0.67), and Sustainable financing (r = 0.76, P <0.01, R2 = 0.58). Coherence was less for Health system structure (r = 0.61, P <0.01, R2 = 0.38). Conclusions This

  9. Validation of the 2015 prostate cancer grade groups for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes in a shared equal-access health system.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Ariel A; Howard, Lauren E; Tay, Kae Jack; Tsivian, Efrat; Sze, Christina; Amling, Christopher L; Aronson, William J; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Kane, Christopher J; Terris, Martha K; Freedland, Stephen J; Polascik, Thomas J

    2017-06-29

    A 5-tier prognostic grade group (GG) system was enacted to simplify the risk stratification of patients with prostate cancer in which Gleason scores of ≤6, 3 + 4, 4 + 3, 8, and 9 or 10 are considered GG 1 through 5, respectively. The authors investigated the utility of biopsy GG for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. Men who underwent prostatectomy at 1 of 6 Veterans Affairs hospitals in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed. The prognostic ability of biopsy GG was examined using Cox models. Interactions between GG and race also were tested. In total, 2509 men were identified who had data available on biopsy Gleason scores, covariates, and follow-up. The cohort included men with GG 1 (909 patients; 36.2%), GG 2 (813 patients; 32.4%), GG 3 (398 patients; 15.9%), GG 4 (279 patients; 11.1%), and GG 5 (110 patients; 4.4%) prostate cancer. The cohort included 1002 African American men (41%). The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 33-90 months). Higher GG was associated with higher clinical stage, older age, more recent surgery, and surgical center (P < .001) as well as increased biochemical recurrence, secondary therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer, metastases, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (all P < .001). There were no significant interactions with race in predicting measured outcomes. The 5-tier GG system predicted multiple long-term endpoints after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. The predictive value was consistent across races. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  10. Does small equal predatory? Analysis of publication charges and transparency of editorial policies in Croatian open access journals

    PubMed Central

    Stojanovski, Jadranka; Marušić, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We approach the problem of "predatory" journals and publishers from the perspective of small scientific communities and small journals that may sometimes be perceived as "predatory". Among other characteristics of "predatory" journals two most relevant are their business model and the quality of the editorial work. Materials and methods We analysed 444 Croatian open access (OA) journals in the Hrčak (portal of Croatian scientific journals) digital journal repository for the presence of article processing charges as a business model and the transparency of editorial policies. Results The majority of journals do not charge authors or require submission or article processing charges, which clearly distinguishes them from “predatory” journals. Almost all Hrčak OA journals have publicly available information on editorial boards, including full names and affiliations, and detailed contact information for the editorial office at the Hrčak website. The journal names are unique and cannot be easily confused with another journal or intend to mislead about the journal’s origin. While most journals provide information on peer review process, many do not provide guidelines for reviewers or other editorial and publication ethics standards. Conclusion In order to clearly differentiate themselves from predatory journals, it is not enough for journals from small research communities to operate on non-commercial bases, but also to have transparent editorial policies. PMID:28694721

  11. Does small equal predatory? Analysis of publication charges and transparency of editorial policies in Croatian open access journals.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Jadranka; Marušić, Ana

    2017-06-15

    We approach the problem of "predatory" journals and publishers from the perspective of small scientific communities and small journals that may sometimes be perceived as "predatory". Among other characteristics of "predatory" journals two most relevant are their business model and the quality of the editorial work. We analysed 444 Croatian open access (OA) journals in the Hrčak (portal of Croatian scientific journals) digital journal repository for the presence of article processing charges as a business model and the transparency of editorial policies. The majority of journals do not charge authors or require submission or article processing charges, which clearly distinguishes them from "predatory" journals. Almost all Hrčak OA journals have publicly available information on editorial boards, including full names and affiliations, and detailed contact information for the editorial office at the Hrčak website. The journal names are unique and cannot be easily confused with another journal or intend to mislead about the journal's origin. While most journals provide information on peer review process, many do not provide guidelines for reviewers or other editorial and publication ethics standards. In order to clearly differentiate themselves from predatory journals, it is not enough for journals from small research communities to operate on non-commercial bases, but also to have transparent editorial policies.

  12. Communication from the Information Sharing Working Group: Agreement for Data Sharing Among Caribbean Foresters

    Treesearch

    Tamara Heartsill Scalley; Saara DeWalt; François Korysko; Guy Van Laere; Kasey Jacobs; Seth Panka; Joseph Torres

    2016-01-01

    We presented a new information-sharing platform at the 16th Caribbean Foresters Meeting in August 2013 to facilitate and promote collaboration among Caribbean foresters. The platform can be accessed through the Caribbean Foresters website where information and data on forest research sites can be shared. There is a special focus on identifying potential collaborations...

  13. Implementing Equal Access Computer Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Janeen; And Others

    This paper discusses the philosophy followed in Palm Beach County to adapt computer literacy curriculum, hardware, and software to meet the needs of all children. The Department of Exceptional Student Education and the Department of Instructional Computing Services cooperated in planning strategies and coordinating efforts to implement equal…

  14. Open Admissions and Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rever, Philip R., Ed.

    The papers in this volume, except for the last one, were delivered at the March 1970 National Conference of the American Association for Higher Education held in Chicago. Part I deals with "who should decide who goes to college," and contains a paper by Wayne Morse who concludes that it is the people who should make the decision, since it's for…

  15. The Global Opioid Policy Initiative (GOPI) project to evaluate the availability and accessibility of opioids for the management of cancer pain in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East: introduction and methodology.

    PubMed

    Cherny, N I; Cleary, J; Scholten, W; Radbruch, L; Torode, J

    2013-12-01

    Opioid analgesics are critical to the effective relief of cancer pain. Effective treatment is predicated on sound assessments, individually tailored analgesic therapy, and the availability and accessibility of the required medications. In some countries, pain relief is hampered by the lack of availability or barriers to the accessibility of opioid analgesics. As the follow-up to a successful project to evaluate the availability and accessibility of opioids and regulatory barriers in Europe, the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) undertook to expand their research to those parts of the world where data were lacking regarding these aspects of care, in particular Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the states of India. This project has been undertaken in collaboration with the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), the Pain and Policy Studies Group (PPSG) of the University of Wisconsin, and the World Health Organization (WHO), together with a consortium of 17 international oncology and palliative care societies. This article describes the study methodology.

  16. Utilization and impact of surgical technique on the performance of pelvic lymph node dissection at radical prostatectomy: Results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Kathleen F; Sun, Xizi; Howard, Lauren E; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher L; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Freedland, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate performance of pelvic lymph node dissection during radical prostatectomy within an equal access care setting over a period of time, and stratified by prostate cancer risk group and surgical technique. We identified men in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database who had open or robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy from 2006 to 2013. Univariable logistic regression was used to test the association between age, race, body mass index, total biopsy cores, number of positive biopsy cores, risk group, year, center, surgical volume and surgical technique on pelvic lymph node dissection use. Multivariable logistic analysis was used to examine surgical technique and pelvic lymph node dissection performance. Spearman's correlation examined temporal changes in pelvic lymph node dissection utilization stratified by risk group and surgical technique. A total of 1425 men met inclusion criteria; 67% of them underwent pelvic lymph node dissection. On multivariable analysis, robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy was associated with an 92% decreased use of pelvic lymph node dissection in low-risk, 84% decreased in intermediate-risk and 91% decreased in high-risk men (all P < 0.001). In robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy, there was a trend for increased pelvic lymph node dissection utilization over time in high-risk men (Spearman; P = 0.077) reaching ~85% in 2012-2013, which was accompanied by increased use in low-risk men (P = 0.016). For open radical prostatectomy, fewer pelvic lymph node dissections were carried out in low-risk men over time, decreasing to ~35% (P = 0.047) in 2012-2013, whereas rates remained high for high-risk men throughout (~95%; P = 0.621). Regardless of risk group, pelvic lymph node dissection is carried out significantly less during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy. For robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection utilization increased over time for high-risk men, but rates also increased for

  17. Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY): impact of an eye health education program on patient knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Lindsay A; Huisingh, Carrie E; McGwin, Gerald; Mennemeyer, Stephen T; Bregantini, Mary; Patel, Nita; Saaddine, Jinan; Crews, John E; Girkin, Christopher A; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of the education program of the Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY) telemedicine program on at-risk patients’ knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care as well as to assess patient satisfaction with EQUALITY. Patients and methods New or existing patients presenting for a comprehensive eye exam (CEE) at one of two retail-based primary eye clinics were enrolled based on ≥1 of the following at-risk criteria for glaucoma: African Americans ≥40 years of age, Whites ≥50 years of age, diabetes, family history of glaucoma, and/or preexisting diagnosis of glaucoma. A total of 651 patients were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered prior to the patients’ CEE and prior to the patients receiving any of the evidence-based eye health education program; a follow-up questionnaire was administered 2–4 weeks later by phone. Baseline and follow-up patient responses regarding knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care were compared using McNemar’s test. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association of patient-level characteristics with improvement in knowledge and attitudes. Overall patient satisfaction was summarized. Results At follow-up, all patient responses in the knowledge and attitude domains significantly improved from baseline (P≤0.01 for all questions). Those who were unemployed (odds ratio =0.63, 95% confidence interval =0.42–0.95, P=0.026) or had lower education (odds ratio =0.55, 95% confidence interval =0.29–1.02, P=0.058) were less likely to improve their knowledge after adjusting for age, sex, race, and prior glaucoma diagnosis. This association was attenuated after further adjustment for other patient-level characteristics. Ninety-eight percent (n=501) of patients reported being likely to have a CEE within the next 2 years, whereas 63% (n=326) had a CEE in the previous 2 years. Patient satisfaction with EQUALITY was high (99

  18. The Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) nomogram for risk stratification in intermediate risk group of men with prostate cancer: validation in the Duke Prostate Center database.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Jayakrishnan; Schroeck, Florian; Sun, Leon; Gerber, Leah; Moreira, Daniel M; Moul, Judd W; Freedland, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    To validate the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) nomogram to better risk stratify men with intermediate-risk pathology after prostatectomy (positive surgical margins, PSM, and/or extracapsular disease, ECE, without seminal vesicle or lymph node involvement) in a tertiary referral centre (the Duke Prostate Center, DPC). We retrospectively analysed 485 men in the DPC cohort with PSM and/or ECE but without seminal vesicle or lymph node involvement. The predicted risk of biochemical progression-free probability at 1, 3 and 5 years was estimated by the SEARCH and updated Kattan postoperative nomograms. Calibration plots were generated and accuracy assessed with the concordance index. The SEARCH nomogram appeared to be well calibrated, with the highest-risk quartile having a predicted <60% progression-free probability at 5 years, vs >80% for the lowest risk. In comparison, overall external calibration appeared to be similar for the updated Kattan nomogram, although there was less separation between the highest- and lowest-risk quartiles. The SEARCH model had an overall predictive accuracy of 0.65, which compared favourably with the updated Kattan nomogram (0.57). In an external dataset, the SEARCH nomogram to predict progression-free probability for men at intermediate risk after prostatectomy was well calibrated and performed better than the updated postoperative Kattan nomogram.

  19. The association between prostate size and Gleason score upgrading depends on the number of biopsy cores obtained: results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital Database

    PubMed Central

    Turley, Ryan S.; Terris, Martha K.; Kane, Christopher J.; Aronson, William J.; Presti, Joseph C.; Amling, Christopher L.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that the association between prostate size and risk of Gleason grade upgrading varies as a function of sampling. PATIENTS AND METHODS We examined the association between pathological prostate weight, prostate biopsy scheme and Gleason upgrading (Gleason ≥7 at radical prostatectomy, RP) among 646 men with biopsy Gleason 2–6 disease treated with RP between 1995 and 2007 within the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital Database using logistic regression. In all, 204 and 442 men had a sextant (six or seven cores) or extended-core biopsy (eight or more cores), respectively. Analyses were adjusted for centre, age, surgery, preoperative prostate-specific antigen level, clinical stage, body mass index, race, and percentage of cores positive for cancer. RESULTS In all, 281 men (44%) were upgraded; a smaller prostate was positively associated with the risk of upgrading in men who had an extended-core biopsy (P < 0.001), but not among men who had a sextant biopsy (P = 0.22). The interaction between biopsy scheme and prostate size was significant (P interaction = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS These data support the hypothesis that the risk of upgrading is a function of two opposing contributions: (i) a more aggressive phenotype in smaller prostates and thus increased risk of upgrading; and (ii) more thorough sampling in smaller prostates and thus decreased risk of upgrading. When sampled more thoroughly, the phenotype association dominates and smaller prostates are linked with an increased risk of upgrading. In less thoroughly sampled prostates, these opposing factors nullify, resulting in no association between prostate size and risk of upgrading. These findings help to explain previously published disparate results of the importance of prostate size as a predictor of Gleason upgrading. PMID:18778348

  20. A natural history of weight change in men with prostate cancer on androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT): results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Howard S.; Moreira, Daniel M.; Smith, Matthew R.; Presti, Joseph C.; Aronson, William J.; Terris, Martha K.; Kane, Christopher J.; Amling, Christopher L.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To better understand the natural history of weight change with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), we investigated the effect of ADT on body weight among men from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database.Men undergoing ADT lose lean muscle but gain fat mass, contributing to an overall gain in weight. PATIENTS AND METHODS We identified 132 men in SEARCH who received ADT after radical prostatectomy.‘Weight change’ was defined as the difference in weight before starting ADT (6 months before ADT) and the on-ADT weight (between 6 and 18 months after starting ADT).In a subanalysis, baseline characteristics of weight-gainers and -losers were analysed using univariate and multivariate analysis to test association with weight change. RESULTS In all, 92 men (70%) gained weight, and 40 (30%) either lost or maintained a stable weight.On average, weight on ADT was 2.2 kg higher than the weight before ADT, with the mean change for weight-gainers and -losers being +4.2 kg and −2.4 kg, respectively.This compared with no significant weight change in the year before starting ADT (paired t-test, change −0.7 kg, P = 0.19) or in the second year on ADT (paired t-test, change −0.5 kg, P = 0.46) for 84 men in whom these additional weight values were recorded.There was no significant association between any of the features examined and weight change on univariate and multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS In this longitudinal study, ADT was accompanied by significant weight gain (+2.2 kg). This change occurred primarily in the first year of therapy, with men neither losing nor gaining additional weight thereafter. PMID:20860651

  1. Obesity and positive surgical margins by anatomic location after radical prostatectomy: results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Jayakrishnan; Aronson, William J.; Terris, Martha K.; Presti, Joseph C.; Amling, Christopher L.; Kane, Christopher J.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine if there is predilection for any specific anatomical location of positive surgical margins (PSMs) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer in obese men, as previous studies found that obesity was associated with an increased risk of PSMs. PATIENTS AND METHODS We analysed retrospectively 1434 men treated with RP between 1989 and 2007 within the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database. The association between increased body mass index (BMI) and overall and site-specific PSMs was assessed using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS After adjusting for several preoperative clinical and pathological characteristics, a higher BMI was associated with an increased risk of PSMs both overall and at all specific anatomical locations (all P ≤ 0.007). For mildly obese men, this risk was very similar across all anatomical sites (44–78% increased risk relative to men of normal weight). When BMI was coded as a continuous variable, the odds ratio for the risk of overall PSMs or at any specific locations was nearly identical at 1.05–1.06. Among men with a BMI of ≥35 kg/m2, there was more variation, with the highest excess risk of PSMs at the bladder neck and apex. CONCLUSIONS Obesity was associated with an increased risk of overall PSMs and at all anatomical locations. Although the excess risk of PSMs was similar across all anatomical locations, there was a suggestion of a higher risk of apical margins among the most obese men, which if validated, further supports the importance of the apical dissection in all men and suggests added difficulty in obese patients. PMID:18691176

  2. Positive surgical margins in radical prostatectomy patients do not predict long-term oncological outcomes: results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) cohort.

    PubMed

    Mithal, Prabhakar; Howard, Lauren E; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher; Freedland, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    To assess the impact of positive surgical margins (PSMs) on long-term outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP), including metastasis, castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Retrospective study of 4,051 men in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) cohort treated by RP from 1988 to 2013. Proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of PSMs in predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR), CRPC, metastases, and PCSM. To determine if PSMs were more predictive in certain patients, analyses were stratified by pathological Gleason score, stage, and preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. The median (interquartile range) follow-up was 6.6 (3.2-10.6) years and 1 127 patients had >10 years of follow-up. During this time, 302 (32%) men had BCR, 112 (3%) developed CRPC, 144 (4%) developed metastases, and 83 (2%) died from prostate cancer. There were 1,600 (40%) men with PSMs. In unadjusted models, PSMs were significantly associated with all adverse outcomes: BCR, CRPC, metastases and PCSM (all P ≤ 0.001). After adjusting for demographic and pathological characteristics, PSMs were associated with increased risk of only BCR (HR 1.98, P < 0.001), and not CRPC, metastases, or PCSM (HR ≤1.29, P > 0.18). Similar results were seen when stratified by pathological Gleason score, stage, or PSA level, and when patients who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy were excluded. PSMs after RP are not an independent risk factor for CRPC, metastasis, or PCSM overall or within any subset. In the absence of other high-risk features, PSMs alone may not be an indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Obesity as a predictor of adverse outcome across black and white race: results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) Database.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Jayakrishnan; Bañez, Lionel L; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Presti, Joseph C; Amling, Christopher L; Kane, Christopher J; Freedland, Stephen J

    2009-11-15

    Across multiple studies, obesity has been associated with an increased risk of higher grade disease and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP). Whether these associations vary by race is unknown. In the current study, the authors examined the association between obesity and outcome after RP stratified by race. A retrospective analysis was performed on 1415 men in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database who underwent RP between 1989 and 2008. The association between increased body mass index (BMI) and adverse pathology and biochemical recurrence was examined using multivariate logistic regression and Cox models, respectively. Data were examined stratified by race. After adjusting for preoperative clinical characteristics, higher BMI was associated with higher tumor grade (P = .008) and positive surgical margins (P < .001) in white men, and similar but statistically nonsignificant trends were observed in black men. No significant interaction was noted between race and BMI for associations with adverse pathology (P(interaction)> or =.12). After adjusting for preoperative clinical characteristics, higher BMI was associated with an increased risk of recurrence in both white men (P = .001) and black men (P = .03). After further adjusting for pathologic variables, higher BMI was associated with significantly increased risk of recurrence in white men (P = .002) and black men (P = .01). No significant interactions were observed between race and BMI for predicting biochemical progression adjusting either for preoperative factors (P(interaction) = .35) or for preoperative and pathologic features (P(interaction) = .47). Obesity was associated with a greater risk of recurrence among both black men and white men. Obesity did not appear to be more or less influential in 1 race than another but, rather, was identified as a risk factor for aggressive cancer regardless of race.

  4. Long-term oncological outcomes of apical positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital cohort.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, H; Terris, M K; Aronson, W J; Kane, C J; Amling, C L; Cooperberg, M R; Freedland, S J; Abern, M R

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 29-38% of all positive surgical margins (PSMs) at radical prostatectomy (RP) involve the apex. The prognostic significance of apical PSM remains unclear. We therefore compared the long-term oncologic outcomes of men with apical PSMs to those with negative PSMs, apical and other PSMs, and other PSMs at RP. The SEARCH (Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital) database was used to identify 4031 men with prostate cancer (PCa) managed with RP with complete pathologic grade and stage data. Margin status was categorized as negative, apex only, or other positive. Multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for pathologic stage and grade were developed to test the relationship between margin status and biochemical recurrence (BCR), metastases and PCa death. In the final cohort, 34.3% had PSMs, whereas 65.7% had negative margins. Univariable analysis showed that compared with negative margins, apex-only PSM was associated with BCR (hazard ratio (HR): 1.4 [1.1-1.8]), but not metastases or PCa death, whereas apex and other PSMs were associated with BCR (HR: 3.3 [2.8-4]) and metastases (HR: 1.8 [1.02-3.1]) but not PCa death. Nonapical PSMs were associated with BCR (HR: 2.7 [2.4-3.1]), metastases (1.7 [1.2-2.5)] and PCa death (1.8 [1.05-3]). On multivariable analysis, apex-only, apex and other, and nonapical PSMs were associated with BCR but margin status was not associated with metastases or PCa death. In a large cohort of men undergoing RP, those with PSMs at the prostatic apex had lower BCR, metastases, or PCa death compared with those with PSMs at other locations. When adjusted for pathologic stage and grade, however, PSMs were associated with BCR but not long-term oncologic outcomes. These data confirm that men with apex-only PSMs may not be ideal candidates for adjuvant therapy after RP.

  5. Diabetes and outcomes after radical prostatectomy: are results affected by obesity and race? Results from the shared equal-access regional cancer hospital database.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Jayakrishnan; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Presti, Joseph C; Amling, Christopher L; Kane, Christopher J; Freedland, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with lower prostate cancer risk. The association of diabetes with prostate cancer outcomes is less clear. We examined the association between diabetes and outcomes after radical prostatectomy and tested whether associations varied by race and/or obesity. This study is a retrospective analysis of 1,262 men treated with radical prostatectomy between 1988 and 2008 within the Shared Equal-Access Regional Cancer Hospital database. We examined the multivariate association between diabetes at surgery and adverse pathology, biochemical recurrence (BCR), and prostate-specific antigen doubling time at recurrence using logistic, proportional hazards, and linear regression, respectively. Data were examined as a whole and stratified by race and obesity. Diabetes was more prevalent among black (22% versus 15%, P < 0.001) and more obese men (P < 0.001). Diabetes was associated with higher tumor grade (odds ratio, 1.73; P = 0.002), seminal vesicle invasion (odds ratio, 1.73; P = 0.04), but not BCR (P = 0.67) or PSADT at recurrence (P = 0.12). In the secondary analysis, among white obese men, diabetes was associated with 2.5-fold increased BCR risk (P = 0.002) and a trend toward shorter PSADT, whereas among all other men (nonobese white men and black men), diabetes was associated with 23% lower recurrence risk (P = 0.09) and longer PSADT (P = 0.04). In a radical prostatectomy cohort, diabetes was not associated with BCR. In the secondary analysis, diabetes was associated with more aggressive disease in obese white men and less aggressive disease for all other subsets. If externally validated, these findings suggest that among men with prostate cancer, the association between diabetes and prostate cancer aggressiveness may vary by race and obesity.

  6. A natural history of weight change in men with prostate cancer on androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT): results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database.

    PubMed

    Kim, Howard S; Moreira, Daniel M; Smith, Matthew R; Presti, Joseph C; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2011-03-01

    • To better understand the natural history of weight change with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), we investigated the effect of ADT on body weight among men from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. • Men undergoing ADT lose lean muscle but gain fat mass, contributing to an overall gain in weight. • We identified 132 men in SEARCH who received ADT after radical prostatectomy. • 'Weight change' was defined as the difference in weight before starting ADT (6 months before ADT) and the on-ADT weight (between 6 and 18 months after starting ADT). • In a subanalysis, baseline characteristics of weight-gainers and -losers were analysed using univariate and multivariate analysis to test association with weight change. • In all, 92 men (70%) gained weight, and 40 (30%) either lost or maintained a stable weight. • On average, weight on ADT was 2.2 kg higher than the weight before ADT, with the mean change for weight-gainers and -losers being +4.2 kg and -2.4 kg, respectively. • This compared with no significant weight change in the year before starting ADT (paired t-test, change -0.7 kg, P= 0.19) or in the second year on ADT (paired t-test, change -0.5 kg, P= 0.46) for 84 men in whom these additional weight values were recorded. • There was no significant association between any of the features examined and weight change on univariate and multivariate analysis. • In this longitudinal study, ADT was accompanied by significant weight gain (+2.2 kg). This change occurred primarily in the first year of therapy, with men neither losing nor gaining additional weight thereafter. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  7. Employment equality.

    PubMed

    2004-03-01

    Two new sets of employment regulations that came into force at the end of last year are now available on the internet, writes Steven Black. The Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations 2003 are available at www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk/si/si2003/20031660.htm and The Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003 are at www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk/si/si2003/20031661.htm.

  8. What School Boards Should Know Before Attempting to Circumvent the Rights of High School Students to Organize Gay-Straight Alliances Under the Auspices of the Equal Access Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Danielle S.

    2010-01-01

    School Boards desiring to avoid the requirements of the Equal Access Act (EAA) to prevent students from organizing Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) clubs within their schools may have difficulty doing so. However, legal experts have recently purported ways to accomplish this task in order to avoid the problems that may arise when students attempt to…

  9. Equal Access to Public School Facilities for the Boy Scouts of America and Other Designated Youth Groups: Final Rule. Federal Register, Part II: Department of Education, 34 CFR Parts 75, 76, and 108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Administration, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Secretary adds a new part to title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations and amends 34 CFR parts 75 and 76 to implement the provisions of the Boy Scouts of America Equal Access Act (Act). This Act directs the Secretary of Education, through the Office for Civil Rights (OCR), to ensure compliance with this new law. The regulations address equal…

  10. Caribbean Connections: Moving North.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Catherine A., Ed; Warner, Keith Q., Ed.

    This anthology presents the voices of women and men of Caribbean backgrounds living in the United States. Focus is on five most prevalently represented groups: Puerto Ricans, West Indians, Cubans, Haitians, and Dominicans. The book is organized into five sections: (1) "A Primer on Caribbean Migration" presents an overview of Caribbean…

  11. A Caribbean Education Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jules, Didacus; Miller, Errol; Armstrong, L. Ancilla

    The 20 member countries of the Caribbean Group for Cooperation and Development (CGCED) share with the rest of the world the common goals of reforming their education systems to equip Caribbean people for productivity, wealth creation, and social and personal development, and have participated in several regional and global initiatives. This…

  12. Migration in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Mary T.

    1989-01-01

    Addresses the problem of geographic literacy with respect to the Caribbean Basin. Provides a lesson plan, including maps and charts, that encourages and challenges students to learn the geography of the Caribbean Basin, and to think about the problems that develop when large numbers of legal and illegal immigrants enter the United States. (RW)

  13. Caribbean Connections: Moving North.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Catherine A., Ed; Warner, Keith Q., Ed.

    This anthology presents the voices of women and men of Caribbean backgrounds living in the United States. Focus is on five most prevalently represented groups: Puerto Ricans, West Indians, Cubans, Haitians, and Dominicans. The book is organized into five sections: (1) "A Primer on Caribbean Migration" presents an overview of Caribbean…

  14. Migration in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Mary T.

    1989-01-01

    Addresses the problem of geographic literacy with respect to the Caribbean Basin. Provides a lesson plan, including maps and charts, that encourages and challenges students to learn the geography of the Caribbean Basin, and to think about the problems that develop when large numbers of legal and illegal immigrants enter the United States. (RW)

  15. A comparison of Caribbean and non-Caribbean clients in a residential addiction treatment facility in Antigua, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Martin, Thomas C; Klinedinst, Michelle; Josiah-Martin, Judith A; Burke-Forde, Ashley

    2003-01-01

    The first 50 Caribbean clients admitted to a private, multicultural, not for profit addiction treatment center in Antigua, West Indies, were compared with the first 100 non-Caribbean clients admitted. There was no significant difference in age, 38 years (18-61 years) versus 40 years (22-63 years), or gender, 74% versus 67% male. Caribbean clients were more likely to be Black, 68% versus 2%, P < .001. Caribbean clients were less likely to have a prior psychiatric diagnosis, 18% versus 43%, P < .01, or to have been in prior treatment program, 22% versus 64%, P < .001. Caribbean and non-Caribbean clients were equally likely to be polydrug users, 48% versus 50%, and to use alcohol as a primary drug, 52% versus 51%. Caribbean clients were more likely to use cocaine, 30% versus 11%, P < .01, and marijuana, 12% versus 0%, P < .001, but less likely to use heroin, 6% versus 30%, P < .001 or pills, 0% versus 8%, P < .05. Caribbean clients were less likely to have elevated MCV, 24% versus 57%, P < .001 or serum transaminases, 23% versus 46%, P < .01. Differences between groups in this multicultural setting warrant further investigation.

  16. Caribbean landscapes and their biodiversity

    Treesearch

    A. E. Lugo; E. H. Helmer; E. Santiago Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Both the biodiversity and the landscapes of the Caribbean have been greatly modified as a consequence of human activity. In this essay we provide an overview of the natural landscapes and biodiversity of the Caribbean and discuss how human activity has affected both. Our Caribbean geographic focus is on the insular Caribbean and the biodiversity focus is on the flora,...

  17. Equality Versus Inequality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that political equality and democracy are attainable only through the distribution of access to political resources and the willingness to use them. Discusses the broad philosophical and sociological components that contribute to a system marked by advantage and inequalities, as well as opportunities for opposition and resistance. (MJP)

  18. Characterization of a "low-risk" cohort of grade group 2 prostate cancer patients: Results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Kathleen F; Sun, Xizi; Howard, Lauren E; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher L; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    To examine if there is a subset of men with grade group 2 prostate cancer who could be potential candidates for active surveillance. We used the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database to identify 776 men undergoing radical prostatectomy from 2006 to 2015 with >8 biopsy cores obtained and complete information. We compared men who fulfilled low-risk disease criteria (clinical stage T1c/T2a; grade group 1; prostate-specific antigen ≤10 ng/mL) with the exception of grade group 2 versus men who met all three low-risk criteria. Logistic regression was used to test the association between grade group and radical prostatectomy pathological features. Biochemical recurrence was examined using Cox models. To examine whether there was a subset of men with low-volume grade group 2 with comparable outcomes to low-risk men, we repeated all analyses limiting the percentage of positive cores in the grade group 2 group to ≤33%, and positive cores to ≤4, ≤3 or ≤2. Grade group 2 low-risk men had increased risk of pathological grade group 3 or higher (P < 0.001), extraprostatic extension (P < 0.001), seminal vesicle invasion (P < 0.001) and higher risk of biochemical recurrence (hazard ratio = 1.76, P = 0.006). Using increasingly strict definitions of low-volume disease, at ≤2 positive cores there was no difference in adverse pathology between groups (all P > 0.2), except higher pathological grade group (P = 0.006). Biochemical recurrence was similar in men in grade group 1 and grade group 2 (hazard ratio = 1.24; P = 0.529). Among men with prostate-specific antigen ≤10 ng/mL and clinical stage T1c/T2a, those in grade group 2 with ≤2 total positive cores have similar rates of adverse pathology and biochemical recurrence as men with grade group 1. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  19. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  20. Region, Locality Characteristics, High School Tracking and Equality in Access to Educational Credentials: The Case of Palestinian Arab Communities in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazawi, Andre Elias

    1998-01-01

    Examines the effects of regional, locality, and high school characteristics on access opportunities to educational credentials of Palestinian Arab students in Israel. Reveals that while tracking patterns are affected by high school variables at the community level, access to educational credentials is determined by community-level, socioeconomic…

  1. Access to Gender-Sensitive Higher Education in Eastern and Central Europe: Reflections on the CEPES Project "Good Practice in Promoting Gender Equality in Higher Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunberg, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Summarizing the incomplete results of the United Nations Educational and Scientific Organization (UNESCO) program "Good Practice in Promoting Gender Equality in Higher Education," the author asks that any assessment of the progress made in the area of gender-sensitive education take regional specificities into account. The regional…

  2. Access to Gender-Sensitive Higher Education in Eastern and Central Europe: Reflections on the CEPES Project "Good Practice in Promoting Gender Equality in Higher Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunberg, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Summarizing the incomplete results of the United Nations Educational and Scientific Organization (UNESCO) program "Good Practice in Promoting Gender Equality in Higher Education," the author asks that any assessment of the progress made in the area of gender-sensitive education take regional specificities into account. The regional…

  3. Democracy, Equal Citizenship, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Two appealing principles of educational distribution--equality and sufficiency--are comparatively assessed. The initial point of comparison is the distribution of civic educational goods. One reason to favor equality in educational distribution rather than sufficiency is the elimination of undeserved positional advantage in access to labor…

  4. Democracy, Equal Citizenship, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Two appealing principles of educational distribution--equality and sufficiency--are comparatively assessed. The initial point of comparison is the distribution of civic educational goods. One reason to favor equality in educational distribution rather than sufficiency is the elimination of undeserved positional advantage in access to labor…

  5. Geology of the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Edgar, N.T.; Scanlon, K.M.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1987-01-01

    The Venezuelan and Colombian basins are located on the Caribbean Plate whilst the Yucatan basin is on the North American Plate. The processes occurring at the boundaries between the Caribbean Plate and the adjacent North American, South American and Cocos Plates, and the resulting surface features and patterns of volcanic and earthquake activity are described. Most of the Caribbean area is floored by atypical oceanic crust and its most valuable main geologic resources identified so far are petroleum, together with sand and gravel. Geological research is being carried out with techniques for broad-range swath imaging of the seafloor, such as GLORIA, and for directly measuring the movement between plates. -J.G.Harvey

  6. Tsunamis in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farwell, J.; Kelly, A.; Mooney, W. D.

    2006-12-01

    The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami increased global awareness to the destruction hazard posed by earthquakes and tsunamis around the world. The United States government has committed 37.5 million dollars toward the upgrade of earthquake and tsunami monitoring systems in the Caribbean region. Several historical earthquakes have caused considerable damage throughout the Caribbean, many causing tsunamis. The US Geological Survey is using a large part of this money to enhance capabilities for rapid detection and notification of earthquakes in the Caribbean in an attempt to warn the millions living in this area of possible tsunamis. The USGS is working with the Puerto Rico Seismic Network, the Seismological Research Unit at the University of West Indies, eight other host countries, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These groups are in the process of installing or upgrading seismic monitoring sites in the earthquake zones of the region. NOAA is also installing four Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) buoys in support of a Caribbean-wide tsunami warning system. Planned seismic stations are located in Antigua/Barbuda, Barbados, Cuba (U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay), the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Honduras, Panama, Turks and Caicos, and Grenada. Satellite telemetry will transmit data from these sites to NEIC, Golden, CO, where the data will be redistributed to NOAA, the University of Puerto Rico and the University of the West Indies, the IRIS Data Management Center and other agencies. The development of seismic monitoring operations began on January 9, 2006. This will improve seismic monitoring capabilities in the Caribbean and Central America, provide better real time data for global monitoring research and assessment activities, and improve understanding of historical tsunamis and their effects on the Caribbean.

  7. Gendered Distances: A Methodological Inquiry into Spatial Analysis as an Instrument for Assessing Gender Equality in Access to Secondary Schools in Mukono District, Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawro, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on how accessibility to secondary schools in the Mukono District of Uganda is related to the sex and gender of the student and the distance that separates the student's home from the school they attend. This research is a methodological inquiry exploring the use of spatial analysis, specifically how cognitive and metric…

  8. Gendered Distances: A Methodological Inquiry into Spatial Analysis as an Instrument for Assessing Gender Equality in Access to Secondary Schools in Mukono District, Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawro, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on how accessibility to secondary schools in the Mukono District of Uganda is related to the sex and gender of the student and the distance that separates the student's home from the school they attend. This research is a methodological inquiry exploring the use of spatial analysis, specifically how cognitive and metric…

  9. Creating (In)Equalities in Access to Higher Education in the Context of Structural Adjustment and Post-Adjustment Policies: The Case of Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    By analyzing the access of different socio-economic groups to post-secondary institutions by quintile, this paper examines the impact produced by higher education financing policies in Chile during the Pinochet (1973-1990), the Aylwin (1990-1994) and the Frei (1994-2000) administrations. To this purpose, CASEN databases and semi-structured…

  10. Foreign Providers in the Caribbean. Pillagers or Preceptors? Perspectives on Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Stewart, Ed.; Brandon, Ed, Ed.; Thomas, Michael, Ed.; Kanwar, Asha, Ed.; Lyngra, Tove, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The growing phenomenon of cross-border higher education (CBHE) will not help developing countries unless it is accessible, available, affordable, relevant and of acceptable quality. Foreign Providers in the Caribbean: Pillagers or Preceptors? focuses on the trends of CBHE in the Caribbean, which has its own unique characteristics. Following a…

  11. Foreign Providers in the Caribbean. Pillagers or Preceptors? Perspectives on Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Stewart, Ed.; Brandon, Ed, Ed.; Thomas, Michael, Ed.; Kanwar, Asha, Ed.; Lyngra, Tove, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The growing phenomenon of cross-border higher education (CBHE) will not help developing countries unless it is accessible, available, affordable, relevant and of acceptable quality. Foreign Providers in the Caribbean: Pillagers or Preceptors? focuses on the trends of CBHE in the Caribbean, which has its own unique characteristics. Following a…

  12. Equality or equity in health care access: a qualitative study of doctors' explanations to a longer doctor's delay among female TB patients in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thorson, A; Johansson, E

    2004-04-01

    Earlier studies from Vietnam have highlighted the importance of studying gender aspects of health-seeking and diagnosis of potential tuberculosis patients. A longer doctor's delay to diagnosis among female TB patients has been shown. The objective of the present study was to explore doctors' views about and explanations for the longer doctor's delay. Five focus group discussions and three in-depth interviews were performed in a rural province in Vietnam. Thematic content analysis was used to interpret the data. The doctors suggest that women are lost or delayed within the health care-seeking chain, mainly because of barriers associated with the female gender. These barriers are identified, but yet the patient-doctor encounter seems to be steered by an equality principle. This results in gender blindness since equal treatment is suggested despite needs being different. We argue that gender equity should be the guiding principle for the tuberculosis patient-doctor encounter. An equity principle emphasises that needs vary with factors like gender or context. We suggest more research into the health care-seeking chain in order to identify the specific steps where TB diagnosis of men and women may be delayed. Interventions are needed in order to reduce delay to TB diagnosis especially for women and the current TB control strategy, (DOTS), needs to be examined from an equity perspective.

  13. Psychotherapy in Caribbean Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefley, Harriet P.; Bestman, Evalina W.

    Caribbean mental health professionals are concerned with the types of psychotherapy that are relevant to the needs of their clients, and with the uses of psychotherapy in a political context. They appear to be divided into two schools: one seeking to promote in clients a change from a traditional world view to a modern one, and the other seeking…

  14. Geology of the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, William P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes some of the geologic characteristics of the Caribbean region. Discusses the use of some new techniques, including broad-range swath imaging of the sea floor that produces photograph-like images, and satellite measurement of crustal movements, which may help to explain the complex geology of the region. (TW)

  15. Geology of the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, William P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes some of the geologic characteristics of the Caribbean region. Discusses the use of some new techniques, including broad-range swath imaging of the sea floor that produces photograph-like images, and satellite measurement of crustal movements, which may help to explain the complex geology of the region. (TW)

  16. America's Caribbean Basin Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasten, Robert W.

    1983-01-01

    Nearly all of the countries that have succeeded in their development over the past 30 years have done so on the strength of market-oriented policies and vigorous participation in the international economy. Aid must be complemented by trade and investment. The Caribbean Basin Initiative puts these principles into practice. (RM)

  17. Caribbean plate interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Vector analysis of plate motions, derived from studies of Atlantic magnetic lineations and fracture zone trends, indicates the following relative movements between the Caribbean, North American, and South American Plates. (1) During Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, the North American Plate moved 1900 km westward and 900 km northward relative to the South American Plate. A broad zone including the Caribbean region, i.e., the zone between the North and South America Plates, was a site of left-lateral shear and north-south extension. (2) During Early Cretaceous to Late Cretaceous, the North American Mate moved an additional 1200 km westward relative to South America across this zone. (3) During Late Cretaceous to the end of the Eocene, the North American Plate moved 200 km westward and 400 km northward relative to the South American Plate. (4) From the end of the Eocene to near the end of the Miocene, North America converged on South America some 200 km and moved 100 km eastward relative to it. Through the Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary history of the Caribbean, the region was a shear zone within which left-lateral displacement exceeded 3000 km and north-south extension exceeded 1300 km. In regard to time, 80% of the history of the Caribbean region is one of north-south extension and left-lateral shear. In terms of space, 97% of the shear is left-lateral and the ratio of divergence versus convergence is 7 to 1. Thus, characterizing the Caribbean region, and the Atlantic to its east, as a zone of north-south extension and left-lateral shear, is a fair generalization.

  18. Literacy and Access to the Written Culture by Youth and Adults Excluded from the School System: A Cross-Country Field Study in Nine Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Rosa-Maria

    2008-01-01

    The title of this article refers to a field study carried out in 2006-2007 in nine countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. The article summarizes the basic concepts, aims, methodology and findings of the study. In conclusion, the author points out a number of important policy changes that are called for in this domain. While the study itself…

  19. School Law: A Question of Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the Equal Access Act (EAA) as it pertains to high-school student clubs. It raises basics questions about EAA: What does "equal" mean? What level of access is required? Does the First Amendment's free-speech clause offer broader protection to student clubs than the EAA? (WFA)

  20. Freshwater resources in the insular Caribbean: an environmental perspective

    Treesearch

    T. Heartsill Scalley

    2012-01-01

    From islands with no permanent flowing streams to those with navigable inland waters, the insular Caribbean contains a great range of conditions regarding the access to freshwater resources. Because of the variation in topography and size, the ability of islands to retain freshwater also varies widely. The usage of freshwater in this region is being led by two major...

  1. [Migration in the Caribbean Basin].

    PubMed

    Pastor, R A

    1982-06-01

    A review of recent migration trends in the Caribbean region is presented. The region is defined as those countries and territories in or surrounding the Caribbean. Consideration is also given to migration from the region to the United States. The characteristics and consequences of these migration trends are discussed.

  2. Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsopp, Richard, Ed.

    This dictionary is designed to provide an inventory of English usage in the Caribbean environment and lifestyle as known and spoken in each territory but not recorded in the standard British and American desk dictionaries. It cross-references different names for the same item throughout the anglophone Caribbean, identifies different items called…

  3. Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsopp, Richard, Ed.

    This dictionary is designed to provide an inventory of English usage in the Caribbean environment and lifestyle as known and spoken in each territory but not recorded in the standard British and American desk dictionaries. It cross-references different names for the same item throughout the anglophone Caribbean, identifies different items called…

  4. Caribbean Sea Level Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Crespo Jones, H.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past 500 years almost 100 tsunamis have been observed in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic, with at least 3510 people having lost their lives to this hazard since 1842. Furthermore, with the dramatic increase in population and infrastructure along the Caribbean coasts, today, millions of coastal residents, workers and visitors are vulnerable to tsunamis. The UNESCO IOC Intergovernmental Coordination Group for Tsunamis and other Coastal Hazards for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS) was established in 2005 to coordinate and advance the regional tsunami warning system. The CARIBE EWS focuses on four areas/working groups: (1) Monitoring and Warning, (2) Hazard and Risk Assessment, (3) Communication and (4) Education, Preparedness and Readiness. The sea level monitoring component is under Working Group 1. Although in the current system, it's the seismic data and information that generate the initial tsunami bulletins, it is the data from deep ocean buoys (DARTS) and the coastal sea level gauges that are critical for the actual detection and forecasting of tsunamis impact. Despite multiple efforts and investments in the installation of sea level stations in the region, in 2004 there were only a handful of sea level stations operational in the region (Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands, Bermuda, Bahamas). Over the past 5 years there has been a steady increase in the number of stations operating in the Caribbean region. As of mid 2012 there were 7 DARTS and 37 coastal gauges with additional ones being installed or funded. In order to reach the goal of 100 operational coastal sea level stations in the Caribbean, the CARIBE EWS recognizes also the importance of maintaining the current stations. For this, a trained workforce in the region for the installation, operation and data analysis and quality control is considered to be critical. Since 2008, three training courses have been offered to the sea level station operators and data analysts. Other

  5. EQUALITY OF EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY, RECONSIDERED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COLEMAN, JAMES S.

    THIS STUDY POSES THE QUESTION OF HOW TO MEASURE THE DEGREE OF INEQUALITY OF EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY FOR SUBGROUPS IN SOCIETY. IT EXAMINES AND REJECTS THE DOMINANT IDEA THAT EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY IS PROVIDED BY A COMMUNITY THROUGH THE PROVISION OF FACILITIES WITH FREE AND OPEN ACCESS FOR ALL, SUBSTITUTING THE IDEA THAT IT IS THE INTENSITY…

  6. Medical tourism in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Ramírez de Arellano, Annette B

    2011-01-01

    Although travel for medical reasons has a long history, it has more recently evolved from a cottage industry to a worldwide enterprise. A number of countries are positioning themselves to attract visitors who are willing to travel to obtain health services that are more accessible, less expensive, or more available than in their countries of origin. This has in turn given rise to medical packages that combine tourism with health. Several Caribbean nations - including Cuba, Barbados, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico - hope to expand their revenues in this new market. Each country has selected specific service niches and promotes its services accordingly. While Cuba has been promoting its services to other countries for several decades, medical tourism is just beginning in the other islands. Ultimately, these nations' economic success will hinge on their comparative advantage vis-à-vis other options, while their success in terms of improving their own health care depends on the extent to which the services for tourists are also available to the islands' populations.

  7. Epilepsy care in the southern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Gregory; Sandy, Sherry; Corbin, David O C; Bird-Compton, Jacqueline; Jack, Frances; Nelson, Beverly; Jalonen, Tuula O; Ali, Amza; Fortuné, Taryn; Clarke, Dave; Okolie, Jacqueline; Cervenka, Mackenzie C

    2015-10-01

    Very little has been reported about the health resources available for patients with epilepsy in the five English-speaking southern Caribbean countries of Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, Grenada, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Saint Lucia. There is no comprehensive resource describing their health systems, access to specialty care, antiepileptic drug (AED) use, and availability of brain imaging and EEG. The purpose of this study was to profile epilepsy care in these countries as an initial step toward improving the standard of care and identifying gaps in care to guide future policy changes. In each southern Caribbean country, we conducted study visits and interviewed health-care providers, government health ministers, pharmacy directors, hospital medical directors, pharmacists, clinic staff, radiologists, and radiology and EEG technicians. Health-care providers completed extensive epilepsy care surveys. The five countries all have integrated government health systems with clinics and hospitals that provide free or heavily subsidized care and AEDs for patients with epilepsy. Only Trinidad and Tobago and Barbados, however, have neurology specialists. The three smaller countries lack government imaging and EEG facilities. Trinidad had up to one-year waits for public MRI/EEG. Government formularies in Grenada, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Saint Lucia are limited to first-generation AEDs. One or more second-line agents are formulary in Trinidad and Barbados. Nonformulary drugs may be obtained for individual patients in Barbados. Grenada, Saint Lucia, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines participate in an Organization of Eastern Caribbean States formulary purchasing system, which added levetiracetam following the survey. Newer generic AED formulations with the lowest risks for pregnancy malformation were not in use. In conclusion, patients with epilepsy in the southern Caribbean have excellent access to government clinics and hospitals, but AED choices

  8. Equal Measure: Shielding Students and Enabling Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Margo

    2012-01-01

    "If one life is saved, then it's worth it." That is the cliched argument frequently used to justify banning electronic communications, websites, and other forms of technology in schools. The common belief is that these prohibitions will prevent, among other things, the sexual assault of minors or suicides related to cyberbullying. But that…

  9. Equal Access to COBRA Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Boxer, Barbara [D-CA

    2010-03-25

    Senate - 03/25/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Equal Measure: Shielding Students and Enabling Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Margo

    2012-01-01

    "If one life is saved, then it's worth it." That is the cliched argument frequently used to justify banning electronic communications, websites, and other forms of technology in schools. The common belief is that these prohibitions will prevent, among other things, the sexual assault of minors or suicides related to cyberbullying. But that…

  11. Hurricane Luis, Caribbean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-09-09

    STS069-731-031 (9 September 1995) --- Hurricane Luis is captured on film in its latter days in the Caribbean in this 70mm frame. During the 11-plus day mission, the astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour caught with their cameras at least two large oceanic storms. A second one later in the flight, named Marilyn, followed a similar path, leaving havoc in its wake on several islands. Endeavour with a five-member crew, launched on September 7, 1995, from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and ended its mission there September 18, 1995, with a successful landing on Runway 33. The multifaceted mission carried astronauts David M. Walker, mission commander; Kenneth D. Cockrell, pilot; and James S. Voss (payload commander), James H. Newman, Michael L. Gernhardt, all mission specialists.

  12. Tides of the Caribbean Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kjerfve, B.

    1981-05-20

    Analysis of tidal characteristics from 45 gauge locations indicates that the Caribbean Sea has a microtidal range, for the most part between 10 and 20 cm. The tide is primarily either mixed semidiurnal or mixed diurnal but a substantial section from Puerto Rico to Venezuela experiences diurnal tides. Empirical charts of six component tides (M/sub 2/, S/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, K/sub 1/, O/sub 1/, and P/sub 1/) show local detail of phase and amplitude. Each of the semidiurnal component tides is characterized by anticlockwise rotating amphidromes centered in the eastern Caribbean. There is evidence of strong radiational forcing of the S/sub 2/ tide in the south-western Caribbean. The diurnal component tides are largely uniform in both phase and amplitude for most of the western and central Caribbean. However, the diurnal phases increase rapidly towards the northwest and the Yucatan Channel.

  13. Caribbean paleomagnetism and tectonic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Approximately fifty papers treating diverse aspects of Caribbean paleomagnetism have appeared since Creer's pioneering work in the early 1960s. Apparently anomalous early results were initially attributed to anomalous geomagnetic field behavior, to unusual mineralogic effects in rock magnetism and to complex remagnetizations. Eventually the importance of structural and tectonic influences were recognized in paleomagnetic data of the Caribbean area, as elsewhere. Large tectonic rotation is evident from the unusual paleomagnetic declination found at many Caribbean localities. Latitudinal transport, with its plate motion implications, is more subtly expressed in the paleomagnetic inclination parameter, with its typically large relative variance. A review of Caribbean paleomagnetic data is given to form a basis for composing realistic tectonic models.

  14. Satellite Teleconferencing in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankar, Hollis C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the need for, and the development, use, and future trends of, the University of the West Indies Distance Teaching Experiment, which utilizes telephone and communications satellite technology teleconferencing to extend educational opportunities to the peoples of the Caribbean. (MBR)

  15. Satellite Teleconferencing in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankar, Hollis C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the need for, and the development, use, and future trends of, the University of the West Indies Distance Teaching Experiment, which utilizes telephone and communications satellite technology teleconferencing to extend educational opportunities to the peoples of the Caribbean. (MBR)

  16. Forget about equality.

    PubMed

    Powers, Madison

    1996-06-01

    Justice is widely thought to consist in equality. For many theorists, the central question has been: Equality of what? The author argues that the ideal of equality distorts practical reasoning and has deeply counterintuitive implications. Moreover, an alternative view of distributive justice can give a better account of what egalitarians should care about than can any of the competing ideals of equality.

  17. Incentives, health promotion and equality.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Kristin

    2012-07-01

    The use of incentives to encourage individuals to adopt 'healthier' behaviours is an increasingly popular instrument in health policy. Much of the literature has been critical of 'negative' incentives, often due to concerns about equality; 'positive' incentives, however, have largely been welcomed as an instrument for the improvement of population health and possibly the reduction of health inequalities. The aim of this paper is to provide a more systematic assessment of the use of incentives from the perspective of equality. The paper begins with an overview of existing and proposed incentive schemes. I then suggest that the distinction between 'positive' and 'negative' incentives - or 'carrots' and 'sticks' - is of limited use in distinguishing those incentive schemes that raise concerns of equality from those that do not. The paper assesses incentive schemes with respect to two important considerations of equality: equality of access and equality of outcomes. While our assessment of incentive schemes will, ultimately, depend on various empirical facts, the paper aims to advance the debate by identifying some of the empirical questions we need to ask. The paper concludes by considering a number of trade-offs and caveats relevant to the assessment of incentive schemes.

  18. Laboratory-Based Surveillance of Neisseria meningitidis Isolates from Disease Cases in Latin American and Caribbean Countries, SIREVA II 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ibarz-Pavón, Ana Belén; Lemos, Ana Paula; Gorla, Maria Cecilia; Regueira, Mabel; Gabastou, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Background Published data on the epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Latin America and the Caribbean region is scarce and, when available, it is often published in Spanish and/or in non-peer-reviewed journals, making it difficult for the international scientific community to have access. Methods Laboratory data on 4,735 Neisseria meningitidis strains was collected and reported by the National Reference Laboratories in 19 Latin American countries and the Caribbean Epidemiology Centre (CAREC) between 2006 and 2010 as part of the work carried out by the SIREVA II network. Serogroup and MIC to penicillin, rifampin and chloramphenicol were determined. Results Isolates were mainly obtained from patients <5 years, but each year around 25% of isolates came from adult patients. Serogroup distribution was highly variable among countries. Serogroup C was the main cause of disease in Brazil; the majority of disease seen in the Southern cone was caused by serogroup B, but serogroup W135 strains have increased in recent years. In the Andean and Mexico, Central America and Caribbean regions, serogroups B and C were equally present, and serogroup Y was frequently isolated. Isolates were generally susceptible to chloramphenicol, penicillin and rifampin, but almost 60% of isolates characterized in Southern cone countries presented intermediate resistance to penicillin. Five rifampin-resistant isolates have been isolated in Uruguay and Brazil. Conclusions Serogroup distribution is highly variable among countries, but some geographic structuring can be inferred from these data. Epidemiological and laboratory data are scarce among Andean and Mexico, Central America and Caribbean countries. Evaluation and implementation of corrective measures on disease surveillance and reporting systems and the implementation of molecular diagnostic techniques and molecular characterization on meningococcal isolates are advised. PMID:22952888

  19. The Digital Divide: The View from Latin America and the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Adolfo

    This paper discusses the digital divide from the perspective of Latin America and the Caribbean. Highlights include: new issues that make access to electronic resources difficult for users; differences in technological infrastructure among countries; how Internet users are distributed worldwide; Internet access in Africa; the number of students…

  20. Women in Physics: A Caribbean Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2009-03-01

    This paper is concerned with aspects of post-secondary education of women in physics in the Caribbean, focusing more specifically on the main university campuses in Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, and Barbados. Within this framework, there are three institutions of tertiary education that provide for undergraduate and post-graduate studies in physics. On average, the bachelor-level graduating class is roughly 40% female. A great majority of these students go on to seek master's degrees in engineering. Among those enrolled in graduate programs featuring research in astronomy, materials science, environmental physics, medical physics, and quantum physics, 58% are female. Significant numbers of women from the selected countries and from the Caribbean region are engaged in bachelor and doctoral programs in physics abroad, but no formal survey is available to provide the relevant quantitative information. However, an attempt will be made to quantify this component. Based in part on personal experience, a comparison will be made between domestic and foreign educational pathways, in terms of access to resources, level of research training, and occupational opportunities following graduation.

  1. Large Earthquake Potential in the Southeast Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencin, D.; Mora-Paez, H.; Bilham, R. G.; Lafemina, P.; Mattioli, G. S.; Molnar, P. H.; Audemard, F. A.; Perez, O. J.

    2015-12-01

    The axis of rotation describing relative motion of the Caribbean plate with respect to South America lies in Canada near Hudson's Bay, such that the Caribbean plate moves nearly due east relative to South America [DeMets et al. 2010]. The plate motion is absorbed largely by pure strike slip motion along the El Pilar Fault in northeastern Venezuela, but in northwestern Venezuela and northeastern Colombia, the relative motion is distributed over a wide zone that extends from offshore to the northeasterly trending Mérida Andes, with the resolved component of convergence between the Caribbean and South American plates estimated at ~10 mm/yr. Recent densification of GPS networks through COLOVEN and COCONet including access to private GPS data maintained by Colombia and Venezuela allowed the development of a new GPS velocity field. The velocity field, processed with JPL's GOA 6.2, JPL non-fiducial final orbit and clock products and VMF tropospheric products, includes over 120 continuous and campaign stations. This new velocity field along with enhanced seismic reflection profiles, and earthquake location analysis strongly suggest the existence of an active oblique subduction zone. We have also been able to use broadband data from Venezuela to search slow-slip events as an indicator of an active subduction zone. There are caveats to this hypothesis, however, including the absence of volcanism that is typically concurrent with active subduction zones and a weak historical record of great earthquakes. A single tsunami deposit dated at 1500 years before present has been identified on the southeast Yucatan peninsula. Our simulations indicate its probable origin is within our study area. We present a new GPS-derived velocity field, which has been used to improve a regional block model [based on Mora and LaFemina, 2009-2012] and discuss the earthquake and tsunami hazards implied by this model. Based on the new geodetic constraints and our updated block model, if part of the

  2. Survey report: Eastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Yinger, N

    1991-01-01

    Over 1 million people live on 8 small islands in the Eastern Caribbean: St. Kitts-Nevis, Montserrat, Grenada, St. Vincent, Antigua, Barbados, St. Lucia, and Dominica. Starting in 1985 the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region has carried out a series of contraceptive prevalence surveys in these countries. Current information is provided by these surveys in the areas of fertility levels and preferences, contraceptive knowledge and use. Also, socioeconomic, historical and demographic background and analysis such as fertility patterns, desire for additional children, and breastfeeding data; contraceptive awareness including family planning methods and sources; contraceptive use by method, source, and timing, satisfaction, and male attitudes are provided in the surveys, but not in the report abstracted here. The total fertility rate (TFR) and the contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) for the 8 islands are as follows: St. Kitts-Nevis (1984) 2.9 TFR, 40.6 CPR; St. Vincent (1988) 2.9 TFR, 58.3 CPR; Antigua (1988) 1.8 TFR, 52.6 CPR; Barbados (1988) not given, 55.0 CPR; St. Lucia (1988) 3.2 TFR, 47.3 CPR; Dominica (1987) 3.2 TFR, 49.8 CPR. The islands have unusual demographic patterns related to extensive out-migration.

  3. Hurricane Marilyn, Caribbean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-09-17

    STS069-720-026 (17 September 1995) --- Hurricane Marilyn is captured on film as it moves over the Caribbean on September 17, 1995, in this 70mm frame. A motion picture lens on the handheld Hasselblad gives a "fish-eye" effect to the scene. Note the end of the Space Shuttle Endeavour's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm, which stayed quite busy during the flight supporting a space walk and extensive operations with two temporarily free-flying spacecraft. During the 11-plus day mission, the astronauts aboard the Endeavour caught with their cameras at least two large oceanic storms. Another hurricane, named Luis, followed a similar path earlier in the flight. Endeavour, with a five-member crew, launched on September 7, 1995, from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and ended its mission there September 18, 1995, with a successful landing on Runway 33. The multifaceted mission carried the crew of astronauts David M. Walker, mission commander; Kenneth D. Cockrell, pilot; and James S. Voss (payload commander), James H. Newman, Michael L. Gernhardt, all mission specialists.

  4. Curie point depth estimation of the Eastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Andreina; Orihuela Guevara, Nuris

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we present an estimation of the Curie point depth (CPD) on the Eastern Caribbean. The estimation of the CPD was done from satellite magnetic anomalies, by the application of the Centroid method over the studied area. In order to calculate the CPD, the area was subdivided in square windows of side equal to 2°, with an overlap distance of 1° to each other. As result of this research, it was obtained the Curie isotherm grid by using kriging interpolation method. Despite of the oceanic nature of the Eastern Caribbean plate, this map reveals important lateral variations in the interior of the plate and its boundaries. The lateral variations observed in CPD are related with the complexity of thermal processes in the subsurface of the region. From a global perspective, the earth's oceanic provinces show a CPD's smooth behavior, excepting plate boundaries of these oceanic provinces. In this case, the Eastern Caribbean plate's CPD variations are related to both: Plate's boundaries and plate's interior. The maximum CPD variations are observed in the southern boundary of Caribbean plate (9 to 35 km) and over the Lesser Antilles and Barbados prism (16 to 30 km). This behavior reflects the complex geologic evolution history of the studied area, in which has been documented the presence of extensive mantle of basalt and dolerite sills. These sills have been originated in various cycles of cretaceous mantle activity, and have been the main cause of the oceanic crust's thickening in the interior of the Caribbean plate. At the same time, this thickening of the oceanic plate explains the existence of a Mohorovičić discontinuity, with an average depth greater than other regions of the planet, with slight irregularities related to highs of the ocean floor (Nicaragua and Beata Crests, Aves High) but not similar to the magnitude of lateral variations revealed by the Curie isotherm map.

  5. Science EQUALS Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Kitty B., Ed.; Conwell, Catherine R., Ed.

    The purpose of the EQUALS programs is to increase the interest and awareness that females and minorities have concerning mathematics and science related careers. This book, produced by an EQUALS program in North Carolina, contains 35 hands-on, discovery science activities that center around four EQUALS processes--problem solving, cooperative…

  6. Globalizing the English Curriculum through Caribbean Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spoelman, Linda; Thomas, Katherine

    Although Caribbean (English) writers hold differing views on the effectiveness of making connections in an area of so much diversity, Caribbean literature can be connected to the English curriculum to promote diversity and understanding. V. S. Naipaul, Nobel Prize winning author from the region, presents a pessimistic view of Caribbean society in…

  7. 9th Caribbean Geological Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Gren

    The ninth in a series of Caribbean Geological Conferences, which are held every 3 or 4 years, took place in Santo Domingo, capital of the Dominican Republic, from the 15th to 26th of August 1980. The conference, which was sponsored by the government of the Dominican Republic and the Universidad Catolica Madre y Maestra, was preceded by 2 days of field trips and was opened by President Antonio Guzman on the evening of the 17th of August. Generous support was provided by Alcoa Exploration Co., Falconbridge Dominicana, and Rosario Dominicana.Geologists and geophysicists from 25 countries presented about 130 papers on a wide variety of topics ranging from geophysics to paleontology. While the whole Caribbean area was discussed, there was special emphasis on the northern Caribbean and Hispaniola, as befitted the site of the conference. The contribution of workers from the Dirección General de Mineriá was particularly notable.

  8. Some Equalities Are More Equal Than Others: Quality Equality Emerges Later Than Numerical Equality.

    PubMed

    Sheskin, Mark; Nadal, Amber; Croom, Adam; Mayer, Tanya; Nissel, Jenny; Bloom, Paul

    2016-09-01

    By age 6, children typically share an equal number of resources between themselves and others. However, fairness involves not merely that each person receive an equal number of resources ("numerical equality") but also that each person receive equal quality resources ("quality equality"). In Study 1, children (N = 87, 3-10 years) typically split four resources "two each" by age 6, but typically monopolized the better two resources until age 10. In Study 2, a new group of 6- to 8-year-olds (N = 32) allocated resources to third parties according to quality equality, indicating that children in this age group understand that fairness requires both types of equality.

  9. View - Caribbean Coast - Venezuela

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-15

    S73-35079 (July-September 1973) --- A near vertical view of the Caribbean coast of Venezuela is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiment Package S190-B (five-inch Earth terrain camera) photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The large body of water is the Golfo de Venezuela; and the major land mass is the Peninsula de Paraguana. The view is looking northward from the mouth of the Golfete de Coro and Punta Cardon to Punta Macolla. The peninsula is connected to the Venezuelan mainland by the narrow strip of land in the most easterly corner of the picture. The dry, arid climate on the peninsula is indicated by sparse vegetation and the abundance of sand dunes. The highest point is about 2,700 feet above the sea and is the conspicuous black spot. Old raised shoreline features appear as streaks parallel to the Golfete de Coro. Sand dunes and stream erosion have modified these features. Water of the Golfete de Coro is red from the high sediment content. The streaks in the water off the peninsula is apparently an effect of wind which is blowing sand and water offshore. The EREP investigator Dr. Jose Antonio Galavis, of the Ministerio de Mines e Hidrocarburos, will use this information to map geology and coastal sedimentation in the Peninsula de Paraguana. Federal agencies participating with NASA on the EREP projects are the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Corps of Engineers. All EREP photography is available to the public through the Department of Interior?s Earth Resources Observations Systems Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 57198. (Alternate number SL3-83-237) Photo credit: NASA

  10. Genetic Relationships among Tall Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera L.) Accessions of the International Coconut Genebank for Latin America and the Caribbean (ICG-LAC), Evaluated Using Microsatellite Markers (SSRs)

    PubMed Central

    Loiola, Carina Mendes; Azevedo, Alinne Oliveira Nunes; Diniz, Leandro E. C.; Aragão, Wilson Menezes; Azevedo, Carlos Diego de O.; Santos, Pedro Henrique A. D.; Ramos, Helaine Christine C.; Pereira, Messias Gonzaga; Ramos, Semíramis R. Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    The diversity and genetic relationships among two accessions of tall coconut palms collected in Brazil and seven accessions introduced from different geographic regions of the world were analyzed using 25 microsatellite primers, 19 of which were polymorphic and detected between 4 and 10 alleles per locus, with an average of 6.57. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.25 and 0.40 in the Rennell Islands Tall (RIT) accession to 0.54 and 0.62 in the Polynesian Tall (PYT) accession. The analysis of genetic structure resulted in the formation of five distinct groups. The first group was formed by the accessions Brazilian Tall—Praia do Forte (BRTPF), Brazilian Tall—Merepe (BRTMe) and West African Tall (WAT); the second group consisted of Malaysian Tall (MLT); the third group of RIT; the fourth group of Vanuatu Tall (VTT); and the fifth group of Rotuman Tall (RTMT), Tonga Tall (TONT) and PYT. The dendrogram based on the nearest-neighbor method detected the formation of two main groups and five subgroups, indicating that the genetic relationships of the accessions are based on their geographic regions of origin. The analyses revealed genetic relationships between the accessions collected in Brazil and the accession from Africa, and among palms from South East Asia and the South Pacific, confirming the common origin of these accessions. The information obtained in this study can guide decisions on germplasm conservation activities and the efficient selection of genetically divergent parents for use in coconut breeding programs in Brazil, which are attempting to select for disease resistance, mainly to lethal yellowing, among other characteristics. PMID:26974540

  11. Genetic Relationships among Tall Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera L.) Accessions of the International Coconut Genebank for Latin America and the Caribbean (ICG-LAC), Evaluated Using Microsatellite Markers (SSRs).

    PubMed

    Loiola, Carina Mendes; Azevedo, Alinne Oliveira Nunes; Diniz, Leandro E C; Aragão, Wilson Menezes; Azevedo, Carlos Diego de O; Santos, Pedro Henrique A D; Ramos, Helaine Christine C; Pereira, Messias Gonzaga; Ramos, Semíramis R Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    The diversity and genetic relationships among two accessions of tall coconut palms collected in Brazil and seven accessions introduced from different geographic regions of the world were analyzed using 25 microsatellite primers, 19 of which were polymorphic and detected between 4 and 10 alleles per locus, with an average of 6.57. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.25 and 0.40 in the Rennell Islands Tall (RIT) accession to 0.54 and 0.62 in the Polynesian Tall (PYT) accession. The analysis of genetic structure resulted in the formation of five distinct groups. The first group was formed by the accessions Brazilian Tall-Praia do Forte (BRTPF), Brazilian Tall-Merepe (BRTMe) and West African Tall (WAT); the second group consisted of Malaysian Tall (MLT); the third group of RIT; the fourth group of Vanuatu Tall (VTT); and the fifth group of Rotuman Tall (RTMT), Tonga Tall (TONT) and PYT. The dendrogram based on the nearest-neighbor method detected the formation of two main groups and five subgroups, indicating that the genetic relationships of the accessions are based on their geographic regions of origin. The analyses revealed genetic relationships between the accessions collected in Brazil and the accession from Africa, and among palms from South East Asia and the South Pacific, confirming the common origin of these accessions. The information obtained in this study can guide decisions on germplasm conservation activities and the efficient selection of genetically divergent parents for use in coconut breeding programs in Brazil, which are attempting to select for disease resistance, mainly to lethal yellowing, among other characteristics.

  12. 3 CFR 8835 - Proclamation 8835 of June 1, 2012. National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... slavery. Some immigrated to America as children, clutching a parent's hand. Others came as adults, leaving... Americans have sought to ensure their children and grandchildren would have the freedom to make of their... is equal, anyone can make it if they try. As we reflect on the myriad ways Caribbean Americans...

  13. Equality of Opportunity and Equality of Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodelja, Zdenko

    2016-01-01

    The report on the findings of extensive empirical research on equality of educational opportunities carried out in the United States on a very large sample of public schools by Coleman and his colleagues has had a major impact on education policy and has given rise to a large amount of research and various interpretations. However, as some…

  14. Equal Telecommunications Access for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Virginians (TDD/Message Relay Programs). Report to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virginia. House Document No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Richmond.

    The report addresses issues of telecommunications access for hearing and speech impaired persons in Virginia. Six analyses were performed: (1) Accessibility of service organizations--over 89% of sample organizations were not accessible by a telecommunications device for the deaf and existing TDDs were underutilized; (2) Telephone use by persons…

  15. Equal Telecommunications Access for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Virginians (TDD/Message Relay Programs). Report to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virginia. House Document No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Richmond.

    The report addresses issues of telecommunications access for hearing and speech impaired persons in Virginia. Six analyses were performed: (1) Accessibility of service organizations--over 89% of sample organizations were not accessible by a telecommunications device for the deaf and existing TDDs were underutilized; (2) Telephone use by persons…

  16. Obesity and oncological outcome after radical prostatectomy: impact of prostate-specific antigen-based prostate cancer screening: results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital and Duke Prostate Center databases.

    PubMed

    Freedland, Stephen J; Sun, Leon; Kane, Christopher J; Presti, Joseph C; Terris, Martha K; Amling, Christopher L; Moul, Judd W; Aronson, William J

    2008-09-01

    To indirectly test the hypothesis that prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is biased against obese men due to haemodilution of PSA, and thus results in delayed diagnosis and poorer outcome beyond the biological link between obesity and aggressive prostate cancer. We sought to examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and the outcome of radical prostatectomy (RP) separately for men with PSA-detected cancers (cT1c) or with abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) findings (cT2/T3), and stratified by year of treatment, using two large databases. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 1375 and 2014 men treated by RP between 1988 and 2007 using the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) and Duke Prostate Center (DPC) databases. We evaluated the association between BMI and adverse pathological features and biochemical progression, using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for several clinical characteristics, respectively. Data were examined as a whole and as stratified by clinical stage (cT1c vs cT2/T3) and year of surgery (>or=2000 vs <2000). In both cohorts a higher BMI was associated with high-grade disease (P 0.3). Among men with T1c disease, the association between BMI and biochemical progression was limited to men treated in 2000 or later (P 0.4). Obese men with PSA-detected cancers and treated with RP since 2000 were at significantly greater risk of biochemical progression, while obese men treated before 2000 or diagnosed with an abnormal DRE

  17. Caribbean Women Writers: Suggested Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders-Hamilton, Tanya

    This document is a bibliography of books written by Caribbean women writers. Authors and their works are organized by the country of their origin; these include: Antigua, Barbados/USA, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Matinique, Puerto Rico, Trinidad/Tobago, and Trinidad/USA. Books of interest to children and young…

  18. The Geography of Caribbean Holidays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockledge, Ann

    This paper describes Caribbean street festivals as celebrations that reflect the historic, climate, and movement patterns of the region. Celebrations such as Carnival, Hosay, and Jonkonnu are discussed, and it is proposed that study of these and other festivals can be linked to the five thematic generalizations often utilized by geographers. These…

  19. EQUAL PAY FACTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    EQUAL PAY MEANS PAYMENT OF "RATE OF THE JOB" WITHOUT REGARD TO SEX. EQUAL PAY LAWS WERE ENACTED IN 29 STATES FROM 1919 TO 1965. FOUR ADDITIONAL STATES HAVE FAIR EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES LAWS. SUPPORT FOR SUCH LEGISLATION HAS COME FROM WOMEN'S AND CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS, AFL-CIO, AND THE PRESIDENT'S AND STATE COMMISSIONS ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN. THE…

  20. EQUAL PAY FACTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    EQUAL PAY MEANS PAYMENT OF "RATE OF THE JOB" WITHOUT REGARD TO SEX. EQUAL PAY LAWS WERE ENACTED IN 29 STATES FROM 1919 TO 1965. FOUR ADDITIONAL STATES HAVE FAIR EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES LAWS. SUPPORT FOR SUCH LEGISLATION HAS COME FROM WOMEN'S AND CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS, AFL-CIO, AND THE PRESIDENT'S AND STATE COMMISSIONS ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN. THE…

  1. Early Understanding of Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavy, Aisling; Hourigan, Mairéad; McMahon, Áine

    2013-01-01

    Quite a bit of the arithmetic in elementary school contains elements of algebraic reasoning. After researching and testing a number of instructional strategies with Irish third graders, these authors found effective methods for cultivating a relational concept of equality in third-grade students. Understanding equality is fundamental to algebraic…

  2. Integer Equal Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, C A; Schulz, A S

    2009-01-07

    The integer equal flow problem is an NP-hard network flow problem, in which all arcs in given sets R{sub 1}, ..., R{sub {ell}} must carry equal flow. We show this problem is effectively inapproximable, even if the cardinality of each set R{sub k} is two. When {ell} is fixed, it is solvable in polynomial time.

  3. Equality and Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brink, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The two big events in higher education during 2010 were the implementation of the Equality Act, and the introduction of a new dispensation on fees and funding. The former is intended to promote equality, the latter is premised on the need for economy. In this article, the author focuses on the effect of the latter on the former. He considers this…

  4. Early Understanding of Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavy, Aisling; Hourigan, Mairéad; McMahon, Áine

    2013-01-01

    Quite a bit of the arithmetic in elementary school contains elements of algebraic reasoning. After researching and testing a number of instructional strategies with Irish third graders, these authors found effective methods for cultivating a relational concept of equality in third-grade students. Understanding equality is fundamental to algebraic…

  5. Equal Justice Under Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Earl, Jr., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This special theme issue of "Update on Law-Related Education""tells about the past, present, and future of equal legal representation for all in our society." It is dedicated to the history and heroes of legal aid for the poor and the need to further that cause if the United States hopes to achieve equal justice for all. In his…

  6. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  7. 76 FR 71939 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA829 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council..., 5 Estate Bakkeroe, St. Thomas, USVI. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management...

  8. 77 FR 43574 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC125 Caribbean Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management... Water Front, Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, USVI. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery...

  9. 77 FR 47603 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC146 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting addendum. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery... Conquistador Avenue, Fajardo, Puerto Rico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management...

  10. Caribbean Regional Security: The Challenges to creating Formal Military Relationships in the English-Speaking Caribbean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-31

    incomes. Ramon Grosfoguel adds that in the United States and in Europe, there is a perception that foreign immigrants are taking jobs away from the...2Ramon Grosfoguel , “The Geopolitics of Caribbean Migration,” 201. 3Lilian Bobea, “Migration and Regional Security: Besieged Borders and Caribbean... Grosfoguel , Ramon. “The Geopolitics of Caribbean Migration.” In Security, Problems and Policies in the Post-Cold War Caribbean, 201-224. New York

  11. Early implications of the COCONet GPS velocity field for studies of plate and microplate motions in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.

    2013-05-01

    Now entering their 3rd decade, GPS measurements in the Caribbean region have been used to study a wide range of tectonic topics such as the movement of the Caribbean plate relative to North and South America, earthquake cycle effects along the seismically hazardous Caribbean plate boundary faults, and microplate interactions along the complexly deforming Caribbean plate boundaries. The construction of COCONet stands out as the most significant-ever one-time advance in GPS-MET infrastructure in the Caribbean region due to its standardized GPS-MET equipment, its open access to real-time data, and its expansion of coverage relative to pre-existing GPS stations. In this talk, I will show an up-to-date Caribbean region velocity field derived using the most recent version of GIPSY software (release 6.1), the latest satellite orbit products, single-station ambiguity resolution, and a consistent realization of the Caribbean plate reference frame. Consisting of several hundred site velocities, the new velocity field clearly defines how the crust responds to east-to-west changes in the geometry of the Caribbean-North America plate boundary, including the profound effect of the oblique collision zone between the Bahama platform and northern edge of the Caribbean plate. I will discuss implications of the still-maturing COCONet GPS velocities for ongoing studies of Caribbean plate motion and plate rigidity and will also discuss applications of COCONet velocities for testing recently published kinematic estimates for the movements of the Gonave, Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, and southern Jamaica microplates.

  12. Mental health advocacy and African and Caribbean men: good practice principles and organizational models for delivery.

    PubMed

    Newbigging, Karen; McKeown, Mick; French, Beverley

    2013-03-01

    Advocacy has a critical role to play in addressing concerns about access to appropriate mental health care and treatment for African and Caribbean men. To investigate good practice principles and organizational models for mental health advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. The study consisted of: (i) A systematic literature review. Bibliographic and internet searching was undertaken from 1994 to 2006. The inclusion criteria related to mental health, advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. (ii) Four focus groups with African and Caribbean men to explore needs for and experiences of mental health advocacy. (iii) An investigation into current advocacy provision through a survey of advocacy provision in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (iv) Twenty-two qualitative stakeholder interviews to investigate the operation of mental health advocacy for this client group. The study was undertaken in partnership with two service user-led organizations and an African Caribbean mental health service. Primary research in this area is scant. Mainstream mental health advocacy services are often poor at providing appropriate services. Services developed by the Black Community and voluntary sector are grounded in different conceptualizations of advocacy and sharper understanding of the needs of African and Caribbean men. The lack of sustainable funding for these organizations is a major barrier to the development of high-quality advocacy for this group, reflecting a lack of understanding about their distinctive role. The commissioning and provision of mental health advocacy needs to recognize the distinct experiences of African and Caribbean men and develop capacity in the range of organizations to ensure equitable access. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Mental health advocacy and African and Caribbean men: good practice principles and organizational models for delivery

    PubMed Central

    Newbigging, Karen; McKeown, Mick; French, Beverley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  Advocacy has a critical role to play in addressing concerns about access to appropriate mental health care and treatment for African and Caribbean men. Aim  To investigate good practice principles and organizational models for mental health advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. Study design  The study consisted of: (i) A systematic literature review. Bibliographic and internet searching was undertaken from 1994 to 2006. The inclusion criteria related to mental health, advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. (ii) Four focus groups with African and Caribbean men to explore needs for and experiences of mental health advocacy. (iii) An investigation into current advocacy provision through a survey of advocacy provision in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (iv) Twenty‐two qualitative stakeholder interviews to investigate the operation of mental health advocacy for this client group. The study was undertaken in partnership with two service user‐led organizations and an African Caribbean mental health service. Results  Primary research in this area is scant. Mainstream mental health advocacy services are often poor at providing appropriate services. Services developed by the Black Community and voluntary sector are grounded in different conceptualizations of advocacy and sharper understanding of the needs of African and Caribbean men. The lack of sustainable funding for these organizations is a major barrier to the development of high‐quality advocacy for this group, reflecting a lack of understanding about their distinctive role. Conclusions  The commissioning and provision of mental health advocacy needs to recognize the distinct experiences of African and Caribbean men and develop capacity in the range of organizations to ensure equitable access. PMID:21645185

  14. Equal Educational Opportunity Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Thomas H.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the literature on equal educational opportunity (EEO), analyzes data from a school attitude questionnaire and a specially-designed achievement test, and draws implications for funding of EEO programs. (WD)

  15. Changing climate and Caribbean coastlines

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the significance of rising relative sea level to the Caribbean region. The various factors contributing to rising relative sea level are explained -- rising eustatic sea level from atmospheric warming, natural subsidence, and manmade subsidence. The possibility of changes in storms is also raised. Possible impacts are discussed, for both wetlands and urban areas. Some developing government policies are described, such as restrictions on coastal development. International research agendas are described. A list of recommended tide-gage stations is presented.

  16. Symbiodinium Photosynthesis in Caribbean Octocorals

    PubMed Central

    Ramsby, Blake D.; Shirur, Kartick P.

    2014-01-01

    Symbioses with the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium form the foundation of tropical coral reef communities. Symbiodinium photosynthesis fuels the growth of an array of marine invertebrates, including cnidarians such as scleractinian corals and octocorals (e.g., gorgonian and soft corals). Studies examining the symbioses between Caribbean gorgonian corals and Symbiodinium are sparse, even though gorgonian corals blanket the landscape of Caribbean coral reefs. The objective of this study was to compare photosynthetic characteristics of Symbiodinium in four common Caribbean gorgonian species: Pterogorgia anceps, Eunicea tourneforti, Pseudoplexaura porosa, and Pseudoplexaura wagenaari. Symbiodinium associated with these four species exhibited differences in Symbiodinium density, chlorophyll a per cell, light absorption by chlorophyll a, and rates of photosynthetic oxygen production. The two Pseudoplexaura species had higher Symbiodinium densities and chlorophyll a per Symbiodinium cell but lower chlorophyll a specific absorption compared to P. anceps and E. tourneforti. Consequently, P. porosa and P. wagenaari had the highest average photosynthetic rates per cm2 but the lowest average photosynthetic rates per Symbiodinium cell or chlorophyll a. With the exception of Symbiodinium from E. tourneforti, isolated Symbiodinium did not photosynthesize at the same rate as Symbiodinium in hospite. Differences in Symbiodinium photosynthetic performance could not be attributed to Symbiodinium type. All P. anceps (n = 9) and P. wagenaari (n = 6) colonies, in addition to one E. tourneforti and three P. porosa colonies, associated with Symbiodinium type B1. The B1 Symbiodinium from these four gorgonian species did not cluster with lineages of B1 Symbiodinium from scleractinian corals. The remaining eight E. tourneforti colonies harbored Symbiodinium type B1L, while six P. porosa colonies harbored type B1i. Understanding the symbioses between gorgonian corals and Symbiodinium will

  17. [Salvage radiotherapy outcomes for biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy among the African-Caribbean population of Guadeloupe].

    PubMed

    Agoua, N G; Vian, E; Dumoulin, M; Blanchet, P

    2013-02-01

    To make the first analysis of the salvage radiotherapy outcomes for biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in African descendant people, witch has no healthcare access difficulties: the French West-Indies African-Caribbean people of Guadeloupe. Ninety successive patients, with biological failure after radical prostatectomies were treated in the University Hospital of Pointe-à-Pitre with salvage radiotherapy between April 2003 and December 2008. The retrospective study analysed the biochemical disease free survival (bDFs) after irradiation with Kaplan-Meier method, and the independent predictors of bDFs using the Cox model, with P<0.05. The treatment failure was defined for PSA superior or equal to nadir +0.1 ng/mL. The median dose was 64 Gy. At the median follow-up of 24.63 months, 35 (38.9%) patients had biochemical recurrence. The median bDFs was 55.3 months, the bDFs probabilities at months 12, 24, 36 and 48 were 8.1%, 70.3%, 61.9% and 56.1%. Multivariate analysis determined that the independents predictors of treatment failure were the seminals vesicles invasion (P=0.0094, Hazard ratio=2.63 CI 95%: [1.28-5.55]), the PSA velocity superior or equal to 0.75 ng/mL per year (P=0.0002, Hazard ratio=3.88 CI95%: [1.86-7.75]) and the pre-irradiation PSA level superior or equal to 1.5 ng/mL (P=0.0093, Hazard ratio=2.89 CI95%: [1.30-6.45]). Salvage radiotherapy for African descendent people with no healthcare difficulty access was an efficient treatment for the biochemical recurrence and had the same outcomes than others Caucasian people. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Solar drying in the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Headley, O. )

    1992-03-01

    The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) has estimated that a quarter of crops are lost through inadequate handling after harvesting. The use of solar dryers can reduce these losses and improve the quality of food. Oliver Headley of the University of the West Indies overviews a range of dryers developed in the Caribbean region. Solar dryers have been used in various parts of the Caribbean for the past eighteen years. The main types are: closed cycle dryers with separate flat plate collector; open cycle dryers with roof vanes against direct sunlight; open cycle dryers with rockbed heat storage units; open cycle dryers with chimneys for air circulation; wire basket dryers with flow through ventilation; barn roof collectors feeding packed bed dryers. During the dry season (January to April), mean daily insolation in a typical Caribbean island is about 25 MJ/m{sup 2}. With such an abundant resource, solar crop drying emerged as a preferred method for the preservation of perishable commodities. In territories without fossil fuel reserves solar energy is an obvious alternative since it does not involve expenditure of scarce foreign exchange. Research and development work in solar crop drying was conducted both at experimental sites in the University and in rural districts throughout the region. Several types of dryer were designed and tested.

  19. Poverty and Policy in Latin America and the Caribbean. World Bank Technical Paper No. 467.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodon, Quentin T.

    Although the progress toward poverty reduction remains sluggish, other dimensions of social welfare in the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region show signs of improvement. Adult literacy and school enrollment rates, life expectancy at birth, access to safe water, and nutrition indicators are improving. However, other factors demonstrate that…

  20. Universities of the Caribbean Region--Struggles to Democratize. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Barbara Ashton; Waggoner, George R.

    An annotated bibliography on universities in the Caribbean region for the period since World War II is presented. The focus is on access to universities. For book citations, each annotation contains the author's name, publication title, place of publication, publisher, date, and number of pages. Journal references consist of author, title of…

  1. Poverty and Policy in Latin America and the Caribbean. World Bank Technical Paper No. 467.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodon, Quentin T.

    Although the progress toward poverty reduction remains sluggish, other dimensions of social welfare in the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region show signs of improvement. Adult literacy and school enrollment rates, life expectancy at birth, access to safe water, and nutrition indicators are improving. However, other factors demonstrate that…

  2. Renewable power production in a Pan-Caribbean energy grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David

    The Small Island Developing States of the Caribbean are victims of geography and geopolitics. Lacking access to large fossil fuel reserves, they are forced to import fuel at prices they have no control over. Renewable energy resources, particularly wind, have the potential to help break the Caribbean dependency on fossil fuels and allow for increased development at the same time. Working from a sustainable development point of view, this project discusses the history of the area, the theoretical background for the idea of large scale renewable power production, the regional initiatives already in place that address both the cost of fossil fuels and the policy hurdles that need to be overcome to assist the region in gaining energy independence. Haiti is highlighted as a special case in the region and the potential use of several renewable resources are discussed, along with a potential business model based on the idea of the Internet. Power storage is covered, specifically the potential of battery operated vehicles to have a positive impact on the Caribbean region and other developing states. The role of government regulation and policy comes into play next, followed by a discussion on the need for developed states to change patterns of behavior in order to achieve sustainability. Finally, nuclear power and liquefied natural gas are reviewed and rejected as power options for the region.

  3. Regional strategy tested in Caribbean.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Barbados, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia have joined forces in the world's 1st regional Contraceptive Social Marketing (CSM) effort -- the Caribbean CSM. The Barbados Family Planning Association (BFPS) is overseeing the operation, which begins selling 2 contraceptive pills and a condom in early February. Costs and start-up times were shaved by adopting brand names and advertising materials from Jamaica's highly successful CSM project. Jamaica's popular "Panther" condom and "Perle" oral contraceptive (OC) are being used by the Caribbean CSM project. Perle's 9-year-old package has been redesigned and the Caribbean CSM project also is selling a 2nd, low-dose version called "Perle-LD." The products are manufactured in the US by Syntex as Noriday and Norminest, respectively. But the regional approach's financial gains also had a debit side, most notably a tripling of bureaucratic procedures. Part of project difficulties stem from differences among the 3 Caribbean countries. While sharing a common cultural heritage, St. Lucians speak a patois dialect in addition to the English prevalent on the other islands. The biggest hurdle was overcoming an economic disparity between Barbados and its less affluent neighbors, St. Vincent and St. Lucia. The CSM project decided to try a 2-tier product pricing strategy. In US currency, prices run $1.75 per cycle for both OCs on Barbados, but $1.26 on St. Vincent and St. Lucia. A Panther 3-pack costs 75 cents on Barbados and 42 cents on the othe 2 islands. The project is being promoted with generic family planning media advertisements. The project also has held physician orientation seminars on each island. The pilot program will be accompanied by retailer training seminars. In addition the project may introduce a spermicidal foaming tablet, once the US Food and Drug Administration approvs a new American-made product. The unique Caribbean CSM project may spread an idea as potent as the family planning message. Its success could transmit the

  4. Hospice and palliation in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Cheryl Cox; Chiochankitmun, Nina; Akpinar-Elci, Muge

    2014-07-01

    This article presents empirical data on the limited availability of hospice and palliative care to the 6 million people of the English-speaking Caribbean. Ten of the 13 nations therein responded to a survey and reported employing a total of 6 hospice or palliative specialists, and having a total of 15 related facilities. The evolving socioeconomic and cultural context in these nations bears on the availability of such care, and on the willingness to report, assess, and prioritize pain, and to prescribe opiates for pain. Socioeconomics and culture also impinge on what medications and modalities of care are routinely available for pain or other conditions and can challenge professionalism, empathy, and responsiveness to patients' unrelieved pain. Although all respondents report having a protocol for pain management, hospice, or end-of-life care, their annual medical use of opiates is well below the global mean. The International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), which monitors such use, encourages Caribbean and other low- and middle-income countries to increase their use of opiates to treat pain, and to overcome both unfounded fears of addiction and overly restrictive interpretation of related laws and regulations. Contextual considerations like those described here are important to the success of policies and capacity-building programs aiming to increase access to hospice and palliation, and perhaps to improving other aspects of health and healthcare. Exploring and responding to the realities of socioeconomic and cultural conditions will enhance public and policy dialogue and improve the design of interventions to increase access to palliative and hospice care. Improving access to palliative and hospice care in the Caribbean demonstrates beneficence and helps to fulfill human rights conventions.

  5. Transhumanism and moral equality.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James

    2007-10-01

    Conservative thinkers such as Francis Fukuyama have produced a battery of objections to the transhumanist project of fundamentally enhancing human capacities. This article examines one of these objections, namely that by allowing some to greatly extend their capacities, we will undermine the fundamental moral equality of human beings. I argue that this objection is groundless: once we understand the basis for human equality, it is clear that anyone who now has sufficient capacities to count as a person from the moral point of view will continue to count as one even if others are fundamentally enhanced; and it is mistaken to think that a creature which had even far greater capacities than an unenhanced human being should count as more than an equal from the moral point of view.

  6. 43 CFR 2201.6 - Value equalization; cash equalization waiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Value equalization; cash equalization... equalize the agreed upon values of the Federal and non-Federal lands involved in an exchange, either with... cash equalization after making all reasonable efforts to equalize values by adding or excluding...

  7. 43 CFR 2201.6 - Value equalization; cash equalization waiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Value equalization; cash equalization... equalize the agreed upon values of the Federal and non-Federal lands involved in an exchange, either with... cash equalization after making all reasonable efforts to equalize values by adding or excluding...

  8. Race Equality Scheme 2005-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education (HMIE) is strongly committed to promoting race equality in the way that HMIE staff go about performing their role within Scottish education. Scottish society reflects cultural, ethnic, religious and linguistic diversity and Scottish education should be accessible to all. No-one should be disadvantaged or…

  9. Latin American and Caribbean intercomparison of surface contamination monitoring equipment.

    PubMed

    Cabral, T S; Ramos, M M O; Laranjeira, A S; Santos, D S; Suarez, R C

    2011-03-01

    In October 2009, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) sponsored an intercomparison exercise of surface contamination monitoring equipment, which was held at the Laboratório Nacional de Metrologia das Radiações Ionizantes, from the Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria, IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro. This intercomparison was performed to evaluate the calibration accessibility in Latin America and the Caribbean. Thirteen countries within the region and IAEA have sent instruments to be compared, but only five countries and IAEA were considered apt to participate. Analysis of instruments, results and discussions are presented and recommendations are drawn.

  10. Dirt, disease and death: control, resistance and change in the post-emancipation Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Rita

    2012-12-01

    This study examines how health facilities and services were used as an agency of worker control in the British Caribbean between 1838 and 1860. It argues that planter health strategies were based on flawed assumptions. The resultant policy of deprivation of access to medical services by the labouring population backfired within 16 years of freedom when a cholera epidemic rocked the region. It exposed the poor living conditions of the free villages and generated fear and panic among the local elite who were forced to make policy changes regarding health and sanitation. As a result the first steps towards the establishment of public health services in the British Caribbean were stimulated.

  11. Teaching and Learning with Caribbean Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Clement B. G.

    Presently, the most frequent point of contact between the United States and many Caribbean island states is the immigrant population. Incentives for immigration are provided by a tradition of colonialism, economies dependent upon agriculture, and problems resulting from rapidly increasing populations. The continuing influx of Caribbeans to the…

  12. Creating Research Culture in Caribbean Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Theodore; Simmons, Lynette

    2010-01-01

    Recent expansion of tertiary education in the Caribbean via the creation of two new universities invites reflection on what impedes the creation of research culture, and what enables it. We contend that research culture in the Caribbean comes up against the strictures of post-colonial dependence, university education in the region being largely a…

  13. The Caribbean Online: Exploration through Internet Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of websites that cover a variety of topics on the Caribbean such as the African cultures of Cuba, Belize and its government, news organizations throughout the Caribbean, and general information on the University of Puerto Rico. (CMK)

  14. British African Caribbean Women and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkison-Bradley, Carla; Maynard, Donna; Johnson, Phillip; Carter, Stephaney

    2009-01-01

    Depression is a common condition among women in the United Kingdom. However, little is known about the context of depression among British African Caribbean women. This article offers a preliminary discussion regarding issues and information pertaining to depression among British African Caribbean women. Characteristics and symptoms of depression…

  15. Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davids, Melva P.

    2013-01-01

    The paper Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies examines how language is treated in Jamaica and other Anglophone Caribbean societies and the effects of a haphazard approach to language planning on the social dynamics of the society as well as the individual. It briefly explores how Language is handled in Francophone or…

  16. Creating Research Culture in Caribbean Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Theodore; Simmons, Lynette

    2010-01-01

    Recent expansion of tertiary education in the Caribbean via the creation of two new universities invites reflection on what impedes the creation of research culture, and what enables it. We contend that research culture in the Caribbean comes up against the strictures of post-colonial dependence, university education in the region being largely a…

  17. Bibliography of Serials on Caribbean Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Dennis; Milman, Claudio

    An alphabetical listing of serial titles that are relevant to Caribbean affairs and culture is provided. Annotations include the individual publication's scope of coverage as well as its frequency of appearance (monthly, quarterly, weekly, etc.) and postal address. The same type of information regarding newspapers published in the Caribbean area…

  18. British African Caribbean Women and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkison-Bradley, Carla; Maynard, Donna; Johnson, Phillip; Carter, Stephaney

    2009-01-01

    Depression is a common condition among women in the United Kingdom. However, little is known about the context of depression among British African Caribbean women. This article offers a preliminary discussion regarding issues and information pertaining to depression among British African Caribbean women. Characteristics and symptoms of depression…

  19. Caribbean tectonics and relative plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.; Dewey, J. F.; Cooper, C.; Mann, P.; Pindell, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    During the last century, three different ways of interpreting the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean have been proposed, taking into account the Bailey Willis School of a permanent pre-Jurassic deep sea basin, the Edward Suess School of a subsided continental terrain, and the Alfred Wegener School of continental separation. The present investigation is concerned with an outline of an interpretation which follows that of Pindell and Dewey (1982). An attempt is made to point out ways in which the advanced hypotheses can be tested. The fit of Africa, North America, and South America is considered along with aspects of relative motion between North and South America since the early Jurasic. Attention is given to a framework for reconstructing Caribbean plate evolution, the evolution of the Caribbean, the plate boundary zones of the northern and southern Caribbean, and the active deformation of the Caribbean plate.

  20. EQUALS Investigations: Remote Rulers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Karen; Whitlow, Robert

    EQUALS is a teacher education program that helps elementary and secondary educators acquire methods and materials to attract minority and female students to mathematics. It supports a problem-solving approach to mathematics which has students working in groups, uses active assessment methods, and incorporates a broad mathematics curriculum…

  1. Sex Equality Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.; Linkous, Carolyn Maddy

    This partially annotated bibliography is one of a series designed to help educational personnel increase sex equality in vocational guidance and counseling programs. Its purpose is to help counselors and other educators to identify and eliminate sex bias and sex stereotyping, both factors which constrict career options and consequently the choice…

  2. EQUALITY OF EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COLEMAN, JAMES S.; AND OTHERS

    THE PRODUCT OF AN EXTENSIVE SURVEY REQUESTED BY THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, THIS REPORT DOCUMENTS THE AVAILABILITY OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS FOR MINORITY GROUP NEGROES, PUERTO RICANS, MEXICAN-AMERICANS, ORIENTAL-AMERICANS, AND AMERICAN INDIANS, AS COMPARED WITH OPPORTUNITIES FOR MAJORITY GROUP WHITES. COMPARATIVE…

  3. Equal Educational Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Lorenzo

    1980-01-01

    Holds that the "Bakke" decision simply reaffirmed an insufficient commitment to equal opportunities for Blacks in higher education. Reviews several studies, including research conducted at the Institute for the Study of Educational Policy (ISEP) that has focused on the social and economic context of educational discrimination. (GC)

  4. The Equal Rights Amendment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Eileen

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) including questions often asked of social studies teachers in the classroom. A map of the United States shows which states have passed the ERA to date. Also includes a bibliography of 43 resources about ERA. (BC)

  5. Equality and Academic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardarson, Atli

    2013-01-01

    A recent national curriculum guide for upper secondary schools in my home country, Iceland, requires secondary schools to work towards equality and five other overarching aims. This requirement raises questions about to what extent secondary schools have to change their curricula in order to approach these aims or work towards them in an adequate…

  6. EQUALS Investigations: Remote Rulers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Karen; Whitlow, Robert

    EQUALS is a teacher education program that helps elementary and secondary educators acquire methods and materials to attract minority and female students to mathematics. It supports a problem-solving approach to mathematics which has students working in groups, uses active assessment methods, and incorporates a broad mathematics curriculum…

  7. The Equal Pay Boondoggle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Richard A.

    1975-01-01

    Problems of extending the Equal Pay Act to university faculty are examined in light of the complicated market forces and merit systems affecting faculty appointments and salaries. Solutions to the problem are suggested including guidelines for the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor to use in identifying sex discrimination. (JT)

  8. Equality of Fitness Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swoyer, Jesse O.

    2008-01-01

    The author, who has been a personal trainer for the past ten years, recently realized that all fitness centers are not equal. In February, he was able to participate in the grand opening of the Center for Independent Living of Central PA (CILCP), a fitness center that is designed to accommodate persons with disabilities living in the Central…

  9. Equality of Educational Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, K. Patricia

    A consideration of the use of the phrase "equality of educational opportunity" and of the educational models used to attempt its implementation suggest the following recommendations. If education is to devise learning models that will maximize individual potential and aid in matching human abilities to the work required by societies, then (1) we…

  10. Defining Equal Educational Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Wilbur J.

    1973-01-01

    Maintains that opportunities for equal education are inextricably related to other societal factors such as health, welfare, employment, and housing; suggests that equitable distribution of society's finite resources, diversification of educational programs and systems, desegregation, and a redefinition of the Federal government's role in…

  11. Motivation and Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, John G.; Burton, John T.

    1982-01-01

    Argues that if teachers maintain task involvement in all children, they will achieve justifiable form of educational equality. Discusses social and personal factors which influence task involvement, including value framework of school (i.e., purpose school is seen to serve), organizational strategies adopted to facilitate learning, and specific…

  12. Equality. No through road.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Alexis

    2005-11-24

    NHS Employers is pushing to promote equal employment opportunities for disabled people. The Disability Discrimination Act allows disabled people to follow medical careers, but progress remains patchy and varies by area. There have been calls for the General Medical Council to issue national disability guidance for medical schools.

  13. Fight For Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mink, Patsy T.

    1973-01-01

    In this presentation to the annual conventions of the NAWDAC and the ACPA (Cleveland 1973) the author, a Congresswoman from Hawaii, deplores the practice of some counselors of directing women students into traditional women's courses. She urges college counselors and personnel workers to join in the struggle to achieve equal educational and…

  14. Equal Opportunity in Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Paul

    This book focuses on discrimination in employment, defined as the denial of equal opportunity in the labor market to qualified persons on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, or any other factor not related to their individual qualifications for work. The average nonwhite college graduate can expect to earn less during…

  15. Engaging African and Caribbean Immigrants in HIV Testing and Care in a Large US City: Lessons Learned from the African Diaspora Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Kwakwa, Helena A; Wahome, Rahab; Goines, Djalika S; Jabateh, Voffee; Green, Arraina; Bessias, Sophia; Flanigan, Timothy P

    2016-05-19

    The lifting in 2010 of the HIV entry ban eliminated an access point for HIV testing of the foreign-born. The African Diaspora Health Initiative (ADHI) was developed to examine alternative pathways to testing for African and Caribbean persons. The ADHI consists of Clinics Without Walls (CWW) held in community settings. HIV testing is offered to participants along with hypertension and diabetes screening. A survey is administered to participants. Descriptive data were analyzed using SAS 9.2. Between 2011 and 2015, 4152 African and Caribbean individuals participated in 352 CWW. Participants were mostly (67.7 %) African. HIV rates were lowest in Caribbean women (0.4 %) and highest in Caribbean men (8.4 %). Efforts to engage African and Caribbean communities in HIV testing are important given the elimination of the HIV entry ban and continued immigration to the US from areas of higher prevalence. The ADHI offers a successful model of engagement.

  16. Experiences of and responses to HIV among African and Caribbean communities in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gardezi, F; Calzavara, L; Husbands, W; Tharao, W; Lawson, E; Myers, T; Pancham, A; George, C; Remis, R; Willms, D; McGee, F; Adebajo, S

    2008-07-01

    African and Caribbean communities in Canada and other developed countries are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. This qualitative study of African and Caribbean communities in Toronto sought to understand HIV-related stigma, discrimination, denial and fear, and the effects of multiple intersecting factors that influence responses to the disease, prevention practices and access to treatment and support services. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 HIV-positive men and women and focus groups were conducted with 74 men and women whose HIV status was negative or unknown. We identified a range of issues faced by African and Caribbean people that may increase the risk for HIV infection, create obstacles to testing and treatment and lead to isolation of HIV-positive people. Our findings suggest the need for greater sensitivity and knowledge on the part of healthcare providers; more culturally specific support services; community development; greater community awareness; and expanded efforts to tackle housing, poverty, racism and settlement issues.

  17. Equal is as equal does: challenging Vatican views on women.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The authors of this piece are women from the Roman Catholic tradition who are critical of the Vatican position on women's rights. The Report of the Holy See in Preparation for the Fourth World Conference on Women reveals a religious fundamentalism that misuses tradition and anthropology to limit women's roles and rights. The Vatican is itself a self-proclaimed state that offers women neither opportunities nor protections within its own organization, and there is no evidence of women's participation in the preparation of its report. The Vatican document constructs a vision of women and men in which men are normative persons, whose dignity is conferred by their humanity, and women are the variant other, defined by and granted dignity by their reproductive and mothering functions. The Vatican document is anti-feminist. It criticizes the "radical feminists" of the 1960s for trying to deny sexual differences, and accuses today's Western feminists of ignoring the needs of women in developing countries while pursuing selfish and hedonistic goals. It makes no recognition of the work of feminists to improve the lives of women worldwide. The Vatican document claims to support women's equality, but it qualifies each statement of equality with a presumption of difference. The document defines women as vulnerable without naming men as responsible for the oppression and violence to which women are vulnerable. It ridicules as feminist cant the well-documented fact that the home is the setting of most violence against women. The Vatican decries the suffering families undergo as a result of cumpulsory birth control and abortion policies, while it would deny families sex education, contraceptives, and safe abortion, thereby making pregnancy cumpulsory. A new vision of social justice is needed, one that: 1) rests on a radical equality, in which both women and men are expected to contribute to work, education, culture, morality, and reproduction; 2) accepts a "discipleship of equals

  18. Battery equalization active methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Lozano, Javier; Romero-Cadaval, Enrique; Milanes-Montero, M. Isabel; Guerrero-Martinez, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Many different battery technologies are available for the applications which need energy storage. New researches are being focused on Lithium-based batteries, since they are becoming the most viable option for portable energy storage applications. As most of the applications need series battery strings to meet voltage requirements, battery imbalance is an important matter to be taken into account, since it leads the individual battery voltages to drift apart over time, and premature cells degradation, safety hazards, and capacity reduction will occur. A large number of battery equalization methods can be found, which present different advantages/disadvantages and are suitable for different applications. The present paper presents a summary, comparison and evaluation of the different active battery equalization methods, providing a table that compares them, which is helpful to select the suitable equalization method depending on the application. By applying the same weight to the different parameters of comparison, switch capacitor and double-tiered switching capacitor have the highest ratio. Cell bypass methods are cheap and cell to cell ones are efficient. Cell to pack, pack to cell and cell to pack to cell methods present a higher cost, size, and control complexity, but relatively low voltage and current stress in high-power applications.

  19. Tsunami Risk for the Caribbean Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozelkov, A. S.; Kurkin, A. A.; Pelinovsky, E. N.; Zahibo, N.

    2004-12-01

    The tsunami problem for the coast of the Caribbean basin is discussed. Briefly the historical data of tsunami in the Caribbean Sea are presented. Numerical simulation of potential tsunamis in the Caribbean Sea is performed in the framework of the nonlinear-shallow theory. The tsunami wave height distribution along the Caribbean Coast is computed. These results are used to estimate the far-field tsunami potential of various coastal locations in the Caribbean Sea. In fact, five zones with tsunami low risk are selected basing on prognostic computations, they are: the bay "Golfo de Batabano" and the coast of province "Ciego de Avila" in Cuba, the Nicaraguan Coast (between Bluefields and Puerto Cabezas), the border between Mexico and Belize, the bay "Golfo de Venezuela" in Venezuela. The analysis of historical data confirms that there was no tsunami in the selected zones. Also, the wave attenuation in the Caribbean Sea is investigated; in fact, wave amplitude decreases in an order if the tsunami source is located on the distance up to 1000 km from the coastal location. Both factors wave attenuation and wave height distribution should be taken into account in the planned warning system for the Caribbean Sea.

  20. Equality in Education: An Equality of Condition Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Kathleen; Baker, John

    2005-01-01

    Transforming schools into truly egalitarian institutions requires a holistic and integrated approach. Using a robust conception of "equality of condition", we examine key dimensions of equality that are central to both the purposes and processes of education: equality in educational and related resources; equality of respect and recognition;…

  1. Geophysical features influence the accumulation of beach debris on Caribbean islands.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, Alexandra M; Lavers, Jennifer L; Stuckenbrock, Silke; Sharp, Paul B; Bond, Alexander L

    2017-08-15

    Anthropogenic beach debris was recorded during beach surveys of 24 Caribbean islands during April 2014-April 2016. Beach debris was classified according to material type (e.g., polystyrene) and item use (e.g., fishing). Geophysical features (substrate type, beach direction, and human accessibility) of sample sites were recorded in order to investigate their relationship with debris density. Results suggest the density of macro debris (items >5mm) is highest on uninhabited, sandy beaches facing a leeward direction. Higher debris quantities on inaccessible beaches may be due to less frequent beach clean ups. Frequently accessed beaches exhibited lower macro, but higher micro debris (items 1-5mm) densities, possibly due to removal of macro debris during frequent beach clean ups. This suggests that while geophysical features have some influence on anthropogenic debris densities, high debris densities are occurring on all islands within the Caribbean region regardless of substrate, beach direction, or human accessibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Abortion within and around the law in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Pheterson, Gail; Azize, Yamila

    2008-03-01

    Small island exigencies and a legacy of colonial jurisprudence set the stage for this three-year study in 2001-2003 of abortion practice on several islands of the northeast Caribbean: St. Martin, St. Maarten, Anguilla, Antigua and St Kitts. Based on in-depth interviews with 26 physicians, 16 of whom were performing abortions, it found that licensed physicians are routinely providing abortions in contravention of the law, and that those services, tolerated by governments and legitimised by European norms, are clearly the mainstay of abortion care on these islands. Medical abortion was being used both under medical supervision and through self-medication. Women travelled to find anonymous services, and also to access a particular method, provider or facility. Sometimes they settled for a less acceptable method if they could not afford a more comfortable one. Significantly, legality was not the main determinant of choice. Most abortion providers accepted the current situation as satisfactory. However, our findings suggest that restrictive laws were hindering access to services and compromising quality of care. Whereas doctors may have the liberty and knowledge to practise illegal abortions, women have no legal right to these services. Interviews suggest that an increasing number of women are self-inducing misoprostol abortions to avoid doctors, high fees and public stigma. The Caribbean Initiative on Abortion and Contraception is organising meetings, training providers and creating a public forum to advocate decriminalisation of abortion and enhance abortion care.

  3. Can biological invasions save Caribbean coral reefs?

    PubMed

    Bellwood, David Roy; Robert Goatley, Christopher Harry

    2017-01-09

    It is widely accepted that coral reefs are in decline globally, due to climate change as well as more direct human impacts such as poor water quality and overharvesting [1-3]. Biological invasions are also seen as a major threat [4-6]; however, they may not all be negative. An invasion of Red Sea rabbitfishes is disrupting Mediterranean ecosystems by removing macro-algae - meanwhile, in contrast, the Caribbean is suffering from excess macro-algal growth. We suggest that an invasion of the Caribbean by rabbitfishes may prove beneficial, and that the future of Caribbean coral reefs may depend upon a rabbitfish invasion.

  4. Why the Equal Rights Amendment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denmark, Florence L.

    The Equal Rights Amendment proposes to ensure constitutional protection against all legislative sex discrimination. "Separate but Equal" standards, be they legal, social or psychological, are inevitably incompatable with equal protection under the law and act as a barrier to each individual's freedom for self determination. Equal rights,…

  5. Increasing Public Access to University Qualifications: Evolution of The University of the West Indies Open Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Michael L.; Soares, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This paper traces the evolution of The University of the West Indies' Open Campus (UWIOC), which is expected to expand service and increase access to the underserved communities of the Eastern Caribbean. At present, UWI, which caters to the needs of the 16 far flung countries of the Commonwealth Caribbean, has not been able to fully serve these…

  6. Caribbean immigrants: a black success story?

    PubMed

    Model, S

    1991-01-01

    "This article examines the 1980 earnings and earnings attainment process of Afro-Caribbean immigrants [to the United States] relative to Afro-Americans, native-born whites and foreign-born whites. Controlling for gender, the comparisons consider Caribbean Islanders as a whole and disaggregated by nation of origin. The results indicate that, in 1980 at least, fact did not justify the opinion that any West Indian subgroup had higher gross or net earnings than native-born blacks. Rather, a few non-English speaking subgroups fared worse. In addition, regardless of national background, Caribbean-born men experienced vast earnings disparities relative to white men. This was not the case for West Indian women, whose net earnings were, at minimum, equivalent to those of white women. Further analysis suggests that, for most Caribbean groups, West Indian background adds little to an understanding of the earnings attainment process that cannot be obtained from other measurable characteristics."

  7. Total Solar Eclipse--A Caribbean Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Steven; Tunstall, Louisa; Tunstall, Neil

    1999-01-01

    Describes the experiences of two high school students who traveled to the Caribbean island of Curacao to view a total solar eclipse and prepare methods for teaching classmates about the eclipse the following school year. (Author/WRM)

  8. Total Solar Eclipse--A Caribbean Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Steven; Tunstall, Louisa; Tunstall, Neil

    1999-01-01

    Describes the experiences of two high school students who traveled to the Caribbean island of Curacao to view a total solar eclipse and prepare methods for teaching classmates about the eclipse the following school year. (Author/WRM)

  9. Alternative energy technologies for the Caribbean islands

    SciTech Connect

    Pytlinski, J.T. )

    1992-01-01

    All islands in the Caribbean except Puerto Rico can be classified as developing islands. Of these islands, all except Trinidad and Tobago are oil importers. Uncertainties concerning uninterrupted oil supply and increasing oil prices causes economic, social and political instability and jeopardizes further development of these islands. The paper discusses the energy situation of the Caribbean islands and presents alternative energy options. Several alternative energy projects financed by local, federal and international organizations are presented. Present and future uses of alternative energy technologies are described in different islands. Barrier which handicap developing and implementing alternative energy sources in the Caribbean are discussed. The potential and possible applications of alternative energy technologies such as: solar-thermal energy, photovoltaics, wind energy, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), ocean currents and tides energy, biomass, peat energy, municipal solid wastes, bioconversion, hydropower, geothermal energy, nuclear energy and energy conservation are discussed in detail as means to alleviate the energy situation in the Caribbean islands.

  10. Business Booms for Caribbean Med Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad, William J.

    1979-01-01

    As a last chance medical haven, Caribbean medical schools are increasingly sought by U.S. students. Federal and state investigations are being run on one of these, and two former students have filed suit. (BB)

  11. Forest fires in the insular Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Robbins, A Marcus J; Eckelmann, Claus-Martin; Quiñones, Maya

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a summary of the forest fire reports in the insular Caribbean derived from both management reports and an analysis of publicly available Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrodiometer (MODIS) satellite active fire products from the region. A vast difference between the amount of fires reported by land managers and fire points in the MODIS Fire Information for Resource Management System data can be observed. Future research is recommended to better understand the nature of these differences. While there is a general lack of available statistical data on forest fires in the Caribbean, a few general observations can be made: Forest fires occur mainly in dry forest types (500 to 1000 mm of mean annual rainfall). These are also the areas where most human settlements are located. Lowland high forests and montane forests with higher rainfall (1000 and more mm y(-1)) are less susceptible to forest fire, but they can burn in exceptionally dry years. Most of the dry forest ecosystems in the Caribbean can be considered to be fire-sensitive ecosystems, while the pine forests in the Caribbean (Cuba, Dominican Republic, and the Bahamas) are maintained by wildfires. In fire-sensitive ecosystems, uncontrolled burning often encourages the spread of alien invasive species. A Caribbean Fire Management Cooperation Strategy was developed between 2005 and 2006 under auspices of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. This regional strategy aims to strengthen Caribbean fire management networking by encouraging closer collaboration among countries with similar ecological conditions. The strategy for the Caribbean identifies a number of research, training, and management activities to improve wildfire management capacity in the Caribbean.

  12. Self-management, health service use and information seeking for diabetes care among Black Caribbean immigrants in Toronto.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Ilene; Gucciardi, Enza; Patychuk, Dianne; Rummens, Joanna Anneke; Shakya, Yogendra; Kljujic, Dragan; Bhamani, Mehreen; Boqaileh, Fedaa

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this research was to explore self-management practices and the use of diabetes information and care among Black-Caribbean immigrants with type 2 diabetes. The study population included Black-Caribbean immigrants and Canadian-born participants between the ages of 35 to 64 years with type 2 diabetes. Study participants were recruited from community health centres (CHCs), diabetes education centres, hospital-based diabetes clinics, the Canadian Diabetes Association and immigrant-serving organizations. A structured questionnaire was used to collect demographics and information related to diabetes status, self-management practices and the use of diabetes information and care. Interviews were conducted with 48 Black-Caribbean immigrants and 54 Canadian-born participants with type 2 diabetes. Black-Caribbean immigrants were significantly more likely than the Canadian-born group to engage in recommended diabetes self-management practices (i.e. reduced fat diet, reduced carbohydrate diet, non-smoking and regular physical activity) and receive regular A1C and eye screening by a health professional. Black-Caribbean immigrant participants were significantly more likely to report receiving diabetes information and care through a community health centre (CHC) and nurses and dieticians than their Canadian-born counterparts. CHCs and allied health professionals play an important role in the management of diabetes in the Black-Caribbean immigrant community and may contribute to this group's favourable diabetes self-management profile and access to information and care. Additional research is necessary to confirm whether these findings are generalizable to the Black-Caribbean community in general (i.e. immigrant and non-immigrant) and to determine whether the use of CHCs and/or allied health professionals is associated with favourable outcomes in the Black-Caribbean immigrant community as well as others. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by

  13. Pay More Attention: a national mixed methods study to identify the barriers and facilitators to ensuring equal access to high-quality hospital care and services for children and young people with and without learning disabilities and their families

    PubMed Central

    Oulton, Kate; Wray, Jo; Carr, Lucinda; Hassiotis, Angela; Jewitt, Carey; Kerry, Sam; Gibson, Faith

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite evidence of health inequalities for adults with intellectual disability (ID) there has yet to be a comprehensive review of how well hospital services are meeting the needs of children and young people (CYP) with ID and their families. We do not know how relevant existing recommendations and guidelines are to CYP, whether these are being applied in the paediatric setting or what difference they are making. Evidence of parental dissatisfaction with the quality, safety and accessibility of hospital care for CYP with ID exists. However, the extent to which their experience differs from parents of CYP without ID is not known and the views and experiences of CYP with ID have not been investigated. We will compare how services are delivered to, and experienced by CYP aged 5–15 years with and without ID and their families to see what inequalities exist, for whom, why and under what circumstances. Methods and analysis We will use a transformative, mixed methods case study design to collect data over four consecutive phases. We will involve CYP, parents and hospital staff using a range of methods; interviews, parental electronic diary, hospital and community staff questionnaire, patient and parent satisfaction questionnaire, content analysis of hospital documents and a retrospective mapping of patient hospital activity. Qualitative data will be managed and analysed using NVivo and quantitative data will be analysed using parametric and non-parametric descriptive statistics. Ethics and dissemination The study will run from December 2015 to November 2018. We have Health Authority Approval (IRAS project ID: 193932) for phase 1 involving staff only and ethical and Health Authority Approval for phases 2–4 (IRAS project ID: 178525). We will disseminate widely to relevant stakeholders, using a range of accessible formats, including social media. We will publish in international peer-reviewed journals and present to professional, academic and lay audiences

  14. The Education Equality Initiative and the Citizen Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Denise

    2005-01-01

    The Education Equality Initiative (EEI) has been established by the Department of Education and Science in an attempt to address educational disadvantage through the strategic allocation of funding to promote equality of access, treatment and outcomes within a lifelong learning framework for individuals and groups. The aim of this initiative is to…

  15. The East Falcon Basin: Its Caribbean roots

    SciTech Connect

    Bartok, P.; Boesi, T.

    1996-08-01

    The East Falcon Basin has been described persistently in the context of the Maracaibo Basin tectonic framework. It is the objective of the present study to demonstrate that the Falcon Basin is, in effect, a Caribbean basin juxtaposed on South America and affected by Caribbean tectonics. The oldest rocks outcropping in the region are Late Paleozoic metamorphic and igneous rocks rafted from northcentral Colombia, Middle Jurassic ophiolite complexes, sediments and metasediments and Cretaceous ophiolites transported by a melange of late Cretaceous to early Tertiary sediments. The south vergence of the Caribbean Nappe province has been documented and extends to the present limit of the Andean uplift and to the southern limit of the Coastal Range. The migrating foredeep that developed during the Paleocene-Eocene deposited dominantly basinal shales and thin sandstones. During the Oligocene the Caribbean faults of the Oca system and conjugates began with a dominantly transtensional regime becoming progressively transpressional by Miocene time. The facies development of the Oligocene-Miocene documents the tectonic history. Unique blocks remained as resistant blocks creating ramparts and modifying the basin configuration. During transpression northward-verging thrusting progressively migrated towards the present coastline. The most evident structures of the region are Caribbean in affinity and combined with the sedimentary history of the region can serve to unravel the complex Caribbean-South American plate interaction.

  16. Upper Extremity Length Equalization

    PubMed Central

    DeCoster, Thomas A.; Ritterbusch, John; Crawford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Significant upper extremity length inequality is uncommon but can cause major functional problems. The ability to position and use the hand may be impaired by shortness of any of the long bones of the upper extremity. In many respects upper and lower extremity length problems are similar. They most commonly occur after injury to a growing bone and the treatment modalities utilized in the lower extremity may be applied to the upper extremity. These treatment options include epiphysiodesis, shortening osteotomy, angulatory correction osteotomy and lengthening. This report reviews the literature relative to upper extremity length inequality and equalization and presents an algorithm for evaluation and planning appropriate treatment for patients with this condition. This algorithm is illustrated by two clinical cases of posttraumatic shortness of the radius which were effectively treated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  17. When equal masses don't balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Ronald; Peidle, Joseph; Rueckner, Wolfgang

    2004-05-01

    We treat a modified Atwood's machine in which equal masses do not balance because of being in an accelerated frame of reference. Analysis of the problem illuminates the meaning of inertial forces, d'Alembert's principle, the use of free-body diagrams and the selection of appropriate systems for the diagrams. In spite of the range of these applications the analysis does not require calculus, so the ideas are accessible even to first-year students.

  18. 2005 Caribbean mass coral bleaching event: A sea surface temperature empirical orthogonal teleconnection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonti, Alicia L.; Eastman, J. Ronald

    2010-11-01

    This study examined the effects of climate teleconnections on the massive Caribbean coral bleaching and mortality event of 2005. A relatively new analytical procedure known as empirical orthogonal teleconnection (EOT) analysis, based on a 26 year monthly time series of observed sea surface temperature (SST), was employed. Multiple regression analysis was then utilized to determine the relative teleconnection contributions to SST variability in the southern Caribbean. The results indicate that three independent climate teleconnections had significant impact on southern Caribbean anomalies in SST and that their interaction was a major contributor to the anomalously high temperatures in 2005. The primary and approximately equal contributors were EOT-5 and EOT-2, which correlate most strongly with the tropical North Atlantic (TNA) and Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO) climate indices, respectively. The third, EOT-9, was most strongly related to the Atlantic meridional mode. However, although statistically significant, the magnitude of its contribution to southern Caribbean variability was small. While there is debate over the degree to which the recent AMO pattern represents natural variability or global ocean warming, the results presented here indicate that natural variability played a strong role in the 2005 coral bleaching conditions. They also argue for a redefinition of the geography of TNA variability.

  19. Equality Matters: The Critical Implications of Precisely Defining Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Valerie; Walkowiak, Temple; Cain, Chris; Lee, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Equality is such an important concept for children to develop. In this article it is argued that a precise definition is needed to ensure that students are provided with a consistent "picture" of what it is that equality really means.

  20. Pay More Attention: a national mixed methods study to identify the barriers and facilitators to ensuring equal access to high-quality hospital care and services for children and young people with and without learning disabilities and their families.

    PubMed

    Oulton, Kate; Wray, Jo; Carr, Lucinda; Hassiotis, Angela; Jewitt, Carey; Kerry, Sam; Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Gibson, Faith

    2016-12-09

    Despite evidence of health inequalities for adults with intellectual disability (ID) there has yet to be a comprehensive review of how well hospital services are meeting the needs of children and young people (CYP) with ID and their families. We do not know how relevant existing recommendations and guidelines are to CYP, whether these are being applied in the paediatric setting or what difference they are making. Evidence of parental dissatisfaction with the quality, safety and accessibility of hospital care for CYP with ID exists. However, the extent to which their experience differs from parents of CYP without ID is not known and the views and experiences of CYP with ID have not been investigated. We will compare how services are delivered to, and experienced by CYP aged 5-15 years with and without ID and their families to see what inequalities exist, for whom, why and under what circumstances. We will use a transformative, mixed methods case study design to collect data over four consecutive phases. We will involve CYP, parents and hospital staff using a range of methods; interviews, parental electronic diary, hospital and community staff questionnaire, patient and parent satisfaction questionnaire, content analysis of hospital documents and a retrospective mapping of patient hospital activity. Qualitative data will be managed and analysed using NVivo and quantitative data will be analysed using parametric and non-parametric descriptive statistics. The study will run from December 2015 to November 2018. We have Health Authority Approval (IRAS project ID: 193932) for phase 1 involving staff only and ethical and Health Authority Approval for phases 2-4 (IRAS project ID: 178525). We will disseminate widely to relevant stakeholders, using a range of accessible formats, including social media. We will publish in international peer-reviewed journals and present to professional, academic and lay audiences through national and international conferences. Published by

  1. On the Atlantic inflow to the Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, William E.; Townsend, Tamara L.; Fratantoni, David M.; Wilson, W. Douglas

    2002-02-01

    New observations are summarized that lead to the first comprehensive description of the mean inflow distribution in the passages connecting the Atlantic Ocean with the Caribbean Sea. The total Caribbean inflow of 28 Sv is shown to be partitioned approximately equally between the Windward Islands Passages (˜ 10 Sv), Leeward Islands Passages (˜ 8 Sv) , and the Greater Antilles Passages (˜ 10 Sv) . These results are compared to a numerical model study using a 6-layer, 1/4° resolution Atlantic Basin version of the NRL Layered Ocean Model. Results from two simulations are described, including a purely wind-forced model driven by Hellerman and Rosenstein (J. Phys. Oceanogr. 13 (1983) 1093) monthly winds, and a model with an additional 14 Sv meridional overturning cell driven by inflow/outflow ports at the northern (65°N) and southern (20°S) model boundaries. The purely wind-driven version of the model exhibits a total Caribbean inflow of 17 Sv, consistent with expectations from steady, non-topographic Sverdrup theory. Nearly all of the wind-driven inflow occurs north of Martinique at latitude ˜15°N. The net transport through the Lesser Antilles passages south of 15°N (Grenada, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia passages) is nearly zero when the model is forced by winds alone. The addition of a 14 Sv meridional cell in the model increases the net Caribbean inflow to 28 Sv, with nearly all of the additional 11 Sv of inflow entering through the southern Lesser Antilles passages. The modeled inflow distribution resulting from the combined wind and overturning forced experiment is found to compare favorably with the observations. The seasonal cycle of the total inflow in the combined forcing experiment has a mixed annual/semiannual character with maximum in spring and summer and minimum in fall, with a total range of about 4 Sv. The seasonal cycle of the Florida Current resulting from this inflow variation is in good qualitative agreement with observations. Most of the

  2. 36 CFR 254.12 - Value equalization; cash equalization waiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.12 Value equalization; cash equalization waiver. (a) To equalize the agreed upon values of the Federal and non-Federal lands involved in an exchange...-Federal party. The amount to be waived may not exceed 3 percent of the value of the lands being...

  3. 36 CFR 254.12 - Value equalization; cash equalization waiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS Land Exchanges § 254.12 Value equalization; cash equalization waiver. (a) To equalize the agreed upon values of the Federal and non-Federal lands involved in an exchange...-Federal party. The amount to be waived may not exceed 3 percent of the value of the lands being...

  4. Minority Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, and Asian Americans are entitled to equal access to all institutions of higher education. Ensuring greater access and participation by minorities in higher education is one of the most practical ways of moving America closer to the ideal of equal opportunity, which is the actualization of the American dream.…

  5. Tests: The Foundation for Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Kenneth L.

    1982-01-01

    Testing and tests are shown to have played a positive and dramatic role in increased opportunities through identification of educational talent. It is argued that tests, far from denying equality, are necessary conditions for equality and quality. (Author/CM)

  6. Trends and Prospects in the Development of Higher Education in Latin America and the Caribbean. Papers on Higher Education, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedesco, Juan Carlos

    Trends in higher education in Latin America and the Caribbean, educational goals, financing of universities, and future prospects are discussed. Attention is directed to the expansion of higher education, the relationship of expansion to the social structure and to democratization, access to higher education by women, access in relation to…

  7. Poverty, drug abuse fuel Caribbean AIDS outbreak.

    PubMed

    Kovaleski, S F

    1998-01-01

    Hatred and fear of homosexuals, together with a fear of losing tourism revenue, drove many high-level policymakers in the Caribbean to ignore the HIV/AIDS in its infancy. With an annual incidence rate of at least 146.6 people per 100,000, the Bahamas now has one of the highest AIDS rates in the world and the highest such rate in the English-speaking Caribbean. AIDS has become the major cause of death for men and women aged 20-44 in the Bahamas. Indeed, throughout the Caribbean, countries like the Bahamas must now cope with a growing AIDS epidemic. UN AIDS Program figures indicate that at least 310,000 people in the Caribbean have either HIV infection or AIDS, and that the prevalence rate among adults is almost 2%. This compares with an estimated 7.4% of the adult population of sub-Saharan Africa which is infected and 0.6% of adults in North America. 65% of reported AIDS cases in the region result from heterosexual intercourse. While the annual number of AIDS cases has been falling in North America over the last several years and rates in Latin America have leveled off, rates in the Caribbean are increasing sharply. Poverty, the population's lack of awareness, low levels of education, internal and international migration, crack cocaine use, promiscuity, high levels of STDs, prostitution, and tourism are also facilitating the spread of HIV in the Caribbean. Social conservatism, mainly in the English-Caribbean, about discussing sex impedes the implementation and success of HIV/AIDS prevention interventions.

  8. Overcoming barriers to pain relief in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Cheryl; Aarons, Derrick

    2009-12-01

    This paper examines pain and pain relief in the Caribbean, where pain is widely perceived as an unavoidable part of life, and where unnecessary suffering results from untreated and under treated pain. Barriers to pain relief in the Caribbean include patient and family attitudes, inadequate knowledge among health professionals and unduly restrictive regulations on the medical use of opioids. Similar barriers exist all over the world. This paper urges medical, nursing and public health professionals, and educators to examine attitudes towards pain and pain relief and to work towards making effective pain relief and palliation more accessible. It recommends that i) health professionals and officials be better educated about pain, palliation and opioids, ii) regulatory restrictions be updated in light of clinical and scientific evidence, iii) opioid procurement policies be adjusted to facilitate increased medical use, iv) medical charts and records be modified to routinely elicit and document patients levels of pain, and v) educational campaigns be developed to inform the public that moderate and severe pain can be safely relieved at the end of life and other stages of life. The professional, respectful, and beneficent response to patients in pain is to provide rapid and aggressive pain relief or to urgently consult a pain or palliative specialist. When a health system hinders such efforts the ethical response is to identify, facilitate and advocate for overcoming barriers to improvement.

  9. Equality, Adequacy, and Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satz, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In this article I argue that the distinction between an adequate education and an equal education has been overdrawn. In my view, a certain type of equality--civic equality--is internal to the idea of educational adequacy. An education system that completely separates the children of the poor and minorities from those of the wealthy and middle…

  10. Genetic Diversity and Human Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobzhansky, Theodosius

    The idea of equality often, if not frequently, bogs down in confusion and apparent contradictions; equality is confused with identity, and diversity with inequality. It would seem that the easiest way to discredit the idea of equality is to show that people are innately, genetically, and, therefore, irremediably diverse and unlike. The snare is,…

  11. Genetic Diversity and Human Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobzhansky, Theodosius

    The idea of equality often, if not frequently, bogs down in confusion and apparent contradictions; equality is confused with identity, and diversity with inequality. It would seem that the easiest way to discredit the idea of equality is to show that people are innately, genetically, and, therefore, irremediably diverse and unlike. The snare is,…

  12. 76 FR 49452 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA622 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council...

  13. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (b) The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring...

  14. 50 CFR 622.493 - Landing Caribbean queen conch intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... conch intact. (a) A Caribbean queen conch in or from the Caribbean EEZ must be maintained with meat and shell intact. (b) The operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring...

  15. 78 FR 14078 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC531 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management...

  16. 78 FR 32623 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC706 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management...

  17. 77 FR 60381 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council (CFMC); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC257 Caribbean Fishery Management Council (CFMC); Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery...

  18. 77 FR 60380 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC264 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management...

  19. U.S. Trade Policy and the Caribbean: From Trade Preferences to Free Trade Agreements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-22

    again drew stiff resistance from U.S. textile and labor interests, once scaled back to modest duty-free treatment for only 10% of Caribbean imports, it...Service 5 These included textiles and apparel subject to textile agreements under the Multi-Fiber Arrangement (MFA),12 petroleum products, footwear...free goods that entered exclusively under CBERA was small. Special Access Program Under CBERA, textile and apparel products were excluded from

  20. Tsunami Warning Services for the Caribbean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, P. M.; Ferris, J. C.; Weinstein, S. A.

    2007-05-01

    Tsunami warning and watch services are currently provided to the Caribbean region through a collaborative effort between the two NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers (TWCs): the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) in Ewa Beach, Hawaii, and the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) in Palmer, Alaska. The WCATWC, in coordination with the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), provides fast-response warning services to the U.S. territories of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (PR/VI). The PTWC provides regional watch services to other countries throughout and surrounding the Caribbean Sea as part of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions. This collaboration is analogous to the TWC's responsibilities in the Pacific basin: the WCATWC provides fast-response warning services for the U.S. west coast states, Alaska, and British Columbia in Canada, while the PTWC provides regional services for countries throughout and surrounding the Pacific Ocean (as well as a fast-response service for the U.S. State of Hawaii). Caribbean seismic data are transmitted to the TWCs through several means. The PRSN directly exports data to the WCATWC, providing the Center sufficient seismic data for the PR/VI region. Additionally, the PRSN provides the TWCs with data gathered from other Caribbean nations. Using modern communication capabilities, the seismic data can be processed at the TWCs at the same time it is processed locally. Another source of high- quality seismic data is the new USGS nine-station array that circles the region. The Global Seismic Network maintains several stations in Caribbean, Central American, and South American nations which are available in real-time to the TWCs. Unfortunately, sea level data coverage is sporadic in the region. The PR/VI has a relatively dense array of coastal tide gages, but coastal tide gage coverage is very sparse for the rest of the Caribbean basin. Three deep-ocean pressure

  1. Medical tourism in the Caribbean region: a call to consider environmental health equity.

    PubMed

    Johnston, R; Crooks, V A

    2013-03-01

    Medical tourism, which is the intentional travel by private-paying patients across international borders for medical treatment, is a sector that has been targeted for growth in many Caribbean countries. The international development of this industry has raised a core set of proposed health equity benefits and drawbacks for host countries. These benefits centre on the potential investment in health infrastructure and opportunities for health labour force development while drawbacks focus on the potential for reduced access to healthcare for locals and inefficient use of limited public resources to support the growth of the medical tourism industry. The development of the medical tourism sector in Caribbean countries raises additional health equity questions that have received little attention in existing international debates, specifically in regard to environmental health equity. In this viewpoint, we introduce questions of environmental health equity that clearly emerge in relation to the developing Caribbean medical tourism sector These questions acknowledge that the growth of this sector will have impacts on the social and physical environments, resources, and waste management infrastructure in countries. We contend that in addition to addressing the wider health equity concerns that have been consistently raised in existing debates surrounding the growth of medical tourism, planning for growth in this sector in the Caribbean must take environmental health equity into account in order to ensure that local populations, environments, and ecosystems are not harmed by facilities catering to international patients.

  2. What drives micro-plate motion and deformation in the northeastern Caribbean plate boundary region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, R. M. A.; Wortel, M. J. R.; van Benthem, S.

    2015-12-01

    The north Caribbean plate boundary zone is a broad deformation zone with several fault systems and tectonic blocks that move with different velocities. The indentation by the Bahamas Platform (the "Bahamas Collision") is generally invoked as a cause of this fragmentation. We propose that a second driver of deformation is the western edge of the south-dipping Puerto Rico slab moving sideways with the North America plate. This proposal derives from our recently imaged tomographic structure of the Lesser Antilles - Puerto Rico slab. The westward motion of the slab edge results in a push on the Caribbean plate further west. We refer to this second mechanism for deformation as "Slab Edge Push". The motion of the North America plate relative to the Caribbean plate causes both drivers to migrate from east to west. The Bahamas Collision and Slab Edge Push have been operating simultaneously since the Miocene. The question is the relative importance of the two mechanisms. We use mechanical finite element models that represent the two mechanisms from the Late Oligocene (30 Ma) to the Present. For the Present, both models successfully reproduce observed deformation, implying that both models are viable. Back in time the Slab Edge Push mechanism better reproduces observations. Neither mechanism successfully reproduces the observed Miocene counter-clockwise rotation of Puerto Rico. We use this rotation to tune a final model that includes fractional contributions of both mechanisms. Both mechanisms contribute equally to the motion of the Caribbean plate. We find that the Slab Edge Push was the dominant driver of deformation in the north Caribbean plate boundary zone since 30 Ma.

  3. 48 CFR 25.405 - Caribbean Basin Trade Initiative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Caribbean Basin Trade... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Trade Agreements 25.405 Caribbean Basin Trade Initiative. Under the Caribbean Basin Trade Initiative, the United States Trade Representative has determined that,...

  4. Achievement and Underachievement: The Experiences of African Caribbeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhamie, Jasmine

    2012-01-01

    The disproportionate representation of African Caribbeans in all the negative educational statistics has been well documented. Despite this, there are African Caribbeans who achieve academically but relatively few studies have explored this area. This study aimed to investigate the factors that contribute to African Caribbean academic success,…

  5. Achievement and Underachievement: The Experiences of African Caribbeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhamie, Jasmine

    2012-01-01

    The disproportionate representation of African Caribbeans in all the negative educational statistics has been well documented. Despite this, there are African Caribbeans who achieve academically but relatively few studies have explored this area. This study aimed to investigate the factors that contribute to African Caribbean academic success,…

  6. Caribbean Life in New York City: Sociocultural Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Constance R., Ed.; Chaney, Elsa M., Ed.

    This book comprises the following papers discussing Caribbean life in New York City: (1) The Context of Caribbean Migration (Elsa M. Chaney); (2) The Caribbeanization of New York City and the Emergence of a Transnational Socio-Cultural System (Constance R. Sutton); (3) New York City and Its People: An Historical Perspective Up to World War II…

  7. 76 FR 39074 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA533 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council...., Isla Verde, Carolina, Puerto Rico 00979. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management...

  8. 75 FR 9391 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU74 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council... Shoys, Lot 7, Christiansted, n St. Croix, U.S.V.I. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery...

  9. 75 FR 69054 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA026 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Catch Share Panel of the Caribbean...: Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz Rivera Avenue, Suite 1108, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00918-2577...

  10. 78 FR 34046 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC707 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council...: Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 270 Mu oz Rivera Avenue, Suite 401, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00918...

  11. 78 FR 41914 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC754 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council..., August 7, 2013, from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: Caribbean Fishery Management Council Office, 270 Mu...

  12. 77 FR 26516 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY.... ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. ] SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council's (Council....S.V.I. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz Rivera...

  13. 78 FR 33357 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC713 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council... Rico 00909. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 270 Mu oz Rivera...

  14. 75 FR 48309 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XY06 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council...: Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Munoz Rivera Avenue, Suite 1108, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00918-1920...

  15. From the past to the globalized future for Caribbean birds

    Treesearch

    Joseph Wunderle Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Extinctions of Caribbean animals were well underway during the period of Amerindian occupation and have continued since the arrival of Columbus. Despite high extinction rates, the Caribbean still retains high levels of terrestrial biodiversity and, for some taxa, exceptionally high levels of endemism relative to other parts of the world. The fate of the Caribbean’s...

  16. Neotectonics of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, northeastern Caribbean, from GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansma, Pamela E.; Mattioli, Glen S.; Lopez, Alberto; Demets, Charles; Dixon, Timothy H.; Mann, Paul; Calais, Eric

    2000-12-01

    The boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates is characterized primarily by left-lateral motion along predominantly east-west striking faults. Seismicity and marine geophysical survey data are consistent with at least two, and possibly three, microplates in the diffuse boundary zone in the northeastern Caribbean: (1) the Gonave, (2) the Hispaniola, and (3) the Puerto Rico-northern Virgin Islands (PRVI). We discuss results from GPS geodetic measurements acquired since 1994 to test the microplate hypothesis, define PRVI translation and rotation within the boundary zone, and constrain PRVI neotectonics. GPS-derived velocities are analyzed with respect to both North American and Caribbean plate reference frames. Integrated displacements across PRVI are limited to a few millimeters per year, consistent with a rigid PRVI and permitting calculation of an average velocity for PRVI. The motions of PRVI relative to North America and the Caribbean are 16.9±1.1 mm/yr toward N68°E±3° (1σ) and 2.4±1.4 mm/yr toward S79°W±26° (1σ), respectively. In contrast with some recent models, ongoing rotation of PRVI about a nearby (< 25° distant) vertical axis is not supported by the geodetic data. In addition, we argue against eastward tectonic escape of PRVI and favor a simple, progressive increase in velocity across the plate boundary zone, requiring that the summed magnitude of strike-slip fault slip rates will equal the total plate motion rate between the Caribbean and North America. GPS data are consistent with components of left-lateral strike-slip faulting along the Muertos trough south of Puerto Rico and shortening across the Puerto Rico trench. Comparison of GPS velocities for PRVI with respect to North America with total North America-Caribbean relative motion suggests up to 85% of North American-Caribbean plate motion is accommodated by the Puerto Rico trench and offshore faults north of Puerto Rico. Differences in GPS-derived velocities from Hispaniola

  17. Commentary: homicide-suicide in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Maisha K; Campbell, Michael H

    2012-01-01

    With the exception of Guyana and Trinidad, suicide rates in the Caribbean are relatively low compared with those in other countries. Homicide rates, however, have increased over the past 15 years, especially in Jamaica and Trinidad. The link between suicide, homicide, and homicide followed by suicide (H-S) is not well established. A newspaper review of H-S events in a selection of Caribbean territories revealed a surprising number of these events. Characteristics of perpetrators were similar to those documented in the literature. The authors agree with Roma et al. that national tracking systems for H-S are needed. Empirical research on this topic in the Caribbean is also desperately needed.

  18. [Echinoderms (Echinodermata) of the Mexican Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo; Solis-Marín, Francisco A; Durán-González, Alicia; Ahearn, Cynthia Gust; Buitrón Sánchez, Blanca Estela; Torres-Vega, Juan

    2005-12-01

    A systematic list of the echinoderms of the Mexican Caribbean based on museum specimens of the Colección Nacional de Equinodermos, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. is presented. This list reveals an important echinoderm biodiversity in the Mexican Caribbean, where five of the six echinoderm classes are represented. A total of 178 echinoderm species is recorded, distributed in 113 genera, 51 families and 22 orders. 30 new records for the Mexican Caribbean are presents: Crínoidea (three), Asteroidea (two), Ophiuroidea (eleven), Echinoidea (one), Holothuroidea (thirteen).

  19. Bioethics and Public Health Collaborate to Reveal Impacts of Climate Change on Caribbean Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, C.; Akpinar-Elci, M.

    2011-12-01

    Interdisciplinary dialog and collaboration aimed at protecting health against climate change is impeded by the small number of scientists and health professionals skilled in interdisciplinary work, and by the view held by many that "climate change won't affect me personally". These challenges may be surmounted by discussions about the lived experience of climate change and how this threatens things we value. Dialog between bioethics and public health generated an innovative collaboration using the focus group method. The main limitation of focus groups is the small number of participants however the data obtained is generalizable to wider groups and is used regularly in business to enhance marketing strategies. Caribbean academicians from varied disciplines discussed how climate change affects them and life in the Caribbean. Caribbean states are particularly vulnerable to climate change because their large coastal areas are directly exposed to rising sea levels and their development relies heavily on foreign aid. The Caribbean comprises about half of the 39 members of the Association of Small Island States (AOSIS), and small island states comprise about 5% of global population [1]. Participants described socioeconomic and environmental changes in the Caribbean that they attribute to climate change. These include extreme weather, unusual rain and drought, drying rivers, beach erosion, declining fish catches, and others. The session exposed impacts on individuals, businesses, agriculture, and disaster preparedness. This data helps to reframe climate change as a personal reality rather than a vague future concern. It is relevant to the design, implementation, and sustainability of climate policies in the Caribbean and perhaps other small island states. The method and interdisciplinary approach can be used in other settings to elicit dialog about experiences and values across sectors, and to inform policies. Those who have experienced extreme weather are more concerned

  20. Combined Operations a Commonwealth Caribbean Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-03

    America and the Caribbeanr 0 exC~ S , slnl estnOC NORTH*,a* I SUEldraasI Cal slnd A. TO.-, T HE 󈧐 C., Sillsan BAHAMAS Olti BCAAS ," Great’ f, Ca...COMBINED OPERATIONS A COMMONWEALTH CARIBBEAN PERSPECTIVE A Thesis presented to the Faculty of the U. S . Army Command and General Staff College in... S A COMMONWEALTH CARIBBEAN PERSPECTIVE A Thesis presented to the Faculty of the U. S . Army Command and General Staff College in partial fulfillment

  1. On Equality: III. Social Mobility and Equal Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipset, Seymour Martin

    1972-01-01

    Analyzes the new understanding of equality of opportunity which requires that children of the lower classes not only have a realistic chance of success, but that they do in fact achieve such success in equal proportions with the children of the middle and upper classes. (DM)

  2. Reframing Inclusive Education: Educational Equality as Capability Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzi, Lorella

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that rethinking questions of inclusive education in the light of the value of educational equality--specifically conceived as capability equality, or genuine opportunities to achieve educational functionings--adds some important insights to the current debate on inclusive education. First, it provides a cohesive value…

  3. Reframing Inclusive Education: Educational Equality as Capability Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzi, Lorella

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that rethinking questions of inclusive education in the light of the value of educational equality--specifically conceived as capability equality, or genuine opportunities to achieve educational functionings--adds some important insights to the current debate on inclusive education. First, it provides a cohesive value…

  4. Equal Pay for Equal Work; Women in Special Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Libraries Association, New York, NY.

    The Special Libraries Association (SLA) provides information on achieving equal pay for equal work for women librarians in special libraries. A 1973 SLA study is cited to show pay differences between men and women. Then relevant legislation and executive orders are listed for the United States, along with similar legislation for Canada. Attention…

  5. Medical Need, Equality, and Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Horne, L Chad

    2016-10-01

    Many hold that distributing healthcare according to medical need is a requirement of equality. Most egalitarians believe, however, that people ought to be equal on the whole, by some overall measure of well-being or life-prospects; it would be a massive coincidence if distributing healthcare according to medical need turned out to be an effective way of promoting equality overall. I argue that distributing healthcare according to medical need is important for reducing individuals' uncertainty surrounding their future medical needs. In other words, distributing healthcare according to medical need is a natural feature of healthcare insurance; it is about indemnity, not equality.

  6. Mental Health of African Americans and Caribbean Blacks in the United States: Results From the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Mayumi; Oquendo, Maria A.; Lawson, William B.; Wang, Shuai; Thomas, Yonette Felicity; Blanco, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Previous epidemiological studies have found lower mood, anxiety, and substance use disorder prevalence in Black Americans, in general, compared with White Americans. We estimated the prevalence and persistence of psychiatric disorders in African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites. Methods. We drew data from wave 1 (2001–2002) of the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions, a nationally representative sample of US adults, which included 7529 African Americans, 469 Caribbean Blacks, and 24 502 non-Hispanic Whites. Results. Blacks had equal or lower prevalence than Whites of lifetime (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.6 for African Americans; 0.3 for Caribbean Blacks) and 12-month (AOR = 0.7 for African Americans; 0.4 for Caribbean Blacks) Axis I psychiatric disorders, but higher prevalence of several personality disorders. Among Blacks, Caribbean Blacks had higher prevalence of 12-month psychotic disorders and lower lifetime prevalence of major depressive disorder, alcohol dependence, and drug abuse than African Americans. There were no differences in persistence of disorders between Caribbean Blacks and African Americans. Conclusions. This study yielded new data on prevalence of mental disorders in these groups, which has important implications for clinical work with US Blacks. PMID:23237171

  7. Mental health of African Americans and Caribbean blacks in the United States: results from the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Tresha A; Okuda, Mayumi; Oquendo, Maria A; Lawson, William B; Wang, Shuai; Thomas, Yonette Felicity; Blanco, Carlos

    2013-02-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have found lower mood, anxiety, and substance use disorder prevalence in Black Americans, in general, compared with White Americans. We estimated the prevalence and persistence of psychiatric disorders in African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites. We drew data from wave 1 (2001-2002) of the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions, a nationally representative sample of US adults, which included 7529 African Americans, 469 Caribbean Blacks, and 24 502 non-Hispanic Whites. Blacks had equal or lower prevalence than Whites of lifetime (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =0.6 for African Americans; 0.3 for Caribbean Blacks) and 12-month (AOR =0.7 for African Americans; 0.4 for Caribbean Blacks) Axis I psychiatric disorders, but higher prevalence of several personality disorders. Among Blacks, Caribbean Blacks had higher prevalence of 12-month psychotic disorders and lower lifetime prevalence of major depressive disorder, alcohol dependence, and drug abuse than African Americans. There were no differences in persistence of disorders between Caribbean Blacks and African Americans. This study yielded new data on prevalence of mental disorders in these groups, which has important implications for clinical work with US Blacks.

  8. Community College Models: Myths and Realities of Access and Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raby, Rosalind Latiner

    The community college model was developed in response to the inability of universities to meet economic needs and the demand for higher education. Configurations of this model include multipurpose institutions, combing academic, pre-university, technical, remedial, and continuing education; specialized orientations, offering 2 to 3 years of…

  9. Equal Access in Vocational Education. Instructor's Guidebook. Models and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, Marilyn; Smith, Armenia

    This guidebook consists of a model and strategies for teachers and counselors to use in recruiting nontraditional and other special needs students into vocational education programs. Provided in the first section are guidelines for fair recruitment of male and female students into vocational programs as well as for recruitment of learning…

  10. Equality through Access. Annual Report, 2000/01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Human Rights Commission, Vancouver.

    This report describes the British Columbia Human Rights Commission's activities during 2000-01. The Commission held public hearings to learn about barriers that prevent Aboriginal students from full participation in the British Columbia education system, and published a report on the findings with recommendations for improving educational…

  11. 75 FR 65214 - Equal Access to Justice Act Implementation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... individual, partnership, corporation, association, or public or private organization that is named or..., association, or public or private organization that is named or admitted as a party, that is admitted as a... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL HOUSING...

  12. 77 FR 39117 - Equal Access to Justice Act Implementation Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... or Social Security numbers, should not be included. Comments will not be edited to remove any..., corporation, association, or public or private organization with a net worth of not more than $7 million and... individuals, corporation or other entity that directly or indirectly controls or owns a majority of the voting...

  13. Equal Access to Quality Education Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Chu, Judy [D-CA-32

    2011-09-13

    House - 11/18/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Equal Access to Quality Education Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Chu, Judy [D-CA-27

    2013-03-21

    House - 04/23/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Open Admissions and Equal Access. ACT Monograph 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rever, Philip F., Ed.

    This document contains a number of papers commissioned by the American College Testing Program (ACT) and the American Association for Higher Education (AAHE), and published as a result of the interest and debate about open admissions policies. Part I concerns the question "Who should decide who goes to college?"; Part II,"Who should go to…

  16. Ensuring Equal Access to High-Quality Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    This brochure describes the activities of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in the U.S. Department of Education. The OCR is a law-enforcement agency charged with upholding the federal civil-rights laws that prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, and age in programs and activities that receive federal…

  17. Equal Access to Quality Education Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Chu, Judy [D-CA-32

    2011-09-13

    11/18/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Equal Access to Quality Education Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Chu, Judy [D-CA-27

    2013-03-21

    04/23/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Ensuring Equal Access to High-Quality Education. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in the U.S. Department of Education (Department) is a law enforcement agency charged with enforcing federal civil rights laws to ensure that educational institutions receiving federal financial assistance do not engage in discriminatory conduct. OCR enforces the federal civil rights laws that prohibit…

  20. Open Book on Equal Access to Justice Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Lummis, Cynthia M. [R-WY-At Large

    2013-08-01

    05/07/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Guardians at the Bridge: Will Immigrants Maintain Equal Access?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Greg

    1995-01-01

    Describes the national mood toward immigration as evidenced by the 1994 passage of Proposition 187 in California, and its effect on the community college mission. Reviews benefits and drawbacks of the measure for educational institutions and examines approaches to illegal immigration taken in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Florida, and Virginia. (16…

  2. Open Book on Equal Access to Justice Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Lummis, Cynthia M. [R-WY-At Large

    2013-08-01

    Senate - 05/07/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Higher Education Access and Equality among Ethnic Minorities in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2010-01-01

    Market reform, financial decentralization, and economic globalization in recent years have greatly accentuated China's social and regional inequalities. These inequalities stem from many factors, including the rise of an urban middle class, a change in the status of women, a resurgence of ethnic identities, an increase in rural-to-urban migration,…

  4. Equal Access to Quality Education Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Chu, Judy [D-CA-27

    2013-03-21

    04/23/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Equal Access to Quality Education Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Chu, Judy [D-CA-32

    2011-09-13

    11/18/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Open Book on Equal Access to Justice Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Lummis, Cynthia M. [R-WY-At Large

    2013-08-01

    05/07/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. 75 FR 17622 - Equal Access to Justice Act Implementation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ...; ] FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY 12 CFR Part 1203 DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Office of... Implementation AGENCY: Federal Housing Finance Agency, HUD, Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) proposes...

  8. Governing Equality: Mathematics for All?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    With the notion of governmentality, this article considers how the equal sign (=) in the U.S. math curriculum organizes knowledge of equality and inscribes cultural rules for thinking, acting, and seeing in the world. Situating the discussion within contemporary math reforms aimed at teaching mathematics for all, I draw attention to how the…

  9. Governing Equality: Mathematics for All?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    With the notion of governmentality, this article considers how the equal sign (=) in the U.S. math curriculum organizes knowledge of equality and inscribes cultural rules for thinking, acting, and seeing in the world. Situating the discussion within contemporary math reforms aimed at teaching mathematics for all, I draw attention to how the…

  10. Equality and Education -- Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John

    1975-01-01

    Discusses equality in education within the framework of the ideas of John Rawls, asserting that even though in the real world it is not easy to implement his version of equality and justice without endangering his prior principle of liberty, he provides a philosophical foundation for the reconsideration of the meritocratic principle. (Author/JM)

  11. Luck, Choice, and Educational Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, John

    2015-01-01

    Harry Brighouse discusses two conceptions of educational equality. The first is a type of equality of opportunity, heavily influenced by the work of John Rawls, which he calls the meritocratic conception. According to this conception, an individual's educational prospects should not be influenced by factors such as their social class background.…

  12. Luck, Choice, and Educational Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, John

    2015-01-01

    Harry Brighouse discusses two conceptions of educational equality. The first is a type of equality of opportunity, heavily influenced by the work of John Rawls, which he calls the meritocratic conception. According to this conception, an individual's educational prospects should not be influenced by factors such as their social class background.…

  13. Equal Pay for Comparable Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Frank, Jane

    1980-01-01

    Argues that sex discrimination has depressed salaries for jobs filled primarily by women. Shows that under the Equal Pay Act and Title VII, workers in traditionally female occupations can establish equal pay claims. Suggests approaches for developing legal and enforcement standards to deal with discriminatory compensation in traditionally female…

  14. Ensuring equal opportunity sprinkler irrigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Equal opportunity for plants to sprinkler irrigation water must be carefully considered by crop producers, irrigation consultants, and the industry that supplies the irrigation equipment. Equal opportunity can be negated by improper marketing, design, and installation, as well as through improper f...

  15. Education and Equality. A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marjoribanks, Kevin

    1975-01-01

    A critical review and contrast of four books dealing with the theme of educational equality: Jencks, C. et al, "Inequality;" Eysenck, H.J., "The Inequality of Man"; Jensen, A.R. "Educational Differences"; and Kopan, A. and Walberg, H. (Eds.) "Rethinking Educational Equality". (EH)

  16. OCLC in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krzyzanowski, Rosaly Favero; Imperatriz, Ines Maria de Morais

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on academic and research library networking in Latin American and Caribbean countries (LAC), where a high level of library service has been achieved. Discusses the information challenges of the 1980s and 1990s to LAC countries; networking in LAC; Brazilian information services; the University of Sao Paulo integrated library system…

  17. Re-Examining Caribbean English Creole Continua.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winford, Donald

    1997-01-01

    Reexamines the history and contemporary structure of Caribbean English creole continua, with illustrations from the varied sociolinguistic situations in Belize, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad. Argues that continua existed there from the earliest period of contact and supports a coexistent systems approach to the contemporary structure of these…

  18. How American History Textbooks View the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Victor W.

    This paper examines: (1) the extent to which recently published textbooks used in United States history survey courses reflect a revised view of the historical relationship between the Caribbean region and the United States; and (2) whether recent shifts in research emphases and methodological expansions in the field of American history have…

  19. The Caribbean Bildungsroman: Notes on a Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Jacqueline Brice

    The universality of the childhood experience is a perspective that is useful in the classroom where the student body reflects the multiethnic, multicultural roots of American culture. The novels from the Caribbean can add new material to the body of world literature and should be included in a crosscultural study of the "bildungsroman"…

  20. The United States in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Ottie K., Comp.

    This reference work lists books, periodicals articles, Rand reports, and other documents in five subject areas: (1) the Caribbean and Central America, (2) the Continent, (3) Cuba, (4) the Dominican Republic, and (5) United States policies. The introductory section focuses on reference aids. The majority of the entries date from 1960 through 1969.…

  1. Coping Strategies of Caribbean "Problem Students"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Donna-Maria B.; Welch, Patricia L.

    2009-01-01

    The coping strategies of middle adolescents (14-16 years) generate interest amongst educators, parents, school psychologists and school counsellors. This study, using a phenomenological approach, examined the coping strategies of "problem" adolescents in the Caribbean in regard to their interactions with peers and teachers. Data were…

  2. Sociology of Education: Research in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony, Ed.; Ezenne, Austin, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the premises, standards, requirements, and consequences of education in the Caribbean. Chapters in the first section, "Gender, Education and EmploymentBroken Promises," are: (1) "Educational Management from a Perspective of Care: Women Teachers in Trinidad and Tobago" (Jeanette Morris);…

  3. Training Caribbean Trawlermen for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Equipped with two multi-purpose fishing vessels, the Caribbean Fishery Development Institute has begun training 45 persons in an 11-month course ranging from navigation to seamanship, from engineering to biology, law, andeconomics. The program description provided by the article is supplemented by figures offering specific curricular and…

  4. Sociology of Education: Research in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony, Ed.; Ezenne, Austin, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the premises, standards, requirements, and consequences of education in the Caribbean. Chapters in the first section, "Gender, Education and EmploymentBroken Promises," are: (1) "Educational Management from a Perspective of Care: Women Teachers in Trinidad and Tobago" (Jeanette Morris);…

  5. Forest fires in the insular Caribbean

    Treesearch

    A.M.J. Robbins; C.M. Eckelmann; M. Quinones

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the forest fire reports in the insular Caribbean derived from both management reports and an analysis of publicly available Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrodiometer (MODIS) satellite active fire products from the region. A vast difference between the amount of fires reported by land managers and fire points in the MODIS Fire...

  6. Planning Functional Literacy Programmes in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jules, Didacus

    1988-01-01

    Examines the question of illiteracy in the Caribbean relative to international trends in adult education. Identifies Jamaica's JAMAL literacy program and Grenada's Centre for Popular Education as the dominant influences on the development of adult education programs. Views strategic planning, as found in these programs, as a necessity for success.…

  7. Caribbean Immigrants: A Black Success Story?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Model, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    Compares the 1980 earnings and earning attainment process of Afro-Caribbean immigrants, Afro-Americans, native-born Whites, and foreign-born Whites. Results do not support the opinion that any West Indian group had higher earnings than native-born Blacks. (DM)

  8. Canada: psychosis in the immigrant Caribbean population.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V

    2011-09-01

    Many reports from European countries suggest that acute episodes of psychosis are more frequent among immigrants from the Caribbean than among their non-immigrant peers. The aim of this selective review is to examine how the social correlates of migration to Canada interact with biological mechanisms to contribute to psychosis in the Caribbean population. PubMed and JSTOR social science databases (between 1966 and 2010) were searched using the following search terms: psychiatric genetics; dopamine pathways; Caribbean family structure and child rearing; cannabis and psychosis; obstetric complications and schizophrenia; social defeat; social capital; racial discrimination; urbanicity; immigration; assimilation; and immigration. This was followed by the cross-checking of references pertinent to Canada. There was no information about the prevalence of psychosis in Afro-Caribbean immigrant groups to Canada. There was a suggestion that the form the acute episode takes may differ, depending perhaps on the island of origin. Ethnicity and migration influence susceptibility and response to psychotic illness in a number of distinct and interacting ways depending both on the host country and the country of origin. Understanding the pathways can help to protect the health of immigrants.

  9. Recognizing and treating diseases in Caribbean trees

    Treesearch

    Deborah Jean Lodge

    2002-01-01

    Although the majority of tree problems in urban setting are not caused by disease organisms, there are some current and potential disease threats in the Caribbean. Symptoms are the expression of stress in the plant. Symptoms may appear to be identical in response to many different types of diseases and physical or chemical damage. It is therefore helpful to determine...

  10. How American History Textbooks View the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Victor W.

    This paper examines: (1) the extent to which recently published textbooks used in United States history survey courses reflect a revised view of the historical relationship between the Caribbean region and the United States; and (2) whether recent shifts in research emphases and methodological expansions in the field of American history have…

  11. Equalization of data transmission cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobrist, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes an equalization approach utilizing a simple RLC network which can obtain a maximum slope of -12dB/octave for reshaping the frequency characteristics of a data transmission cable, so that data may be generated and detected at the receiver. An experimental procedure for determining equalizer design specifications using distortion analysis is presented. It was found that for lengths of 16 PEV-L cable of up to 5 miles and data transmission rates of up to 1 Mbs, the equalization scheme proposed here is sufficient for generation of the data with acceptable error rates.

  12. Loudspeaker equalization for auditory research.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Justin A; Tran, Phuong K

    2007-02-01

    The equalization of loudspeaker frequency response is necessary to conduct many types of well-controlled auditory experiments. This article introduces a program that includes functions to measure a loudspeaker's frequency response, design equalization filters, and apply the filters to a set of stimuli to be used in an auditory experiment. The filters can compensate for both magnitude and phase distortions introduced by the loudspeaker. A MATLAB script is included in the Appendix to illustrate the details of the equalization algorithm used in the program.

  13. Faunal turnover in Neogene to Recent Caribbean reef corals and region environmental change

    SciTech Connect

    Budd, A.F. . Geology Dept.); Johnson, K.G. . Palaeontology Dept.); Stemann, T.A. . Geologisches Inst.)

    1993-03-01

    Quantitative analyses of species richness and species extinction and origination rates in the Neogene to Recent Caribbean reef coral fauna show that a major episode of turnover occurred during middle to late Pliocene time (4--1 Ma). The data for the authors analyses consist of a new compilation of occurrences of 175 species and 49 genera in reef sequences in the Dominican Republic and Costa Rica and in 21 scattered sites ranging in age from 22 Ma to present. The results show that: (1) during turnover, more than 75% of all species living between 6--4 Ma (n = 82) became extinct; (2) during turnover, extinction and origination rates were equally and simultaneously high, and a relatively constant number of species was maintained in the fauna; (3) the taxonomic composition of Caribbean reefs remained relatively constant before (10--4 Ma) and after (1--0 Ma) turnover. Turnover therefore preceded the high frequency sea level oscillations of late Pleistocene time, and appears related to long-term, unidirectional changes in climate and/or ocean circulation across the Caribbean region in association with closure of the Isthmus of Panama. The observed correspondence between high origination and extinction rates indicates that the same environmental factors may have been associated with increases in both rates, and that local habitat differentiation and fragmentation may have been involved. Stability persisted in the region despite the severe environmental stresses associated with Pleistocene climate change.

  14. Measuring surface energy and evapotranspiration across Caribbean mangrove forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomasino, D.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Price, R.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal mangroves lose large amounts of water through evapotranspiration (ET) that can be equivalent to the amount of annual rainfall in certain years. Satellite remote sensing has been used to estimate surface energy and ET variability in many forested ecosystems, yet has been widely overlooked in mangrove forests. Using a combination of long-term datasets (30-year) acquired from the NASA Landsat 5 and 7 satellite databases, the present study investigated ET and surface energy balance variability between two mangrove forest sites in the Caribbean: 1) Everglades National Park (ENP; Florida, USA) and 2) Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve (SKBR; Quintana Roo, Mexico). A satellite-derived surface energy balance model was used to estimate ET in tall and scrub mangroves environments at ENP and SKBR. Results identified significant differences in soil heat flux measurements and ET between the tall and scrub mangrove environments. Scrub mangroves exhibited the highest soil heat flux coincident with the lowest biophysical indices (i.e., Fractional Vegetation Cover, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index) and ET rates. Mangrove damage and mortality was observed on the satellite images following strong tropical storms and associated with anthropogenic modifications and resulted in low values in spectral vegetation indices, higher soil heat flux, and higher ET. Recovery of the spectral characteristics, soil heat flux and ET was within 1-2 years following hurricane disturbance while, degradation caused by human disturbance persisted for many years. Remotely sensed ET of mangrove forests can provide estimates over a few decades and provide us with some understanding of how these environments respond to disturbances to the landscape in periods where no ground data exists or in locations that are difficult to access. Moreover, relationships between energy and water balance components developed for the coastal mangroves of Florida and Mexico could be

  15. Equal Pay for Comparable Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Nancy Lloyd; Rothman, Daniel A.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the legal battleground upon which one struggle for the equality of women is being fought. Updates a civil rights decision of crucial importance to nursing--Lemons v City and County of Denver. (JOW)

  16. Equal Education and the Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanks, Hershel

    1970-01-01

    A number of court cases are cited which trace the development of various definitions and interpretations of the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution as would be applicable to inadequate" schools. (DM)

  17. Electronegativity Equalization and Partial Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    This article elaborates the relationship between covalent radius, homonuclear bond energy, and electronegativity, and sets the background for bond energy calculation by discussing the nature of heteronuclear covalent bonding on the basis of electronegativity equalization and particle charge. (DT)

  18. Electronegativity Equalization with Pauling Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratsch, Steven G.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses electronegativity equalization using Pauling units. Although Pauling has qualitatively defined electronegativity as the power of an atom in a molecule to attract electrons to itself, Pauling electronegativities are treated in this paper as prebonded, isolated-atom quantities. (JN)

  19. Electronegativity Equalization and Partial Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    This article elaborates the relationship between covalent radius, homonuclear bond energy, and electronegativity, and sets the background for bond energy calculation by discussing the nature of heteronuclear covalent bonding on the basis of electronegativity equalization and particle charge. (DT)

  20. Equal Pay for Comparable Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Nancy Lloyd; Rothman, Daniel A.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the legal battleground upon which one struggle for the equality of women is being fought. Updates a civil rights decision of crucial importance to nursing--Lemons v City and County of Denver. (JOW)

  1. Distribution and differentiation of wild, feral, and cultivated populations of perennial upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in Mesoamerica and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Coppens d'Eeckenbrugge, Geo; Lacape, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Perennial forms of Gossypium hirsutum are classified under seven races. Five Mesoamerican races would have been derived from the wild race 'yucatanense' from northern Yucatán. 'Marie-Galante', the main race in the Caribbean, would have developed from introgression with G. barbadense. The racial status of coastal populations from the Caribbean has not been clearly defined. We combined Ecological Niche Modeling with an analysis of SSR marker diversity, to elucidate the relationships among cultivated, feral and wild populations of perennial cottons. Out of 954 records of occurrence in Mesoamerica and the Caribbean, 630 were classified into four categories cultivated, feral (disturbed and secondary habitats), wild/feral (protected habitats), and truly wild cotton (TWC) populations. The widely distributed three first categories cannot be differentiated on ecological grounds, indicating they mostly belong to the domesticated pool. In contrast, TWC are restricted to the driest and hottest littoral habitats, in northern Yucatán and in the Caribbean (from Venezuela to Florida), as confirmed by their climatic envelope in the factorial analysis. Extrapolating this TWC climatic model to South America and the Pacific Ocean points towards places where other wild representatives of tetraploid Gossypium species have been encountered. The genetic analysis sample comprised 42 TWC accessions from 12 sites and 68 feral accessions from 18 sites; at nine sites, wild and feral accessions were collected in close vicinity. Principal coordinate analysis, neighbor joining, and STRUCTURE consistently showed a primary divergence between TWC and feral cottons, and a secondary divergence separating 'Marie-Galante' from all other feral accessions. This strong genetic structure contrasts strikingly with the absence of geographic differentiation. Our results show that TWC populations of Mesoamerica and the Caribbean constitute a homogenous gene pool. Furthermore, the relatively low genetic

  2. Distribution and Differentiation of Wild, Feral, and Cultivated Populations of Perennial Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in Mesoamerica and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Coppens d'Eeckenbrugge, Geo; Lacape, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Perennial forms of Gossypium hirsutum are classified under seven races. Five Mesoamerican races would have been derived from the wild race ‘yucatanense’ from northern Yucatán. ‘Marie-Galante’, the main race in the Caribbean, would have developed from introgression with G. barbadense. The racial status of coastal populations from the Caribbean has not been clearly defined. We combined Ecological Niche Modeling with an analysis of SSR marker diversity, to elucidate the relationships among cultivated, feral and wild populations of perennial cottons. Out of 954 records of occurrence in Mesoamerica and the Caribbean, 630 were classified into four categories cultivated, feral (disturbed and secondary habitats), wild/feral (protected habitats), and truly wild cotton (TWC) populations. The widely distributed three first categories cannot be differentiated on ecological grounds, indicating they mostly belong to the domesticated pool. In contrast, TWC are restricted to the driest and hottest littoral habitats, in northern Yucatán and in the Caribbean (from Venezuela to Florida), as confirmed by their climatic envelope in the factorial analysis. Extrapolating this TWC climatic model to South America and the Pacific Ocean points towards places where other wild representatives of tetraploid Gossypium species have been encountered. The genetic analysis sample comprised 42 TWC accessions from 12 sites and 68 feral accessions from 18 sites; at nine sites, wild and feral accessions were collected in close vicinity. Principal coordinate analysis, neighbor joining, and STRUCTURE consistently showed a primary divergence between TWC and feral cottons, and a secondary divergence separating ‘Marie-Galante’ from all other feral accessions. This strong genetic structure contrasts strikingly with the absence of geographic differentiation. Our results show that TWC populations of Mesoamerica and the Caribbean constitute a homogenous gene pool. Furthermore, the relatively low

  3. A measure of acculturation for Afro-Caribbean youth.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Cynthia; Rhodd, Rupert

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a measure of acculturation for Afro-Caribbean teens who might be at high risk for Sexually Transmitted Disease including Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Adaptation needs become challenging as many Caribbean immigrants to the United States who are undocumented or without financial fortitude, often live in substandard urban communities with highest rates of HIV and STDs. After obtaining permission to revise the instruments and participants' consents, two existing measures of acculturation were used in this instrument development. Eight Afro-Caribbean adolescents served as judges to revise the instruments for appropriateness to Afro-Caribbean culture; they developed a composite of the two instruments. Afro-Caribbean community experts and a researcher with instrument development expertise further checked for readability and content validity. The new instrument with good content validity and high reliability was tested among 42 Afro-Caribbean youth. The results are discussed.

  4. The Continuously Operating Caribbean Observational Network (COCONet): Supporting Regional Development of Geoscience Research Across the Circum-Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, J.; Miller, M. M.; Mattioli, G. S.; Wang, G.; Feaux, K.; Rowan, L.; La Femina, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Continuously Operating Caribbean Observational Network (COCONet) is a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded infrastructure project that stretches across the circum-Caribbean to include Central America and the northern portions of South America. Its objective is to develop a large-scale network of geodetic and atmospheric infrastructure to support a broad range of geoscience and atmospheric investigations and enable research on process-oriented science with direct relevance to geo-hazards. The network includes over 60 new and refurbished continuously operating Global Positioning System (GPS) and surface meterology stations. It will also include data from at least 60 existing stations that are being operated by one of our more than 40 regional partners. As COCONet approaches the completion of its build-out phase, it is appropriate to evaluate the activities associated with the project that facilitate capacity building. These activities include three workshops to solicit feedback from regional partners regarding science objectives, station location, and long-term network operation. COCONet graduate research fellowships have been used to support nine students, with seven from countries within the COCONet footprint. The establishment of three regional data and archive centers to foster access to data and promote free and open data standards. Lastly, two Pan American Advanced Studies Institute (PASI) workshops on topics that are central to the main goals of COCONet were also organized to engage early career scientists who are interested in working on topics that are directly relevant to the region. Perhaps the most significant effort on expanding capacity in the region is the recent deployment of a station in Camaguey, Cuba with full support from both the U.S. and Cuban governments. This presentation summarizes the activities of the COCONet project to enhance and support both the human resource development and technical capabilities within the region.

  5. Eleventh Annual "Brown" Lecture in Education Research A Long Shadow: The American Pursuit of Political Justice and Education Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James D.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the historical relationship between political power and the pursuit of education and social equality from the Reconstruction era to the present. The chief argument is that education equality is historically linked to and even predicated on equal political power, specifically, equal access to the franchise and instruments of…

  6. Eleventh Annual "Brown" Lecture in Education Research A Long Shadow: The American Pursuit of Political Justice and Education Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James D.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the historical relationship between political power and the pursuit of education and social equality from the Reconstruction era to the present. The chief argument is that education equality is historically linked to and even predicated on equal political power, specifically, equal access to the franchise and instruments of…

  7. Caribbean Sea Region Pyrrhocoroidea (Hemiptera: Pyrrhocoridae, Largidae).

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C W; Stehlík, J L

    2013-08-01

    A synopsis of the Pyrrhocoridae and Largidae (Pyrrhocoroidea) of the Caribbean Sea Region is given. Three new taxa are described: Dysdercus jamaicensis jindrai Stehlík n. subsp. (Dominican Republic); Largus fumosus fumosus Stehlík n. sp. (Panama-Barro Colorado Island); and Largus fumosus nigromembranaceus Stehlík n. subsp. (Panama). Largus pallidus Halstead is downgraded to a subspecies of Largus davisi Barber, i.e., L. davisi pallidus Halstead n. stat. The following new records are provided: Dysdercus (Dysdercus) andreae (Linnaeus) from Cayman Islands; Acinocoris elegans van Doesburg from Trinidad; Fibrenus pehlkei Schmidt and Largus maculatus Schmidt from Panama; and Largus obovatus (Barber) from Haiti. Altogether, we report 20 species and 3 subspecies of Pyrrhocoridae and 13 species and 2 subspecies of Largidae from the Caribbean Sea Region.

  8. Cenozoic rift formation in the northern Caribbean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, P.; Burke, K.

    1984-01-01

    Rifts form in many different tectonic environments where the lithosphere is put into extension. An outline is provided of the distribution, orientation, and relative ages of 16 Cenozoic rifts along the northern edge of the Caribbean plate and it is suggested that these structures formed successively by localized extension as the Caribbean plate moved eastward past a continental promontory of North America. Evidence leading to this conclusion includes (1) recognition that the rifts become progressively younger westward; (2) a two-phase subsidence history in a rift exposed by upthrusting in Jamaica; (3) the absence of rifts east of Jamaica; and (4) the observation that removal of 1400 km of strike-slip displacement on the Cayman Trough fault system places the Paleogene rifts of Jamaica in an active area of extension south of Yucatan where the rifts of Honduras and Guatemala are forming today.

  9. [Population dynamics and development in the Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Boland, B

    1995-12-01

    The impact is examined of socioeconomic factors on Caribbean population dynamics. This work begins by describing the socioeconomic context of the late 1980s and early 1990s, under the influence of the economic changes and crises of the 1980s. The small size, openness, dependency, and lack of diversification of the Caribbean economies have made them vulnerable to external pressures. The Bahamas and Belize had economic growth rates exceeding 5% annually during 1981-90, but most of the countries had low or negative growth. Unemployment, poverty, the structural adjustment measures adopted in the mid-1980s, and declines in social spending exacerbated general economic conditions. In broad terms, the population situation of the Caribbean is marked by diversity of sizes and growth rates. A few countries oriented toward services and tourism had demographic growth rates exceeding 3%, while at least 7 had almost no growth or negative growth. Population growth rates reflected different combinations of natural increase and migration. Crude death rates ranged from around 5/1000 to 11/1000, except in Haiti, and all countries of the region except Haiti had life expectancies of 70 years or higher. Despite fertility decline, the average crude birth rate was still relatively high at 26/1000, and the rate of natural increase was 1.8% annually for the region. Nearly half of the regional population was under 15 or over 65 years old. The body of this work provides greater detail on mortality patterns, variations by sex, infant mortality, causes of death, and implications for policy. The discussion of fertility includes general patterns and trends, age specific fertility rates, contraceptive prevalence, levels of adolescent fertility and age factors in adolescent sexual behavior, characteristics of adolescent unions, contraceptive usage, health and social consequences of adolescent childbearing, and the search for solutions. The final section describes the magnitude and causes of

  10. Regional Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Caribbean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    jaundice, Mud fever, Swineherd disease) The spirochete bacterium Leptospira interrogans is the causative agent of this zoonotic disease. More than 200...leptospirosis of any island in the English-speaking Caribbean, thanks to a Leptospira laboratory that was established on the island in 1979 (see website...1995, and 253 cases were diagnosed. Transmission Cycle(s). Leptospira infect the kidneys and are transmitted in the urine of infected animals

  11. Montane Forest Management in the Insular Caribbean.

    Treesearch

    F. H. Wadsworth

    1999-01-01

    Two Elevations-above 800m and above 300m- define the montane forests of the caribbean islands. Of the 36 islands considered, 27 have mountains above 300m and 14, above 800m. of the 233,000 km2 of the island, at least 118,000 km2 are above 300m m, and 60,000 km2 are above 800 m.

  12. Characterization of Caribbean Meso-Scale Eddies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    cacique.uprm.edu Grant Number: N000140310904 LONG-TERM GOALS Our long-term goal is to improve predictivity of physical, biogeochemical and...REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Caribbean Meso-Scale...using radiocarbon incubations on-deck to determine photosynthetic parameters and fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF) in situ. WORK COMPLETED

  13. Spatial structure of the Caribbean lobster ( Metanephrops binghami) in the Colombian Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramo, Jorge; Saint-Paul, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Crustaceans of the genus Metanephrops are of great commercial value in some tropical and subtropical regions. With the potential development of a new deep lobster fishery in the Colombian Caribbean Sea, the objective of this work is to describe for first time the patterns of spatial and bathymetric distribution, and diel migratory periodicity of the Caribbean lobster ( M. binghami). Data were collected by trawling in depths between 200 and 550 m (100 m strata intervals) in the Colombian Caribbean Sea. Higher biomass and size of these crustaceans were found between 250 and 350 m, with a maximum at about 300 m. The study offers diel patterns of M. binghami, which suggests nocturnal activity and burrowing during daylight hours.

  14. Stranded pumice in the western Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, J. A.; Henton De Angelis, S.; Toscano, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Floating and washed-up pumices have been reported by scientific expeditions along the Caribbean Sea coast of the Central American Isthmus and the northern coast of South America since at least 1947. Local coastal communities have been utilizing this resource for many years. The rounded and buffered morphology of hand specimens is consistent with water-borne transit. The volcanically active Caribbean and Central American regions provide a number of candidates for source volcanoes and eruptions. We have attempted to identify this source using samples collected from Carrie Bow Cay and Placencia Beach, Belize; Tulum Beach, Mexico; Morrosquillo Bay, Colombia; and Galeta Point, Panama. We have tracked possible transport routes through the use of river drainage and ocean current maps. The criteria for comparing the products of potential source volcanoes (including Atitlán Caldera in Guatemala and Caribbean sources such as Mt. Pelée, Martinique and Soufrière Hills, Montserrat) were developed from the whole rock major and trace element geochemistry and the compositional and textural characteristics of pumice and their constituent minerals and glasses. The largest pumice sample collected from Carrie Bow Cay, Belize, was 18.5x12 cm with the typical, rounded morphology and distinctively stretched vesicles exhibited by this pumice collection.

  15. Proyecto Principal de Educacion en America Latina y El Caribe. UNESCO Boletin 14 (Major Project for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean. UNESCO Bulletin 14).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    This document begins by describing the technological revolution and the impact of computers, and their role in education in Latin America and the Caribbean. Some educators believe that computer literacy can provide young people with access to better jobs in the society of the future and upgrade the level of education in general. An article by…

  16. Proyecto Principal de Educacion en America Latina y El Caribe. UNESCO Boletin 14 (Major Project for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean. UNESCO Bulletin 14).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    This document begins by describing the technological revolution and the impact of computers, and their role in education in Latin America and the Caribbean. Some educators believe that computer literacy can provide young people with access to better jobs in the society of the future and upgrade the level of education in general. An article by…

  17. Distributive Equality, Relational Equality and Preferences about Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Are scenarios in which disadvantaged students prefer not to attend (certain) universities a concern from the perspective of an egalitarian theory of justice? I consider this question from the respective perspectives of two prominent approaches to equality: distributive theories, which focus on the fairness of inequalities in outcomes, and…

  18. Equal Employment + Equal Pay = Multiple Problems for Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinbach, Sheldon Elliot; Reback, Joyce E.

    1974-01-01

    Issues involved in government regulation of university employment practices are discussed: confidentiality of records, pregnancy as a disability, alleged discrimination in benefits, tests and other employment criteria, seniority and layoff, reverse discrimination, use of statistics for determination of discrimination, and the Equal Pay Act. (JT)

  19. Equality and selection for existence.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, I

    1999-01-01

    It is argued that the policy of excluding from further life some human gametes and pre-embryos as "unfit" for existence is not at odds with a defensible idea of human equality. Such an idea must be compatible with the obvious fact that the "functional" value of humans differs, that their "use" to themselves and others differs. A defensible idea of human equality is instead grounded in the fact that as this functional difference is genetically determined, it is nothing which makes humans deserve or be worthy of being better or worse off. Rather, nobody is worth a better life than anyone else. This idea of equality is, however, not applicable to gametes and pre-embryos, since they are not human beings, but something out of which human beings develop. PMID:10226918

  20. Genomics and equal opportunity ethics.

    PubMed

    Cappelen, A W; Norheim, O F; Tungodden, B

    2008-05-01

    Genomics provides information on genetic susceptibility to diseases and new possibilities for interventions which can fundamentally alter the design of fair health policies. The aim of this paper is to explore implications of genomics from the perspective of equal opportunity ethics. The ideal of equal opportunity requires that individuals are held responsible for some, but not all, factors that affect their health. Informational problems, however, often make it difficult to implement the ideal of equal opportunity in the context of healthcare. In this paper, examples are considered of how new genetic information may affect the way individual responsibility for choice is assigned. It is also argued that genomics may result in relocation of the responsibility cut by providing both new information and new technology. Finally, how genomics may affect healthcare policies and the market for health insurance is discussed.

  1. [Social protection in Latin America and the Caribbean: changes, contradictions, and limits].

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Luiza d'Avila; Fonseca, Ana Maria Medeiros da; Silva, Hudson Pacifico da

    2017-07-27

    Recent studies suggest that governments in the majority of Latin American and Caribbean countries were able to expand social investments and introduce innovations in social protection policies in the last two decades with positive results in the actions' coverage and impact. However, the restrictions imposed by the current fiscal crisis and the rise of governments more ideologically aligned with the neoliberal discourse in various countries in the region point to a new retreat of the state from the social area, thereby compromising recent advances. The article aims to discuss the changes, contradictions, and limits of recent social protection standards in Latin America and the Caribbean. The discussion includes three items: a description of the history of social protection in the region, seeking to identify its principal historical periods and characteristics (benefits, target public, and financing); the social protection models that have been implemented in the region; and the specific case of health. We argue that although countries have adopted different solutions in the field of social protection, the policies' hybrid nature (with extensive private sector participation in the financing, supply, and management of services) and the prevalence of segmented models (with differential access according to individuals' social status) have been predominant traits in social protection in Latin America and the Caribbean, thus limiting the possibilities for greater equity and social justice.

  2. Enigma of maternal race and infant birth weight: a population-based study of US-born Black and Caribbean-born Black women.

    PubMed

    Pallotto, E K; Collins, J W; David, R J

    2000-06-01

    The authors used 1985-1990 Illinois' vital records to determine the low birth weight components of infants delivered to US-born Black women, Caribbean-born Black women, and US-born White women. The moderately low birth weight rate (1,500-2,499 g) was 10% for infants with US-born Black mothers (n = 67,357) and 6% for infants with Caribbean-born mothers (n = 2,265) compared with 4% for infants with US-born White mothers (n = 34,124); the relative risk equaled 2.7 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.5, 2.8) and 1.7 (95% CI: 1.4, 2.0), respectively. The very low birth weight rate (<1,500 g) was 2.6% for infants delivered to US-born Black women and 2.4% for infants to Caribbean-born women compared with 0.7% for infants to US-born White women; the relative risk equaled 3.6 (95% CI: 3.1, 4.1) and 3.3 (95% CI: 2.5, 4.4), respectively. Among the lowest risk mothers, the relative risk of moderately low birth weight for infants with US-born Black mothers and Caribbean-born mothers (compared with US-born White mothers) was 2.7 (95% CI: 2.1, 3.4) and 1.2 (95% CI: 0.4, 3.1), respectively; the relative risk of very low birth weight for infants with US-born Black mothers and Caribbean-born mothers was 6.7 (95% CI: 3.8, 12) and 4.2 (95% CI: 1.0, 18), respectively. The authors conclude that Caribbean-born women and US-born Black women have disparate moderate rates but equivalent very low birth weight rates.

  3. The Invisible Obstacle to Educational Equality: Gender Bias in Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Rae Lesser

    2008-01-01

    Gender bias in textbooks (GBIT) is a low-profile education issue, given the 72,000,000 children who still have no access to schooling, but this article argues that GBIT is: (1) an important, (2) near-universal, (3) remarkably uniform, (4) quite persistent but (5) virtually invisible obstacle on the road to gender equality in education--an obstacle…

  4. Learning To Change. A WEA Equal Opportunities Training Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workers Educational Association, London (England).

    This training pack contains materials to help embed the principles of equal opportunities into the practice of part-time tutors and voluntary members of the Workers' Educational Association (WEA), a national voluntary organization dedicated to giving adults in the United Kingdom access to organized learning. Part 1 describes the rationale for the…

  5. The Invisible Obstacle to Educational Equality: Gender Bias in Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Rae Lesser

    2008-01-01

    Gender bias in textbooks (GBIT) is a low-profile education issue, given the 72,000,000 children who still have no access to schooling, but this article argues that GBIT is: (1) an important, (2) near-universal, (3) remarkably uniform, (4) quite persistent but (5) virtually invisible obstacle on the road to gender equality in education--an obstacle…

  6. Educational Opportunity: El Salvador's Barriers to Achieving Equality Persist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosekrans, Kristin

    This paper analyzes barriers to educational equality in El Salvador, using a multi-layered framework of educational opportunity. To improve educational opportunity and give the most marginalized sectors of society the possibility of changing their life circumstances requires policies that go beyond mere access to formal schooling. The model…

  7. CARICOF - The Caribbean Regional Climate Outlook Forum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meerbeeck, Cedric

    2013-04-01

    Regional Climate Outlook Forums (RCOFs) are viewed as a critical building block in the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The GFCS seeks to extend RCOFs to all vulnerable regions of the world such as the Caribbean, of which the entire population is exposed to water- and heat-related natural hazards. An RCOF is initially intended to identify gaps in information and technical capability; facilitate research cooperation and data exchange within and between regions, and improve coordination within the climate forecasting community. A focus is given on variations in climate conditions on a seasonal timescale. In this view, the relevance of a Caribbean RCOF (CARICOF) is the following: while the seasonality of the climate in the Caribbean has been well documented, major gaps in knowledge exist in terms of the drivers in the shifts of amplitude and phase of seasons (as evidenced from the worst region-wide drought period in recent history during 2009-2010). To address those gaps, CARICOF has brought together National Weather Services (NWSs) from 18 territories under the coordination of the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), to produce region-wide, consensus, seasonal climate outlooks since March 2012. These outlooks include tercile rainfall forecasts, sea and air surface temperature forecasts as well as the likely evolution of the drivers of seasonal climate variability in the region, being amongst others the El Niño Southern Oscillation or tropical Atlantic and Caribbean Sea temperatures. Forecasts for both the national-scale forecasts made by the NWSs and CIMH's regional-scale forecast amalgamate output from several forecasting tools. These currently include: (1) statistical models such as Canonical Correlation Analysis run with the Climate Predictability Tool, providing tercile rainfall forecasts at weather station scale; (2) a global outlooks published by the WMO appointed Global Producing

  8. Stennis observes Women's Equality Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-26

    NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center celebrated Women's Equality Day with a program featuring presentations from a pair of area women - Leslie Henderson, founder and brewmaster of Lazy Magnolia Brewing Co. in Kiln, Miss., and Kathanne Greene, associate professor of political science at the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg. Shown are (l to r): Jo Ann Larson, Stennis Equal Opportunity officer; Henderson; Greene; and Shannon Breland, public affairs officer for the Naval Research Laboratory at Stennis and a member of the Stennis Diversity Council.

  9. Kinematic reconstruction of the Caribbean region since the Early Jurassic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochman, Lydian; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Torsvik, Trond; Spakman, Wim; Pindell, James

    2014-05-01

    The Caribbean region results from a complex tectonic history governed by the interplay of the North American, South American and (Paleo-)Pacific plates, between which the Caribbean plate evolved since the early Cretaceous. During its entire tectonic evolution, the Caribbean plate was largely surrounded by subduction and transform boundaries, which hampers a quantitative integration into the global circuit of plate motions. In addition, reconstructions of the region have so far not resulted in a first order kinematic description of the main tectonic units in terms of Euler poles and finite rotation angles. Here, we present an updated, quantitatively described kinematic reconstruction of the Caribbean region back to 200 Ma integrated into the global plate circuit, and implemented with GPlates free software. Our analysis of Caribbean tectonic evolution incorporates an extensive literature review. To constrain the Caribbean plate motion between the American continents, we use a novel approach that takes structural geological observations rather than marine magnetic anomalies as prime input, and uses regionally extensive metamorphic and magmatic phenomena such as the Great Arc of the Caribbean, the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) and the Caribbean high-pressure belt as correlation markers. The resulting model restores the Caribbean plate back along the Cayman Trough and major strike-slip faults in Guatemala, offshore Nicaragua, offshore Belize and along the Northern Andes towards its position of origin, west of the North and South American continents in early Cretaceous time. We provide the paleomagnetic reference frame for the Caribbean region by rotating the Global Apparent Polar Wander Path into coordinates of the Caribbean plate interior, Cuba, and the Chortis Block. We conclude that a plate kinematic scenario for a Panthalassa/Pacific origin of Caribbean lithosphere leads to a much simpler explanation than a Proto-Caribbean/Atlantic origin. Placing our

  10. Stroke among African-Caribbean women: lay beliefs of risks and causes.

    PubMed

    Moorley, Calvin; Cahill, Sharon; Corcoran, Nova

    2016-02-01

    To investigate African Caribbean women's subjective accounts of stroke and how this impacted on their lives and identify beliefs attributed to the causes of stroke in this post stroke. In the UK, those from African or African Caribbean ethnicity are at an increased risk of stroke, and stroke risks are double that of the UK White population. This is because diabetes and hypertension are more common in those of African and African Caribbean ethnic groups. The main risk factors for stroke are high blood pressure, alongside obesity and overweight, poor diet and lack of physical activity. A qualitative study using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Data were collected via semi-structured indepth interviews for six African Caribbean women. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to deconstruct the data and facilitate developing themes. Six semi-structured interviews were completed with women aged 47-85 years. Two themes emerged (1) the role of lifestyle and biological risk factors linked to the causes of stroke and (2) the role of spirituality, in identifying the lay beliefs and causes of stroke. Alternative explanations of the causes of stroke that include witchcraft, or wishing someone wrong suggests a lack of perceived control over stroke. This may suggest a focus on less visible risk factors such as hypertension, familial history or diabetes and will need inclusion in health promotion materials. Lay beliefs such as witchcraft can co-exist amicably alongside modern medicine, as long as they do not hinder access to medication, treatment or risk factor management of stroke. The results demonstrated that nursing care and health promotion materials should emphasise on obesity, overweight and management of these through diet and physical activity to prevent stroke occurring. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Religious Freedom vs. Sex Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    This essay examines Susan Moller Okin's writing on conflicts between religious freedom and sex equality, and her criticism of "political liberal" approaches to these conflicts, which I take to be a part of her lifelong critique of the public-private distinction. I argue that, while Okin ultimately accepted a version of the distinction, she was…

  12. Extending Understanding of Equal Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyfuss, Elisabeth T.

    1988-01-01

    Presents four strategies for teaching secondary students about equal protection clause of the U.S. Constitution's Fourteenth Amendment. To be taught by the classroom teacher or a visiting lawyer, these strategies use such methods as a panel discussion and examination of Fourteenth Amendment court cases to accomplish their goals. (GEA)

  13. Detecting entanglement with Jarzynski's equality

    SciTech Connect

    Hide, Jenny; Vedral, Vlatko

    2010-06-15

    We present a method for detecting the entanglement of a state using nonequilibrium processes. A comparison of relative entropies allows us to construct an entanglement witness. The relative entropy can further be related to the quantum Jarzynski equality, allowing nonequilibrium work to be used in entanglement detection. To exemplify our results, we consider two different spin chains.

  14. Promote Equality in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sharon; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents suggestions to help physical educators treat all students equally and avoid unconsciously making inequitable gender-based statements and practicing other gender discrimination. Suggestions include encouraging girls to talk more, praising girls' performance and boys' appearance, using gender-neutral language, not stereotyping either sex,…

  15. Equal Pay: The Emerging Terrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Kent M.

    1985-01-01

    Colleges and universities can employ several statutory defenses to alleged pay disparities and demonstrate that there are legitimate reasons for pay differentials. Several preventive strategies in response to the emerging legal terrain of equal pay litigation are suggested. (Author/MLW)

  16. STEM Equality and Diversity Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Jill

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Centre for Science Education at Sheffield Hallam University teamed up with VT Enterprise (now Babcock International) in their submission of a successful bid to deliver the national STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) Subject Choice and Careers Project. An integral part of the bid was the promotion of equality and…

  17. Equal, but not the same.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Gabriel

    2006-10-19

    In April 2007, the gender equality duty will make it obligatory for all health providers to actively demonstrate equity in service provision. Good practice tends to exist in small projects with little evidence of national progress towards gender equity. The DoH says trusts should already be working towards

  18. Equal Opportunity Through Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrighi, Margarite A.

    1985-01-01

    The assumption is that sex-integrated classes are inherently equal by the very fact that boys and girls are in the same class. In fact, educational inequity has increased primarily because of instructional design which perpetuates differences among individuals. Good teaching must accommodate individual differences. (MT)

  19. Equal Employment Opportunity. 1968 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Industry, Labor and Human Relations, Madison.

    The Equal Employment Opportunity survey reported employment levels and information in the state of Wisconsin for 1968. A sample of 2,132 business firms employing 532,231 persons took part in the survey. Information categories were: (1) minority group employment, (2) major industry group firms, (3) women in employment, (4) employment by job…

  20. Primer of Equal Employment Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Howard J.

    This booklet presents laws and court cases concerning discrimination in hiring. It begins with a presentation of the laws and orders regulating equal employment opportunity and the remedies available. It lists those employees and employers to whom the laws apply and exemptions. Sections deal with discrimination on the basis of race, sex, sexual…

  1. Equal Time for Creationism? No.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skoog, Gerald

    1983-01-01

    Legal decisions and other arguments support the argument that the exclusion of creationism from school curricula is not the result of censorship or bias. Equal-time legislation for creationism has the potential to entangle the state and religion and to make the task of teachers, textbook authors, and publishers nearly impossible. (PP)

  2. Health Care in the Caribbean and Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlynn, Frank, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This publication examines a range of public health issues in the Caribbean Basin including conditions responsible for the transmission of disease, folk palliatives, and factors affecting preventive and curative health services on the national level. Comparisons are also made among the various Caribbean countries. The book has seven chapters: (1)…

  3. Teaching Reading to Bidialectal English-Speaking Caribbean American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David Rodriguez, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    There is little research on bidialectal teacher preparation for teaching bidialectal English-speaking Caribbean American students. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to understand teachers' perception of reading difficulties of Caribbean American children in a local district that has a large percentage of these students who demonstrate…

  4. Incorporating Caribbean Immigration into the Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Murry

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that immigration into the United States from the Caribbean region receives much less attention in the social studies curriculum than immigration from Asia and Latin America. Reviews the coverage of recent Caribbean immigration in elementary and secondary textbooks. Recommends several elementary and secondary instructional units of study.…

  5. 78 FR 14981 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands: Compatible Trip and Bag ] Limits for the U.S. Caribbean.... Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 270... compatible regulations with U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) territorial regulations for the harvest of queen conch...

  6. Photochemical Studies of the Eastern Caribbean: An Introductory Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-15

    seasonal variations in surface water photoreactivity, optical and biooptical characteristics over much of the Caribbean basin. These changes resulted...seasonal variations in surface water photoreactivity, optical and biooptical characteristics over much of the Caribbean basin. These changes resulted from...extent does seasonal variation of the Orinoco River Cooper, 1987; Blough and Zepp, 19901. plume influence optical and photochemical properties of the In

  7. Mental Retardation in the Caribbean: Needs, Resources, Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorburn, Marigold J., Ed.

    Presented are conference reports including an opening address on the economic benefits of programs for the mentally retarded (MR), and eight papers discussing the problem of mental retardation in the Caribbean. Two papers on preschool age children, respectively, consider the identification and assessment of MR children in the Caribbean and present…

  8. Researching Change in Caribbean Education: Curriculum, Teaching and Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, T. Ed.; Ezenne, A., Ed.

    The chapters of this collection deal with a number of issues and concerns at all levels of education in the Caribbean. Section 1, "Curriculum," contains: (1) "Science Education in the Caribbean: Analysis of Current Trends" (Aldrin E. Sweeney); (2) "A Decade of Research in Technology Education: Implications for Caribbean…

  9. 78 FR 46578 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Scoping Meetings Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC731 Caribbean Fishery Management Council...: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council will hold scoping meetings to obtain input from fishers, the... management plans for Puerto Rico, St. Thomas/St. John, USVI and St. Croix, USVI. DATES AND ADDRESSES: Due...

  10. Lessons from CXC for Caribbean Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Stafford Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to show how higher education institutions in the Caribbean may benefit from the quality assurance measures implemented by the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC). Design/methodology/approach: The paper uses an outcomes model of quality assurance to analyse the measures implemented by the CXC to assure quality…

  11. The Caribbean Basin: Cradle, Crossroads, and Crucible of the Americas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    This ERIC Clearinghouse on Social Studies/Social Science Education column is an annotated bibliography of 10 documents, available through the ERIC system, that deal with the Caribbean. Focuses on social science research done on parts of the Caribbean, the region's economic development, history instruction (Virgin Islands), and analysis of…

  12. Empowering an Endangered Species: The African-Caribbean/Canadian Male.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehm-Hill, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The powerlessness of African-Caribbean/Canadian males stems from racism, sexism, and the absence of acceptable models of manhood, and results in their numerous social and educational problems. Adult African-Caribbean/Canadian men serving as positive role models and mentors for boys in the school and community can encourage development of…

  13. Theorising African Caribbean Absences in Multicultural Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dash, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at the learning of African Caribbean pupils in art and design classrooms in the United Kingdom. It proceeds from the proposition that African Caribbean pupils, as the descendants of enslaved peoples whose cultural lineage has been blurred by the skewed relationship with the white majority group, are uniquely disadvantaged in the…

  14. Caribbean basin framework, 1: Introduction, Nicaraguan rise and Greater Antilles

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, P. )

    1991-03-01

    Recent progress in lithologic description and microfossil dating of onshore basins from around the Caribbean has improved constraints on the age and tectonic setting of major basin-forming periods. The author presents an integrated tectonostratigraphic summary from the northern, western, and southwestern Caribbean and use this framework to interpret seismic profiles in offshore areas lacking wells.

  15. Health Care in the Caribbean and Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlynn, Frank, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This publication examines a range of public health issues in the Caribbean Basin including conditions responsible for the transmission of disease, folk palliatives, and factors affecting preventive and curative health services on the national level. Comparisons are also made among the various Caribbean countries. The book has seven chapters: (1)…

  16. 78 FR 33959 - National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... recognize men and women who trace their roots to the Caribbean. Through every chapter of our Nation's... arts, spurring our movements and answering the call to serve. Caribbean traditions have enriched our... descendants have reaffirmed America's promise as a land of opportunity-- a place where no matter who you...

  17. School Leadership in the Caribbean: Perceptions, Practices, Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Paul, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Successful school leadership is an issue currently being debated up and down Caribbean territories. Key issues in the ongoing debate include: students' outcomes and participation in the regional Caribbean Secondary Examinations (CSEC); teacher recruitment and retention; teacher training and continuing professional development (upgrading); and…

  18. 50 CFR 622.50 - Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Caribbean spiny lobster import... ATLANTIC Management Measures § 622.50 Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions. (a) Minimum size limits for imported spiny lobster. There are two minimum size limits that apply to importation of...

  19. 50 CFR 622.50 - Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Caribbean spiny lobster import... ATLANTIC Management Measures § 622.50 Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions. (a) Minimum size limits for imported spiny lobster. There are two minimum size limits that apply to importation of...

  20. 50 CFR 622.458 - Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Caribbean spiny lobster import..., AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.458 Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions. (a) Minimum size limits for imported spiny lobster. There...

  1. 50 CFR 622.50 - Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Caribbean spiny lobster import... ATLANTIC Management Measures § 622.50 Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions. (a) Minimum size limits for imported spiny lobster. There are two minimum size limits that apply to importation of...

  2. Women and Education. Women in the Caribbean Project, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massiah, Joycelin, Ed.

    One of a series emanating from a three-year project concerned with the role of women in the English-speaking Caribbean, these papers discuss the history of Caribbean women's education. The project's objectives are to establish a data base for teaching, research, and planning purposes and to develop guidelines for a social policy that recognizes…

  3. Monitoring Educational Performance in the Caribbean. World Bank Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    di Gropello, Emanuela

    This study represents a first attempt at providing a comprehensive quantification of educational outcomes in the Caribbean region. Its main objectives are: (1) to define a set of operationally relevant education indicators; (2) to provide a database of comparable education indicators in Caribbean countries where data is available, namely Belize,…

  4. HIV/AIDS and Children in the English Speaking Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Barbara A., Ed.

    This collection of papers addresses the HIV/AIDS situation among English-speaking children in the Caribbean. Papers include: "Preface" (C. James Hospedales); "Introduction"; (Barbara A. Dicks); "HIV/AIDS: Challenging a Monster" (Brendan Bain); "HIV/AIDS in Caribbean Children and Adolescents" (Noreen Jack);…

  5. School Leadership in the Caribbean: Perceptions, Practices, Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Paul, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Successful school leadership is an issue currently being debated up and down Caribbean territories. Key issues in the ongoing debate include: students' outcomes and participation in the regional Caribbean Secondary Examinations (CSEC); teacher recruitment and retention; teacher training and continuing professional development (upgrading); and…

  6. Researching Change in Caribbean Education: Curriculum, Teaching and Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, T. Ed.; Ezenne, A., Ed.

    The chapters of this collection deal with a number of issues and concerns at all levels of education in the Caribbean. Section 1, "Curriculum," contains: (1) "Science Education in the Caribbean: Analysis of Current Trends" (Aldrin E. Sweeney); (2) "A Decade of Research in Technology Education: Implications for Caribbean…

  7. Teaching Reading to Bidialectal English-Speaking Caribbean American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David Rodriguez, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    There is little research on bidialectal teacher preparation for teaching bidialectal English-speaking Caribbean American students. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to understand teachers' perception of reading difficulties of Caribbean American children in a local district that has a large percentage of these students who demonstrate…

  8. Monitoring Educational Performance in the Caribbean. World Bank Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    di Gropello, Emanuela

    This study represents a first attempt at providing a comprehensive quantification of educational outcomes in the Caribbean region. Its main objectives are: (1) to define a set of operationally relevant education indicators; (2) to provide a database of comparable education indicators in Caribbean countries where data is available, namely Belize,…

  9. 75 FR 37390 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ..., Caribbean coral reefs and their associated community experienced a major bleaching event and an above... these larger parrotfish have on the ecological health of the coral reefs and the testimony at Council.... Caribbean coral reefs. Alternative 3. Redefine management reference points or proxies for the snapper...

  10. HIV/AIDS and Children in the English Speaking Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Barbara A., Ed.

    This collection of papers addresses the HIV/AIDS situation among English-speaking children in the Caribbean. Papers include: "Preface" (C. James Hospedales); "Introduction"; (Barbara A. Dicks); "HIV/AIDS: Challenging a Monster" (Brendan Bain); "HIV/AIDS in Caribbean Children and Adolescents" (Noreen Jack);…

  11. 78 FR 67127 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... Outreach & Education USVI Style'' --Caribbean Fisheries Teacher's Resource Book --Development of Visual...'s Outreach and Education Advisory Panel (OEAP) will meet. DATES: The meeting will be held on... Caribbean Exclusive Economic Zone --Other Business The OEAP meeting will convene on November 26, 2013, from...

  12. Integrating Latin America and the Caribbean into Global History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grahn, Lance

    1997-01-01

    Argues that global studies courses often leave out Third World countries, especially those in Latin America and the Caribbean. Presents a proposal for integrating Latin America and the Caribbean into global history curricula through the thematic categories of economics, politics, and ideas. Provides annotated reading lists. (16 citations) (AJL)

  13. 76 FR 2665 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Scoping Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... p.m. to 10 p.m. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz... INFORMATION: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council will hold Scoping meetings to receive public input on... attempt to incorporate information on recreational catches in the USVI because the MRFSS does not provide...

  14. US Military interventions in the Caribbean from 1898 to 1998 Lessons for Caribbean Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-16

    of the sea route between the east and west coast of the United States. More who organized expeditions into Cuba and other Caribbean countries and...and Dominican Republic and the United States. The mandate of the OAS was to achieve an order of peace and justice , to promote solidarity, to...

  15. Teaching Caribbean Students: Research on Social Issues in the Caribbean and Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony, Ed.; Ezenne, Austin, Ed.

    The issues and findings in the research essays in this collection focus on two main themes: the identification of challenges in preparing Caribbean students for the new global network and the isolation of the challenges posed in developing these global relations. Part 1, "Socially Sensitive Pedagogies," contains: (1) "Domain-Specific Modern…

  16. Caribbean-American Perspectives. Proceedings and Papers from the Caribbean-American Exchange Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps-Stokes Fund, New York, NY.

    In this booklet, six essays presented at meetings of the Caribbean American Exchange Program are reprinted: (1) "Externally Propelled Economy" by Lloyd Best; (2) "Ethos for a Black Literature: Cultural Continuities and Patterns" by Martha Cobb; (3) "Parameters of Information and Communication among Afro-Americans and…

  17. Equity of access: adaptive technology.

    PubMed

    Grodzinsky, F S

    2000-04-01

    In this age of information technology, it is morally imperative that equal access to information via computer systems be afforded to people with disabilities. This paper addresses the problems that computer technology poses for students with disabilities and discusses what is needed to ensure equity of access, particularly in a university environment.

  18. Accessibility Considerations for Hybrid Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behling, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    This chapter explores the central questions and issues that faculty and administrators need to consider when designing and implementing hybrid courses to ensure that all students, including those with disabilities, have equal access. The author offers resources on faculty development programs, accessibility checklists, and online resources on…

  19. True subduction vs. underthrusting of the Caribbean plate beneath Hispaniola, northern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes Estrada, P.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Granja Bruna, J.; Carbó-Gorosabel, A.; Flores, C. H.; Villasenor, A.; Pazos, A.; Martin Davila, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Eastern Greater Antilles arc (Hispaniola and Puerto Rico) is bounded by a north-verging accretionary prism on its north side and a south-verging thrust belt (Muertos thrust belt) on its south side. This bivergent geometry has been attributed for the last 30 years to opposing subduction of the North American plate and the Caribbean oceanic interior beneath the island arc at the Muertos margin. Recent observations of seafloor and shallow sub-seafloor deformational features at the Muertos compressive margin together with sandbox kinematic and gravity modeling question the hypothesized subduction of the Caribbean plate's interior beneath the eastern Greater Antilles island arc. To further test the subduction hypothesis, we carried out in 2009 a wide-angle seismic transect across the widest part of the Muertos compressive margin at longitude 69°W. A 2-D forward ray-tracing model of the wide-angle transect outlines the broad-scale crustal structure across the Muertos margin. The Caribbean oceanic slab is imaged beneath the Muertos margin to about 50 km north of the deformation front and down to 19 km depth. A change in crustal p-wave velocity at ~60 km from the deformation front is interpreted as the boundary between the compressive deformed belt and the arc crust. The Caribbean oceanic crust is not seen extending farther north or penetrating the upper mantle. Modeling of ship's gravity data, acquired along the seismic profile, corroborates the seismic results. Any subduction model imply the existence of a regional mass deficit generated by the subducted Caribbean slab beneath the island arc and that variations in the geometry of the subduction angle and the depth are not able to compensate it. Earthquake hypocenter distribution in the Muertos Margin shows diffuse seismicity beneath the island arc, being very hard to identify different clusters and to assign them to different subducted slabs. The diffuse seismicity may be related to the transition between subduction

  20. African dust and the demise of Caribbean coral reefs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Smith, G.W.; Prospero, J.M.; Betzer, P.; Hayes, M.L.; Garrison, V.; Barber, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    The vitality of Caribbean coral reefs has undergone a continual state of decline since the late 1970s, a period of time coincidental with large increases in transatlantic dust transport. It is proposed that the hundreds of millions of tons/year of soil dust that have been crossing the Atlantic during the last 25 years could be a significant contributor to coral reef decline and may be affecting other ecosystems. Benchmark events, such as near synchronous Caribbean-wide mortalities of acroporid corals and the urchin Diadema in 1983, and coral bleaching beginning in 1987, correlate with the years of maximum dust flux into the Caribbean. Besides crustal elements, in particular Fe, Si, and aluminosilicate clays, the dust can serve as a substrate for numerous species of viable spores, especially the soil fungus Aspergillus. Aspergillus sydowii, the cause of an ongoing Caribbean-wide seafan disease, has been cultured from Caribbean air samples and used to inoculate sea fans.

  1. COCONet and TLALOCNet: Multi-hazard GNSS/Met Observatories, Enhancing Geodetic Infrastructure and the Scientific Community in Mexico and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feaux, K.; Adams, D. K.; Braun, J.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Dausz, K.; Dittmann, S. T.; Fend, M.; Galetzka, J.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M. M.; Normandeau, J.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; Sandru, J.; Serra, Y. L.; Wang, G.

    2015-12-01

    UNAVCO manages the construction of two large NSF-funded networks of geophysical instruments in Central America and the Caribbean. COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean Observational Network), which consists of 83 new and refurbished cGNSS/Met stations, spans the entire Caribbean region. TLALOCNet (Trans-boundary Land and Atmospheric Long-term Observational and Collaborative Network) is a similar 24-station in Mexico. Data are being used to study solid earth processes such as plate kinematics, plate boundary deformation, and the earthquake cycle; in addition, by providing more precise estimates of tropospheric water vapor to better forecast the dynamics associated with the annual Caribbean hurricane cycle and the North American monsoon, they also address atmospheric science objectives. COCONet and TLALOCNet rely on the concept of building partnerships with a range of stakeholders that support a common goal of providing free, high-quality, low-latency, open-format data and data products. As part of COCONet, UNAVCO completed installation of sea level monitoring instruments at two locations in the Caribbean Basin. Additionally, two existing sea level stations were upgraded with co-located GNSS hardware. The locations (Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, and the Dominican Republic) enhance the coverage of tide gauge instrumentation in the Caribbean region. Each station consists of tide gauge instruments (radar and pressure gauge) on a marine pier co-located with a cGNSS/Met system. A second cGNSS system is installed nearby (<5km). GNSS data from over 100 COCONet and TLALOCNet stations are available at http://www.unavco.org/data/gps-gnss/data-access-methods/dai2/app/dai2.html. Sea level data are available at the IOC sea level archive (ioc-sealevelmonitoring.org). We present the siting plan, construction status, and other highlights of the COCONet and TLALOCNet projects, including the establishment of regional GNSS/Met data centers in Mexico and the Caribbean.

  2. Kinematic reconstruction of the Caribbean region since the Early Jurassic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschman, L. M.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Caribbean region has a complex tectonic history that resulted from the interplay of the North and South American, the Caribbean, and (Paleo-)Pacific plates. Being largely surrounded by long-lived subduction zones and transform boundaries, reconstructing Caribbean plate motion into the global plate circuit cannot be done using marine magnetic anomalies. Here, we present a fully quantitative, kinematically consistent tectonic reconstruction, back to 200 Ma, using the Atlantic plate circuit as boundary condition. This reconstruction is made in GPlates freeware and all reconstruction files are made available. To restore Caribbean plate motion between the American continents, we use a reconstruction hierarchy based on strike-slip and thrust belt records, using regionally extensive geological phenomena such as the Great Arc of the Caribbean, the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) and the Caribeana high-pressure belt as correlation markers. The resulting model restores the Caribbean plate back along the Cayman Trough and strike-slip faults in Guatemala, offshore Nicaragua, offshore Belize and along the Northern Andes towards its position of origin, west of the North and South American continents. Two plate kinematic scenarios for the origin of the Caribbean plate lithosphere are evaluated; an origin from Proto-Caribbean/Atlantic spreading, or from spreading within the Panthalassa domain: we conclude that the latter can provide a simpler explanation. Placing our reconstruction in the most recent mantle reference frames shows that the CLIP erupted 2-3000 km east of, and is probably not the result of the plume head stage of the Galápagos hotspot. Finally, our reconstruction suggests that all modern subduction zones surrounding the Caribbean plate probably formed by inversion of transform faults, two of these (along the southern Mexican and NW South American margins) strongly diachronously as a result of migrating trench-trench-transform triple junctions.

  3. Diabetes in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Hennis, Anselm; Fraser, Henry S

    2004-02-01

    Rates of diabetes mellitus in the English-speaking Caribbean have been rising in recent years, and they are projected to continue climbing in the new millennium. Prevalence rates across countries of the African diaspora mirror levels of Western acculturation, and available data emphasize the importance of obesity as a modifiable risk factor. The population-based Barbados Eye Studies have provided new information about the burden of ocular complications of diabetes such as retinopathy and lens opacities. Diabetes was shown to increase the risk of lens opacities, and 14% of prevalent cataract was attributed to diabetes. Persons with type 1 diabetes were particularly at increased risk of retinopathy, as a result of longer durations of illness and poor glycemic control. Other Caribbean studies have suggested that glycemic control in patients evaluated in various clinical settings is suboptimal, which raises important concerns about quality of care. Diabetics are at increased risk of mortality compared with nondiabetics, and that mortality risk increases with higher baseline levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, even among nondiabetics. These data highlight the need for urgent attention to public health and clinical strategies to prevent diabetes in unaffected persons as well as to prevent or reduce the burden of complications among those who are affected. Among the measures that should be adopted to stem the flood of diabetes in the Caribbean region are lifestyle interventions to promote better nutrition and to increase exercise; patient education, particularly about the central role of diabetes self-management; and the multidisciplinary team approach in the provision of care.

  4. Caribbean plate tectonics from seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Brink, U. S.; Villasenor, A.

    2012-12-01

    New seismic tomography in the Caribbean shows close links between the geometry and dynamics of subducting slabs and the geology of the overriding plate. Unlike most oceanic plates, the Caribbean plate lacks identifiable seafloor magnetic anomalies and fracture zones. The plate's history has therefore been inferred primarily from land geology along the plate boundary, which is complicated by large-scale shear deformation, and from finite rotations of surrounding plates.We used more than 14 million arrival times from 300,000 earthquakes to identify P-wave velocity anomalies. We relate the anomalies to the geometry and dynamics of subducting slabs and to patterns of earthquake activity, volcanism, topographic relief, and tectonic deformation. For example, we detect two separate slabs belonging to the North and South American plates, respectively, which appear to be responsible for morphologic and tectonic differences between the arcs of the Northern (from Guadeloupe northward) and Southern (from Dominica southward) Lesser Antilles. Variations in earthquake activity between Haiti and the Dominican Republic can be explained by a change in slab geometry from an underplated slab beneath Haiti to a subducting slab under the Dominican Republic. A shallow tear in the slab may explain the anomalously deep Puerto Rico Trench and the frequent earthquake swarms there. The westward shift in volcanic activity in the Northern Lesser Antilles from the Miocene Limestone Caribbees to the present arc can be attributed to the limit on convective flow imposed by the 3-D geometry of the slab at depth. A thinned South America slab under the southern Lesser Antilles may result from traction imposed on the slab by a wide forearc wedge. Variations in tectonic deformation of northern South America could be related to the location of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province north of the Maracaibo Block.

  5. Caribbean Foresters take steps towards a network of permanent forest plots in the Caribbean: a meeting report

    Treesearch

    A.E. Lugo

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript contains an overview of the 16th meeting of Caribbean Foresters that resulted in the establishment of a network of forest plots throughout the region with the purpose of increasing understanding of the patterns of long-term forest dynamics. Research projects in the network will improve collaboration among those working in Caribbean forests and will...

  6. Equal opportunity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Allen, A

    1992-04-01

    The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) was created by the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The commission encourages voluntary compliance with equal employment opportunity practices, and has authority to investigate complaints alleging discrimination in hiring, firing, wage rates, testing, training, apprenticeship, and other conditions of employment. In October 1991, during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings, the confirmation of Judge Clarence Thomas for a seat on the United States Supreme Court was placed in jeopardy by a charge of sexual harassment while Thomas was head of the EEOC. This article focuses on aspects of sexual harassment in the workplace, the role of the EEOC, and offers some suggestions for keeping the work environment free of abusive behavior.

  7. Office of Equal Opportunity Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Office of Equal Opportunity Programs works to provide quality service for all programs and/or to assist the Center in becoming a model workplace. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Deborah Cotleur along with other staff members to create and modify customer satisfaction surveys. This office aims to assist in developing a model workplace by providing functions as a change agent to the center by serving as an advisor to management to ensure equity throughout the Center. In addition, the office serves as a mediator for the Center in addressing issues and concerns. Lastly, the office provides assistance to employees to enable attainment of personal and organizational goals. The Office of Equal Opportunities is a staff office which reports and provides advice to the Center Director and Executive Leadership, implements laws, regulations, and presidential executive orders, and provides center wide leadership and assistance to NASA GRC employees. Some of the major responsibilities of the office include working with the discrimination complaints program, special emphasis programs (advisory groups), management support, monitoring and evaluation, contract compliance, and community outreach. During my internship in this office, my main objective was to create four customer satisfaction surveys based on EO retreats, EO observances, EO advisory boards, and EO mediation/counseling. I created these surveys after conducting research on past events and surveys as well as similar survey research created and conducted by other NASA centers, program for EO Advisory group members, leadership training sessions for supervisors, preventing sexual harassment training sessions, and observance events. I also conducted research on the style and format from feedback surveys from the Marshall Equal Opportunity website, the Goddard website, and the main NASA website. Using the material from the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs at Glenn Research Center along with my

  8. Office of Equal Opportunity Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Office of Equal Opportunity Programs works to provide quality service for all programs and/or to assist the Center in becoming a model workplace. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Deborah Cotleur along with other staff members to create and modify customer satisfaction surveys. This office aims to assist in developing a model workplace by providing functions as a change agent to the center by serving as an advisor to management to ensure equity throughout the Center. In addition, the office serves as a mediator for the Center in addressing issues and concerns. Lastly, the office provides assistance to employees to enable attainment of personal and organizational goals. The Office of Equal Opportunities is a staff office which reports and provides advice to the Center Director and Executive Leadership, implements laws, regulations, and presidential executive orders, and provides center wide leadership and assistance to NASA GRC employees. Some of the major responsibilities of the office include working with the discrimination complaints program, special emphasis programs (advisory groups), management support, monitoring and evaluation, contract compliance, and community outreach. During my internship in this office, my main objective was to create four customer satisfaction surveys based on EO retreats, EO observances, EO advisory boards, and EO mediation/counseling. I created these surveys after conducting research on past events and surveys as well as similar survey research created and conducted by other NASA centers, program for EO Advisory group members, leadership training sessions for supervisors, preventing sexual harassment training sessions, and observance events. I also conducted research on the style and format from feedback surveys from the Marshall Equal Opportunity website, the Goddard website, and the main NASA website. Using the material from the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs at Glenn Research Center along with my

  9. 50 CFR 622.19 - South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access off Georgia and Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access... CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Effort Limitations § 622.19 South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access... for rock shrimp in the South Atlantic EEZ off Georgia or off Florida or possess rock shrimp in or from...

  10. Access for Women to Higher Education in England and Australia: A "Second Chance".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Mark

    This paper explores the way that opportunity of access to higher education, particularly for women of color and those disadvantaged by homelessness, is placed at risk by market approaches to education. In England, Asian and Afro-Caribbean women, have been able to access higher education through funds made available under the Race Relations Act of…

  11. 50 CFR 622.19 - South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access off Georgia and Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access... CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Effort Limitations § 622.19 South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access... for rock shrimp in the South Atlantic EEZ off Georgia or off Florida or possess rock shrimp in or from...

  12. 50 CFR 622.19 - South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access off Georgia and Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access... CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Effort Limitations § 622.19 South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access... for rock shrimp in the South Atlantic EEZ off Georgia or off Florida or possess rock shrimp in or from...

  13. The equal right to drink.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Laura A

    2014-11-01

    The starting place for this essay is Knupfer and Room's insight that more restrictive norms around drinking and intoxication tend to be selectively applied to the economically dependent segments of society, such as women. However, since these authors wrote in 1964, women in the US and many other societies around the globe have experienced rising economic independence. The essay considers how the moral categories of acceptable drinking and drunkenness may have shifted alongside women's rising economic independence, and looks at evidence on the potential consequences for women's health and wellbeing. I argue that, as women have gained economic independence, changes in drinking norms have produced two different kinds of negative unintended consequences for women at high and low extremes of economic spectrum. As liberated women of the middle and upper classes have become more economically equal to men, they have enjoyed the right to drink with less restraint. For them, alongside the equal right to drink has come greater equality in exposure to alcohol-attributable harms, abuse and dependence. I further suggest that, as societies become more liberated, the economic dependency of low-income women is brought into greater question. Under such conditions, women in poverty-particularly those economically dependent on the state, such as welfare mothers-have become subject to more restrictive norms around drinking and intoxication, and more punitive social controls. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  14. AIDS stigma in health services in the Eastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Scott Edward; Abell, Neil; Padmore, Jacqueline; McCann, Theresa J

    2009-01-01

    Stigma obstructs HIV/AIDS prevention and care worldwide, including in the Caribbean, where the prevalence of AIDS is second only to sub-Saharan Africa. To contextualise the experience of AIDS stigma in health services in Grenada and Trinidad and Tobago, we conducted eight focus groups with 51 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA), families, and service providers. Quasi-deductive content analysis revealed consonance with Western and Northern conceptualisations of AIDS stigma wherein stigma is enacted upon marginalized populations and reinforced through psycho-sociological processes comparing 'in' and 'out' groups. Socially constructed to be physically contagious and socially deviant, PLHA are scorned by some service providers, especially when they are perceived to be gay or bisexual. PLHA and providers identified passive neglect and active refusal by hospital and clinic staff to provide care to PLHA. Institutional practices for safeguarding patient confidentiality are perceived as marginally enforced. Interventions are needed to reduce provider stigma so the public will access HIV testing and PLHA will seek treatment.

  15. Tectonics and terranes of the Southeastern Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The southeastern Caribbean plate (Ca) is comprised of the following terranes: Tobago, Grenada Basin, St. Vincent, Araya-Margarita, and Paria-Trinidad-Barbardos (PTB). All are alient relative to South America (SA) east of Caracas except for PTB, which is of continental provenance and parautochthonous and lies within the principal movement zone of the Ca-Sa plate boundary. The Tobago terrane extends between the eastern Venezuelan coastline and the Grenada Basin. On its south, the Tobago terrane overrode PTB and the South American passive margin during Neogene oblique collision. The Mesozoic tectonostratigraphy of the Tobago terrane is not unlike that of the Colombian Basin, suggesting the Tobago may belong to the Pacific-derived Caribbean plate. The Grenada Basin terrane consists of Eocene and older oceanic crust that now occupies the southern Lesser Antilles arc platform and the southern Grenada Basin. Such crust abducted southward below the Tobago terrane in mid-Cenozoic time, probably taking up boundary-normal shortening during oblique collision of the Ca and Sa plates. The oceanic crust of the GB terrane arose by backarc spreading of unknown orientation. The St. Vincent terrane extends north in the Antilles from St. Vincent; it is defined by thick crust, perhaps an old arc basement. The Araya-Margarita terrane is a probable subduction complex of Mesozoic age of metamorphism that has been transported far eastward from an unknown site with the Ca plate.

  16. Sea level extremes in the Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, R. Ricardo; Tsimplis, Michael N.

    2014-08-01

    Sea level extremes in the Caribbean Sea are analyzed on the basis of hourly records from 13 tide gauges. The largest sea level extreme observed is 83 cm at Port Spain. The largest nontidal residual in the records is 76 cm, forced by a category 5 hurricane. Storm surges in the Caribbean are primarily caused by tropical storms and stationary cold fronts intruding the basin. However, the seasonal signal and mesoscale eddies also contribute to the creation of extremes. The five stations that have more than 20 years of data show significant trends in the extremes suggesting that flooding events are expected to become more frequent in the future. The observed trends in extremes are caused by mean sea level rise. There is no evidence of secular changes in the storm activity. Sea level return periods have also been estimated. In the south Colombian Basin, where large hurricane-induced surges are rare, stable estimates can be obtained with 30 years of data or more. For the north of the basin, where large hurricane-induced surges are more frequent, at least 40 years of data are required. This suggests that the present data set is not sufficiently long for robust estimates of return periods. ENSO variability correlates with the nontidal extremes, indicating a reduction of the storm activity during positive ENSO events. The period with the highest extremes is around October, when the various sea level contributors' maxima coincide.

  17. Deglaciation explains bat extinction in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, Liliana M; Russell, Amy L

    2012-12-01

    Ecological factors such as changing climate on land and interspecific competition have been debated as possible causes of postglacial Caribbean extinction. These hypotheses, however, have not been tested against a null model of climate-driven postglacial area loss. Here, we use a new Quaternary mammal database and deep-sea bathymetry to estimate species-area relationships (SARs) at present and during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) for bats of the Caribbean, and to model species loss as a function of area loss from rising sea level. Island area was a significant predictor of species richness in the Bahamas, Greater Antilles, and Lesser Antilles at all time periods, except for the Lesser Antilles during the LGM. Parameters of LGM and current SARs were similar in the Bahamas and Greater Antilles, but not the Lesser Antilles, which had fewer estimated species during the LGM than expected given their size. Estimated postglacial species losses in the Bahamas and Greater Antilles were largely explained by inferred area loss from rising sea level in the Holocene. However, there were more species in the Bahamas at present, and fewer species in the smaller Greater Antilles, than expected given island size and the end-Pleistocene/early Holocene SARs. Poor fossil sampling and ecological factors may explain these departures from the null. Our analyses illustrate the importance of changes in area in explaining patterns of species richness through time and emphasize the role of the SAR as a null hypothesis in explorations of the impact of novel ecological interactions on extinction.

  18. Neogene Proto-Caribbean porcupinefishes (Diodontidae)

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Orangel; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Machado, Alessandra Silveira; dos Santos, Thaís Maria; Marques, Gabriela; Bertucci, Thayse; Aguiar, Thayanne; Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge; Rodriguez, Felix; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Fossil Diodontidae in Tropical America consist mostly of isolated and fused beak-like jawbones, and tooth plate batteries. These durophagous fishes are powerful shell-crushing predators on shallow water invertebrate faunas from Neogene tropical carbonate bottom, rocky reefs and surrounding flats. We use an ontogenetic series of high-resolution micro CT of fossil and extant species to recognize external and internal morphologic characters of jaws and tooth plate batteries. We compare similar sizes of jaws and/or tooth-plates from both extant and extinct species. Here, we describe three new fossil species including †Chilomycterus exspectatus n. sp. and †Chilomycterus tyleri n. sp. from the late Miocene Gatun Formation in Panama, and †Diodon serratus n. sp. from the middle Miocene Socorro Formation in Venezuela. Fossil Diodontidae review included specimens from the Neogene Basins of the Proto-Caribbean (Brazil: Pirabas Formation; Colombia: Jimol Formation, Panama: Gatun and Tuira formations; Venezuela: Socorro and Cantaure formations). Diodon is present in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, whereas the distribution of Chilomycterus is highly asymmetrical with only one species in the Pacific. It seems that Diodon was as abundant in the Caribbean/Western Atlantic during the Miocene as it is there today. We analyze the paleogeographic distribution of the porcupinefishes group in Tropical America, after the complete exhumation of the Panamanian isthmus during the Pliocene. PMID:28746370

  19. Food and nutrition research in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Henry, F J

    2012-07-01

    Studies at the Caribbean Food and Nutrition Institute (CFNI) were conducted to provide information that would guide the prevention and management of major food and nutrition problems in the region. One of the Institutes mandates is to strengthen the capacity of countries to collect, analyse, interpret and use data to monitor develop, influence, strengthen or inform policy decisions, interventions and public education programmes. Over the years, numerous studies were done with countries at the individual level, however as a regional institution, the primary aim was (i) to identify the challenges and opportunities that have application across the region and (ii) to go beyond the descriptive work and elaborate the proximal and distal barriers and interventions that relate to the two major food and nutrition problems in the Caribbean -food insecurity and obesity. Central to all the research was the recognition that unless the studies are grounded in the context of poverty and inequity, the importance of the findings on food security and obesity will be consequently diminished.

  20. Neogene Proto-Caribbean porcupinefishes (Diodontidae).

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Orangel; Silva, Guilherme Oliveira Andrade; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Machado, Alessandra Silveira; Dos Santos, Thaís Maria; Marques, Gabriela; Bertucci, Thayse; Aguiar, Thayanne; Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge; Rodriguez, Felix; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Fossil Diodontidae in Tropical America consist mostly of isolated and fused beak-like jawbones, and tooth plate batteries. These durophagous fishes are powerful shell-crushing predators on shallow water invertebrate faunas from Neogene tropical carbonate bottom, rocky reefs and surrounding flats. We use an ontogenetic series of high-resolution micro CT of fossil and extant species to recognize external and internal morphologic characters of jaws and tooth plate batteries. We compare similar sizes of jaws and/or tooth-plates from both extant and extinct species. Here, we describe three new fossil species including †Chilomycterus exspectatus n. sp. and †Chilomycterus tyleri n. sp. from the late Miocene Gatun Formation in Panama, and †Diodon serratus n. sp. from the middle Miocene Socorro Formation in Venezuela. Fossil Diodontidae review included specimens from the Neogene Basins of the Proto-Caribbean (Brazil: Pirabas Formation; Colombia: Jimol Formation, Panama: Gatun and Tuira formations; Venezuela: Socorro and Cantaure formations). Diodon is present in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, whereas the distribution of Chilomycterus is highly asymmetrical with only one species in the Pacific. It seems that Diodon was as abundant in the Caribbean/Western Atlantic during the Miocene as it is there today. We analyze the paleogeographic distribution of the porcupinefishes group in Tropical America, after the complete exhumation of the Panamanian isthmus during the Pliocene.